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Sample records for model volume iii

  1. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  2. Integrating Model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume III. User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.L.; Hutzler, M.J.

    1979-03-01

    Volume III of the six-volume series documenting the Integrating Model of PIES provides a potential PIES user with a description of how PIES operates with particular emphasis on the possible variations in assumptions and data that can be made in specifying alternative scenarios. PIES is described as it existed on January 1, 1978. The introductory chapter is followed by Section II, an overview of the structure and components of PIES. Section III discusses each of the PIES components in detail; describes the Demand Model; contains a description of the models, assumptions, and data which provide supply side inputs to the PIES Integrating Model; and concludes with a discussion of those aspects of PIES which extend the scope of the analysis beyond the national energy market. Section IV discusses two reports produced by the PIES Integrating Model: the PIES Integrating Model Report and the Coal Transportation Report. (MCW)

  3. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume III. Program descriptions. [SIMWEST CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume III, the SIMWEST program description contains program descriptions, flow charts and program listings for the SIMWEST Model Generation Program, the Simulation program, the File Maintenance program and the Printer Plotter program. Volume III generally would not be required by SIMWEST user.

  4. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    The DART II is a remote, interactive, microprocessor-based data acquistion system suitable for use with air monitors. This volume of DART II documentation contains the following appendixes: adjustment and calibration procedures; mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets; ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction list, octal listing; and cable lists. (RWR)

  5. New Trends in Mathematics Teaching, Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    Each of the ten chapters in this volume is intended to present an objective analysis of the trends of some important subtopic in mathematics education and each includes a bibliography for fuller study. The chapters cover primary school mathematics, algebra, geometry, probability and statistics, analysis, logic, applications of mathematics, methods…

  6. DART II documentation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-23

    The DART II is a data acquisition system that can be used with air pollution monitoring equipment. This volume contains appendices that deal with the following topics: adjustment and calibration procedures (power supply adjustment procedure, ADC calibration procedure, analog multiplexer calibration procedure); mother board signature list; schematic diagrams; device specification sheets (microprocessor, asynchronous receiver/transmitter, analog-to-digital converter, arithmetic processing unit, 5-volt power supply, +- 15-volt power supply, 24-volt power supply, floppy disk formater/controller, random access static memory); ROM program listing; 6800 microprocessor instruction set, octal listing; and cable lists. (RR)

  7. Baseline metal enrichment from Population III star formation in cosmological volume simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaacks, Jason; Thompson, Robert; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Bromm, Volker

    2018-04-01

    We utilize the hydrodynamic and N-body code GIZMO coupled with our newly developed sub-grid Population III (Pop III) Legacy model, designed specifically for cosmological volume simulations, to study the baseline metal enrichment from Pop III star formation at z > 7. In this idealized numerical experiment, we only consider Pop III star formation. We find that our model Pop III star formation rate density (SFRD), which peaks at ˜ 10- 3 M⊙ yr- 1 Mpc- 1 near z ˜ 10, agrees well with previous numerical studies and is consistent with the observed estimates for Pop II SFRDs. The mean Pop III metallicity rises smoothly from z = 25 to 7, but does not reach the critical metallicity value, Zcrit = 10-4 Z⊙, required for the Pop III to Pop II transition in star formation mode until z ≃ 7. This suggests that, while individual haloes can suppress in situ Pop III star formation, the external enrichment is insufficient to globally terminate Pop III star formation. The maximum enrichment from Pop III star formation in star-forming dark matter haloes is Z ˜ 10-2 Z⊙, whereas the minimum found in externally enriched haloes is Z ≳ 10-7 Z⊙. Finally, mock observations of our simulated IGM enriched with Pop III metals produce equivalent widths similar to observations of an extremely metal-poor damped Lyman alpha system at z = 7.04, which is thought to be enriched by Pop III star formation only.

  8. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  9. MARS CODE MANUAL VOLUME III - Programmer's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Hwang, Moon Kyu; Jeong, Jae Jun; Kim, Kyung Doo; Bae, Sung Won; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Won Jae

    2010-02-01

    Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute (KAERI) conceived and started the development of MARS code with the main objective of producing a state-of-the-art realistic thermal hydraulic systems analysis code with multi-dimensional analysis capability. MARS achieves this objective by very tightly integrating the one dimensional RELAP5/MOD3 with the multi-dimensional COBRA-TF codes. The method of integration of the two codes is based on the dynamic link library techniques, and the system pressure equation matrices of both codes are implicitly integrated and solved simultaneously. In addition, the Equation-Of-State (EOS) for the light water was unified by replacing the EOS of COBRA-TF by that of the RELAP5. This programmer's manual provides a complete list of overall information of code structure and input/output function of MARS. In addition, brief descriptions for each subroutine and major variables used in MARS are also included in this report, so that this report would be very useful for the code maintenance. The overall structure of the manual is modeled on the structure of the RELAP5 and as such the layout of the manual is very similar to that of the RELAP. This similitude to RELAP5 input is intentional as this input scheme will allow minimum modification between the inputs of RELAP5 and MARS3.1. MARS3.1 development team would like to express its appreciation to the RELAP5 Development Team and the USNRC for making this manual possible

  10. Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant applicability study. Volume III. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Volume III suppliees supporting information to assist Congress in making a decision on the optimum utilization of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant. Included are applicable fuel cycle policies; properties of reference fuels; description and evaluation of alternative operational (flue cycle) modes; description and evaluation of safeguards systems and techniques; description and evaluation of spiking technology; waste and waste solidification evaluation; and Department of Energy programs relating to nonproliferation

  11. Tongue volume in adults with skeletal Class III dentofacial deformities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihan Hren, N; Barbič, U

    2016-03-22

    The size of the tongue is implicated as an essential etiological factor in the development of malocclusions. The aim of our study was to assess tongue size in skeletal Class III (SCIII) patients in comparison to adults with normal occlusion, using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound. The SCIII group consisted of 54 subjects; 34 females and 20 males and the control group contained 36 subjects, 18 from each gender with Class I relationship. 3D ultrasound images of the tongues were acquired, and then the tongues' volumes were assessed. The males in both the SCIII and control groups had significantly larger tongue volumes than the female subjects (mean SCIII 100.8 ± 6.3 and control 92.4 ± 9.8 cm(3) in males vs. SCIII 77.4 ± 10.2 and control 67.2 ± 5.6 cm(3) in females). The highly significantly larger tongue volumes were in SCIII patients of both genders (p were less than 0.01 for female and 0.03 for male). The tongue volumes within the whole SCIII group were significantly larger with more negative Wits values. The tongue volumes are significantly bigger in SCIII subjects than normal. Larger tongues correlate with more severe SCIII. The clinical importance of this data is that limited mandibular setback planning is necessary to prevent narrowing of respiratory airways.

  12. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  13. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  14. SIMMER-III analytic thermophysical property model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, K; Tobita, Y.; Kondo, Sa.; Fischer, E.A.

    1999-05-01

    An analytic thermophysical property model using general function forms is developed for a reactor safety analysis code, SIMMER-III. The function forms are designed to represent correct behavior of properties of reactor-core materials over wide temperature ranges, especially for the thermal conductivity and the viscosity near the critical point. The most up-to-date and reliable sources for uranium dioxide, mixed-oxide fuel, stainless steel, and sodium available at present are used to determine parameters in the proposed functions. This model is also designed to be consistent with a SIMMER-III model on thermodynamic properties and equations of state for reactor-core materials. (author)

  15. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Volume III. Demonstration plant environmental analysis (Deliverable No. 27)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    An Environmental Report on the Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Demonstration Plant was prepared for submission to the US Department of Energy under Contract ET-77-C-01-2582. This document is Volume III of a three-volume Environmental Report. Volume I consists of the Summary, Introduction and the Description of the Proposed Action. Volume II consists of the Description of the Existing Environment. Volume III contains the Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Action, Mitigating Measures and Alternatives to the Proposed Action.

  16. INEL environmental characterization report. Volume III. Appendices E-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: (1) INEL subsurface hydrology; (2) cultural resources assessment of two study areas on the INEL; (3) description of INEL facilities; and (4) effluent measurements and environmental monitoring programs

  17. Council on Anthropology and Education Newsletter. Volume III, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, John Ed.

    General information on format, included, materials, broad concerns, objectives, and availability of the newsletter are described in Volume I, ED 048 049. This issue focuses on ethnology, offering two papers presented at the American Anthropological Association symposiums. The lead paper presents a psycho-cultural developmental approach to the…

  18. Contemporary Navajo Affairs: Navajo History Volume III, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Norman K.

    Written specifically for Navajo junior high through college students, but also serving those interested in modern reservation developments and processs, the third volume of a curricular series on Navajo history provides a synthesis of data and pictorial records on current events in the areas of Navajo government, economic development, and health.…

  19. Albanian: Basic Course. Volume III, Lessons 27-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This third of ten volumes of audiolingual classroom instruction in Albanian for adult students treats Albanian grammar, syntax, and usage in a series of exercises consisting of grammar perception drills, grammar analysis, translation exercises, readings, question-and-answer exercises, and dialogues illustrating specific grammatical features. A…

  20. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Foxall, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lindsey, Nathaniel [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ferrar, Kyle [The FracTracker Alliance, Oakland, CA (United States); Gautier, Donald [DonGautier LLC., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Greenfield, Ben [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jerrett, Michael L.B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, issued in July 2015, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, this volume, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. The Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  1. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume III. Manpower and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    This volume addresses ways to bridge the gap between existing tribal skill levels and the skill levels required for higher-paying jobs in energy resource development projects. It addresses opportunities for technical, skilled, and semiskilled employment as well as professional positions, because it is important to have tribal participation at all levels of an operation. Section II, ''Energy-Related Employment Opportunities,'' covers three areas: (1) identification of energy-resource occupations; (2) description of these occupations; and (3) identification of skill requirements by type of occupation. Section III, ''Description of Training Programs,'' also covers three areas: (a) concept of a training-program model; (b) description of various training methods; and (c) an assessment of the cost of training, utilizing different programs. Section IV concentrates on development of a training program for target occupations, skills, and populations. Again this section covers three areas: (i) overview of the development of a skills training program; (ii) identification of target occupations, skills, and populations; and (iii) energy careers for younger tribal members.

  2. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume III.- Extremadura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trueba, C; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Roquero, C; Magister, M.

    1998-01-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-13 7 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalized and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Extremadura. (Author) 50 refs

  3. Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control. Volume III: Inspection Procedures for Specific Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisburd, Melvin I.

    The Field Operations and Enforcement Manual for Air Pollution Control, Volume III, explains in detail the following: inspection procedures for specific sources, kraft pulp mills, animal rendering, steel mill furnaces, coking operations, petroleum refineries, chemical plants, non-ferrous smelting and refining, foundries, cement plants, aluminum…

  4. Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems – Volume III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Duić

    2015-12-01

    In total 32 manuscripts were published in Volume III, all of them reviewed by at least two reviewers. The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems would like to thank reviewers for their contribution to the quality of the published manuscripts.

  5. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME III/III, IAEA COMMITTEE 24, DEVELOPMENT OF INFCIRC/540, ARTICLE-BY-ARTICLE REVIEW (1996-1997).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this section of the report, the development of INFCIRC/540 is traced by a compilation of citations from the IAEA documents presented to the Board of Governors and the records of discussions in the Board that took place prior to the establishment of Committee 24 as well as the documents and discussions of that committee. The evolution of the text is presented separately for each article or, for the more complex articles, for each paragraph or group of paragraphs of the article. This section covers all articles, including those involving no issues. Background, issues, interpretations and conclusions, which were addressed in Volumes I, II, and III are not repeated here. The comments by states that are included are generally limited to objections and suggested changes. Requests for clarification or elaboration have been omitted, although it is recognized that such comments were sometimes veiled objections.

  6. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II

  7. NASA 3D Models: Mark III Spacesuit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Both the JSC Mark III and the ARC AX-5 suit have been designed to operate at a pressure of 8.3 psi. Current space shuttle spacesuits operate at 4.3 psi and require a...

  8. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume III. Country data, LY-PO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. III, are Libya, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, and Portugal. The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy supplies; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  9. Parameter Estimation for the Thurstone Case III Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, David B.; Chaiy, Seoil

    1982-01-01

    The ability of three estimation criteria to recover parameters of the Thurstone Case V and Case III models from comparative judgment data was investigated via Monte Carlo techniques. Significant differences in recovery are shown to exist. (Author/JKS)

  10. 1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 3, Health and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume III include the use of models in handling hazardous materials, communication at waste sites, asbestos, regulatory decisions, emergency planning, training programs, occupational hazards, and protection of subcontractors

  11. Mortality Probability Model III and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dudley, R. Adams

    2009-01-01

    Background: To develop and compare ICU length-of-stay (LOS) risk-adjustment models using three commonly used mortality or LOS prediction models. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, we performed a retrospective, observational study of 11,295 ICU patients from 35 hospitals in the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project. We compared the accuracy of the following three LOS models: a recalibrated acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) IV-LOS model; and models developed using risk factors in the mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0) and the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II mortality prediction model. We evaluated models by calculating the following: (1) grouped coefficients of determination; (2) differences between observed and predicted LOS across subgroups; and (3) intraclass correlations of observed/expected LOS ratios between models. Results: The grouped coefficients of determination were APACHE IV with coefficients recalibrated to the LOS values of the study cohort (APACHE IVrecal) [R2 = 0.422], mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0 III) [R2 = 0.279], and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) [R2 = 0.008]. For each decile of predicted ICU LOS, the mean predicted LOS vs the observed LOS was significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) for three, two, and six deciles using APACHE IVrecal, MPM0 III, and SAPS II, respectively. Plots of the predicted vs the observed LOS ratios of the hospitals revealed a threefold variation in LOS among hospitals with high model correlations. Conclusions: APACHE IV and MPM0 III were more accurate than SAPS II for the prediction of ICU LOS. APACHE IV is the most accurate and best calibrated model. Although it is less accurate, MPM0 III may be a reasonable option if the data collection burden or the treatment effect bias is a consideration. PMID:19363210

  12. Computational Model for Spacecraft/Habitat Volume

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Please note that funding to Dr. Simon Hsiang, a critical co-investigator for the development of the Spacecraft Optimization Layout and Volume (SOLV) model, was...

  13. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Europe and Central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  14. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  15. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Africa and the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  16. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Asia and the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  17. Recovery boiler model; Soodakattilan kehitystyoe III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, K.; Ylitalo, M.; Sundstroem, K.; Helke, R.; Heinola, M. [Kvaerner Pulping Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The recovery boiler model was further tested and developed. At this moment the model includes submodels for: droplet drying, pyrolysis, char burning, gas burning and for droplet trajectory. During 1996 the formation of CH{sub 4} during pyrolysis and release of sulfur was included to the model. Further the formation of NO from fuel nitrogen and formation of thermal- NO were included to the model using Arrhenius type reaction rate equations. The calculated results are realistic and the model is used as a tool to find out methods to increase the efficiency and availability and decrease the emissions. Analysing the results of the earlier field study of 8 boilers showed that the furnace heat load, fuming rate, find the black liquor composition have influence on the enrichment of the potassium to the fly ash. (orig.)

  18. Circumplex Model VII: validation studies and FACES III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D H

    1986-09-01

    This paper reviews some of the recent empirical studies validating the Circumplex Model and describes the newly developed self-report measure, FACES III. Studies testing hypotheses derived from the Circumplex Model regarding the three dimensions of cohesion, change, and communication are reviewed. Case illustrations using FACES III and the Clinical Rating Scale are presented. These two assessment tools can be used for making a diagnosis of family functioning and for assessing changes over the course of treatment. This paper reflects the continuing attempt to develop further the Circumplex Model and to bridge more adequately research, theory, and practice.

  19. Maternal vitamin C deficiency does not reduce hippocampal volume and beta-tubulin III intensity in prenatal Guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Schjoldager, Janne Gram; Paidi, Maya Devi

    2016-01-01

    Marginal vitamin C (vitC) deficiency affects 5% to 10% of adults including subpopulations such as pregnant women and newborns. Animal studies link vitC deficiency to deleterious effects on the developing brain, but exactly how the brain adapts to vitC deficiency and the mechanisms behind...... the observed deficits remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that vitC deficiency in utero may lead to a decreased neuronal maturation and increased cellular death giving rise to alterations of the hippocampal morphology in a guinea pig model. Brains from prenatal guinea pig pups (n = 9-10 in each group......) subjected to either a sufficient (918 mg vitC/kg feed) or deficient (100 mg vitC/kg feed) maternal dietary regimen were assessed with regards to hippocampal volume and beta-tubulin isotype III staining intensity at 2 gestational time points (45 and 56). We found a distinct differential regional growth...

  20. Proceedings of the symposium to review Volume III of the Annual Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, F.; Norland, D.

    1979-01-01

    This report is a transcript of the proceedings of a two-day Symposium, held in the Fall of 1979 at the University of Maryland in order to independently review the 1978 Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Report to Congress (ARC), Volume III. Participants included energy forecasting experts from the academic community and the private sector; other Federal, State, and local government energy experts; and Office of Applied Analysis, EIA, staff members. The Symposium and its transcript are a critique of the underlying 1978 ARC assumptions, methodologies, and energy system projections. Discussions cover the short-, mid-, and long-term periods, national and international forecasts, source and consuming sectors and projected economic impacts. 27 figures, 22 tables.

  1. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume IV. Model documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M L; Allen, B J; Gale, J E; Lutz, M S; O& #x27; Hara, N E; Wood, R K

    1979-02-01

    This volume is the fourth in a series of seven documenting the PIES Integrating Model. It contains detailed descriptions of the basic assumptions behind each of the components of PIES and how they interact with one another. Chapter II of this volume presents the methodology used to integrate supply and demand. It includes a discussion of both the interface between the Demand Model and the equilibrating mechanism and the various supply models via the equilibrating algorithm used by PIES. Chapters III through IX describe each supply submodel in turn: coal, oil, and natural gas supply, utilities, refineries, advanced technologies, and transportation. Code and data documentation are covered elsewhere in this series (Volumes V and VI respectively). PIES is an evolving system. As this document was being prepared, many parts of the model were being modified. This document describes the PIES Integrating Model as of January 1, 1978.

  2. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  3. Dark radiation in LARGE volume models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoli, Michele; Conlon, Joseph P.; Quevedo, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    We consider reheating driven by volume modulus decays in the LARGE volume scenario. Such reheating always generates nonzero dark radiation through the decays to the axion partner, while the only competitive visible sector decays are Higgs pairs via the Giudice-Masiero term. In the framework of sequestered models where the cosmological moduli problem is absent, the simplest model with a shift-symmetric Higgs sector generates 1.56≤ΔNeff≤1.74. For more general cases, the known experimental bounds on ΔNeff strongly constrain the parameters and matter content of the models.

  4. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 3: Papers by Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, R.L. [ed.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process-and how-would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and discussion panels. Volume 2 contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. This volume contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.).

  5. EARTHWORK VOLUME CALCULATION FROM DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANIĆ Milorad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of cut and fill volume has an essential importance in many fields. This article shows a new method, which has no approximation, based on Digital Terrain Models. A relatively new mathematical model is developed for that purpose, which is implemented in the software solution. Both of them has been tested and verified in the praxis on several large opencast mines. This application is developed in AutoLISP programming language and works in AutoCAD environment.

  6. Thermal Modeling Method Improvements for SAGE III on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; McLeod, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Many innovative analysis methods have been used in developing this model; these will be described in the paper. This paper builds on a paper presented at TFAWS 2013, which described some of the initial developments of efficient methods for SAGE III. The current paper describes additional improvements that have been made since that time. To expedite the correlation of the model to thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing, the chambers and GSE for both TVAC chambers at Langley used to test the payload were incorporated within the thermal model. This allowed the runs of TVAC predictions and correlations to be run within the flight model, thus eliminating the need for separate models for TVAC. In one TVAC test, radiant lamps were used which necessitated shooting rays from the lamps, and running in both solar and IR wavebands. A new Dragon model was incorporated which entailed a change in orientation; that change was made using an assembly, so that any potential additional new Dragon orbits could be added in the future without modification of the model. The Earth orbit parameters such as albedo and Earth infrared flux were incorporated as time-varying values that change over the course of the orbit; despite being required in one of the ISS documents, this had not been done before by any previous payload. All parameters such as initial temperature, heater voltage, and location of the payload are defined based on the case definition. For one component, testing was performed in both air and vacuum; incorporating the air convection in a submodel that was

  7. Bianchi VI0 and III models: self-similar approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinchon, Jose Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We study several cosmological models with Bianchi VI 0 and III symmetries under the self-similar approach. We find new solutions for the 'classical' perfect fluid model as well as for the vacuum model although they are really restrictive for the equation of state. We also study a perfect fluid model with time-varying constants, G and Λ. As in other studied models we find that the behaviour of G and Λ are related. If G behaves as a growing time function then Λ is a positive decreasing time function but if G is decreasing then Λ 0 is negative. We end by studying a massive cosmic string model, putting special emphasis in calculating the numerical values of the equations of state. We show that there is no SS solution for a string model with time-varying constants.

  8. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 4 include site characterization and remediation projects, environmental monitoring and modeling; disposal site selection and facility design, risk assessment, safety and health issues, and site remediation technology.

  9. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 4 include site characterization and remediation projects, environmental monitoring and modeling; disposal site selection and facility design, risk assessment, safety and health issues, and site remediation technology

  10. Effects of uncertainty in model predictions of individual tree volume on large area volume estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; James A. Westfall

    2014-01-01

    Forest inventory estimates of tree volume for large areas are typically calculated by adding model predictions of volumes for individual trees. However, the uncertainty in the model predictions is generally ignored with the result that the precision of the large area volume estimates is overestimated. The primary study objective was to estimate the effects of model...

  11. Sensitivity analysis of the terrestrial food chain model FOOD III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, Reto.

    1980-10-01

    As a first step in constructing a terrestrial food chain model suitable for long-term waste management situations, a numerical sensitivity analysis of FOOD III was carried out to identify important model parameters. The analysis involved 42 radionuclides, four pathways, 14 food types, 93 parameters and three percentages of parameter variation. We also investigated the importance of radionuclides, pathways and food types. The analysis involved a simple contamination model to render results from individual pathways comparable. The analysis showed that radionuclides vary greatly in their dose contribution to each of the four pathways, but relative contributions to each pathway are very similar. Man's and animals' drinking water pathways are much more important than the leaf and root pathways. However, this result depends on the contamination model used. All the pathways contain unimportant food types. Considering the number of parameters involved, FOOD III has too many different food types. Many of the parameters of the leaf and root pathway are important. However, this is true for only a few of the parameters of animals' drinking water pathway, and for neither of the two parameters of mans' drinking water pathway. The radiological decay constant increases the variability of these results. The dose factor is consistently the most important variable, and it explains most of the variability of radionuclide doses within pathways. Consideration of the variability of dose factors is important in contemporary as well as long-term waste management assessment models, if realistic estimates are to be made. (auth)

  12. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  13. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  14. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3 - 7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Volume 2 contains information on environmental restoration at federal facilities, waste disposal technology, quality assurance, contingency planning and emergency response, decontamination and decommissioning, environmental restoration, and public involvement in waste management

  15. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3 - 7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 3 include treatment of soils, waste characterization and certification, waste minimization site remediation management plans and programs, and training programs.

  16. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3 - 7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 3 include treatment of soils, waste characterization and certification, waste minimization site remediation management plans and programs, and training programs

  17. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 1 are Environmental Data Management, Site characterization technology, Wastewater treatment, Waste management in foreign countries, Transuranic waste management, and Groundwater characterization and treatment

  18. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3--7, 1988 DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 5 include environmental assessments and program strategies, waste treatment technologies, and regulations and compliance studies

  19. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3--7, 1988 DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 5 include environmental assessments and program strategies, waste treatment technologies, and regulations and compliance studies.

  20. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 1 are Environmental Data Management, Site characterization technology, Wastewater treatment, Waste management in foreign countries, Transuranic waste management, and Groundwater characterization and treatment.

  1. Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8155 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model... Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) by Clayton Walker and Gail Vaucher Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL...2017 June 28 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Atmospheric Renewable Energy Research, Volume 5 (Solar Radiation Flux Model) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ROTC Internship

  2. Feasibility planning study for a behavior database. Volume III Appendix B, Compendium of survey questions on drinking and driving and occupant restraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    The general objective of the project was to determine the feasibility of and the general requirements for a centralized database on driver behavior and attitudes related to drunk driving and occupant restraints. Volume III is a compendium of question...

  3. Yunnan-III models for evolutionary population synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Li, L.; Han, Z.; Zhuang, Y.; Kang, X.

    2013-02-01

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the mesa stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1 Myr to 15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100 M⊙). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art mesa code. mesa code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars makes the V - K, V - J and V - R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr) ≳ 7.6 [the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr) ˜ 8.6, ˜0.5-0.2 mag for colours, approximately two times for K-band flux]. We also find that the colour-evolution trends of Model with-TPAGB at intermediate and large ages are similar to those from the starburst99 code, which employs the Padova-AGB stellar library, BaSeL spectral library and the Kroupa IMF. At last, we compare the colours with the other EPS models comprising TP-AGB stars (such as CB07, M05, V10 and POPSTAR), and find that the B - V colour agrees with each other but the V-K colour shows a larger discrepancy among these EPS models [˜1 mag when 8 ≲ log(t/yr) ≲ 9]. The stellar evolutionary tracks, isochrones, colours and ISEDs can be obtained on request from the first author or from our website (http://www1.ynao.ac.cn/~zhangfh/). Using the isochrones, you can build your EPS models. Now the format of stellar evolutionary tracks is the same as that in the starburst99 code; you can put them into the starburst99 code and get the SP's results. Moreover, the colours involving other passbands

  4. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  5. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part I. Cultural Resources Survey, Dry Lake Valley, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Artemisia nova) but also include cliffrose (Cowania mexicana ) and broom snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothreae) as dominant species. Other species include... CULTURA Ale ~~REOUC SURVEYa AREASczCAvE L CU 11U CUUI 3-2 E-TR-48-III-I 69 was used because it is considered intensive by the Bureau of Land Management and

  6. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project's scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary

  7. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  8. Proceedings of the sixth international conference on fluidized bed combustion. Volume III. Technical sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held April 9-11, 1980, at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Tennessee Valley Authority. Forty-five papers from Vol. III of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. Two papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  9. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  10. Petroleum industry in Latin America: volume III Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A.E.; Tissot, R.R.

    1995-01-01

    As the previous volume in this series, this concluding volume was divided into separately paged sections, one for each of Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico and Peru, each section being complete in itself. For each of the countries dealt with, there was a brief historical introduction, followed by a detailed analysis of its energy sector, a description of the physical and market characteristics, the transportation and infrastructure systems, the legal and regulatory issues pertaining to the petroleum industry, especially as regards investment and environmental requirements, and an analysis of the prevailing political climate. figs., tabs., refs

  11. Modelling Eu(III) speciation in a Eu(III)/PAHA/α-Al2O3 ternary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janot, Noemie; Reiller, Pascal E.; Benedetti, Marc F.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, modelling of Eu(III) speciation in a ternary system, i.e., in presence of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) and α-Al 2 O 3 , is presented. First, the mineral surface charge is measured by potentiometric titrations and then described using the CD-MUSIC model. This model is also used to describe Eu(III) binding to the α-Al 2 O 3 surface at different pH values, ionic strength and mineral concentrations. Time resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS) is then used to study the binding of Eu(III) to PAHA at pH 4 with different humic acid concentrations. The spectra are used to calculate a spectroscopic 'titration curve', used to determine Eu(III)/PAHA binding parameters in the NICA-Donnan model. Following a previous study (Janot et al., Water Res. 46, 731-740), modelling of the ternary system is based upon the definition of two PAHA pools where one fraction remains in solution and the other is adsorbed onto the mineral surface, with each possessing different proton and metal binding parameters. The modification of protonation behaviour for both fractions is examined using spectrophotometric titrations of the non adsorbed PAHA fraction at different organic/mineral ratios. These data are then used to describe Eu(III) interactions in the ternary system: Eu(III) re-partitioning in the ternary system is calculated for different pH, ionic strength and PAHA concentrations, and results are compared to experimental observations. The model is in good agreement with experimental data, except at high PAHA fractionation rates. Results show that organic complexation dominates over a large pH range, with the predominant species existing as the surface-bound fraction. Above pH 8, Eu(III) seems to be mostly complexed to the mineral surface, which is in agreement with previous spectroscopic observations (Janot et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 45, 3224-3230). (authors)

  12. Analysis and forecast of electrical distribution system materials. Final report. Volume III. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, C G

    1976-08-23

    These appendixes are referenced in Volume II of this report. They contain the detailed electrical distribution equipment requirements and input material requirements forecasts. Forecasts are given for three electric energy usage scenarios. Also included are data on worldwide reserves and demand for 30 raw materials required for the manufacture of electrical distribution equipment.

  13. Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Volume III. Appendices. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-11-01

    A design study for a 100 MW gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle solar/fossil-fuel hybrid power plant is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (a) preconceptual design data; (b) market potential analysis methodology; (c) parametric analysis methodology; (d) EPGS systems description; (e) commercial-scale solar hybrid power system assessment; and (f) conceptual design data lists. (WHK)

  14. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume III: appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    This volume contains time estimate summaries to the second level of detail for scheduled or unscheduled maintenance of the first wall/blanket, some selected subsystem components and maintenance equipment. Elaboration of selected maintenance equipment functions and performance as well as conceptual designs is also included

  15. New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium - Volume III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    During, W.E.; Oakey, R.; Kauser, S.

    2004-01-01

    This tenth volume from the annual International High Technology Small Firms Conference adds to substantial specialist work on growth problems of New Technology Based Firms (NTBFs). This series represents a clear case where the whole is greater than the sum of its individual parts and, in view of

  16. A mode III moving interfacial crack based on strip magneto-electric polarization saturation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with a mode III Yoffe-type interfacial crack propagating subsonically under the moving strip magneto-electric saturation model. Nonlinear effects are characterized by different magnetic and electric saturation strips around the crack tip. Employing the extended Stroh method, we obtain generalized moving interfacial dislocation densities analytically under impermeable magneto-electric crack boundary conditions. The generalized intensity factor and local energy release rate with nonlinear effects are derived as fracture parameters for the moving magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) interfacial crack. Numerical results are presented to show the characteristics of fracture dominant parameters with respect to the loading as well as the propagation velocity. In addition, a dimensionless parameter defined by the ratio of the volume fraction of the composite constituents is proposed to evaluate the influences of the MEE bimaterial properties. This research will give us ideas on material selection for optimizing the fracture toughness of MEE composites. (paper)

  17. Humboldt Bay Wetlands Review and Baylands Analysis. Volume III. Habitat Classification and Mapping and Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Dqvtiirtticiii of Army pet m~its biefore thi’sf acts.x. be Inafially undi-rlaken. ii’e re’s Federal leg.slati-n apic; to Uit view of each aclivlty...there In no economtciitv feasIble Method or with State and local ageicivs ifalitb of imole thani one owner provided tle site available otter than a...PanIrda Ilus daa (sub littora 1; ce grass , channels) orec I a ii c rab , Pet ro 1 ;t ho S sp-) O’MIVCI’i$;a IpL:dl cSrabis, I i iii xa ":I) (-]I) c rai

  18. Mouse model of glycogen storage disease type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai-Ming; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2014-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa) is caused by a deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), which is encoded by the Agl gene. GDE deficiency leads to the pathogenic accumulation of phosphorylase limit dextrin (PLD), an abnormal glycogen, in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. To further investigate the pathological mechanisms behind this disease and develop novel therapies to treat this disease, we generated a GDE-deficient mouse model by removing exons after exon 5 in the Agl gene. GDE reduction was confirmed by western blot and enzymatic activity assay. Histology revealed massive glycogen accumulation in the liver, muscle, and heart of the homozygous affected mice. Interestingly, we did not find any differences in the general appearance, growth rate, and life span between the wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous affected mice with ad libitum feeding, except reduced motor activity after 50 weeks of age, and muscle weakness in both the forelimb and hind legs of homozygous affected mice by using the grip strength test at 62 weeks of age. However, repeated fasting resulted in decreased survival of the knockout mice. Hepatomegaly and progressive liver fibrosis were also found in the homozygous affected mice. Blood chemistry revealed that alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were significantly higher in the homozygous affected mice than in both wild-type and heterozygous mice and the activity of these enzymes further increased with fasting. Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activity was normal in young and adult homozygous affected mice. However, the activity was significantly elevated after fasting. Hypoglycemia appeared only at a young age (3 weeks) and hyperlipidemia was not observed in our model. In conclusion, with the exception of normal lipidemia, these mice recapitulate human GSD IIIa; moreover, we found that repeated fasting was detrimental to these mice. This mouse model will

  19. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS, INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME II/III IAEA COMMITTEE 24, Major Issues Underlying the Model Additional Protocol (1996-1997).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.

    2010-01-01

    Volume I of this Review traces the origins of the Model Additional Protocol. It covers the period from 1991, when events in Iraq triggered an intensive review of the safeguards system, until 1996, when the IAEA Board of Governors established Committee 24 to negotiate a new protocol to safeguards agreement. The period from 1991-1996 set the stage for this negotiation and shaped its outcome in important ways. During this 5-year period, many proposals for strengthening safeguards were suggested and reviewed. Some proposals were dropped, for example, the suggestion by the IAEA Secretariat to verify certain imports, and others were refined. A rough consensus was established about the directions in which the international community wanted to go, and this was reflected in the draft of an additional protocol that was submitted to the IAEA Board of Governors on May 6, 1996 in document GOV/2863, Strengthening the Effectiveness and Improving the Efficiency of the Safeguards System - Proposals For Implementation Under Complementary Legal Authority, A Report by the Director General. This document ended with a recommendation that, 'the Board, through an appropriate mechanism, finalize the required legal instrument taking as a basis the draft protocol proposed by the Secretariat and the explanation of the measures contained in this document.'

  20. Economic evaluation of the annual cycle energy system (ACES). Final report. Volume III, appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume consists of seven appendices related to ACES, the first three of which are concerned with computer programs. The appendices are entitled: (A) ACESIM: Residential Program Listing; (B) Typical Inputs and Outputs of ACESIM; (C) CACESS: Commercial Building Program Listing; (D) Typical Weather-Year Selection Requirements; (E) Building Characteristics; (F) List of Major Variables Used in the Computer Programs; and (G) Bibliography. 79 references.

  1. Allometric Models for Estimating Tree Volume and Aboveground Biomass in Lowland Forests of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Ancelm Mugasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Models to assist management of lowland forests in Tanzania are in most cases lacking. Using a sample of 60 trees which were destructively harvested from both dry and wet lowland forests of Dindili in Morogoro Region (30 trees and Rondo in Lindi Region (30 trees, respectively, this study developed site specific and general models for estimating total tree volume and aboveground biomass. Specifically the study developed (i height-diameter (ht-dbh models for trees found in the two sites, (ii total, merchantable, and branches volume models, and (iii total and sectional aboveground biomass models of trees found in the two study sites. The findings show that site specific ht-dbh model appears to be suitable in estimating tree height since the tree allometry was found to differ significantly between studied forests. The developed general volume models yielded unbiased mean prediction error and hence can adequately be applied to estimate tree volume in dry and wet lowland forests in Tanzania. General aboveground biomass model appears to yield biased estimates; hence, it is not suitable when accurate results are required. In this case, site specific biomass allometric models are recommended. Biomass allometric models which include basic wood density are highly recommended for improved estimates accuracy when such information is available.

  2. A method for mapping tissue volume model onto target volume using volumetric self-organizing deformable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, Shoko; Morooka, Ken'ichi; Tsuji, Tokuo; Miyagi, Yasushi; Fukuda, Takaichi; Kurazume, Ryo

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new method for mapping volume models of human tissues onto a target volume with simple shapes. The proposed method is based on our modified self-organizing deformable model (mSDM)1, 2 which finds the one-to-one mapping with no foldovers between arbitrary surface model and a target surface. By extending mSDM to apply to volume models, the proposed method, called volumetric SDM (vSDM), establishes the one-to-one correspondence between the tissue volume model and its target volume. At the same time, vSDM can preserve geometrical properties of the original model before and after mapping. This characteristic of vSDM makes it easy to find the correspondence between tissue models.

  3. Total tree, merchantable stem and branch volume models for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total tree, merchantable stem and branch volume models for miombo woodlands of Malawi. Daud J Kachamba, Tron Eid. Abstract. The objective of this study was to develop general (multispecies) models for prediction of total tree, merchantable stem and branch volume including options with diameter at breast height (dbh) ...

  4. Documentation for grants equal to tax model: Volume 3, Source code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boryczka, M.K.

    1986-01-01

    The GETT model is capable of forecasting the amount of tax liability associated with all property owned and all activities undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in site characterization and repository development. The GETT program is a user-friendly, menu-driven model developed using dBASE III/trademark/, a relational data base management system. The data base for GETT consists primarily of eight separate dBASE III/trademark/ files corresponding to each of the eight taxes (real property, personal property, corporate income, franchise, sales, use, severance, and excise) levied by State and local jurisdictions on business property and activity. Additional smaller files help to control model inputs and reporting options. Volume 3 of the GETT model documentation is the source code. The code is arranged primarily by the eight tax types. Other code files include those for JURISDICTION, SIMULATION, VALIDATION, TAXES, CHANGES, REPORTS, GILOT, and GETT. The code has been verified through hand calculations

  5. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  6. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

  7. NWTS conceptual reference repository description (CRRD). Volume III. Criteria, bases, special studies, and codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This volume documents the criteria, design bases, and special studies and provides the backup for the design presented in Volume II. The criteria presented here were developed by ONWI as a draft version for consideration in this conceptual report. Since these criteria were developed subsequent to preparation of the reports used as a basis for the CRRD, not all of the criteria could be fully considered in preparation of the CRRD. However, they were used as guidelines wherever possible. The criteria for terminal storage of waste are still in development. The chapter on the design bases identifies the important design considerations and provides the justification for their selection. The design bases were developed not so much to give exact values for parameters as to identify the parameters that are significant to the design. They also serve as a common basis for coordinating analysis and design studies unitl the next design phase is completed. Some of the design bases presented here were taken directly from the Stearns-Roger NWTS-R1 Conceptual Design Report. The special studies document technical aspects of the design that are of particular importance or that furnish additional information pertaining to the design

  8. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task II. Regulations and Tariffs. Final report, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The evaluation of the energy impacts of regulations and tariffs is structured around three sequential steps: identification of agencies and organizations that impact the commercial marine transportation industry; identification of existing or proposed regulations that were perceived to have a significant energy impact; and quantification of the energy impacts. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter II describes the regulatory structure of the commercial marine transportation industry and includes a description of the role of each organization and the legislative basis for their jurisdiction and an identification of major areas of regulation and those areas that have an energy impact. Chapters III through IX each address one of the 7 existing or proposed regulatory or legislative actions that have an energy impact. Energy impacts of the state of Washington's tanker regulations, of tanker segregated ballast requirements, of inland waterway user charges, of cargo pooling and service rationalization, of the availability of intermodal container transportation services, of capacity limitations at lock and dam 26 on the Mississippi River and the energy implications of the transportation alternatives available for the West Coast crude oil supplies are discussed. (MCW)

  9. An excursion through elementary mathematics, volume iii discrete mathematics and polynomial algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Caminha Muniz Neto, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, in-depth overview of elementary mathematics as explored in Mathematical Olympiads around the world. It expands on topics usually encountered in high school and could even be used as preparation for a first-semester undergraduate course. This third and last volume covers Counting, Generating Functions, Graph Theory, Number Theory, Complex Numbers, Polynomials, and much more. As part of a collection, the book differs from other publications in this field by not being a mere selection of questions or a set of tips and tricks that applies to specific problems. It starts from the most basic theoretical principles, without being either too general or too axiomatic. Examples and problems are discussed only if they are helpful as applications of the theory. Propositions are proved in detail and subsequently applied to Olympic problems or to other problems at the Olympic level. The book also explores some of the hardest problems presented at National and International Mathematics Ol...

  10. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume III. Collector subsystem. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-05-01

    The Honeywell collector subsystem features a low-profile, multifaceted heliostat designed to provide high reflectivity and accurate angular and spatial positioning of the redirected solar energy under all conditions of wind load and mirror attitude within the design operational envelope. The heliostats are arranged in a circular field around a cavity receiver on a tower halfway south of the field center. A calibration array mounted on the receiver tower provides capability to measure individual heliostat beam location and energy periodically. This information and weather data from the collector field are transmitted to a computerized control subsystem that addresses the individual heliostat to correct pointing errors and determine when the mirrors need cleaning. This volume contains a detailed subsystem design description, a presentation of the design process, and the results of the SRE heliostat test program.

  11. Guide for the evaluation of physical protection equipment. Book 1: Volumes I--III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberman, W.

    1977-06-01

    A guide for evaluating the performance of commercially available physical protection equipment has been prepared in partial fulfillment of Task 2 of MITRE contract AT(49-24)-0376 for use by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Separate evaluation procedures are provided for each generic type of equipment contained in the companion document, Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment. Among the equipment parameters evaluated, as appropriate, are sensitivity, area/volume of coverage, false/nuisance alarm rate, resistance to countermeasures, environmental requirements, installation parameters and maintenance. Four evaluation techniques are employed (inspections, analyses, demonstrations and tests); standard test equipment (both commercially available as well as developmental) to be used in the evaluation are listed

  12. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The report documents efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power systems portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the Pu-238 heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The work performed had two parallel themes. The first of these was the development of an integrated implantable model for bench and animal experiments plus design effort on a more advanced model. The second was research and development on components of the system done in conjunction with the development of the implantable model and to provide technology for incorporation into advanced models plus support to implantations, at the University of Utah, of the systems blood pumping elements when driven by electric motor. The efforts and results of implantable model development are covered, mainly, in the text of the report. The research and development efforts and results are reported, primarily, in the appendices (Vol. 2).

  13. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report documents efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power systems portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the Pu-238 heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The work performed had two parallel themes. The first of these was the development of an integrated implantable model for bench and animal experiments plus design effort on a more advanced model. The second was research and development on components of the system done in conjunction with the development of the implantable model and to provide technology for incorporation into advanced models plus support to implantations, at the University of Utah, of the systems blood pumping elements when driven by electric motor. The efforts and results of implantable model development are covered, mainly, in the text of the report. The research and development efforts and results are reported, primarily, in the appendices

  14. OTEC modular experiment cold water pipe concept evaluation. Volume III. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The Cold Water Pipe System Design Study was undertaken to evaluate the diverse CWP concepts, recommend the most viable alternatives for a 1984 deployment of the 10 to 40 MWe MEP, and carry out preliminary designs of three concepts. The concept evaluation phase reported involved a systems analysis of design alternatives in the broad categories of rigid walled (with hinges), compliant walled, stockade and bottom mounted buoyant. Quantitative evaluations were made of concept performance, availability, deployment schedule, technical feasibility and cost. CWP concepts were analyzed to determine if they met or could be made to meet established system requirements and could be deployed by 1984. Fabrication, construction and installation plans were developed for successful concepts, and costs were determined in a WBS format. Evaluations were performed on the basis of technical and cost risk. This volume includes the following appendices: (A) materials and associated design criteria; (B) summary of results of dynamic flow and transportation analysis; (C) CWP sizing analysis; (D) CWP thermal performance; and (E) investigation of the APL/ABAM CWP design. (WHK)

  15. Site characterization report for the basalt waste isolation project. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The reference location for a repository in basalt for the terminal storage of nuclear wastes on the Hanford Site and the candidate horizons within this reference repository location have been identified and the preliminary characterization work in support of the site screening process has been completed. Fifteen technical questions regarding the qualification of the site were identified to be addressed during the detailed site characterization phase of the US Department of Energy-National Waste Terminal Storage Program site selection process. Resolution of these questions will be provided in the final site characterization progress report, currently planned to be issued in 1987, and in the safety analysis report to be submitted with the License Application. The additional information needed to resolve these questions and the plans for obtaining the information have been identified. This Site Characterization Report documents the results of the site screening process, the preliminary site characterization data, the technical issues that need to be addressed, and the plans for resolving these issues. Volume 3 contains chapters 13 through 19: site issues and plans; geoengineering and repository design issues and plans; waste package and site geochemistry issues and plans; performance-assessment issues and plans; site characterization program; quality assurance; and identification of alternate sites

  16. PHOTOIONIZATION MODELS FOR THE SEMI-FORBIDDEN C iii] 1909 EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskot, A. E. [Department of Astronomy, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Ravindranath, S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The increasing neutrality of the intergalactic medium at z  > 6 suppresses Ly α emission, and spectroscopic confirmation of galaxy redshifts requires the detection of alternative ultraviolet lines. The strong [C iii]  λ 1907+C iii]  λ 1909 doublet frequently observed in low-metallicity, actively star-forming galaxies is a promising emission feature. We present CLOUDY photoionization model predictions for C iii] equivalent widths (EWs) and line ratios as a function of starburst age, metallicity, and ionization parameter. Our models include a range of C/O abundances, dust content, and gas density. We also examine the effects of varying the nebular geometry and optical depth. Only the stellar models that incorporate binary interaction effects reproduce the highest observed C iii] EWs. The spectral energy distributions from the binary stellar population models also generate observable C iii] over a longer timescale relative to single-star models. We show that diagnostics using C iii] and nebular He ii  λ 1640 can separate star-forming regions from shock-ionized gas. We also find that density-bounded systems should exhibit weaker C iii] EWs at a given ionization parameter, and C iii] EWs could, therefore, select candidate Lyman continuum-leaking systems. In almost all models, C iii] is the next strongest line at <2700 Å after Ly α , and C iii] reaches detectable levels for a wide range of conditions at low metallicity. C iii] may therefore serve as an important diagnostic for characterizing galaxies at z  > 6.

