WorldWideScience

Sample records for model vertical profiles

  1. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Ho Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future.

  2. A multi-model analysis of vertical ozone profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Jonson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi-model study of the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from major anthropogenic source regions was coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP. Vertical profiles of ozone at 12-h intervals from 2001 are available from twelve of the models contributing to this study and are compared here with observed profiles from ozonesondes. The contributions from each major source region are analysed for selected sondes, and this analysis is supplemented by retroplume calculations using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model to provide insight into the origin of ozone transport events and the cause of differences between the models and observations.

    In the boundary layer ozone levels are in general strongly affected by regional sources and sinks. With a considerably longer lifetime in the free troposphere, ozone here is to a much larger extent affected by processes on a larger scale such as intercontinental transport and exchange with the stratosphere. Such individual events are difficult to trace over several days or weeks of transport. This may explain why statistical relationships between models and ozonesonde measurements are far less satisfactory than shown in previous studies for surface measurements at all seasons. The lowest bias between model-calculated ozone profiles and the ozonesonde measurements is seen in the winter and autumn months. Following the increase in photochemical activity in the spring and summer months, the spread in model results increases, and the agreement between ozonesonde measurements and the individual models deteriorates further.

    At selected sites calculated contributions to ozone levels in the free troposphere from intercontinental transport are shown. Intercontinental transport is identified based on differences in model calculations with unperturbed emissions and

  3. A multi-model analysis of vertical ozone profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Tarasick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A multi-model study of the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from major anthropogenic source regions was coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP. Vertical profiles of ozone at 12-h intervals in year 2001 are available from twelve of the models contributing to this study and are compared here with observed profiles from ozonesondes. The contributions from each major source region are analysed for selected sondes, and this analysis is supplemented by retroplume calculations using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model to provide insight into the origin of ozone transport events and the cause of differences between the models and observations.

    In the boundary layer ozone levels are in general strongly affected by regional sources and sinks. With a considerably longer lifetime in the free troposphere, ozone here is to a much larger extent affected by processes on a larger scale such as intercontinental transport and exchange with the stratosphere. Such individual events are difficult to trace over several days or weeks of transport. As a result statistical relationships between models and ozone sonde measurements are far less satisfactory than for surface measurements at all seasons. The lowest bias between model calculated ozone profiles and the ozone sonde measurements is seen in the winter and autumn months. Following the increase in photochemical activity in the spring and summer months the spread in model results increases and the agreement between ozone sonde measurements and the individual models deteriorates further.

    At selected sites calculated contributions to ozone levels in the free troposphere from intercontinental transport are presented. Intercontinental transport is identified based on differences in model calculations with unperturbed emissions and emissions reduced by 20% by

  4. Evaluation strategies for vertical profiles of physical properties simulated by multilayer snowpack models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Samuel; Hagenmuller, Pascal; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer snowpack models aim at representing processes responsible for the layering of a one-dimensional snowpack, and its time evolution. Their evaluation should ideally not only rely on observations of vertically integrated properties (depth, albedo, snow water equivalent, surface temperature) but also vertical profiles of properties such as density, liquid water content, specific surface area, penetration resistance etc. However, even at well-documented sites where meteorological conditions are monitored with the highest possible accuracy, the direct comparison of simulated and observed profiles has proven challenging. This is due, not only to intrinsic model errors and snow observation uncertainties, which are classically considered, but also to errors of the meteorological observations used to drive the snowpack models and snowpack heterogeneity. These sources of errors stratigraphic mismatches, i.e. a layer at the same depth in the simulated and observed snowpack may not necessarily correspond to the same stratigraphic horizon. In addition, such errors accumulate during the course of a snow season. Altogether, this makes it particularly difficult to disentangle errors due to the snowpack model itself (which is the primary goal of such comparisons) from other sources of errors. This presentation will review various approaches already developed (e.g. Lehning and Fierz, CRST 2001) and introduce yet-to-implement methods, with the aim to provide a framework allowing improved comparisons between observed and simulated snow profiles, which is a long-lasting need of the snow modelling community.

  5. Dust vertical profile impact on global radiative forcing estimation using a coupled chemical-transport–radiative-transfer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral dust particles exert significant direct radiative forcings and are important drivers of climate and climate change. We used the GEOS-Chem global three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM coupled with the Fu-Liou-Gu (FLG radiative transfer model (RTM to investigate the dust radiative forcing and heating rate based on different vertical profiles for April 2006. We attempt to actually quantify the sensitivities of radiative forcing to dust vertical profiles, especially the discrepancies between using realistic and climatological vertical profiles. In these calculations, dust emissions were constrained by observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD. The coupled calculations utilizing a more realistic dust vertical profile simulated by GEOS-Chem minimize the physical inconsistencies between 3-D CTM aerosol fields and the RTM. The use of GEOS-Chem simulated vertical profile of dust extinction, as opposed to the FLG prescribed vertical profile, leads to greater and more spatially heterogeneous changes in the estimated radiative forcing and heating rate produced by dust. Both changes can be attributed to a different vertical structure between dust and non-dust source regions. Values of the dust vertically resolved AOD per grid level (VRAOD are much larger in the middle troposphere, though smaller at the surface when the GEOS-Chem simulated vertical profile is used, which leads to a much stronger heating rate in the middle troposphere. Compared to the FLG vertical profile, the use of GEOS-Chem vertical profile reduces the solar radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA by approximately 0.2–0.25 W m−2 over the African and Asian dust source regions. While the Infrared (IR radiative forcing decreases 0.2 W m−2 over African dust belt, it increases 0.06 W m−2 over the Asian dust belt when the GEOS-Chem vertical profile is used. Differences in the solar radiative forcing at the surface between the use of the GEOS-Chem and

  6. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using 210Pbex measurements and Bayesian inversion

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    B. Kruijt

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In view of its potential significance for soil organic matter (SOM cycling, the vertical SOM distribution in the profile should be considered in models. To mechanistically predict the SOM profile, three additional processes should be represented compared to bulk SOM models: (vertically distributed rhizodeposition, mixing due to bioturbation, and movement with the liquid phase as dissolved organic matter. However, the convolution of these processes complicates parameter estimation based on the vertical SOM distribution alone. Measurements of the atmospherically produced isotope 210Pbex may provide the additional information needed to constrain the processes. Since 210Pbex enters the soil at the surface and bind strongly to organic matter it is an effective tracer for SOM transport. In order to study the importance of root input, bioturbation, and liquid phase transport for SOM profile formation we performed Bayesian parameter estimation of the previously developed mechanistic SOM profile model SOMPROF. 13 parameters, related to decomposition and transport of organic matter, were estimated for the soils of two temperate forests with strongly contrasting SOM profiles: Loobos (the Netherlands and Hainich (Germany. Measurements of organic carbon stocks and concentrations, decomposition rates, and 210Pbex profiles were used in the optimization. For both sites, 3 optimizations were performed in which stepwise 210Pbex data and prior knowledge were added. The optimizations yielded posterior distributions with several cases (modes which were characterized by the dominant organic matter (OM pool: non-leachable slow OM, leachable slow OM, or root litter. For Loobos, the addition of 210Pbex data to the optimization clearly indicated which case was most likely. For Hainich, there is more uncertainty, but the most likely case produced by the optimization agrees well with other measurements. For both sites the most likely case of the final optimization was one

  7. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  8. Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Ilaria; Curci, Gabriele; Falasca, Serena; Ferrero, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys Ilaria Gandolfi1,2, Gabriele Curci1,2, Serena Falasca1,2, Luca Ferrero3 1 Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 2 Center of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 3 POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126, Milan, Italy Last decades were characterized by a growing interest in aerosols: mainly for their effect on human health and on the energy balance of solar and planetary radiation, thus their role in climate change. In this study, we analyze the evolution of vertical profile of black carbon (BC) through tethered balloon observations and chemistry-transport modelling. Black carbon is regarded as the second most important anthropogenic climate forcing agent and its concentration varies significantly depending on the altitude and the sources on the territory. In winter of 2010 University Of Milan Bicocca conducted three intensive measurements campaigns over three Italian basin valleys (Terni, Po Valley, Passiria Valley). The choice of the valleys was made taking into consideration the orography and the river basin structure. The measurement campaign was based on a helium-filled tethered balloon, on which the instrumentation for the analysis has been mounted; the instrumentation consisted on a meteorological station, an OPC, a cascade impactor and a micro-Aethalometer. Subsequently, at University of L'Aquila simulations were produced to help interpretation of these vertical aerosol profiles (mass, composition and distribution) and related optical properties (scattering, absorption) using a chemistry-transport model (WRF-CHIMERE) at high horizontal resolution (1 km). The analysis focused primarily on the calculation of the heating rate and of the Direct Radiative Effect (DRE), and on the analysis of the

  9. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Braakhekke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM in the profile may constitute an important factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing due to bioturbation, and organic matter leaching. In this study we quantified the contribution of these three processes using Bayesian parameter estimation for the mechanistic SOM profile model SOMPROF. Based on organic carbon measurements, 13 parameters related to decomposition and transport of organic matter were estimated for two temperate forest soils: an Arenosol with a mor humus form (Loobos, the Netherlands, and a Cambisol with mull-type humus (Hainich, Germany. Furthermore, the use of the radioisotope 210Pbex as tracer for vertical SOM transport was studied. For Loobos, the calibration results demonstrate the importance of organic matter transport with the liquid phase for shaping the vertical SOM profile, while the effects of bioturbation are generally negligible. These results are in good agreement with expectations given in situ conditions. For Hainich, the calibration offered three distinct explanations for the observations (three modes in the posterior distribution. With the addition of 210Pbex data and prior knowledge, as well as additional information about in situ conditions, we were able to identify the most likely explanation, which indicated that root litter input is a dominant process for the SOM profile. For both sites the organic matter appears to comprise mainly adsorbed but potentially leachable material, pointing to the importance of organo-mineral interactions. Furthermore, organic matter in the mineral soil appears to be mainly derived from root litter, supporting previous studies that highlighted the importance of root input for soil carbon sequestration. The 210

  10. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Braakhekke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM in the profile may constitute a significant factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing due to bioturbation, and organic matter leaching. In this study we quantified the contribution of these three processes using Bayesian parameter estimation for the mechanistic SOM profile model SOMPROF. Based on organic carbon measurements, 13 parameters related to decomposition and transport of organic matter were estimated for two temperature forest soils: an Arenosol with a mor humus form (Loobos, The Netherlands, and a Cambisol with mull type humus (Hainich, Germany. Furthermore, the use of the radioisotope 210Pbex as tracer for vertical SOM transport was studied.

    For Loobos the calibration results demonstrate the importance of liquid phase transport for shaping the vertical SOM profile, while the effects of bioturbation are generally negligible. These results are in good agreement with expectations given in situ conditions. For Hainich the calibration offered three distinct explanations for the observations (three modes in the posterior distribution. With the addition of 210Pbex data and prior knowledge, as well as additional information about in situ conditions, we were able to identify the most likely explanation, which identified root litter input as the dominant process for the SOM profile. For both sites the organic matter appears to comprise mainly adsorbed but potentially leachable material, pointing to the importance of organo-mineral interactions. Furthermore, organic matter in the mineral soil appears to be mainly derived from root litter, supporting previous studies that highlighted the importance of root input for soil carbon sequestration. The 210

  11. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Wutzler, T.; Beer, C.; Kattge, J.; Schrumpf, M.; Ahrens, B.; Schoning, I.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.; Reichstein, M.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) in the profile may constitute an important factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing du

  12. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Wutzler, T.; Beer, C.; Kattge, J.; Schrumpf, M.; Schöning, I.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2012-01-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) in the profile may constitute a significant factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing d

  13. Vertical radar profiles for the calibration of unsaturated flow models under dynamic water table conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, G.; Gallotti, L.; Ventura, V.; Andreotti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The identification of flow and transport characteristics in the vadose zone is a fundamental step towards understanding the dynamics of contaminated sites and the resulting risk of groundwater pollution. Borehole radar has gained popularity for the monitoring of moisture content changes, thanks to its apparent simplicity and its high resolution characteristics. However, cross-hole radar requires closely spaced (a few meters), plastic-cased boreholes, that are rarely available as a standard feature in sites of practical interest. Unlike cross-hole applications, Vertical Radar Profiles (VRP) require only one borehole, with practical and financial benefits. High-resolution, time-lapse VRPs have been acquired at a crude oil contaminated site in Trecate, Northern Italy, on a few existing boreholes originally developed for remediation via bioventing. The dynamic water table conditions, with yearly oscillations of roughly 5 m from 6 to 11 m bgl, offers a good opportunity to observe via VRP a field scale drainage-imbibition process. Arrival time inversion has been carried out using a regularized tomographic algorithm, in order to overcome the noise introduced by first arrival picking. Interpretation of the vertical profiles in terms of moisture content has been based on standard models (Topp et al., 1980; Roth et al., 1990). The sedimentary sequence manifests itself as a cyclic pattern in moisture content over most of the profiles. We performed preliminary Richards' equation simulations with time varying later table boundary conditions, in order to estimate the unsaturated flow parameters, and the results have been compared with laboratory evidence from cores.

  14. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, N

    2013-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects set in the film can be related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerical solving of adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position in the soap film can be reproduced by simple modeling taking into account film thickness measurements.

  15. Constraining Early Cenozoic exhumation of the British Isles with vertical profile modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepke, Daniel; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite decades of research is the Early Cenozoic exhumation history of Ireland and Britain still poorly understood and subject to contentious debate (e.g., Davis et al., 2012 and subsequent comments). One reason for this debate is the difficultly of constraining the evolution of onshore parts of the British Isles in both time and space. The paucity of Mesozoic and Cenozoic onshore outcrops makes direct analysis of this time span difficult. Furthermore, Ireland and Britain are situated at a passive margin, where the amount of post-rift exhumation is generally very low. Classical thermochronological tools are therefore near the edge of their resolution and make precise dating of post-rift cooling events challenging. In this study we used the established apatite fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He techniques, but took advantage of the vertical profile approach of Gallagher et al. (2005) implemented in the QTQt modelling package (Gallagher, 2012), to better constrain the thermal histories. This method allowed us to define the geographical extent of a Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary cooling event and to show that it was centered around the Irish Sea. Thus, we argue that this cooling event is linked to the underplating of hot material below the crust centered on the Irish Sea (Jones et al., 2002; Al-Kindi et al., 2003), and demonstrate that such conclusion would have been harder, if not impossible, to draw by modelling the samples individually without the use of the vertical profile approach. References Al-Kindi, S., White, N., Sinha, M., England, R., and Tiley, R., 2003, Crustal trace of a hot convective sheet: Geology, v. 31, no. 3, p. 207-210. Davis, M.W., White, N.J., Priestley, K.F., Baptie, B.J., and Tilmann, F.J., 2012, Crustal structure of the British Isles and its epeirogenic consequences: Geophysical Journal International, v. 190, no. 2, p. 705-725. Jones, S.M., White, N., Clarke, B.J., Rowley, E., and Gallagher, K., 2002, Present and past influence of the Iceland

  16. Application of vertical advection-diffusion model for studying CO2 and O2 profiles in central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, N.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    The vertical advection-diffusion model proposed by Craig has been applied to the study of CO sub(2) and O sub(2) profiles in Central Arabian Sea. Distributions of total CO Sub(2) and O sub(2) are explained better by expressions involving exponential...

  17. Autonomous vertical profiler data management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.S.; Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    The Autonomous Vertical Profiler (AVP), developed at NIO [1] [2], collects position and water column data over a period of 3 days and transmits through a satellite modem which is collated and stored on a PC. Data includes GPS positions, water column...

  18. TransCom model simulations of methane: Comparison of vertical profiles with aircraft measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, R.; Patra, P.K.; Sweeney, C.; Machida, T.; Krol, M.C.; Houweling, S.; Bousquet, P.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Belikov, D.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.S.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Fraser, A.; Gatti, L.V.; Gloor, E.; Hess, P.; Kawa, S.R.; Law, R.M.; Locatelli, R.; Loh, Z.; Maksyutov, S.; Meng, L.; Miller, J.B.; Palmer, P.I.; Prinn, R.G.; Rigby, M.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    To assess horizontal and vertical transports of methane (CH4) concentrations at different heights within the troposphere, we analyzed simulations by 12 chemistry transport models (CTMs) that participated in the TransCom-CH4 intercomparison experiment. Model results are compared with aircraft measure

  19. The potential of LIRIC to validate the vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration estimated by an air quality model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Filoglou, Maria; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyros; Melas, Dimitris; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Balis, Dimitris

    2015-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by a retrieval algorithm that uses combined sunphotometer and LIDAR data (LIRIC) were used in order to validate the mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. LIDAR and CIMEL measurements of the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki were used for this validation.The aerosol mass concentration profiles of the fine and coarse mode derived by CAMx were compared with the respective profiles derived by the retrieval algorithm. For the coarse mode particles, forecasts of the Saharan dust transportation model BSC-DREAM8bV2 were also taken into account. Each of the retrieval algorithm's profiles were matched to the models' profile with the best agreement within a time window of four hours before and after the central measurement. OPAC, a software than can provide optical properties of aerosol mixtures, was also employed in order to calculate the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values for 355nm and 532nm for each of the model's profiles aiming in a comparison with the angstrom exponent and the lidar ratio values derived by the retrieval algorithm for each measurement. The comparisons between the fine mode aerosol concentration profiles resulted in a good agreement between CAMx and the retrieval algorithm, with the vertical mean bias error never exceeding 7 μgr/m3. Concerning the aerosol coarse mode concentration profiles both CAMx and BSC-DREAM8bV2 values are severely underestimated, although, in cases of Saharan dust transportation events there is an agreement between the profiles of BSC-DREAM8bV2 model and the retrieval algorithm.

  20. Measurements and Mesoscale Modeling of Autumnal Vertical Ozone Profiles in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ping Peng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical measurements of ozone were made using a tethered balloon at the Linyuan site in Kaohsiung County, southern Taiwan. Ozone was monitored at altitudes of 0, 100, 300, 500, and 1000 m from November 23 to 25 in 2005. The potential temperature profiles revealed a stable atmosphere during the study period, largely because of the dominance of the high-pressure system and nocturnal radiation cooling close to the surface. The mixing height was low (50 - 300 m, particularly in the late night and early morning. The surface ozone concentrations that were predicted using TAPM (The Air Pollution Model were high (33.7 - 119 ppbv in the daytime (10:00 - 16:00 and were low (10 - 40 ppbv at other times; the predictions of which were consistent with the observations. The simulated surface ozone concentrations reveal that costal lands typically had higher ozone concentrations than those inland, because most industrial parks are located in or close to the boundaries of Kaohsiung City. Both measurements and simulations indicate that daytime ozone concentrations decreased quickly with increasing height at altitudes below 300 m; while nighttime ozone concentrations were lower at low altitudes (50 to 300 m than at higher altitudes, partly because of dry deposition and titration of surface ozone by the near-surface nitrogen oxides (NOx and partly because of the existence of the residual layer above the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The simulations show a good correlation between the maximum daytime surface ozone concentration and average nighttime ozone concentration above the nocturnal boundary layer.