  17. PHOTOIONIZATION MODELS FOR THE SEMI-FORBIDDEN C iii] 1909 EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Ravindranath, S.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing neutrality of the intergalactic medium at z  > 6 suppresses Ly α emission, and spectroscopic confirmation of galaxy redshifts requires the detection of alternative ultraviolet lines. The strong [C iii]  λ 1907+C iii]  λ 1909 doublet frequently observed in low-metallicity, actively star-forming galaxies is a promising emission feature. We present CLOUDY photoionization model predictions for C iii] equivalent widths (EWs) and line ratios as a function of starburst age, metallicity, and ionization parameter. Our models include a range of C/O abundances, dust content, and gas density. We also examine the effects of varying the nebular geometry and optical depth. Only the stellar models that incorporate binary interaction effects reproduce the highest observed C iii] EWs. The spectral energy distributions from the binary stellar population models also generate observable C iii] over a longer timescale relative to single-star models. We show that diagnostics using C iii] and nebular He ii  λ 1640 can separate star-forming regions from shock-ionized gas. We also find that density-bounded systems should exhibit weaker C iii] EWs at a given ionization parameter, and C iii] EWs could, therefore, select candidate Lyman continuum-leaking systems. In almost all models, C iii] is the next strongest line at <2700 Å after Ly α , and C iii] reaches detectable levels for a wide range of conditions at low metallicity. C iii] may therefore serve as an important diagnostic for characterizing galaxies at z  > 6.

  18. The Study of Productivity Measurement and Incentive Methodology (Phase III - Paper Test). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-14

    analogy of a crown of jewels might be used to illustrate the relationship. The models tested represent the jewels and are valuable in their own...right. However, when the jewels are placed in the crown (models built into an integrated methodology), they take on added value. Recommendat ions We...8217:hrou!;h product pries changes. The mathematical relationship remains jusc as crue for a whole induscry as for individual

  19. 1987 Oak Ridge model conference: Proceedings: Volume 2, Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    See the abstract for Volume I for general information on the conference. Topics discussed in Volume II include data management techiques for environmental protection efforts, the use of models in environmental auditing, in emergency plans, chemical accident emergency response, risk assessment, monitoring of waste sites, air and water monitoring of waste sites, and in training programs

  20. Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume III. Analysis of concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal conversion concepts that are potentially suitable for development as small electric power systems (1 to 10 MWe) is given. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces; (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting suraces; and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and the latter of the two also was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. This volume describes the systems analyses performed on all the alternative configurations of the seven generic collector concepts and the results obtained. The SOLSTEP computer code used to determine each configuration's system cost and performance is briefly described. The collector and receiver performance calculations used are also presented. The capital investment and related costs that were obtained from the systems studies are presented, and the levelized energy costs are given as a function of capacity factor obtained from the systems studies. Included also are the values of the other attributes used in the concepts' final ranking. The comments, conclusions, and recommendations developed by the PNL study team during the concept characterization and systems analysis tasks of the study are presented. (WHK)

  1. Novel concepts for the compression of large volumes of carbon dioxide-phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J. Jeffrey [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Allison, Timothy C. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Evans, Neal D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Moreland, Brian [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hernandez, Augusto J. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Day, Meera [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Ridens, Brandon L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-30

    and tested in a closed loop compressor facility using CO2 . Both test programs successfully demonstrated good performance and mechanical behavior. In Phase III, a pilot compression plant consisting of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor with cooled diaphragm technology has been designed, constructed, and tested. Comparative testing of adiabatic and cooled tests at equivalent inlet conditions shows that the cooled diaphragms reduce power consumption by 3-8% when the compressor is operated as a back-to-back unit and by up to 9% when operated as a straight-though compressor with no intercooler. The power savings, heat exchanger effectiveness, and temperature drops for the cooled diaphragm were all slightly higher than predicted values but showed the same trends.

  2. Correleation of the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Models in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Davis, Warren T.; Liles, Kaitlin, A. K.; McLeod, Shawn C.

    2017-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III was launched on February 19, 2017 and mounted to the International Space Station (ISS) to begin its three-year mission. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Correlation of the thermal model is important since the payload will be expected to survive a three-year mission on ISS under varying thermal environments. Three major thermal vacuum (TVAC) tests were completed during the development of the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP); two subsystem-level tests and a payload-level test. Additionally, a characterization TVAC test was performed in order to verify performance of a system of heater plates that was designed to allow the IP to achieve the required temperatures during payload-level testing; model correlation was performed for this test configuration as well as those including the SAGE III flight hardware. This document presents the methods that were used to correlate the SAGE III models to TVAC at the subsystem and IP level, including the approach for modeling the parts of the payload in the thermal chamber, generating pre-test predictions, and making adjustments to the model to align predictions with temperatures observed during testing. Model correlation quality will be presented and discussed, and lessons learned during the correlation process will be shared.

  3. Disc volume reduction with percutaneous nucleoplasty in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kasch

    Full Text Available STUDY DESIGN: We assessed volume following nucleoplasty disc decompression in lower lumbar spines from cadaveric pigs using 7.1Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. PURPOSE: To investigate coblation-induced volume reductions as a possible mechanism underlying nucleoplasty. METHODS: We assessed volume following nucleoplastic disc decompression in pig spines using 7.1-Tesla MRI. Volumetry was performed in lumbar discs of 21 postmortem pigs. A preoperative image data set was obtained, volume was determined, and either disc decompression or placebo therapy was performed in a randomized manner. Group 1 (nucleoplasty group was treated according to the usual nucleoplasty protocol with coblation current applied to 6 channels for 10 seconds each in an application field of 360°; in group 2 (placebo group the same procedure was performed but without coblation current. After the procedure, a second data set was generated and volumes calculated and matched with the preoperative measurements in a blinded manner. To analyze the effectiveness of nucleoplasty, volumes between treatment and placebo groups were compared. RESULTS: The average preoperative nucleus volume was 0.994 ml (SD: 0.298 ml. In the nucleoplasty group (n = 21 volume was reduced by an average of 0.087 ml (SD: 0.110 ml or 7.14%. In the placebo group (n = 21 volume was increased by an average of 0.075 ml (SD: 0.075 ml or 8.94%. The average nucleoplasty-induced volume reduction was 0.162 ml (SD: 0.124 ml or 16.08%. Volume reduction in lumbar discs was significant in favor of the nucleoplasty group (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that nucleoplasty has a volume-reducing effect on the lumbar nucleus pulposus in an animal model. Furthermore, we show the volume reduction to be a coblation effect of nucleoplasty in porcine discs.

  4. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    This report relates to protection of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. This volume presents the source listings for the Fixed Site Neutralization Model and its supporting modules, the Plex Preprocessor and the Data Preprocessor

  5. Synthetic liquid fuels development: assessment of critical factors. Volume III. Coal resource depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, E.M.; Yabroff, I.W.; Kroll, C.A.; White, R.K.; Walton, B.L.; Ivory, M.E.; Fullen, R.E.; Weisbecker, L.W.; Hays, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    While US coal resources are known to be vast, their rate of depletion in a future based predominantly on coal has not been examined analytically heretofore. The Coal Depletion Model inventories the coal resource on a regional basis and calculates the cost of coal extraction by three technologies - strip and underground mining and in-situ combustion. A plausible coal demand scenario extending from 1975 to the year 2050 is used as a basis in applying the model. In the year 2050, plants in operation include 285 syncrude plants, each producing 100,000 B/D; 312 SNG plants, each producing 250 million SCF/D and 722 coal-fired electric power plants, each of 1000 MW capacity. In addition, there is 890 million tons per year of industrial coal consumption. Such a high level of coal use would deplete US coal resources much more rapidly than most people appreciate. Of course, the actual amount of US coal is unknown, and if the coal in the hypothetical reliability category is included, depletion is delayed. Coal in this category, however, has not been mapped; it is only presumed to exist on the basis of geological theory. The coal resource depletion model shows that unilateral imposition of a severance tax by a state tends to shift production to other coal producing regions. Boom and bust cycles are both delayed and reduced in their magnitude. When several states simultaneously impose severance taxes, the effect of each is weakened.Key policy issues that emerge from this analysis concern the need to reduce the uncertainty of the magnitude and geographic distribution of the US coal resource and the need to stimulate interaction among the parties at interest to work out equitable and acceptable coal conversion plant location strategies capable of coping with the challenges of a high-coal future.

  6. Ovarian volume throughout life: a validated normative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham; Greve, Tine; Andersen, Claus Y; Anderson, Richard A; Wallace, W Hamish B

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of ovarian volume has been shown to be a useful indirect indicator of the ovarian reserve in women of reproductive age, in the diagnosis and management of a number of disorders of puberty and adult reproductive function, and is under investigation as a screening tool for ovarian cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from conception to 82 years of age. This model shows that 69% of the variation in ovarian volume is due to age alone. We have shown that in the average case ovarian volume rises from 0.7 mL (95% CI 0.4-1.1 mL) at 2 years of age to a peak of 7.7 mL (95% CI 6.5-9.2 mL) at 20 years of age with a subsequent decline to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis and management of a number of diverse gynaecological and reproductive conditions in females from birth to menopause and beyond.

  7. Optimized volume models of earthquake-triggered landslides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chong; Xu, Xiwei; Shen, Lingling; Yao, Qi; Tan, Xibin; Kang, Wenjun; Ma, Siyuan; Wu, Xiyan; Cai, Juntao; Gao, Mingxing; Li, Kang

    2016-07-12

    In this study, we proposed three optimized models for calculating the total volume of landslides triggered by the 2008 Wenchuan, China Mw 7.9 earthquake. First, we calculated the volume of each deposit of 1,415 landslides triggered by the quake based on pre- and post-quake DEMs in 20 m resolution. The samples were used to fit the conventional landslide "volume-area" power law relationship and the 3 optimized models we proposed, respectively. Two data fitting methods, i.e. log-transformed-based linear and original data-based nonlinear least square, were employed to the 4 models. Results show that original data-based nonlinear least square combining with an optimized model considering length, width, height, lithology, slope, peak ground acceleration, and slope aspect shows the best performance. This model was subsequently applied to the database of landslides triggered by the quake except for two largest ones with known volumes. It indicates that the total volume of the 196,007 landslides is about 1.2 × 10(10) m(3) in deposit materials and 1 × 10(10) m(3) in source areas, respectively. The result from the relationship of quake magnitude and entire landslide volume related to individual earthquake is much less than that from this study, which reminds us the necessity to update the power-law relationship.

  8. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues

  9. Model documentation Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) of the National Energy Modeling System is developed and maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. This report documents the archived version of the NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1996, (DOE/EIA-0383(96)). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic approach, and provides detail on the methodology employed. Previously this report represented Volume I of a two-volume set. Volume II reported on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.

  10. Modeling ecological and economic systems with STELLA : Part III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costanza, Robert; Voinov, Alexey

    2001-01-01

    This special issue contains a group of eight modeling studies covering a range of ecological and economic systems and problems. The models were all developed using Stella®, an icon-based software package specifically designed for dynamic systems modeling. Models included in the special issue were

  11. Spatial Economics Model Predicting Transport Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is extremely important to predict the logistics requirements in a scientific and rational way. However, in recent years, the improvement effect on the prediction method is not very significant and the traditional statistical prediction method has the defects of low precision and poor interpretation of the prediction model, which cannot only guarantee the generalization ability of the prediction model theoretically, but also cannot explain the models effectively. Therefore, in combination with the theories of the spatial economics, industrial economics, and neo-classical economics, taking city of Zhuanghe as the research object, the study identifies the leading industry that can produce a large number of cargoes, and further predicts the static logistics generation of the Zhuanghe and hinterlands. By integrating various factors that can affect the regional logistics requirements, this study established a logistics requirements potential model from the aspect of spatial economic principles, and expanded the way of logistics requirements prediction from the single statistical principles to an new area of special and regional economics.

  12. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  13. Transport of solid commodities via freight pipeline: cost estimating methodology. Volume III, parts A and B. First year final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, J.A.; Morlok, E.K.; Gimm, K.K.; Zandi, I.

    1976-07-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of an intercity freight pipeline, it was necessary to develop cost equations for various competing transportation modes. This volume presents cost-estimating equations for rail carload, trailer-on-flatcar, truck, and freight pipeline. Section A presents mathematical equations that approximate the fully allocated and variable costs contained in the ICC cost tables for rail carload, trailer-on-flatcar (TOFC) and truck common-carrier intercity freight movements. These equations were developed to enable the user to approximate the ICC costs quickly and easily. They should find use in initial studies of costs where exact values are not needed, such as in consideration of rate changes, studies of profitability, and in general inter-modal comparisons. Section B discusses the development of a set of engineering cost equations for pneumo-capsule pipelines. The development was based on an analysis of system components and can readily be extended to other types of pipeline. The model was developed for the purpose of a feasibility study. It employs a limited number of generalized parameters and its use is recommended when sufficient detailed and specific engineering information is lacking. These models were used in the comparison of modes presented in Volume I and hence no conclusions regarding relative costs or service of the modes are presented here. The primary conclusion is that the estimates of costs resulting from these models is subject to considerable uncertainty.

  14. Mathematical models for volume rendering and neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews several different models for light interaction with volume densities of absorbing, glowing, reflecting, or scattering material. They include absorption only, glow only, glow and absorption combined, single scattering of external illumination, and multiple scattering. The models are derived from differential equations, and illustrated on a data set representing a cloud. They are related to corresponding models in neutron transport. The multiple scattering model uses an efficient method to propagate the radiation which does not suffer from the ray effect

  15. Morphological modeling of terrains and volume data

    CERN Document Server

    Comic, Lidija; Magillo, Paola; Iuricich, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical background behind discrete approaches to morphological analysis of scalar fields, with a focus on Morse theory and on the discrete theories due to Banchoff and Forman. The algorithms and data structures presented are used for terrain modeling and analysis, molecular shape analysis, and for analysis or visualization of sensor and simulation 3D data sets. It covers a variety of application domains including geography, geology, environmental sciences, medicine and biology. The authors classify the different approaches to morphological analysis which are all ba

  16. Three-dimensional (3-D) Circumplex Model and revised scoring of FACES III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D H

    1991-03-01

    FACES III can, however, continue to be a useful scale now that the Circumplex Model has been expanded into a three-dimensional design. Past and future studies would benefit from using FACES III as a linear dimension with high scores representing Balanced types and low scores representing Extreme types. This approach means that many past studies with FACES III need to be re-analyzed and/or re-interpreted in light of this 3-D Model. This revised scoring will significantly increase the number of studies that support the basic hypotheses of the Circumplex model, that Balanced families tend to function in more effective ways. It is clear from more recent work with the Clinical Rating Scale (CRS) that the lack of support for the curvilinear hypotheses of the Circumplex Model is due to the limitations of the FACES instrument and not the underlying theoretical model. The CRS clearly demonstrated the curvilinear pattern that has been hypothesized. It is important that future studies using FACES III analyze data in a linear way that fits with the three-dimensional model. In this way, there is a better match conceptually and methodologically between FACES III and the Circumplex Model. It is also highly recommended that future studies use both the self-report of FACES and the observational approaches to family assessment of the Clinical Rating Scale. This combined approach will help advance the field conceptually, methodologically, and clinically.

  17. Documentation for Grants Equal to Tax model: Volume 1, Technical description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A computerized model, the Grants Equal to Tax (GETT) model, was developed to assist in evaluating the amount of federal grant monies that would go to state and local jurisdictions under the provisions outlined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The GETT model is capable of forecasting the amount of tax liability associated with all property owned and all activities undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in site characterization and repository development. The GETT program is a user-friendly, menu-driven model developed using dBASE III/trademark/, a relational data base management system. The data base for GETT consists primarily of eight separate dBASE III/trademark/ files corresponding to each of the eight taxes levied by state and local jurisdictions on business property and activity. Additional smaller files help to control model inputs and reporting options. Volume 1 of the GETT model documentation is a technical description of the program and its capabilities providing (1) descriptions of the data management system and its procedures; (2) formulas for calculating taxes (illustrated with flow charts); (3) descriptions of tax data base variables for the Deaf Smith County, Texas, Richton Dome, Mississippi, and Davis Canyon, Utah, salt sites; and (4) data inputs for the GETT model. 10 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Building Administrator. Edition III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching, learning, and school leadership. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Building Administrator Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all building administrators improve.…

  19. A volume element model (VEM) for energy systems engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Dilay, Emerson; Vargas, Jose Viriato Coelho; Souza, Jeferson Avila; Ordonez, Juan Carlos; Yang, Sam; Mariano, André Bellin

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a simplified modeling and simulation approach for energy systems engineering that is capable of providing quick and accurate responses during system design. For that, the laws of conservation are combined with available empirical and theoretical correlations to quantify the diverse types of flows that cross the system and produce a simplified tridimensional mathematical model, namely a volume element model (VEM). The physical domain of interest is discretized in space, thus...

  20. Genetic correlations between brain volumes and the WAIS-III dimensions of verbal comprehension, working memory, perceptual organization, and processing speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posthuma, Daniëlle; Baare, Wim F.C.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.

    2003-01-01

    We recently showed that the correlation of gray and white matter volume with full scale IQ and the Working Memory dimension are completely mediated by common genetic factors (Posthuma et al., 2002). Here we examine whether the other WAIS III dimensions (Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Organization...... to Working Memory capacity (r = 0.27). This phenotypic correlation is completely due to a common underlying genetic factor. Processing Speed was genetically related to white matter volume (r(g) = 0.39). Perceptual Organization was both genetically (r(g) = 0.39) and environmentally (r(e) = -0.71) related...

  1. In pursuit of clean air: a data book of problems and strategies at the state level. Volume 2. Federal Regions I, II, and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, D.B.; Streets, D.G.

    1980-02-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 and EPA regulations set up stringent requirements for the control of emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards were being exceeded. Implementation plans have been devised by the various states for the attainment of those standards. This second volume of the five-volume series presents outlines of the plans in Federal Regions I, II, and III and maps of the nonattainment status of counties and subcounty areas in each state. Federal Region I consists of the following states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Federal Region II is made up of New Jersey and New York; Federal Region III is composed of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. (JGB)

  2. Models of cognitive behavior in nuclear power plant personnel. A feasibility study: main report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.; Hanes, L.F.

    1986-07-01

    This report contains the results of a feasibility study to determine if the current state of models human cognitive activities can serve as the basis for improved techniques for predicting human error in nuclear power plants emergency operations. Based on the answer to this questions, two subsequent phases of research are planned. Phase II is to develop a model of cognitive activities, and Phase III is to test the model. The feasibility study included an analysis of the cognitive activities that occur in emergency operations and an assessment of the modeling concepts/tools available to capture these cognitive activities. The results indicated that a symbolic processing (or artificial intelligence) model of cognitive activities in nuclear power plants is both desirable and feasible. This cognitive model can be built upon the computational framework provided by an existing artificial intelligence system for medical problem solving called Caduceus. The resulting cognitive model will increase the capability to capture the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessments studies. Volume I summarizes the major findings and conclusions of the study. Volume II provides a complete description of the methods and results, including a synthesis of the cognitive activities that occur during emergency operations, and a literature review on cognitive modeling relevant to nuclear power plants. 112 refs., 10 figs

  3. A volume-balance model for flow on porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2015-11-01

    Volume-balance models are used by petroleum engineers for simulating multiphase and multicomponent flow phenomena in porous media and the extraction process in oil reservoirs. In these models, mass conservation equations and Darcy's law are supplemented by a balance condition for the pore and fluid volumes. This provides a pressure equation suitable for simulating a compressible flow within a compressible solid matrix. Here we present an alternative interpretation of the volume-balance condition that includes the advective transport within a consolidated porous media. We obtain a modified equation for the time evolution of the pressure field. Numerical tests for phase separation under gravity are presented for multiphase three dimensional flow in heterogeneous porous media. The authors acknowledge funding from Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER grant number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  4. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part III: model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Based on conventional mass transfer models developed for oxygen, the use of the non-linear ASCE method, 2-point method, and one parameter linear-regression method were evaluated for carbon dioxide stripping data. For values of KLaCO2 down at higher values of KLaCO2. How to correct KLaCO2 for gas phase enrichment remains to be determined. The one-parameter linear regression model was used to vary the C*CO2 over the test, but it did not result in a better fit to the experimental data when compared to the ASCE or fixed C*CO2 assumptions.

  5. Model validation studies of solar systems, Phase III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, L.J.; Winn, C.B.

    1978-12-01

    Results obtained from a validation study of the TRNSYS, SIMSHAC, and SOLCOST solar system simulation and design are presented. Also included are comparisons between the FCHART and SOLCOST solar system design programs and some changes that were made to the SOLCOST program. Finally, results obtained from the analysis of several solar radiation models are presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for ten papers.

  6. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  7. Computer - based modeling in extract sciences research -III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular modeling techniques have been of great applicability in the study of the biological sciences and other exact science fields like agriculture, mathematics, computer science and the like. In this write up, a list of computer programs for predicting, for instance, the structure of proteins has been provided. Discussions on ...

  8. Improving Hybrid III injury assessment in steering wheel rim to chest impacts using responses from finite element Hybrid III and human body model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Kristian; Davidsson, Johan; Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Rundberget, Peter; Svensson, Mats Y; Thorn, Stefan; Törnvall, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to improve the quality of injury risk assessments in steering wheel rim to chest impacts when using the Hybrid III crash test dummy in frontal heavy goods vehicle (HGV) collision tests. Correction factors for chest injury criteria were calculated as the model chest injury parameter ratios between finite element (FE) Hybrid III, evaluated in relevant load cases, and the Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS). This is proposed to be used to compensate Hybrid III measurements in crash tests where steering wheel rim to chest impacts occur. The study was conducted in an FE environment using an FE-Hybrid III model and the THUMS. Two impactor shapes were used, a circular hub and a long, thin horizontal bar. Chest impacts at velocities ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 m/s were simulated at 3 impact height levels. A ratio between FE-Hybrid III and THUMS chest injury parameters, maximum chest compression C max, and maximum viscous criterion VC max, were calculated for the different chest impact conditions to form a set of correction factors. The definition of the correction factor is based on the assumption that the response from a circular hub impact to the middle of the chest is well characterized and that injury risk measures are independent of impact height. The current limits for these chest injury criteria were used as a basis to develop correction factors that compensate for the limitations in biofidelity of the Hybrid III in steering wheel rim to chest impacts. The hub and bar impactors produced considerably higher C max and VC max responses in the THUMS compared to the FE-Hybrid III. The correction factor for the responses of the FE-Hybrid III showed that the criteria responses for the bar impactor were consistently overestimated. Ratios based on Hybrid III and THUMS responses provided correction factors for the Hybrid III responses ranging from 0.84 to 0.93. These factors can be used to estimate C max and VC max values when the Hybrid III is

  9. Asymmetric Gepner models III. B-L lifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-06-21

    In the same spirit as heterotic weight lifting, B-L lifting is a way of replacing the superfluous and ubiquitous U(1){sub B-L} with something else with the same modular properties, but different conformal weights and ground state dimensions. This method works in principle for all variants of (2,2) constructions, such as orbifolds, Calabi-Yau manifolds, free bosons and fermions and Gepner models, since it only modifies the universal SO(10)xE{sub 8} part of the CFT. However, it can only yield chiral spectra if the 'internal' sector of the theory provides a simple current of order 5. Here we apply this new method to Gepner models. Including exceptional invariants, 86 of them have the required order 5 simple current, and 69 of these yield chiral spectra. Three family spectra occur abundantly.

  10. Adiabatic analysis of collisions. III. Remarks on the spin model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of a spin-rotation model illustrates how transitions between adiabatic channel states stem from the second, rather than from the first, rate of change of these states, provided that appropriate identification of channels and scaling of the independent variable are used. These remarks, like the earlier development of a post-adiabatic approach, aim at elucidating the surprising success of approximate separation of variables in the treatment of complex mechanical systems

  11. A global magnetic topology model for magnetic clouds. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    In two previous papers, we presented a global model for the analysis of magnetic clouds (MCs), where the three components of the magnetic field were fitted to the corresponding Geocentric Solar Ecliptic experimental data, obtaining reliable information, for example, about the orientation of these events in the interplanetary medium. That model, due to its non-force-free character, (∇p ≠ 0), could be extended to determine the plasma behavior. In the present work, we develop that extension, now including the plasma behavior inside the cloud through the analysis of the plasma pressure, and define a fitting procedure where the pressure and the magnetic field components are fitted simultaneously. After deducing the magnetic field topology and the current density components of the model, we calculate the expression of the pressure tensor and, in particular, its trace. In light of the results, we conclude that incorporating the plasma behavior in the analysis of the MCs can give us a better scenario in which to understand the physical mechanisms involved in the evolution of such magnetic structures in the interplanetary medium.

  12. Some five-dimensional Bianchi type-iii string cosmological models in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, G.C.; Biswal, S.K.; Mohanty, G.; Rameswarpatna, Bhubaneswar

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we have constructed some five-dimensional Bianchi type-III cosmological models in general relativity when source of gravitational field is a massive string. We obtained different classes of solutions by considering different functional forms of metric potentials. It is also observed that one of the models is not physically acceptable and the other models possess big-bang singularity. The physical and kinematical behaviors of the models are discussed

  13. The joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure: development and cross-validation of a six-factor model of cognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Price, Larry R

    2003-06-01

    During the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (3rd ed.; WMS-III) the participants in the normative study completed both scales. This "co-norming" methodology set the stage for full integration of the 2 tests and the development of an expanded structure of cognitive functioning. Until now, however, the WAIS-III and WMS-III had not been examined together in a factor analytic study. This article presents a series of confirmatory factor analyses to determine the joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure. Using a structural equation modeling approach, a 6-factor model that included verbal, perceptual, processing speed, working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory constructs provided the best model fit to the data. Allowing select subtests to load simultaneously on 2 factors improved model fit and indicated that some subtests are multifaceted. The results were then replicated in a large cross-validation sample (N = 858).

  14. Computer modelling of the chemical speciation of Americium (III) in human body fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Shu-bin; Lei, Jia-rong; Wang, He-yi; Zhong, Zhi-jing; Yang, Yong; Du, Yang

    2008-01-01

    A multi-phase equilibrium model consisted of multi-metal ion and low molecular mass ligands in human body fluid has been constructed to discuss the speciation of Am 3+ in gastric juice, sweat, interstitial fluid, intracellular fluid and urine of human body, respectively. Computer simulations indicated that the major Am(III)P Species were Am 3+ , [Am Cl] 2+ and [AmH 2 PO 4 ] 2+ at pH 4 became dominant with higher pH value when [Am] = 1 x 10 -7 mol/L in gastric juice model and percentage of AmPO 4 increased with [Am]. in sweat system, Am(III) existed with soluble species at pH 4.2∼pH 7.5 when [Am] = 1 x 10 -7 mol/L and Am(III) existed with Am 3+ and [Am OH] 2+ at pH 6.5 when [Am] -10 mol/L or [Am] > 5 x 10 -8 mol/L . With addition of EDTA, the Am(III) existed with soluble [Am EDTA] - whereas the Am(III) existed with insoluble AmPO 4 when [Am] > 1 x 10 -12 mol/L at interstitial fluid. The major Am(III) species was AmPO 4 at pH 7.0 and [Am]=4 x 10 -12 mol/L in intracellular fluid, which implied Am(III) represented strong cell toxicity. The percentage of Am(III) soluble species increased at lower pH hinted that the Am(III), in the form of aerosol, ingested by macrophage, could released into interstitial fluid and bring strong toxicity to skeleton system. The soluble Am(III) species was dominant when pH 4 when pH > 4.5 when [Am] = 1 x 10 -10 Pmol/L in human urine, so it was favorable to excrete Am(III) from kidney by taking acid materials. (author)

  15. Control volume based modelling of compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Thomsen, Per Grove; Carlsen, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum applied to a staggered mesh consisting of two overlapping strings of control volumes. Loss mechanisms can be included directly in the governing equations of models by including them as terms in the conservation laws. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects must be calculated using empirical correlations; correlations for steady state flow can be used as an approximation. A transformation that assumes ideal gas is presented for transforming equations for masses and energies in control volumes into the corresponding pressures and temperatures...

  16. Projective limits of state spaces III. Toy-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanéry, Suzanne; Thiemann, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    In this series of papers, we investigate the projective framework initiated by Kijowski (1977) and Okołów (2009, 2014, 2013) [1,2], which describes the states of a quantum theory as projective families of density matrices. A short reading guide to the series can be found in Lanéry (2016). A strategy to implement the dynamics in this formalism was presented in our first paper Lanéry and Thiemann (2017) (see also Lanéry, 2016, section 4), which we now test in two simple toy-models. The first one is a very basic linear model, meant as an illustration of the general procedure, and we will only discuss it at the classical level. In the second one, we reformulate the Schrödinger equation, treated as a classical field theory, within this projective framework, and proceed to its (non-relativistic) second quantization. We are then able to reproduce the physical content of the usual Fock quantization.

  17. Modeling of piezoelectric devices with the finite volume method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolborici, Valentin; Dawson, Francis; Pugh, Mary

    2010-07-01

    A partial differential equation (PDE) model for the dynamics of a thin piezoelectric plate in an electric field is presented. This PDE model is discretized via the finite volume method (FVM), resulting in a system of coupled ordinary differential equations. A static analysis and an eigenfrequency analysis are done with results compared with those provided by a commercial finite element (FEM) package. We find that fewer degrees of freedom are needed with the FVM model to reach a specified degree of accuracy. This suggests that the FVM model, which also has the advantage of an intuitive interpretation in terms of electrical circuits, may be a better choice in control situations.

  18. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  19. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idol, Rachel A; Wozniak, David F; Fujiwara, Hideji; Yuede, Carla M; Ory, Daniel S; Kornfeld, Stuart; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II) or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β), while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ). Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  20. Thermodynamic model for solution behavior and solid-liquid equilibrium in Na-Al(III)-Fe(III)-Cr(III)-Cl-H2O system at 25°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Laurent; Christov, Christomir; Lassin, Arnault; Azaroual, Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic behavior of multicomponent aqueous electrolyte systems is of main interest in geo-, and environmental-sciences. The main objective of this study is the development of a high accuracy thermodynamic model for solution behavior, and highly soluble M(III)Cl3(s) (M= Al, Fe, Cr) minerals solubility in Na-Al(III)-Cr(III)-Fe(III)-Cl-H2O system at 25°C. Comprehensive thermodynamic models that accurately predict aluminium, chromium and iron aqueous chemistry and M(III) mineral solubilities as a function of pH, solution composition and concentration are critical for understanding many important geochemical and environmental processes involving these metals (e.g., mineral dissolution/alteration, rock formation, changes in rock permeability and fluid flow, soil formation, mass transport, toxic M(III) remediation). Such a model would also have many industrial applications (e.g., aluminium, chromium and iron production, and their corrosion, solve scaling problems in geothermal energy and oil production). Comparisons of solubility and activity calculations with the experimental data in binary and ternary systems indicate that model predictions are within the uncertainty of the data. Limitations of the model due to data insufficiencies are discussed. The solubility modeling approach, implemented to the Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. The resulting parameterization was developed for the geochemical Pitzer formalism based PHREEQC database.

  1. Atomistic models of amorphous polybutadienes; 3 -- Static free volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, S.; Mattice, W.L. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Inst. of Polymer Science

    1993-12-20

    Atomistic models of polybutadiene have been generated using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics at a bulk density of 0.89 g cm{sup {minus}3}. Four microstructures formed by cis-1,4-polybutadiene, trans-1,4-polybutadiene, 1,2-polybutadiene, and a random copolymer of the three (55% trans, 35% cis, and 10% vinyl) are analyzed for static free volume. The free volume is determined by hard spherical probes that see the atoms as hard spheres of radii which equal 89% of their van der Waals radii. The total free volume, the free volume distribution, and the shape of the voids are analyzed for all four microstructures. The accessible free volume as a function of the probe size is found to be characteristic of voids in disordered packings of hard spheres. The free volume distributions have some common features across the microstructures. In particular, the free volume distributions as probed by a 1-{angstrom} radius probe show void size concentrations around {approximately}7.5 and 15 {angstrom}{sup 3} (with the exception of trans-polybutadiene, which does not display the latter). The shape factors for all four structures decay to the same asymptotic value of 0.67 {+-} 0.1 over the size range of 0--5 {angstrom}{sup 3}. There is a marked difference in the asphericity and the acylindricity of voids in the four microstructures. Analysis of randomly generated shapes suggests that the voids in the polymer microstructures are mostly elongated in comparison with randomly ``grown`` cavities, probably due to the connectivity of the polymer chains.

  2. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 3. Appendix on service and fuel demands. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    This book is the third volume of the ISTUM report. The first volume of the report describes the primary model logic and the model's data inputs. The second volume lists and evaluates the results of one model run. This and the fourth volume give supplementary information in two sets of model data - the energy consumption base and technology descriptions. Chapter III of Vol. I, Book 1 describes the ISTUM demand base and explains how that demand base was developed. This volume serves as a set of appendices to that chapter. The chapter on demands in Vol. I describes the assumptions and methodology used in constructing the ISTUM demand base; this volume simply lists tables of data from that demand base. This book divides the demand tables into two appendices. Appendix III-1 contains detailed tables on ISTUM fuel-consumption estimates, service-demand forecasts, and size and load-factor distributions. Appendix III-2 contains tables detailing ISTUM allocations of each industry's fuel consumption to service sectors. The tables show how the ECDB was used to develop the ISTUM demand base.

  3. Evaluating FACES III and the Circumplex Model: 2,440 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R G; Harris, R N; Forte, J A; Robinson, M

    1991-03-01

    Previous evaluations of the Circumplex Model's curvilinear hypothesis using FACES instruments have yielded conflicting results. A review of the different research procedures and samples used in those investigations revealed that none of the studies had samples large and/or heterogenous enough to test the curvilinear hypothesis adequately. The present study evaluates the curvilinear hypothesis of family functioning and the concurrent validity of FACES III with a sample of optimal size (N = 2,440 families) and diversity. The lack of support for the curvilinear hypothesis in this "greenhouse" sample is explained by different findings for the two FACES III subscales. There was no relationship between the study's measures of well-being and the adaptability subscale and a linear relationship between these measures and the cohesion subscale. Implications of these findings for the continuing use of the FACES III and for the Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems are discussed.

  4. Model documentation: Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System; Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-02-24

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is a component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. This report documents the archived version of NGTDM that was used to produce the natural gas forecasts used in support of the Annual Energy Outlook 1994, DOE/EIA-0383(94). The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. It is intended to fulfill the legal obligation of the EIA to provide adequate documentation in support of its models (Public Law 94-385, Section 57.b.2). This report represents Volume 1 of a two-volume set. (Volume 2 will report on model performance, detailing convergence criteria and properties, results of sensitivity testing, comparison of model outputs with the literature and/or other model results, and major unresolved issues.) Subsequent chapters of this report provide: (1) an overview of the NGTDM (Chapter 2); (2) a description of the interface between the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and the NGTDM (Chapter 3); (3) an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM (Chapter 4); (4) the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module (Chapter 5); (5) the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module (Chapter 6); (6) the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module (Chapter 7); (7) the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module (Chapter 8); and (8) a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs (Chapter 9).

  5. Concentrated Language Encounter Instruction Model III in Reading and Creative Writing Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promnont, Piyapong; Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2015-01-01

    The research is aimed to study the development of eleventh grade students' reading, creative writing abilities, satisfaction taught through the concentrated language encounter instruction method, CLE model III. One experimental group time series design was used, and the data was analyzed by MANOVA with repeated measures, t-test for one-group…

  6. Tilted Bianchi Type III Wet Dark Fluid Cosmological Model in Saez and Ballester Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Subrata Kumar; Kantila, Endale Nigatu; Gebru, Dawit Melese

    2016-01-01

    Tilted Bianchi-III wet dark fluid cosmological model is investigated in the frame work of Saez and Ballester theory (Phys. Lett. A. 113:467, 1986). Exact solutions to the field equations are derived when the metric potentials are functions of cosmic time only. Some physical and geometrical properties of the solutions are also discussed.

  7. MODEL PERUBAHAN VOLUME KERIPIK BUAH SELAMA PROSES PENGGORENGAN SECARA VAKUM [Model for Volume Changes in Fruit Chips during Vacuum Frying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaluddin1*

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Expansion and puffing are specific characteristics of fried products critical for consumer preferences. To obtain expanded and puffed dried products that fit well with consumer acceptance criteria, it is necessary to pay attention to the process conditions which change the raw material characteristics during frying. The important changes include volume and density ratio of the products during frying. Hypothetically, these changes are due to water vaporization and the decrease dry matter in the products. The objective of this research is to develop a mathematical model of volume and density ratio changes for jack fruit during vacuum frying as a function of water and starch content reductions. Samples were vacuum fried at 70–100OC and pressure of 80-90 kPa for 15–60 min. The parameters observed were volume and density as well as water and starch contents of samples before and after vacuum frying. The results showed that the developed model can be used to predict changes in volume and density ratio of jack fruit during vacuum frying.

  8. Thermodynamic model for solution behavior and solid-liquid equilibrium in Na-Al(III-Fe(III-Cr(III-Cl-H2O system at 25°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Laurent

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the thermodynamic behavior of multicomponent aqueous electrolyte systems is of main interest in geo-, and environmental-sciences. The main objective of this study is the development of a high accuracy thermodynamic model for solution behavior, and highly soluble M(IIICl3(s (M= Al, Fe, Cr minerals solubility in Na-Al(III-Cr(III-Fe(III-Cl-H2O system at 25°C. Comprehensive thermodynamic models that accurately predict aluminium, chromium and iron aqueous chemistry and M(III mineral solubilities as a function of pH, solution composition and concentration are critical for understanding many important geochemical and environmental processes involving these metals (e.g., mineral dissolution/alteration, rock formation, changes in rock permeability and fluid flow, soil formation, mass transport, toxic M(III remediation. Such a model would also have many industrial applications (e.g., aluminium, chromium and iron production, and their corrosion, solve scaling problems in geothermal energy and oil production. Comparisons of solubility and activity calculations with the experimental data in binary and ternary systems indicate that model predictions are within the uncertainty of the data. Limitations of the model due to data insufficiencies are discussed. The solubility modeling approach, implemented to the Pitzer specific interaction equations is employed. The resulting parameterization was developed for the geochemical Pitzer formalism based PHREEQC database.

  9. Type III intermittency: a nonlinear dynamic model of EEG burst suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae-Grant, A D; Kim, Y W

    1994-01-01

    Burst suppression electroencephalograms from 9 comatose patients have been studied using nonlinear dynamic techniques. These EEG records show many dynamical features characteristic of nonlinear systems, including sensitive dependence on initial conditions, self-organization, similarity across scales, and intermittency. Histograms of burst durations showed an asymmetric distribution with a decreasing tail of increasing duration. Interpreting the histograms from the standpoint of intermittency classifications of iterated dynamical maps, the absence of any conspicuous maximal cut-off duration suggests a type III intermittency. The power-law exponent of the decreasing tail is -3/2 for type III intermittency in the large scale sample size limit, and we have found the EEGs to be consistent with type III intermittency behavior. We have also developed a nonlinear algorithm which models burst suppression pattern based on a low dimensional return map. Burst suppression pattern appears to be the constrained activity of a nonlinear dynamical system at the transition to chaos.

  10. A novel model surgery technique for LeFort III advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachiramon, Amornpong; Yen, Stephen L-K; Lypka, Michael; Bindignavale, Vijay; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey; Reinisch, John; Urata, Mark M

    2007-09-01

    Current techniques for model surgery and occlusal splint fabrication lack the ability to mark, measure and plan the position of the orbital rim for LeFort III and Monobloc osteotomies. This report describes a model surgery technique for planning the three dimensional repositioning of the orbital rims. Dual orbital pointers were used to mark the infraorbital rim during the facebow transfer. These pointer positions were transferred onto the surgical models in order to follow splint-determined movements. Case reports are presented to illustrate how the model surgery technique was used to differentiate the repositioning of the orbital rim from the occlusal correction in single segment and combined LeFort III/LeFort I osteotomies.

  11. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume III.- Extremadura; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles Volumen III.- Extremadura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millam, R.; Schmid, T.; Roquero, C.; Magister, M.

    1998-12-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography is very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidad Autonoma de Extremadura. (Author) 50 refs.

  12. Air quality and climate change, Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia Phase III (MICS-Asia III) - Part 1: Overview and model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Zirui; Li, Meng; Xin, Jinyuan; Tao, Zhining; Li, Jiawei; Kang, Jeong-Eon; Huang, Kan; Dong, Xinyi; Zhuang, Bingliang; Li, Shu; Ge, Baozhu; Wu, Qizhong; Cheng, Yafang; Wang, Yuesi; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Fu, Joshua S.; Wang, Tijian; Chin, Mian; Woo, Jung-Hun; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2018-04-01

    Topic 3 of the Model Inter-Comparison Study for Asia (MICS-Asia) Phase III examines how online coupled air quality models perform in simulating high aerosol pollution in the North China Plain region during wintertime haze events and evaluates the importance of aerosol radiative and microphysical feedbacks. A comprehensive overview of the MICS-Asia III Topic 3 study design, including descriptions of participating models and model inputs, the experimental designs, and results of model evaluation, are presented. Six modeling groups from China, Korea and the United States submitted results from seven applications of online coupled chemistry-meteorology models. Results are compared to meteorology and air quality measurements, including data from the Campaign on Atmospheric Aerosol Research Network of China (CARE-China) and the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). The correlation coefficients between the multi-model ensemble mean and the CARE-China observed near-surface air pollutants range from 0.51 to 0.94 (0.51 for ozone and 0.94 for PM2.5) for January 2010. However, large discrepancies exist between simulated aerosol chemical compositions from different models. The coefficient of variation (SD divided by the mean) can reach above 1.3 for sulfate in Beijing and above 1.6 for nitrate and organic aerosols in coastal regions, indicating that these compositions are less consistent from different models. During clean periods, simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs) from different models are similar, but peak values differ during severe haze events, which can be explained by the differences in simulated inorganic aerosol concentrations and the hygroscopic growth efficiency (affected by varied relative humidity). These differences in composition and AOD suggest that future models can be improved by including new heterogeneous or aqueous pathways for sulfate and nitrate formation under hazy conditions, a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation chemical

  13. Modelling and Simulation of Volume Controlled Mechanical Ventilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume controlled mechanical ventilation system is a typical time-delay system, which is applied to ventilate patients who cannot breathe adequately on their own. To illustrate the influences of key parameters of the ventilator on the dynamics of the ventilated respiratory system, this paper firstly derived a new mathematical model of the ventilation system; secondly, simulation and experimental results are compared to verify the mathematical model; lastly, the influences of key parameters of ventilator on the dynamics of the ventilated respiratory system are carried out. This study can be helpful in the VCV ventilation treatment and respiratory diagnostics.

  14. Development of modelling and forecasting in geology. (Volume 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, J.J.; Fourniguet, J.; Peaudecerf, P.

    1990-01-01

    To access the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems, validation of predictive models is essential and large efforts should be given to barriers, particularly geologic barriers. This work appears in the form of four volumes, the subject of the second part is described below. HERODE (calculation of relief altitude under erosion process from 0 to 100000 years) is a weathering and erosion computerized simulation. The model describes materials and rocks transport and also substratum weathering process. FORTRAN 77 is the software language. 31 figs., 6 tabs., 40 refs

  15. Suited and Unsuited Hybrid III Impact Testing and Finite Element Model Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C.; Somers, J. T.; Baldwin, M. A.; Wells, J. A.; Newby, N.; Currie, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA spacecraft design requirements for occupant protection are a combination of the Brinkley Dynamic Response Criteria and injury assessment reference values (IARV) extracted from anthropomorphic test devices (ATD). For the ATD IARVs, the requirements specify the use of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the 95th percentile male Hybrid III. Each of these ATDs is required to be fitted with an articulating pelvis (also known as the aerospace pelvis) and a straight spine. The articulating pelvis is necessary for the ATD to fit into spacecraft seats, while the straight spine is required as injury metrics for vertical accelerations are better defined for this configuration. Sled testing of the Hybrid III 5th Percentile Female Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) was performed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WAPFB). Two 5th Percentile ATDs were tested, the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) and NASA owned Hybrid III ATDs with aerospace pelvises. Testing was also conducted with a NASA-owned 95th Percentile Male Hybrid III with aerospace pelvis at WPAFB. Testing was performed using an Orion seat prototype provided by Johnson Space Center (JSC). A 5-point harness comprised of 2 inch webbing was also provided by JSC. For suited runs, a small and extra-large Advanced Crew Escape System (ACES) suit and helmet were also provided by JSC. Impact vectors were combined frontal/spinal and rear/lateral. Some pure spinal and rear axis testing was also performed for model validation. Peak accelerations ranged between 15 and 20-g. This range was targeted because the ATD responses fell close to the IARV defined in the Human-Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) document. Rise times varied between 70 and 110 ms to assess differences in ATD responses and model correlation for different impact energies. The purpose of the test series was to evaluate the Hybrid III ATD models in Orion-specific landing orientations both with and without a spacesuit. The results of these tests were used

  16. Field Surveys, IOC Valleys. Volume III, Part II. Cultural Resources Survey, Pine and Wah Wah Valleys, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    others), cacti, especially prickly pear ( Opuntia basilaris and others), saltbrush (Atriplex canescens), shadscale Ert r E-TR-48- III-II 17 (Atriplex...supplies were depleted by the settlers through plowing and hunting, and the slave trade, disease , and indentured servitude to the Mormons decimated the

  17. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME III: LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: NASHUA CORPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume discusses Nashua Corporation's Omaha facility, a label and label stock manufacturing facility that no longer uses solvent-based adhesives. Information obtained includes issues related to the technical, economic, and environmental barriers and opportunities associated ...

  18. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, James; Hays, David; Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  19. Modeling of deformation phenomena in volume label during its operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Sheludko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BIt was considered in the article the research of physical and mechanical properties of materials based on PVC film ORACAL and RITRAMA that used in the production of volume labels. In particular, it was shown the changes of dependences between linear deformation of printed and unprinted films and the value of stress with regard to their minimum and maximum values. It was also established that deformation properties of the films are different in the transverse and longitudinal directions, which should be considered when producing labels. It was conducted the modeling of stress-strain state of volume label when gluing it to the surfaces of various shapes. We considered the boundary conditions for displacement and stress of labels layer components with regard to the chemical structure of epoxy resins and their physical and mechanical characteristics.

  20. Regulatory activity based risk model identifies survival of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Dong, Chuanpeng; Wang, Xing; Hou, Guojun; Zheng, Yu; Xu, Huilin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Liu, Lei

    2017-11-17

    Clinical and pathological indicators are inadequate for prognosis of stage II and III colorectal carcinoma (CRC). In this study, we utilized the activity of regulatory factors, univariate Cox regression and random forest for variable selection and developed a multivariate Cox model to predict the overall survival of Stage II/III colorectal carcinoma in GSE39582 datasets (469 samples). Patients in low-risk group showed a significant longer overall survival and recurrence-free survival time than those in high-risk group. This finding was further validated in five other independent datasets (GSE14333, GSE17536, GSE17537, GSE33113, and GSE37892). Besides, associations between clinicopathological information and risk score were analyzed. A nomogram including risk score was plotted to facilitate the utilization of risk score. The risk score model is also demonstrated to be effective on predicting both overall and recurrence-free survival of chemotherapy received patients. After performing Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) between high and low risk groups, we found that several cell-cell interaction KEGG pathways were identified. Funnel plot results showed that there was no publication bias in these datasets. In summary, by utilizing the regulatory activity in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma, the risk score successfully predicts the survival of 1021 stage II/III CRC patients in six independent datasets.

  1. A comparison of low volume, Draize and in vitro eye irritation test data. III. Surfactant-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, S D; Lordo, R A; Feder, P I; Hintze, K L

    1998-03-01

    The third phase in a series of investigations of the relationship between low volume eye test (LVET) data, Draize eye irritation test data, and comparable data from in vitro assay protocols is presented. These investigations utilize Draize eye test and in vitro endpoint data generated previously as part of the CTFA Evaluation of Alternatives Program. LVET data were generated de novo using the same 25 representative surfactant-based personal-care formulations. In general, these formulations were minimally to moderately irritating. The linear correlation between maximum average score as determined by the Draize test (MAS) and the LVET (LVET-MAS) was 0.87; LVET-MAS values were typically about 30% lower then corresponding MAS values. Comparison of in vitro assay performance with that of the LVET was determined by statistical analysis of the relationship between LVET-MAS and in vitro endpoint. Regression modelling was the primary means of enabling such a comparison, the objective being to predict LVET-MAS for a given test material (and to place upper and lower prediction bounds on the range in which the LVET-MAS is anticipated to fall with high probability) based on observation of an in vitro score for that material. The degree of 95% confidence in prediction is quantified in terms of the relative widths of prediction intervals constructed about the fitted regression curves. Twenty in vitro endpoints were shown to have the greatest agreement with the LVET (these endpoints included those with low discordance rates relative to the Draize test) and were therefore selected for regression modelling. Although prediction interval widths tended to be narrower when predicting LVET-MAS compared with predicting MAS, the confidence with which the selected in vitro endpoints predicted both LVET-MAS and MAS for surfactant-based formulations was greatest when values were close to the lower or upper limits of the observed irritation range (i.e. 95% prediction interval widths were most

  2. NATO Reference Mobility Model (NRMM) Modeling of the DEMO III Experimental Unmanned Ground Vehicle (XUV)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vong, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Weapons Concepts Branch, Army Research Laboratory (ARL), was asked to assess and evaluate the predicted cross-country performance of the current DEMO III Experimental Unmanned Ground Vehicle (XUV...

  3. EPR-based material modelling of soils considering volume changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Asaad; Javadi, Akbar A.; Alani, Amir M.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper an approach is presented for developing material models for soils based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), taking into account its volumetric behaviour. EPR is a recently developed hybrid data mining technique that searches for structured mathematical equations (representing the behaviour of a system) using genetic algorithm and the least squares method. Stress-strain data from triaxial test are used to train and develop EPR-based material models for soil. The developed models are compared with some of the well known conventional material models. In particular, the capability of the developed EPR models in predicting volume change behaviour of soils is illustrated. It is also shown that the developed EPR-based material models can be incorporated in finite element (FE) analysis. Two geotechnical examples are presented to verify the developed EPR-based FE model (EPR-FEM). The results of the EPR-FEM are compared with those of a standard FEM where conventional constitutive models are used to describe the material behaviour. The results show that EPR-FEM can be successfully employed to analyse geotechnical engineering problems. The advantages of the proposed EPR models are highlighted.

  4. Analysis of modeling cumulative noise from simultaneous flights volume 1 : analysis at four national parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    This is the first of two volumes of the report on modeling cumulative noise from simultaneous flights. This volume includes: an overview of the time compression algorithms used to model simultaneous aircraft; revised summary of a preliminary study (w...

  5. Assessment of the hybrid propagation model, Volume 1: Analysis of noise propagation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    This is the first of two volumes of a report on the Hybrid Propagation Model (HPM), an advanced prediction model for aviation noise propagation. This volume presents the noise level predictions for eleven different sets of propagation conditions, run...

  6. School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study-III: Volume I: School Food Service, School Food Environment, and Meals Offered and Served.

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Gordon; Mary Kay Crepinsek; Renée Nogales; Elizabeth Condon

    2007-01-01

    SNDA-III provides detailed information on the operation of school meal programs, the school environment that affects these programs, the nutrient content of school meals, and the contribution of school meals to students’ diets. Mathematica collected data for the study during school year 2004-2005 from a nationally representative sample of districts, schools, and students. This summary report notes that in a typical week, more than 70 percent of schools served meals that met standards for key ...

  7. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume III. Estuaries and coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupka, R.C.; Sharma, R.K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 32 power plants, located on estuaries and coastal waters has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV

  8. Survey of fish impingement at power plants in the United States. Volume III. Estuaries and coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupka, Richard C.; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    1977-03-01

    Impingement of fish at cooling-water intakes of 32 power plants, located on estuaries and coastal waters has been surveyed and data are presented. Descriptions of site, plant, and intake design and operation are provided. Reports in this volume summarize impingement data for individual plants in tabular and histogram formats. Information was available from differing sources such as the utilities themselves, public documents, regulatory agencies, and others. Thus, the extent of detail in the reports varies greatly from plant to plant. Histogram preparation involved an extrapolation procedure that has inadequacies. The reader is cautioned in the use of information presented in this volume to determine intake-design acceptability or intensity of impacts on ecosystems. No conclusions are presented herein; data comparisons are made in Volume IV.

  9. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume III: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    This volume contains information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the six options described in Volume 1, Section 2: Option 1 -- Total removal clean closure; No subsequent use; Option 2 -- Risk-based clean closure; LLW fill; Option 3 -- Risk-based clean closure; CERCLA fill; Option 4 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; LLW fill; Option 5 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; CERCLA fill; and Option 6 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; Clean fill. This volume is divided into two portions. The first portion contains the cost and planning schedule estimates while the second portion contains life-cycle costs and yearly cash flow information for each option

  10. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peiming; Wilson, Leslie L.; Wesolowski, David J.; Rosenqvist, Joergen; Anderko, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO 2 has been determined at 80 deg. C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl 2+ ) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH 2+ , Mo(OH) 2 + , and Mo(OH) 3 0 ) in addition to the Mo 3+ ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  11. Bianchi Type-III Cosmological Models in Lyra's Geometry in the Presence of Massive Scalar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. K.; Rani, Sarita

    2015-02-01

    Spatially homogeneous and totally anisotropic Bianchi type-III cosmological models in the theory based on Lyra's geometry in Gauss normal gauge in the presence of an attractive massive scalar field have been investigated. To get the deterministic model in terms of cosmic time, it has been assumed that the expansion scalar Θ in the models is proportional to the shear scalar σ. Two models, one with variable deceleration parameter and another with constant deceleration parameter have been discussed. To discuss the model with constant deceleration parameter, we have used the special law of variation for Hubble's parameter proposed by (Berman Nuovo Cimento 74B, 184, 1983). The physical and geometrical properties of the models have been discussed. The energy conditions of the models are verified. It has been concluded that one of the universe models approaches to isotropy through the evolution of the universe, in some special cases.

  12. Modeling of Cementitious Representative Volume Element with Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzamanian, M. M.; Basirun, W. J.

    CEMHYD3D has been employed to simulate the representative volume element (RVE) of cementitious systems (Type I cement) containing fly ash (Class F) through a voxel-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. Three-dimensional microstructures composed of voxels are generated for a heterogeneous cementitious material consisting of various constituent phases. The primary focus is to simulate a cementitious RVE containing fly ash and to present the homogenized macromechanical properties obtained from its analysis. Simple kinematic uniform boundary conditions as well as periodic boundary conditions were imposed on the RVE to obtain the principal and shear moduli. Our current work considers the effect of fly ash percentage on the elastic properties based on the mass and volume replacements. RVEs with lengths of 50, 100 and 200μm at different degrees of hydration are generated, and the elastic properties are modeled and simulated. In general, the elastic properties of a cementitious RVE with fly ash replacement for cement based on mass and volume differ from each other. Moreover, the finite element (FE) mesh density effect is studied. Results indicate that mechanical properties decrease with increasing mesh density.

  13. Homogenization in the Modelling of Volume-Controlled Elastic Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The background for this article is the question of modification of the geometric configuration of an elastic structure by means of 'volume'-type actuation. In this actuation mode stresses are applied to the elastic body by injection/extraction of a fluid into, or from, a large number of vacuoles in the elastic 'matrix' material. Previous articles by the author, and others, have examined this process and studied its effectiveness in the context of a 'naive' continuous model. The present paper develops modified models in the two-dimensional case by applying the 'multiple scales' homogenization method to elastic bodies with increasingly small and numerous vacuoles arranged in a rectangularly periodic structure. The process leads to a modification of the naive model potentially useful in future elastic system control research

  14. Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Ma, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long slim body aircraft with pronounced aero-servo-elastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics; leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics as well as the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

  15. Molecular model of a type III secretion system needle: Implications for host-cell sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Janet E; Roversi, Pietro; Cordes, Frank S; Johnson, Steven; Kenjale, Roma; Daniell, Sarah; Booy, Frank; Picking, William D; Picking, Wendy L; Blocker, Ariel J; Lea, Susan M

    2006-08-15

    Type III secretion systems are essential virulence determinants for many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The type III secretion system consists of cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and extracellular domains. The extracellular domain is a hollow needle protruding above the bacterial surface and is held within a basal body that traverses both bacterial membranes. Effector proteins are translocated, via this external needle, directly into host cells, where they subvert normal cell functions to aid infection. Physical contact with host cells initiates secretion and leads to formation of a pore, thought to be contiguous with the needle channel, in the host-cell membrane. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Shigella flexneri needle subunit MxiH and a complete model for the needle assembly built into our three-dimensional EM reconstruction. The model, combined with mutagenesis data, reveals that signaling of host-cell contact is relayed through the needle via intersubunit contacts and suggests a mode of binding for a tip complex.

  16. High-field EPR investigations of Mn(III)Mn(IV) and Mn(II)Mn(III) states of dimanganese catalase and related model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutloff, Christian; Schäfer, Kai-Oliver; Sinnecker, Sebastian; Barynin, Vladimir; Bittl, Robert; Wieghardt, Karl; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    Multi-frequency EPR experiments at 9, 34 and 94 GHz are reported on the antiferromagnetically coupled mixed valence Mn(II)Mn(III) complex of manganese catalase and on several dinuclear manganese model systems. They are compared with similar experiments obtained earlier for the Mn(III)Mn(IV) states. It is demonstrated how accurate information on the G- and 55Mn hyperfine tensors can be derived from this approach. Furthermore, the effect of oxidation state, planarity of the manganese-oxygen core and the type of ligands bridging the manganese ions on the magnetic resonance parameters and the related electronic structure is investigated. 'Broken-symmetry' density functional calculations on two Mn(III)Mn(IV) complexes, including the superoxidized state of the catalase, are presented. The agreement between calculated and experimental EPR parameters and complex geometries is remarkably good. Implications of these results for the structure and function of the dimanganese catalase are discussed. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  17. String cloud cosmologies for Bianchi type-III models with electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, S. K.; Sahu, S. K.; Routray, T. R.

    2008-06-01

    The Saez-Ballester field equations for spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III cosmological models have been solved for pure geometric cosmic string cloud pervading the universe either in the absence or in presence of electromagnetic field. It has been established here that the model does not survive for geometric cosmic string cloud pervading the universe when there is no electromagnetic field. But in presence of electromagnetic field the model can have plausible solutions fostering the idea that strings forming the surface of the world sheet have to co-exist with electromagnetic field.

  18. OPTIMASI PEMILIHAN LOKASI FASILITAS PENGOLAHAN LIMBAH ELEKTRONIK (E-WASTE DI INDONESIA DENGAN MODEL ELECTRE III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertiwi Andarani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limbah elektronik adalah masalah yang muncul di Indonesia karena mengandung bahan yang berpotensi berbahaya. Dalam rangka menciptakan manajemen yang ramah lingkungan dari limbah elektronik, fasilitas yang memadai diperlukan. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk memilih lokasi yang optimal untuk mengembangkan fasilitas pengolahan limbah elektronik (FLPE. Pemilihan lokasi yang optimal dilakukan dengan menggunakan metode model ELECTRE III. ELECTRE adalah keluarga metode analisis keputusan multi-kriteria yang berasal di Eropa. Kriteria yang dipilih untuk analisis ini adalah penduduk setempat, penduduk yang dilayani, persentase belanja bulanan, harga rata-rata rumah tangga per unit, populasi pengangguran, status finansial dari penduduk lokal, jarak dari fasilitas yang telah ada, dan jarak dari pelabuhan terdekat. ELECTRE III membutuhkan penentuan tiga ambang batas, yaitu ambang kelalaian (q, ambang batas preferensi (p, dan ambang veto (v dalam upaya untuk lebih beradaptasi dengan ketidakpastian. Bobot masing-masing kriteria yang ditentukan sesuai dengan kepentingan relatif terhadap kriteria lain. Lokasi optimal untuk FPLE adalah Provinsi Banten berdasarkan model ELECTRE III.   Kata Kunci: limbah elektronik, fasilitas, optimasi, ELECTRE Abstract E-waste is an emerging issue in Indonesia due to its potentially hazardous content and some precious metal. In order to create an environmentally sound management of e-waste, a facility is necessary. The objectives of this study are to to select the optimal location of e-waste dismantling and sorting facility (DSF/FLPE.  The optimal location selection was conducted using the method of ELECTRE III model. ELECTRE is a family of multi-criteria decision analysis methods that originated in Europe. The criteria chosen for this analysis are local population, population served, the percentage of monthly expenditure, average household price per unit, unemployed population, financial status of the local population

  19. Two Dimensional Modeling of III-V Heterojunction Gate All Around Tunnel Field Effect Transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Manjula Vijh; R.S. Gupta; Sujata Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Tunnel Field Effect Transistor is one of the extensively researched semiconductor devices, which has captured attention over the conventional Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor. This device, due to its varied advantages, is considered in applications where devices are scaled down to deep sub-micron level. Like MOSFETs, many geometries of TFETs have been studied and analyzed in the past few years. This work, presents a two dimensional analytical model for a III-V Heterojunction ...

  20. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  1. An Evaluation of the Mulligan Stew 4-H Television Series for Extension Service, USDA. Volume III: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    Conducted on over 3,000 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade children in six states, this study documents changes in nutrition-related knowledge and behaviors which can be related to participating in the Mulligan Stew television series. The case studies which comprise this volume function as a brief organizational analysis of the Mulligan Stew effort at…

  2. The Uses of Mass Communications: Current Perspectives on Gratifications Research. Sage Annual Reviews of Communication Research Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumler, Jay G., Ed.; Katz, Elihu, Ed.

    The essays in this volume examine the use of the mass media and explore the findings of the gratifications approach to mass communication research. Part one summaries the achievements in this area of mass media research and proposes an agenda for discussion of the future direction of this research in terms of a set of theoretical, methodological,…

  3. International conference on high-energy physics. Volume 1. Sessions I to III. [Geneva, June 27-July 4, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Volume 1 of the conference proceedings contains sessions on neutrino physics and weak interactions, e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics, and theory. Five of the papers have already been cited in ERA, and can be found by reference to the entry CONF-790642-- in the Report Number Index. The remaining 30 will be processed as they are received on the Atomindex tape. (RWR)

  4. Bianchi VI{sub 0} and III models: self-similar approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinchon, Jose Antonio, E-mail: abelcal@ciccp.e [Departamento de Fisica, ETS Arquitectura, UPM, Av. Juan de Herrera 4, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2009-09-07

    We study several cosmological models with Bianchi VI{sub 0} and III symmetries under the self-similar approach. We find new solutions for the 'classical' perfect fluid model as well as for the vacuum model although they are really restrictive for the equation of state. We also study a perfect fluid model with time-varying constants, G and LAMBDA. As in other studied models we find that the behaviour of G and LAMBDA are related. If G behaves as a growing time function then LAMBDA is a positive decreasing time function but if G is decreasing then LAMBDA{sub 0} is negative. We end by studying a massive cosmic string model, putting special emphasis in calculating the numerical values of the equations of state. We show that there is no SS solution for a string model with time-varying constants.

  5. BWR Mark III containment analyses using a GOTHIC 8.0 3D model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Gonzalo; Serrano, César; Lopez-Alonso, Emma; Molina, M del Carmen; Calvo, Daniel; García, Javier; Queral, César; Zuriaga, J. Vicente; González, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The development of a 3D GOTHIC code model of BWR Mark-III containment is described. • Suppression pool modelling based on the POOLEX STB-20 and STB-16 experimental tests. • LOCA and SBO transient simulated to verify the behaviour of the 3D GOTHIC model. • Comparison between the 3D GOTHIC model and MAAP4.07 model is conducted. • Accurate reproduction of pre severe accident conditions with the 3D GOTHIC model. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to establish a detailed three-dimensional model of Cofrentes NPP BWR/6 Mark III containment building using the containment code GOTHIC 8.0. This paper presents the model construction, the phenomenology tests conducted and the selected transient for the model evaluation. In order to study the proper settings for the model in the suppression pool, two experiments conducted with the experimental installation POOLEX have been simulated, allowing to obtain a proper behaviour of the model under different suppression pool phenomenology. In the transient analyses, a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and a Station Blackout (SBO) transient have been performed. The main results of the simulations of those transients were qualitative compared with the results obtained from simulations with MAAP 4.07 Cofrentes NPP model, used by the plant for simulating severe accidents. From this comparison, a verification of the model in terms of pressurization, asymmetric discharges and high pressure release were obtained. The completeness of this model has proved to adequately simulate the thermal hydraulic phenomena which occur in the containment during accidental sequences

  6. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  7. Development of modelling and forecasting in geology (Volume 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbouleix, S.; Colleau, A.; Defaut, B.; Fourniguet, J.; Peaudecerf, P.

    1990-01-01

    To access the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems, validation of predictive models is essential and large efforts should be given to barriers, particularly geologic barriers. This work appears in the form of four volumes, the subject of the fourth part is described below. The purpose of this study is to find actual climates which can represent past climates in Europe, during Plio-Quaternary Palynology technics is the most adapted to restore ancient climates. A climatic index, Q n is defined as a function of yearly rainfalls, monthly extreme temperatures and aridity. A climatic diagram is built with climatic index Q n along X axis and a function of the yearly mean temperature along Y axis. This original method can ensure vegetation determination from climate and vice versa. Erosion and Weathering values may be determined after model calibration. 23 figs., 21 refs

  8. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    The Fixed Site Neutralization Model (FSNM) is a stochastic, time-stepped simulation of an engagement process whereby an adversary force attempts to steal or sabotage sensitive (e.g., nuclear) materials being guarded by a security force on a fixed site and a response force that is off-site. FSNM will assist regulatory bodies of the US Government in evaluating fixed site physical protection systems at various installations in a variety of scenarios. Most data input to the Fixed Site Neutralization Model are in binary form. The user's data are transformed into binary form by two supporting modules, the Data Preprocessor (DPP) and the Plex Preprocessor (PPP). Both preprocessors and the FSNM itself are written in FORTRAN. This volume of the program maintenance program contains: introduction, logic descriptions, PLEX data structure, PLEX records, dictionaries, and error conditions and comments

  9. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  10. Negative emotionality across diagnostic models: RDoC, DSM-5 Section III, and FFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Whitney L; Widiger, Thomas A

    2018-03-01

    The research domain criteria (RDoC) were established in an effort to explore underlying dimensions that cut across many existing disorders and to provide an alternative to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). One purpose of the present study was to suggest a potential alignment of RDoC negative valence with 2 other dimensional models of negative emotionality: five-factor model (FFM) neuroticism and the DSM-5 Section III negative affectivity. A second purpose of the study, though, was to compare their coverage of negative emotionality, more specifically with respect to affective instability. Participants were adult community residents (N = 90) currently in mental health treatment. Participants received self-report measures of RDoC negative valence, FFM neuroticism, and DSM-5 Section III negative affectivity, along with measures of affective instability, borderline personality disorder, and impairment. Findings suggested that RDoC negative valence is commensurate with FFM neuroticism and DSM-5 Section III negative affectivity, and it would be beneficial if it was expanded to include affective instability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Volume conductor model of transcutaneous electrical stimulation with kilohertz signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Leonel E.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Incorporating high-frequency components in transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) waveforms may make it possible to stimulate deeper nerve fibers since the impedance of tissue declines with increasing frequency. However, the mechanisms of high-frequency TES remain largely unexplored. We investigated the properties of TES with frequencies beyond those typically used in neural stimulation. Approach. We implemented a multilayer volume conductor model including dispersion and capacitive effects, coupled to a cable model of a nerve fiber. We simulated voltage- and current-controlled transcutaneous stimulation, and quantified the effects of frequency on the distribution of potentials and fiber excitation. We also quantified the effects of a novel transdermal amplitude modulated signal (TAMS) consisting of a non-zero offset sinusoidal carrier modulated by a square-pulse train. Main results. The model revealed that high-frequency signals generated larger potentials at depth than did low frequencies, but this did not translate into lower stimulation thresholds. Both TAMS and conventional rectangular pulses activated more superficial fibers in addition to the deeper, target fibers, and at no frequency did we observe an inversion of the strength-distance relationship. Current regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by fiber depth, whereas voltage regulated stimulation was more strongly influenced by skin thickness. Finally, our model reproduced the threshold-frequency relationship of experimentally measured motor thresholds. Significance. The model may be used for prediction of motor thresholds in TES, and contributes to the understanding of high-frequency TES.

  12. A note on tilted Bianchi type VIh models: the type III bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, A. A.; Hervik, S.

    2008-10-01

    In this note we complete the analysis of Hervik, van den Hoogen, Lim and Coley (2007 Class. Quantum Grav. 24 3859) of the late-time behaviour of tilted perfect fluid Bianchi type III models. We consider models with dust, and perfect fluids stiffer than dust, and eludicate the late-time behaviour by studying the centre manifold which dominates the behaviour of the model at late times. In the dust case, this centre manifold is three-dimensional and can be considered a double bifurcation as the two parameters (h and γ) of the type VIh model are varied. We therefore complete the analysis of the late-time behaviour of tilted ever-expanding Bianchi models of types I VIII.

  13. INTRA/Mod3.2. Manual and Code Description. Volume I - Physical Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jenny; Edlund, O.; Hermann, J.; Johansson, Lise-Lotte

    1999-01-01

    The INTRA Manual consists of two volumes. Volume I of the manual is a thorough description of the code INTRA, the Physical modelling of INTRA and the ruling numerical methods and volume II, the User`s Manual is an input description. This document, the Physical modelling of INTRA, contains code characteristics, integration methods and applications

  14. Models for estimation of tree volume in the miombo woodlands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volume of trees is an important parameter in forest management, but only volume models with limited geographical and tree size coverage have previously been developed for Tanzanian miombo woodlands. This study developed models for estimating total, merchantable stem and branches volume applicable for the entire ...

  15. Energy consumption data base. Volume III, Chapter 4, Part 2. Paper and allied products, SIC 26. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, D.; Dandekar, R.

    1977-05-31

    This volume documents how consumption estimates for the paper industry were derived. This industry consumed one-ninth of total manufacturing energy consumed in the U.S. in 1974. Two aspects of the industry's fuel-use pattern set it apart from other industries. First, 39% of its 1974 consumption came from renewable forest fuels rather than gas, oil, or coal. Second, the paper industry consumes nearly one-third of all residual oil used in the manufacturing sector. (MCW)

  16. Development of modelling and forecasting in geology. (Volume 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzali, H.; Fourniguet, J.; Peaudecerf, P.

    1990-01-01

    To assess the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal systems, validation of predictive models is essential and large efforts should be given to barriers, particularly geologic barriers. This work appears in the form of four volumes, the subject of the first part is described below. Soils and rocks erosion depends upon climate, relief, lithology and human activities (deforesting). In the world, mechanical erosion is evaluated from 5 to 8 cm per 1000 years (mean denudation ratio). Rocks weathering solubilize chemical elements in the running water and rocks fracturation becomes more easily under erosion effects. Alteration front progress is 0.3-3 cm per 1000 years in temperate zones and 4-7 cm per 1000 years in tropical zones. 5 figs., 14 tabs., 80 refs

  17. Ammunition Resupply Model. Volume 2. Programmer’s Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    database for the ARM model (see volume I for the array definitions): COMMON/LOG/IATP(lO,53), IASP (lO,lIO), IUNIT(75,142), Z ITRUCK(1400,15), ITYPE(9,6), IMIX...from either the ATP or the ASP. C NASP The ASP number from the IASP array. (..6) C NATP The ATP rumber from the IATP array. (1..6) C ND ) The number of...TTLOAD C**Z2 DECREMENT AMMO AVAILABLE SO0 CONTINUE IASP (NASP9NUMAM*37+1B) = IASP (NASPYNUMAMt3+19) - MIX(MIXPNUMAM) IF7IASP(NASPiNUMAHM*3+1S).LT, 0

  18. A model of high-affinity antibody binding to type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, M R; Muñoz, A; Kasper, D L

    1987-12-01

    We recently reported that the single repeating-unit pentasaccharide of type III group B Streptococcus (GBS) capsular polysaccharide is only weakly reactive with type III GBS antiserum. To further elucidate the relationship between antigen-chain length and antigenicity, tritiated oligosaccharides derived from type III capsular polysaccharide were used to generate detailed saturation binding curves with a fixed concentration of rabbit antiserum in a radioactive antigen-binding assay. A graded increase in affinity of antigen-antibody binding was seen as oligosaccharide size increased from 2.6 repeating units to 92 repeating units. These differences in affinity of antibody binding to oligosaccharides of different molecular size were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and competitive ELISA, two independent assays of antigen-antibody binding. Analysis of the saturation binding experiment indicated a difference of 300-fold in antibody-binding affinity for the largest versus the smallest tested oligosaccharides. Unexpectedly, the saturation binding values approached by the individual curves were inversely related to oligosaccharide chain length on a molar basis but equivalent on a weight basis. This observation is compatible with a model in which binding of an immunoglobulin molecule to an antigenic site on the polysaccharide facilitates subsequent binding of antibody to that antigen.

  19. REVIEW OF THE NEGOTIATION OF THE MODEL PROTOCOL ADDITIONAL TO THE AGREEMENT(S) BETWEEN STATE(S) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY FOR THE APPLICATION OF SAFEGUARDS,INFCIRC/540 (Corrected) VOLUME I/III SETTING THE STAGE: 1991-1996.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.D.; Saum-Manning, L.; Houck, F.; Anzelon, G.

    2010-01-01

    Events in Iraq at the beginning of the 1990s demonstrated that the safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needed to be improved. It had failed, after all, to detect Iraq's clandestine nuclear weapon program even though some of Iraq's's activities had been pursued at inspected facilities in buildings adjacent to ones being inspected by the IAEA. Although there were aspects of the implementation of safeguards where the IAEA needed to improve, the primary limitations were considered to be part of the safeguards system itself. That system was based on the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty of 1970, to which Iraq was a party, and implemented on the basis of a model NPT safeguards agreement, published by the IAEA 1972 as INFCIRC/153 (corrected). The agreement calls for states to accept and for the IAEA to apply safeguards to all nuclear material in the state. Iraq was a party to such an agreement, but it violated the agreement by concealing nuclear material and other nuclear activities from the IAEA. Although the IAEA was inspecting in Iraq, it was hindered by aspects of the agreement that essentially limited its access to points in declared facilities and provided the IAEA with little information about nuclear activities anywhere else in Iraq. As a result, a major review of the NPT safeguards system was initiated by its Director General and Member States with the objective of finding the best means to enable the IAEA to detect both diversions from declared stocks and any undeclared nuclear material or activities in the state. Significant improvements that could be made within existing legal authority were taken quickly, most importantly a change in 1992 in how and when and what design information would be reported to the IAEA. During 1991-1996, the IAEA pursued intensive study, legal and technical analysis, and field trials and held numerous consultations with Member States. The Board of Governors discussed the issue of

  20. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro); Spektroskopische Untersuchungen zur Komplexbildung von Cm(III) und Eu(III) mit organischen Modellliganden sowie ihrer chemischen Bindungsform in menschlichem Urin (in vitro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-10-26

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D. [CSIRO Div of Water Resources, PO Wembley, WA (Australia); Braumiller, S. [Univ of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept of Hydrology and Water Resources; Kawanishi, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Abiko-Shi, Chiba-Ken (Japan)] [and others

    1992-12-31

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  2. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Hydrogeological modelling. Final Report - Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, L.R.; Trefry, M.G.; Barr, A.D.; Braumiller, S.

    1992-01-01

    This volume describes hydrogeological modelling carried out as part of the Alligator Rivers Analogue Project. Hydrogeology has played a key integrating role in the Project, largely because water movement is believed to have controlled the evolution of the Koongarra uranium Orebody and therefore affects field observations of all types at all scales. Aquifer testing described uses the concept of transmissivity in its interpretation of aquifer response to pumping. The concept of an aquifer, a layer transmitting significant quantities of water in a mainly horizontal direction, seems hard to accept in an environment as heterogeneous as that at Koongarra. But modelling of aquifers both in one dimension and two dimensionally in plan has contributed significantly to our understanding of the site. A one-dimensional model with three layers (often described as a quasi two dimensional model) was applied to flow between the Fault and Koongarra Creek. Being a transient model, this model was able to show that reverse flows can indeed occur back towards the Fault, but only if there is distributed recharge over the orebody as well as a mechanism for the Fault, or a region near the Fault, to remove water from the simulated cross-section. The model also showed clearly that the response of the three-layered system, consisting of a highly weathered zone, a fractured transmissive zone and a less conductive lower schist zone, is governed mainly by the transmissivity and storage coefficient of the middle layer. The storage coefficient of the higher layer has little effect. A two-dimensional model in plan used a description of anisotropy to show that reverse flows can also occur even without a conducting Fault. Modelling of a three-dimensional region using discrete fractures showed that it is certainly possible to simulate systems like that observed at Koongarra, but that large amounts of data are probably needed to obtain realistic descriptions of the fracture networks. Inverse modelling

  3. Modeled Urea Distribution Volume and Mortality in the HEMO Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Tom; Depner, Thomas A.; Levin, Nathan W.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives In the Hemodialysis (HEMO) Study, observed small decreases in achieved equilibrated Kt/Vurea were noncausally associated with markedly increased mortality. Here we examine the association of mortality with modeled volume (Vm), the denominator of equilibrated Kt/Vurea. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Parameters derived from modeled urea kinetics (including Vm) and blood pressure (BP) were obtained monthly in 1846 patients. Case mix–adjusted time-dependent Cox regressions were used to relate the relative mortality hazard at each time point to Vm and to the change in Vm over the preceding 6 months. Mixed effects models were used to relate Vm to changes in intradialytic systolic BP and to other factors at each follow-up visit. Results Mortality was associated with Vm and change in Vm over the preceding 6 months. The association between change in Vm and mortality was independent of vascular access complications. In contrast, mortality was inversely associated with V calculated from anthropometric measurements (Vant). In case mix–adjusted analysis using Vm as a time-dependent covariate, the association of mortality with Vm strengthened after statistical adjustment for Vant. After adjustment for Vant, higher Vm was associated with slightly smaller reductions in intradialytic systolic BP and with risk factors for mortality including recent hospitalization and reductions in serum albumin concentration and body weight. Conclusions An increase in Vm is a marker for illness and mortality risk in hemodialysis patients. PMID:21511841

  4. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested

  5. Inventory of Federal Energy-Related Environment and Safety Research for FY 1978. Volume III, interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C. E.; Barker, Janice F.

    1979-12-01

    This users' guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environmental and safety research projects for FY 1978. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports. The data contained in this data base are not exhaustive and represent research reported by the following agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of the Interior, Department of Transportation, Federal Energy Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  6. Artificial heart development program. Volume II. System support. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Volume 2 covers major activities of the Artificial Heart Development program that supported the design, fabrication, and test of the system demonstration units. Section A.1.0 provides a listing beyond that of the body of the report on the components needed for an implantation. It also presents glove box sterilization calibration results and results of an extensive mock circulation calibration. Section A.2.0 provides detailed procedures for assembly, preparing for use, and the use of the system and major components. Section A.3.0 covers the component research and development activities undertaken to improve components of the existing system units and to prepare for a future prototype system. Section A.4.0 provides a listing of the top assembly drawings of the major systems variations fabricated and tested.

  7. Developing a type-III wind turbine model for stability studies of the Hydro-Quebec network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlois, Charles-Eric; Lefebvre, Daniel [Hydro-Quebec TransEnergie, Montreal, QC (Canada); Dube, Laurent [DEI Technology, Montreal, QC (Canada); Gagnon, Richard [Hydro-Quebec IREQ, Varennes, QC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a type-III (with DFIG) wind turbine model developed by Hydro-Quebec for stability studies. The model was built in EMTPWorks for use in PSS/E via an EMTP-PSS/E multi-model interface, also developed by Hydro-Quebec. The type-III model includes a physical representation of the asynchronous generator with rotor flux transients and two-mass shaft dynamics. The paper describes the turbine controls and discusses the design basis of the model. The model was validated with a full-transient detailed MATLAB/SimPowerSystems model developed by Hydro-Quebec. The latter was successfully compared with measurements from some disturbances on the Hydro-Quebec network. Test comparisons with a type-III generic model from the PSS/E library are presented. (orig.)

  8. Bianchi Type-III Dark Energy Model in a Saez-Ballester Scalar-Tensor Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, R. L.; Satyanarayana, B.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate Bianchi type-III universe which has dynamical energy density. We introduce three different skewness parameters along spatial directions to quantify the deviation of pressure from isotropy. We also assume that the skewness parameters are time dependent. The Saez-Ballester (J. Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986) field equations have been solved by applying a variation law for generalized Hubble's parameter given by Bermann (Nuovo Cimento B 74:182, 1983). Some physical and kinematical properties of dark energy model are discussed.

  9. Traveling waves in a diffusive predator-prey model with holling type-III functional response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wantong; Wu Shiliang

    2008-01-01

    We establish the existence of traveling wave solutions and small amplitude traveling wave train solutions for a reaction-diffusion system based on a predator-prey model with Holling type-III functional response. The analysis is in the three-dimensional phase space of the nonlinear ordinary differential equation system given by the diffusive predator-prey system in the traveling wave variable. The methods used to prove the results are the shooting argument, invariant manifold theory and the Hopf bifurcation theorem

  10. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  11. Final Report. Fumex-III. Improvement of Models Used for Fuel Behaviour Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulacsy, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    The FUMEX-III coordinated research programme organised by the IAEA was the first FUMEX exercise in which AEKI (Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute) took part with the partial support of Paks NPP. The aim of the participation was to test the code FUROM developed at AEKI against not only measurements but also other fuel behaviour simulation codes, to share and discuss modelling experience and issues, and to establish acquaintance with fuel modellers in other countries. Among the numerous cases proposed for the programme, AEKI chose to simulate normal operation up to high burn-up and ramp tests, with special interest in VVER rods and PWR rods with annular pellets. The US PWR 16x16, the SPC RE GINNA, the Kola3-MIR, the IFA-519.9 cases and the AREVA idealised rod were thus selected. The present Final Report gives a short description of the FUROM models relevant to the selected cases, presents the results for the 5 cases and summarises the conclusions of the FUMEX-III programme. The input parameters used for the simulations can be found in the Appendix at the end of the Report. Observations concerning the IFPE datasets are collected for each dataset in their respective Sections for possible use in the IFPE database. (author)

  12. PENGEMBANGAN MODEL UNTUK SIMULASI KESELAMATAN REAKTOR PWR 1000 MWe GENERASI III+ MENGGUNAKAN PROGRAM KOMPUTER RELAP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Sofrany Ekariansyah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Reaktor daya PWR AP1000 yang didesain oleh Westinghouse adalah reaktor Generasi III+ pertama yang telah menerima persetujuan desain dari U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC. Saat ini utilitas China telah memulai pembangunan beberapa unit AP1000 di dua tapak terpilih untuk rencana operasi pada 2013-2015. AP1000 sebagai desain PWR berdasarkan teknologi teruji dari desain PWR lainnya yang dibuat oleh Westinghouse dengan penguatan pada sistem keselamatan pasif dengan demikian dapat dipertimbangkan untuk dibangun di Indonesia bila mengacu pada persyaratan pada PP 43/2006 mengenai Perijinan Reaktor Nuklir. Namun demikian, desain tersebut perlu diverifikasi oleh Technical Support Organization (TSO independen sebelum dapat dibangun di Indonesia. Verifikasi dapat dilakukan menggunakan paket program RELAP5 dalam bentuk analisis kecelakaan. Selama ini analisis kecelakaan PLTN dilakukan untuk tipe PWR 1000 MWe dari generasi II atau tipe konvensional. Mengingat saat ini referensi yang menggambarkan teknologi AP1000 yang menyertakan teknologi keselamatan pasif sudah tersedia maka dilakukan kegiatan pemodelan yang nantinya dapat digunakan untuk melakukan analisis kecelakaan. Metode pengembangan model mengacu pada pedoman IAEA yang terdiri dari pengumpulan data instalasi, pengembangan engineering data dan penyusunan input deck, verifikasi dan validasi data input. Model yang berhasil dikembangkan secara umum telah mewakili sistem AP1000 secara keseluruhan dan dianggap sebagai model dasar. Model tersebut telah diverifikasi dan divalidasi dengan data desain yang terdapat pada referensi dimana respon parameter termohidraulika menunjukkan perbedaan hasil ± 3% selain untuk parameter penurunan tekanan teras yang lebih rendah 13%. Sebagai model dasar, input deck yang diperoleh dapat dikembangkan lebih lanjut dengan mengintegrasikan pemodelan sistem keselamatan, sistem proteksi, dan sistem kendali yang spesifik AP1000 untuk keperluan simulasi keselamatan yang lebih

  13. Artificial heart development program phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977. Volume I. System development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf-implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart are discussed. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power systems portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the 238 Pu heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The 238 Pu heat sources and blood pump ventricles were provided as Government Furnished Equipment as developed and fabricated by other contractors. The work performed had two parallel themes. The first of these was the development of an integrated implantable model for bench and animal experiments plus design effort on a more advanced model. The second was research and development on components of the system done in conjunction with the development of the implantable model and to provide technology for incorporation into advanced models plus support to implantations, at the University of Utah, of the systems blood pumping elements when driven by electric motor. The efforts and results of implantable model development are covered, mainly, in the text of the report. The research and development efforts and results are reported, primarily, in the appendices

  14. The catalytic ozonization of model lignin compounds in the presence of Fe(III) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben'ko, E. M.; Mukovnya, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    The ozonization of several model lignin compounds (guaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, phenol, and vanillin) was studied in acid media in the presence of iron(III) ions. It was found that Fe3+ did not influence the initial rate of the reactions between model phenols and ozone but accelerated the oxidation of intermediate ozonolysis products. The metal concentration dependences of the total ozone consumption and effective rate constants of catalytic reaction stages were determined. Data on reactions in the presence of oxalic acid as a competing chelate ligand showed that complex formation with Fe3+ was the principal factor that accelerated the ozonolysis of model phenols at the stage of the oxidation of carboxylic dibasic acids and C2 aldehydes formed as intermediate products.

  15. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart are discussed. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power system's portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the 238 Pu heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The 238 Pu heat sources and blood pump ventricles were provided as Government Furnished Equipment as developed and fabricated by other contractors

  16. Artificial heart development program. Volume I. System development. Phase III summary report, July 1, 1973--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Efforts and results in the development of the power system portions of a calf implantable model of nuclear-powered artificial heart are discussed. The primary objective in developing the implantable model was to solve the packaging problems for total system implantation. The power system's portion is physically that portion of the implantable model between the /sup 238/Pu heat sources and the blood pump ventricles. The /sup 238/Pu heat sources and blood pump ventricles were provided as Government Furnished Equipment as developed and fabricated by other contractors.

  17. Theoretical modeling of molar volume and thermal expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiaogang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: gang@mse.kth.se; Selleby, Malin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Sundman, Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-05-15

    The molar volumes and thermal expansions of transition cubic metals were studied by means of the Calphad approach and the Debye-Grueneisen model. Experimental data were collected and assessed using Calphad procedures, and consistent results were obtained which give the best description of all experimental data. In order to put the prediction of the thermodynamic properties of metastable phases on a sound physical basis, the Debye-Grueneisen model was chosen to account for the vibrational contribution and calculate the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CLEs) of stable cubic metals. Two approximations for Grueneisen parameter {gamma}, i.e. Slater's and Dugdale and MacDonald's expressions were adopted. A modified calculation scheme, first proposed by Wang et al., was derived in a straightforward way and used to evaluate the Debye temperature from ab initio electronic total-energy calculations at T = 0 K. The thermal electronic contribution to CLE was also evaluated from the electronic density of states. The calculated total CLEs were compared with those from the Calphad assessments. A satisfactory agreement is reached.

  18. Theoretical modeling of molar volume and thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiaogang; Selleby, Malin; Sundman, Bo

    2005-01-01

    The molar volumes and thermal expansions of transition cubic metals were studied by means of the Calphad approach and the Debye-Grueneisen model. Experimental data were collected and assessed using Calphad procedures, and consistent results were obtained which give the best description of all experimental data. In order to put the prediction of the thermodynamic properties of metastable phases on a sound physical basis, the Debye-Grueneisen model was chosen to account for the vibrational contribution and calculate the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CLEs) of stable cubic metals. Two approximations for Grueneisen parameter γ, i.e. Slater's and Dugdale and MacDonald's expressions were adopted. A modified calculation scheme, first proposed by Wang et al., was derived in a straightforward way and used to evaluate the Debye temperature from ab initio electronic total-energy calculations at T = 0 K. The thermal electronic contribution to CLE was also evaluated from the electronic density of states. The calculated total CLEs were compared with those from the Calphad assessments. A satisfactory agreement is reached

  19. Solar energy conversion systems engineering and economic analysis radiative energy input/thermal electric output computation. Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, G.