  1. Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, N.; Caps, H.

    2015-01-01

    Surface tension profiles in vertical soap films are experimentally investigated. Measurements are performed by introducing deformable elastic objets in the films. The shape adopted by those objects once set in the film is related to the surface tension value at a given vertical position by numerically solving the adapted elasticity equations. We show that the observed dependency of the surface tension versus the vertical position is predicted by simple modeling that takes into account the mechanical equilibrium of the films coupled to previous thickness measurements.

  2. TransCom model simulations of methane: Comparison of vertical profiles with aircraft measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, R.; Patra, PK; C. Sweeney; Machida, T.; Krol, M.; Houweling, S.; Bousquet, P.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; D. Belikov; D. Bergmann; H. Bian; P. Cameron-Smith; Chipperfield, MP; Fortems-Cheiney, A.; Fraser, A.

    2013-01-01

    To assess horizontal and vertical transports of methane (CH4) concentrations at different heights within the troposphere, we analyzed simulations by 12 chemistry transport models (CTMs) that participated in the TransCom-CH4 intercomparison experiment. Model results are compared with aircraft measurements at 13 sites in Amazon/Brazil, Mongolia, Pacific Ocean, Siberia/Russia, and United States during the period of 2001-2007. The simulations generally show good agreement with observations for se...

  3. Vertical emission profiles for Europe based on plume rise calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieser, J.; Aulinger, A.; Matthias, V.; Quante, M.; Denier Van Der Gon, H.A.C.

    2011-01-01

    The vertical allocation of emissions has a major impact on results of Chemistry Transport Models. However, in Europe it is still common to use fixed vertical profiles based on rough estimates to determine the emission height of point sources. This publication introduces a set of new vertical profile

  4. Empirical model for estimating vertical concentration profiles of re-suspended, sediment-associated contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H. W.; Cheng, P. D.; Li, W.; Chen, J. H.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.

    2017-03-01

    Vertical distribution processes of sediment contaminants in water were studied by flume experiments. Experimental results show that settling velocity of sediment particles and turbulence characteristics are the major hydrodynamic factors impacting distribution of pollutants, especially near the bottom where particle diameter is similar in size to vortex structure. Sediment distribution was uniform along the distance, while contaminant distribution slightly lagged behind the sediment. The smaller the initial sediment concentration was, the more time it took to achieve a uniform concentration distribution for suspended sediment. A contaminants transportation equation was established depending on mass conservation equations. Two mathematical estimation models of pollutant distribution in the overlying water considering adsorption and desorption were devised based on vertical distribution of suspended sediment: equilibrium partition model and dynamic micro-diffusion model. The ratio of time scale between the sediment movement and sorption can be used as the index of the models. When this ratio was large, the equilibrium assumption was reasonable, but when it was small, it might require dynamic micro-diffusion model.

  5. Measured and modelled concentrations and vertical profiles of airborne particulate matter within the boundary layer of a street canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colls, J J; Micallef, A

    1999-09-01

    Concentrations and vertical profiles of various fractions of airborne particulate matter (suspended particulate matter (SPM), PM10 and PM2.5) have been measured over the first three metres from ground in a street canyon. Measurements were carried out using automated near real-time apparatus called the Kinetic Sequential Sampling (KSS) system. KSS system is essentially an electronically-controlled lift carrying a real-time particle monitor for sampling air sequentially, at different heights within the breathing zone, which includes all heights within the surface layer of a street canyon at which people may breathe. Data is automatically logged at the different receptor levels, for the determination of the average vertical concentration profile of airborne particulate matter. For measuring the airborne particle concentration, a Grimm Dust Monitor 1.104/5 was used. The recorded data also allows for time series analysis of airborne particulate matter concentration at different heights. Time series data and hourly-average vertical concentration profiles in the boundary layer of the confines of a street are thought to be mainly determined by traffic emissions and traffic associated processes. Hence the measured data were compared with results of a street canyon emission-dispersion model in time and space. This Street Level Air Quality (SLAQ) model employs the plume-box technique and includes modules for simulating vehicle-generated effects such as thermally- and mechanically-generated turbulence and resuspension of road dust. Environmental processes, such as turbulence resulting from surface sensible heat and the formation of sulphate aerosol from sulphur dioxide exhaust emissions, are taken into account. The paper presents an outline description of the measuring technique and model used, and a comparison of the measured and modelled data.

  6. Measured and modelled concentrations and vertical profiles of airborne particulate matter within the boundary layer of a street canyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colls, J.J.; Micallef, A. [Division of Environmental Science, School of Biological Sciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, University of Nottingham, Loughborough LE12 5RD (United Kingdom)

    1999-09-01

    Concentrations and vertical profiles of various fractions of airborne particulate matter (suspended particulate matter (SPM), PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}) have been measured over the first three metres from ground in a street canyon. Measurements were carried out using automated near real-time apparatus called the Kinetic Sequential Sampling (KSS) system. KSS system is essentially an electronically-controlled lift carrying a real-time particle monitor for sampling air sequentially, at different heights within the breathing zone, which includes all heights within the surface layer of a street canyon at which people may breathe. Data is automatically logged at the different receptor levels, for the determination of the average vertical concentration profile of airborne particulate matter. For measuring the airborne particle concentration, a Grimm Dust Monitor 1.104/5 was used. The recorded data also allows for time series analysis of airborne particulate matter concentration at different heights. Time series data and hourly-average vertical concentration profiles in the boundary layer of the confines of a street are thought to be mainly determined by traffic emissions and traffic associated processes. Hence the measured data were compared with results of a street canyon emission-dispersion model in time and space. This Street Level Air Quality (SLAQ) model employs the plume-box technique and includes modules for simulating vehicle-generated effects such as thermally- and mechanically-generated turbulence and resuspension of road dust. Environmental processes, such as turbulence resulting from surface sensible heat and the formation of sulphate aerosol from sulphur dioxide exhaust emissions, are taken into account. The paper presents an outline description of the measuring technique and model used, and a comparison of the measured and modelled data.

  7. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  8. Vertical and Spatial Profiling of Arctic Black Carbon on the North Slope of Alaska 2015: Comparison of Model and Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Feng, Y.; Biraud, S.; Springston, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic Cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. One class of under measured radiative forcing agents in the Polar Region is the absorbing aerosol - black carbon and brown carbon. In particular, vertical profile information of BC is critical in reducing uncertainty in model assessment of aerosol radiative impact at high latitudes. During the summer of 2015, a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was deployed aboard the Department of Energy (DOE) Gultstream-1 (G-1) aircraft to measure refractory BC (rBC) concentrations as part of the DOE-sponsored ACME-V (ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements) campaign. This campaign was conducted from June through to mid-September along the North Slope of Alaska and was punctuated by vertical profiling over 5 sites (Atquasuk, Barrow, Ivotuk, Oliktok, and Toolik). In addition, measurement of CO, CO2 and CH4were also taken to provide information on the spatial and seasonal differences in GHG sources and how these sources correlate with BC. Lastly, these aerosol and gas measurements provide an important dataset to assess the representativeness of ground sites at regional scales. Comparisons between observations and a global climate model (CAM5) simulations will be agumented with a discussion on the capability of the model to capture observed monthly mean profiles of BC and stratified aerosol layers. Additionally, the ability of the SP2 to partition rBC-containing particles into nascent or aged species allows an evaluation of how well the CAM5 model captures aging of long distant transported carbonaceous aerosols. Finally model sensitivity studies will be aso be presented that investigated the relative importance of the different emission sectors to the summer Arctic

  9. Modelling the effect of the position of cooling elements on the vertical profile of transpiration in a greenhouse tomato crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Dieleman, J.A.; Driever, S.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Semi-closed greenhouse management may increase greenhouse productivity. However, it relies on the application of mechanical cooling. Cooling can be applied from above or below the canopy. The positioning of the cooling affects the vertical climate profile in the canopy. In order to determine how thi

  10. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Russo, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, is wound up by the disk shear, and is pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and Ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field $B_r \\sim (10^{-4}$-$10^{-2})(r/{\\rm AU})^{-2}$ G. Careful attention is giv...

  11. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siomos N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC, that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  12. The Potential of The Synergy of Sunphotometer and Lidar Data to Validate Vertical Profiles of The Aerosol Mass Concentration Estimated by An Air Quality Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, N.; Filioglou, M.; Poupkou, A.; Liora, N.; Dimopoulos, S.; Melas, D.; Chaikovsky, A.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived by the Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC), that uses combined sunphotometer and lidar data, were used in order to validate the aerosol mass concentration profiles estimated by the air quality model CAMx. Lidar and CIMEL measurements performed at the Laboratory of Atmospheric Physics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece (40.5N, 22.9E) from the period 2013-2014 were used in this study.

  13. Long Term Three-dimensional Model Parameterization and Evaluation By The Use of Combined Continuous Ozone Lidar Profiles, Vertical Wind Profiles and Ground Based Monitors Obtained During The Escompte Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frejafon, E.; Robin, D.; Kalthoff, N.; Pesch, M.

    ESCOMPTE 2001 is a field experiment that took place in the southeast of France, in order to understand chemical transformation and transport and then to improve numer- ical models devoted to pollution study and forecasting. To achieve this goal, a stand alone ozone LIDAR was installed from June 11th to July 13th in Cadarache, 30 km northeast of the cities of Marseilles and Aix-en-Provence, downwind from the ozone precursors emissions zones in case of sea-breeze development conditions. This full automatic LIDAR provided vertical profiles of ozone concentration and also the mix- ing height dynamics, between 100 m and 2 500 m, with a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and a temporal resolution of 3 minutes. Data obtained with the LIDAR were connected to ground based ozone monitor installed on the same location by the air quality network, in order to evaluate the data quality and to obtain ozone verti- cal profiles from the ground level up to the free troposphere, which is an optimized support for tree-dimensional photochemical models parameterization and evaluation. The ozone diurnal cycles and the daily atmospheric stratification recorded during this month show the fast dynamics during pollution episodes, resulting from combined photochemical and transport effects in case of sea-breeze. They also specify the re- maining ozone vertical structure during non polluted episodes. Such long-term infor- mation is then a consistent support for model parameterization and evaluation, as it can specify the ozone concentration and the PBL dynamics from the beginning to the last end of a pollution episode. This one month vertical ozone profiles, which were compiled in a movie, will be presented and discussed more precisely. The obtained results, combined with continuous vertical wind profiles obtained with a SODAR and a ground based meteorological station installed on the same location, give access to the continuous ozone flux vertical profiles and the PBL dynamics.

  14. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  15. Configuration of the relationship of soil moistures for vertical soil profiles on a steep hillslope using a vector time series model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyun; Sun, Hanna; Jung, Sungwon

    2011-03-01

    SummaryVariation in soil moisture content throughout soil profiles during several sequential rainfalls represents the internal hydrological response on a hillslope scale. A multiplex TDR system has been operating on a mountainous hillslope to obtain the time series of soil moisture along two transects in the study area. The soil moisture modeling conducted in this study highlights our understanding of the inter-relationships between soil moistures at identical spatial locations, but at different depths. A sequential procedure was used for the time series modeling to delineate an appropriate model for application to all monitoring points. The feedback relationship of soil wetness between two different depths was expressed with the proposed vector autoregressive model. Based on the successful modeling of 31 coupled soil water histories, the vertical distributions of the stochastic model throughout the study area were obtained. The distribution of the delineated models implied a spatial distribution of the hydrological processes, such as vertical infiltration for the upper soil layers and some of the lower soil layers (38 out of 62 models), lateral redistribution and subsurface flow over bedrock mostly for the lower soil layers (24 out of 62 models) on the steep hillslope. With the use of the resultant models, applications were proposed to improve the data acquisition system, i.e. gap filling for missing data and limited prediction for an ungauged location.

  16. A vertical/horizontal integration wind-induced circulation model (VH13D): A method for including surface and bottom logarithmic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    A three-dimensional model called VH13D is developed using the vertical/horizontal integration (VHI) approach. The double-logarithmic velocity profile including both the surface and bottom sublayer characteristic lengths is employed to accurately evaluate the bottom shear stress and depth-averaged advective terms. The model is verified using analytical solutions and laboratory data for shear-induced countercurrent flows and is compared with other two- and three-dimensional circulation models in a simplified basin. It is demonstrated that the newly developed model improves the conventional two-dimensional depth-averaged and Quasi-3D models and provides a new approach to the three-dimensional wind-induced circulation model. It can efficiently simulate the wind-induced 3D current structure in lakes and estuaries under isothermal conditions.

  17. Validation of mixing height determined from vertical profiles of wind and temperature from the DMI-HIRLAM NWP model in comparison with readiosoundings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, J.H.; Nielsen, N.W. [Danish Meteorological Inst., DMI, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1997-10-01

    A sensitivity study is performed of vertical profiles from the numerical weather prediction model DMI-HIRLAM (DMI-HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model). The study involves profiles of horizontal wind, temperature and humidity in the lower troposphere up to 2500 meter. Detailed comparisons of analysed as well as forecast profiles are made with measured data from several radio-sonde stations throughout Europe. Methods for estimating the Mixing Height (MH) based on a bulk Richardson number method, the Vogelezang and Holtslag method and parcel methods are also studied. The methods are inter-compared, and MH based on data from DMI-HIRLAM are compared with the corresponding MH based on radiosonde data. For convective conditions the MH estimates are also compared with subjective estimates of the MH. In this paper preliminary results mainly based on data from Jaegersborg (Copenhagen) are presented. Results based on data from 1994-95 show that the resemblance between measured profiles and the DMI-HIRLAM profiles is fairly good in general. Also the estimates of the MH based on DMI-HIRLAM data is in general of nearly the same quality as estimations based on observed data. However, especially in convective conditions there is a tendency by DMI-HIRLAM to underestimate the strength of the mixing and thereby relatively large errors in the estimates of the MH can occur. (au)

  18. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  19. A Comparison of the Solar Cycle Signature in Vertical Ozone and Temperature Profiles Seen by SAGE II With Coupled Chemistry-Climate Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodeker, G. E.; Austin, J.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2002-12-01

    Solar variability is known to affect the Earth's climate. However, the exact mechanisms whereby small changes in extra-terrestrial solar irradiance over the 11 year solar cycle affect the climate are poorly understood. One of the primary objectives of the SOLar Impacts on Climate and the Environment (SOLICE) project is to assess the impact of solar variability on stratospheric ozone, radiative forcing and surface UV using coupled chemistry-climate models. Comparisons of model results and observations are expected to advance understanding of the mechanisms of solar-climate links. Global vertical ozone profiles (version 6.1) from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), together with co-located NCEP/NCAR temperature profiles, have been examined for the solar cycle signature from October 1984 to June 2001 as a function of altitude/pressure and latitude. In addition to solar cycle forcing, ozone concentrations and temperatures may also be influenced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), volcanic eruptions, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), tropopause height variations, and the solar zenith angle (time of day) at the measurement location [Bodeker et al., JGR, vol. 103, 28661-28681, 1998]. These confounding effects must be eliminated before the solar cycle signal can be quantitatively identified. Two different approaches have been used: 1) Outside of volcanically perturbed periods, the QBO is expected to be the largest source of variability. Ozone and temperature profiles are sorted according to the phase of the QBO before profile differences between solar maximum and minimum are calculated. 2) A regression model, incorporating all forcings as basis functions, is applied to the ozone and temperature profiles and the amplitude of the solar cycle basis function is extracted. These results are compared with output from the UMETRAC (Unified Model with Eulerian TRansport And Chemistry) coupled chemistry-climate model.

  20. Vertical profiles of pollutant gases measured with passive DOAS in the Po Valley devoted to satellite and chemical model data comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masieri, S.; Petritoli, A.; Kostadinov, I.; Bortoli, D.; Premuda, M.; Ravegnani, F.; Giovanelli, G.

    2009-04-01

    whose profile depends strongly on altitude [7][8]. Due to this it is also possible gain information about the atmospheric aerosol profile to set better the parameters in AMF Calculation, and then retrieve gas concentration's profiles. The NO2 concentrations measured were in the range of 0.5-25 ppb, as we expect for summer periods in rural area. GAMES (Gas Aerosol Modelling Evaluation System) model [9] was used in this work to have a reference about vertical distribution of gases (the model provides concentration profiles along 4km of altitude, with 11 growing thickness levels). Result of comparison with profile caculate by the model and profile calulate by the Multi-axis DOAS technique, is presented and then it is compared with Satellite column retrieved (with our satellite Data processor) from SCIAMACHY sensor (onboard on ENVISAT platform) and (directly NO2 Tropospheric Vertical Column provided by KNMI) from OMI (onboard on AURA platform). Good agreements between used series are shown and improvements for this methodology are discussed. One month of measurement has been taken in consideration starting from 15 May to 15 June of 2007. Vertical structure of most important trace gases calculated with model has strong correlation with the off-axis DOAS one (in some cases with R2=0,8), so better understanding of profiles and chemistry behaviour can be studied. The experience acquired within QUITSAT activity appears valuable contribution for enlargement of the DOAS applications what concern atmospheric chemistry studies, operative monitoring of the air quality over regional scale as well as satellite data validation. Deployed approaches are not restricted to NO2 but could be applied to other gases e.g. ozone, formaldehyde etc.. Key words: Off axis DOAS, NO2, CTM, AMF, gas profiles, satellite data validation, 1 2. BIBLIOGRAPHY [1] F. Evangelisti, A. Baroncelli, P. Bonasoni, G. Giovanelli, And F. Ravegnani, "Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of

  1. Vertical Soil Profiling Using a Galvanic Contact Resistivity Scanning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan Pan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument.

  2. Vertical soil profiling using a galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S; Dabas, Michel

    2014-07-23

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument.

  3. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  4. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  5. SOMPROF: A vertically explicit soil organic matter model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Beer, M.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2011-01-01

    Most current soil organic matter (SOM) models represent the soil as a bulk without specification of the vertical distribution of SOM in the soil profile. However, the vertical SOM profile may be of great importance for soil carbon cycling, both on short (hours to years) time scale, due to

  6. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffi, Brigitte [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Schulz, Michael [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Bréon, François-Marie [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Dentener, Frank [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Steensen, Birthe Marie [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Griesfeller, Jan [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Winker, David [NASA Langley Research Center, MS/475, Hampton Virginia USA; Balkanski, Yves [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Bauer, Susanne E. [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Bellouin, Nicolas [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Berntsen, Terje [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Bian, Huisheng [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore Country Maryland USA; Chin, Mian [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Diehl, Thomas [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra Italy; Easter, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Ghan, Steven [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Hauglustaine, Didier A. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Iversen, Trond [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, Oslo Norway; Kirkevåg, Alf [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Liu, Xiaohong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at University of Wyoming, Laramie Wyoming USA; Lohmann, Ulrike [ETH-Zentrum, Zürich Switzerland; Myhre, Gunnar [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Rasch, Phil [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Seland, Øyvind [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Skeie, Ragnhild B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research-Oslo (CICERO), Oslo Norway; Steenrod, Stephen D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt Maryland USA; Stier, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford UK; Tackett, Jason [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Takemura, Toshihiko [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Tsigaridis, Kostas [Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University, New York New York USA; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York New York USA; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, Gif-sur-Yvette France; Now at National Institute for Agronomic Research, Thiverval-Grignon France; Yoon, Jinho [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju Korea; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  7. Modelling horizontal and vertical concentration profiles of ozone and oxides of nitrogen within high-latitude urban area

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J P; Fowler, D

    2000-01-01

    A Lagrangian column model has been developed to simulate the mean (monthly and annual) three-dimensional structure in ozone and nitrogen oxides concentrations in the boundary layer within and immediately around an urban area. Short time-scale photochemical processes of ozone, as well as emissions and deposition to the ground are simulated. The results show that the average surface ozone concentration in the urban area is lower than the surrounding rural areas by typically 50%. Model results are compared with observations.

  8. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius in shallow convective clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2011-05-01

    >fad becomes smaller, representing a higher degree of mixing, and re becomes smaller (~10 % and more variable. However, for the clean case, smaller fad corresponds to larger re (and larger re variability, reflecting the additional influence of droplet collision-coalescence and sedimentation on re. Finally, profiles of the vertically inhomogeneous clouds as simulated by the LES and those of the vertically homogeneous clouds are used as input to a radiative transfer model to study the effect of cloud vertical inhomogeneity on shortwave radiative forcing. For clouds that have the same liquid water path, re of a vertically homogeneous cloud must be about 76–90 % of the cloud-top re of the vertically inhomogeneous cloud in order for the two clouds to have the same shortwave radiative forcing.

  9. Vertical eddy heat fluxes from model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Peter H.; Yao, Mao-Sung

    1991-01-01

    Vertical eddy fluxes of heat are calculated from simulations with a variety of climate models, ranging from three-dimensional GCMs to a one-dimensional radiative-convective model. The models' total eddy flux in the lower troposphere is found to agree well with Hantel's analysis from observations, but in the mid and upper troposphere the models' values are systematically 30 percent to 50 percent smaller than Hantel's. The models nevertheless give very good results for the global temperature profile, and the reason for the discrepancy is unclear. The model results show that the manner in which the vertical eddy flux is carried is very sensitive to the parameterization of moist convection. When a moist adiabatic adjustment scheme with a critical value for the relative humidity of 100 percent is used, the vertical transports by large-scale eddies and small-scale convection on a global basis are equal: but when a penetrative convection scheme is used, the large-scale flux on a global basis is only about one-fifth to one-fourth the small-scale flux. Comparison of the model results with observations indicates that the results with the latter scheme are more realistic. However, even in this case, in mid and high latitudes the large and small-scale vertical eddy fluxes of heat are comparable in magnitude above the planetary boundary layer.

  10. Inter-comparison of MAX-DOAS Retrieved Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Extinction, SO2 and NO2 in the Alberta Oil Sands with LIDAR Data and GEM-MACH Air Quality Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Zoe; Friess, Udo; Strawbridge, Kevin; Whiteway, James; Aggarwal, Monika; Makar, Paul; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason; Baray, Sabour; Schnitzler, Elijah; Olfert, Jason S.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Lobo, Akshay; McLaren, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Understanding industrial emissions of trace gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands is essential to maintaining air quality standards and informing public policy. Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of trace gases can improve knowledge of pollutant levels, vertical distribution and chemical transformation. During an intensive air measurement campaign to study emissions, transport, transformation and deposition of oil sands air pollutants from August to September of 2013, a MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at a site north of Fort McMurray, Alberta to determine the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, NO2 and SO2 through retrieval from the MAX-DOAS spectral measurements using an optimal estimation method. The large complement of data collected from multiple instruments deployed during this field campaign provides a unique opportunity to validate and characterize the performance of the MAX-DOAS vertical profile retrievals. Aerosol extinction profiles determined from two Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) instruments, one collocated and the other on a Twin Otter aircraft that flew over the site during the study, will be compared to the MAX-DOAS aerosol extinction profile retrievals. Vertical profiles of NO2 and SO2 retrieved from the MAX-DOAS measurements will be further compared with the composite vertical profiles measured from the flights of a second aircraft, the NRC-Convair 580, over the field site during the same measurement period. Finally, the MAX-DOAS retrieved tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 and NO2 will be compared to the predicted VCDs from Environment and Climate Change Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and Chemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality model over the grid cell containing the field site. Emission estimates of SO2 from the major oil mining facility Syncrude Mildred Lake using the MAX-DOAS VCD results, validated through the detailed characterization above

  11. The Naval Ocean Vertical Aerosol Model : Progress Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Gathman, S.G.; Davidson, K.L.; Jensen, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) has been formulated to estimate the vertical structure of the optical and infrared extinction coefficients in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). NOVAM was designed to predict the non-uniform and non-logarithmic extinction profiles which are

  12. Modelling Of Random Vertical Irregularities Of Railway Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podwórna M.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The study presents state-of-the-art in analytical and numerical modelling of random vertical irregularities of continuously welded ballasted railway tracks. The common model of railway track irregularity vertical profiles is applied, in the form of a stationary and ergodic Gaussian process in space. Random samples of track irregularity vertical profiles are generated with the Monte-Carlo method. Based on the numerical method developed in the study, the minimum and recommended sampling number required in the random analysis of railway bridges and number of frequency increments (harmonic components in track irregularity vertical profiles simulation are determined. The lower and upper limits of wavelengths are determined based on the literature studies. The approach yields track irregularity random samples close to reality. The track irregularity model developed in the study can be used in the dynamic analysis of railway bridge / track structure / highspeed train systems.

  13. Development of an autonomous vertical profiler for oceanographic studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dabholkar, N.; Desa, E.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Madhan, R.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Navelkar, G.; Maurya, P.K.; Prabhudesai, S.; Nagvekar, S.; Martins, H.; Sawkar, G.; Fernandes, P.; Manoj, K.K.

    showing different modules of it coupled together 2. AVP architecture The AVP electronics is shown as a block diagram in Fig. 2. It is based on distributed node architecture comprising of two CYGNAL C8051F041 [2] microcontroller boards... acquisition from the sensors. Fig. 2 : Architecture of Autonomous Vertical Profiler Initially the CNMC controller was interfaced with an Altitude & Heading Reference System (AHRS) [5] for measuring the vehicle dynamics data which was used...

  14. On the sensitivity of undeformed Arctic sea ice to its vertical salinity profile

    OpenAIRE

    Vancoppenolle, M.; Fichefet, T.; C. M. Bitz

    2005-01-01

    The temporal evolution of sea ice salinity affects the temperature profile and vertical growth and decay of the ice cover, as well as many other important properties. Here, we use a one-dimensional thermodynamic sea ice model to explore the sensitivity to the vertical profile of ice salinity of (1) Arctic first-year and equilibrium multiyear sea ice thickness, and (2) the salt/freshwater flux at the ice/ocean interface. Results indicate that increasing the mean salinity induces a higher therm...

  15. Determination of the vertical electron-density profile in ionospheric tomography: experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Mitchell

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the vertical electron-density profile is a fundamental problem in ionospheric tomography. Lack of near-horizontal ray paths limits the information available on the vertical profile, so that the resultant image of electron density is biased in a horizontal sense. The vertical profile is of great importance as it affects the authenticity of the entire tomographic image. A new method is described whereby the vertical profile is selected using relative total-electron-content measurements. The new reconstruction process has been developed from modelling studies. A range of background ionospheres, representing many possible peak heights, scale heights and electron densities are formed from a Chapman profile on the bottomside with a range of topside profiles. The iterative reconstruction process is performed on all of these background ionospheres and a numerical selection criterion employed to select the final image. The resulting tomographic images show excellent agreement in electron density when compared with independent verification provided by the EISCAT radar.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release and Their Retrieval for TOGA COARE Convective Systems Using a Cloud Resolving Model, SSM/I, and Ship-borne Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Olson, W. S.; Johnson, D.; Ferrier, B.; Kummerow, C.; Adler, R.

    1999-01-01

    Latent heating profiles associated with three (TOGA COARE) Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment active convective episodes (December 10-17 1992; December 19-27 1992; and February 9-13 1993) are examined using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) Model and retrieved by using the Goddard Convective and Stratiform Heating (CSH) algorithm . The following sources of rainfall information are input into the CSH algorithm: Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/1), Radar and the GCE model. Diagnostically determined latent heating profiles calculated using 6 hourly soundings are used for validation. The GCE model simulated rainfall and latent heating profiles are in excellent agreement with those estimated by soundings. In addition, the typical convective and stratiform heating structures (or shapes) are well captured by the GCE model. Radar measured rainfall is smaller than that both estimated by the GCE model and SSM/I in all three different COARE IFA periods. SSM/I derived rainfall is more than the GCE model simulated for the December 19-27 and February 9-13 periods, but is in excellent agreement with the GCE model for the December 10-17 period. The GCE model estimated stratiform amount is about 50% for December 19-27, 42% for December 11-17 and 56% for the February 9-13 case. These results are consistent with large-scale analyses. The accurate estimates of stratiform amount is needed for good latent heating retrieval. A higher (lower) percentage of stratiform rain can imply a maximum heating rate at a higher (lower) altitude. The GCE model always simulates more stratiform rain (10 to 20%) than the radar for all three convective episodes. SSM/I derived stratiform amount is about 37% for December 19-27, 48% for December 11-17 and 41% for the February 9-13 case. Temporal variability of CSH algorithm retrieved latent heating profiles using either GCE model simulated or radar estimated rainfall and stratiform amount is in good

  17. Forest Canopy LAI and Vertical FAVD Profile Inversion from Airborne Full-Waveform LiDAR Data Based on a Radiative Transfer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest canopy leaf area index (LAI is a critical variable for the modeling of climates and ecosystems over both regional and global scales. This paper proposes a physically based method to retrieve LAI and foliage area volume density (FAVD profile directly from full-waveform Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR data using a radiative transfer (RT model. First, a physical interaction model between LiDAR and a forest scene was built on the basis of radiative transfer theories. Next, FAVD profile of each laser shot of full-waveform LiDAR was inverted using the physical model. In addition, the missing LiDAR data, caused by high-density forest and LiDAR system limitations, were filled in based on the inverted FAVD and the ancillary CHM data. Finally, LAI of the study area was retrieved from the inverted FAVD at a 10-m resolution. CHM derived LAI based on the Beer-Lambert law was compared with the LAI derived from full-waveform data. Also, we compared the results with the field measured LAI. The values of correlation coefficient r and RMSE of the estimated LAI were 0.73 and 0.67, respectively. The results indicate that full-waveform LiDAR data is a reliable data source and represent a useful tool for retrieving forest LAI.

  18. Airborne Vertical Profiling of Mercury Speciation near Tullahoma, TN, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Brooks

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric transport and in situ oxidation are important factors influencing mercury concentrations at the surface and wet and dry deposition rates. Contributions of both natural and anthropogenic processes can significantly impact burdens of mercury on local, regional and global scales. To address these key issues in atmospheric mercury research, airborne measurements of mercury speciation and ancillary parameters were conducted over a region near Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA, from August 2012 to June 2013. Here, for the first time, we present vertical profiles of Hg speciation from aircraft for an annual cycle over the same location. These airborne measurements included gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM and particulate bound mercury (PBM, as well as ozone (O3, sulfur dioxide (SO2, condensation nuclei (CN and meteorological parameters. The flights, each lasting ~3 h, were conducted typically one week out of each month to characterize seasonality in mercury concentrations. Data obtained from 0 to 6 km altitudes show that GEM exhibited a relatively constant vertical profile for all seasons with an average concentration of 1.38 ± 0.17 ng∙m−3. A pronounced seasonality of GOM was observed, with the highest GOM concentrations up to 120 pg∙m−3 in the summer flights and lowest (0–20 pg∙m−3 in the winter flights. Vertical profiles of GOM show the maximum levels at altitudes between 2 and 4 km. Limited PBM measurements exhibit similar levels to GOM at all altitudes. HYSPLIT back trajectories showed that the trajectories for elevated GOM (>70 pg∙m−3 or PBM concentrations (>30 pg∙m−3 were largely associated with air masses coming from west/northwest, while events with low GOM (<20 pg∙m−3 or PBM concentrations (<5 pg∙m−3 were generally associated with winds from a wider range of wind directions. This is the first set of speciated mercury vertical profiles collected in a single location over the course

  19. Analysis of atmospheric vertical profiles in the presence of desert dust aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. J.; Obregón, M. A.; Pereira, S.; Salgueiro, V.; Potes, M.; Couto, F. T.; Salgado, R.; Bortoli, D.; Silva, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims at studying a very recent episode of desert dust transport that affected Iberia in mid May 2015. The dust aerosols were detected over Évora, where a varied set of instrumentation for aerosol measurements is installed, including: a CIMEL sunphotometer integrated in AERONET, a Raman Lidar and a TEOM monitor, as well as ceilometer and a microwave radiometer (profiler). The aerosol occurrence, detected using the columnar, vertically-resolved and in situ measurements, was characterized by a fairly high aerosol optical thickness that reached a value of 1.0 at 440 nm and showed mass concentration peaks at the surface of the order of 100 μg/m3. Subsequently, the tropospheric vertical profiles of humidity and temperature obtained with the passive microwave (MW) radiometer are analysed in order to distinguish possible modifications that can be connected with the transport of desert dust. Modelling results are also examined and the total, SW and LW radiative forcings are investigated, taking into account the different vertical profiles obtained during the desert dust occurrence. It is found that the differences in the atmospheric profiles mostly affect the LW radiative forcing, with an underestimation of about 30% when the actual vertical profile is not considered.

  20. Employing Beam-Gas Interaction Vertices for Transverse Profile Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, Mariana; Baglin, Vincent; Barschel, Colin; Bay, Aurelio; Blanc, Frederic; Bravin, Enrico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Chritin, Nicolas; Dehning, Bernd; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Gaspar, Clara; Gianì, Sebastiana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Greim, Roman; Haefeli, Guido; Hopchev, Plamen; Jacobsson, Richard; Jensen, Lars; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Jurado, Nicolas; Kain, Verena; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kirn, Thomas; Kuhn, Maria; Luthi, Berengere; Magagnin, Paolo; Matev, Rosen; Nakada, Tatsuya; Neufeld, Niko; Panman, Jaap; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Salvant, Benoit; Schael, Stefan; Schneider, Olivier; Schwering, Georg; Tobin, Mark; Veness, Raymond; Veyrat, Quentin; Vlachos, Sotiris; Wlochal, Michael; Xu, Zhirui; von Dratzig, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of high-energy beam particles with residual gas offer a unique opportunity to measure the beam profile in a non-intrusive fashion. Such a method was successfully pioneered* at the LHCb experiment using a silicon microstrip vertex detector. During the recent Large Hadron Collider shutdown at CERN, a demonstrator Beam-Gas Vertexing system based on eight scintillating-fibre modules was designed**, constructed and installed on Ring 2 to be operated as a pure beam diagnostics device. The detector signals are read out and collected with LHCb-type front-end electronics and a DAQ system consisting of a CPU farm. Tracks and vertices will be reconstructed to obtain a beam profile in real time. Here, first commissioning results are reported. The advantages and potential for future applications of this technique are discussed.

  1. Statistics of vertical backscatter profile of cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veglio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A nearly global statistical analysis of vertical backscatter and extinction profiles of cirrus clouds collected by the CALIOP lidar, on-board of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, is presented.

    Statistics on frequency of occurrence and distributions of bulk properties of cirrus clouds in general and, for the first time, of horizontally homogeneous (on a 5-km field of view cirrus clouds only are provided. Annual and seasonal backscatter profiles (BSP are computed for the horizontally homogeneous cirri. Differences found in the day/night cases and for midlatitudes and tropics are studied in terms of the mean physical parameters of the clouds from which they are derived.

    The relation between cloud physical parameters (optical depth, geometrical thickness and temperature and the shape of the BSP is investigated. It is found that cloud geometrical thickness is the main parameter affecting the shape of the mean CALIOP BSP. Specifically, cirrus clouds with small geometrical thicknesses show a maximum in mean BSP curve placed near cloud top. As the cloud geometrical thickness increases the BSP maximum shifts towards cloud base. Cloud optical depth and temperature have smaller effect on the shape of the CALIOP BSPs. In general a slight increase in the BSP maximum is observed as cloud temperature and optical depth increase.

    In order to fit mean BSPs, as functions of geometrical thickness and position within the cloud layer, polynomial functions are provided. The impact on satellite radiative transfer simulations in the infrared spectrum when using either a constant ice-content (IWC along the cloud vertical dimension or an IWC profile derived from the BSP fitting functions is evaluated. It is, in fact, demonstrated that, under realistic hypotheses, the mean BSP is linearly proportional to the IWC profile.

  2. Statistics of vertical backscatter profiles of cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veglio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A nearly global statistical analysis of vertical backscatter and extinction profiles of cirrus clouds collected by the CALIOP lidar, on-board of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, is presented.

    Statistics on frequency of occurrence and distribution of bulk properties of cirrus clouds in general and, for the first time, of horizontally homogeneous (on a 5-km field of view cirrus clouds only are provided. Annual and seasonal backscatter profiles (BSP are computed for the horizontally homogeneous cirri. Differences found in the day/night cases and for midlatitudes and tropics are studied in terms of the mean physical parameters of the clouds from which they are derived.

    The relationship between cloud physical parameters (optical depth, geometrical thickness and temperature and the shape of the BSP is investigated. It is found that cloud geometrical thickness is the main parameter affecting the shape of the mean CALIOP BSP. Specifically, cirrus clouds with small geometrical thicknesses show a maximum in mean BSP curve located near cloud top. As the cloud geometrical thickness increases the BSP maximum shifts towards cloud base. Cloud optical depth and temperature have smaller effects on the shape of the CALIOP BSPs. In general a slight increase in the BSP maximum is observed as cloud temperature and optical depth increase.

    In order to fit mean BSPs, as functions of geometrical thickness and position within the cloud layer, polynomial functions are provided. The impact on satellite radiative transfer simulations in the infrared spectrum when using either a constant ice-content (IWC along the cloud vertical dimension or an IWC profile derived from the BSP fitting functions is evaluated. It is, in fact, demonstrated that, under realistic hypotheses, the mean BSP is linearly proportional to the IWC profile.