    1982-09-01

    The direct energy flux analytical model, an analysis of the results, and a brief description of a non-steady state model of a thermal solar energy conversion system implemented on a code, SIRR2, as well as the coupling of CIRR2 which computes global solar flux on a collector and SIRR2 are presented. It is shown how the CIRR2 and, mainly, the SIRR2 codes may be used for a proper design of a solar collector system. (LEW)

  20. Models of cognitive behavior in nuclear power plant personnel. A feasibility study: summary of results. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.; Hanes, L.F.

    1986-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a feasibility study to determine if the current state of models of human cognitive activities can serve as the basis for improved techniques for predicting human error in nuclear power plants emergency operations. Based on the answer to this question, two subsequent phases of research are planned. Phase II is to develop a model of cognitive activities, and Phase III is to test the model. The feasibility study included an analysis of the cognitive activities that occur in emergency operations and an assessment of the modeling concepts/tools available to capture these cognitive activities. The results indicated that a symbolic processing (or artificial intelligence) model of cognitive activities in nuclear power plants is both desirable and feasible. This cognitive model can be built upon the computational framework provided by an existing artificial intelligence system for medical problem solving, called Caduceus. The resulting cognitive model will increase the capability to capture the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessment studies. Volume 1 summarizes the major findings and conclusions of the study. Volume 2 provides a complete description of the methods and results, including a synthesis of the cognitive activities that occur during emergency operations, and a literature review on cognitive modeling relevant to nuclear power plants. 19 refs

  1. Development and Implementation of Efficiency-Improving Analysis Methods for the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Model Originating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; Scola, Salvatore; Tobin, Steven; McLeod, Shawn; Mannu, Sergio; Guglielmo, Corrado; Moeller, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2015. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Several novel methods have been implemented to facilitate efficient payload-level thermal analysis, including the use of a design of experiments (DOE) methodology to determine the worst-case orbits for SAGE III while on ISS, use of TD assemblies to move payloads from the Dragon trunk to the Enhanced Operational Transfer Platform (EOTP) to its final home on the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (ExPRESS) Logistics Carrier (ELC)-4, incorporation of older models in varying unit sets, ability to change units easily (including hardcoded logic blocks), case-based logic to facilitate activating heaters and active elements for varying scenarios within a single model, incorporation of several coordinate frames to easily map to structural models with differing geometries and locations, and streamlined results processing using an Excel-based text file plotter developed in-house at LaRC. This document presents an overview of the SAGE III thermal model and describes the development and implementation of these efficiency-improving analysis methods.

  2. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  3. Global modeling of land water and energy balances. Part III: Interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmakin, A.B.; Milly, P.C.D.; Dunne, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Land Dynamics (LaD) model is tested by comparison with observations of interannual variations in discharge from 44 large river basins for which relatively accurate time series of monthly precipitation (a primary model input) have recently been computed. When results are pooled across all basins, the model explains 67% of the interannual variance of annual runoff ratio anomalies (i.e., anomalies of annual discharge volume, normalized by long-term mean precipitation volume). The new estimates of basin precipitation appear to offer an improvement over those from a state-of-the-art analysis of global precipitation (the Climate Prediction Center Merged Analysis of Precipitation, CMAP), judging from comparisons of parallel model runs and of analyses of precipitation-discharge correlations. When the new precipitation estimates are used, the performance of the LaD model is comparable to, but not significantly better than, that of a simple, semiempirical water-balance relation that uses only annual totals of surface net radiation and precipitation. This implies that the LaD simulations of interannual runoff variability do not benefit substantially from information on geographical variability of land parameters or seasonal structure of interannual variability of precipitation. The aforementioned analyses necessitated the development of a method for downscaling of long-term monthly precipitation data to the relatively short timescales necessary for running the model. The method merges the long-term data with a reference dataset of 1-yr duration, having high temporal resolution. The success of the method, for the model and data considered here, was demonstrated in a series of model-model comparisons and in the comparisons of modeled and observed interannual variations of basin discharge.

  4. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

  5. Modelling of the L-band brightness temperatures measured with ELBARA III radiometer on Bubnow wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba, Lukasz; Sagan, Joanna; Lukowski, Mateusz; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Microwave radiometry has become the main tool for investigating soil moisture (SM) with remote sensing methods. ESA - SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite operating at L-band provides global distribution of soil moisture. An integral part of SMOS mission are calibration and validation activities involving measurements with ELBARA III which is an L-band microwave passive radiometer. It is done in order to improve soil moisture retrievals - make them more time-effective and accurate. The instrument is located at Bubnow test-site, on the border of cultivated field, fallow, meadow and natural wetland being a part of Polesie National Park (Poland). We obtain both temporal and spatial dependences of brightness temperatures for varied types of land covers with the ELBARA III directed at different azimuths. Soil moisture is retrieved from brightness temperature using L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model, the same as currently used radiative transfer model for SMOS. Parametrization of L-MEB, as well as input values are still under debate. We discuss the results of SM retrievals basing on data obtained during first year of the radiometer's operation. We analyze temporal dependences of retrieved SM for one-parameter (SM), two-parameter (SM, τ - optical depth) and three-parameter (SM, τ, Hr - roughness parameter) retrievals, as well as spatial dependences for specific dates. Special case of Simplified Roughness Parametrization, combining the roughness parameter and optical depth, is considered. L-MEB processing is supported by the continuous measurements of soil moisture and temperature obtained from nearby agrometeorological station, as well as studies on the soil granulometric composition of the Bubnow test-site area. Furthermore, for better estimation of optical depth, the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was employed, supported by measured in situ vegetation parameters (such as Leaf Area Index and Vegetation

  6. T3_MM: a Markov model effectively classifies bacterial type III secretion signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yejun; Sun, Ming'an; Bao, Hongxia; White, Aaron P

    2013-01-01

    Type III Secretion Systems (T3SSs) play important roles in the interaction between gram-negative bacteria and their hosts. T3SSs function by translocating a group of bacterial effector proteins into the host cytoplasm. The details of specific type III secretion process are yet to be clarified. This research focused on comparing the amino acid composition within the N-terminal 100 amino acids from type III secretion (T3S) signal sequences or non-T3S proteins, specifically whether each residue exerts a constraint on residues found in adjacent positions. We used these comparisons to set up a statistic model to quantitatively model and effectively distinguish T3S effectors. In this study, the amino acid composition (Aac) probability profiles conditional on its sequentially preceding position and corresponding amino acids were compared between N-terminal sequences of T3S and non-T3S proteins. The profiles are generally different. A Markov model, namely T3_MM, was consequently designed to calculate the total Aac conditional probability difference, i.e., the likelihood ratio of a sequence being a T3S or a non-T3S protein. With T3_MM, known T3S and non-T3S proteins were found to well approximate two distinct normal distributions. The model could distinguish validated T3S and non-T3S proteins with a 5-fold cross-validation sensitivity of 83.9% at a specificity of 90.3%. T3_MM was also shown to be more robust, accurate, simple, and statistically quantitative, when compared with other T3S protein prediction models. The high effectiveness of T3_MM also indicated the overall Aac difference between N-termini of T3S and non-T3S proteins, and the constraint of Aac exerted by its preceding position and corresponding Aac. An R package for T3_MM is freely downloadable from: http://biocomputer.bio.cuhk.edu.hk/softwares/T3_MM. T3_MM web server: http://biocomputer.bio.cuhk.edu.hk/T3DB/T3_MM.php.

  7. Simple, Inexpensive Model Spirometer for Understanding Ventilation Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Spirometers are useful for enhancing students' understanding of normal lung volumes, capacities, and flow rates. Spirometers are also excellent for understanding how lung diseases alter ventilation volumes. However, spirometers are expensive, complex, and not appropriate for programs with limited space and budgets. Therefore, we developed a…

  8. Development and validation of stem volume models for Pinus kesiya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem volume equations (overbark) were developed, using established volume equation forms, and validated using a subset of the data collected for Pinus kesiya in Benguet province, Philippines. A total of 481 trees from Pinus kesiya stands in Benguet were measured through non-destructive sampling. The data set was ...

  9. Stem biomass and volume models of selected tropical tree species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimating tree volume and biomass constitutes an essential part of the forest resources assessment and the evaluation of the climate change mitigation potential of forests through biomass accumulation and carbon sequestration. This research article provides stem volume and biomass equations applicable to five tree ...

  10. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer

  11. Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

  12. Sacramento River Flood Control Project, California, Mid-Valley Area, Phase III. Design Memorandum, Volume 2 of 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    important industry. Crops such as prunes, melons , peaches, grain, beans, clover, rice, pears, tomatoes, 39 and walnuts are produced in Sutter County. Sutter...berries, and nectar are also utilized (Bent 1958; Martin et al. 1961). For purposes of this model, it is assumed that if suitable habitat is available...crop production. Crops grown in the study area are wheat, barley, sugar beets, tomatoes, melons , peaches, prunes, kiwi, pears, walnuts, pistachios

  13. High Velocity Jet Noise Source Location and Reduction. Task 3 - Experimental Investigation of Suppression Principles Volume III - Suppressor Concepts Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    High Pressure Turbine Rotor 27000 F Inlet Temperature, Cruise 0 Compressor Discharge Temperature, 1150" F Max imum Installed Engine Performance...44.44.44 t It 00 rn ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -(V a/ý) ISo 1’, I +¢ 00 _____ _ ___ ___ a -- , W Go .4 W N O4-4 -. 4) 0 .4 .4 4. . ooz---------- ’.4105 ii (VSI %/,0...I 160 ,onic- " X Ixx I󈧄 150- 160 32 Chute’I 150 J79, Vi = 2157 J79, Vj - 2159 0Model, Vi 2155 140- 160 0 32 Chute + Ejector ISO 50 80 125 200

  14. Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package. A computer code for power generating system expansion planning. Version WASP-III Plus. User's manual. Volume 1: Chapters 1-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    As a continuation of its effort to provide comprehensive and impartial guidance to Member States facing the need for introducing nuclear power, the IAEA has completed a new version of the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) Package for carrying out power generation expansion planning studies. WASP was originally developed in 1972 in the USA to meet the IAEA's needs to analyze the economic competitiveness of nuclear power in comparison to other generation expansion alternatives for supplying the future electricity requirements of a country or region. The model was first used by the IAEA to conduct global studies (Market Survey for Nuclear Power Plants in Developing Countries, 1972-1973) and to carry out Nuclear Power Planning Studies for several Member States. The WASP system developed into a very comprehensive planning tool for electric power system expansion analysis. Following these developments, the so-called WASP-Ill version was produced in 1979. This version introduced important improvements to the system, namely in the treatment of hydroelectric power plants. The WASP-III version has been continually updated and maintained in order to incorporate needed enhancements. In 1981, the Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED) was developed in order to allow the determination of electricity demand, consistent with the overall requirements for final energy, and thus, to provide a more adequate forecast of electricity needs to be considered in the WASP study. MAED and WASP have been used by the Agency for the conduct of Energy and Nuclear Power Planning Studies for interested Member States. More recently, the VALORAGUA model was completed in 1992 as a means for helping in the preparation of the hydro plant characteristics to be input in the WASP study and to verify that the WASP overall optimized expansion plan takes also into account an optimization of the use of water for electricity generation. The combined application of VALORAGUA and WASP permits the

  15. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume III, Book 3. Appendices, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouradian, E. M.

    1983-12-31

    Thermal analyses for the preliminary design phase of the Receiver of the Carrizo Plains Solar Power Plant are presented. The sodium reference operating conditions (T/sub in/ = 610/sup 0/F, T/sub out/ = 1050/sup 0/F) have been considered. Included are: Nominal flux distribution on receiver panal, Energy input to tubes, Axial temperature distribution; sodium and tubes, Sodium flow distribution, Sodium pressure drop, orifice calculations, Temperature distribution in tube cut (R-0), Backface structure, and Nonuniform sodium outlet temperature. Transient conditions and panel front face heat losses are not considered. These are to be addressed in a subsequent design phase. Also to be considered later are the design conditions as variations from the nominal reference (operating) condition. An addendum, designated Appendix C, has been included describing panel heat losses, panel temperature distribution, and tube-manifold joint thermal model.

  16. Partial molar volume of proteins studied by the three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takashi; Kovalenko, Andriy; Hirata, Fumio

    2005-04-14

    The three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory is applied to the analysis of hydration effects on the partial molar volume of proteins. For the native structure of some proteins, the partial molar volume is decomposed into geometric and hydration contributions using the 3D-RISM theory combined with the geometric volume calculation. The hydration contributions are correlated with the surface properties of the protein. The thermal volume, which is the volume of voids around the protein induced by the thermal fluctuation of water molecules, is directly proportional to the accessible surface area of the protein. The interaction volume, which is the contribution of electrostatic interactions between the protein and water molecules, is apparently governed by the charged atomic groups on the protein surface. The polar atomic groups do not make any contribution to the interaction volume. The volume differences between low- and high-pressure structures of lysozyme are also analyzed by the present method.

  17. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 2. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate. Mallayan Palaniandavar Kusalendiran Visvaganesan.

  18. Apoptotic and chemotherapeutic properties of iron(III-salophene in an ovarian cancer animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilo S Lange

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Thilo S Lange1,2, Carolyn McCourt2, Rakesh K Singh2, Kyu Kwang Kim2, Ajay P Singh3, Brian S Luisi4, Onur Alptürk5, Robert M Strongin6, Laurent Brard21Division of Biology and Medicine Brown University, Providence, R1, USA; 2Molecular Therapeutics Laboratory, Program in Women’s Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women and Infants’ Hospital of RI, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3Department of Plant Biology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA; 4Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 5Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: The cytotoxicity of organometallic compounds iron(III-, cobalt(III-, manganese(II-, and copper(II-salophene (-SP on platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines was compared. Fe-SP displayed selective cytotoxicity (IC50 at ∼1 μM against SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cell lines while Co-SP caused cytotoxic effects only at higher concentrations (IC50 at 60 μM and Cu-SP effects were negligible. High cytotoxicity of Mn-SP (30–60 μM appeared to be nonspecific because the Mn-chloride salt reduced cell viability similarly. The effect of Fe-SP at 1 μM proved to be ovarian cancer cell selective when compared to a panel of cell lines derived from different tumors. The first irreversible step in the induction of cell death by Fe-SP occurred after 3 hrs as indicated by the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm and was mainly linked to apoptotic, not necrotic events. To evaluate the toxicity of Fe-SP in vivo we conducted an acute toxicity study in rats. The LD50 of Fe-SP is >2000 mg/kg orally and >5.5 mg/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection. An ovarian cancer animal model showed that the chemotherapeutic relevant dose of Fe-SP in rats is 0.5–1 mg/kg body weight. The present report suggests that Fe-SP is a

  19. Uncertainty modelling and analysis of volume calculations based on a regular grid digital elevation model (DEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang; Wang, Qing; Shi, Wenzhong; Zhao, Sisi

    2018-05-01

    The accuracy of earthwork calculations that compute terrain volume is critical to digital terrain analysis (DTA). The uncertainties in volume calculations (VCs) based on a DEM are primarily related to three factors: 1) model error (ME), which is caused by an adopted algorithm for a VC model, 2) discrete error (DE), which is usually caused by DEM resolution and terrain complexity, and 3) propagation error (PE), which is caused by the variables' error. Based on these factors, the uncertainty modelling and analysis of VCs based on a regular grid DEM are investigated in this paper. Especially, how to quantify the uncertainty of VCs is proposed by a confidence interval based on truncation error (TE). In the experiments, the trapezoidal double rule (TDR) and Simpson's double rule (SDR) were used to calculate volume, where the TE is the major ME, and six simulated regular grid DEMs with different terrain complexity and resolution (i.e. DE) were generated by a Gauss synthetic surface to easily obtain the theoretical true value and eliminate the interference of data errors. For PE, Monte-Carlo simulation techniques and spatial autocorrelation were used to represent DEM uncertainty. This study can enrich uncertainty modelling and analysis-related theories of geographic information science.

  20. Development of a hydrogen diffusion gothic model of MARK III-containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Zhen-Yu [National Tsing Hua Univ., Dept. of Engineering and System Science, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yu-Kai; Pei, Bau-Shei [National Tsing Hua Univ., Inst. of Nuclear Engineering Science, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wen-Sheng [National Tsing Hua Univ., Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Shu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Nuclear Engineering Div., Taiyuan County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-15

    The accident that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is a reminder of the danger of hydrogen explosion within a reactor building. Sufficiently high hydrogen concentration may cause an explosion that could damage the structure, resulting in the release of radioisotopes into the environment. In the first part of this study, a gas diffusion experiment was performed, in which helium was used as the working fluid. An analytical model was also developed using the GOTHIC code and the model predictions of the helium distribution were found to be in good agreement with the experimentally measured data. In the second part of the study, a model of the Mark III containment of the Kuosheng Plant in Taiwan was developed, and was applied to a long-term station blackout (SBO) accident similar to that of the Fukushima plant. The hydrogen generation was calculated using the Modular Accident Analysis Program and was used as the boundary condition for the GOTHIC containment model. The simulation results revealed that the hydrogen concentration at the first floor of the wetwell in the containment reached 4 % 9.7 h after the accident. This indicated the possibility of dangerous conditions inside the containment. Although active hydrogen ignitors are already installed in the Kuosheng plant, the findings of this study indicate that it may be necessary to add passive recombiners to prolong an SBO event.

  1. Development of a hydrogen diffusion gothic model of MARK III-containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Yu-Kai; Pei, Bau-Shei; Hsu, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Yen-Shu

    2015-01-01

    The accident that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is a reminder of the danger of hydrogen explosion within a reactor building. Sufficiently high hydrogen concentration may cause an explosion that could damage the structure, resulting in the release of radioisotopes into the environment. In the first part of this study, a gas diffusion experiment was performed, in which helium was used as the working fluid. An analytical model was also developed using the GOTHIC code and the model predictions of the helium distribution were found to be in good agreement with the experimentally measured data. In the second part of the study, a model of the Mark III containment of the Kuosheng Plant in Taiwan was developed, and was applied to a long-term station blackout (SBO) accident similar to that of the Fukushima plant. The hydrogen generation was calculated using the Modular Accident Analysis Program and was used as the boundary condition for the GOTHIC containment model. The simulation results revealed that the hydrogen concentration at the first floor of the wetwell in the containment reached 4 % 9.7 h after the accident. This indicated the possibility of dangerous conditions inside the containment. Although active hydrogen ignitors are already installed in the Kuosheng plant, the findings of this study indicate that it may be necessary to add passive recombiners to prolong an SBO event.

  2. Applying ARIMA model for annual volume time series of the Magdalena River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Amaris

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The simulated results obtained with the ARIMA model compared to the observed data showed a fairly good adjustment of the minimum and maximum magnitudes. This allows concluding that it is a good tool for estimating minimum and maximum volumes, even though this model is not capable of simulating the exact behaviour of an annual volume time series.

  3. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 5: Verification of 2-dimensional numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorate (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth (e.g., natural or man-made inland lakes) because surface elevation has been removed as a parameter. These models allow computation of time dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions.

  4. Development and validation of a model TRIGA Mark III reactor with code MCNP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Aguilar H, F.

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to obtain a model of the reactor core TRIGA Mark III that accurately represents the real operating conditions to 1 M Wth, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. To provide a more detailed analysis, different models of the reactor core were realized by simulating the control rods extracted and inserted in conditions in cold (293 K) also including an analysis for shutdown margin, so that satisfied the Operation Technical Specifications. The position they must have the control rods to reach a power equal to 1 M Wth, were obtained from practice entitled Operation in Manual Mode performed at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). Later, the behavior of the K eff was analyzed considering different temperatures in the fuel elements, achieving calculate subsequently the values that best represent the actual reactor operation. Finally, the calculations in the developed model for to obtain the distribution of average flow of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons in the six new experimental facilities are presented. (Author)

  5. Trihalomethane exposures in indoor swimming pools: a level III fugacity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Roberta; Sadiq, Rehan; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Simard, Sabrina; Tardif, Robert

    2011-10-15

    The potential for generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in swimming pools is high due to the concentrations of chlorine required to maintain adequate disinfection, and the presence of organics introduced by the swimmers. Health Canada set guidelines for trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water; however, no such guideline exists for swimming pool waters. Exposure occurs through ingestion, inhalation and dermal contact in swimming pools. In this research, a multimedia model is developed to evaluate exposure concentrations of THMs in the air and water of an indoor swimming pool. THM water concentration data were obtained from 15 indoor swimming pool facilities in Quebec (Canada). A level III fugacity model is used to estimate inhalation, dermal contact and ingestion exposure doses. The results of the proposed model will be useful to perform a human health risk assessment and develop risk management strategies including developing health-based guidelines for disinfection practices and the design of ventilation system for indoor swimming pools. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interaction of anticancer Ru(III) complexes with single stranded and duplex DNA model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Domenica; Rozza, Lucia; Merlino, Antonello; Paduano, Luigi; Marzo, Tiziano; Massai, Lara; Messori, Luigi; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-08-21

    The interaction of the anticancer Ru(iii) complex AziRu - in comparison with its analogue NAMI-A, currently in advanced clinical trials as an antimetastatic agent - with DNA model systems, both single stranded and duplex oligonucleotides, was investigated using a combined approach, including absorption UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Ru complexes were recorded at different times in a pseudo-physiological solution, to monitor the ligand exchange processes in the absence and in the presence of the examined oligonucleotides. CD experiments provided information on the overall conformational changes of the DNA model systems induced by these metal complexes. UV- and CD-monitored thermal denaturation studies were performed to analyse the effects of AziRu and NAMI-A on the stability of the duplex structures. ESI-MS experiments, carried out on the oligonucleotide/metal complex mixtures under investigation, allowed us to detect the formation of stable adducts between the guanine-containing oligomers and the ruthenium complexes. These data unambiguously demonstrate that both AziRu and NAMI-A can interact with the DNA model systems. Although very similar in their structures, the two metal compounds manifest a markedly different reactivity with the examined sequences, respectively, with either a naked Ru(3+) ion or a Ru(Im)(3+) (Im = imidazole) fragment being incorporated into the oligonucleotide structure via stable linkages.

  7. GCR Environmental Models III: GCR Model Validation and Propagated Uncertainties in Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Xu, Xiaojing; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the last of three papers focused on quantifying the uncertainty associated with galactic cosmic rays (GCR) models used for space radiation shielding applications. In the first paper, it was found that GCR ions with Z>2 and boundary energy below 500 MeV/nucleon induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This is an important finding since GCR model development and validation have been heavily biased toward Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer measurements below 500 MeV/nucleon. Weights were also developed that quantify the relative contribution of defined GCR energy and charge groups to effective dose behind shielding. In the second paper, it was shown that these weights could be used to efficiently propagate GCR model uncertainties into effective dose behind shielding. In this work, uncertainties are quantified for a few commonly used GCR models. A validation metric is developed that accounts for measurements uncertainty, and the metric is coupled to the fast uncertainty propagation method. For this work, the Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) 2010 and 2011 and the Matthia GCR models are compared to an extensive measurement database. It is shown that BON2011 systematically overestimates heavy ion fluxes in the range 0.5-4 GeV/nucleon. The BON2010 and BON2011 also show moderate and large errors in reproducing past solar activity near the 2000 solar maximum and 2010 solar minimum. It is found that all three models induce relative errors in effective dose in the interval [-20%, 20%] at a 68% confidence level. The BON2010 and Matthia models are found to have similar overall uncertainty estimates and are preferred for space radiation shielding applications.

  8. An in vitro model of skeletal muscle volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibberley, Anna; Staunton, Caroline A; Feetham, Claire H; Vereninov, Alexey A; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic media causes cells to shrink due to water loss through aquaporin channels. After acute shrinkage, cells either regulate their volume or, alternatively, undergo a number of metabolic changes which ultimately lead to cell death. In many cell types, hypertonic shrinkage is followed by apoptosis. Due to the complex 3D morphology of skeletal muscle and the difficulty in obtaining isolated human tissue, we have begun skeletal muscle volume regulation studies using the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD. In this study we investigated whether hypertonic challenge of the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD triggered cell death or evoked a cell volume recovery response. The cellular volume of TE671RD cells was calculated from the 2D surface area. Cell death was assessed by both the trypan blue live/dead assay and the TUNEL assay. Medium osmolality was increased by addition of up to 200 mM sucrose. Addition of 200 mM sucrose resulted in mean cell shrinkage of 44±1% after 30 mins. At later time points (2 and 4 hrs) two separate cell subpopulations with differing mean cell volume became apparent. The first subpopulation (15±2% of the total cell number) continued to shrink whereas the second subpopulation had an increased cell volume. Cell death was observed in a small proportion of cells (approximately 6-8%). We have established that a substantial proportion of TE671RD cells respond to hypertonic challenge with RVI, but that these cells are resistant to hypertonicity triggered cell death.

  9. An in vitro model of skeletal muscle volume regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wibberley

    Full Text Available Hypertonic media causes cells to shrink due to water loss through aquaporin channels. After acute shrinkage, cells either regulate their volume or, alternatively, undergo a number of metabolic changes which ultimately lead to cell death. In many cell types, hypertonic shrinkage is followed by apoptosis. Due to the complex 3D morphology of skeletal muscle and the difficulty in obtaining isolated human tissue, we have begun skeletal muscle volume regulation studies using the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD. In this study we investigated whether hypertonic challenge of the human skeletal muscle cell line TE671RD triggered cell death or evoked a cell volume recovery response.The cellular volume of TE671RD cells was calculated from the 2D surface area. Cell death was assessed by both the trypan blue live/dead assay and the TUNEL assay.Medium osmolality was increased by addition of up to 200 mM sucrose. Addition of 200 mM sucrose resulted in mean cell shrinkage of 44±1% after 30 mins. At later time points (2 and 4 hrs two separate cell subpopulations with differing mean cell volume became apparent. The first subpopulation (15±2% of the total cell number continued to shrink whereas the second subpopulation had an increased cell volume. Cell death was observed in a small proportion of cells (approximately 6-8%.We have established that a substantial proportion of TE671RD cells respond to hypertonic challenge with RVI, but that these cells are resistant to hypertonicity triggered cell death.

  10. Carbon footprint estimator, phase II : volume I - GASCAP model & volume II - technical appendices [technical brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This study resulted in the development of the GASCAP model (the Greenhouse Gas Assessment : Spreadsheet for Transportation Capital Projects). This spreadsheet model provides a user-friendly interface for determining the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...

  11. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 6: User's manual for 1-dimensional numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth (e.g., natural or man-made inland lakes) because surface elevation has been removed as a parameter.

  12. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Appendix consists of two unpublished reports produced by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These two reports formed the basis for the subsequent development of the Fuel Economy Model described in Volume 1. They are included in order to document more completely the efforts undertaken to construct a comprehensive model of automobile fuel economy. The supplemental reports are as follows: Supplement 1--Documentation Attributes of Technologies to Improve Automotive Fuel Economy; Supplement 2--Analysis of the Fuel Economy Boundary for 2010 and Comparison to Prototypes.

  13. Diameter structure modeling and the calculation of plantation volume of black poplar clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrašev Siniša

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of diameter structure modeling was applied in the calculation of plantation (stand volume of two black poplar clones in the section Aigeiros (Duby: 618 (Lux and S1-8. Diameter structure modeling by Weibull function makes it possible to calculate the plantation volume by volume line. Based on the comparison of the proposed method with the existing methods, the obtained error of plantation volume was less than 2%. Diameter structure modeling and the calculation of plantation volume by diameter structure model, by the regularity of diameter distribution, enables a better analysis of the production level and assortment structure and it can be used in the construction of yield and increment tables.

  14. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    has evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  15. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of low back pain (LBPhas evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  16. Modeling and experimental assessment of a buried Leu–Ile mutation in dengue envelope domain III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, Manjiri R.; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ito, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Envelope protein domain III (ED3) of the dengue virus is important for both antibody binding and host cell interaction. Here, we focused on how a L387I mutation in the protein core could take place in DEN4 ED3, but cannot be accommodated in DEN3 ED3 without destabilizing its structure. To this end, we modeled a DEN4_L387I structure using the Penultimate Rotamer Library and taking the DEN4 ED3 main-chain as a fixed template. We found that three out of seven Ile 387 conformers fit in DEN4 ED3 without introducing the severe atomic clashes that are observed when DEN3 serotype’s ED3 is used as a template. A more extensive search using 273 side-chain rotamers of the residues surrounding Ile 387 confirmed this prediction. In order to assess the prediction, we determined the crystal structure of DEN4_L387I at 2 Å resolution. Ile 387 indeed adopted one of the three predicted rotamers. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the effects of single mutations are to a large extent successfully predicted by systematically modeling the side-chain structures of the mutated as well as those of its surrounding residues using fixed main-chain structures and assessing inter-atomic steric clashes. More accurate and reliable predictions require considering sub-angstrom main-chain deformation, which remains a challenging task. - Highlights: • We mutated L387I of DEN4 ED3 and examined its effects on structure and stability. • We modeled the side-chain of Ile 387 using DEN4 ED3's structure as a template. • We determined the crystal structure of DEN4_L387I and confirmed the modeling. • Side-chain repacking occurring around Ile 387 involved >3 inter-connected residues. • These results explained why L387I mutation in DEN4 ED3 conserves thermostability.

  17. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. III. Twist Number Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y. [School of Astronomy and Space Science and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Pariat, E.; Moraitis, K. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-92190 Meudon (France); Valori, G. [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Anfinogentov, S. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS 664033, Irkutsk, P.O. box 291, Lermontov Street, 126a (Russian Federation); Chen, F. [Max-Plank-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Georgoulis, M. K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics of the Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Thalmann, J. K. [Institute of Physics, Univeristy of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Yang, S., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-05-01

    We study the writhe, twist, and magnetic helicity of different magnetic flux ropes, based on models of the solar coronal magnetic field structure. These include an analytical force-free Titov–Démoulin equilibrium solution, non-force-free magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and nonlinear force-free magnetic field models. The geometrical boundary of the magnetic flux rope is determined by the quasi-separatrix layer and the bottom surface, and the axis curve of the flux rope is determined by its overall orientation. The twist is computed by the Berger–Prior formula, which is suitable for arbitrary geometry and both force-free and non-force-free models. The magnetic helicity is estimated by the twist multiplied by the square of the axial magnetic flux. We compare the obtained values with those derived by a finite volume helicity estimation method. We find that the magnetic helicity obtained with the twist method agrees with the helicity carried by the purely current-carrying part of the field within uncertainties for most test cases. It is also found that the current-carrying part of the model field is relatively significant at the very location of the magnetic flux rope. This qualitatively explains the agreement between the magnetic helicity computed by the twist method and the helicity contributed purely by the current-carrying magnetic field.

  18. Synthesis, characterisation and modelling of a ferromagnetically coupled chromium(III) Dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    A rare example of a ferromagnetically coupled dinuclear chromium(III) complex, the di-μ-hydroxobis[tetrakis(isothiocyanato)chromate(III)] anion, is reported. This complex has been synthesised from the oxo-bridged acetonitrile complex [(CH3CN)5CrOCr(NCCH3)5](BF4)4 and isolated as the solvated tetr...

  19. Expression of metallothionein-I, -II, and -III in Alzheimer disease and animal models of neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Juan; Penkowa, Milena; Espejo, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that the metallothionein (MT) family of proteins is important in neurobiology. MT-I and MT-II are normally dramatically up-regulated by neuroinflammation. Results for MT-III are less clear. MTs could also be relevant in human neuropathology. In Alz......-II, and MT-III in brain physiology....

  20. Electric field distribution in a finite-volume head model of deep brain stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Peadar F.; Lowery, Madeleine M.

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a whole-head finite element model of deep brain stimulation to examine the effect of electrical grounding, the finite conducting volume of the head, and scalp, skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers. The impedance between the stimulating and reference electrodes in the whole-head model was found to lie within clinically reported values when the reference electrode was incorporated on a localized surface in the model. Incorporation of the finite volume of the head and inclusi...

  1. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The attachments contained within this appendix provide additional details about the model development and estimation process which do not easily lend themselves to incorporation in the main body of the model documentation report. The information provided in these attachments is not integral to the understanding of the model`s operation, but provides the reader with opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of some of the model`s underlying assumptions. There will be a slight degree of replication of materials found elsewhere in the documentation, made unavoidable by the dictates of internal consistency. Each attachment is associated with a specific component of the transportation model; the presentation follows the same sequence of modules employed in Volume 1. The following attachments are contained in Appendix F: Fuel Economy Model (FEM)--provides a discussion of the FEM vehicle demand and performance by size class models; Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Model--describes data input sources and extrapolation methodologies; Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) Stock Model--discusses the fuel economy gap estimation methodology; Light Duty Vehicle Fleet Model--presents the data development for business, utility, and government fleet vehicles; Light Commercial Truck Model--describes the stratification methodology and data sources employed in estimating the stock and performance of LCT`s; Air Travel Demand Model--presents the derivation of the demographic index, used to modify estimates of personal travel demand; and Airborne Emissions Model--describes the derivation of emissions factors used to associate transportation measures to levels of airborne emissions of several pollutants.

  2. Comparison of the Mortality Probability Admission Model III, National Quality Forum, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV hospital mortality models: implications for national benchmarking*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andrew A; Higgins, Thomas L; Zimmerman, Jack E

    2014-03-01

    To examine the accuracy of the original Mortality Probability Admission Model III, ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum modification of Mortality Probability Admission Model III, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa models for comparing observed and risk-adjusted hospital mortality predictions. Retrospective paired analyses of day 1 hospital mortality predictions using three prognostic models. Fifty-five ICUs at 38 U.S. hospitals from January 2008 to December 2012. Among 174,001 intensive care admissions, 109,926 met model inclusion criteria and 55,304 had data for mortality prediction using all three models. None. We compared patient exclusions and the discrimination, calibration, and accuracy for each model. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa excluded 10.7% of all patients, ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum 20.1%, and Mortality Probability Admission Model III 24.1%. Discrimination of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa was superior with area under receiver operating curve (0.88) compared with Mortality Probability Admission Model III (0.81) and ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum (0.80). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa was better calibrated (lowest Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic). The accuracy of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa was superior (adjusted Brier score = 31.0%) to that for Mortality Probability Admission Model III (16.1%) and ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum (17.8%). Compared with observed mortality, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa overpredicted mortality by 1.5% and Mortality Probability Admission Model III by 3.1%; ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum underpredicted mortality by 1.2%. Calibration curves showed that Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation performed well over the entire risk range, unlike the Mortality Probability Admission Model and ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum models. Acute

  3. Estimating tree bole volume using artificial neural network models for four species in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Ramazan; Diamantopoulou, Maria J; Brooks, John R; Wiant, Harry V

    2010-01-01

    Tree bole volumes of 89 Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), 96 Brutian pine (Pinus brutia Ten.), 107 Cilicica fir (Abies cilicica Carr.) and 67 Cedar of Lebanon (Cedrus libani A. Rich.) trees were estimated using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models. Neural networks offer a number of advantages including the ability to implicitly detect complex nonlinear relationships between input and output variables, which is very helpful in tree volume modeling. Two different neural network architectures were used and produced the Back propagation (BPANN) and the Cascade Correlation (CCANN) Artificial Neural Network models. In addition, tree bole volume estimates were compared to other established tree bole volume estimation techniques including the centroid method, taper equations, and existing standard volume tables. An overview of the features of ANNs and traditional methods is presented and the advantages and limitations of each one of them are discussed. For validation purposes, actual volumes were determined by aggregating the volumes of measured short sections (average 1 meter) of the tree bole using Smalian's formula. The results reported in this research suggest that the selected cascade correlation artificial neural network (CCANN) models are reliable for estimating the tree bole volume of the four examined tree species since they gave unbiased results and were superior to almost all methods in terms of error (%) expressed as the mean of the percentage errors. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Does amniotic fluid volume affect fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies? Modelling two possible mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umur, Asli; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Ross, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that increased amniotic fluid volume due to polyhydrarnnios increases placental vascular resistance. We have sought to model the possible effects of an increased amniotic fluid volume oil the net fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies. We wanted to compare

  5. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Report of phase III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Stephansson, O.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of the field/laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling defined for the phase III of the project. Results from test cases 2-6 are given in separate chapters of the report (which have been indexed separately), and the last chapter discusses the lessons learned from the three phases of the DECOVALEX project

  6. Exact Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi types I and III cosmological models with a conformally invariant scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Einstein-Conformally Invariant Scalar Field Equations are obtained for Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi types I and III cosmologies. The presence of the conformally invariant scalar field is responsible for some interesting features of the solutions. In particular it is found that the Bianchi I model is consistent with the big-bang theory of cosmology. (Author) [pt

  7. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Modelling of FEBEX In-Situ Test. Task1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E.E.; Alcoverro, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)] (comps.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 1 of DECOVALEX III was conceived as a benchmark exercise supported by all field and laboratory data generated during the performance of the FEBEX experiment designed to study thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical processes of the buffer and rock in the near field. The task was defined as a series of three successive blind prediction exercises (Parts A, B and C), which cover the behaviour of both the rock and bentonite barrier. Research teams participating in the FEBEX task were given, for each of the three parts, a set of field and laboratory data theoretically sufficient to generate a proper model and were asked to submit predictions, at given locations and time, for some of the measured variables. The merits and limitations of different modeling approaches were therefore established. The teams could perform additional calculations, once the actual 'solution' was disclosed. Final calculations represented the best approximation that a given team could provide, always within the general time constraints imposed by the General DECOVALEX III Organization. This report presents the works performed for Task 1. It contains the case definitions and evaluations of modelling results for Part A, B and C, and the overall evaluation of the works performed. The report is completed by a CD-ROM containing a set of final reports provided by the modeling teams participating in each of the three parts defined. These reports provide the necessary details to better understand the nature of the blind or final predictions included in this report. The report closes with a set of conclusions, which provides a summary of the main findings and highlights the lessons learned, some of which were summarized below. The best predictions of the water inflow into the excavated tunnel are found when the hydro geological model is properly calibrated on the basis of other known flow measurements in the same area. The particular idealization of the rock mass (equivalent

  8. Review of air quality modeling techniques. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Air transport and diffusion models which are applicable to the assessment of the environmental effects of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation are reviewed. The general classification of models and model inputs are discussed. A detailed examination of the statistical, Gaussian plume, Gaussian puff, one-box and species-conservation-of-mass models is given. Representative models are discussed with attention given to the assumptions, input data requirement, advantages, disadvantages and applicability of each

  9. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  10. A general method for assessing the effects of uncertainty in individual-tree volume model predictions on large-area volume estimates with a subtropical forest illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Paolo Moser; Laio Zimermann Oliveira; Alexander C. Vibrans

    2015-01-01

    Forest inventory estimates of tree volume for large areas are typically calculated by adding the model predictions of volumes for individual trees at the plot level, calculating the mean over plots, and expressing the result on a per unit area basis. The uncertainty in the model predictions is generally ignored, with the result that the precision of the large-area...

  11. Spectroscopic, structural characterizations and antioxidant capacity of the chromium (III) niacinamide compound as a diabetes mellitus drug model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hussien, M. A.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Al-Omar, Mohamed A.; Naglah, Ahmed M.; Afifi, Walid M.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2017-02-01

    New binuclear chromium (III) niacinamide compound with chemical formula [Cr2(Nic)(Cl)6(H2O)4]·H2O was obtained upon the reaction of chromium (III) chloride with niacinamide (Nic) in methanol solvent at 60 °C. The proposed structure was discussed with the help of microanalytical analyses, conductivity, spectroscopic (FT-IR and UV-vis.), magnetic calculations, thermogravimetric analyses (TG/TGA), and morphological studies (X-ray of solid powder and scan electron microscopy. The infrared spectrum of free niacinamide in comparison with its chromium (III) compound indicated that the chelation mode occurs via both nitrogen atoms of pyridine ring and primary -NH2 group. The efficiency of chromium (III) niacinamide compound in decreasing of glucose level of blood and HbA1c in case of diabetic rats was checked. The ameliorating gluconeogenic enzymes, lipid profile and antioxidant defense capacities are considered as an indicator of the efficiency of new chromium (III) compound as antidiabetic drug model.

  12. Urokinase receptor cleavage correlates with tumor volume in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurison, Tine; Almholt, Kasper; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    PAR(I)]. The level of muPAR(I) is significantly increased in mammary tumor-bearing mice compared to controls and, notably, there is a strong correlation to tumor volume. In contrast, the tumor volume is only weakly correlated to the level of intact muPAR(I-III), indicating that cleavage of muPAR is a more specific...... marker for cancer than increased expression of muPAR per se. The levels of the muPAR forms are dramatically affected by in vivo challenge with a urokinase -blocking antibody, demonstrating a functional role of uPA in uPAR cleavage. The levels of the muPAR forms are, however, unaffected by u......PA-deficiency, suggesting that redundant proteases maintains the task of cleaving uPAR(I-III) when uPA is absent. Our findings emphasize the significance of the cleaved uPAR forms as cancer biomarkers. The strong correlation between muPAR(I) and the tumor volume in our experimental setup may motivate investigations...

  13. 3D CT modeling of hepatic vessel architecture and volume calculation in living donated liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frericks, Bernd B.; Caldarone, Franco C.; Savellano, Dagmar Hoegemann; Stamm, Georg; Kirchhoff, Timm D.; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Galanski, Michael; Nashan, Bjoern; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schenk, Andrea; Selle, Dirk; Spindler, Wolf; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a software tool for non-invasive preoperative volumetric assessment of potential donors in living donated liver transplantation (LDLT). Biphasic helical CT was performed in 56 potential donors. Data sets were post-processed using a non-commercial software tool for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualisation of liver segments. Semi-automatic definition of liver margins allowed the segmentation of parenchyma. Hepatic vessels were delineated using a region-growing algorithm with automatically determined thresholds. Volumes and shapes of liver segments were calculated automatically based on individual portal-venous branches. Results were visualised three-dimensionally and statistically compared with conventional volumetry and the intraoperative findings in 27 transplanted cases. Image processing was easy to perform within 23 min. Of the 56 potential donors, 27 were excluded from LDLT because of inappropriate liver parenchyma or vascular architecture. Two recipients were not transplanted due to poor clinical conditions. In the 27 transplanted cases, preoperatively visualised vessels were confirmed, and only one undetected accessory hepatic vein was revealed. Calculated graft volumes were 1110±180 ml for right lobes, 820 ml for the left lobe and 270±30 ml for segments II+III. The calculated volumes and intraoperatively measured graft volumes correlated significantly. No significant differences between the presented automatic volumetry and the conventional volumetry were observed. A novel image processing technique was evaluated which allows a semi-automatic volume calculation and 3D visualisation of the different liver segments. (orig.)

  14. Calculation of search volume on cruise-searching planktivorous fish in foraging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bae Kyung; Lee, Yong Seok; Park, Seok Soon

    2007-07-01

    Search volume of cruising planktivorous fish was calculated based on its detailed behavior Th examine the factors influencing search volume, a series of experiments were conducted by varying ambient conditions, such as structural complexity light intensity and turbidity Pseudorasbora parva were used in experiment as predator and Daphnia pulex was selected as prey The shape of scanning area of P parva showed elliptic and the search volume changed drastically depending on ambient conditions. Compared with the results of previous foraging model, the search volumes of the fish under previous study were larger (1.2 to 2.4 times) than those from our study These results on the changes in feeding rate can be useful in determining microhabitat requirement of P parva and othercyprinids with a similar foraging behavior The calculated search volume is compared with other foraging model andthe effect of zooplankton-planktivore interactions on aquatic ecosystem is discussed.

  15. Indicators of residential traffic exposure: Modelled NOX, traffic proximity, and self-reported exposure in RHINE III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Hanne Krage; Bäck, Erik; Eneroth, Kristina; Gislason, Thorarinn; Holm, Mathias; Janson, Christer; Jensen, Steen Solvang; Johannessen, Ane; Kaasik, Marko; Modig, Lars; Segersson, David; Sigsgaard, Torben; Forsberg, Bertil; Olsson, David; Orru, Hans

    2017-10-01

    Few studies have investigated associations between self-reported and modelled exposure to traffic pollution. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between self-reported traffic exposure and modelled (a) NOX and (b) traffic proximity in seven different northern European cities; Aarhus (Denmark), Bergen (Norway), Gothenburg, Umeå, and Uppsala (Sweden), Reykjavik (Iceland), and Tartu (Estonia). We analysed data from the RHINE III (Respiratory Health in Northern Europe, http://www.rhine.nu)

  16. An enhanced matrix-free edge-based finite volume approach to model structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the formulation, implementation and evaluation of an enhanced matrix free edge-based finite volume approach to model the mechanics of solids undergoing large non-linear deformations. The developed technology is evaluated via...

  17. Fixed site neutralization model programmer's manual. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engi, D.; Chapman, L.D.; Judnick, W.; Blum, R.; Broegler, L.; Lenz, J.; Weinthraub, A.; Ballard, D.