  3. Convective cloud vertical velocity and mass-flux characteristics from radar wind profiler observations during GoAmazon2014/5: VERTICAL VELOCITY GOAMAZON2014/5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giangrande, Scott E. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Toto, Tami [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Jensen, Michael P. [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Environmental and Climate Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Feng, Zhe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Protat, Alain [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne Victoria Australia; Williams, Christopher R. [University of Colorado Boulder and NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory/Physical Sciences Division, Boulder Colorado USA; Schumacher, Courtney [Texas A& M University, College Station Texas USA; Machado, Luiz [National Institute for Space Research, Sao Jose dos Campos Brazil

    2016-11-15

    A radar wind profiler data set collected during the 2 year Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign is used to estimate convective cloud vertical velocity, area fraction, and mass flux profiles. Vertical velocity observations are presented using cumulative frequency histograms and weighted mean profiles to provide insights in a manner suitable for global climate model scale comparisons (spatial domains from 20 km to 60 km). Convective profile sensitivity to changes in environmental conditions and seasonal regime controls is also considered. Aggregate and ensemble average vertical velocity, convective area fraction, and mass flux profiles, as well as magnitudes and relative profile behaviors, are found consistent with previous studies. Updrafts and downdrafts increase in magnitude with height to midlevels (6 to 10 km), with updraft area also increasing with height. Updraft mass flux profiles similarly increase with height, showing a peak in magnitude near 8 km. Downdrafts are observed to be most frequent below the freezing level, with downdraft area monotonically decreasing with height. Updraft and downdraft profile behaviors are further stratified according to environmental controls. These results indicate stronger vertical velocity profile behaviors under higher convective available potential energy and lower low-level moisture conditions. Sharp contrasts in convective area fraction and mass flux profiles are most pronounced when retrievals are segregated according to Amazonian wet and dry season conditions. During this deployment, wet season regimes favored higher domain mass flux profiles, attributed to more frequent convection that offsets weaker average convective cell vertical velocities.

  4. Vertical profile of fog microphysics : a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Frédéric; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Mazoyer, Marie; Bourrianne, Thierry; Etcheberry, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Brigitte; Legain, Dominique; Tzanos, Diane; Barrié, Joel; Barrau, Sébastien; Defoy, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence and development of fogs result from the non-linear interaction of competing radiative, thermodynamic, microphysical and dynamical processes and the forecasting of their life cycle still remains a challenging issue. Several field campaigns have been carried out at the SIRTA observatory in the Paris suburb area (France). These experiments have shown that fog events exhibit large differences of the microphysical properties and various evolutions during their life cycle. To better understand relationships between the different processes and to validate numerical simulations it is necessary however to document the vertical profile of the fog microphysics. A CDP (Cloud Droplet Spectrometer) from DMT (Droplet Measurement Technology, Boulder, CO) has been modified to allow measurements of the droplet size distribution in fog layers with a tethered balloon. This instrumental set-up has been used during a field campaign during the winter 2013-214 in the Landes area in the South West of France. To validate the vertical profiles provided by the modified CDP, a mast was equipped with microphysical instruments at 2 altitude levels with an another CDP at 24 m and a Fog Monitor FM100 at 42 m. The instrumental set-up deployed during this campaign is presented. Data collected during a fog event that occurred during the night of 5-6 March 2014 are analysed. We show that microphysical properties such as droplet number concentration, LWC and mean droplet size, exhibit different time evolution during the fog life cycle depending on the altitude level. Droplet size distribution measurements are also investigated. They reveal sharp variations along the vertical close to the top of the fog layer. In addition it is shown that the shape of the size distributions at the top follows a time evolution typical of a quasi-adiabatic droplet growth.

  5. FAME-C: Retrieval of cloud top pressure with vertically inhomogeneous cloud profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henken, Cintia Carbajal; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Filipitsch, Florian; Walther, Andi; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    A synergistic FAME-C (Freie Universität Berlin AATSR-MERIS Cloud Retrieval) algorithm is developed within the frame of the ESA CCI Cloud project. Within FAME-C the ratio of two MERIS measurements (the Oxygen-A absorption channel and a window channel) is used to retrieve cloud top pressure. In case of high, extended clouds the retrieved cloud top pressure is generally too high. This can be understood as an overestimation of extinction in upper cloud layers due to the assumption of vertical homogeneous clouds in the radiative transfer simulations. To include more realistic cloud vertical profiles, one year of data from the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat has been used to determine average normalized cloud vertical extinction profiles with a fixed pressure thickness for nine cloud types. The nine cloud types are based on the ISCCP COT-CTP classification table. The retrieved cloud top pressure, now using CloudSat cloud profiles in the forward model, is compared to CPR reflectivities as well as the retrieved cloud top pressure using vertically homogeneous cloud profiles. In the first number of cases under examination the overestimation of cloud top pressure, and therefore the bias, is reduced by a large amount when using CloudSat vertical cloud profiles. Another advantage is that no assumption about the cloud geometrical thickness has to be made in the new retrieval. It should be noted that comparisons between FAME-C products and A-train products can only be made at high latitudes where A-train and ENVISAT have overlapping overflights.

  6. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  7. Reconstruction of Vertical Profile of Permittivity of Layered Media which is Probed Using Vertical Differential Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochanin, Gennadiy P.; Poyedinchuk, Anatoliy Y.; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla A.; Pochanina, Iryna Ye.

    2016-04-01

    Results of this research are intended to use at GPR investigations of layered media (for example, at roads' inspection) for the processing of collected data and reconstruction of dependence of permittivity on the depth. Recently, an antenna system with a vertical differential configuration of receiving module (Patent UA81652) for GPR was suggested and developed The main advantage of the differential antennas in comparison with bistatic antennas is a high electromagnetic decoupling between the transmitting and receiving modules. The new vertical differential configuration has an additional advantage because it allows collecting GPR data reflected by layered media without any losses of information about these layers [1] and, potentially, it is a more accurate instrument for the layers thickness measurements [2]. The developed antenna system is tested in practice with the GPR at asphalt thickness measurements [3] and shown an accuracy which is better than 0.5 cm. Since this antenna system is good for sounding from above the surface (air coupled technique), the mobile laboratory was equipped with the developed GPR [3]. In order to process big set of GPR data that collected during probing at long routes of the roads, for the data processing it was tested new algorithm of the inverse problem solution. It uses a fast algorithm for calculation of electromagnetic wave diffraction by non-uniform anisotropic layers [4]. The algorithm is based on constructing a special case solution to the Riccati equation for the Cauchy problem and enables a qualitative description of the wave diffraction by the electromagnetic structure of the type within a unitary framework. At this stage as initial data we used synthetic GPR data that were obtained as results of the FDTD simulation of the problem of UWB electromagnetic impulse diffraction on layered media. Differential and bistatic antenna configurations were tested at several different profiles of permittivity. Meanings of permittivity of

  8. From the shape of the vertical profile of in vivo fluorescence to Chlorophyll-a concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, A.; Claustre, H.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Xing, X.; Poteau, A.; Ras, J.

    2011-08-01

    In vivo fluorescence of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) is a potentially useful property to study the vertical distribution of phytoplankton biomass. However the technique is presently not fully exploited as it should be, essentially because of the difficulties in converting the fluorescence signal into an accurate Chl-a concentration. These difficulties arise noticeably from natural variations in the Chl-a fluorescence relationship, which is under the control of community composition as well as of their nutrient and light status. As a consequence, although vertical profiles of fluorescence are likely the most recorded biological property in the open ocean, the corresponding large databases are underexploited. Here with the aim to convert a fluorescence profile into a Chl-a concentration profile, we test the hypothesis that the Chl-a concentration can be gathered from the sole knowledge of the shape of the fluorescence profile. We analyze a large dataset from 18 oceanographic cruises conducted in case-1 waters from the highly stratified hyperoligotrophic waters (surface Chl-a = 0.02 mg m-3) of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Benguela upwelling (surface Chl-a = 32 mg m-3) and including the very deep mixed waters in the North Atlantic (Mixed Layer Depth = 690 m). This dataset encompasses more than 700 vertical profiles of Chl-a fluorescence as well as accurate estimations of Chl-a by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Two typical fluorescence profiles are identified, the uniform profile, characterized by a homogeneous layer roughly corresponding to the mixed layer, and the non-uniform profile, characterized by the presence of a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum. Using appropriate mathematical parameterizations, a fluorescence profile is subsequently represented by 3 or 5 shape parameters for uniform or non-uniform profiles, respectively. For both situations, an empirical model is developed to predict the "true" Chl-a concentration from these shape

  9. From the shape of the vertical profile of in vivo fluorescence to Chlorophyll-a concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ras

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In vivo fluorescence of Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a is a potentially useful property to study the vertical distribution of phytoplankton biomass. However the technique is presently not fully exploited as it should be, essentially because of the difficulties in converting the fluorescence signal into an accurate Chl-a concentration. These difficulties arise noticeably from natural variations in the Chl-a fluorescence relationship, which is under the control of community composition as well as of their nutrient and light status. As a consequence, although vertical profiles of fluorescence are likely the most recorded biological property in the open ocean, the corresponding large databases are underexploited. Here with the aim to convert a fluorescence profile into a Chl-a concentration profile, we test the hypothesis that the Chl-a concentration can be gathered from the sole knowledge of the shape of the fluorescence profile. We analyze a large dataset from 18 oceanographic cruises conducted in case-1 waters from the highly stratified hyperoligotrophic waters (surface Chl-a = 0.02 mg m−3 of the South Pacific Gyre to the eutrophic waters of the Benguela upwelling (surface Chl-a = 32 mg m−3 and including the very deep mixed waters in the North Atlantic (Mixed Layer Depth = 690 m. This dataset encompasses more than 700 vertical profiles of Chl-a fluorescence as well as accurate estimations of Chl-a by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Two typical fluorescence profiles are identified, the uniform profile, characterized by a homogeneous layer roughly corresponding to the mixed layer, and the non-uniform profile, characterized by the presence of a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum. Using appropriate mathematical parameterizations, a fluorescence profile is subsequently represented by 3 or 5 shape parameters for uniform or non-uniform profiles, respectively. For both situations, an empirical model is developed to predict the "true" Chl-a concentration

  10. Experimental study of vertical stress profiles of a confined granular bed under static and dynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, S; Cuq, B; Ruiz, T

    2012-07-01

    In a wet agglomeration process inside a low shear mixer, the blade function is to induce i) homogenization of the liquid sprayed on the powder surface and ii) a stress field able to transfer the mechanical energy at the particle scale. In this work we study the mechanical state of a confined powder bed through the analysis of stress distributions (by force measurements) in a rectangular cell in two cases: for a classical model powder (i.e. glass beads) and a complex powder (i.e. wheat semolina). Two types of vertical stress profiles are obtained according to the type of measurements carried out in the powder bed, either locally (at different positions in the cell) or globally (at the entire base). The global vertical stress profile follows Janssen's model and the local vertical stress profile highlights a critical length, identified as the percolation threshold of the force network, and a shielding length near the bottom, which is similar to an influence length of the side walls. In the context of wet agglomeration, the results allow to consider the role of the characteristic lengths in the mixing bowl under vertical mechanical solicitation.

  11. On the representation of IAGOS/MOZAIC vertical profiles in chemical transport models: contribution of different error sources in the example of carbon monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Boschetti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Utilising a fleet of commercial airliners, MOZAIC/IAGOS provides atmospheric composition data on a regular basis that are widely used for modelling applications. Due to the specific operational context of the platforms, such observations are collected close to international airports and hence in an environment characterised by high anthropogenic emissions. This provides opportunities for assessing emission inventories of major metropolitan areas around the world, but also challenges in representing the observations in typical chemical transport models. We assess here the contribution of different sources of error to overall model–data mismatch using the example of MOZAIC/IAGOS carbon monoxide (CO profiles collected over the European regional domain in a time window of 5 yr (2006–2011. The different sources of error addressed in the present study are: 1 mismatch in modelled and observed mixed layer height; 2 bias in emission fluxes and 3 spatial representation error (related to unresolved spatial variations in emissions. The modelling framework combines a regional Lagrangian transport model (STILT with EDGARv4.3 emission inventory and lateral boundary conditions from the MACC reanalysis. The representation error was derived by coupling STILT with emission fluxes aggregated to different spatial resolutions. We also use the MACC reanalysis to assess uncertainty related to uncertainty sources 2 and 3. We treat the random and the bias components of the uncertainty separately and found that 1 and 3 have a comparable impact on the random component for both models, while 2 is far less important. On the other hand, the bias component shows comparable impacts from each source of uncertainty, despite both models being affected by a low bias of a factor of 2–2.5 in the emission fluxes. In addition, we suggested methods to correct for biases in emission fluxes and in mixing heights. Lastly, the evaluation of the spatial representation error against

  12. Vertical Profile of Aerosol Properties at Pico Mountain, Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.; Dzepina, K.; Hueber, J.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2013-12-01

    Pico Mountain (2325m asl) is a dormant volcano in the archipelago of the Azores1500 km west of Lisbon, Portugal in the North Atlantic. It differs from typical mountain ranges such as the Alps or the Rockies, which are large and present a complex orography. Pico Mountain has a simple cone-like structure with only one main peak and is thousands of kilometers away from any other significant mountain range. In summer months, it is typical for air masses to move around the mountain rather than traveling up its face. This implies that often the peak of the mountain lies above the marine boundary layer in the free troposphere, while the lower part of the mountain is affected by marine clouds and marine air-masses. An atmospheric monitoring station, the Pico Mountain Observatory was established in 2001 in the summit caldera of the volcano at 2225m above sea level. The observatory is far from large populations or pollution sources, which makes the station ideal to study atmospheric gases and aerosols transported over long-ranges in the free troposphere. The station is reachable only by foot following a steep and strenuous hiking trail. In the summer of 2013 we began to collect vertical profiles of aerosol by carrying an instrumented backpack up to the summit of the mountain, with the goal of studying the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols from the marine boundary layer to the free troposphere. The backpack was carried from the base of trail at 1200m asl. The backpack was equipped with the following instruments: 1. Nephelometer to measure light scattering from aerosol 2. 2-size optical particle counter (300-500 nm) 3. Portable micro-aethalometer to measure absorbing aerosols 4. SEM/TEM sampler to collect particles for off-line electron microscopy analysis 5. Battery powered data logger to measure relative humidity, temperature and pressure 6. GPS tracking device We provide a preliminary analysis of data collected in 2013 to gain insight on the vertical distribution

  13. Validation of vertical refractivity profiles as required for performance prediction of coastal surveillance radars

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naicker, K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available for modeling the detection performance of coastal surveillance radars. Validation is provided through meteorological and radio wave propagation measurements undertaken in False Bay, South Africa. Keywords-vertical refractive profiles, evaporation ducts.... An atmospheric duct is a horizontal layer in troposphere, where the refractive conditions are such that an EM wave will be channeled or guided as discussed above. This results in EM wave propagation over great ranges. In a littoral environment, evaporation...

  14. Transmission of vertical stress in a real soil profile. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    on the stress distribution in the soil profile. The reference soil had not been ploughed or otherwise tilled for 18 months. The distribution of vertical stress near the tyre–soil interface was fitted by a model combining a power function and an exponential function for the stresses, respectively, along...... and across the driving direction (FRIDA model). The tillage-induced reduction in topsoil strength lead to more even stress distribution at the tyre–soil interface but did not significantly affect the measured vertical stresses at 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m depth. The vertical stresses at 0.3 m depth were equivalent...... to the peak stresses measured in the contact area between tyre and soil (approx. 200 kPa) and appeared more scattered when the top 0.2 m had been recently ploughed. Taking the FRIDA-estimated vertical stresses in the tyre–soil interface as input to the analytical Söhne model, vertical stresses in the subsoil...

  15. Experiments and modelling on vertical flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keski-Rahkonen, O.; Mangs, J. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    he principle and some preliminary results are shown of a new vertical flame spread modelling effort. Quick experimental screenings on relevant phenomena are made, some models are evaluated, and a new set of needed measuring instruments is proposed. Finally a single example of FRNC cable is shown as application of the methods. (orig.)

  16. Quantification of the advected CO2 concentration due to upstream surface fluxes in aircraft vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, A.; Morguí, J.-A.; Curcoll, R.; Rodó, X.

    2009-04-01

    A model framework which couples the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART (LPDM) with the new global surface flux inversion CarbonTracker from NOAA-ESRL (2007B release) is used to quantify the advected CO2 concentration from outbound surface fluxes to measured vertical profiles carried out during different seasons in 2006 at La Muela site in Spain (LMU; 41.60°N, 1.1°W). The Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART (LPDM) calculates the influence of surface CO2 fluxes upwind of the study area, allowing us to identify those sources or sink areas that strongly modify the CO2 content of air masses that arrives at different altitudes of measured profiles. CarbonTracker is a new assimilation system that informs of global carbon fluxes at 1°x1° at 3 hours resolution. Coupling LPDM results with surface fluxes allows assessing the net CO2 contribution of identified areas to measured concentrations along the profiles above a reference or background concentration. Furthermore, it allows the quantification of the percentage of each component flux (biospheric, anthropogenic and oceanic) to each vertical layer. At LMU, biospheric fluxes account ~70% of total CO2 advection; fossil fuel ~25%; and ~5% is attributed to the oceanic ones. By far, late spring and summer profiles are largely influence by the biospheric component (~90%). Finally, the CO2 concentration above the background value of profiles measured on 22nd February, 13th October and 30th November 2006 are well explained by the advection of upstream surface fluxes. In other profiles examined, the variation of CO2 along the profile is partially explained by the advection of CO2 outbound fluxes.

  17. A Remote Sensing Approach to Estimate Vertical Profile Classes of Phytoplankton in a Eutrophic Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Xue

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The extension and frequency of algal blooms in surface waters can be monitored using remote sensing techniques, yet knowledge of their vertical distribution is fundamental to determine total phytoplankton biomass and understanding temporal variability of surface conditions and the underwater light field. However, different vertical distribution classes of phytoplankton may occur in complex inland lakes. Identification of the vertical profile classes of phytoplankton becomes the key and first step to estimate its vertical profile. The vertical distribution profile of phytoplankton is based on a weighted integral of reflected light from all depths and is difficult to determine by reflectance data alone. In this study, four Chla vertical profile classes (vertically uniform, Gaussian, exponential and hyperbolic were found to occur in three in situ vertical surveys (28 May, 19–24 July and 10–12 October in a shallow eutrophic lake, Lake Chaohu. We developed and validated a classification and regression tree (CART to determine vertical phytoplankton biomass profile classes. This was based on an algal bloom index (Normalized Difference algal Bloom Index, NDBI applied to both in situ remote sensing reflectance (Rrs and MODIS Rayleigh-corrected reflectance (Rrc data in combination with data of local wind speed. The results show the potential of retrieving Chla vertical profiles information from integrated information sources following a decision tree approach.

  18. Measuring vertical oxygen profiles in the hyporheic zone using planar optodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieweg, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-04-01

    On of the key parameters, controlling biogeochemical reactions in the hyporheic zone (HZ) is the distribution of oxygen. A reliable measurement of the vertical oxygen distribution is an important tool to understand the dynamic fluctuations of the aerobic zone within the HZ. With repeated measurements of continuous profiles, mixing of surface water and groundwater as well as the consumption of oxygen can be evaluated. We present a novel approach for the in situ measurements of vertical oxygen distribution in the riverbed using a planar optode. The luminescence based optode measurement enables a non invasive measurement without consumption of oxygen, no creation of preferential flow paths and only minimal disturbance of the flow field. Possible atmospheric contamination by pumping pore water into a vessel can be avoided and the readings are independent of flow velocity. A self manufactured planar optode is wrapped around an acrylic tube and installed in the riverbed. The measurement is performed by vertically moving a profiler-piston inside the acrylic tube. The piston holds a robust polymer optical fibre which emits a modulated light signal through the acrylic glass to the optode-foil and transmits the induced luminescence signal back to a commercially available trace oxygen meter. Temperature compensation is accomplished using a depth-oriented temperature probe nearby and processing the raw data within a Matlab script. Robust and unbiased oxygen profiles are obtained by averaging multiple consecutive measurements. To ensure a constant velocity of the profiler for replicating the exact measuring depths, an electric motor device is used. First results at our test site show a variable oxygen profile down to 40 cm depth which is strongly influenced by stream level and upwelling groundwater conditions. The measured oxygen profiles will serve as input parameter for a 3D solute transport and chemical reaction subsurface model of the HZ.

  19. Vertical profiles of aerosol absorption coefficient from micro-Aethalometer data and Mie calculation over Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, L; Mocnik, G; Ferrini, B S; Perrone, M G; Sangiorgi, G; Bolzacchini, E

    2011-06-15

    Vertical profiles of aerosol number-size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentration were measured between ground-level and 500m AGL over Milan. A tethered balloon was fitted with an instrumentation package consisting of the newly-developed micro-Aethalometer (microAeth® Model AE51, Magee Scientific, USA), an optical particle counter, and a portable meteorological station. At the same time, PM(2.5) samples were collected both at ground-level and at a high altitude sampling site, enabling particle chemical composition to be determined. Vertical profiles and PM(2.5) data were collected both within and above the mixing layer. Absorption coefficient (b(abs)) profiles were calculated from the Aethalometer data: in order to do so, an optical enhancement factor (C), accounting for multiple light-scattering within the filter of the new microAeth® Model AE51, was determined for the first time. The value of this parameter C (2.05±0.03 at λ=880nm) was calculated by comparing the Aethalometer attenuation coefficient and aerosol optical properties determined from OPC data along vertical profiles. Mie calculations were applied to the OPC number-size distribution data, and the aerosol refractive index was calculated using the effective medium approximation applied to aerosol chemical composition. The results compare well with AERONET data. The BC and b(abs) profiles showed a sharp decrease at the mixing height (MH), and fairly constant values of b(abs) and BC were found above the MH, representing 17±2% of those values measured within the mixing layer. The BC fraction of aerosol volume was found to be lower above the MH: 48±8% of the corresponding ground-level values. A statistical mean profile was calculated, both for BC and b(abs), to better describe their behaviour; the model enabled us to compute their average behaviour as a function of height, thus laying the foundations for valid parametrizations of vertical profile data which can be useful in both remote sensing

  20. The power of vertical geolocation of atmospheric profiles from GNSS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwärz, Marc; Leroy, Stephen S.

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution measurements from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) provide atmospheric profiles with independent information on altitude and pressure. This unique property is of crucial advantage when analyzing atmospheric characteristics that require joint knowledge of altitude and pressure or other thermodynamic atmospheric variables. Here we introduce and demonstrate the utility of this independent information from RO and discuss the computation, uncertainty, and use of RO atmospheric profiles on isohypsic coordinates - mean sea level altitude and geopotential height - as well as on thermodynamic coordinates (pressure and potential temperature). Using geopotential height as vertical grid, we give information on errors of RO-derived temperature, pressure, and potential temperature profiles and provide an empirical error model which accounts for seasonal and latitudinal variations. The observational uncertainty of individual temperature/pressure/potential temperature profiles is about 0.7 K/0.15%/1.4 K in the tropopause region. It gradually increases into the stratosphere and decreases toward the lower troposphere. This decrease is due to the increasing influence of background information. The total climatological error of mean atmospheric fields is, in general, dominated by the systematic error component. We use sampling error-corrected climatological fields to demonstrate the power of having different and accurate vertical coordinates available. As examples we analyze characteristics of the location of the tropopause for geopotential height, pressure, and potential temperature coordinates as well as seasonal variations of the midlatitude jet stream core. This highlights the broad applicability of RO and the utility of its versatile vertical geolocation for investigating the vertical structure of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  1. MEASURING VERTICAL PROFILES OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY WITH IN SITU DIRECT-PUSH METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a Geopr...

  2. A Generalized Method for Vertical Profiles of Mean Layer Values of Meteorological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Meteorological Variables by James Cogan Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOTICES Disclaimers...Method for Vertical Profiles of Mean Layer Values of Meteorological Variables by James Cogan Computational and Information Sciences Directorate...SUBTITLE A Generalized Method for Vertical Profiles of Mean Layer Values of Meteorological Variables 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  3. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  4. Radiosonde aerosol counter for vertical profiling of atmospheric dust layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, miniature aerosol particle counter has been developed, intended for use with balloon-borne meteorological radiosondes. It is particularly suitable for airborne mineral dust measurements. Ambient air is drawn into the counter using a diaphragm pump at a rate of 0.5 litre per minute. The counter detects particles in the airstream using a diode laser and a photodiode. Output from the photodiode is digitised into 5 size bins, with minimum particle diameters equivalent to 0.6, 1.4, 2.6, 5.4 and 10.6 micrometers. The counter is interfaced to a Vaisala RS92 radiosonde, which transmits data from the counter together with meteorological parameters and GPS-derived position to a ground based receiver at 1 Hz rate. Statistically significant particle size distributions can be obtained once a second for number concentrations down to about 100,000 particle per litre (within the measured size range), or correspondingly less at lower temporal resolutions. At the same time, the counter is capable of measuring dust number concentrations exceeding a million per litre without incurring significant errors. Soundings during the DREAME campaign in Kuwait (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) and on Cape Verde Islands (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7) provided dust concentration profiles with a typical vertical resolution of 4 m. Comparisons with integrated dust column size distribution measurements from AERONET sun photometers showed good agreement in two out of three cases where near-simultaneous retrievals were available. Optical thickness calculations based on the size distributions measured in Kuwait, with the assumption that the dust particles were prolate spheroids, agreed with the AERONET optical thickness at 675 nm to within 15%.

  5. A vertically integrated model with vertical dynamics for CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Bo; Bandilla, Karl W.; Doster, Florian; Keilegavlen, Eirik; Celia, Michael A.

    2014-08-01

    Conventional vertically integrated models for CO2 storage usually adopt a vertical equilibrium (VE) assumption, which states that due to strong buoyancy, CO2 and brine segregate quickly, so that the fluids can be assumed to have essentially hydrostatic pressure distributions in the vertical direction. However, the VE assumption is inappropriate when the time scale of fluid segregation is not small relative to the simulation time. By casting the vertically integrated equations into a multiscale framework, a new vertically integrated model can be developed that relaxes the VE assumption, thereby allowing vertical dynamics to be modeled explicitly. The model maintains much of the computational efficiency of vertical integration while allowing a much wider range of problems to be modeled. Numerical tests of the new model, using injection scenarios with typical parameter sets, show excellent behavior of the new approach for homogeneous geologic formations.

  6. On the representation of IAGOS/MOZAIC vertical profiles in chemical transport models : contribution of different error sources in the example of carbon monoxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschetti, Fabio; Chen, Huilin; Thouret, Valerie; Nedelec, Philippe; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Gerbig, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Utilising a fleet of commercial airliners, MOZAIC/IAGOS provides atmospheric composition data on a regular basis that are widely used for modelling applications. Due to the specific operational context of the platforms, such observations are collected close to international airports and hence in an

  7. A comparison of vertical velocity variance measurements from wind profiling radars and sonic anemometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Katherine; Bianco, Laura; Johnston, Paul; Wilczak, James M.

    2017-03-01

    Observations of turbulence in the planetary boundary layer are critical for developing and evaluating boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale numerical weather prediction models. These observations, however, are expensive and rarely profile the entire boundary layer. Using optimized configurations for 449 and 915 MHz wind profiling radars during the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA), improvements have been made to the historical methods of measuring vertical velocity variance through the time series of vertical velocity, as well as the Doppler spectral width. Using six heights of sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower, correlations of up to R2 = 0. 74 are seen in measurements of the large-scale variances from the radar time series and R2 = 0. 79 in measurements of small-scale variance from radar spectral widths. The total variance, measured as the sum of the small and large scales, agrees well with sonic anemometers, with R2 = 0. 79. Correlation is higher in daytime convective boundary layers than nighttime stable conditions when turbulence levels are smaller. With the good agreement with the in situ measurements, highly resolved profiles up to 2 km can be accurately observed from the 449 MHz radar and 1 km from the 915 MHz radar. This optimized configuration will provide unique observations for the verification and improvement to boundary layer parameterizations in mesoscale models.

  8. Combined vertical-velocity observations with Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bühl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Case studies of combined vertical-velocity measurements of Doppler lidar, cloud radar and wind profiler are presented. The measurements were taken at the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany. Synergistic products are presented that are derived from the vertical-velocity measurements of the three instruments: A comprehensive classification mask of vertically moving atmospheric targets and the terminal fall velocity of water droplets and ice crystals corrected for vertical air motion. It is shown that the measurements of the Doppler lidar can extent the view of the cloud radar and the wind profiler, especially when observing clouds.

  9. Vertical profiles of heating derived from IR-based precipitation estimates during FGGE SOP-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Vincent, Dayton G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper examines a technique for retrieving from geostationary IR data the vertical profiles of heating and cooling due to moist diabatic processes. First, GOES IR imagery is used to estimate precipitation fields which are independent of fields inferred from residuals in heat budget analysis based on the FGGE level III-b data. Vertical distributions of the associated heating are then obtained using thermodynamic data from the level III-b analysis, one-dimensional cloud models, and the satellite-estimated precipitation. The technique was applied to infer heating in the South Pacific convergence zone during a portion of FGEE SOP-1, and the results were compared with heat-budget calculations made using the ECMWF analyses.

  10. Vertical distribution of ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa in a podzol profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosling, A.; Landeweert, R.; Lindahl, B.D.; Larsson, K.H.; Kuyper, T.W.; Taylor, A.F.S.; Finlay, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    Studies of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in forest soils are usually restricted to the uppermost organic horizons. Boreal forest podzols are highly stratified and little is known about the vertical distribution of ectomycorrhizal communities in the underlying mineral horizons. Ectomycorrhizal r

  11. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  12. A simple model for the interaction between vertical eddy heat fluxes and static stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, W. J., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical model for studying the interaction of vertical eddy heat fluxes and vertical temperature structure in midlatitude regions is described. The temperature profile for the model was derived from calculations of the equilibrium among heating rates in simplified representations of large-scale vertical eddy heat flux, moist convection and radiation. An eddy flux profile is calculated based on the quasi-geostrophic, liner baroclinic instability of a single wave. Model equilibrium states for summer and winter conditions are compared with observations, and the results are discussed in detail.

  13. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  14. The vertical velocity dispersion profile of the Galactic thick disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bidin, C Moni; Carraro, G; Méndez, R A; Van Altena, W F; Korchagin, V I; Casetti-Dinescu, D I

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of radial velocity measurements of 770 thick disk red giants toward the South Galactic Pole, vertically distributed from 0.5 kpc to 5 kpc with respect to the Galactic plane. We find a small gradient in the vertical velocity dispersion (sigma_W) of 3.8+/-0.8 km/s kpc. Even more noteworthy, our values of $\\sigma_W$ are small compared to literature values: in the middle of the vertical height range we find sigma_W(z=2kpc)=30 km/s. We found no possible explanation for this small value of sigma_W in terms of sample contamination by thin disk stars, nor by wrong assumptions regarding the metallicity distribution and the derived distances.

  15. THE VERTICAL VELOCITY DISPERSION PROFILE OF THE GALACTIC THICK DISK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moni Bidin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of radial velocity measurements of 770 thick disk red giants toward the South Galactic Pole, vertically distributed from 0.5 kpc to 5 kpc with respect to the Galactic plane. We nd a small gradient in the vertical velocity dispersion (W of 3.8 0.8 km s-1 kpc-1. Even more noteworthy, our values of W are small compared to literature values: in the middle of the vertical height range we nd W;z=2kpc=30 km s-1. We found no possible explanation for this small value oW in terms of sample contamination by thin disk stars, nor by wrong assumptions regarding the metallicity distribution and the derived distances.

  16. An Integrated Approach to Study Mud Banks of Alleppey Kerala using the Autonomous Vertical Profiler (AVP)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Madhan, R.; Maurya, P.; Desa, E.S.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Dabholkar, N.A.; Lamani, V.; Manoharan, V.; Naik, N.; Thottam, T.J.; DineshKumar, P.K.; deAraujo, B.A.

    =UTF-8 An Integrated Approach to Study Mud Banks of Alleppey Kerala using the Autonomous Vertical Profiler (AVP) Mascarenhas Antonio 1 , Sanjeev Afzulpurkar 1 , Gajanan Navelkar 1 , R. Madhan 1 , Pramod Maurya 1 , Elgar Desa 1 , Shivanand...

  17. A vertically resolved model for phytoplankton aggregation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iris Kriest; Geoffrey T Evans

    2000-12-01

    This work presents models of the vertical distribution and flux of phytoplankton aggregates, including changes with time in the distribution of aggregate sizes and sinking speeds. The distribution of sizes is described by two parameters, the mass and number of aggregates, which greatly reduces the computational cost of the models. Simple experiments demonstrate the effects of aggregation on the timing and depth distribution of primary production and export. A more detailed ecological model is applied to sites in the Arabian Sea; it demonstrates that aggregation can be important for deep sedimentation even when its effect on surface concentrations is small, and it presents the difference in timing between settlement of aggregates and fecal pellets.

  18. Comparing the Cloud Vertical Structure Derived from Several Methods Based on Radiosonde Profiles and Ground-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Suros, M.; Calbo, J.; Gonzalez, J. A.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-08-27

    The cloud vertical distribution and especially the cloud base height, which is linked to cloud type, is an important characteristic in order to describe the impact of clouds in a changing climate. In this work several methods to estimate the cloud vertical structure (CVS) based on atmospheric sounding profiles are compared, considering number and position of cloud layers, with a ground based system which is taken as a reference: the Active Remote Sensing of Clouds (ARSCL). All methods establish some conditions on the relative humidity, and differ on the use of other variables, the thresholds applied, or the vertical resolution of the profile. In this study these methods are applied to 125 radiosonde profiles acquired at the ARM Southern Great Plains site during all seasons of year 2009 and endorsed by GOES images, to confirm that the cloudiness conditions are homogeneous enough across their trajectory. The overall agreement for the methods ranges between 44-88%; four methods produce total agreements around 85%. Further tests and improvements are applied on one of these methods. In addition, we attempt to make this method suitable for low resolution vertical profiles, which could be useful in atmospheric modeling. The total agreement, even when using low resolution profiles, can be improved up to 91% if the thresholds for a moist layer to become a cloud layer are modified to minimize false negatives with the current data set, thus improving overall agreement.

  19. Modeling of daytime HONO vertical gradients during SHARP 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Wong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous Acid (HONO acts as a major precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH in the urban atmospheric boundary layer in the morning and throughout the day. Despite its importance, HONO formation mechanisms are not yet completely understood. It is generally accepted that conversion of NO2 on surfaces in the presence of water is responsible for the formation of HONO in the nocturnal boundary layer, although the type of surface on which the mechanism occurs is still under debate. Recent observations of higher than expected daytime HONO concentrations in both urban and rural areas indicate the presence of unknown daytime HONO source(s. Various formation pathways in the gas-phase and on aerosol and ground surfaces have been proposed to explain the presence of daytime HONO. However, it is unclear which mechanism dominates and, in the cases of heterogeneous mechanisms, on which surfaces they occur.

    Vertical concentration profiles of HONO and its precursors can help in identifying the dominant HONO formation pathways. In this study, daytime HONO and NO2 vertical profiles, measured in three different height intervals (20–70 m, 70–130 m and 130–300 m in Houston, TX during the 2009 Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP are analyzed using a one-dimensional (1-D chemistry and transport model. Model results with various HONO formation pathways suggested in the literature are compared to the the daytime HONO and HONO/NO2 ratios observed during SHARP. The best agreement of HONO and HONO/NO2 ratios between model and observations is achieved by including both a photolytic source of HONO at the ground and on the aerosol. Model sensitivity studies show that the observed diurnal variations of HONO/NO2 ratio are not reproduced by the model if there is only a photolytic HONO source on aerosol or in the gas-phase from NO2* + H2O. Further analysis of the

  20. Tropical Forest Biomass Estimation from Vertical Fourier Transforms of Lidar and InSAR Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Goncalves, F.; Drake, J.; Hensley, S.; Chapman, B. D.; Michel, T.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Dutra, L.; Graca, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Structural forest biomass estimation from lidar or interferometric SAR (InSAR) has demonstrated better performance than radar-power-based approaches for the higher biomasses (>150 Mg/ha) found in tropical forests. Structural biomass estimation frequently regresses field biomass to some function of forest height. With airborne, 25-m footprint lidar data and fixed-baseline C-band InSAR data over tropical wet forests of La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, we compare the use of Fourier transforms of vertical profiles at a few frequencies to the intrinsically low-frequency “average height”. RMS scatters of Fourier-estimated biomass about field-measured biomass improved by 40% and 20% over estimates base on average height from lidar and fixed-baseline InSAR, respectively. Vertical wavelengths between 14 and 100 m were found to best estimate biomass. The same airborne data acquisition over La Selva was used to generate many 10’s of repeat-track L-band InSAR baselines with time delays of 1-72 hours, and vertical wavelengths of 5-100 m. We will estimate biomass from the Fourier transforms of L-band radar power profiles (InSAR complex coherence). The effects of temporal decorrelation will be modeled in the Fourier domain to try to model and reduce their impact. Using L-band polarimetric interferometry, average heights will be estimated as well and biomass regression performance compared to the Fourier transform approach. The more traditional approach of using L-band radar polarimetry will also be compared to structural biomass estimation.

  1. An algorithm to estimate the heating budget from vertical hydrometeor profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Mccumber, Michael; Adler, Robert; Lang, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    A simple algorithm to estimate the latent heating of cloud systems from their vertical hydrometeor profiles is proposed. The derivation as well as the validation of the algorithm is based on output generated by a nonhydrostatic cloud model with parameterized microphysical processes. Mature and decaying stages of a GATE squall-type convective system have been tested. The algorithm-derived heating budget is in reasonable agreement with the budget predicted by the cloud model. The input to the proposed algoritm can be obtained from either a rain retrieval technique based on information from multichannel passive microwave signals or a kinematic cloud model based on information from Doppler radar wind fields and radar reflectivity patterns. Such an application would have significant implications for spaceborne remote sensing and the large-scale weather prediction data assimilation problem.

  2. Vertical Structure of the Wind Speed Profile at the North Sea Offshore Measurement Platform FINO1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical wind speed profile in the lowest 100m of the marine atmospheric boundary layer has been characterized from data collected at the FINO1 offshore research platform in the German North Sea sector for 2005. Located in 30m of water, the platform has a dense vertical array of meteorological instrumentation to measure wind speed, air temperature, relative humidity, and atmospheric turbulence characteristics. Along measurements of the ocean temperature and surface waves, the platform is well-equipped to characterize wind properties in the near-surface boundary layer. Preliminary analysis reveals a high incidence of vertical wind speed profiles that deviate significantly from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory with wind speed inflections that suggest decoupled layers near the surface. The presentation shows how the properties of the vertical wind speed profile change mainly depending on the wind speed, wind direction, and time of year. The results are significant because there are few reports of inflections in the vertical wind speed profile over the ocean and there is an a priori assumption that the vertical wind speed profile varies smoothly according to similarity theory. There are possible consequences for the wind energy development in terms of understanding the forces acting on offshore wind turbines whose rotors sweep across heights 150-200m above the sea surface.