    1979-12-01

    This report relates to protection of nuclear materials at nuclear facilities. This volume presents the source listings for the Fixed Site Neutralization Model and its supporting modules, the Plex Preprocessor and the Data Preprocessor. (DLC)

  18. Modeling and experimental assessment of a buried Leu–Ile mutation in dengue envelope domain III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Manjiri R. [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Nakamachi, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Numoto, Nobutaka; Ito, Nobutoshi [Department of Structural Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Kuroda, Yutaka, E-mail: ykuroda@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Nakamachi, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-26

    Envelope protein domain III (ED3) of the dengue virus is important for both antibody binding and host cell interaction. Here, we focused on how a L387I mutation in the protein core could take place in DEN4 ED3, but cannot be accommodated in DEN3 ED3 without destabilizing its structure. To this end, we modeled a DEN4-L387I structure using the Penultimate Rotamer Library and taking the DEN4 ED3 main-chain as a fixed template. We found that three out of seven Ile{sup 387} conformers fit in DEN4 ED3 without introducing the severe atomic clashes that are observed when DEN3 serotype’s ED3 is used as a template. A more extensive search using 273 side-chain rotamers of the residues surrounding Ile{sup 387} confirmed this prediction. In order to assess the prediction, we determined the crystal structure of DEN4-L387I at 2 Å resolution. Ile{sup 387} indeed adopted one of the three predicted rotamers. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the effects of single mutations are to a large extent successfully predicted by systematically modeling the side-chain structures of the mutated as well as those of its surrounding residues using fixed main-chain structures and assessing inter-atomic steric clashes. More accurate and reliable predictions require considering sub-angstrom main-chain deformation, which remains a challenging task. - Highlights: • We mutated L387I of DEN4 ED3 and examined its effects on structure and stability. • We modeled the side-chain of Ile{sup 387} using DEN4 ED3's structure as a template. • We determined the crystal structure of DEN4-L387I and confirmed the modeling. • Side-chain repacking occurring around Ile{sup 387} involved >3 inter-connected residues. • These results explained why L387I mutation in DEN4 ED3 conserves thermostability.

  19. HYDROCARBON SPILL SCREENING MODEL (HSSM) VOLUME 1: USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This users guide describes the Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM). The model is intended for simulation of subsurface releases of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). The model consists of separate modules for LNAPL flow through the vadose zone, spreading in the capil...

  20. Statistical Modeling of Ultrawideband Body-Centric Wireless Channels Considering Room Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Hirose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a statistical modeling of onbody ultrawideband (UWB radio channels for wireless body area network (WBAN applications. Measurements were conducted in five different rooms. A measured delay profile can be divided into two domains; in the first domain (04 ns has multipath components that are dominant and dependent on room volume. The first domain was modeled with a conventional power decay law model, and the second domain with a modified Saleh-Valenzuela model considering the room volume. Realizations of the impulse responses are presented based on the composite model and compared with the measured average power delay profiles.

  1. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  2. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (17th, Tsukuba, Japan, July 18-23, 1993). Volumes I-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Ichiei, Ed.; And Others

    The Proceedings of PME-XVII has been published in three volumes because of the large number of papers presented at the conference. Volume I contains a brief Plenary Panel report, 4 full-scale Plenary Addresses, the brief reports of 10 Working Groups and 4 Discussion Groups, and a total of 23 Research Reports grouped under 4 themes. Volume II…

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference on the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (11th, Montreal, Canada, July 19-25, 1987). Volumes I-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Jacques C., Ed.; And Others

    The Proceedings of PME-XI has been published in three separate volumes because of the large total of 161 individual conference papers reported. Volume I contains four plenary papers, all on the subject of "constructivism," and 44 commented papers arranged under 4 themes. Volume II contains 56 papers (39 commented; 17 uncommented)…

  4. Stimulation model for lenticular sands: Volume 2, Users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybicki, E.F.; Luiskutty, C.T.; Sutrick, J.S.; Palmer, I.D.; Shah, G.H.; Tomutsa, L.

    1987-07-01

    This User's Manual contains information for four fracture/proppant models. TUPROP1 contains a Geertsma and de Klerk type fracture model. The section of the program utilizing the proppant fracture geometry data from the pseudo three-dimensional highly elongated fracture model is called TUPROPC. The analogous proppant section of the program that was modified to accept fracture shape data from SA3DFRAC is called TUPROPS. TUPROPS also includes fracture closure. Finally there is the penny fracture and its proppant model, PENNPROP. In the first three chapters, the proppant sections are based on the same theory for determining the proppant distribution but have modifications to support variable height fractures and modifications to accept fracture geometry from three different fracture models. Thus, information about each proppant model in the User's Manual builds on information supplied in the previous chapter. The exception to the development of combined treatment models is the penny fracture and its proppant model. In this case, a completely new proppant model was developed. A description of how to use the combined treatment model for the penny fracture is contained in Chapter 4. 2 refs.

  5. Bianchi type-I and -III modified holographic Ricci Dark energy models in Saez-Ballester theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, V. U. M.; Divya Prasanthi, U. Y.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we study the spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III (B-III) and locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Binachi type-I (B-I) models filled with matter and dark energy in the framework of the Saez-Ballester (1986) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. Here, we consider the modified holographic Ricci dark energy as the viable candidate to dark energy. To obtain a deterministic solution we consider the time-varying deceleration parameter, which leads to the average scale factor a(t)=[sinh(α t)]^{1/k}. This average scale factor describes a model which generates a smooth transition of the universe from the early decelerating phase to the recent accelerating phase. The physical and kinematical aspects of the models are discussed through figures and also found to be in good agreement with recent astrophysical observations under suitable conditions.

  6. Predictor model for seasonal variations in skid resistance, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J. J.; Saito, K.; Blackburn, R.

    1984-04-01

    Two models, utilizing data collected in 1979 and 1980, were developed to predict variations in skid resistance due to rainfall conditions, temperature effects, and time of the year. A generalized predictor model was developed from purely statistical considerations and a mechanistic model was developed from hypothesized mechanisms. This model may be utilized to estimate the skid resistance at any time in the season from a measurement made during the same season, or to adjust skid-resistance measurement made at any time during the season to the end-of-season level. The mechanistic model requires, in addition to the above inputs, two pavement properties describing the polishing characteristics of the aggregate and an estimate of the percent normalized gradient of the skid resistance. The application of these models is summarized.

  7. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Bander, T.J.; Athey, G.F.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-03-01

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates

  8. A model for vented deflagration of hydrogen in a volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulpuru, S.R.; Wilkin, G.B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple model was constructed to predict the property transients resulting from the deflagration of a combustible mixture in a sphere or cylinder with venting of the gas mixture to the environment. A computer program VENT, was written to solve the model equation. The model will be particularly useful for studying hydrogen burning effects in loss-of-coolant plus losss of emergency coolant accidents in CANDU reactors

  9. A Validated Normative Model for Human Uterine Volume from Birth to Age 40 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Ginbey, Eleanor; Chowdhury, Moti M; Bath, Louise E; Anderson, Richard A; Wallace, W Hamish B

    2016-01-01

    Transabdominal pelvic ultrasound and/or pelvic Magnetic Resonance Imaging are safe, accurate and non-invasive means of determining the size and configuration of the internal female genitalia. The assessment of uterine size and volume is helpful in the assessment of many conditions including disorders of sex development, precocious or delayed puberty, infertility and menstrual disorders. Using our own data from the assessment of MRI scans in healthy young females and data extracted from four studies that assessed uterine volume using transabdominal ultrasound in healthy females we have derived and validated a normative model of uterine volume from birth to age 40 years. This shows that uterine volume increases across childhood, with a faster increase in adolescence reflecting the influence of puberty, followed by a slow but progressive rise during adult life. The model suggests that around 84% of the variation in uterine volumes in the healthy population up to age 40 is due to age alone. The derivation of a validated normative model for uterine volume from birth to age 40 years has important clinical applications by providing age-related reference values for uterine volume.

  10. Mechanistic Fluid Transport Model to Estimate Gastrointestinal Fluid Volume and Its Dynamic Change Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alex; Jackson, Trachette; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Koenigsknecht, Mark; Wysocki, Jeffrey; Marciani, Luca; Amidon, Gordon L; Frances, Ann; Baker, Jason R; Hasler, William; Wen, Bo; Pai, Amit; Sun, Duxin

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) fluid volume and its dynamic change are integral to study drug disintegration, dissolution, transit, and absorption. However, key questions regarding the local volume and its absorption, secretion, and transit remain unanswered. The dynamic fluid compartment absorption and transit (DFCAT) model is proposed to estimate in vivo GI volume and GI fluid transport based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quantified fluid volume. The model was validated using GI local concentration of phenol red in human GI tract, which was directly measured by human GI intubation study after oral dosing of non-absorbable phenol red. The measured local GI concentration of phenol red ranged from 0.05 to 168 μg/mL (stomach), to 563 μg/mL (duodenum), to 202 μg/mL (proximal jejunum), and to 478 μg/mL (distal jejunum). The DFCAT model characterized observed MRI fluid volume and its dynamic changes from 275 to 46.5 mL in stomach (from 0 to 30 min) with mucus layer volume of 40 mL. The volumes of the 30 small intestine compartments were characterized by a max of 14.98 mL to a min of 0.26 mL (0-120 min) and a mucus layer volume of 5 mL per compartment. Regional fluid volumes over 0 to 120 min ranged from 5.6 to 20.38 mL in the proximal small intestine, 36.4 to 44.08 mL in distal small intestine, and from 42 to 64.46 mL in total small intestine. The DFCAT model can be applied to predict drug dissolution and absorption in the human GI tract with future improvements.

  11. A hybrid ARIMA and neural network model applied to forecast catch volumes of Selar crumenophthalmus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Ronald L.; Alcantara, Nialle Loui Mar T.; Addawe, Rizavel C.

    2017-11-01

    The Selar crumenophthalmus with the English name big-eyed scad fish, locally known as matang-baka, is one of the fishes commonly caught along the waters of La Union, Philippines. The study deals with the forecasting of catch volumes of big-eyed scad fish for commercial consumption. The data used are quarterly caught volumes of big-eyed scad fish from 2002 to first quarter of 2017. This actual data is available from the open stat database published by the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA)whose task is to collect, compiles, analyzes and publish information concerning different aspects of the Philippine setting. Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) models, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model and the Hybrid model consisting of ARIMA and ANN were developed to forecast catch volumes of big-eyed scad fish. Statistical errors such as Mean Absolute Errors (MAE) and Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE) were computed and compared to choose the most suitable model for forecasting the catch volume for the next few quarters. A comparison of the results of each model and corresponding statistical errors reveals that the hybrid model, ARIMA-ANN (2,1,2)(6:3:1), is the most suitable model to forecast the catch volumes of the big-eyed scad fish for the next few quarters.

  12. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-06-01

    A two dimensional, steady-state model for describing a variety of reactive and nonreactive flows, including pulverized coal combustion and gasification, is presented. The model, referred to as 93-PCGC-2 is applicable to cylindrical, axi-symmetric systems. Turbulence is accounted for in both the fluid mechanics equations and the combustion scheme. Radiation from gases, walls, and particles is taken into account using a discrete ordinates method. The particle phase is modeled in a lagrangian framework, such that mean paths of particle groups are followed. A new coal-general devolatilization submodel (FG-DVC) with coal swelling and char reactivity submodels has been added.

  13. Operational Modelling of the Aerospace Propagation Environment. Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    radiative transfer models are rarely available in a battlefield environment. tnly secondary ECNET parameters may be available. Hence, current modeling and...adopthe done lee traitements a 6tA de remplacer chaque valeur X4Dar son rang. Clest-h-diro quo Zj eet rermplacO pax Is nombre d’dohant~illons do X. qui...out uslub r -aItistial model relevant to thobe arcac If the Urt chooses a terraln typ- from the lIs- glvtn ,hov, a stetistlcol ’irregulal terr .’n

  14. Volume and aboveground biomass models for dry Miombo woodland in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mwakalukwa, Ezekiel Edward; Meilby, Henrik; Treue, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Tools to accurately estimate tree volume and biomass are scarce for most forest types in East Africa, including Tanzania. Based on a sample of 142 trees and 57 shrubs from a 6,065 ha area of dry miombo woodland in Iringa rural district in Tanzania, regression models were developed for volume...... and biomass of three important species, Brachystegia spiciformis Benth. (n=40), Combretum molle G. Don (n=41), and Dalbergia arbutifolia Baker (n=37) separately, and for broader samples of trees (28 species, n=72), shrubs (16 species, n=31), and trees and shrubs combined (44 species, n=104). Applied...... of the predictions tended to increase from general to species-specific models. Except for a few volume and biomass models developed for shrubs, all models had R2 values of 96–99%. Thus, the models appear robust and should be applicable to forests with similar site conditions, species, and diameter ranges....

  15. Carbon footprint estimator, phase II : volume I - GASCAP model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The GASCAP model was developed to provide a software tool for analysis of the life-cycle GHG : emissions associated with the construction and maintenance of transportation projects. This phase : of development included techniques for estimating emiss...

  16. A physical multifield model predicts the development of volume and structure in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooij, Rijk de; Kuhl, Ellen

    2018-03-01

    The prenatal development of the human brain is characterized by a rapid increase in brain volume and a development of a highly folded cortex. At the cellular level, these events are enabled by symmetric and asymmetric cell division in the ventricular regions of the brain followed by an outwards cell migration towards the peripheral regions. The role of mechanics during brain development has been suggested and acknowledged in past decades, but remains insufficiently understood. Here we propose a mechanistic model that couples cell division, cell migration, and brain volume growth to accurately model the developing brain between weeks 10 and 29 of gestation. Our model accurately predicts a 160-fold volume increase from 1.5 cm3 at week 10 to 235 cm3 at week 29 of gestation. In agreement with human brain development, the cortex begins to form around week 22 and accounts for about 30% of the total brain volume at week 29. Our results show that cell division and coupling between cell density and volume growth are essential to accurately model brain volume development, whereas cell migration and diffusion contribute mainly to the development of the cortex. We demonstrate that complex folding patterns, including sinusoidal folds and creases, emerge naturally as the cortex develops, even for low stiffness contrasts between the cortex and subcortex.

  17. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Thoracic Volume Modeling: The Effect of Surgical Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniczka, Jennifer K; Ledonio, Charles G T; Polly, David W; Rosenstein, Benjamin E; Nuckley, David J

    2017-12-01

    Scoliosis has been shown to have detrimental effects on pulmonary function, traditionally measured by pulmonary function tests, which is theorized to be correlated to the distortion of the spine and thorax. The changes in thoracic volume with surgical correction have not been well quantified. This study seeks to define the effect of surgical correction on thoracic volume in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Images were obtained from adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis enrolled in a multicenter database (Prospective Pediatric Scoliosis Study). A convenience sample of patients with Lenke type 1 curves with a complete data set meeting specific parameters was used. Blender v2.63a software was used to construct a 3-dimensional (3D) computational model of the spine from 2-dimensional calibrated radiographs. To accomplish this, the 3D thorax model was deformed to match the calibrated radiographs. The thorax volume was then calculated in cubic centimeters using Mimics v15 software. The results using this computational modeling technique demonstrated that surgical correction resulted in decreased curve measurement as determined by Cobb method, and increased postoperative thoracic volume as expected. Thoracic volume significantly increased by a mean of 567 mm (P3D changes in thoracic volumes using 2-dimensional imaging. This is an assessment of the novel modeling technique, to be used in larger future studies to assess clinical significance. Level 3-retrospective comparison of prospectively collected data.

  18. Kinetic model building using advanced nuclear medicine techniques: the kinetics of chromium(III) in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T.H.

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a valid index of chromium (III) nutritional status can be determined with satisfaction through in vivo kinetic analysis. Three normal subjects and three patients suffering from hemochromatosis were periodically scanned with the Donner Laboratory computerized whole body scanners, starting seconds after radiochromium(III) was administered intravenously, up to a period of 84 days. The activity in the liver, adipose and muscle tissues, spleen and bone was quantitated and corrected, by subtraction of the blood circulation activity in that organ; the major concentration was found in the liver and spleen. From the series of scan images, a kinetic model for the radiochromium(III) metabolic pathway was constructed. Computer analysis showed a significant difference between the two classes of subjects in organs as well as whole body radiochromium(III) transfer. Interpretation of these results showed that in patients with excessive iron stores, a smaller amount of chromium bound to plasma protein was found and a corresponding decrease in transfer of chromium into stores in the liver and other tissues was also found

  19. Developing a stochastic traffic volume prediction model for public-private partnership projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, Nguyen Thanh; Likhitruangsilp, Veerasak; Onishi, Masamitsu

    2017-11-01

    Transportation projects require an enormous amount of capital investment resulting from their tremendous size, complexity, and risk. Due to the limitation of public finances, the private sector is invited to participate in transportation project development. The private sector can entirely or partially invest in transportation projects in the form of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) scheme, which has been an attractive option for several developing countries, including Vietnam. There are many factors affecting the success of PPP projects. The accurate prediction of traffic volume is considered one of the key success factors of PPP transportation projects. However, only few research works investigated how to predict traffic volume over a long period of time. Moreover, conventional traffic volume forecasting methods are usually based on deterministic models which predict a single value of traffic volume but do not consider risk and uncertainty. This knowledge gap makes it difficult for concessionaires to estimate PPP transportation project revenues accurately. The objective of this paper is to develop a probabilistic traffic volume prediction model. First, traffic volumes were estimated following the Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM) process. Monte Carlo technique is then applied to simulate different scenarios. The results show that this stochastic approach can systematically analyze variations in the traffic volume and yield more reliable estimates for PPP projects.

  20. Finite-volume model for chemical vapor infiltration incorporating radiant heat transfer. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.W.; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Most finite-volume thermal models account for the diffusion and convection of heat and may include volume heating. However, for certain simulation geometries, a large percentage of heat flux is due to thermal radiation. In this paper a finite-volume computational procedure for the simulation of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in three dimensional complex enclosures is developed. The radiant heat transfer is included as a source term in each volume element which is derived by Monte Carlo ray tracing from all possible radiating and absorbing faces. The importance of radiative heat transfer is illustrated in the modeling of chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of tubes. The temperature profile through the tube preform matches experimental measurements only when radiation is included. An alternative, empirical approach using an {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} thermal conductivity for the gas space can match the initial temperature profile but does not match temperature changes that occur during preform densification.

  1. Probabilistic Modeling of Aircraft Trajectories for Dynamic Separation Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    With a proliferation of new and unconventional vehicles and operations expected in the future, the ab initio airspace design will require new approaches to trajectory prediction for separation assurance and other air traffic management functions. This paper presents an approach to probabilistic modeling of the trajectory of an aircraft when its intent is unknown. The approach uses a set of feature functions to constrain a maximum entropy probability distribution based on a set of observed aircraft trajectories. This model can be used to sample new aircraft trajectories to form an ensemble reflecting the variability in an aircraft's intent. The model learning process ensures that the variability in this ensemble reflects the behavior observed in the original data set. Computational examples are presented.

  2. Enhanced FAA-hybrid III numerical dummy model in Madymo for aircraft occupant safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucher, H.; Waagmeester, C.D.

    2003-01-01

    To improve survivability and to minimize the risk of injury to occupants in helicopter crash events, a complete Cabin Safety System concept including safety features and an enhanced FAA-Hybrid III dummy were developed within the HeliSafe project. A numerical tool was also created and validated to

  3. Rich dynamics of a food chain model with ratio-dependent type III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dependent type III functional response. The investigations that are presented in this paper focus on the computation of food chain with and without time delay. Two types of discrete time delay in top level predator population are considered. In first type ...

  4. Recreation of architectural structures using procedural modeling based on volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Barroso Juan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available While the procedural modeling of buildings and other architectural structures has evolved very significantly in recent years, there is noticeable absence of high-level tools that allow a designer, an artist or an historian, creating important buildings or architectonic structures in a particular city. In this paper we present a tool for creating buildings in a simple and clear, following rules that use the language and methodology of creating their own buildings, and hiding the user the algorithmic details of the creation of the model.

  5. Pharmacodynamic modeling of propofol-induced tidal volume depression in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jin-Oh; Khosravi, Sara; Dosani, Maryam; Dumont, Guy A; Mark Ansermino, J

    2011-08-01

    This investigation aimed to develop a pediatric pharmacodynamic model of propofol-induced tidal volume depression towards an ultimate goal of developing a dosing schedule that would preserve spontaneous breathing following a loading dose of propofol. Fifty two ASA 1 and 2 children aged 6-15 year presenting for gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled. Subjects were administered a loading dose of 4 mg/kg of propofol intravenously at a constant infusion rate determined by a randomization schedule. Respiratory parameters including tidal volume, respiratory rate, minute volume, and end-tidal CO(2) were recorded at 5 s intervals. Using the predicted plasma concentration, based on the Paedfusor pharmacokinetic model, propofol-induced tidal volume depression was modeled by 3 different approaches (2-stage, pooled, and mixed effects) and results were compared using prediction residual, median percentage errors, median absolute percentage errors, and root-mean-squared normalized errors. The effects of age and body weight as covariates were examined. Respiratory rate and end-tidal CO(2) did not show clear dependence on the predicted plasma concentration. The pharmacodynamic models for tidal volume derived from different modeling approaches were highly consistent. The 2-stage, pooled, and mixed effects approaches yielded k(e0) of 1.06, 1.24, and 0.72 min(-1); γ of 1.10, 0.83, and 0.93; EC50 of 3.18, 3.44, and 3.00 mcg/ml. Including age and body weight as covariates did not significantly improve the predictive performance of the models. A pediatric pharmacodynamic model of propofol-induced tidal volume depression was developed. Models derived from 3 different approaches were shown to be consistent with each other; however, the individual pharmacodynamic parameters exhibited significant inter-individual variability without strong dependence on age and body weight. This would suggest the desirability of adapting the pharmacodynamic model to each subject in real time.

  6. Modeling, Growth and Characterization of III-V and Dilute Nitride Antimonide Materials and Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maros, Aymeric

    III-V multijunction solar cells have demonstrated record efficiencies with the best device currently at 46 % under concentration. Dilute nitride materials such as GaInNAsSb have been identified as a prime choice for the development of high efficiency, monolithic and lattice-matched multijunction solar cells as they can be lattice-matched to both GaAs and Ge substrates. These types of cells have demonstrated efficiencies of 44% for terrestrial concentrators, and with their upright configuration, they are a direct drop-in product for today's space and concentrator solar panels. The work presented in this dissertation has focused on the development of relatively novel dilute nitride antimonide (GaNAsSb) materials and solar cells using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, along with the modeling and characterization of single- and multijunction solar cells. Nitrogen-free ternary compounds such as GaInAs and GaAsSb were investigated first in order to understand their structural and optical properties prior to introducing nitrogen. The formation of extended defects and the resulting strain relaxation in these lattice-mismatched materials is investigated through extensive structural characterization. Temperature- and power-dependent photoluminescence revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of Sb in GaAsSb films, leading to carrier localization effects at low temperatures. Tuning of the growth parameters was shown to suppress these Sb-induced localized states. The introduction of nitrogen was then considered and the growth process was optimized to obtain high quality GaNAsSb films lattice-matched to GaAs. Near 1-eV single-junction GaNAsSb solar cells were produced. The best devices used a p-n heterojunction configuration and demonstrated a current density of 20.8 mA/cm2, a fill factor of 64 % and an open-circuit voltage of 0.39 V, corresponding to a bandgap-voltage offset of 0.57 V, comparable with the state-of-the-art for this type of solar cells. Post-growth annealing

  7. Applying control volume finite element for modelling direct injection boom spraying flow

    OpenAIRE

    El Aissaoui, Abdellah; Lebeau, Frédéric; Destain, Marie-France; Houmy, Karim

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of injection lag transport and uniformity of direct injection boom sprayer is an important issue for successful variable rate spraying technology. To estimate the boom lag transport and pressure loss, a numerical model is formulated on the basis of fluid hydrodynamic conservation equations. The software is implemented in visual basic. To solve the pressure – velocities equations, control volume finite element method (CV) is used to delimit elementary volumes of the boom. Linearizat...

  8. Faster Deterministic Volume Estimation in the Oracle Model via Thin Lattice Coverings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.N. Dadush (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractWe give a 2O(n)(1+1/")n time and poly(n)-space deterministic algorithm for computing a (1+")n approximation to the volume of a general convex body K, which comes close to matching the (1+c/")n/2 lower bound for volume estimation in the oracle model by Bárány and Füredi (STOC 1986,

  9. Volume Sculpting: Intuitive, Interactive 3D Shape Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    A system for interactive modelling of 3D shapes on a computer is presented. The system is intuitive and has a flat learning curve. It is especially well suited to the creation of organic shapes and shapes of complex topology. The interaction is simple; the user can either add new shape features...

  10. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  11. Abelian Sandpile Model (ASM) and Infinite Volume Limit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Self Organised Criticality (SOC). SOC- dynamics drive a system towards stationary state characterized by power law correlations in space and time. SOC- was proposed by [BTW 87,88] as a mechanism which could explain occurrence of fractal structures in diverse natural phenomena. ASM is a simple model where SOC ...

  12. 3D Modeling and Visualization of Geology Volume based on Geophysical Field Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Qi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available 3D modeling and visualization of geology volume is very important to interpret accurately and locate subsurface geology volume for mining exploration and deep prospecting. However, it faces a lack of information because the target area is usually unexplored and lacks geological data. This paper presents our experience in applying a 3D model of geology volume based on geophysics. This work has researched and developed a 3D visualization system. It is based on an OO (orientated object approach and modular programming, uses the C++ language and Microsoft .NET platform. This system has built first a high resistivity method and MT database. The system uses irregular tetrahedrons to construct its model and then finally has built the 3D geological model itself.

  13. Modelling and Bayesian adaptive prediction of individual patients’ tumour volume change during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, Imran; Chen, Tao; Kirkby, Norman F; Jena, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a mathematical modelling method that can predict individual patients’ response to radiotherapy, in terms of tumour volume change during the treatment. The main concept is to start from a population-average model, which is subsequently updated from an individual’s tumour volume measurement. The model becomes increasingly personalised and so too does the prediction it produces. This idea of adaptive prediction was realised by using a Bayesian approach for updating the model parameters. The feasibility of the developed method was demonstrated on the data from 25 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy, during which tumour volume was measured from daily imaging as part of the image-guided radiotherapy. The method could provide useful information for adaptive treatment planning and dose scheduling based on the patient’s personalised response. (paper)

  14. Tree Root System Characterization and Volume Estimation by Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Quantitative Structure Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Smith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate characterization of three-dimensional (3D root architecture, volume, and biomass is important for a wide variety of applications in forest ecology and to better understand tree and soil stability. Technological advancements have led to increasingly more digitized and automated procedures, which have been used to more accurately and quickly describe the 3D structure of root systems. Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS have successfully been used to describe aboveground structures of individual trees and stand structure, but have only recently been applied to the 3D characterization of whole root systems. In this study, 13 recently harvested Norway spruce root systems were mechanically pulled from the soil, cleaned, and their volumes were measured by displacement. The root systems were suspended, scanned with TLS from three different angles, and the root surfaces from the co-registered point clouds were modeled with the 3D Quantitative Structure Model to determine root architecture and volume. The modeling procedure facilitated the rapid derivation of root volume, diameters, break point diameters, linear root length, cumulative percentages, and root fraction counts. The modeled root systems underestimated root system volume by 4.4%. The modeling procedure is widely applicable and easily adapted to derive other important topological and volumetric root variables.

  15. ERDYM: Economic Recovery Dynamics Model. Volume 1. Modifications and Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    factors of production and demands. The use of input-output structure can improve the realism of the analysis, thus it can aid the formation of policies...follow a neoclassical approach. The second maior *0.1 structural change to ERDYM is the addition of a monetary sector structured so that interest rates...changes, the investment sector 4 * still remains a neoclassical model of optimum capital accumulation rather than -01 the investment sector originally

  16. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (16th, Durham, NH, August 6-11, 1992). Volumes I-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeslin, William, Ed.; Graham, Karen, Ed.

    The Proceedings of PME-XVI has been published in three volumes because of the large number of papers presented at the conference. Volume 1 contains: (1) brief reports from each of the 11 standing Working Groups on their respective roles in organizing PME-XVI; (2) brief reports from 6 Discussion Groups; and (3) 35 research reports covering authors…

  17. MARS CODE MANUAL VOLUME V: Models and Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Bae, Sung Won; Lee, Seung Wook; Yoon, Churl; Hwang, Moon Kyu; Kim, Kyung Doo; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2010-02-01

    Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute (KAERI) conceived and started the development of MARS code with the main objective of producing a state-of-the-art realistic thermal hydraulic systems analysis code with multi-dimensional analysis capability. MARS achieves this objective by very tightly integrating the one dimensional RELAP5/MOD3 with the multi-dimensional COBRA-TF codes. The method of integration of the two codes is based on the dynamic link library techniques, and the system pressure equation matrices of both codes are implicitly integrated and solved simultaneously. In addition, the Equation-Of-State (EOS) for the light water was unified by replacing the EOS of COBRA-TF by that of the RELAP5. This models and correlations manual provides a complete list of detailed information of the thermal-hydraulic models used in MARS, so that this report would be very useful for the code users. The overall structure of the manual is modeled on the structure of the RELAP5 and as such the layout of the manual is very similar to that of the RELAP. This similitude to RELAP5 input is intentional as this input scheme will allow minimum modification between the inputs of RELAP5 and MARS3.1. MARS3.1 development team would like to express its appreciation to the RELAP5 Development Team and the USNRC for making this manual possible

  18. Modeling finite-volume effects and chiral symmetry breaking in two-flavor QCD thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Bertram

    2017-11-01

    Finite-volume effects in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) have been a subject of much theoretical interest for more than two decades. They are in particular important for the analysis and interpretation of QCD simulations on a finite, discrete space-time lattice. Most of these effects are closely related to the phenomenon of spontaneous breaking of the chiral flavor symmetry and the emergence of pions as light Goldstone bosons. These long-range fluctuations are strongly affected by putting the system into a finite box, and an analysis with different methods can be organized according to the interplay between pion mass and box size. The finite volume also affects critical behavior at the chiral phase transition in QCD. In the present review, I will be mainly concerned with modeling such finite volume effects as they affect the thermodynamics of the chiral phase transition for two quark flavors. I review recent work on the analysis of finite-volume effects which makes use of the quark-meson model for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. To account for the effects of critical long-range fluctuations close to the phase transition, most of the calculations have been performed using non-perturbative Renormalization Group (RG) methods. I give an overview over the application of these methods to a finite volume. The method, the model and the results are put into the context of related work in random matrix theory for very small volumes, chiral perturbation theory for larger volumes, and related methods and approaches. They are applied towards the analysis of finite-volume effects in lattice QCD simulations and their interpretation, mainly in the context of the chiral phase transition for two quark flavors.

  19. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in heart failure patients with volume overload despite the standard treatment with conventional diuretics: a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (QUEST study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Masunori; Hori, Masatsugu; Izumi, Tohru; Fukunami, Masatake

    2011-12-01

    Diuretics are recommended to treat volume overload with heart failure (HF), however, they may cause serum electrolyte imbalance, limiting their use. Moreover, patients with advanced HF could poorly respond to these diuretics. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of Tolvaptan, a competitive vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist developed as a new drug to treat volume overload in HF patients. A phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in treating HF patients with volume overload despite the use of conventional diuretics. One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7 consecutive days. Compared with placebo, tolvaptan administered for 7 days significantly reduced body weight and improved symptoms associated with volume overload. The safety profile of tolvaptan was considered acceptable for clinical use with minimal adverse effects. Tolvaptan reduced volume overload and improved congestive symptoms associated with HF by a potent water diuresis (aquaresis).

  20. Tactical Target Acquisition Model (TATAC). Volume I. Analysts’ Manual,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    Cockpit Obstructions C. THE SEARCH TERMo .... ... . . . ..... 0 1-8 D. DISCRIMINABILITY (P3 ) ".. ..-. ... I0-l X. DYNAMICS OF ACQUISITION...amplitude which will be designated the square wave flux response RSF(N(r ]** The mean value of g(x) is: 4S W [rK 1/2 N(r) R *[N(r) - 4"" .(r) K/ ( wr)osN...angles from 20* to 120* off the axis of the flight path using Cassegrain antenna designs . The MARSAM model was modified to account for this variable

  1. Validation of the 5th and 95th Percentile Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Device Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, C.; Somers, J. T.; Baldwin, M. A.; Wells, J. A.; Newby, N.; Currie, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA spacecraft design requirements for occupant protection are a combination of the Brinkley criteria and injury metrics extracted from anthropomorphic test devices (ATD's). For the ATD injury metrics, the requirements specify the use of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III and the 95th percentile male Hybrid III. Furthermore, each of these ATD's is required to be fitted with an articulating pelvis and a straight spine. The articulating pelvis is necessary for the ATD to fit into spacecraft seats, while the straight spine is required as injury metrics for vertical accelerations are better defined for this configuration. The requirements require that physical testing be performed with both ATD's to demonstrate compliance. Before compliance testing can be conducted, extensive modeling and simulation are required to determine appropriate test conditions, simulate conditions not feasible for testing, and assess design features to better ensure compliance testing is successful. While finite element (FE) models are currently available for many of the physical ATD's, currently there are no complete models for either the 5th percentile female or the 95th percentile male Hybrid III with a straight spine and articulating pelvis. The purpose of this work is to assess the accuracy of the existing Livermore Software Technology Corporation's FE models of the 5th and 95th percentile ATD's. To perform this assessment, a series of tests will be performed at Wright Patterson Air Force Research Lab using their horizontal impact accelerator sled test facility. The ATD's will be placed in the Orion seat with a modified-advanced-crew-escape-system (MACES) pressure suit and helmet, and driven with loadings similar to what is expected for the actual Orion vehicle during landing, launch abort, and chute deployment. Test data will be compared to analytical predictions and modelling uncertainty factors will be determined for each injury metric. Additionally, the test data will be used to

  2. COMBINING 3D VOLUME AND MESH MODELS FOR REPRESENTING COMPLICATED HERITAGE BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tsai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a simple but effective strategy to combine 3D volume and mesh models for representing complicated heritage buildings and structures. The idea is to seamlessly integrate 3D parametric or polyhedral models and mesh-based digital surfaces to generate a hybrid 3D model that can take advantages of both modeling methods. The proposed hybrid model generation framework is separated into three phases. Firstly, after acquiring or generating 3D point clouds of the target, these 3D points are partitioned into different groups. Secondly, a parametric or polyhedral model of each group is generated based on plane and surface fitting algorithms to represent the basic structure of that region. A “bare-bones” model of the target can subsequently be constructed by connecting all 3D volume element models. In the third phase, the constructed bare-bones model is used as a mask to remove points enclosed by the bare-bones model from the original point clouds. The remaining points are then connected to form 3D surface mesh patches. The boundary points of each surface patch are identified and these boundary points are projected onto the surfaces of the bare-bones model. Finally, new meshes are created to connect the projected points and original mesh boundaries to integrate the mesh surfaces with the 3D volume model. The proposed method was applied to an open-source point cloud data set and point clouds of a local historical structure. Preliminary results indicated that the reconstructed hybrid models using the proposed method can retain both fundamental 3D volume characteristics and accurate geometric appearance with fine details. The reconstructed hybrid models can also be used to represent targets in different levels of detail according to user and system requirements in different applications.

  3. A simplified permeability model for coalbed methane reservoirs based on matchstick strain and constant volume theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiang [China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China); Harpalani, Satya; Liu, Shimin [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Significant changes occur in the absolute permeability of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs during primary depletion or enhanced recovery/CO{sub 2} sequestration operations. In order to project gas production, several analytical models have been developed to predict changes in coal permeability as a function of stress/porosity and sorption. Although these models are more transparent and less complicated than the coupled numerical models, there are differences between the various analytical models and there are several uncertainties. These are discussed briefly in this paper. A new model is then proposed, which is based on the volumetric balance between the bulk coal, and solid grains and pores, using the constant volume theory. It incorporates primarily the changes in grain and cleat volumes and is, therefore, different from the other models that lay heavy emphasis on the pore volume/cleat compressibility values. Finally, in order to demonstrate the simplicity of the proposed model, a history matching exercise is carried out using field data in order to compare the different models. The modeling results suggest that the agreement between the predicted permeability using the existing models and the one proposed here is very good. The merit of the proposed model is its simplicity, and the fact that all input parameters are easily measurable for any coal type with no uncertainties. (author)

  4. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A

  5. Model documentation: Natural gas transmission and distribution model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-17

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. NEMS was developed in the Office of integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy information Administration (EIA). NEMS is the third in a series of computer-based, midterm energy modeling systems used since 1974 by the EIA and its predecessor, the Federal Energy Administration, to analyze domestic energy-economy markets and develop projections. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The methodology employed allows the analysis of impacts of regional capacity constraints in the interstate natural gas pipeline network and the identification of pipeline capacity expansion requirements. There is an explicit representation of core and noncore markets for natural gas transmission and distribution services, and the key components of pipeline tariffs are represented in a pricing algorithm. Natural gas pricing and flow patterns are derived by obtaining a market equilibrium across the three main elements of the natural gas market: the supply element, the demand element, and the transmission and distribution network that links them. The NGTDM consists of four modules: the Annual Flow Module, the Capacity F-expansion Module, the Pipeline Tariff Module, and the Distributor Tariff Module. A model abstract is provided in Appendix A.

  6. Volume-Targeted Ventilation in the Neonate: Benchmarking Ventilators on an Active Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias J; Wald, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Mechanically ventilated neonates have been observed to receive substantially different ventilation after switching ventilator models, despite identical ventilator settings. This study aims at establishing the range of output variability among 10 neonatal ventilators under various breathing conditions. Relative benchmarking test of 10 neonatal ventilators on an active neonatal lung model. Neonatal ICU. Ten current neonatal ventilators. Ventilators were set identically to flow-triggered, synchronized, volume-targeted, pressure-controlled, continuous mandatory ventilation and connected to a neonatal lung model. The latter was configured to simulate three patients (500, 1,500, and 3,500 g) in three breathing modes each (passive breathing, constant active breathing, and variable active breathing). Averaged across all weight conditions, the included ventilators delivered between 86% and 110% of the target tidal volume in the passive mode, between 88% and 126% during constant active breathing, and between 86% and 120% under variable active breathing. The largest relative deviation occurred during the 500 g constant active condition, where the highest output machine produced 147% of the tidal volume of the lowest output machine. All machines deviate significantly in volume output and ventilation regulation. These differences depend on ventilation type, respiratory force, and patient behavior, preventing the creation of a simple conversion table between ventilator models. Universal neonatal tidal volume targets for mechanical ventilation cannot be transferred from one ventilator to another without considering necessary adjustments.

  7. A decision theoretical modeling for Phase III investments and drug licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Frank; Burman, Carl-Fredrik

    2017-09-18

    For a new candidate drug to become an approved medicine, several decision points have to be passed. In this article, we focus on two of them: First, based on Phase II data, the commercial sponsor decides to invest (or not) in Phase III. Second, based on the outcome of Phase III, the regulator determines whether the drug should be granted market access. Assuming a population of candidate drugs with a distribution of true efficacy, we optimize the two stakeholders' decisions and study the interdependence between them. The regulator is assumed to seek to optimize the total public health benefit resulting from the efficacy of the drug and a safety penalty. In optimizing the regulatory rules, in terms of minimal required sample size and the Type I error in Phase III, we have to consider how these rules will modify the commercial optimization made by the sponsor. The results indicate that different Type I errors should be used depending on the rarity of the disease.

  8. An advective volume-balance model for flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Carlos; Mandujano, Francisco; Becerra, Julian

    2016-11-01

    Volume-balance models are used by petroleum engineers to simulate multiphase and multicomponent flow phenomena in porous media and the extraction process in oil reservoirs. In these models, mass conservation equations and Darcy's law are supplemented by a balance condition for the pore and fluid volumes. This provides a pressure equation suitable for simulating a compressible flow within a compressible solid matrix. Here we present an alternative interpretation of the volume-balance condition that includes the advective transport within a consolidated porous media. We obtain a modified equation for the time evolution of the pressure field. Preliminary numerical tests of phase separation due to gravity suggest the model reproduces qualitatively the physical phenomena. Fondo Sectorial CONACYT-SENER Grant Number 42536 (DGAJ-SPI-34-170412-217).

  9. Glass Transition Temperature of Saccharide Aqueous Solutions Estimated with the Free Volume/Percolation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Julian Gelman; Schneider, Matthias; Corti, Horacio R

    2016-06-09

    The glass transition temperature of trehalose, sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions has been predicted as a function of the water content by using the free volume/percolation model (FVPM). This model only requires the molar volume of water in the liquid and supercooled regimes, the molar volumes of the hypothetical pure liquid sugars at temperatures below their pure glass transition temperatures, and the molar volumes of the mixtures at the glass transition temperature. The model is simplified by assuming that the excess thermal expansion coefficient is negligible for saccharide-water mixtures, and this ideal FVPM becomes identical to the Gordon-Taylor model. It was found that the behavior of the water molar volume in trehalose-water mixtures at low temperatures can be obtained by assuming that the FVPM holds for this mixture. The temperature dependence of the water molar volume in the supercooled region of interest seems to be compatible with the recent hypothesis on the existence of two structure of liquid water, being the high density liquid water the state of water in the sugar solutions. The idealized FVPM describes the measured glass transition temperature of sucrose, glucose, and fructose aqueous solutions, with much better accuracy than both the Gordon-Taylor model based on an empirical kGT constant dependent on the saccharide glass transition temperature and the Couchman-Karasz model using experimental heat capacity changes of the components at the glass transition temperature. Thus, FVPM seems to be an excellent tool to predict the glass transition temperature of other aqueous saccharides and polyols solutions by resorting to volumetric information easily available.

  10. Two-Higgs-doublet type-II and -III models and t → ch at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arhrib, A. [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, B. 416, Tangier (Morocco); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Benbrik, R. [Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, Semlalia, Marrakech (Morocco); Faculte Polydisciplinaire de Safi, MSISM Team, Sidi Bouzid, B.P 4162, Safi (Morocco); Chen, Chuan-Hung [National Cheng-Kung University, Department of Physics, Tainan (China); Gomez-Bock, Melina [Universidad de las Americas Puebla, DAFM, Cholula, PUE (Mexico); Semlali, Souad [Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, Semlalia, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2016-06-15

    We study the constraints of the generic two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) type-III and the impacts of the new Yukawa couplings. For comparisons, we revisit the analysis in the 2HDM type-II. To understand the influence of all involving free parameters and to realize their correlations, we employ a χ-square fitting approach by including theoretical and experimental constraints, such as the S, T, and U oblique parameters, the production of standard model Higgs and its decay to γγ, WW*/ZZ*, τ{sup +}τ{sup -}, etc. The errors of the analysis are taken at 68, 95.5, and 99.7% confidence levels. Due to the new Yukawa couplings being associated with cos(β - α) and sin(β - α), we find that the allowed regions for sin α and tan β in the type-III model can be broader when the dictated parameter χ{sub F} is positive; however, for negative χ{sub F}, the limits are stricter than those in the type-II model. By using the constrained parameters, we find that the deviation from the SM in h → Zγ can be of O(10 %). Additionally, we also study the top-quark flavor-changing processes induced at the tree level in the type-III model and find that when all current experimental data are considered, we get Br(t → c(h, H)) < 10{sup -3} for m{sub h} = 125.36 and m{sub h} = 150 GeV, and Br(t → cA) slightly exceeds 10{sup -3} for m{sub A} = 130 GeV. (orig.)

  11. Precise determination of universal finite volume observables in the Gross-Neveu model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzec, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Gross-Neveu model is a quantum field theory in two space time dimensions that shares many features with quantum chromo dynamics. In this thesis the continuum model and its discretized versions are reviewed and a finite volume renormalization scheme is introduced and tested. Calculations in the limit of infinitely many fermion flavors as well as perturbative computations are carried out. In extensive Monte-Carlo simulations of the one flavor and the four flavor lattice models with Wilson fermions a set of universal finite volume observables is calculated to a high precision. In the one flavor model which is equivalent to the massless Thirring model the continuum extrapolated Monte-Carlo results are confronted with an exact solution of the model. (orig.)