  3. Quantitative precipitation estimation in complex orography using quasi-vertical profiles of dual polarization radar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Weather radars are nowadays a unique tool to estimate quantitatively the rain precipitation near the surface. This is an important task for a plenty of applications. For example, to feed hydrological models, mitigate the impact of severe storms at the ground using radar information in modern warning tools as well as aid the validation studies of satellite-based rain products. With respect to the latter application, several ground validation studies of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) products have recently highlighted the importance of accurate QPE from ground-based weather radars. To date, a plenty of works analyzed the performance of various QPE algorithms making use of actual and synthetic experiments, possibly trained by measurement of particle size distributions and electromagnetic models. Most of these studies support the use of dual polarization variables not only to ensure a good level of radar data quality but also as a direct input in the rain estimation equations. Among others, one of the most important limiting factors in radar QPE accuracy is the vertical variability of particle size distribution that affects at different levels, all the radar variables acquired as well as rain rates. This is particularly impactful in mountainous areas where the altitudes of the radar sampling is likely several hundred of meters above the surface. In this work, we analyze the impact of the vertical profile variations of rain precipitation on several dual polarization radar QPE algorithms when they are tested a in complex orography scenario. So far, in weather radar studies, more emphasis has been given to the extrapolation strategies that make use of the signature of the vertical profiles in terms of radar co-polar reflectivity. This may limit the use of the radar vertical profiles when dual polarization QPE algorithms are considered because in that case all the radar variables used in the rain estimation process should be consistently extrapolated at the surface

  4. Synergetic ground-based methods for remote measurements of ozone vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeyev, Yuriy; Kostsov, Vladimir; Virolainen, Yana

    2013-05-01

    The technique of combining ground-based measurements in infrared and microwave spectral regions in order to achieve higher accuracy of ozone profile retrieval in extensive altitude ranges is described and analyzed. The information content, errors, altitude ranges and vertical resolution of ozone profile retrieval have been studied on the basis of numerical simulation of synergetic experiments. Optimal conditions of measurements are defined and requirements to additional information are formulated. The first results on ozone vertical profile retrieval using groundbased measurements of FTIR-spectrometer and microwave radiometer are given.

  5. One year of vertical wind profiles measurements at a Mediterranean coastal site of South Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Avolio, Elenio; Federico, Stefano; Gullì, Daniel; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Sempreviva, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    In order to develop wind farms projects is challenging to site them on coastal areas both onshore and offshore as suitable sites. Developing projects need high quality databases under a wide range of atmospheric conditions or high resolution models that could resolve the effect of the coastal discontinuity in the surface properties. New parametrizations are important and high quality databases are also needed for formulating them. Ground-based remote sensing devices such as lidars have been shown to be functional for studying the evolution of the vertical wind structure coastal atmospheric boundary layer both on- and offshore. Here, we present results from a year of vertical wind profiles, wind speed and direction, monitoring programme at a site located in the Italian Calabria Region, Central Mediterranean, 600m from the Thyrrenian coastline, where a Lidar Doppler, ZephIr (ZephIr ltd) has been operative since July 2013. The lidar monitors wind speed and direction from 10m up to 300m at 10 vertical levels with an average of 10 minutes and it is supported by a metmast providing: Atmospheric Pressure, Solar Radiation, Precipitation, Relative Humidity, Temperature,Wind Speed and Direction at 10m. We present the characterization of wind profiles during one year period according to the time of the day to transition periods night/day/night classified relating the local scale, breeze scale, to the large scale conditions. The dataset is also functional for techniques for short-term prediction of wind for the renewable energy integration in the distribution grids. The site infrastructure is funded within the Project "Infrastructure of High Technology for Environmental and Climate Monitoring" (I-AMICA) (PONa3_00363) by the Italian National Operative Program (PON 2007-2013) and European Regional Development Fund. Real-time data are show on http://www.i-amica.it/i-amica/?page_id=1122.

  6. Matrix model and dimensions at hypercube vertices

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A; Popolitov, A

    2015-01-01

    In hypercube approach to correlation functions in Chern-Simons theory (knot polynomials) the central role is played by the numbers of cycles, in which the link diagram is decomposed under different resolutions. Certain functions of these numbers are further interpreted as dimensions of graded spaces, associated with hypercube vertices. Finding these functions is, however, a somewhat non-trivial problem. In arXiv:1506.07516 it was suggested to solve it with the help of the matrix model technique, in the spirit of AMM/EO topological recursion. In this paper we further elaborate on this idea and provide a vast collection of non-trivial examples, related both to ordinary and virtual links and knots. Remarkably, most powerful versions of the formalism freely convert ordinary knots/links to virtual and back -- moreover, go beyond the knot-related set of the (2,2)-valent graphs.

  7. Fluid Substitution Modeling to Determine Sensitivity of 3D Vertical Seismic Profile Data to Injected CO­2­ at an active Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Project, Farnsworth field, TX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, K. K.; Balch, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration monitors a CO2 capture, utilization and storage project at Farnsworth field, TX. The reservoir interval is a Morrowan age fluvial sand deposited in an incised valley. The sands are between 10 to 25m thick and located about 2800m below the surface. Primary oil recovery began in 1958 and by the late 1960's secondary recovery through waterflooding was underway. In 2009, Chaparral Energy began tertiary recovery using 100% anthropogenic CO2 sourced from an ethanol and a fertilizer plant. This constitutes carbon sequestration and fulfills the DOE's initiative to determine the best approach to permanent carbon storage. One purpose of the study is to understand CO­2 migration from injection wells. CO2­ plume spatial distribution for this project is analyzed with the use of time-lapse 3D vertical seismic profiles centered on CO2 injection wells. They monitor raypaths traveling in a single direction compared to surface seismic surveys with raypaths traveling in both directions. 3D VSP surveys can image up to 1.5km away from the well of interest, exceeding regulatory requirements for maximum plume extent by a factor of two. To optimize the timing of repeat VSP acquisition, the sensitivity of the 3D VSP surveys to CO2 injection was analyzed to determine at what injection volumes a seismic response to the injected CO­2 will be observable. Static geologic models were generated for pre-CO2 and post-CO2 reservoir states through construction of fine scale seismic based geologic models, which were then history matched via flow simulations. These generated static states of the model, where CO2­ replaces oil and brine in pore spaces, allow for generation of impedance volumes which when convolved with a representative wavelet generate synthetic seismic volumes used in the sensitivity analysis. Funding for the project is provided by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Award No. DE-FC26-05NT42591.

  8. Tropospheric CO vertical profiles deduced from total columns using data assimilation: methodology and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. El Amraoui

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation of a method to derive the vertical profile of carbon monoxide (CO from its total column using data assimilation. The main motivation of this study is twofold. First, to deduce both the vertical CO profiles and the assimilated CO fields with good confidence. Second, for chemical species that can be measured only as the total column, this method provides an attractive alternative for estimating their vertical profiles in the troposphere. We choose version 3 (V3 of MOPITT CO total columns to validate the proposed method. MOPITT has the advantage of providing both the vertical profiles and the total columns of CO. Furthermore, this version has been extensively validated by comparison with many independent datasets, and has been used in many scientific studies. The first step of the paper consists in the specification of the observation errors based on the Chi-square (χ2 test. The observations have been binned according to day, night, land and sea (LAND_DAY, LAND_NIGHT and SEA, respectively. The respective optimal observation error values for which the χ2 metric is the closest to 1 are: 7%, 8% and 11% for SEA, LAND_DAY and LAND_NIGHT, respectively. In a second step, the CO total column, with its specified errors, is used within the assimilation system to estimate the vertical profiles. These are validated by comparison with vertical profiles of MOPITT V3 retrievals at global and regional scales. Generally, both datasets show similar patterns and good agreement at both global and regional scales. Nevertheless, the total column analyses (TOTCOL_ANALYSES slightly overestimate CO concentrations compared to MOPITT observations. In a third step, vertical profiles calculated from TOTCOL_ANALYSES have been compared to those calculated from the assimilation of MOPITT V3 vertical profiles (PROFILE_ANALYSES. Both datasets shows very good agreement, but TOTCOL_ANALYSES tend to slightly overestimate CO concentrations. The mean

  9. Tropospheric CO vertical profiles deduced from total columns using data assimilation: methodology and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amraoui, L.; Attié, J.-L.; Ricaud, P.; Lahoz, W. A.; Piacentini, A.; Peuch, V.-H.; Warner, J. X.; Abida, R.; Barré, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a validation of a method to derive the vertical profile of carbon monoxide (CO) from its total column using data assimilation. The main motivation of this study is twofold. First, to deduce both the vertical CO profiles and the assimilated CO fields with good confidence. Second, for chemical species that can be measured only as the total column, this method provides an attractive alternative for estimating their vertical profiles in the troposphere. We choose version 3 (V3) of MOPITT CO total columns to validate the proposed method. MOPITT has the advantage of providing both the vertical profiles and the total columns of CO. Furthermore, this version has been extensively validated by comparison with many independent datasets, and has been used in many scientific studies. The first step of the paper consists in the specification of the observation errors based on the Chi-square (χ2) test. The observations have been binned according to day, night, land and sea (LAND_DAY, LAND_NIGHT and SEA, respectively). The respective optimal observation error values for which the χ2 metric is the closest to 1 are: 7%, 8% and 11% for SEA, LAND_DAY and LAND_NIGHT, respectively. In a second step, the CO total column, with its specified errors, is used within the assimilation system to estimate the vertical profiles. These are validated by comparison with vertical profiles of MOPITT V3 retrievals at global and regional scales. Generally, both datasets show similar patterns and good agreement at both global and regional scales. Nevertheless, the total column analyses (TOTCOL_ANALYSES) slightly overestimate CO concentrations compared to MOPITT observations. In a third step, vertical profiles calculated from TOTCOL_ANALYSES have been compared to those calculated from the assimilation of MOPITT V3 vertical profiles (PROFILE_ANALYSES). Both datasets shows very good agreement, but TOTCOL_ANALYSES tend to slightly overestimate CO concentrations. The mean bias between

  10. Vertical AMS variation within basalt flow profiles from the Xitle volcano (Mexico) as indicator of heterogeneous strain in lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; González-Rangel, J. A.; Gogitchaishvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Kontny, A.

    2016-02-01

    The within-flow vertical variation of anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of three basaltic flow profiles from the Xitle volcano were investigated in relation to the lava flow-induced shear strain. Rock magnetic properties and opaque microscopy studies have shown that the magnetic mineralogy is dominated by Ti-poor magnetite with subtle vertical variations in grain size distribution: PSD grains dominate in a thin bottommost zone, and from base to top from PSD-MD to PSD-SD grains are found. The vertical variation of AMS principal direction patterns permitted identification of two to three main lava zones, some subdivided into subzones. The lower zone is very similar in all profiles with the magnetic foliation dipping toward the flow source, whereas the upper zone has magnetic foliation dipping toward the flow direction or alternates between dipping against and toward the flow direction. The K1 (maximum AMS axis) directions tend to be mostly parallel to the flow direction in both zones. The middle zone shows AMS axes diverging among profiles. We present heterogeneous strain ellipse distribution models for different flow velocities assuming similar viscosity to explain the AMS directions and related parameters of each zone. Irregular vertical foliations and transverse to flow lineation of a few samples at the bottommost and topmost part of profiles suggest SD inverse fabric, levels of intense friction, or degassing effects in AMS orientations.

  11. A Vertical Grid Module for Baroclinic Models of the Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, John B [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The vertical grid of an atmospheric model assigns dynamic and thermo- dynamic variables to grid locations. The vertical coordinate is typically not height but one of a class of meteorological variables that vary with atmo- spheric conditions. The grid system is chosen to further numerical approx- imations of the boundary conditions so that the system is terrain following at the surface. Lagrangian vertical coordinates are useful in reducing the numerical errors from advection processes. That the choices will effect the numercial properties and accuracy is explored in this report. A MATLAB class for Lorentz vertical grids is described and applied to the vertical struc- ture equation and baroclinic atmospheric circulation. A generalized meteo- rolgoical coordinate system is developed which can support σ, isentropic θ vertical coordinate, or Lagrangian vertical coordinates. The vertical atmo- spheric column is a MATLAB class that includes the kinematic and ther- modynamic variables along with methods for computing geopoentials and terms relevant to a 3D baroclinc atmospheric model.

  12. Vertical dissipation profiles and the photosphere location in thin and slim accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sadovskii, A; Bursa, M; Kluzniak, W; Rozanska, A

    2009-01-01

    We calculate optically thick but geometrically thin (and slim) accretion disk models and perform a ray-tracing of photons (in the Kerr geometry) to calculate the observed disk spectra. Previously, it was a common practice to ray-trace photons assuming that they are emitted from the Kerr geometry equatorial plane, z = 0. We show that the spectra calculated with this assumption differ from these calculated under the assumption that photons are emitted from the actual surface of the disc, z = H(r). This implies that a knowledge of the location of the thin disks effective photosphere is relevant for calculating the spectra. In this paper we investigate, in terms of a simple toy model, a possible influence of the (unknown, and therefore ad hoc assumed) vertical dissipation profiles on the vertical structure of the disk and thus on the location of the effective photosphere, and on the observed spectra. For disks with moderate and high mass accretion rates (\\dot m>0.01\\dot m_C) we find that the photosphere location ...

  13. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  14. Tropospheric mercury vertical profiles between 500 and 10 000 m in central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Andreas; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Pirrone, Nicola; Bieser, Johannes; Bödewadt, Jan; Esposito, Giulio; Slemr, Franz; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of the vertical distribution of atmospheric mercury (Hg) plays an important role in determining the transport and cycling of mercury. However, measurements of the vertical distribution are rare, because airborne measurements are expensive and labour intensive. Consequently, only a few vertical Hg profile measurements have been reported since the 1970s. Besides the Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container (CARIBIC) observations, the latest vertical profile over Europe was measured in 1996. Within the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, four vertical profiles were taken on board research aircraft (CASA-212) in August 2013 in background air over different locations in Slovenia and Germany. Each vertical profile consists of at least seven 5 min horizontal flight sections from 500 m above ground to 3000 m a.s.l. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and total gaseous mercury (TGM) were measured with Tekran 2537X and Tekran 2537B analysers. In addition to the mercury measurements, SO2, CO, O3, NO, and NO2, basic meteorological parameters (pressure, temperature, relative humidity) have been measured. Additional ground-based mercury measurements at the GMOS master site in Waldhof, Germany and measurements onboard the CARIBIC passenger aircraft were used to extend the profile to the ground and upper troposphere respectively. No vertical gradient was found inside the well-mixed boundary layer (variation of less than 0.1 ng m-3) at different sites, with GEM varying from location to location between 1.4 and 1.6 ng m-3 (standard temperature and pressure, STP: T = 273.15 K, p = 1013.25 hPa). At all locations GEM dropped to 1.3 ng m-3 (STP) when entering the free troposphere and remained constant at higher altitudes. The combination of the vertical profile, measured on 21 August 2013 over Leipzig, Germany, with the CARIBIC measurements during ascent and descent to Frankfurt Airport, Germany, taken at

  15. Vertical profile and aerosol size distribution measurements in Iceland (LOAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Vignelles, Damien; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Cold climate and high latitudes regions contain important dust sources where dust is frequently emitted, foremost from glacially-derived sediments of riverbeds or ice-proximal areas (Arnalds, 2010; Bullard, 2013). Iceland is probably the most active dust source in the arctic/sub-arctic region (Dagsson-Waldhauserova, 2013). The frequency of days with suspended dust exceeds 34 dust days annually. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin; it is very dark in colour and contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles. Such properties allow even large particles to be easily transported long distances. Thus, there is a need to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of these dusts. Two launch campaigns of the Light Optical Aerosols Counter (LOAC) were conducted in Iceland with meteorological balloons. LOAC use a new optical design that allows to retrieve the size concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 microm, and to provide an estimate of the main nature of aerosols. Vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere was studied in detail. The July 2011 launch represented clean non-dusty season with low winds while the November 2013 launch was conducted during the high winds after dusty period. For the winter flight (performed from Reykjavik), the nature of aerosols strongly changed with altitude. In particular, a thin layer of volcanic dust was observed at an altitude of 1 km. Further LOAC measurements are needed to understand the implication of Icelandic dust to the Arctic warming and climate change. A new campaign of LAOC launches is planned for May 2014. Reference: Arnalds, O., 2010. Dust sources and deposition of aeolian materials in Iceland. Icelandic Agricultural Sciences 23, 3-21. Bullard, J.E., 2013. Contemporary glacigenic inputs to the dust cycle. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 71-89. Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Arnalds O., Olafsson H. 2013. Long-term frequency and characteristics of dust storm events in

  16. Vertical profiles of urban aerosol complex refractive index in the frame of ESQUIF airborne measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Raut

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A synergy between lidar, sunphotometer and in situ measurements has been applied to airborne observations performed during the Etude et Simulation de la QUalité de l'air en Ile-de-France (ESQUIF, enabling the retrieval of vertical profiles for the aerosol complex refractive index (ACRI and single-scattering albedo with a vertical resolution of 200 m over Paris area. The averaged value over the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL for the ACRI is close to 1.51(±0.02–i0.017(±0.003 at 532 nm. The single-scattering albedo of the corresponding aerosols is found to be ~0.9 at the same wavelength. A good agreement is found with previous studies for urban aerosols. A comparison of vertical profiles of ACRI with simulations combining in situ measurements and relative humidity (RH profiles has highlighted a modification in aerosol optical properties linked to their history and the origin of the air mass. The determination of ACRI in the atmospheric column enabled to retrieve vertical profiles of extinction coefficient in accordance with lidar profiles measurements.

  17. Estimating the vertical profiles of cloud water content in warm rain clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Guo, Jingchao; Fu, Yufei; Min, Qinlong; Wang, Yu; Gao, Xiaoming; Dong, Xue

    2017-04-01

    The cloud water content (CWC) in rainy clouds is a crucial parameter to determine the onset and the growth rate of precipitation, and to quantify the associated latent heating rate. No direct retrieval of CWC in rainy cloud from satellite observations is reported due to the difficulties of separating cloud particles from precipitation sized particles. However, based on multiple cloud simulations from the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model, we have found that the CWC profile in warm rains can be well determined by three macro-physical cloud properties of cloud water path (CWP), cloud top height (CTH), and cloud bottom height (CBH). The CBH can be estimated using CWP, CTH and near surface rain rate. We proposed an algorithm with a lookup table for estimating the CWC profile using CWP, CTH and near surface rain rate as inputs. The performance of this algorithm was tested with WRF model simulations and a real drizzle case observed by the CloudSat satellite. Testing verified that the algorithm can retrieve the vertical distribution of CWC correctly with few errors at different spatiotemporal scales. In addition, the algorithm is not confined to particular microphysics schemes and is valid for multiple cloud systems in different areas over the world. This algorithm is expected to improve current knowledge of cloud water content in rainy clouds.