  12. Absorption and scattering coefficient dependence of laser-Doppler flowmetry models for large tissue volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzoni, T; Leung, T S; Ruefenacht, D; Delpy, D T

    2006-01-01

    Based on quasi-elastic scattering theory (and random walk on a lattice approach), a model of laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been derived which can be applied to measurements in large tissue volumes (e.g. when the interoptode distance is >30 mm). The model holds for a semi-infinite medium and takes into account the transport-corrected scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of the tissue, and the scattering coefficient of the red blood cells. The model holds for anisotropic scattering and for multiple scattering of the photons by the moving scatterers of finite size. In particular, it has also been possible to take into account the simultaneous presence of both Brownian and pure translational movements. An analytical and simplified version of the model has also been derived and its validity investigated, for the case of measurements in human skeletal muscle tissue. It is shown that at large optode spacing it is possible to use the simplified model, taking into account only a 'mean' light pathlength, to predict the blood flow related parameters. It is also demonstrated that the 'classical' blood volume parameter, derived from LDF instruments, may not represent the actual blood volume variations when the investigated tissue volume is large. The simplified model does not need knowledge of the tissue optical parameters and thus should allow the development of very simple and cost-effective LDF hardware

  13. Mathematical model of a utility firm. Final technical report, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-08-21

    This project is aimed at understanding the economic and behavioral processes that take place within a utility firm, and without it. This volume covers dynamics of economic systems (Phase II of the project): economic equilibrium theory, discrete economics, exchange economics, production economics, approach to equilibrium.

  14. Vehicle-based road dust emission measurement (III):. effect of speed, traffic volume, location, and season on PM 10 road dust emissions in the Treasure Valley, ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etyemezian, V.; Kuhns, H.; Gillies, J.; Chow, J.; Hendrickson, K.; McGown, M.; Pitchford, M.

    The testing re-entrained aerosol kinetic emissions from roads (TRAKER) road dust measurement system was used to survey more than 400 km of paved roads in southwestern Idaho during 3-week sampling campaigns in winter and summer, 2001. Each data point, consisting of a 1-s measurement of particle light scattering sampled behind the front tire, was associated with a link (section of road) in the traffic demand model network for the Treasure Valley, ID. Each link was in turn associated with a number of characteristics including posted speed limit, vehicle kilometers traveled (vkt), road class (local/residential, collector, arterial, and interstate), county, and land use (urban vs. rural). Overall, the TRAKER-based emission factors based on location, setting, season, and speed spanned a narrow range from 3.6 to 8.0 g/vkt. Emission factors were higher in winter compared to summer, higher in urban areas compared to rural, and lower for roads with fast travel speeds compared to slower roads. The inherent covariance between traffic volume and traffic speed obscured the assessment of the effect of traffic volume on emission potentials. Distance-based emission factors expressed in grams per kilometer traveled (g/vkt) for roads with low travel speeds (˜11 m/s residential roads) compared to those with high travel speeds (˜25 m/s interstates) were higher (5.2 vs. 3.0 g/vkt in summer and 5.9 vs. 4.9 g/vkt in winter). However, emission potentials which characterize the amount of suspendable material on a road were substantially higher on roads with low travel speeds (0.71 vs. 0.13 g/vkt/(m/s) in summer and 0.78 vs. 0.21 g/vkt/(m/s) in winter). This suggested that while high speed roads are much cleaner (factor of 5.4 in summer), on a vehicle kilometer traveled basis, emissions from high and low speed roads are of the same order. Emission inventories based on the TRAKER method, silt loadings obtained during the field study, and US EPA's AP-42 default values of silt loading were

  15. Automated modelling of spatially-distributed glacier ice thickness and volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, William H. M.; Carrivick, Jonathan L.

    2016-07-01

    Ice thickness distribution and volume are both key parameters for glaciological and hydrological applications. This study presents VOLTA (Volume and Topography Automation), which is a Python script tool for ArcGISTM that requires just a digital elevation model (DEM) and glacier outline(s) to model distributed ice thickness, volume and bed topography. Ice thickness is initially estimated at points along an automatically generated centreline network based on the perfect-plasticity rheology assumption, taking into account a valley side drag component of the force balance equation. Distributed ice thickness is subsequently interpolated using a glaciologically correct algorithm. For five glaciers with independent field-measured bed topography, VOLTA modelled volumes were between 26.5% (underestimate) and 16.6% (overestimate) of that derived from field observations. Greatest differences were where an asymmetric valley cross section shape was present or where significant valley infill had occurred. Compared with other methods of modelling ice thickness and volume, key advantages of VOLTA are: a fully automated approach and a user friendly graphical user interface (GUI), GIS consistent geometry, fully automated centreline generation, inclusion of a side drag component in the force balance equation, estimation of glacier basal shear stress for each individual glacier, fully distributed ice thickness output and the ability to process multiple glaciers rapidly. VOLTA is capable of regional scale ice volume assessment, which is a key parameter for exploring glacier response to climate change. VOLTA also permits subtraction of modelled ice thickness from the input surface elevation to produce an ice-free DEM, which is a key input for reconstruction of former glaciers. VOLTA could assist with prediction of future glacier geometry changes and hence in projection of future meltwater fluxes.

  16. Joint modelling of flood peaks and volumes: A copula application for the Danube River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou George

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flood frequency analysis is usually performed as a univariate analysis of flood peaks using a suitable theoretical probability distribution of the annual maximum flood peaks or peak over threshold values. However, other flood attributes, such as flood volume and duration, are necessary for the design of hydrotechnical projects, too. In this study, the suitability of various copula families for a bivariate analysis of peak discharges and flood volumes has been tested. Streamflow data from selected gauging stations along the whole Danube River have been used. Kendall’s rank correlation coefficient (tau quantifies the dependence between flood peak discharge and flood volume settings. The methodology is applied to two different data samples: 1 annual maximum flood (AMF peaks combined with annual maximum flow volumes of fixed durations at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 60 days, respectively (which can be regarded as a regime analysis of the dependence between the extremes of both variables in a given year, and 2 annual maximum flood (AMF peaks with corresponding flood volumes (which is a typical choice for engineering studies. The bivariate modelling of the extracted peak discharge - flood volume couples is achieved with the use of the Ali-Mikhail-Haq (AMH, Clayton, Frank, Joe, Gumbel, Hüsler-Reiss, Galambos, Tawn, Normal, Plackett and FGM copula families. Scatterplots of the observed and simulated peak discharge - flood volume pairs and goodness-of-fit tests have been used to assess the overall applicability of the copulas as well as observing any changes in suitable models along the Danube River. The results indicate that for the second data sampling method, almost all of the considered Archimedean class copula families perform better than the other copula families selected for this study, and that for the first method, only the upper-tail-flat copulas excel (except for the AMH copula due to its inability to model stronger relationships.

  17. Performance Prediction Modelling for Flexible Pavement on Low Volume Roads Using Multiple Linear Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Makendran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction models for low volume village roads in India are developed to evaluate the progression of different types of distress such as roughness, cracking, and potholes. Even though the Government of India is investing huge quantum of money on road construction every year, poor control over the quality of road construction and its subsequent maintenance is leading to the faster road deterioration. In this regard, it is essential that scientific maintenance procedures are to be evolved on the basis of performance of low volume flexible pavements. Considering the above, an attempt has been made in this research endeavor to develop prediction models to understand the progression of roughness, cracking, and potholes in flexible pavements exposed to least or nil routine maintenance. Distress data were collected from the low volume rural roads covering about 173 stretches spread across Tamil Nadu state in India. Based on the above collected data, distress prediction models have been developed using multiple linear regression analysis. Further, the models have been validated using independent field data. It can be concluded that the models developed in this study can serve as useful tools for the practicing engineers maintaining flexible pavements on low volume roads.

  18. ATHENA code manual. Volume 1. Code structure, system models, and solution methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, K.E.; Roth, P.A.; Ransom, V.H.

    1986-09-01

    The ATHENA (Advanced Thermal Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer) code has been developed to perform transient simulation of the thermal hydraulic systems which may be found in fusion reactors, space reactors, and other advanced systems. A generic modeling approach is utilized which permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of a complete facility. Several working fluids are available to be used in one or more interacting loops. Different loops may have different fluids with thermal connections between loops. The modeling theory and associated numerical schemes are documented in Volume I in order to acquaint the user with the modeling base and thus aid effective use of the code. The second volume contains detailed instructions for input data preparation

  19. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  20. Models for high cell density bioreactors must consider biomass volume fraction: Cell recycle example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbouquette, H G

    1987-06-01

    Intrinsic models, which take into account biomass volume fraction, must be formulated for adequate simulation of high-biomass-density fermentations with cell recycle. Through comparison of corresponding intrinsic and non-intrinsic models in dimensionless form, constraints for non-intrinsic model usage in terms of biokinetic and fermenter operating parameters can be identified a priori. Analysis of a simple product-inhibition model indicates that the non-intrinsic approach is suitable only when the attainable biomass volume fraction in the fermentation broth is less than about 0.10. Inappropriate application of a non-intrinsic model can lead to gross errors in calculated substrate and product concentrations, substrate conversion, and volumetric productivity.

  1. Models for high cell density bioreactors must consider biomass volume fraction: cell recycle example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monbouquette, H.G.

    1987-06-01

    Intrinsic models, which take into account biomass volume fraction, must be formulated for adequate simulation of high-biomass-density fermentations with cell recycle. Through comparison of corresponding intrinsic and non-intrinsic models in dimensionless form, constraints for non-intrinsic model usage in terms of biokinetic and fermenter operating parameters can be identified a priori. Analysis of a simple product-inhibition model indicates that the non-intrinsic approach is suitable only when the attainable biomass volume fraction in the fermentation broth is less than about 0.10. Inappropriate application of a non-intrinsic model can lead to gross errors in calculated substrate and product concentrations, substrate conversion, and volumetric productivity. (Refs. 14).

  2. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  3. Continuous modelling study of numerical volumes - Applications to the visualization of anatomical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goret, C.

    1990-12-01

    Several technics of imaging (IRM, image scanners, tomoscintigraphy, echography) give numerical informations presented by means of a stack of parallel cross-sectional images. Since many years, 3-D mathematical tools have been developed and allow the 3 D images synthesis of surfaces. In first part, we give the technics of numerical volume exploitation and their medical applications to diagnosis and therapy. The second part is about a continuous modelling of the volume with a tensor product of cubic splines. We study the characteristics of this representation and its clinical validation. Finally, we treat of the problem of surface visualization of objects contained in the volume. The results show the interest of this model and allow to propose specifications for 3-D workstation realization [fr

  4. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) project conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA Program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. This volume contains the Appendices, which include listings of the FORTRAN code and Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide. 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  5. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  6. On the Use of Generalized Volume Scattering Models for the Improvement of General Polarimetric Model-Based Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a general polarimetric model-based decomposition framework was proposed by Chen et al., which addresses several well-known limitations in previous decomposition methods and implements a simultaneous full-parameter inversion by using complete polarimetric information. However, it only employs four typical models to characterize the volume scattering component, which limits the parameter inversion performance. To overcome this issue, this paper presents two general polarimetric model-based decomposition methods by incorporating the generalized volume scattering model (GVSM or simplified adaptive volume scattering model, (SAVSM proposed by Antropov et al. and Huang et al., respectively, into the general decomposition framework proposed by Chen et al. By doing so, the final volume coherency matrix structure is selected from a wide range of volume scattering models within a continuous interval according to the data itself without adding unknowns. Moreover, the new approaches rely on one nonlinear optimization stage instead of four as in the previous method proposed by Chen et al. In addition, the parameter inversion procedure adopts the modified algorithm proposed by Xie et al. which leads to higher accuracy and more physically reliable output parameters. A number of Monte Carlo simulations of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR data are carried out and show that the proposed method with GVSM yields an overall improvement in the final accuracy of estimated parameters and outperforms both the version using SAVSM and the original approach. In addition, C-band Radarsat-2 and L-band AIRSAR fully polarimetric images over the San Francisco region are also used for testing purposes. A detailed comparison and analysis of decomposition results over different land-cover types are conducted. According to this study, the use of general decomposition models leads to a more accurate quantitative retrieval of target parameters. However, there

  7. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task III. Efficiency improvements; Task IV. Industry future. Final report, Volume IV. [Projections for year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Tasks III and IV measure the characteristics of potential research and development programs that could be applied to the maritime industry. It was necessary to identify potential operating scenarios for the maritime industry in the year 2000 and determine the energy consumption that would result given those scenarios. After the introductory chapter the operational, regulatory, and vessel-size scenarios for the year 2000 are developed in Chapter II. In Chapter III, future cargo flows and expected levels of energy use for the baseline 2000 projection are determined. In Chapter IV, the research and development programs are introduced into the future US flag fleet and the energy-savings potential associated with each is determined. The first four appendices (A through D) describe each of the generic technologies. The fifth appendix (E) contains the baseline operating and cost parameters against which 15 program areas were evaluated. (MCW)

  8. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sup Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01. Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose.

  9. Validation of MIL-F-9490D. General Specification for Flight Control System for Piloted Military Aircraft. Volume III. C-5A Heavy Logistics Transport Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-04-01

    State III shall be provided following reversion. ’hile disengaged, interaction of backup mode provisions with the normal mode shall not degrade...program, the test pilot could not get a satisfactory view of the runway with- out leaning forward because of his elevated location above the runway. The...be consulted to isolate the specific component at fault. The test may then be continued by depressing the BIM switch again. Detail set-up requirements

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Wavelet Neural Network Model for Short-Term Traffic Volume Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve a more accurate and robust traffic volume prediction model, the sensitivity of wavelet neural network model (WNNM is analyzed in this study. Based on real loop detector data which is provided by traffic police detachment of Maanshan, WNNM is discussed with different numbers of input neurons, different number of hidden neurons, and traffic volume for different time intervals. The test results show that the performance of WNNM depends heavily on network parameters and time interval of traffic volume. In addition, the WNNM with 4 input neurons and 6 hidden neurons is the optimal predictor with more accuracy, stability, and adaptability. At the same time, a much better prediction record will be achieved with the time interval of traffic volume are 15 minutes. In addition, the optimized WNNM is compared with the widely used back-propagation neural network (BPNN. The comparison results indicated that WNNM produce much lower values of MAE, MAPE, and VAPE than BPNN, which proves that WNNM performs better on short-term traffic volume prediction.

  11. B→ηK* and B→φKs decays in the two Higgs doublet model III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuaiwei; Song Taiping; Lv Linxia

    2008-01-01

    Using the QCD factorization approach, we investigate the large branching ratios of B→ηK * decays and the S φK s anomaly of B→φK s decay in the two Higgs doublet model III. With the contributions of flavour-changing neutral current mediated by the neutral Higgs bosons H 0 , h 0 and A 0 at the tree level, we provide a coherent resolution to these anomalies within the constrained parameter spaces, which are 120 bs λ ss |<136. This will be really interesting in searching for the signs of new physics. (authors)

  12. Bianchi type-III bulk viscous cosmic string model in a scalar-tensor theory of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyasagar, T.; Purnachandra Rao, C.; Bhuvana Vijaya, R.; Reddy, D. R. K.

    2014-01-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-III space-time is considered in the presence of bulk viscous fluid containing one dimensional cosmic strings in the frame work of a scalar-tensor theory of gravity proposed by Saez and Ballester (in Phys. Lett. A 113:467, 1986). We have obtained a determinate solution of the field equations of this theory, using (i) a barotropic equation of state for the pressure and density and (ii) the bulk viscous pressure is proportional to the energy density. Some physical properties of the model are also discussed.

  13. Hopf and Bautin Bifurcation in a Tritrophic Food Chain Model with Holling Functional Response Types III and IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Víctor; Castillo-Santos, Francisco Eduardo; Dela-Rosa, Miguel Angel; Loreto-Hernández, Iván

    In this paper, we analyze the Hopf and Bautin bifurcation of a given system of differential equations, corresponding to a tritrophic food chain model with Holling functional response types III and IV for the predator and superpredator, respectively. We distinguish two cases, when the prey has linear or logistic growth. In both cases we guarantee the existence of a limit cycle bifurcating from an equilibrium point in the positive octant of ℝ3. In order to do so, for the Hopf bifurcation we compute explicitly the first Lyapunov coefficient, the transversality Hopf condition, and for the Bautin bifurcation we also compute the second Lyapunov coefficient and verify the regularity conditions.

  14. Comparison of Moving Boundary and Finite-Volume Heat Exchanger Models in the Modelica Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Desideri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When modeling low capacity energy systems, such as a small size (5–150 kWel organic Rankine cycle unit, the governing dynamics are mainly concentrated in the heat exchangers. As a consequence, the accuracy and simulation speed of the higher level system model mainly depend on the heat exchanger model formulation. In particular, the modeling of thermo-flow systems characterized by evaporation or condensation requires heat exchanger models capable of handling phase transitions. To this aim, the finite volume (FV and the moving boundary (MB approaches are the most widely used. The two models are developed and included in the open-source ThermoCycle Modelica library. In this contribution, a comparison between the two approaches is presented. An integrity and accuracy test is designed to evaluate the performance of the FV and MB models during transient conditions. In order to analyze how the two modeling approaches perform when integrated at a system level, two organic Rankine cycle (ORC system models are built using the FV and the MB evaporator model, and their responses are compared against experimental data collected on an 11 kWel ORC power unit. Additionally, the effect of the void fraction value in the MB evaporator model and of the number of control volumes (CVs in the FV one is investigated. The results allow drawing general guidelines for the development of heat exchanger dynamic models involving two-phase flows.

  15. Volume and Aboveground Biomass Models for Dry Miombo Woodland in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Edward Mwakalukwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tools to accurately estimate tree volume and biomass are scarce for most forest types in East Africa, including Tanzania. Based on a sample of 142 trees and 57 shrubs from a 6,065 ha area of dry miombo woodland in Iringa rural district in Tanzania, regression models were developed for volume and biomass of three important species, Brachystegia spiciformis Benth. (n = 40, Combretum molle G. Don (n = 41, and Dalbergia arbutifolia Baker (n = 37 separately, and for broader samples of trees (28 species, n = 72, shrubs (16 species, n = 32, and trees and shrubs combined (44 species, n = 104. Applied independent variables were log-transformed diameter, height, and wood basic density, and in each case a range of different models were tested. The general tendency among the final models is that the fit improved when height and wood basic density were included. Also the precision and accuracy of the predictions tended to increase from general to species-specific models. Except for a few volume and biomass models developed for shrubs, all models had R2 values of 96–99%. Thus, the models appear robust and should be applicable to forests with similar site conditions, species, and diameter ranges.

  16. Application of UV-irradiated Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (UV-Fe(III)NTA) and UV-NTA-Fenton systems to degrade model and natural occurring naphthenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a highly complex mixture of organic compounds naturally present in bitumen and identified as the primary toxic constituent of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). This work investigated the degradation of cyclohexanoic acid (CHA), a model NA compound, and natural occurring NAs during the UV photolysis of Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (UV-Fe(III)NTA) and UV-NTA-Fenton processes. The results indicated that in the UV-Fe(III)NTA process at pH 8, the CHA removal increased with increasing NTA dose (0.18, 0.36 and 0.72 mM), while it was independent of the Fe(III) dose (0.09, 0.18 and 0.36 mM). Moreover, the three Fe concentrations had no influence on the photolysis of the Fe(III)NTA complex. The main responsible species for the CHA degradation was hydroxyl radical (OH), and the role of dissolved O 2 in the OH generation was found to be negligible. Real OSPW was treated with the UV-Fe(III)NTA and UV-NTA-Fenton advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The removals of classical NAs (O 2 -NAs), oxidized NAs with one additional oxygen atom (O 3 -NAs) and with two additional oxygen atoms (O 4 -NAs) were 44.5%, 21.3%, and 25.2% in the UV-Fe(III)NTA process, respectively, and 98.4%, 86.0%, and 81.0% in the UV-NTA-Fenton process, respectively. There was no influence of O 2 on the NA removal in these two processes. The results also confirmed the high reactivity of the O 2 -NA species with more carbons and increasing number of rings or double bond equivalents. This work opens a new window for the possible treatment of OSPW at natural pH using these AOPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in heart failure patients with sustained volume overload despite the use of conventional diuretics: a phase III open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunami, Masatake; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Hori, Masatsugu; Izumi, Tohru

    2011-12-01

    Volume overload is a common complication associated with heart failure (HF) and is recommended to be treated with loop or thiazide diuretics. However, use of diuretics can cause serum electrolyte imbalances and diuretic resistance. Tolvaptan, a selective, oral, non-peptide vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, offers a new option for treating volume overload in HF patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in Japanese HF patients with volume overload. Fifty-one HF patients with volume overload, despite using conventional diuretics, were treated with 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7 days. If the response was insufficient at Day 7, tolvaptan was continued for a further 7 days at either 15 mg/day or 30 mg/day. Outcomes included changes in body weight, symptoms and safety parameters. Thirty-six patients discontinued treatment within 7 days, therefore 15 patients entered the second phase of treatment. In two patients, tolvaptan was increased to 30 mg/day after 7 days. Body weight was reduced on Day 7 (-1.95 ± 1.98 kg; n = 41) and Day 14 (-2.35 ± 1.44 kg; n = 11, 15 mg/day). Symptoms of volume overload, including lower limb edema, pulmonary congestion, jugular venous distention and hepatomegaly, were improved by tolvaptan treatment for 7 or 14 days. Neither tolvaptan increased the incidence of severe or serious adverse events when administered for 7-14 days. This study confirms the efficacy and safety of 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7-14 days in Japanese HF patients with volume overload despite conventional diuretics.

  18. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual: Code structure, system models, and solution methods. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents, and operational transients, such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling, approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I provides modeling theory and associated numerical schemes

  19. Volume Averaging Theory (VAT) based modeling and closure evaluation for fin-and-tube heat exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Catton, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    A fin-and-tube heat exchanger was modeled based on Volume Averaging Theory (VAT) in such a way that the details of the original structure was replaced by their averaged counterparts, so that the VAT based governing equations can be efficiently solved for a wide range of parameters. To complete the VAT based model, proper closure is needed, which is related to a local friction factor and a heat transfer coefficient of a Representative Elementary Volume (REV). The terms in the closure expressions are complex and sometimes relating experimental data to the closure terms is difficult. In this work we use CFD to evaluate the rigorously derived closure terms over one of the selected REVs. The objective is to show how heat exchangers can be modeled as a porous media and how CFD can be used in place of a detailed, often formidable, experimental effort to obtain closure for the model.

  20. Computational Methods for Protein Structure Prediction and Modeling Volume 1: Basic Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Volume one of this two volume sequence focuses on the basic characterization of known protein structures as well as structure prediction from protein sequence information. The 11 chapters provide an overview of the field, covering key topics in modeling, force fields, classification, computational methods, and struture prediction. Each chapter is a self contained review designed to cover (1) definition of the problem and an historical perspective, (2) mathematical or computational formulation of the problem, (3) computational methods and algorithms, (4) performance results, (5) existing software packages, and (6) strengths, pitfalls, challenges, and future research directions.

  1. The Qinshan phase III project-a successful model of sino-canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, S.H.H.; Alikhan, S.; Gu Jun

    2005-01-01

    The Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) Project, the largest-scale cooperative project between China and Canada, was completed in 2003 well in advance of the schedule and 10% under budget. The Third Qinshan (Phase III) Nuclear Power Plant (TQNPP) was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 20, 2003, 43 days and 115 days ahead of schedule respectively. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 months from First Concrete to Criticality - a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods, electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management and control. New design and construction techniques were introduced by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools has benefited TQNPC in its subsequent plant operation, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China as well as enhancing their opportunities internationally. Excellent co-operation and teamwork within the integrated TQNPC/AECL Commissioning Team with well documented QA program, process and procedures also contributed to the remarkable success of the Project. AECL's initial assessment, based on lessons learned, showed that the project schedule could readily be reduced to 66 months and the capital costs reduced by 25% for a replication project. AECL is building on this experience and successful results of TQNPP in its Advanced CANDU Reactor TM (ACR TM ) ** design. (authors)

  2. Fatigue crack growth in mixed mode I+III+III non proportional loading conditions in a 316 stainless steel, experimental analysis and modelization of the effects of crack tip plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremy, F.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with fatigue crack growth in non-proportional variable amplitude mixed mode I + II + III loading conditions and analyses the effects of internal stresses stemming from the confinement of the plastic zone in small scale yielding conditions. The tests showed that there are antagonistic long-distance and short-distance effects of the loading history on fatigue crack growth. The shape of loading path, and not only the maximum and minimum values in this path, is crucial and, by comparison, the effects of contact and friction are of lesser importance. Internal stresses play a major role on the fatigue crack growth rate and on the crack path. An approach was developed to analyze the elastic-plastic behavior of a representative section of the crack front using the FEA. A model reduction technic is used to extract the relevant information from the FE results. To do so, the velocity field is partitioned into mode I, II, III elastic and plastic components, each component being characterized by an intensity factor and a fixed spatial distribution. The calculations were used to select seven loading paths in I + II and I + II + III mixed mode conditions, which all have the same amplitudes for each mode, the same maximum, minimum and average values. These paths are supposed to be equivalent in the sense of common failure criteria, but differ significantly when the elastic-plastic behavior of the material is accounted for. The results of finite element simulations and of simulations using a simplified model proposed in this thesis are both in agreement with experimental results. The approach was also used to discuss the role of mode III loading steps. Since the material behavior is nonlinear, the nominal loading direction does not coincide with the plastic flow direction. Adding a mode III loading step in a mode I+II fatigue cycle, may, in some cases, significantly modify the behaviour of the crack (crack growth rate, crack path and plastic flow). (author)

  3. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume III. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. This volume consists of Table 9 Computer printout of environmental data collected NRC

  4. The Development of a Finite Volume Method for Modeling Sound in Coastal Ocean Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Wen; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.; Jung, Ki Won; Deng, Zhiqun

    2015-10-28

    : As the rapid growth of marine renewable energy and off-shore wind energy, there have been concerns that the noises generated from construction and operation of the devices may interfere marine animals’ communication. In this research, a underwater sound model is developed to simulate sound prorogation generated by marine-hydrokinetic energy (MHK) devices or offshore wind (OSW) energy platforms. Finite volume and finite difference methods are developed to solve the 3D Helmholtz equation of sound propagation in the coastal environment. For finite volume method, the grid system consists of triangular grids in horizontal plane and sigma-layers in vertical dimension. A 3D sparse matrix solver with complex coefficients is formed for solving the resulting acoustic pressure field. The Complex Shifted Laplacian Preconditioner (CSLP) method is applied to efficiently solve the matrix system iteratively with MPI parallelization using a high performance cluster. The sound model is then coupled with the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for simulating sound propagation generated by human activities in a range-dependent setting, such as offshore wind energy platform constructions and tidal stream turbines. As a proof of concept, initial validation of the finite difference solver is presented for two coastal wedge problems. Validation of finite volume method will be reported separately.

  5. Electric field distribution in a finite-volume head model of deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Peadar F; Lowery, Madeleine M

    2009-11-01

    This study presents a whole-head finite element model of deep brain stimulation to examine the effect of electrical grounding, the finite conducting volume of the head, and scalp, skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers. The impedance between the stimulating and reference electrodes in the whole-head model was found to lie within clinically reported values when the reference electrode was incorporated on a localized surface in the model. Incorporation of the finite volume of the head and inclusion of surrounding outer tissue layers reduced the magnitude of the electric field and activating function by approximately 20% in the region surrounding the electrode. Localized distortions of the electric field were also observed when the electrode was placed close to the skull. Under bipolar conditions the effect of the finite conducting volume was shown to be negligible. The results indicate that, for monopolar stimulation, incorporation of the finite volume and outer tissue layers can alter the magnitude of the electric field and activating function when the electrode is deep within the brain, and may further affect the shape if the electrode is close to the skull.

  6. Evaluation of Simulated Marine Aerosol Production Using the WaveWatchIII Prognostic Wave Model Coupled to the Community Atmosphere Model within the Community Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, M. S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Keene, William C. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Zhang, J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Reichl, B. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Shi, Y. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Hara, T. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Reid, J. S. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Monterey, CA (United States); Fox-Kemper, B. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences; Craig, A. P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Erickson, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Division; Ginis, I. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Webb, A. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Ocean Technology, Policy, and Environment

    2016-11-08

    Primary marine aerosol (PMA) is emitted into the atmosphere via breaking wind waves on the ocean surface. Most parameterizations of PMA emissions use 10-meter wind speed as a proxy for wave action. This investigation coupled the 3rd generation prognostic WAVEWATCH-III wind-wave model within a coupled Earth system model (ESM) to drive PMA production using wave energy dissipation rate – analogous to whitecapping – in place of 10-meter wind speed. The wind speed parameterization did not capture basin-scale variability in relations between wind and wave fields. Overall, the wave parameterization did not improve comparison between simulated versus measured AOD or Na+, thus highlighting large remaining uncertainties in model physics. Results confirm the efficacy of prognostic wind-wave models for air-sea exchange studies coupled with laboratory- and field-based characterizations of the primary physical drivers of PMA production. No discernible correlations were evident between simulated PMA fields and observed chlorophyll or sea surface temperature.

  7. A structural model of age, grey matter volumes, education, and personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Soichiro; Yasuno, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Akihide; Kazui, Hiroaki; Kudo, Takashi; Matsuoka, Kiwamu; Kiuchi, Kuniaki; Kosaka, Jun; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Iida, Hidehiro; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    When the relationship between ageing and changes in personality traits is considered, it is important to know how they are influenced by biological and environmental factors. The present study examined the relationships between various factors associated with the effect of ageing on personality traits, including structural changes of the brain and environmental factors such as education. We recruited 41 healthy subjects. We administered the NEO Five-Factor Inventory to assess personality factors. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed, and regional grey matter (GM) volumes were obtained. We identified associations in the correlation analysis of age, cerebral GM volume, years of education, and the personality trait of openness. Path analysis was used to estimate the relationships among these factors. The path analysis model of age, GM volume, years of education, and the personality trait of openness revealed that age has an indirect negative association with openness through GM volume and years of education. Ageing was related to a decrease in GM volume, which was in turn related to a decrease in the openness score. Older subjects generally had fewer years of education, which was related to a lower openness score. Maintaining openness against the effects of ageing is desirable, and our results imply that interventions against age-related cerebral atrophy and the promotion of opportunities for higher education may contribute to the development and stability of a healthy personality during the adult life course. © 2015 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2015 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  8. A Control Volume Model of Solute Transport in a Single Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher A.; Lennox, William C.

    1995-02-01

    A control volume model of solute transport through a single fracture in a porous matrix is developed. Application to problems of contaminant transport through fractured clay demonstrates several strong features of the method. The control volume approach inherently conserves mass and treats dispersivity at interfaces in a physically correct manner. By employing an upstream weighting scheme, based on the exact solution to the one-dimensional steady state advection-dispersion equation, the model proves to be more efficient than previous single-fracture models. The significance of matrix diffusion in the direction parallel to the fracture axis is investigated. For the transport of a nonreactive tracer through a 20-micrometer-wide fracture in clay material, analytical solutions based on one-dimensional matrix diffusion are erroneous for flow velocities of less than 1 m/day. The influence of boundary conditions on two-dimensional matrix diffusion is considered, and the clean-up of a contaminated fracture is simulated.

  9. Modeling Accumulated Volume of Landslides Using Remote Sensing and DTM Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengchao Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Landslides, like other natural hazards, such as avalanches, floods, and debris flows, may result in a lot of property damage and human casualties. The volume of landslide deposits is a key parameter for landslide studies and disaster relief. Using remote sensing and digital terrain model (DTM data, this paper analyzes errors that can occur in calculating landslide volumes using conventional models. To improve existing models, the mechanisms and laws governing the material deposited by landslides are studied and then the mass balance principle and mass balance line are defined. Based on these ideas, a novel and improved model (Mass Balance Model, MBM is proposed. By using a parameter called the “height adaptor”, MBM translates the volume calculation into an automatic search for the mass balance line within the scope of the landslide. Due to the use of mass balance constraints and the height adaptor, MBM is much more effective and reliable. A test of MBM was carried out for the case of a typical landslide, triggered by the Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008.

  10. Optics Elements for Modeling Electrostatic Lenses and Accelerator Components: III. Electrostatic Deflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code, which includes a linear space charge model, that was originally developed to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators. Several new optical models for a number of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns have been developed recently that allow the code to be used for modeling beamlines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) Einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic prisms, and (4) electrostatic quadrupoles. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the modeling of cylindrical, spherical, and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low energy beamline at CAMS

  11. River water quality model no. 1 (RWQM1): III. Biochemical submodel selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanrolleghem, P.; Borchardt, D.; Henze, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    The new River Water Quality Model no.1 introduced in the two accompanying papers by Shanahan et al. and Reichert et al. is comprehensive. Shanahan et al. introduced a six-step decision procedure to select the necessary model features for a certain application. This paper specifically addresses one...... of these steps, i.e. the selection of submodels of the comprehensive biochemical conversion model introduced in Reichert et al. Specific conditions for inclusion of one or the other conversion process or model component are introduced, as are some general rules that can support the selection. Examples...... of simplified models are presented....

  12. III-V microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Nougier, JP

    1991-01-01

    As is well known, Silicon widely dominates the market of semiconductor devices and circuits, and in particular is well suited for Ultra Large Scale Integration processes. However, a number of III-V compound semiconductor devices and circuits have recently been built, and the contributions in this volume are devoted to those types of materials, which offer a number of interesting properties. Taking into account the great variety of problems encountered and of their mutual correlations when fabricating a circuit or even a device, most of the aspects of III-V microelectronics, from fundamental p

  13. Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 2. Pilot Plant preliminary design report. Volume III, Book 1. Collector subsystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1977-10-01

    The central receiver system consists of a field of heliostats, a central receiver, a thermal storage unit, an electrical power generation system, and balance of plant. This volume discusses the collector field geometry, requirements and configuration. The development of the collector system and subsystems are discussed and the selection rationale outlined. System safety and availability are covered. Finally, the plans for collector portion of the central receiver system are reviewed.

  14. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1995-09-01

    This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

  15. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Mathematical Models of Coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes for Nuclear Waste Repositories. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O.; Kautzky, F.

    2005-02-01

    DECOVALEX is an international consortium of governmental agencies associated with the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a number of countries. The consortium's mission is the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments. Hence the acronym/name DECOVALEX. Currently, agencies from Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States are in DECOVALEX. Emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in geologic media causes a number of physical processes to be intensified in the surrounding rock mass due to the decay heat from the waste. The four main processes of concern are thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical. Interactions or coupling between these heat-driven processes must be taken into account in modeling the performance of the repository for such modeling to be meaningful and reliable. DECOVALEX III is organized around four tasks. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment) in situ experiment being conducted at the Grimsel site in Switzerland is to be simulated and analyzed in Task 1. Task 2, centered around the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, USA, has several sub-tasks (Task 2A, Task 2B, Task 2C and Task 2D) to investigate a number of the coupled processes in the DST. Task 3 studies three benchmark problems: a) the effects of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) coupling on the performance of the near-field of a nuclear waste repository (BMT1); b) the effect of upscaling THM processes on the results of performance assessment (BMT2); and c) the effect of glaciation on rock mass behavior (BMT3). Task 4 is on the direct application of THM coupled process modeling in the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories in geologic media. This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, approaches, and the highlights of the main achievements and outstanding issues of the tasks studied in the DECOVALEX III project. The

  16. Verification of Conjugate Heat Transfer Models in a Closed Volume with Radiative Heat Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimov Vyacheslav I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of verification of mathematical model of convective-conductive heat transfer in a closed volume with a thermally conductive enclosing structures are presented. Experiments were carried out to determine the temperature of floor premises in the working conditions of radiant heating systems. Comparison of mathematical modelling of temperature fields and experiments showed their good agreement. It is concluded that the mathematical model of conjugate heat transfers in the air cavity with a heat-conducting and heat-retaining walls correspond to the real process of formation of temperature fields in premises with gas infrared heaters system.

  17. Understanding the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes via the ``cluster volume to surface area" model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandati, Sreekanth; Kunstmann, Jens; Boerrnert, Felix; Schoenfelder, Ronny; Ruemmeli, Mark; Kar, Kamal K.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2010-03-01

    The influence of mixed catalysts for the high yield production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been studied systematically. Based on extensive experimental data a ``Catalyst Volume to Surface Area'' (CVSA) model was developed to understand the influence of the process parameters on the yield and CNT diameter distribution [1]. In our study, we present a refined version of the CVSA model developed by combining experiments and simulations. We discuss our current understanding of the growth mechanism and how the model might be used to increase CNT yields by using mixed catalysts.[4pt] [1] S. Tetali et al., ACS Nano (2009), DOI: 10.1021/nn9012548.

  18. Statistical modeling of volume of alcohol exposure for epidemiological studies of population health: the US example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gmel Gerrit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol consumption is a major risk factor in the global burden of disease, with overall volume of exposure as the principal underlying dimension. Two main sources of data on volume of alcohol exposure are available: surveys and per capita consumption derived from routine statistics such as taxation. As both sources have significant problems, this paper presents an approach that triangulates information from both sources into disaggregated estimates in line with the overall level of per capita consumption. Methods A modeling approach was applied to the US using data from a large and representative survey, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Different distributions (log-normal, gamma, Weibull were used to model consumption among drinkers in subgroups defined by sex, age, and ethnicity. The gamma distribution was used to shift the fitted distributions in line with the overall volume as derived from per capita estimates. Implications for alcohol-attributable fractions were presented, using liver cirrhosis as an example. Results The triangulation of survey data with aggregated per capita consumption data proved feasible and allowed for modeling of alcohol exposure disaggregated by sex, age, and ethnicity. These models can be used in combination with risk relations for burden of disease calculations. Sensitivity analyses showed that the gamma distribution chosen yielded very similar results in terms of fit and alcohol-attributable mortality as the other tested distributions. Conclusions Modeling alcohol consumption via the gamma distribution was feasible. To further refine this approach, research should focus on the main assumptions underlying the approach to explore differences between volume estimates derived from surveys and per capita consumption figures.

  19. Laboratory Testing, Characterization and Mathematical Modeling of the Moniwrist III by Ross-Hime Designs, Incorporated

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skormin, Victor A

    2005-01-01

    .... It is proposed to enhance the system performance through development of an optimal comptroller extending the conventional state-variable and model reference control laws, with dynamic programming...

  20. Conversion of a Surface Model of a Structure of Interest into a Volume Model for Medical Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmad ISTEPHAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric medical image datasets contain vital information for noninvasive diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis. However, direct and unlimited query of such datasets is hindered due to the unstructured nature of the imaging data. This study is a step towards the unlimited query of medical image datasets by focusing on specific Structures of Interest (SOI. A requirement in achieving this objective is having both the surface and volume models of the SOI. However, typically, only the surface model is available. Therefore, this study focuses on creating a fast method to convert a surface model to a volume model. Three methods (1D, 2D and 3D are proposed and evaluated using simulated and real data of Deep Perisylvian Area (DPSA within the human brain. The 1D method takes 80 msec for DPSA model; about 4 times faster than 2D method and 7.4 fold faster than 3D method, with over 97% accuracy. The proposed 1D method is feasible for surface to volume conversion in computer aided diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis systems containing large amounts of unstructured medical images.

  1. Iterative model reconstruction reduces calcified plaque volume in coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Károlyi, Mihály, E-mail: mihaly.karolyi@cirg.hu [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Szilveszter, Bálint, E-mail: szilveszter.balint@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Kolossváry, Márton, E-mail: martonandko@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Takx, Richard A.P, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 100 Heidelberglaan, 3584, CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Celeng, Csilla, E-mail: celengcsilla@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Bartykowszki, Andrea, E-mail: bartyandi@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Jermendy, Ádám L., E-mail: adam.jermendy@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Panajotu, Alexisz, E-mail: panajotualexisz@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); Karády, Júlia, E-mail: karadyjulia@gmail.com [MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Semmelweis University, 68. Varosmajor st, 1122, Budapest (Hungary); and others

    2017-02-15

    Objective: To assess the impact of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) on calcified plaque quantification as compared to filtered back projection reconstruction (FBP) and hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) in coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). Methods: Raw image data of 52 patients who underwent 256-slice CTA were reconstructed with IMR, HIR and FBP. We evaluated qualitative, quantitative image quality parameters and quantified calcified and partially calcified plaque volumes using automated software. Results: Overall qualitative image quality significantly improved with HIR as compared to FBP, and further improved with IMR (p < 0.01 all). Contrast-to-noise ratios were improved with IMR, compared to HIR and FBP (51.0 [43.5–59.9], 20.3 [16.2–25.9] and 14.0 [11.2–17.7], respectively, all p < 0.01) Overall plaque volumes were lowest with IMR and highest with FBP (121.7 [79.3–168.4], 138.7 [90.6–191.7], 147.0 [100.7–183.6]). Similarly, calcified volumes (>130 HU) were decreased with IMR as compared to HIR and FBP (105.9 [62.1–144.6], 110.2 [63.8–166.6], 115.9 [81.7–164.2], respectively, p < 0.05 all). High-attenuation non-calcified volumes (90–129 HU) yielded similar values with FBP and HIR (p = 0.81), however it was lower with IMR (p < 0.05 both). Intermediate- (30–89 HU) and low-attenuation (<30 HU) non-calcified volumes showed no significant difference (p = 0.22 and p = 0.67, respectively). Conclusions: IMR improves image quality of coronary CTA and decreases calcified plaque volumes.

  2. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This Volume VI of six volumes is data documentation, containing the standard table data used for the Administrator's Report at the beginning of 1978, along with the primary data sources and the office responsible. It also contains a copy of a PIES Integrating Model Report with a description of its content. Following an overview chapter, Chapter II, Supply and Demand Data Tables and Sources for the Mid-range Scenario for Target Years 1985 and 1990, data on demand, price, and elasticity; coal; imports; oil and gas; refineries; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal; transportation; and utilities are presented. The following data on alternate scenarios are discussed: low and high demand; low and high oil and gas supply; refinery and oil and gas data assuming a 5% annual increase in real world oil prices. Chapter IV describes the solution output obtained from an execution of PIES.

  3. 3-D reconstruction and volume modelling of the grain fabric of geological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschallinger, R.

    This paper describes three-dimensional reconstruction and volume modelling of geological materials at the macroscopic and the microscopic scale. By means of a precision lapping device, samples are eroded in plan-parallel steps, erosion intervals being adapted to the size of minerals and fabric features of interest. For reconstruction of macroscopic features, each newly eroded sample surface is recorded by a high-resolution color flatbed scanner. Supervised image classification applied to the derived images yields color based mineral recognition. At the microscopic scale, scanning is done with a microanalyzer to portray mineral phases and microchemical variation. Minerals and fabric features are three dimensionally reconstructed by stacking and interpolating the acquired raster images of successive erosion levels in a voxel array. The voxel data structure features analyical flexibility, integration of both discrete and continuous spatial variation and versatile 3-D volume model visualization.

  4. Monte Carlo method for critical systems in infinite volume: The planar Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Victor; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we propose a Monte Carlo method for generating finite-domain marginals of critical distributions of statistical models in infinite volume. The algorithm corrects the problem of the long-range effects of boundaries associated to generating critical distributions on finite lattices. It uses the advantage of scale invariance combined with ideas of the renormalization group in order to construct a type of "holographic" boundary condition that encodes the presence of an infinite volume beyond it. We check the quality of the distribution obtained in the case of the planar Ising model by comparing various observables with their infinite-plane prediction. We accurately reproduce planar two-, three-, and four-point of spin and energy operators. We also define a lattice stress-energy tensor, and numerically obtain the associated conformal Ward identities and the Ising central charge.

  5. Simulation model for wind energy storage systems. Volume II. Operation manual. [SIMWEST code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, A.W.; Edsinger, R.W.; Burroughs, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The effort developed a comprehensive computer program for the modeling of wind energy/storage systems utilizing any combination of five types of storage (pumped hydro, battery, thermal, flywheel and pneumatic). An acronym for the program is SIMWEST (Simulation Model for Wind Energy Storage). The level of detail of SIMWEST is consistent with a role of evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and load components. Volume II, the SIMWEST operation manual, describes the usage of the SIMWEST program, the design of the library components, and a number of simple example simulations intended to familiarize the user with the program's operation. Volume II also contains a listing of each SIMWEST library subroutine.

  6. Modelling the Hydraulic Behaviour of Growing Media with the Explicit Finite Volume Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing imperviousness of urban areas reduces the infiltration and evapotranspiration capacity of urban catchments and results in increased runoff. In the last few decades, several solutions and techniques have been proposed to prevent such impacts by restoring the hydrological cycle. A limiting factor in spreading the use of such systems is the lack of proper modelling tools for design, especially for the infiltration processes in a growing medium. In this research, a physically-based model, employing the explicit Finite Volume Method (FVM, is proposed for modelling infiltration into growing media. The model solves a modified version of the Richards equation using a formulation which takes into account the main characteristics of green infrastructure substrates. The proposed model was verified against the HYDRUS-1D software and the comparison of results confirmed the suitability of the proposed model for correctly describing the hydraulic behaviour of soil substrates.

  7. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  8. Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops: III. Comparison of Zero-Dimensional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, Stephen J.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Zero dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic models, provide a simple and quick way to study the thermal evolution of coronal loops subjected to time-dependent heating. This paper presents a comparison of a number of 0D models that have been published in the past and is intended to provide a guide for those interested in either using the old models or developing new ones. The principal difference between the models is the way the exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region and chromosphere is treated, as plasma cycles into and out of a loop during a heating-cooling cycle. It is shown that models based on the principles of mass and energy conservation can give satisfactory results at some, or, in the case of the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model, all stages of the loop evolution. Empirical models can lead to low coronal densities, spurious delays between the peak density and temperature, and, for short heating pulses, overly short loop lifetimes.

  9. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  10. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 3: Verification of 3-dimensional rigid-lid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.; Sinha, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth (e.g., natural or man-made inland lakes) because surface elevation has been removed as a parameter. These models allow computation of time-dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions. The free-surface model also provides surface height variations with time.

  11. Predicting mortality in the intensive care unit: a comparison of the University Health Consortium expected probability of mortality and the Mortality Prediction Model III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshutz, Angela K M; Feiner, John R; Grimes, Barbara; Gropper, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Quality benchmarks are increasingly being used to compare the delivery of healthcare, and may affect reimbursement in the future. The University Health Consortium (UHC) expected probability of mortality (EPM) is one such quality benchmark. Although the UHC EPM is used to compare quality across UHC members, it has not been prospectively validated in the critically ill. We aimed to define the performance characteristics of the UHC EPM in the critically ill and compare its ability to predict mortality with the Mortality Prediction Model III (MPM-III). The first 100 consecutive adult patients discharged from the hospital (including deaths) each quarter from January 1, 2009 until September 30, 2011 that had an intensive care unit (ICU) stay were included. We assessed model discrimination, calibration, and overall performance, and compared the two models using Bland-Altman plots. Eight hundred ninety-one patients were included. Both the UHC EPM and the MPM-III had excellent performance (Brier score 0.05 and 0.06, respectively). The area under the curve was good for both models (UHC 0.90, MPM-III 0.87, p = 0.28). Goodness of fit was statistically significant for both models (UHC p = 0.002, MPM-III p = 0.0003), but improved with logit transformation (UHC p = 0.41; MPM-III p = 0.07). The Bland-Altman plot showed good agreement at extremes of mortality, but agreement diverged as mortality approached 50 %. The UHC EPM exhibited excellent overall performance, calibration, and discrimination, and performed similarly to the MPM-III. Correlation between the two models was poor due to divergence when mortality was maximally uncertain.

  12. AN AUTOMATIC FEATURE BASED MODEL FOR CELL SEGMENTATION FROM CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY VOLUMES

    OpenAIRE

    Delibaltov, Diana; Ghosh, Pratim; Veeman, Michael; Smith, William; Manjunath, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a model for the automated segmentation of cells from confocal microscopy volumes of biological samples. The segmentation task for these images is exceptionally challenging due to weak boundaries and varying intensity during the imaging process. To tackle this, a two step pruning process based on the Fast Marching Method is first applied to obtain an over-segmented image. This is followed by a merging step based on an effective feature representation. The algorithm is applied on two...

  13. Applying Training System Estimation Models to Army Training. Volume 2. An Annotated Bibliography 1970-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    associated with the Educational Technology Assessment Model ( ETAM ). It contains relevant background information and results of prior studies leading to...the finalized ETAM procedures and computerized routines. A comparison of the manual and automated approach is included, and data base structures and... ETAM program flow are described. The second volume (see PA, Vol 59:11358) contains the 344-page appendix. 039Duffy, L.R., Miller, R.B., & Staley, J.D

  14. Control volume based modelling in one space dimension of oscillating, compressible flow in reciprocating machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård; Carlsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2006-01-01

    We present an approach for modelling unsteady, primarily one-dimensional, compressible flow. The conservation laws for mass, energy, and momentum are applied to a staggered mesh of control volumes and loss mechanisms are included directly as extra terms. Heat transfer, flow friction......, and multidimensional effects are calculated using empirical correlations. Transformations of the conservation equations into new variables, artificial dissipation for dissipating acoustic phenomena, and an asymmetric interpolation method for minimising numerical diffusion and non physical temperature oscillations...

  15. Model-based segmentation in orbital volume measurement with cone beam computed tomography and evaluation against current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Maximilian E H; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Friese, Karl-Ingo; Becker, Matthias; Wolter, Franz-Erich; Lichtenstein, Juergen T; Stoetzer, Marcus; Rana, Majeed; Essig, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Objective determination of the orbital volume is important in the diagnostic process and in evaluating the efficacy of medical and/or surgical treatment of orbital diseases. Tools designed to measure orbital volume with computed tomography (CT) often cannot be used with cone beam CT (CBCT) because of inferior tissue representation, although CBCT has the benefit of greater availability and lower patient radiation exposure. Therefore, a model-based segmentation technique is presented as a new method for measuring orbital volume and compared to alternative techniques. Both eyes from thirty subjects with no known orbital pathology who had undergone CBCT as a part of routine care were evaluated (n = 60 eyes). Orbital volume was measured with manual, atlas-based, and model-based segmentation methods. Volume measurements, volume determination time, and usability were compared between the three methods. Differences in means were tested for statistical significance using two-tailed Student's t tests. Neither atlas-based (26.63 ± 3.15 mm(3)) nor model-based (26.87 ± 2.99 mm(3)) measurements were significantly different from manual volume measurements (26.65 ± 4.0 mm(3)). However, the time required to determine orbital volume was significantly longer for manual measurements (10.24 ± 1.21 min) than for atlas-based (6.96 ± 2.62 min, p model-based (5.73 ± 1.12 min, p measurements. All three orbital volume measurement methods examined can accurately measure orbital volume, although atlas-based and model-based methods seem to be more user-friendly and less time-consuming. The new model-based technique achieves fully automated segmentation results, whereas all atlas-based segmentations at least required manipulations to the anterior closing. Additionally, model-based segmentation can provide reliable orbital volume measurements when CT image quality is poor.

  16. Comparing the dependability and associations with functioning of the DSM-5 Section III trait model of personality pathology and the DSM-5 Section II personality disorder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Michael; Ruggero, Camilo J; Kotov, Roman; Liu, Keke; Krueger, Robert F

    2017-07-01

    Two competing models of personality psychopathology are included in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ( DSM-5 ; American Psychiatric Association, 2013); the traditional personality disorder (PD) model included in Section II and an alternative trait-based model included in Section III. Numerous studies have examined the validity of the alternative trait model and its official assessment instrument, the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5; Krueger, Derringer, Markon, Watson, & Skodol, 2012). However, few studies have directly compared the trait-based model to the traditional PD model empirically in the same dataset. Moreover, to our knowledge, only a single study (Suzuki, Griffin, & Samuel, 2015) has examined the dependability of the PID-5, which is an essential component of construct validity for traits (Chmielewski & Watson, 2009; McCrae, Kurtz, Yamagata, & Terracciano, 2011). The current study directly compared the dependability of the DSM-5 traits, as assessed by the PID-5, and the traditional PD model, as assessed by the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-4 (PDQ-4+), in a large undergraduate sample. In addition, it evaluated and compared their associations with functioning, another essential component of personality pathology. In general, our findings indicate that most DSM-5 traits demonstrate high levels of dependability that are superior to the traditional PD model; however, some of the constructs assessed by the PID-5 may be more state like. The models were roughly equivalent in terms of their associations with functioning. The current results provide additional support for the validity of PID-5 and the DSM-5 Section III personality pathology model. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. The Acute Toxicity of Major Ion Salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia. III. Mathematical models for mixture toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset concerns the development of models for describing the acute toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia using data from single salt tests and binary...

  18. Best-practices guidelines for L2PSA development and applications. Volume 2 - Best practices for the Gen II PWR, Gen II BWR L2PSAs. Extension to Gen III reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimond, E.; Durin, T.; Rahni, N.; Meignen, R.; Cranga, M.; Pichereau, F.; Bentaib, A.; Guigueno, Y.; Loeffler, H.; Mildenberger, O.; Lajtha, G.; Santamaria, C.S.; Dienstbier, J.; Rydl, A.; Holmberg, J.E.; Lindholm, I.; Maennistoe, I.; Pauli, E.M.; Dirksen, G.; Grindon, L.; Peers, K.; Hulqvist, G.; Parozzi, F.; Polidoro, F.; Cazzoli, E.; Vitazkova, J.; Burgazzi, L.; Oury, L.; Ngatchou, C.; Siltanen, S.; Niemela, I.; Routamo, T.; Helstroem, P.; Bassi, C.; Brinkman, H.; Seidel, A.; Schubert, B.; Wohlstein, R.; Guentay, S.; Vincon, L.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this coordinated action was to develop best practice guidelines for the performance of Level 2 PSA methodologies with a view of harmonisation at EU level and to allow meaningful and practical uncertainty evaluations in a Level 2 PSA. Specific relationships with community in charge of nuclear reactor safety (utilities, safety authorities, vendors, and research or services companies) have been established in order to define the current needs in terms of guidelines for level 2 PSA development and applications. An international workshop was organised in Hamburg, with the support of VATTENFALL, in November 2008. The level 2 PSA experts from the ASAMPSA2 project partners have proposed some guidelines for the development and application of L2PSA based on their experience and on information available from international cooperation (EC Severe Accident network of Excellence - SARNET, IAEA standards, OECD-NEA publications and workshop) or open literature. The number of technical issues addressed in the guideline is very large and all are not covered with the same relevancy in the first version of the guideline. This version is submitted for external review in November 2010 by severe accident experts and PSA, especially, from SARNET and OECD-NEA members. The feedback of the external review will be dis cussed during an international open works hop planned in March 2011 and all outcomes will be taken into consideration in the final version of this guideline (June 2011). The guideline includes 3 volumes: - Volume 1 - General considerations on L2PSA. - Volume 2 - Technical recommendations for Gen II and III reactors. - Volume 3 - Specific considerations for future reactor (Gen IV). The recommendations formulated in the guideline should not be considered as 'mandatory' but should help the L2PSA developers to achieve high quality studies with limited time and resources. It may also help the L2PSA reviewers by positioning one specific study in comparison

  19. Engineered materials characterization report for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Volume 3: Corrosion and data modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; McCright, R.D.; Roy, A.K.; Jones, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    This three-volume report serves several purposes. The first volume provides an introduction to the engineered materials effort for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. It defines terms and outlines the history of selection and characterization of these materials. A summary of the recent engineered barrier materials characterization workshop is presented, and the current candidate materials are listed. The second volume tabulates design data for engineered materials, and the third volume is devoted to corrosion data, radiation effects on corrosion, and corrosion modeling. The second and third volumes are intended to be evolving documents, to which new data will be added as they become available from additional studies. The initial version of Volume 3 is devoted to information currently available for environments most similar to those expected in the potential Yucca Mountain repository. This is volume three

  20. Evaluation of Mid-Size Male Hybrid III Models for use in Spaceflight Occupant Protection Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, J.; Somers, J.; Wells, J.; Newby, N.; Currie-Gregg, N.; Lawrence, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In an effort to improve occupant safety during dynamic phases of spaceflight, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has worked to develop occupant protection standards for future crewed spacecraft. One key aspect of these standards is the identification of injury mechanisms through anthropometric test devices (ATDs). Within this analysis, both physical and computational ATD evaluations are required to reasonably encompass the vast range of loading conditions any spaceflight crew may encounter. In this study the accuracy of publically available mid-size male HIII ATD finite element (FE) models are evaluated within applicable loading conditions against extensive sled testing performed on their physical counterparts. Methods: A series of sled tests were performed at the Wright Patterson Air force Base (WPAFB) employing variations of magnitude, duration, and impact direction to encompass the dynamic loading range for expected spaceflight. FE simulations were developed to the specifications of the test setup and driven using measured acceleration profiles. Both fast and detailed FE models of the mid-size male HIII were ran to quantify differences in their accuracy and thus assess the applicability of each within this field. Results: Preliminary results identify the dependence of model accuracy on loading direction, magnitude, and rate. Additionally the accuracy of individual response metrics are shown to vary across each model within evaluated test conditions. Causes for model inaccuracy are identified based on the observed relationships. Discussion: Computational modeling provides an essential component to ATD injury metric evaluation used to ensure the safety of future spaceflight occupants. The assessment of current ATD models lays the groundwork for how these models can be used appropriately in the future. Identification of limitations and possible paths for improvement aid in the development of these effective analysis tools.

  1. Productivity Analysis of Volume Fractured Vertical Well Model in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a semianalytical model to simulate the productivity of a volume fractured vertical well in tight oil reservoirs. In the proposed model, the reservoir is a composite system which contains two regions. The inner region is described as formation with finite conductivity hydraulic fracture network and the flow in fracture is assumed to be linear, while the outer region is simulated by the classical Warren-Root model where radial flow is applied. The transient rate is calculated, and flow patterns and characteristic flowing periods caused by volume fractured vertical well are analyzed. Combining the calculated results with actual production data at the decline stage shows a good fitting performance. Finally, the effects of some sensitive parameters on the type curves are also analyzed extensively. The results demonstrate that the effect of fracture length is more obvious than that of fracture conductivity on improving production in tight oil reservoirs. When the length and conductivity of main fracture are constant, the contribution of stimulated reservoir volume (SRV to the cumulative oil production is not obvious. When the SRV is constant, the length of fracture should also be increased so as to improve the fracture penetration and well production.

  2. Multiple Model Adaptive Estimation and Control Redistribution Performance on the Vista F-16 During Partial Actuator Impairments. Volume III

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, Curtis

    1997-01-01

    .... This stage of research explores the capability of the existing MMAE algorithm to estimate single, partial actuator impairments, and helps to define refinements and expansions needed in the MMAE...

  3. Monitor III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Monitor III is a totally portable version of the Monitor I and II systems in use at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) since 1976. The Monitor III system differs from the other systems in that it is capable of operating in any location accessible by truck. Although Monitor III was designed primarily for the handling and disposal of radioactive materials, it is also capable of performing the more sophisticated operations normally performed by the other Monitor systems. The development and operational capabilities of the Monitor remote handling system have been thoroughly reported since 1978. This paper reports on the commissioning of a new system with unique capabilities

  4. ESCALA DE EVALUACIÓN DEL FUNCIONAMIENTO FAMILIAR FACES III: ¿MODELO DE DOS O TRES FACTORES? ( Family Functioning Evaluation Scale FACES III: Model of two or three factors?)

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Laura Maglio; Juan Pablo Barreyro; Vanina Schmidt

    2010-01-01

    The Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES III) by Olson, Portner and Lavee was developed to assess two of Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Systems dimensions: the family cohesion and flexibility. The aim of this research is to contribute to determine the family functioning dimensions assessed by this instrument and to provide information about the structural validity of the scale for its application in Argentina population. Seven hundred and eighty-five parents (M = 4...

  5. Ethanol mediated As(III) adsorption onto Zn-loaded pinecone biochar: Experimental investigation, modeling, and optimization using hybrid artificial neural network-genetic algorithm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Mohd; Van Vinh, N; Behera, Shishir Kumar; Park, Hung-Suck

    2017-04-01

    Organic matters (OMs) and their oxidization products often influence the fate and transport of heavy metals in the subsurface aqueous systems through interaction with the mineral surfaces. This study investigates the ethanol (EtOH)-mediated As(III) adsorption onto Zn-loaded pinecone (PC) biochar through batch experiments conducted under Box-Behnken design. The effect of EtOH on As(III) adsorption mechanism was quantitatively elucidated by fitting the experimental data using artificial neural network and quadratic modeling approaches. The quadratic model could describe the limiting nature of EtOH and pH on As(III) adsorption, whereas neural network revealed the stronger influence of EtOH (64.5%) followed by pH (20.75%) and As(III) concentration (14.75%) on the adsorption phenomena. Besides, the interaction among process variables indicated that EtOH enhances As(III) adsorption over a pH range of 2 to 7, possibly due to facilitation of ligand-metal(Zn) binding complexation mechanism. Eventually, hybrid response surface model-genetic algorithm (RSM-GA) approach predicted a better optimal solution than RSM, i.e., the adsorptive removal of As(III) (10.47μg/g) is facilitated at 30.22mg C/L of EtOH with initial As(III) concentration of 196.77μg/L at pH5.8. The implication of this investigation might help in understanding the application of biochar for removal of various As(III) species in the presence of OM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report

  7. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.D. (ed.)

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  8. Power flow evaluations for HERMES III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Ramirez, J.J.; Corley, J.P.; Hasti, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the transfer of electro-magnetic pulses from water dielectric strip transmission lines into a diode insulator stack. The HERMES III Scale Model Experiments (HERMEX) included single-stage diodes as well as multistage models in which a variety of parallel/series combinations of strip transmission lines (strip lines) were used to evaluate the voltage adding efficiency at the diode. A technique has been established to estimate an equivalent shunt impedance across the diode due to the nearby uncharged water volume

  9. Development og groundwater flow modeling techniques for the low-level radwaste disposal (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Dae-Seok; Kim, Chun-Soo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Park, Byung-Yoon; Koh, Yong-Kweon; Park, Hyun-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    The project amis to establish the methodology of hydrogeologic assessment by the field application of the evaluation techniques gained and accumulated from the previous hydrogeological research works in Korea. The results of the project and their possible areas for application are (1) acquisition of detailed hydrogeologic information by using a borehole televiewer and a multipacker system, (2) establishing an integrated hydrogeological assessment method for fractured rocks, (3) acquisition of the fracture parameters for fracture modeling, (4) an inversion analysis of hydraulic parameters from fracture network modeling, (5) geostatistical methods for the spatial assignment of hydraulic parameters for fractured rocks, and (6) establishing the groundwater flow modeling procedure for a repository. 75 refs., 72 figs., 34 tabs. (Author)

  10. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. III. Volatile escape stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhjargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The present paper is a continuation of previous publications of the authors in this journal in which two phases of the multistage process of combustion of a coal particle were considered in detail with the help of mathematical modeling: its radiation-convection heating and drying. In the present work, the escape dynamics of volatiles is investigated. The physico-mathematical model of the thermodestruction of an individual coal particle with a dominant influence of endothermal effects has been formulated. Approximate-analytical solutions of this model that are of paramount importance for detailed analysis of the influence of the physical and regime parameters on the escape dynamics of volatiles have been found. The results obtained form the basis for engineering calculations of the volatile escape stage and can be used successfully in the search for effective regimes of burning of various solid fuels, in particular, Shivé-Ovoos coal of Mongolia.

  11. Computer simulation of Gumboro disease outbreak. III. Construction model G-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, T; Ito, T; Tanaka, T; Mizumura, Y

    1980-01-01

    Following the simulation mode., G-3, of Gumboro disease outbreak, Model G-4 was constructed. The algorithm for computer simulation is shown in a flow chart. The postulates added to those for Models G-1 and G-2 are as follows: (1) The source of contamination is the virus remaining in the house and declining gradually in value with the lapse of time. (2) Any diseased bird excretes the virus during a certain period, so that the virus may be added to the source of contamination. (3) The morbid status of the diseased bird becomes worse in process of time, but the infection remains subclinical until a threshold value is reached. Beyond this value the bird becomes clinically diseased. In this model, more than 20 parameters are involved, and random numbers used for expressing the individual differences in the four variables, viz., the level of innate resistance, parentally conferred immunity, virus-intake, and threshold of clinical manifestation.

  12. The acute toxicity of major ion salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia. III. Mathematical models for mixture toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Russell J; Mount, David R; Highland, Terry L; Hockett, J Russell; Hoff, Dale J; Jenson, Correne T; Norberg-King, Teresa J; Peterson, Kira N

    2018-01-01

    Based on previous research on the acute toxicity of major ions (Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Cl - , SO 4 2- , and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- ) to Ceriodaphnia dubia, a mathematical model was developed for predicting the median lethal concentration (LC50) for any ion mixture, excepting those dominated by K-specific toxicity. One component of the model describes a mechanism of general ion toxicity to which all ions contribute and predicts LC50s as a function of osmolarity and Ca activity. The other component describes Mg/Ca-specific toxicity to apply when such toxicity exceeds the general ion toxicity and predicts LC50s as a function of Mg and Ca activities. This model not only tracks well the observed LC50s from past research used for model development but also successfully predicts LC50s from new toxicity tests on synthetic mixtures of ions emulating chemistries of various ion-enriched effluents and receiving waters. It also performs better than a previously published model for major ion toxicity. Because of the complexities of estimating chemical activities and osmolarity, a simplified model based directly on ion concentrations was also developed and found to provide useful predictions. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:247-259. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  13. Methods to Increase the Robustness of Finite-Volume Flow Models in Thermodynamic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Quoilin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issues linked to simulation failures during integration in finite-volume flow models, especially those involving a two-phase state. This kind of model is particularly useful when modeling 1D heat exchangers or piping, e.g., in thermodynamic cycles involving a phase change. Issues, such as chattering or stiff systems, can lead to low simulation speed, instabilities and simulation failures. In the particular case of two-phase flow models, they are usually linked to a discontinuity in the density derivative between the liquid and two-phase zones. In this work, several methods to tackle numerical problems are developed, described, implemented and compared. In addition, methods available in the literature are also implemented and compared to the proposed approaches. Results suggest that the robustness of the models can be significantly increased with these different methods, at the price of a small increase of the error in the mass and energy balances.

  14. Classical and recent free-volume models for polymer solutions: A comparative evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radfarnia, H.R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ghotbi, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, two "classical" (UNIFAC-FV, Entropic-FV) and two "recent" free-volume (FV) models (Kannan-FV, Freed-FV) are comparatively evaluated for polymer-solvent vapor-liquid equilibria including both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Moreover, some further developments are presented here...... by the modified Freed-FV model for athermal and non-athermal polymer systems are compared to other "recent" and "classical" FV models, indicating an improvement for the modified Freed-FV model for aqueous polymer solutions. Second, for the original Freed-FV model, new UNIFAC group energy parameters are regressed...... to using the classical UNIFAC parameters, for VLE of aqueous and alcohol polymer systems....

  15. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 2: User's manual for 3-dimensional free-surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Tuann, S. Y.; Lee, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one-dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth. These models allow computation of time-dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions.

  16. PIO I-II tendencies. Part 2. Improving the pilot modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan URSU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study is conceived in two parts and aims to get some contributions to the problem ofPIO aircraft susceptibility analysis. Part I, previously published in this journal, highlighted the mainsteps of deriving a complex model of human pilot. The current Part II of the paper considers a properprocedure of the human pilot mathematical model synthesis in order to analyze PIO II typesusceptibility of a VTOL-type aircraft, related to the presence of position and rate-limited actuator.The mathematical tools are those of semi global stability theory developed in recent works.

  17. Effect of stand structure on models for volume and aboveground biomass assessment (Castelfusano pinewood, Roma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this research was to analyse the effects of stand structure on biomass allocation and on the accurancy of estimation models for volume and aboveground biomass of Italian stone pine (Pinus pinea L.. Although the species is widely distributed on Mediterranean coasts, few studies on forest biomass estimation have focused on pinewoods. The research was carried out in the Castelfusano’s pinewood (Rome and concerned the two most common structural types: (a 50 years-old pinewood originated by broadcast seeding; and (b 62 years-old pinewood originated by partial seeding alternating worked strips to firm strips. Some 83 sample trees were selected for stem volume estimation and a subset of 32 trees used to quantify the total epigeous biomass, the wooden biomass compartment, including stem and big branches (diameter > 3 cm and the photosynthetic biomass, including thin branches (diameter < 3 cm and needles. Collected data were used to elaborate allometric relations for stem volume, total biomass and specific relations for both compartments, based on one (d2 or two (d2h indipendent variables, for both structural types. Furthermore, pinewood specific biomass expansion factors (BEF - indexes used to estimate carbon stocks starting from stem biomass data - were obtained. The achieved estimation models were subjected to both parallelism and coincidence tests, showing significant effects of stand structure on the accurancy of the allometric relations. The effects of stand structure and reliability of tree height curves on the accurancy of estimation models for volume and aboveground biomass and on biomass allocation in different compartments are analysed and discussed.

  18. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume VI. Data documentation. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J

    1979-02-01

    This documentation describes the PIES Integrating Model as it existed on January 1, 1978. This volume contains two chapters. In Chapter I, Overview, the following subjects are briefly described: supply data, EIA projection series and scenarios, demand data and assumptions, and supply assumptions - oil and gas availabilities. Chapter II contains supply and demand data tables and sources used by the PIES Integrating Model for the mid-range scenario target years 1985 and 1990. Tabulated information is presented for demand, price, and elasticity data; coal data; imports data; oil and gas data; refineries data; synthetics, shale, and solar/geothermal data; transportation data; and utilities data.

  19. Measurements and Modeling of Soot Formation and Radiation in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, Li; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. A compact, self-contained drop rig is used for microgravity experiments in the 2.2-second drop tower facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. On modeling, we have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed Beta-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude- Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H20 and C02. It is shown that when compared to results from true spectral integration, the Rosseland mean absorption coefficient can provide reasonably accurate predictions for the type of flames studied. The soot formation model proposed by Moss, Syed, and Stewart seems to produce better fits to experimental data and more physically sound than the simpler model by Khan et al. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar

  20. Long-Term Prediction of Emergency Department Revenue and Visitor Volume Using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh-Fan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed meteorological, clinical and economic factors in terms of their effects on monthly ED revenue and visitor volume. Monthly data from January 1, 2005 to September 30, 2009 were analyzed. Spearman correlation and cross-correlation analyses were performed to identify the correlation between each independent variable, ED revenue, and visitor volume. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA model was used to quantify the relationship between each independent variable, ED revenue, and visitor volume. The accuracies were evaluated by comparing model forecasts to actual values with mean absolute percentage of error. Sensitivity of prediction errors to model training time was also evaluated. The ARIMA models indicated that mean maximum temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, non-trauma, and trauma visits may correlate positively with ED revenue, but mean minimum temperature may correlate negatively with ED revenue. Moreover, mean minimum temperature and stock market index fluctuation may correlate positively with trauma visitor volume. Mean maximum temperature, relative humidity and stock market index fluctuation may correlate positively with non-trauma visitor volume. Mean maximum temperature and relative humidity may correlate positively with pediatric visitor volume, but mean minimum temperature may correlate negatively with pediatric visitor volume. The model also performed well in forecasting revenue and visitor volume.

  1. Theoretical modeling of a new structure of III-V tandem solar cells by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    junction solar cell is theoretically investigated by optimizing the thickness of GaAs and GaInPandusing a new optical model to separate the junction between the two solar cell in order to solve problems of tunnel junction and difficulties of fabrication.

  2. Rich dynamics of a food chain model with ratio-dependent type III ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    It breaks the stable behaviour of model and drives it to unstable state. Keywords: Food .... System (b) is proposed based on the assumption that in the absence of predator the prey satisfies the Hutchinson's equation. 2. A time-delay τ in the ...... By Descarte's rule of sign, the cubic equation (18d) has at least one positive root.

  3. Domain-Specific QSAR Models for Identifying Potential Estrogenic Activity of Phenols (FutureTox III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational tools can be used for efficient evaluation of untested chemicals for their ability to disrupt the endocrine system. We have employed previously developed global QSAR models that were trained and validated on the ToxCast/Tox21 ER assay data for virtual screening of a...

  4. PIO I-II tendencies case study. Part 1. Mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a study is performed from the perspective of giving a method to reduce the conservatism of the well known PIO (Pilot-Induced Oscillation criteria in predicting the susceptibility of an aircraft to this very harmful phenomenon. There are three interacting components of a PIO – the pilot, the vehicle, and the trigger (in fact, the hazard. The study, conceived in two parts, aims to underline the importance of human pilot model involved in analysis. In this first part, it is shown, following classical sources, how the LQG theory of control and estimation is used to obtain a complex model of human pilot. The approach is based on the argument, experimentally proved, that the human behaves “optimally” in some sense, subject to his inherent psychophysical limitations. The validation of such model is accomplished based on the experimental model of a VTOL-type aircraft. Then, the procedure of inserting typical saturation nonlinearities in the open loop transfer function is presented. A second part of the paper will illustrate PIO tendencies evaluation by means of a grapho-analytic method.

  5. On Witnessed Models in Fuzzy Logic III - Witnessed Gödel Logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2010), s. 171-174 ISSN 0942-5616 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : mathematical fuzzy logic * Gödel logic * witnessed models * arithmetical complexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.361, year: 2010

  6. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  7. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography: Chapter 9, zooplankton. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, K.W.

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana and is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil shortage cavers are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. This volume contains chapter 9 on zooplankton.

  8. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume III of IV, Assessment of Fishway Development and Design, 1982-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    This volume covers the broad, though relatively short, historical basis for this project. The historical developments of certain design features, criteria and research activities are traced. Current design practices are summarized based on the results of an international survey and interviews with agency personnel and consultants. The fluid mechanics and hydraulics of fishway systems are discussed. Fishways (or fishpasses) can be classified in two ways: (1) on the basis of the method of water control (chutes, steps (ladders), or slots); and (2) on the basis of the degree and type of water control. This degree of control ranges from a natural waterfall to a totally artificial environment at a hatchery. Systematic procedures for analyzing fishways based on their configuration, species, and hydraulics are presented. Discussions of fish capabilities, energy expenditure, attraction flow, stress and other factors are included.

  9. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O' Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W. (eds.)

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  10. Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume III. Wind conversion systems with energy storage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The variability of energy output inherent in wind energy conversion systems (WECS) has led to the investigation of energy storage as a means of managing the available energy when immediate, direct use is not possible or desirable. This portion of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a wind energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with wind energy conversion systems.

  11. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part III: Stochastic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marro, Massimo; Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Cassiani, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the reliability of the Lagrangian stochastic micromixing method in predicting higher-order statistics of the passive scalar concentration induced by an elevated source (of varying diameter) placed in a turbulent boundary layer. To that purpose we analyze two different modelling approaches by testing their results against the wind-tunnel measurements discussed in Part I (Nironi et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 2015, Vol. 156, 415-446). The first is a probability density function (PDF) micromixing model that simulates the effects of the molecular diffusivity on the concentration fluctuations by taking into account the background particles. The second is a new model, named VPΓ, conceived in order to minimize the computational costs. This is based on the volumetric particle approach providing estimates of the first two concentration moments with no need for the simulation of the background particles. In this second approach, higher-order moments are computed based on the estimates of these two moments and under the assumption that the concentration PDF is a Gamma distribution. The comparisons concern the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration and the evolution of the PDF along the plume centreline. The novelty of this work is twofold: (i) we perform a systematic comparison of the results of micro-mixing Lagrangian models against experiments providing profiles of the first four moments of the concentration within an inhomogeneous and anisotropic turbulent flow, and (ii) we show the reliability of the VPΓ model as an operational tool for the prediction of the PDF of the concentration.

  12. Myocardial twitch duration and the dependence of oxygen consumption on pressure-volume area: experiments and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J-C; Tran, K; Taberner, A J; Nickerson, D P; Kirton, R S; Nielsen, P M F; Ward, M-L; Nash, M P; Crampin, E J; Loiselle, D S

    2012-09-15

    We tested the proposition that linear length dependence of twitch duration underlies the well-characterised linear dependence of oxygen consumption (V(O(2)) ) on pressure–volume area (PVA) in the heart. By way of experimental simplification, we reduced the problem from three dimensions to one by substituting cardiac trabeculae for the classically investigated whole-heart. This allowed adoption of stress–length area (SLA) as a surrogate for PVA, and heat as a proxy for V(O(2)) . Heat and stress (force per cross-sectional area), at a range of muscle lengths and at both 1 mM and 2 mM [Ca(2+)](o), were recorded from continuously superfused rat right-ventricular trabeculae undergoing fixed-end contractions. The heat–SLA relations of trabeculae (reported here, for the first time) are linear. Twitch duration increases monotonically (but not strictly linearly) with muscle length. We probed the cellular mechanisms of this phenomenon by determining: (i) the length dependence of the duration of the Ca(2+) transient, (ii) the length dependence of the rate of force redevelopment following a length impulse (an index of Ca(2+) binding to troponin-C), (iii) the effect on the simulated time course of the twitch of progressive deletion of length and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms of crossbridge cooperativity, using a detailed mathematical model of the crossbridge cycle, and (iv) the conditions required to achieve these multiple length dependencies, using a greatly simplified model of twitch mechano-energetics. From the results of these four independent investigations, we infer that the linearity of the heat–SLA relation (and, by analogy, the V(O(2))–PVA relation) is remarkably robust in the face of departures from linearity of length-dependent twitch duration.

  13. Myocardial twitch duration and the dependence of oxygen consumption on pressure–volume area: experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J-C; Tran, K; Taberner, A J; Nickerson, D P; Kirton, R S; Nielsen, P M F; Ward, M-L; Nash, M P; Crampin, E J; Loiselle, D S

    2012-01-01

    We tested the proposition that linear length dependence of twitch duration underlies the well-characterised linear dependence of oxygen consumption () on pressure–volume area (PVA) in the heart. By way of experimental simplification, we reduced the problem from three dimensions to one by substituting cardiac trabeculae for the classically investigated whole-heart. This allowed adoption of stress–length area (SLA) as a surrogate for PVA, and heat as a proxy for . Heat and stress (force per cross-sectional area), at a range of muscle lengths and at both 1 mm and 2 mm[Ca2+]o, were recorded from continuously superfused rat right-ventricular trabeculae undergoing fixed-end contractions. The heat–SLA relations of trabeculae (reported here, for the first time) are linear. Twitch duration increases monotonically (but not strictly linearly) with muscle length. We probed the cellular mechanisms of this phenomenon by determining: (i) the length dependence of the duration of the Ca2+ transient, (ii) the length dependence of the rate of force redevelopment following a length impulse (an index of Ca2+ binding to troponin-C), (iii) the effect on the simulated time course of the twitch of progressive deletion of length- and Ca2+-dependent mechanisms of crossbridge cooperativity, using a detailed mathematical model of the crossbridge cycle, and (iv) the conditions required to achieve these multiple length dependencies, using a greatly simplified model of twitch mechano-energetics. From the results of these four independent investigations, we infer that the linearity of the heat–SLA relation (and, by analogy, the –PVA relation) is remarkably robust in the face of departures from linearity of length-dependent twitch duration. PMID:22570375

  14. Coupling model of aerobic waste degradation considering temperature, initial moisture content and air injection volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Lei; Ge, Sai; Xue, Qiang; Li, Jiangshan; Wan, Yong; Hui, Xinminnan

    2018-03-01

    A quantitative description of aerobic waste degradation is important in evaluating landfill waste stability and economic management. This research aimed to develop a coupling model to predict the degree of aerobic waste degradation. On the basis of the first-order kinetic equation and the law of conservation of mass, we first developed the coupling model of aerobic waste degradation that considered temperature, initial moisture content and air injection volume to simulate and predict the chemical oxygen demand in the leachate. Three different laboratory experiments on aerobic waste degradation were simulated to test the model applicability. Parameter sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the reliability of parameters. The coupling model can simulate aerobic waste degradation, and the obtained simulation agreed with the corresponding results of the experiment. Comparison of the experiment and simulation demonstrated that the coupling model is a new approach to predict aerobic waste degradation and can be considered as the basis for selecting the economic air injection volume and appropriate management in the future.

  15. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Manganese III. Physiological Approaches Accounting for Background and Tracer Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Gearhart, Jeffrey; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Nong, Andy; Anderson, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient. Mn deficiency is associated with altered lipid (Kawano et al. 1987) and carbohydrate metabolism (Baly et al. 1984; Baly et al. 1985), abnormal skeletal cartilage development (Keen et al. 2000), decreased reproductive capacity, and brain dysfunction. Occupational and accidental inhalation exposures to aerosols containing high concentrations of Mn produce neurological symptoms with Parkinson-like characteristics in workers. At present, there is also concern about use of the manganese-containing compound, methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT), in unleaded gasoline as an octane enhancer. Combustion of MMT produces aerosols containing a mixture of manganese salts (Lynam et al. 1999). These Mn particulates may be inhaled at low concentrations by the general public in areas using MMT. Risk assessments for essential elements need to acknowledge that risks occur with either excesses or deficiencies and the presence of significant amounts of these nutrients in the body even in the absence of any exogenous exposures. With Mn there is an added complication, i.e., the primary risk is associated with inhalation while Mn is an essential dietary nutrient. Exposure standards for inhaled Mn will need to consider the substantial background uptake from normal ingestion. Andersen et al. (1999) suggested a generic approach for essential nutrient risk assessment. An acceptable exposure limit could be based on some ‘tolerable’ change in tissue concentration in normal and exposed individuals, i.e., a change somewhere from 10 to 25 % of the individual variation in tissue concentration seen in a large human population. A reliable multi-route, multi-species pharmacokinetic model would be necessary for the implementation of this type of dosimetry-based risk assessment approach for Mn. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for various xenobiotics have proven valuable in contributing to a variety of chemical specific risk

  17. Circumplex model of marital and family systems: III. Empirical evaluation with families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C S

    1979-03-01

    This study was designed to test the circumplex model of family systems that hypothesizes moderate family cohesion and moderate adaptability to be more functional than either extreme. Thirty-one Catholic family triads with daughters ranging in age from 14 to 17 years participated in a structured family interaction game (SIMFAM) and filled out questionnaires that measured the variables of cohesion and adaptability and the facilitative variables of support and creativity. All families were considered normal but were subdivided into those that had more and less difficulty with this adolescent. Analysis of the data yielded considerable support for the circumplex model. High family functioning was associated with moderate family cohesion and adaptability, and low family functioning had extreme scores on these dimensions. As predicted, high family support and creativity were also related to high family functioning. Implications of these findings for family therapy are discussed.

  18. Intention to Purchase Products under Volume Discount Scheme: A Conceptual Model and Research Propositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Iranmanesh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many standard brands sell products under the volume discount scheme (VDS as more and more consumers are fond of purchasing products under this scheme. Despite volume discount being commonly practiced, there is a dearth of research, both conceptual and empirical, focusing on purchase characteristics factors and consumer internal evaluation concerning the purchase of products under VDS. To attempt to fill this void, this article develops a conceptual model on VDS with the intention of delineating the influence of the purchase characteristics factors on the consumer intention to purchase products under VDS and provides an explanation of their effects through consumer internal evaluation. Finally, the authors discuss the managerial implications of their research and offer guidelines for future empirical research.

  19. Infrared imaging systems: Design, analysis, modeling, and testing III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Gerald C.

    This volume discusses today's thermal imaging systems, modeling of thermal imaging systems, sampling and aliasing, and systems and testing. Individual papers are on single-frame multispectral thermal imagery, measurement of the MTF of IR staring-array imaging systems, IRC-64 infrared focal-plane-array camera, performance and application of serial-scan FLIRs, and nondestructive thermal analysis with portable pyroelectric television camera. Attention is also given to standard night vision thermal modeling parameters, the analysis of a proposed infrared sensor focal plane, spatial aliasing effects in ground vehicle IR imagery, spatial sampling effects of multipixel sensors on the guided-missile system performance, and the perception of unwanted signals in displayed imagery. Other papers are on the assessment of environment-driven infrared intensity components, measurements of optical transfer function of discretely sampled thermal imaging systems, and the status of uncooled infrared imagers.

  20. Preserving charge and oxidation state of Au(III) ions in an agent-functionalized nanocrystal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Stefan; Schöfberger, Wolfgang; Rashidi, Mohammad; Lengauer, Thomas; Klappenberger, Florian; Diller, Katharina; Kara, Kamuran; Barth, Johannes V; Rauls, Eva; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Koch, Reinhold

    2011-08-23

    Supporting functional molecules on crystal facets is an established technique in nanotechnology. To preserve the original activity of ionic metallorganic agents on a supporting template, conservation of the charge and oxidation state of the active center is indispensable. We present a model system of a metallorganic agent that, indeed, fulfills this design criterion on a technologically relevant metal support with potential impact on Au(III)-porphyrin-functionalized nanoparticles for an improved anticancer-drug delivery. Employing scanning tunneling microscopy and -spectroscopy in combination with photoemission spectroscopy, we clarify at the single-molecule level the underlying mechanisms of this exceptional adsorption mode. It is based on the balance between a high-energy oxidation state and an electrostatic screening-response of the surface (image charge). Modeling with first principles methods reveals submolecular details of the metal-ligand bonding interaction and completes the study by providing an illustrative electrostatic model relevant for ionic metalorganic agent molecules, in general. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Deep in situ dry-etch monitoring of III-V multilayer structures using laser reflectometry and reflectivity modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moussa, H; Meriadec, C; Manin, L; Sagnes, I; Raj, R

    2002-01-01

    Deep reactive ion etching of III-V multilayer structures is an important issue for long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSELs) where full laser structures are usually very thick. Test etchings were performed on GaAs/Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As Bragg mirror structures and monitored using laser reflectometry at 651.4 nm. In order to perform very deep etching, up to 9 mu m, we designed and fabricated a special two-level mask made up of a thick nitride layer and a thin nickel layer. The etching rate is a complex function of many parameters and may change from run to run for similar structures. Therefore, it is important to have a method to control accurately the process in situ by continuously matching, experimental curves with the results of the reflectivity modeling. Here, we present a model, based on the Abeles matrix method, of the normal incidence reflectivity of a multilayer stack as a function of etch depth. Comparison between the model and the observed reflectivity variation durin...

  2. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-III Presentation of a fully automatic titration apparatus and of results supporting the theories given in the preceding parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    This paper forms Part III of a series in which the first two parts describe methods for evaluating titrations performed by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant. The great advantage of these methods is that they do not require an accurate calibration of the electrode system. This property makes the methods very suitable for routine work. e.g., in automatic analysis. An apparatus for performing such titrations automatically is presented. Further, results of titrations of monoprotic acids, a diprotic acid, an ampholyte, a mixture of an acid with its conjugate base, and mixtures of two acids with a small difference between the stability constants are given. Most of these titrations cannot be evaluated by the Gran or Hofstee methods but yield results having errors of the order of 0.1% if the methods proposed in Parts I and II of this series are employed. The advantages of the method of stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant combined with the proposed evaluation methods, in comparison with common methods such as titration to a preset pH, are that all the data are used in the evaluation, permitting a statistical treatment and giving better possibilities for tracing systematic errors.

  3. A reaction-diffusion model for market fluctuations - A relation between price change and traded volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvan, Steven; Bier, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Two decades ago Bak et al. (1997) [3] proposed a reaction-diffusion model to describe market fluctuations. In the model buyers and sellers diffuse from opposite ends of a 1D interval that represents a price range. Trades occur when buyers and sellers meet. We show analytically and numerically that the model well reproduces the square-root relation between traded volumes and price changes that is observed in real-life markets. The result is remarkable as this relation has commonly been explained in terms of more elaborate trader strategies. We furthermore explain why the square-root relation is robust under model modifications and we show how real-life bond market data exhibit the square-root relation.

  4. Validation of Align Technology's Treat III digital model superimposition tool and its case application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R J; Kuo, E; Choi, W

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the efficacy and accuracy of three-dimensional computer-based predictive orthodontic systems requires that new methods of treatment analysis be developed and validated. Invisalign is a digitally fabricated, removable orthodontic appliance that has been commercially available since 1999. It is made up of two main components: 1) computerized graphical images of a patient's teeth moving through a series of stages from initial to final position; 2) pressure formed clear plastic appliances made from stereolithography models of the images in the first component. The manufacturer of Invisalign (Align Technology, Inc.) has created a software tool that can be used to superimpose digital models to evaluate treatment outcomes in three dimensions. Using this software, research was conducted to determine if a single operator could repeatedly superimpose two identical digital models using 12 selected points from the palatal rugae over 10 trials. The tool was then applied to one subject's orthodontic treatment. EXPERIMENT VARIABLES: The output from this tool includes rotations, translations and morphological changes. For this study, translations and rotations were chosen. The results showed that the digital superimposition was reproducible, and that after multiple trials, the superimposition error decreased. The average error in x, y, z, Rx, Ry and Rz after 10 trials was determined to approach approximately 0.2 mm in translation and less than 1 degree in rotation, with a standard deviation of 0.15 mm and 0.7 mm, respectively. The treatment outcome from a single Invisalign-treated bicuspid extraction case was also evaluated tooth-by-tooth in x, y, z, Rx, Ry and Rz dimensions. Using the palate, as a stable reference seemed to work well and the evaluation of the single case showed that many, but not all, of the planned movements occurred.

  5. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  6. Centrifugal Modelling of Soil Structures. Part III. The Stability of River Banks and Flood Embankments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    F .ET 1%0 %S FIG. 1 -1 ISOMETRIC VIEW OF THE FAILURE AT MONTZI LA 1973 (Torrey & Strohm, 1976) PRMTCM! LAND uNPUOTECTED LAND PEN...stainless angle fraise 10n deep, Plate 3.2, which was filled with two layers of sand: a layer of course sand 8a thick and an upper layer of fine sand...J11 3 r0l 00 La " 4.4.5 Two Dimensional Flood Embankment Test 2DF6 55.. Harsh Red model failed prematurely by an increase in self weight with no uplift

  7. Modeling Three-Terminal III-V/Si Tandem Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Emily L.; Deceglie, Michael G.; Stradins, Paul; Tamboli, Adele C.

    2017-06-27

    Three-terminal (3T) tandem cells fabricated by combining an interdigitated back contact (IBC) Si device with a wider bandgap top cell have the potential to provide a robust operating mechanism to efficiently capture the solar spectrum without the need to current match sub-cells or fabricate complicated metal interconnects between cells. Here we develop a two dimensional device physics model to study the behavior of IBC Si solar cells operated in a 3T configuration. We investigate how different cell designs impact device performance and discuss the analysis protocol used to understand and optimize power produced from a single junction, 3T device.