  18. Analytical solution for the vertical profile of daily production in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Žarko; Platt, Trevor; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Morović, Mira

    2016-05-01

    Photosynthesis parameters are routinely estimated from in vitro measurements of primary production under constant light reaching each incubation bottle, by fitting a photosynthesis-irradiance function to the measurements. Here we take one such function and integrate it in time for variable light input, similar to natural conditions, to obtain the analytical solution for the vertical profile of daily phytoplankton production in the field. This solution is then fitted to in situ measurements of primary production profiles in the same manner as a photosynthesis-irradiance function is fitted to in vitro measurements under controlled and constant light conditions to retrieve the photosynthesis-irradiance parameters. The method is tested on the Hawaii Ocean Time-series data set. The solution explained 97.88% of the variance in measured normalized production at individual depths. The recovered parameters were then used to model the normalized daily water-column production. The model explained 99.21% of variance in normalized watercolumn production of the entire data set. The seasonal cycle of the photosynthesis parameters recovered with the analytical solution was further studied for the Hawaii Ocean Time-series. With respect to the photosynthesis parameter determination, the solution bridges the gap between classical photosynthesis-irradiance measurements under controlled light conditions and in situ measurements which are made under natural, variable light conditions. It presents a new tool for the estimation of photosynthesis parameters from in situ measurements of primary production.

  19. Convection Fingerprints on the Vertical Profiles of Q1 and Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Lin, H.; Chou, C.

    2013-12-01

    Different types of tropical convection left their fingerprints on vertical structures of apparent heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2). Profile of deep convection on condensation heating and drying has been well-documented, yet direct assessment of shallow convection remains to be explored. Shallow convection prevails over subtropical ocean, where large-scale subsidence is primarily balanced by radiative cooling and moistening due to surface evaporation instead of moist convection. In this study a united framework is designed to investigate the vertical structures of tropical marine convections in three reanalysis data, including ERA-Interim, MERRA, and CFSR. It starts by sorting and binning data from the lightest to the heaviest rain. Then the differences between two neighboring bins are used to examine the direct effects for precipitation change, in light of the fact that non-convective processes would change slowly from bin to bin. It is shown that all three reanalyses reveal the shallow convective processes in light rain bins, featured by re-evaporating and detraining at the top of boundary layer and lower free troposphere. For heavy rain bins, three reanalyses mainly differ in their numbers and altitudes of heating and drying peaks, implying no universal agreement has been reached on partitioning of cloud populations. Coherent variations in temperature, moisture, and vertical motion are also discussed. This approach permits a systematical survey and comparison of tropical convection in GCM-type models, and preliminary studies of three reanalyses suggest certain degree of inconsistency in simulated convective feedback to large-scale heat and moisture budgets.

  20. Vertical Profiles of Ammonia in the Colorado Front Range: Impacts of Source Region and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, A.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Ortega, J. V.; Smith, J. N.; Brophy, P.; Kirkland, J.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Wolfe, D. E.; Dube, W. P.; McDuffie, E. E.; Brown, S. S.; Zaragoza, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Murphy, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in aerosol particle formation and growth, as well as in nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. However, significant uncertainties are associated with the distribution and strength of emission sources, and many of the processes that control its atmospheric fate are not fully understood. The high density of agricultural and urban sources located in close proximity to more pristine mountainous areas to the west make the Colorado Front Range a unique area for studying atmospheric ammonia. The meteorology of the region, where heavy monsoon rains can be followed by rapid evaporation, can also impact surface-atmosphere partitioning of ammonia. As part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ), vertical profiles of ammonia were measured throughout the boundary layer aboard a moveable platform on the 300 m Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) tower. Changes in ammonia concentration and its vertical structure were driven not only by changes in wind direction and estimated source region, but also by fluctuations in surface and atmosphere water content. For example, large increases in atmospheric ammonia mixing ratios were observed following rain events. This may be explained by surface-atmosphere exchange of wet-deposited ammonia associated with rapid evaporation following the event, and likely impacts particle formation. This may also play a role in transport from ammonia-rich agricultural areas towards the mountainous regions to the west during periods of upslope flow. The vertical ammonia concentration gradients observed throughout the structured early morning boundary layer also provide insight into the possible causes of early morning spikes in ammonia - a phenomenon that has been well-documented in many other locations. A box model was used to assess the relative importance of surface emissions due to the evaporation of morning dew versus entrainment of ammonia-rich air from above the

  1. Characterizing Leaf Area Index (LAI and Vertical Foliage Profile (VFP over the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI and vertical foliage profile (VFP are among the important canopy structural variables. Recent advances in lidar remote sensing technology have demonstrated the capability of accurately mapping LAI and VFP over large areas. The primary objective of this study was to derive and validate a LAI and VFP product over the contiguous United States using spaceborne waveform lidar data. This product was derived at the footprint level from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS using a biophysical model. We validated GLAS derived LAI and VFP across major forest biomes using airborne waveform lidar. The comparison results showed that GLAS retrievals of total LAI were generally accurate with little bias (r2 = 0.67, bias = −0.13, RMSE = 0.75. The derivations of GLAS retrievals of VFP within layers was not as accurate overall (r2 = 0.36, bias = −0.04, RMSE = 0.26, and these varied as a function of height, increasing from understory to overstory −0 to 5 m layer: r2 = 0.04, bias = 0.09, RMSE = 0.31; 10 to 15 m layer: r2 = 0.53, bias = −0.08, RMSE = 0.22; and 15 to 20 m layer: r2 = 0.66, bias =−0.05, RMSE = 0.20. Significant relationships were also found between GLAS LAI products and different environmental factors, in particular elevation and annual precipitation. In summary, our results provide a unique insight into vertical canopy structure distribution across North American ecosystems. This data set is a first step towards a baseline of canopy structure needed for evaluating climate and land use induced forest changes at continental scale in the future and should help deepen our understanding of the role of vertical canopy structure on terrestrial ecosystem processes across varying scales.

  2. Characterizing leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) over the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H.; Ganguly, S.; Zhang, G.; Hofton, M. A.; Nelson, R. F.; Dubayah, R.

    2016-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and vertical foliage profile (VFP) are among the important canopy structural variables. Recent advances in lidar remote sensing technology have demonstrated the capability of accurately mapping LAI and VFP over large areas. The primary objective of this study was to derive and validate a LAI and VFP product over the contiguous United States (CONUS) using spaceborne waveform lidar data. This product was derived at the footprint level from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) using a biophysical model. We validated GLAS-derived LAI and VFP across major forest biomes using airborne waveform lidar. The comparison results showed that GLAS retrievals of total LAI were generally accurate with little bias (r2 = 0.67, bias = -0.13, RMSE = 0.75). The derivations of GLAS retrievals of VFP within layers were not as accurate overall (r2 = 0.36, bias = -0.04, RMSE = 0.26), and these varied as a function of height, increasing from understory to overstory - 0 to 5 m layer: r2 = 0.04, bias = 0.09, RMSE = 0.31; 10 to 15 m layer: r2 = 0.53, bias = -0.08, RMSE = 0.22; and 15 to 20 m layer: r2 = 0.66, bias = -0.05, RMSE = 0.20. Significant relationships were also found between GLAS LAI products and different environmental factors, in particular elevation and annual precipitation. In summary, our results provide a unique insight into vertical canopy structure distribution across North American ecosystems. This data set is a first step towards a baseline of canopy structure needed for evaluating climate and land use induced forest changes at the continental scale in the future, and should help deepen our understanding of the role of vertical canopy structure in terrestrial ecosystem processes across varying scales.

  3. Effects of vertical shear in modelling horizontal oceanic dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanotte, A. S.; Corrado, R.; Palatella, L.; Pizzigalli, C.; Schipa, I.; Santoleri, R.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of the South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observation and model data. In situ current measurements reveal that vertical gradients of horizontal velocities in the upper mixing layer decorrelate quite fast ( ˜ 1 day), whereas an eddy-permitting ocean model, such as the Mediterranean Forecasting System, tends to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispersion, simulated by the Mediterranean sea Forecasting System, is mostly affected by: (1) unresolved scale motions, and mesoscale motions that are largely smoothed out at scales close to the grid spacing; (2) poorly resolved time variability in the profiles of the horizontal velocities in the upper layer. For the case study we have analysed, we show that a suitable use of deterministic kinematic parametrizations is helpful to implement realistic statistical features of tracer dispersion in two and three dimensions. The approach here suggested provides a functional tool to control the horizontal spreading of small organisms or substance concentrations, and is thus relevant for marine biology, pollutant dispersion as well as oil spill applications.

  4. Vertical shear instability in accretion disc models with radiation transport

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, Moritz H R

    2014-01-01

    The origin of turbulence in accretion discs is still not fully understood. While the magneto-rotational instability is considered to operate in sufficiently ionized discs, its role in the poorly ionized protoplanetary disc is questionable. Recently, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has been suggested as a possible alternative. Our goal is to study the characteristics of this instability and the efficiency of angular momentum transport, in extended discs, under the influence of radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. We use multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to model a larger section of an accretion disc. First we study inviscid and weakly viscous discs using a fixed radial temperature profile in two and three spatial dimensions. The simulations are then extended to include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. In agreement with previous studies we find for the isothermal disc a sustained unstable state with a weak positive angular momentum transport of the o...

  5. Sensitivity of simulated wintertime Arctic atmosphere to vertical resolution in the ARPEGE/IFS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrkjedal, Oeyvind [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway); Kjeller Vindteknikk, PO-Box 122, Kjeller (Norway); Esau, Igor [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway); Kvamstoe, Nils G. [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway)

    2008-06-15

    The current state-of-the-art general circulation models, including several of those used by the IPCC, show considerable biases in the simulated present day high-latitude climate compared to observations and reanalysis data. These biases are most pronounced during the winter season. We here employ ideal vertical profiles of temperature and wind from turbulence-resolving simulations to perform a priori studies of the first-order eddy-viscosity closure scheme employed in the ARPEGE/IFS model. This reveals that the coarse vertical resolution (31 layers) of the model cannot be expected to realistically resolve the Arctic stable boundary layer. The curvature of the Arctic inversion and thus also the vertical turbulent-exchange processes cannot be reproduced by the coarse vertical mesh employed. To investigate how turbulent vertical exchange processes in the Arctic boundary layer are represented by the model parameterization, a simulation with high vertical resolution (90 layers in total) in the lower troposphere is performed. Results from the model simulations are validated against data from the ERA-40 reanalysis. The dependence of the surface air temperature on surface winds, surface energy fluxes, free atmosphere stability and boundary layer height is investigated. The coarse-resolution run reveals considerable biases in these parameters, and in their physical relations to surface air temperature. In the simulation with fine vertical resolution, these biases are clearly reduced. The physical relation between governing parameters for the vertical turbulent-exchange processes improves in comparison with ERA-40 data. (orig.)

  6. Effect of diurnal cycle in anthropogenic emissions on the vertical profile of black carbon over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govardhan, G.; Nanjundiah, R. S.; Satheesh, S.

    2013-12-01

    South Asian region is considered to be a regional hot spot for natural as well as anthropogenic aerosols viz. mineral dust, black carbon (BC), organic matter and so on. Vehicular and industrial emissions, forest fires, biomass burning for agricultural purposes and cooking are the main sources for the carbonaceous aerosols over the region. On the other hand, seasonal wind patterns over the region are the mainly responsible for the abundance of the mineral dust. Climate impact of large aerosol abundance on the regional climate has been a topic of interest during the last decade. The anthropogenic aerosols over the region have a diurnal variation owing to their sources (vehicular and industrial emissions). In this study, we have analysed the effect of diurnal cycle in emissions on the overall meteorology and the aerosols' concentrations over the region. We have used the version 3.3 of the online chemistry transport model WRF-Chem for this study. The model simulations for control runs (No diurnal emission cycle for anthropogenic aerosols i.e. constant emissions) and sensitivity runs (diurnal cycle for anthropogenic aerosols) are done for the 3 selected months of 2011 viz. May, October and December. From the results it has been observed that, the monthly mean vertical profile of BC over the selected 18 stations (urban+semi-urban+rural) is significantly affected by the inclusion of the diurnal cycle in the emissions. The changes in BC mass concentration are more than 60% over a few of the selected stations. The effect of diurnal cycle in emissions on the vertical profile of BC is more prominent in May than in October and December. In May, the noteworthy changes in BC mass concentrations occur within 3-8 km. Additionally, the effect of the diurnal cycle in emissions is seen on the vertical profile of BC over the selected oceanic regions as well. The back trajectory analysis of our model data with HYSPLIT model indicates the changes in the overall wind directions

  7. Comparison of NO2 vertical profiles from satellite and ground based measurements over Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Pavan; Bortoli, Daniele; Costa, Maria João; Silva, Ana Maria; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    The Intercomparison of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical profiles, derived from the satellite based HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) measurements and from the ground based UV-VIS spectrometer GASCOD (Gas Analyzer Spectrometer Correlating Optical Differences) observations at the Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS), in Antarctica, are done for the first time. It is shown here that both datasets are in good agreement showing the same features in terms of magnitude, profile structure, a...

  8. Impact of the vertical emission profiles on background gas-phase pollution simulated from the EMEP emissions over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mailler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Five one-year air quality simulations over a domain covering Europe have been performed using the CHIMERE chemistry transport model and the EMEP emission dataset for Europe. These five simulations differ only by the representation of the effective emission heights for anthropogenic emissions: one has been run using the EMEP standard recommendations, three others with vertical injection profiles derived from the EMEP recommendations but multiplying the injection height by 0.75, 0.50 and 0.25, respectively, while the last one uses vertical profiles derived from the recent literature. It is shown that using injection heights lower than the EMEP recommendations leads to significantly improved simulation of background SO2, NO2 and O3 concentrations when compared to the Airbase station measurements.

  9. Concept of spinsonde for multi-cycle measurement of vertical wind profile of tropical cyclones

    CERN Document Server

    Poh, Chung-How

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclones and cyclogenesis are active areas of research. Chute-operated dropsondes jointly developed by NASA and NCAR are capable of acquiring high resolution vertical wind profile of tropical cyclones. This paper proposes a chute-free vertical retardation technique (termed as spinsonde) that can accurately measure vertical wind profile. Unlike the expendable dropsondes, the spinsonde allows multi-cycle measurement to be performed within a single flight. Proof of principle is demonstrated using a simulation software and results indicate that the GPS ground speed correlates with the wind speeds to within +/-5 km/h. This technique reduces flying weight and increases payload capacity by eliminating bulky chutes. Maximum cruising speed (Vh) achieved by the spinsonde UAV is 372 km/h.

  10. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T.F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Baltink, H.K.; Henzing, J.S.; Größ,, J.; Gobbi, G.P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M.C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol particles hygroscopic properties, their mixing state as well as chemical composition were measured above northern Italy and the Netherlands. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; for chemical composition) and a white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer

  11. One Year of Vertical Wind Profiles Measurements at a Mediterranean Coastal Site of South Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calidonna, Claudia Roberta; Gullì, Daniel; Avolio, Elenio

    2015-01-01

    To exploit wind energy both onshore and offshore in coastal area the effect of the coastal discontinuity is important. The shape of the vertical wind profiles and the related c parameter of the Weibull distribution are impacted by the atmospheric internal boundary layers developing from the coast...

  12. Vertical profile measurements of carbonylsulfide in the stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, A.; Schmidt, U.

    Measurements of COS in the altitude region between 17 and 30 km were made, using a whole air sampling technique with subsequent gaschromatographic analysis. The data show COS mixing-ratios from about 200 pptv at 17 km decreasing to less then 20 pptv at about 28 km. This behaviour is in qualitative agreement with the model-calculations by Turco et al. (1981). From the correlation with CFCl3 and CF2Cl2 the lifetime with respect to removal in the stratosphere is calculated to be 69±28 years. This corresponds to a sink of between 47 and 112 * 109 g of COS per year in the stratosphere. Comparing this number to the estimated fluxes needed to sustain the background sulfuric-acid aerosol confirms that most of the non-volcanic aerosol is produced by the oxidation of COS in the stratosphere.

  13. Measurement of a small vertical emittance with a laser wire beam profile monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakai

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe in this paper a measurement of vertical emittance in the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF damping ring at KEK with a laser wire beam profile monitor. This monitor is based on the Compton scattering process of electrons with a laser light target which is produced by injecting a cw laser beam into a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We installed the monitor at a straight section of the damping ring and measured the vertical emittance with three different ring conditions. In all cases, the ATF ring was operated at 1.28 GeV in a single bunch mode. When the ring was tuned for ultralow emittance, the vertical emittance of ε_{y}=(1.18±0.08×10^{-11}   mrad was achieved. This shows that the ATF damping ring has realized its target value also vertically.

  14. Cloud vertical distribution from radiosonde, remote sensing, and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Li, Zhanqing; Chen, Hongbin; Yoo, Hyelim; Cribb, Maureen

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of cloud vertical structure is important for meteorological and climate studies due to the impact of clouds on both the Earth's radiation budget and atmospheric adiabatic heating. Yet it is among the most difficult quantities to observe. In this study, we develop a long-term (10 years) radiosonde-based cloud profile product over the Southern Great Plains and along with ground-based and space-borne remote sensing products, use it to evaluate cloud layer distributions simulated by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction global forecast system (GFS) model. The primary objective of this study is to identify advantages and limitations associated with different cloud layer detection methods and model simulations. Cloud occurrence frequencies are evaluated on monthly, annual, and seasonal scales. Cloud vertical distributions from all datasets are bimodal with a lower peak located in the boundary layer and an upper peak located in the high troposphere. In general, radiosonde low-level cloud retrievals bear close resemblance to the ground-based remote sensing product in terms of their variability and gross spatial patterns. The ground-based remote sensing approach tends to underestimate high clouds relative to the radiosonde-based estimation and satellite products which tend to underestimate low clouds. As such, caution must be exercised to use any single product. Overall, the GFS model simulates less low-level and more high-level clouds than observations. In terms of total cloud cover, GFS model simulations agree fairly well with the ground-based remote sensing product. A large wet bias is revealed in GFS-simulated relative humidity fields at high levels in the atmosphere.

  15. Vertical profiles of the specific surface area of the snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific surface area (SSA of snow determines in Part the albedo of snow surfaces and the capacity of the snow to adsorb chemical species and catalyze reactions. Despite these crucial roles, almost no value of snow SSA are available for the largest permanent snow expanse on Earth, the Antarctic. We have measured the first vertical profiles of snow SSA near Dome C (DC: 75°06´ S, 123°20´ E, 3233 m a.s.l. on the Antarctic plateau, and at seven sites during the logistical traverse between Dome C and the French coastal base Dumont D'Urville (DDU: 66°40´ S, 140°01´ E during the Austral summer 2008–2009. We used the DUFISSS system, which measures the IR reflectance of snow at 1310 nm with an integrating sphere. At DC, the mean SSA of the snow in the top 1 cm is 38 m2 kg−1, decreasing monotonically to 14 m2 kg−1 at a depth of 15 cm. Along the traverse, the snow SSA profile is similar to that at DC in the first 600 km from DC. Closer to DDU, the SSA of the top 5 cm is 23 m2 kg−1, decreasing to 19 m2 kg−1 at 50 cm depth. This is attributed to wind, which causes a rapid decrease of surface snow SSA, but forms hard windpacks whose SSA decrease more slowly with time. Since light-absorbing impurities are not concentrated enough to affect albedo, the vertical profiles of SSA and density were used to calculate the spectral albedo of the snow for several realistic illumination conditions, using the DISORT radiative transfer model. A preliminary comparison with MODIS data is presented for use in energy balance calculations and for comparison with other satellite retrievals. These calculated albedos are compared to the few existing measurements on the Antarctic plateau. The interest of postulating a submillimetric, high-SSA layer at the snow surface to explain measured albedos is discussed.