  8. Developing Successful Proposals in Women's Educational Equity, Volume I: The Guide = Desarrollo de propuestas exitosas relacionadas con la equidad educativa de la mujer, volumen I: La guia. Volume II: The Supplement. Volume III: The Swipe File. Volume IV: Workshop Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Walter R.; And Others

    Four volumes present materials and a training workshop on proposal writing. The materials aim to give people the skills and resources with which to translate their ideas into fully developed grant proposals for projects related to educational equity for women. However, the information is applicable to most other funding procedures. The first…

  9. A birdcage model for the Chinese meridian system: part III. Possible mechanism of magnetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Kaung-Ti

    2005-01-01

    Based on the electromagnetic model of the transmission line for the channel and the birdcage resonator for the meridian network, we interpret two effects, seemingly incomprehensible in terms of current Western physiology, the lasting effect and the remote effect. For the lasting effect, acupuncture enhances the amplitude of the Qi standing wave, and this increased amplitude is retained and thus is able to sustain a gradual remodeling of the extracellular matrix in interstitial connective tissues, resulting in a lasting therapeutic effect. For the remote effect (acupuncture effect far from the site of needle insertion), our model puts the mechanism of magnetic therapy on an equal footing with that of acupuncture. It may not be a coincidence that accounts of investigators in both acupuncture and magnetotherapy about the depth of the effective site--along cleavage planes between muscles, or between muscle and bone or tendon--are in accord with that of the Huang Di Nei Jing about the course of channels: "they are embedded and travel between interstitial muscles, deep and invisible." A possible magnetic field generated outside the birdcage may be manipulated to produce local areas of higher temperature or very strong fields.

  10. Mass matrix ansatz and lepton flavor violation in the two-Higgs doublet model-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Cruz, J.L.; Noriega-Papaqui, R.; Rosado, A.

    2004-01-01

    Predictive Higgs-boson-fermion couplings can be obtained when a specific texture for the fermion mass matrices is included in the general two-Higgs doublet model. We derive the form of these couplings in the charged lepton sector using a Hermitian mass matrix ansatz with four-texture zeros. The presence of unconstrained phases in the vertices φ i l i l j modifies the pattern of flavor-violating Higgs boson interactions. Bounds on the model parameters are obtained from present limits on rare lepton flavor-violating processes, which could be extended further by the search for the decay τ→μμμ and μ-e conversion at future experiments. The signal from Higgs boson decays φ i →τμ could be searched for at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, while e-μ transitions could produce a detectable signal at a future eμ collider, through the reaction e + μ - →h 0 →τ + τ -

  11. 3D robust Chan-Vese model for industrial computed tomography volume data segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linghui; Zeng, Li; Luan, Xiao

    2013-11-01

    Industrial computed tomography (CT) has been widely applied in many areas of non-destructive testing (NDT) and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). In practice, CT volume data to be dealt with may be corrupted by noise. This paper addresses the segmentation of noisy industrial CT volume data. Motivated by the research on the Chan-Vese (CV) model, we present a region-based active contour model that draws upon intensity information in local regions with a controllable scale. In the presence of noise, a local energy is firstly defined according to the intensity difference within a local neighborhood. Then a global energy is defined to integrate local energy with respect to all image points. In a level set formulation, this energy is represented by a variational level set function, where a surface evolution equation is derived for energy minimization. Comparative analysis with the CV model indicates the comparable performance of the 3D robust Chan-Vese (RCV) model. The quantitative evaluation also shows the segmentation accuracy of 3D RCV. In addition, the efficiency of our approach is validated under several types of noise, such as Poisson noise, Gaussian noise, salt-and-pepper noise and speckle noise.

  12. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The increased interest in 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an ''analysis region'' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  13. High-Volume Transanal Surgery with CPH34 HV for the Treatment of III-IV Degree Haemorrhoids: Final Short-Term Results of an Italian Multicenter Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Reboa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical chart of 621 patients with III-IV haemorrhoids undergoing Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy (SH with CPH34 HV in 2012–2014 was consecutively reviewed to assess its safety and efficacy after at least 12 months of follow-up. Mean volume of prolapsectomy was significantly higher (13.0 mL; SD, 1.4 in larger prolapse (9.3 mL; SD, 1.2 (p<0.001. Residual or recurrent haemorrhoids occurred in 11 of 621 patients (1.8% and in 12 of 581 patients (1.9%, respectively. Relapse was correlated with higher preoperative Constipation Scoring System (CSS (p=0.000, Pescatori’s degree (p=0.000, Goligher’s grade (p=0.003, prolapse exceeding half of the length of the Circular Anal Dilator (CAD (p=0.000, and higher volume of prolapsectomy (p=0.000. At regression analysis, only the preoperative CSS, Pescatori’s degree, Goligher’s grade, and volume of resection were significantly predictive of relapse. A high level of satisfaction (VAS = 8.6; SD, 1.0 coupled with a reduction of 12-month CSS (Δ preoperative CSS/12 mo CSS = 3.4, SD, 2.0; p<0.001 was observed. The wider prolapsectomy achievable with CPH34 HV determined an overall 3.7% relapse rate in patients with high prevalence of large internal rectal prolapse, coupled with high satisfaction index, significant reduction of CSS, and very low complication rates.

  14. A model experiment to study sonic boom propagation through turbulence. Part III: validation of sonic boom propagation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkens, Bart

    2002-01-01

    In previous papers, we have shown that model experiments are successful in simulating the propagation of sonic booms through the atmospheric turbulent boundary layer. The results from the model experiment, pressure wave forms of spark-produced N waves and turbulence characteristics of the plane jet, are used to test various sonic boom models for propagation through turbulence. Both wave form distortion models and rise time prediction models are tested. Pierce's model [A. D. Pierce, "Statistical theory of atmospheric turbulence effects on sonic boom rise times," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 49, 906-924 (1971)] based on the wave front folding mechanism at a caustic yields an accurate prediction for the rise time of the mean wave form after propagation through the turbulence.

  15. Comparing rankings of selected TRI organic chemicals for two environments using a level III fugacity model and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, F.G.; Egemen, E.; Nirmalakhandan, N.

    1998-01-01

    The Toxics Release Inventory, TRI (USEPA, 1995) is a comprehensive listing of chemicals, mass released, source of releases, and other related information for chemicals which are released into the environment in the US. These chemicals are then ranked according to the mass released as a indication of their environmental impact. Industries have been encouraged to adopt production methods to decrease the release of chemicals which are ranked highly in the TRI. Clearly, this ranking of the chemicals based upon the mass released fails to take into account very important environmental aspects. The first and most obvious aspect is the wide range of toxicity's of the chemicals released. Numerous researchers have proposed systems to rank chemicals according to their toxicity. The second aspect, which a mass released based ranking does not take into account, is the fate and transport of each chemical within the environment. Cohen and Ryan (1985) and Mackay and Paterson (1991) have proposed models to evaluate the fate and transport of chemicals released into the environment. Some authors have incorporated the mass released and toxicity with some fate and transport aspects to rank the impact of released chemicals. But, due to the complexities of modeling the environment, the lack of published data on properties of chemicals, and the lack of information on the speciation of chemicals in complex systems, modeling the fate and transport of toxic chemicals in the environment remains difficult. To provide an indication of the need to rank chemicals according to their environmental impact instead of the mass released, the authors have utilized a subset of 45 organic chemicals from the TRI, modeled the fate and transport of the chemicals using a Level III fugacity model, and compared those equilibrium concentrations with toxicity data to yield a hazard value for each chemical

  16. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actis, S.; Passarino, G.

    2006-12-01

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  17. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Passarino, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  18. Chemical association in simple models of molecular and ionic fluids. III. The cavity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaoqi; Stell, George

    1992-01-01

    Exact equations which relate the cavity function to excess solvation free energies and equilibrium association constants are rederived by using a thermodynamic cycle. A zeroth-order approximation, derived previously by us as a simple interpolation scheme, is found to be very accurate if the associative bonding occurs on or near the surface of the repulsive core of the interaction potential. If the bonding radius is substantially less than the core radius, the approximation overestimates the association degree and the association constant. For binary association, the zeroth-order approximation is equivalent to the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) of Wertheim. For n-particle association, the combination of the zeroth-order approximation with a ``linear'' approximation (for n-particle distribution functions in terms of the two-particle function) yields the first-order TPT result. Using our exact equations to go beyond TPT, near-exact analytic results for binary hard-sphere association are obtained. Solvent effects on binary hard-sphere association and ionic association are also investigated. A new rule which generalizes Le Chatelier's principle is used to describe the three distinct forms of behaviors involving solvent effects that we find. The replacement of the dielectric-continuum solvent model by a dipolar hard-sphere model leads to improved agreement with an experimental observation. Finally, equation of state for an n-particle flexible linear-chain fluid is derived on the basis of a one-parameter approximation that interpolates between the generalized Kirkwood superposition approximation and the linear approximation. A value of the parameter that appears to be near optimal in the context of this application is obtained from comparison with computer-simulation data.

  19. Measurement and thermal modeling of sapphire substrate temperature at III-Nitride MOVPE conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.

    2017-04-01

    Growth rates and alloy composition of AlGaN grown by MOVPE is often very temperature dependent due to the presence of gas-phase parasitic chemical processes. These processes make wafer temperature measurement highly important, but in fact such measurements are very difficult because of substrate transparency in the near-IR ( 900 nm) where conventional pyrometers detect radiation. The transparency problem can be solved by using a mid-IR pyrometer operating at a wavelength ( 7500 nm) where sapphire is opaque. We employ a mid-IR pyrometer to measure the sapphire wafer temperature and simultaneously a near-IR pyrometer to measure wafer pocket temperature, while varying reactor pressure in both a N2 and H2 ambient. Near 1300 °C, as the reactor pressure is lowered from 300 Torr to 10 Torr the wafer temperature drops dramatically, and the ΔT between the pocket and wafer increases from 20 °C to 250 °C. Without the mid-IR pyrometer the large wafer temperature change with pressure would not have been noted. In order to explain this behavior we have developed a quasi-2D thermal model that includes a proper accounting of the pressure-dependent thermal contact resistance, and also accounts for sapphire optical transmission. The model and experimental results demonstrate that at most growth conditions the majority of the heat is transported from the wafer pocket to the wafer via gas conduction, in the free molecular flow limit. In this limit gas conductivity is independent of gap size but first order in pressure, and can quantitatively explain results from 20 to 300 Torr. Further analysis yields a measure of the thermal accommodation coefficients; α(H2) =0.23, α(N2) =0.50, which are in the range typically measured.

  20. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: −11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: −7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: −6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: −1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: −11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography

  1. New model for estimating the relationship between surface area and volume in the human body using skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasabova, Boryana E; Holliday, Trenton W

    2015-04-01

    A new model for estimating human body surface area and body volume/mass from standard skeletal metrics is presented. This model is then tested against both 1) "independently estimated" body surface areas and "independently estimated" body volume/mass (both derived from anthropometric data) and 2) the cylindrical model of Ruff. The model is found to be more accurate in estimating both body surface area and body volume/mass than the cylindrical model, but it is more accurate in estimating body surface area than it is for estimating body volume/mass (as reflected by the standard error of the estimate when "independently estimated" surface area or volume/mass is regressed on estimates derived from the present model). Two practical applications of the model are tested. In the first test, the relative contribution of the limbs versus the trunk to the body's volume and surface area is compared between "heat-adapted" and "cold-adapted" populations. As expected, the "cold-adapted" group has significantly more of its body surface area and volume in its trunk than does the "heat-adapted" group. In the second test, we evaluate the effect of variation in bi-iliac breadth, elongated or foreshortened limbs, and differences in crural index on the body's surface area to volume ratio (SA:V). Results indicate that the effects of bi-iliac breadth on SA:V are substantial, while those of limb lengths and (especially) the crural index are minor, which suggests that factors other than surface area relative to volume are driving morphological variation and ecogeographical patterning in limb prorportions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The development of a volume element model for energy systems engineering and integrative thermodynamic optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sam

    The dissertation presents the mathematical formulation, experimental validation, and application of a volume element model (VEM) devised for modeling, simulation, and optimization of energy systems in their early design stages. The proposed model combines existing modeling techniques and experimental adjustment to formulate a reduced-order model, while retaining sufficient accuracy to serve as a practical system-level design analysis and optimization tool. In the VEM, the physical domain under consideration is discretized in space using lumped hexahedral elements (i.e., volume elements), and the governing equations for the variable of interest are applied to each element to quantify diverse types of flows that cross it. Subsequently, a system of algebraic and ordinary differential equations is solved with respect to time and scalar (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, etc.) fields are obtained in both spatial and temporal domains. The VEM is capable of capturing and predicting dynamic physical behaviors in the entire system domain (i.e., at system level), including mutual interactions among system constituents, as well as with their respective surroundings and cooling systems, if any. The VEM is also generalizable; that is, the model can be easily adapted to simulate and optimize diverse systems of different scales and complexity and attain numerical convergence with sufficient accuracy. Both the capability and generalizability of the VEM are demonstrated in the dissertation via thermal modeling and simulation of an Off-Grid Zero Emissions Building, an all-electric ship, and a vapor compression refrigeration (VCR) system. Furthermore, the potential of the VEM as an optimization tool is presented through the integrative thermodynamic optimization of a VCR system, whose results are used to evaluate the trade-offs between various objective functions, namely, coefficient of performance, second law efficiency, pull-down time, and refrigerated space temperature, in

  3. Models for Quarks and Elementary Particles. Part III: What is the Nature of the Gravitational Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann U. K. W.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The first two parts of this article series dealt with the questions: What is a quark? and What is mass? While the present models lead to a physical idea of the mass, the geometrical theory of the general relativity only shows the effect of mass. From the physical idea of mass, from the idea of the resultant vector (EV as electric flux and from the ideas relating to the magnetic monopole (MMP it follows that the gravitational field is an electrical field. The share of the electrical gravitational flux on the entire electrical flux of a quark is determined from Newton’s empirical gravitational constant G . The superposition of the < fluxes of two quark collectives produces the gravitational force effect between two quark collectives. Gravitational fields reach infinitely far according to our current ideas. Connected with the quark oscillations hinted in the Parts I and II this results in the idea of the < - < flux spreading with infinite speed, having enormous consequences.

  4. Renormalization Group Evolution of the Standard Model Dimension Six Operators III: Gauge Coupling Dependence and Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Manohar, Aneesh V; Trott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the gauge terms of the one-loop anomalous dimension matrix for the dimension-six operators of the Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT). Combining these results with our previous results for the $\\lambda$ and Yukawa coupling terms completes the calculation of the one-loop anomalous dimension matrix for the dimension-six operators. There are 1350 $CP$-even and $1149$ $CP$-odd parameters in the dimension-six Lagrangian for 3 generations, and our results give the entire $2499 \\times 2499$ anomalous dimension matrix. We discuss how the renormalization of the dimension-six operators, and the additional renormalization of the dimension $d \\le 4$ terms of the SM Lagrangian due to dimension-six operators, lays the groundwork for future precision studies of the SM EFT aimed at constraining the effects of new physics through precision measurements at the electroweak scale. As some sample applications, we discuss some aspects of the full RGE improved result for essential processes such as $gg \\to h...

  5. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value <5%, p < 0.01), especially in case of tumor late responses, which can hardly be handled by models entailing a constant radiosensitivity, failing to model changes from initial severe hypoxia to aerobic conditions during the treatment course. The model predictive capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level).

  6. Development and Analysis of Volume Multi-Sphere Method Model Generation using Electric Field Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, G. J.

    Electrostatic modeling of spacecraft has wide-reaching applications such as detumbling space debris in the Geosynchronous Earth Orbit regime before docking, servicing and tugging space debris to graveyard orbits, and Lorentz augmented orbits. The viability of electrostatic actuation control applications relies on faster-than-realtime characterization of the electrostatic interaction. The Volume Multi-Sphere Method (VMSM) seeks the optimal placement and radii of a small number of equipotential spheres to accurately model the electrostatic force and torque on a conducting space object. Current VMSM models tuned using force and torque comparisons with commercially available finite element software are subject to the modeled probe size and numerical errors of the software. This work first investigates fitting of VMSM models to Surface-MSM (SMSM) generated electrical field data, removing modeling dependence on probe geometry while significantly increasing performance and speed. A proposed electric field matching cost function is compared to a force and torque cost function, the inclusion of a self-capacitance constraint is explored and 4 degree-of-freedom VMSM models generated using electric field matching are investigated. The resulting E-field based VMSM development framework is illustrated on a box-shaped hub with a single solar panel, and convergence properties of select models are qualitatively analyzed. Despite the complex non-symmetric spacecraft geometry, elegantly simple 2-sphere VMSM solutions provide force and torque fits within a few percent.

  7. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  8. Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-15

    This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

  9. A new stellar spectrum interpolation algorithm and its application to Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liantao; Zhang, Fenghui; Kang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Lang

    2018-05-01

    In evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models, we need to convert stellar evolutionary parameters into spectra via interpolation in a stellar spectral library. For theoretical stellar spectral libraries, the spectrum grid is homogeneous on the effective-temperature and gravity plane for a given metallicity. It is relatively easy to derive stellar spectra. For empirical stellar spectral libraries, stellar parameters are irregularly distributed and the interpolation algorithm is relatively complicated. In those EPS models that use empirical stellar spectral libraries, different algorithms are used and the codes are often not released. Moreover, these algorithms are often complicated. In this work, based on a radial basis function (RBF) network, we present a new spectrum interpolation algorithm and its code. Compared with the other interpolation algorithms that are used in EPS models, it can be easily understood and is highly efficient in terms of computation. The code is written in MATLAB scripts and can be used on any computer system. Using it, we can obtain the interpolated spectra from a library or a combination of libraries. We apply this algorithm to several stellar spectral libraries (such as MILES, ELODIE-3.1 and STELIB-3.2) and give the integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of stellar populations (with ages from 1 Myr to 14 Gyr) by combining them with Yunnan-III isochrones. Our results show that the differences caused by the adoption of different EPS model components are less than 0.2 dex. All data about the stellar population ISEDs in this work and the RBF spectrum interpolation code can be obtained by request from the first author or downloaded from http://www1.ynao.ac.cn/˜zhangfh.

  10. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  11. Modeling the spatial distribution of the parameters of the coolant in the reactor volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the approach to the question about the spatial distribution of the parameters of the coolant in-reactor volume. To describe the in-core space is used specially developed preprocessor. When the work of the preprocessor in the first place, is recreated on the basis of available information (mostly-the original drawings) with high accuracy three-dimensional description of the structures of the reactor volume and, secondly, are prepared on this basis blocks input to the nodal system code improved estimate ATHLET, allows to take into account the hydrodynamic interaction between the spatial control volumes. As an example the special case of solutions of international standard problem on the reconstruction of the transition process in the third unit of the Kalinin nuclear power plant, due to the shutdown of one of the four Main Coolant Pumps in operation at the rated capacity (first download). Model-core area consists of approximately 58 000 control volumes and spatial relationships. It shows the influence of certain structural units of the core to the distribution of the mass floe rate of its height. It is detected a strong cross-flow coolant in the area over the baffle. Moreover, we study the distribution of the coolant temperature at the assembly head of WWER-1000 reactor. It is shown that in the region of the top of the assembly head, where we have installation of thermocouples, the flow coolant for internal assemblies core is formed by only from guide channel Reactor control and protected system Control rod flow, or a mixture of the guide channel flow and flow from the area in front of top grid head assembly (the peripheral assemblies). It is shown that the magnitude of the flow guide channels affects not only the position of control rods, but also the presence of a particular type of measuring channels (Self powered neutron detector sensors or Temperature control sensors) in the cassette. (Author)

  12. Front tracking based modeling of the solid grain growth on the adaptive control volume grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredyński, Mirosław; Łapka, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    The paper presents the micro-scale model of unconstrained solidification of the grain immersed in under-cooled liquid, based on the front tracking approach. For this length scale, the interface tracked through the domain is meant as the solid-liquid boundary. To prevent generation of huge meshes the energy transport equation is discretized on the adaptive control volume (c.v.) mesh. The coupling of dynamically changing mesh and moving front position is addressed. Preliminary results of simulation of a test case, the growth of single grain, are presented and discussed.

  13. Review of models used for determining consequences of UF6 release: Model evaluation report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Radonjic, Z.R.; Coutts, P.T.; Lewis, C.J.; Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1997-11-01

    Three uranium hexafluoride-(UF 6 -) specific models--HGSYSTEM/UF 6 , Science Application International Corporation, and RTM-96; three dense-gas models--DEGADIS, SLAB, and the Chlorine Institute methodology; and one toxic chemical model--AFTOX--are evaluated on their capabilities to simulate the chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion of UF 6 released from accidents at nuclear fuel-cycle facilities, to support Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis. These models are also evaluated for user-friendliness and for quality assurance and quality control features, to ensure the validity and credibility of the results. Model performance evaluations are conducted for the three UF 6 -specific models, using field data on releases of UF 6 and other heavy gases. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF 6 and SAIC models are within an order of magnitude of the field data, but the SAIC model overpredicts beyond an order of magnitude for a few UF 6 -specific data points. The RTM-96 model provides overpredictions within a factor of 3 for all data points beyond 400 m from the source. For one data set, however, the RTM-96 model severely underpredicts the observations within 200 m of the source. Outputs of the models are most sensitive to the meteorological parameters at large distances from the source and to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters at distances close to the source. Specific recommendations are being made to improve the applicability and usefulness of the three models and to choose a specific model to support the intended analyses. Guidance is also provided on the choice of input parameters for initial dilution, building wake effects, and distance to completion of UF 6 reaction with water

  14. Preliminary thermal and thermomechanical modeling for the near surface test facility heater experiments at Hanford. Volume II: Appendix D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Remer, J.S.

    1978-12-01

    Appendix D is a complete set of figures illustrating the detailed calculations necessary for designing the heater experiments at the Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) at Hanford, Washington. The discussion of the thermal and thermomechanical modeling that yielded these calculations is presented in Volume 1. A summary of the figures and the models they illustrate is given in table D1. The most important figures have also been included in the discussion in Volume 1, and Table D2 lists the figure numbers in this volume that correspond to figure numbers used there

  15. Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Model (NGTDM) is the component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) that is used to represent the domestic natural gas transmission and distribution system. The NGTDM is the model within the NEMS that represents the transmission, distribution, and pricing of natural gas. The model also includes representations of the end-use demand for natural gas, the production of domestic natural gas, and the availability of natural gas traded on the international market based on information received from other NEMS models. The NGTDM determines the flow of natural gas in an aggregate, domestic pipeline network, connecting domestic and foreign supply regions with 12 demand regions. The purpose of this report is to provide a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public that defines the objectives of the model, describes its basic design, provides detail on the methodology employed, and describes the model inputs, outputs, and key assumptions. Subsequent chapters of this report provide: an overview of NGTDM; a description of the interface between the NEMS and NGTDM; an overview of the solution methodology of the NGTDM; the solution methodology for the Annual Flow Module; the solution methodology for the Distributor Tariff Module; the solution methodology for the Capacity Expansion Module; the solution methodology for the Pipeline Tariff Module; and a description of model assumptions, inputs, and outputs.

  16. A Volume-Fraction Based Two-Phase Constitutive Model for Blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Rui (Carnegie-Mellon Univ.); Massoudi, Mehrdad; Hund, S.J. (Carnegie-Mellon Univ.); •Antaki, J.F. (Carnegie-Mellon Univ.)

    2008-06-01

    Mechanically-induced blood trauma such as hemolysis and thrombosis often occurs at microscopic channels, steps and crevices within cardiovascular devices. A predictive mathematical model based on a broad understanding of hemodynamics at micro scale is needed to mitigate these effects, and is the motivation of this research project. Platelet transport and surface deposition is important in thrombosis. Microfluidic experiments have previously revealed a significant impact of red blood cell (RBC)-plasma phase separation on platelet transport [5], whereby platelet localized concentration can be enhanced due to a non-uniform distribution of RBCs of blood flow in a capillary tube and sudden expansion. However, current platelet deposition models either totally ignored RBCs in the fluid by assuming a zero sample hematocrit or treated them as being evenly distributed. As a result, those models often underestimated platelet advection and deposition to certain areas [2]. The current study aims to develop a two-phase blood constitutive model that can predict phase separation in a RBC-plasma mixture at the micro scale. The model is based on a sophisticated theory known as theory of interacting continua, i.e., mixture theory. The volume fraction is treated as a field variable in this model, which allows the prediction of concentration as well as velocity profiles of both RBC and plasma phases. The results will be used as the input of successive platelet deposition models.

  17. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Executive summary for Phases I,II and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O.; Tsang, C.F.; Kautsky, F.

    1996-06-01

    This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, methodologies and results of the first stage of the international DECOVALEX project - DECOVALEX I (1992-1995). The acronym stands for Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiment in Nuclear Waste Isolation, and the project is an international effort to develop mathematical models, numerical methods and computer codes for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rocks and buffer materials for geological isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, and validate them against laboratory and field experiments. 24 refs

  18. Training program for energy conservation in new building construction. Volume III. Energy conservation technology for plan examiners and code administrators. Energy Conservation Technology Series 200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, a Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction has been developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. The subject of regulation of new building construction to assure energy conservation is recognized as one in which code officials have not had previous exposure. It was also determined that application of the model code would be made at varying levels by officials with both a specific requirement for knowledge and a differing degree of prior training in the state-of-the-art. Therefore, a training program and instructional materials were developed for code officials to assist them in the implementation and enforcement of energy efficient standards and codes. The training program for Energy Conservation Tehnology for Plan Examiners and Code Administrators (ECT Series 200) is presented.

  19. Geometry modeling and grid generation using 3D NURBS control volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzu-Yi; Soni, Bharat K.; Shih, Ming-Hsin

    1995-01-01

    The algorithms for volume grid generation using NURBS geometric representation are presented. The parameterization algorithm is enhanced to yield a desired physical distribution on the curve, surface and volume. This approach bridges the gap between CAD surface/volume definition and surface/volume grid generation. Computational examples associated with practical configurations have shown the utilization of these algorithms.

  20. Dose-volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Saitoh, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint ('point A dose-reduced plan') instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A ('tentative 6-Gy plan'). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control. (author)

  1. A Computational Model for the Automatic Diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Based on Functional Brain Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the problem of computer-aided diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD using machine learning techniques. With the ADHD-200 dataset, we developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM model to classify ADHD patients from typically developing controls (TDCs, using the regional brain volumes as predictors. Conventionally, the volume of a brain region was considered to be an anatomical feature and quantified using structural magnetic resonance images. One major contribution of the present study was that we had initially proposed to measure the regional brain volumes using fMRI images. Brain volumes measured from fMRI images were denoted as functional volumes, which quantified the volumes of brain regions that were actually functioning during fMRI imaging. We compared the predictive power of functional volumes with that of regional brain volumes measured from anatomical images, which were denoted as anatomical volumes. The former demonstrated higher discriminative power than the latter for the classification of ADHD patients vs. TDCs. Combined with our two-step feature selection approach which integrated prior knowledge with the recursive feature elimination (RFE algorithm, our SVM classification model combining functional volumes and demographic characteristics achieved a balanced accuracy of 67.7%, which was 16.1% higher than that of a relevant model published previously in the work of Sato et al. Furthermore, our classifier highlighted 10 brain regions that were most discriminative in distinguishing between ADHD patients and TDCs. These 10 regions were mainly located in occipital lobe, cerebellum posterior lobe, parietal lobe, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe. Our present study using functional images will likely provide new perspectives about the brain regions affected by ADHD.

  2. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  3. Geoscience data base handbook for modeling a nuclear waste repository. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1979-12-01

    This handbook contains reference information on parameters that should be considered in analyzing or modeling a proposed nuclear waste repository site. Only those parameters and values that best represent the natural environment are included. Rare extremes are avoided. Where laboratory and field data are inadequate, theoretical treatments and informed engineering judgements are presented. Volume 1 contains a data base on salt as a repository medium. Chapters on the geology of bedded and dome salt, the geomechanics of salt, hydrology, geochemistry, natural and man-made features, and seismology provide compiled data and related information useful for studying a proposed repository in salt. These and other data will be needed to derive generic deep geologic modeling parameters and will also serve as background for the verification of source data that may be presented in licensing applications for nuclear waste repositories. Volume 2 is the result of a scoping study for a data base on the geology, geomechanics, and hydrology of shale, granite, and basalt as alternative repository media. Except for the geomechanics of shale, most of the sections contain relatively complete compilations of the available data, as well as discussions of the properties that are unique to each rock type

  4. Environmental fate model for ultra-low-volume insecticide applications used for adult mosquito management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J.; Peterson, Robert K.D.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Marshall, Lucy M.; Weaver, David K.; Preftakes, Collin J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the more effective ways of managing high densities of adult mosquitoes that vector human and animal pathogens is ultra-low-volume (ULV) aerosol applications of insecticides. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses models that are not validated for ULV insecticide applications and exposure assumptions to perform their human and ecological risk assessments. Currently, there is no validated model that can accurately predict deposition of insecticides applied using ULV technology for adult mosquito management. In addition, little is known about the deposition and drift of small droplets like those used under conditions encountered during ULV applications. The objective of this study was to perform field studies to measure environmental concentrations of insecticides and to develop a validated model to predict the deposition of ULV insecticides. The final regression model was selected by minimizing the Bayesian Information Criterion and its prediction performance was evaluated using k-fold cross validation. Density of the formulation and the density and CMD interaction coefficients were the largest in the model. The results showed that as density of the formulation decreases, deposition increases. The interaction of density and CMD showed that higher density formulations and larger droplets resulted in greater deposition. These results are supported by the aerosol physics literature. A k-fold cross validation demonstrated that the mean square error of the selected regression model is not biased, and the mean square error and mean square prediction error indicated good predictive ability.

  5. Dose-volume effects in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord: an evaluation of NTCP models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Marielle E P; Pop, Lucas A M; Visser, Andries G; Schellekens, Suzanne A M W; van der Kogel, Albert J

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate models for normal-tissue-complication probability (NTCP) on describing the dose-volume effect in rat thoracolumbar spinal cord. Single-dose irradiation of four field lengths (4, 1.5, 1.0, and 0.5 cm) was evaluated by the endpoints paresis and white-matter necrosis. The resulting dose-response data were used to rank phenomenological and tissue architecture NTCP models. The 0.5-cm field length showed a steep increase in radiation tolerance. Statistical analysis of the model fits, which included evaluation of goodness of fit (GOF) and confidence intervals, resulted in the rejection of all the models considered. Excluding the smallest field length, the Schultheiss (D(50) = 21.5 Gy, k = 26.5), the relative seriality (D(50) = 21.4 Gy, s = 1.6, gamma(50) = 6.3), and the critical element (D(50,FSU) = 26.6 Gy, gamma(50,FSU) = 2.3, n = 1.3) model gave the best fit. A thorough statistical analysis resulted in a serial or critical-element behavior for the field lengths of 1.0 cm and greater. Including the 0.5-cm field length, the radiation response markedly diverged from serial properties, but none of the models applied acceptably described this dose-response relationship. This study suggests that the commonly assumed serial behavior of the spinal cord might be valid for daily use in external- beam irradiation.

  6. Controlling and modelling the wetting properties of III-V semiconductor surfaces using re-entrant nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wing H; Lu, Yao; Liu, Huiyun; Carmalt, Claire J; Parkin, Ivan P; Kenyon, Anthony J

    2018-02-23

    Inorganic semiconductors such as III-V materials are very important in our everyday life as they are used for manufacturing optoelectronic and microelectronic components with important applications span from energy harvesting to telecommunications. In some applications, these components are required to operate in harsh environments. In these cases, having waterproofing capability is essential. Here we demonstrate design and control of the wettability of indium phosphide based multilayer material (InP/InGaAs/InP) using re-entrant structures fabricated by a fast electron beam lithography technique. This patterning technique enabled us to fabricate highly uniform nanostructure arrays with at least one order of magnitude shorter patterning times compared to conventional electron beam lithography methods. We reduced the surface contact fraction significantly such that the water droplets may be completely removed from our nanostructured surface. We predicted the wettability of our patterned surface by modelling the adhesion energies between the water droplet and both the patterned surface and the dispensing needle. This is very useful for the development of coating-free waterproof optoelectronic and microelectronic components where the coating may hinder the performance of such devices and cause problems with semiconductor fabrication compatibility.

  7. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  8. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description. Appendix A-H (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.

    1985-01-01

    The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decisions based on an input set of technical, economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. This volume contains appendices A through H including a description of subroutines and the Fortran listing of the program

  9. Numerical Modeling of Poroelastic-Fluid Systems Using High-Resolution Finite Volume Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Grady

    Poroelasticity theory models the mechanics of porous, fluid-saturated, deformable solids. It was originally developed by Maurice Biot to model geophysical problems, such as seismic waves in oil reservoirs, but has also been applied to modeling living bone and other porous media. Poroelastic media often interact with fluids, such as in ocean bottom acoustics or propagation of waves from soft tissue into bone. This thesis describes the development and testing of high-resolution finite volume numerical methods, and simulation codes implementing these methods, for modeling systems of poroelastic media and fluids in two and three dimensions. These methods operate on both rectilinear grids and logically rectangular mapped grids. To allow the use of these methods, Biot's equations of poroelasticity are formulated as a first-order hyperbolic system with a source term; this source term is incorporated using operator splitting. Some modifications are required to the classical high-resolution finite volume method. Obtaining correct solutions at interfaces between poroelastic media and fluids requires a novel transverse propagation scheme and the removal of the classical second-order correction term at the interface, and in three dimensions a new wave limiting algorithm is also needed to correctly limit shear waves. The accuracy and convergence rates of the methods of this thesis are examined for a variety of analytical solutions, including simple plane waves, reflection and transmission of waves at an interface between different media, and scattering of acoustic waves by a poroelastic cylinder. Solutions are also computed for a variety of test problems from the computational poroelasticity literature, as well as some original test problems designed to mimic possible applications for the simulation code.

  10. Mass residuals in implicit finite volume models for overland and groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, A. M. Wasantha; Wang, Naming; Moustafa, M. Z.; Brown, M. C.

    2010-04-01

    SummaryA primary advantage in using the finite volume method for simulating groundwater flow and overland flow is the conservation property or the ability to conserve mass. However, when implicit finite volume methods are used with large time steps, small cell areas, or parameters with extreme value ranges, the conservation of mass equation becomes slightly unbalanced with a residual. Problems with large mass residuals can be predicted using the condition number of the solution matrix, and the convergence criterion used in the sparse matrix solver. The amount of practical guidance available on how to manage the magnitude of the mass residual or the matrix condition number is limited. To address this need, the current paper shows the usefulness of the mesh ratio. The mesh ratio is a dimensionless number that is a function of the mesh resolution and the temporal resolution. It is directly related to the condition number of the matrix, which in turn affects the mass residual and the model run time. During the current study, several numerical experiments are carried out to determine how the mesh ratio and the water level are related to the condition number, how the critical mesh ratio is related to the number of cells, how the run time is related to the mesh ratio, and how the mass residual is related to the mesh ratio. The results are useful in creating guidelines for mesh design during large-scale model applications. These guidelines can be applied to reducing the mass residual and the run time. The usefulness of the mesh ratio is illustrated using a Regional Simulation Model (RSM) (Lal, A.M.W., Van Zee, Randy, Belnap, Mark, 2005. Case study: model to simulate regional flow in South Florida. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 131 (4), 247-258) application in south Florida.

  11. Does amniotic fluid volume affect fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies? Modelling two possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umur, Asli; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Ross, Michael G.

    2002-06-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that increased amniotic fluid volume due to polyhydramnios increases placental vascular resistance. We have sought to model the possible effects of an increased amniotic fluid volume on the net fetofetal transfusion in monochorionic twin pregnancies. We wanted to compare these effects with the results of previous simulations, which aimed to explain why the twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) placentas more often include bidirectional arteriovenous (AV) rather than AV plus arterioarterial (AA) anastomoses. We extended our mathematical model of TTTS by simulating two different mechanisms that increase the placental vascular resistance as a consequence of polyhydramnios. First, there is an increase in the placental capillary resistance and hence in deep AV and opposite AV (denoted as VA) resistances due to polyhydramnios. Second, there is an increase in the resistance of chorionic veins due to polyhydramnios, assuming that these veins act as Starling resistors. We then simulated the effects of polyhydramnios on different placental anastomotic patterns. The results were as follows. In the first mechanism (polyhydramnios affects AV-VA resistances), an increased amniotic fluid volume hardly affected bidirectional AV, but slightly decreased fetofetal transfusion in AV plus AA anastomoses. However, for these effects to change the natural development of the pregnancy, polyhydramnios needed to persist for approximately 4 weeks, and by comparing the effects of polyhydramnios with the effects of amnioreduction, amnioreduction was more beneficial for normalizing the donor amniotic fluid volume. Therefore, these beneficial effects due to polyhydramnios have no practical clinical significance. In the second mechanism (Starling resistor for chorionic veins), polyhydramnios slightly increased fetofetal transfusion and hence slightly increased TTTS severity in bidirectional AV and AV plus VV, but did not affect AV plus AA anastomoses. In conclusion, we

  12. EOS simulation and GRNN modeling of the constant volume depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsharkawy, A.M.; Foda, S.G. [Kuwait University, Safat (Kuwait). Petroleum Engineering Dept.

    1998-03-01

    Currently, two approaches are being used to predict the changes in retrograde gas condensate composition and estimate the pressure depletion behavior of gas condensate reservoirs. The first approach uses the equation of states whereas the second uses empirical correlations. Equations of states (EOS) are poor predictive tools for complex hydrocarbon systems. The EOS needs adjustment against phase behavior data of reservoir fluid of known composition. The empirical correlation does not involve numerous numerical computations but their accuracy is limited. This study presents two general regression neural network (GRNN) models. The first model, GRNNM1, is developed to predict dew point pressure and gas compressibility at dew point using initial composition of numerous samples while the second model, GRNNM2, is developed to predict the changes in well stream effluent composition at any stages of pressure depletion. GRNNM2 can also be used to determine the initial reservoir fluid composition using dew point pressure, gas compressibility at dew point, and reservoir temperature. These models are based on analysis of 142 sample of laboratory studies of constant volume depletion (CVD) for gas condensate systems forming a total of 1082 depletion stages. The database represents a wide range of gas condensate systems obtained worldwide. The performance of the GRNN models has been compared to simulation results of the equation of state. The study shows that the proposed general regression neural network models are accurate, valid, and reliable. These models can be used to forecast CVD data needed for many reservoir engineering calculations in case laboratory data is unavailable. The GRNN models save computer time involved in EOS calculations. The study also show that once these models are properly trained they can be used to cut expenses of frequent sampling and laborious experimental CVD tests required for gas condensate reservoirs. 55 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Thermal Pollution Mathematical Model. Volume 2; Verification of One-Dimensional Numerical Model at Lake Keowee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    A one dimensional model for studying the thermal dynamics of cooling lakes was developed and verified. The model is essentially a set of partial differential equations which are solved by finite difference methods. The model includes the effects of variation of area with depth, surface heating due to solar radiation absorbed at the upper layer, and internal heating due to the transmission of solar radiation to the sub-surface layers. The exchange of mechanical energy between the lake and the atmosphere is included through the coupling of thermal diffusivity and wind speed. The effects of discharge and intake by power plants are also included. The numerical model was calibrated by applying it to Cayuga Lake. The model was then verified through a long term simulation using Lake Keowee data base. The comparison between measured and predicted vertical temperature profiles for the nine years is good. The physical limnology of Lake Keowee is presented through a set of graphical representations of the measured data base.

  14. SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 code manual: Damage progression model theory. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K.L. [ed.; Allison, C.M.; Berna, G.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, the core, fission products released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater conditioning systems. This volume contains detailed descriptions of the severe accident models and correlations. It provides the user with the underlying assumptions and simplifications used to generate and implement the basic equations into the code, so an intelligent assessment of the applicability and accuracy of the resulting calculation can be made.

  15. SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD 3.1 code manual: Damage progression model theory. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, K.L.

    1995-06-01

    The SCDAP/RELAP5 code has been developed for best estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during a severe accident. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system, the core, fission products released during a severe accident transient as well as large and small break loss of coolant accidents, operational transients such as anticipated transient without SCRAM, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits as much of a particular system to be modeled as necessary. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater conditioning systems. This volume contains detailed descriptions of the severe accident models and correlations. It provides the user with the underlying assumptions and simplifications used to generate and implement the basic equations into the code, so an intelligent assessment of the applicability and accuracy of the resulting calculation can be made

  16. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  17. Exposure to monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) leads to altered selenoprotein synthesis in a primary human lung cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meno, Sarah R; Nelson, Rebecca; Hintze, Korry J; Self, William T

    2009-09-01

    Monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a trivalent metabolite of arsenic, is highly cytotoxic and recent cell culture studies suggest that it might act as a carcinogen. The general consensus of studies indicates that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) is a result of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A longstanding relationship between arsenic and selenium metabolism has led to the use of selenium as a supplement in arsenic exposed populations, however the impact of organic arsenicals (methylated metabolites) on selenium metabolism is still poorly understood. In this study we determined the impact of exposure to MMA(III) on the regulation of expression of TrxR1 and its activity using a primary lung fibroblast line, WI-38. The promoter region of the gene encoding the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) contains an antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that has been shown to be activated in the presence of electrophilic compounds. Results from radiolabeled selenoproteins indicate that exposure to low concentrations of MMA(III) resulted in increased synthesis of TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, and lower incorporation of selenium into other selenoproteins. MMA(III) treatment led to increased mRNA encoding TrxR1 in WI-38 cells, while lower levels of mRNA coding for cellular glutathione peroxidase (cGpx) were detected in exposed cells. Luciferase activity of TrxR1 promoter fusions increased with addition of MMA(III), as did expression of a rat quinone reductase (QR) promoter fusion construct. However, MMA(III) induction of the TRX1 promoter fusion was abrogated when the ARE was mutated, suggesting that this regulation is mediated via the ARE. These results indicate that MMA(III) alters the expression of selenoproteins based on a selective induction of TrxR1, and this response to exposure to organic arsenicals that requires the ARE element.

  18. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of secondary uranium ore formation. Final Report - Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D.; Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish how the uranyl phosphate zone at the Koongarra site was formed. The overall approach taken in the present study employed theoretical chemical mass transfer calculations and models that permit investigation and reconstruction of the kinds of waters that could produce the uranyl phosphate zone. These calculations have used the geological and mineralogical data for the Koongarra weathered zone (Volumes 2, 8, and 9 of this series), to constrain the initial compositions and reactions undergone by groundwater during the formation of the uranyl phosphate zone. In carrying out these calculations the present-day analyses of Koongarra waters are used only as a guide to the possible initial composition of the fluids associated with the formation of the phosphate zone. Aqueous speciation, saturation state and chemical mass transfer calculations were carried out using the computer programs EQ3NR and EQ6 (Wolery, 1983; Wolery et al., 1984) and a thermodynamic database generated at The Johns Hopkins University over the last eight years which is tabulated in the Appendix 1 to Volume 12 of this series. Despite uncertainties in the thermodynamic characterisation of species, all the above calculations suggest that the uranyl phosphate zone at Koongarra has not formed from present-day groundwaters (Volume 12 of this series). The present-day groundwaters in the weathered zone (eg. at 13 m depth) appear to be undersaturated with respect to saleeite. Furthermore, as present-day groundwaters descend below the water table they rapidly lose their atmospheric oxygen imprint, as is typical of most groundwaters, and become even more reducing in character. Under these circumstances, the groundwaters become more undersaturated with respect to saleeite than the shallow groundwaters. Because much of the phosphate zone is currently below the water table, under saturated zone conditions, it is suggested in the present study that the uranyl phosphate

  19. Atomic models for anionic ligand passivation of cation-rich surfaces of IV-VI, II-VI, and III-V colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Yoo, Dongsuk; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2016-12-22

    We formulated atomic models of cation-rich surfaces passivated with anionic ligands for IV-VI, II-VI, and III-V colloidal quantum dots, employing electron counting models and quantum mechanical calculations. We found that the fractional dangling bonds of cation-rich (100) and (111) surfaces could be greatly stabilized by dimerization-anion passivation and amine-anion co-passivation.

  20. Use of the Galleria mellonella Caterpillar as a Model Host To Study the Role of the Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Miyata, Sachiko; Casey, Monika; Frank, Dara W.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Drenkard, Eliana

    2003-01-01

    Nonvertebrate model hosts represent valuable tools for the study of host-pathogen interactions because they facilitate the identification of bacterial virulence factors and allow the discovery of novel components involved in host innate immune responses. In this report, we determined that the greater wax moth caterpillar Galleria mellonella is a convenient nonmammalian model host for study of the role of the type III secretion system (TTSS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis. Based on the...