  16. Retrieval of Vertical LAI Profiles Over Tropical Rain Forests using Waveform Lidar at La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Dubayah, Ralph; Swatantra, Anu; Hofton, Michelle; Sheldon, Sage; Clark, David B.; Blair, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the potential of waveform lidar in mapping the vertical and spatial distributions of leaf area index (LAI) over the tropical rain forest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Vertical profiles of LAI were derived at 0.3 m height intervals from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data using the Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model. Cumulative LAI profiles obtained from LVIS were validated with data from 55 ground to canopy vertical transects using a modular field tower to destructively sample all vegetation. Our results showed moderate agreement between lidar and field derived LAI (r2=0.42, RMSE=1.91, bias=-0.32), which further improved when differences between lidar and tower footprint scales (r2=0.50, RMSE=1.79, bias=0.27) and distance of field tower from lidar footprint center (r2=0.63, RMSE=1.36, bias=0.0) were accounted for. Next, we mapped the spatial distribution of total LAI across the landscape and analyzed LAI variations over different land cover types. Mean values of total LAI were 1.74, 5.20, 5.41 and 5.62 over open pasture, secondary forests, regeneration forests after selective-logging and old-growth forests respectively. Lastly, we evaluated the sensitivities of our LAI retrieval model to variations in canopy/ground reflectance ratio and to waveform noise such as induced by topographic slopes. We found for both, that the effects were not significant for moderate LAI values (about 4). However model derivations of LAI might be inaccurate in areas of high-slope and high LAI (about 8) if ground return energies are low. This research suggests that large footprint waveform lidar can provide accurate vertical LAI profile estimates that do not saturate even at the high LAI levels in tropical rain forests and may be a useful tool for understanding the light transmittance within these canopies.

  17. Retrieval of Vertical LAI Profiles Over Tropical Rain Forests using Waveform Lidar at La Selva, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Dubayah, Ralph; Swatantra, Anu; Hofton, Michelle; Sheldon, Sage; Clark, David B.; Blair, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the potential of waveform lidar in mapping the vertical and spatial distributions of leaf area index (LAI) over the tropical rain forest of La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Vertical profiles of LAI were derived at 0.3 m height intervals from the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data using the Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model. Cumulative LAI profiles obtained from LVIS were validated with data from 55 ground to canopy vertical transects using a modular field tower to destructively sample all vegetation. Our results showed moderate agreement between lidar and field derived LAI (r2=0.42, RMSE=1.91, bias=-0.32), which further improved when differences between lidar and tower footprint scales (r2=0.50, RMSE=1.79, bias=0.27) and distance of field tower from lidar footprint center (r2=0.63, RMSE=1.36, bias=0.0) were accounted for. Next, we mapped the spatial distribution of total LAI across the landscape and analyzed LAI variations over different land cover types. Mean values of total LAI were 1.74, 5.20, 5.41 and 5.62 over open pasture, secondary forests, regeneration forests after selective-logging and old-growth forests respectively. Lastly, we evaluated the sensitivities of our LAI retrieval model to variations in canopy/ground reflectance ratio and to waveform noise such as induced by topographic slopes. We found for both, that the effects were not significant for moderate LAI values (about 4). However model derivations of LAI might be inaccurate in areas of high-slope and high LAI (about 8) if ground return energies are low. This research suggests that large footprint waveform lidar can provide accurate vertical LAI profile estimates that do not saturate even at the high LAI levels in tropical rain forests and may be a useful tool for understanding the light transmittance within these canopies.

  18. Using the IODP Expedition 312 Vertical Seismic Profile to Investigate Sub-basement Reflections in Multi-Channel Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, S.; Swift, S. A.; Stephen, R. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) initiated drilling at Site 1256D in the Guatemala Basin, about 1000km off the East Pacific Rise to penetrate plutonic rocks, anticipated to be relatively shallow in this region formed at an ultra- fast spreading rate. IODP Expedition E312 successfully drilled into gabbros at ~ 1150m in basement. Multi- channel seismic traces, although not processed for the purpose, show weak laterally-coherent sub-basement reflections at borehole depths (Hallenborg et. al., Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 108 No. B11, 2532, 2003). Synthetic reflectivity seismograms were computed using a Ricker wavelet and impedance profiles from borehole sonic logs. They strongly suggest the presence of significant sub-basement amplitude peaks - although attenuation has not been modeled. Zero-offset vertical seismic profiles were processed to investigate the authenticity of these reflections and interpret the geological features that caused them. A dual scheme of the median filtering and F-K dip filtering was used. Down-going energy is clearly identified but negligible up-going energy is visible over random noise. The absence of geophones above the basement prevents comparison of basement reflections with sub-basement ones, so that a critical energy level above the noise could be established to identify up-going energy. The negative results are consistent with the topography of geological horizons on horizontal scales less than the Fresnel Zone (~ 300m). This expedition is the first penetration through volcanic extrusives and dikes into plutonic basement. In such a setting, sub-basement reflections, if present, would have been accurately measured. Absence of such clear and comprehensible observations in this area strongly suggests that lava flows and igneous contacts in upper ocean crust have significant topography on lateral scales < 300 m due to igneous and tectonic processes.

  19. Verification of the Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model During Fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, K.L.; Leeuw, G. de; Gathman, S.G.; Jensen, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) has been formulated to estimate the vertical structure of the optical and infrared extinction coefficients in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), for waverengths between 0,2 and 40 um. NOVAM was designed to predict, utilizing a set of routin

  20. CREATING EFFECTIVE MODELS OF VERTICAL INTEGRATED STRUCTURES IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Koliesnikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of scientific research aimed at development of methodology-theoretical mechanisms of building the effective models of vertically-integrated structures are presented. A presence of vertically-integrated structures on natural-monopolistic markets at private and governmental sectors of economy and priority directions of integration are given.

  1. Magnetic depth profile in GaMnAs layers with vertically graded Mn concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, J., E-mail: leinerjc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kirby, B.J. [Center for Neutron Research, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Fitzsimmons, M.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tivakornsasithorn, K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol Univeristy, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K.; Dobrowolska, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Controlled vertical grading of magnetization of the ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs represents a significant step toward optimizing its magnetic properties for device applications. Quantitative control of such grading is difficult due to various competing effects, such as Mn diffusion, self-annealing, and diffusion of charge carriers. Furthermore, there are also several surface effects that can influence the magnetization profile, which should be considered in designing and fabricating graded GaMnAs specimens. However, we show that vertical magnetization gradients in GaMnAs layers can be readily achieved by appropriate growth strategies. In this paper we describe the preparation, magnetization measurements, and polarized neutron reflectometry studies of vertically graded GaMnAs layers, which provide direct evidence that vertical grading of Mn concentration has been successfully achieved in our GaMnAs samples. Our measurements also indicate that these graded samples exhibit magnetic “hardening” near the surface. - Highlights: • Controlled vertical grading of the magnetization ferromagnetic semiconductors represents a significant step toward optimizing its magnetic properties for device applications. • Quantitative control of such grading is difficult due to various competing effects, such as Mn diffusion, self-annealing, and diffusion of charge carriers. • We show (via SQUID and Polarized Neutron Scattering) that vertical magnetization gradients in GaMnAs layers can be readily achieved by appropriate MBE growth strategies. • Our measurements also indicate that these graded samples exhibit magnetic “hardening” near the surface.

  2. Ground-based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertical resolution absolute humidity profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Verdejo, María; Crewell, Susanne; Löhnert, Ulrich; Orlandi, Emiliano; Di Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity profiles is important for many applications, e.g., assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. Nowadays there are a wide variety of ground-based sensors for atmospheric humidity profiling. Unfortunately there is no single instrument able to provide a measurement with complete vertical coverage, high vertical and temporal resolution and good performance under all weather conditions, simultaneously. For example, Raman lidar (RL) measurements can provide water vapor with a high vertical resolution, albeit with limited vertical coverage, due to sunlight contamination and the presence of clouds. Microwave radiometers (MWRs) receive water vapor information throughout the troposphere, though their vertical resolution is poor. In this work, we present an MWR and RL system synergy, which aims to overcome the specific sensor limitations. The retrieval algorithm combining these two instruments is an optimal estimation method (OEM), which allows for an uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information, taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied to a 2-month field campaign around Jülich (Germany), focusing on clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyze the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity uncertainty is reduced above the last usable lidar range by a factor of ˜ 2 with respect to the case where only RL measurements are used. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom per signal reveal that most information is gained above the usable lidar range, especially important during daytime when the lidar vertical coverage is limited. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using

  3. Direct comparisons of GOMOS and SAGE III NO3 vertical profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Moore

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present first global comparisons between the two unique satellite-borne data sets of NO3 vertical profiles retrieved from the GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by the Occultation of Stars stellar occultations and the SAGE III (Stratospheric Aerosols and Gas Experiment lunar occultations. The comparison results indicate that between the altitudes 25 km and 45 km the median difference between these two data sets is within ±25%. The study of zonal median profiles shows agreement between these data sets. The agreement is at its best in tropics and slightly deviating towards the poles.

  4. Study of vertical wind profiles in an urban area with complex terrain (Tehran)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Pegahfar; A A Bidokhti; P Zawar-reza; M M Farahani

    2011-10-01

    In this paper monthly trends of vertical wind profiles within and above an urban area with complex topography (Tehran) have been investigated using data from a Sodar, a 100-m and two 28-m towers and some surface stations. It includes the occurrence, evolution, dissipation time, peak time and maximum height for katabatic–anabatic winds due to topography, return flow and urban circulation. Vertical distributions of wind and the heat and momentum fluxes up to 600 m were also considered. The vertical wind profiles which have diurnal and seasonal variations show southwesterly daily anabatic wind and northeasterly nocturnal katabatic wind. Daily vertical wind profile structure which has two layers and two jets contains a decrease approximately at 300–400 m which may be due to the return flow and a daily thermal convective flow in the urban convergent terrain. At night the nocturnal wind profile structure, in the majority of months, has two layers and sometimes three layers containing northeasterly flows. In two layers structure, a decrease can be seen between two layers. In three layers structure, the middle layer has a different direction that indicates the return flow and urban circulation more clearly. Katabatic flows also develop in successive phases varying from 1 to 3 phases in different months. Investigation on surface wind demonstrates that in cold months a drainage flow from a valley located in the west of the station can affect wind speed and direction especially at evening transition time. These flow patterns can influence the way air pollutants disperse in this area.

  5. Gas Deliverability Model with Different Vertical Wells Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mucharam

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available We present here a gas deliverability computational model for single reservoir with multi wells. The questions of how long the gas delivery can be sustained and how to estimate the plateau time are discussed here. In order to answer such a question, in this case, a coupling method which consists of material balance method and gas flow equation method is developed by assuming no water influx in the reservoir. Given the rate and the minimum pressure of gas at the processing plant, the gas pressure at the wellhead and at the bottom hole can be obtained. From here, the estimation of the gas deliverability can be done. In this paper we obtain a computational method which gives direct computation for pressure drop from the processing plant to the wells, taking into account different well behavior. Here AOF technique is used for obtaining gas rate in each well. Further Tian & Adewumi correlation is applied for pressure drop model along vertical and horizontal pipes and Runge-Kutta method is chosen to compute the well head and bottom hole pressures in each well which then being used to estimate the plateau times. We obtain here direct computational scheme of gas deliverability from reservoir to processing plant for single reservoir with multi-wells properties. Computational results give different profiles (i.e. gas rate, plateau and production time, etc for each well. Further by selecting proper flow rate reduction, the flow distribution after plateau time to sustain the delivery is computed for each well.

  6. A Method for Modeling of Floating Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Moan, Torgeir

    2013-01-01

    . In order to assess the technical and economic feasibility of this novel concept, a comprehensive simulation tool for modeling of the floating vertical axis wind turbine is needed. This work presents the development of a coupled method for modeling of the dynamics of a floating vertical axis wind turbine......It is of interest to investigate the potential advantages of floating vertical axis wind turbine (FVAWT) due to its economical installation and maintenance. A novel 5MW vertical axis wind turbine concept with a Darrieus rotor mounted on a semi-submersible support structure is proposed in this paper....... This integrated dynamic model takes into account the wind inflow, aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, structural dynamics (wind turbine, floating platform and the mooring lines) and a generator control. This approach calculates dynamic equilibrium at each time step and takes account of the interaction between the rotor...

  7. Studying Vertical Microbiome Transmission from Mothers to Infants by Strain-Level Metagenomic Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Serena; Truong, Duy Tin; Armanini, Federica; Ferretti, Pamela; Gorfer, Valentina; Pedrotti, Anna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiome becomes shaped in the first days of life and continues to increase its diversity during the first months. Links between the configuration of the infant gut microbiome and infant health are being shown, but a comprehensive strain-level assessment of microbes vertically transmitted from mother to infant is still missing. We collected fecal and breast milk samples from multiple mother-infant pairs during the first year of life and applied shotgun metagenomic sequencing followed by computational strain-level profiling. We observed that several specific strains, including those of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Coprococcus comes, and Ruminococcus bromii, were present in samples from the same mother-infant pair, while being clearly distinct from those carried by other pairs, which is indicative of vertical transmission. We further applied metatranscriptomics to study the in vivo gene expression of vertically transmitted microbes and found that transmitted strains of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species were transcriptionally active in the guts of both adult and infant. By combining longitudinal microbiome sampling and newly developed computational tools for strain-level microbiome analysis, we demonstrated that it is possible to track the vertical transmission of microbial strains from mother to infants and to characterize their transcriptional activity. Our work provides the foundation for larger-scale surveys to identify the routes of vertical microbial transmission and its influence on postinfancy microbiome development. IMPORTANCE Early infant exposure is important in the acquisition and ultimate development of a healthy infant microbiome. There is increasing support for the idea that the maternal microbial reservoir is a key route of microbial transmission, and yet much is inferred from the observation of shared species in mother and infant. The presence of common species, per se, does not necessarily equate to vertical transmission, as

  8. Studying Vertical Microbiome Transmission from Mothers to Infants by Strain-Level Metagenomic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnicar, Francesco; Manara, Serena; Zolfo, Moreno; Truong, Duy Tin; Scholz, Matthias; Armanini, Federica; Ferretti, Pamela; Gorfer, Valentina; Pedrotti, Anna; Tett, Adrian; Segata, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiome becomes shaped in the first days of life and continues to increase its diversity during the first months. Links between the configuration of the infant gut microbiome and infant health are being shown, but a comprehensive strain-level assessment of microbes vertically transmitted from mother to infant is still missing. We collected fecal and breast milk samples from multiple mother-infant pairs during the first year of life and applied shotgun metagenomic sequencing followed by computational strain-level profiling. We observed that several specific strains, including those of Bifidobacterium bifidum, Coprococcus comes, and Ruminococcus bromii, were present in samples from the same mother-infant pair, while being clearly distinct from those carried by other pairs, which is indicative of vertical transmission. We further applied metatranscriptomics to study the in vivo gene expression of vertically transmitted microbes and found that transmitted strains of Bacteroides and Bifidobacterium species were transcriptionally active in the guts of both adult and infant. By combining longitudinal microbiome sampling and newly developed computational tools for strain-level microbiome analysis, we demonstrated that it is possible to track the vertical transmission of microbial strains from mother to infants and to characterize their transcriptional activity. Our work provides the foundation for larger-scale surveys to identify the routes of vertical microbial transmission and its influence on postinfancy microbiome development. IMPORTANCE Early infant exposure is important in the acquisition and ultimate development of a healthy infant microbiome. There is increasing support for the idea that the maternal microbial reservoir is a key route of microbial transmission, and yet much is inferred from the observation of shared species in mother and infant. The presence of common species, per se, does not necessarily equate to vertical transmission, as species

  9. The vertical structure of oceanic Rossby waves: a comparison of high-resolution model data to theoretical vertical structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Hunt

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tests of the new Rossby wave theories that have been developed over the past decade to account for discrepancies between theoretical wave speeds and those observed by satellite altimeters have focused primarily on the surface signature of such waves. It appears, however, that the surface signature of the waves acts only as a rather weak constraint, and that information on the vertical structure of the waves is required to better discriminate between competing theories.

    Due to the lack of 3-D observations, this paper uses high-resolution model data to construct realistic vertical structures of Rossby waves and compares these to structures predicted by theory. The meridional velocity of a section at 24° S in the Atlantic Ocean is pre-processed using the Radon transform to select the dominant westward signal. Normalized profiles are then constructed using three complementary methods based respectively on: (1 averaging vertical profiles of velocity, (2 diagnosing the amplitude of the Radon transform of the westward propagating signal at different depths, and (3 EOF analysis. These profiles are compared to profiles calculated using four different Rossby wave theories: standard linear theory (SLT, SLT plus mean flow, SLT plus topographic effects, and theory including mean flow and topographic effects.

    The model data supports the classical theoretical assumption that westward propagating signals have a well-defined vertical modal structure associated with a phase speed independent of depth, in contrast with the conclusions of a recent study using the same model. The model structures were surface intensified, with a sign reversal at depth in some regions, notably occurring at shallower depths in the East Atlantic. SLT provides a good fit to the model structures in the top 300 m, but grossly overestimates the sign reversal at depth. The addition of mean flow slightly improves the latter issue, but is too surface intensified. SLT plus

  10. Numerical determination of vertical water flux based on soil temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbagh, Alain; Cheviron, Bruno; Henine, Hocine; Guérin, Roger; Bechkit, Mohamed-Amine

    2017-07-01

    High sensitivity temperature sensors (0.001 K sensitivity Pt100 thermistors), positioned at intervals of a few centimetres along a vertical soil profile, allow temperature measurements to be made which are sensitive to water flux through the soil. The development of high data storage capabilities now makes it possible to carry out in situ temperature recordings over long periods of time. By directly applying numerical models of convective and conductive heat transfer to experimental data recorded as a function of depth and time, it is possible to calculate Darcy's velocity from the convection transfer term, thus allowing water infiltration/exfiltration through the soil to be determined as a function of time between fixed depths. In the present study we consider temperature data recorded at the Boissy-le-Châtel (Seine et Marne, France) experimental station between April 16th, 2009 and March 8th, 2010, at six different depths and 10-min time intervals. We make use of two numerical finite element models to solve the conduction/convection heat transfer equation and compare their merits. These two models allow us to calculate the corresponding convective flux rate every day using a group of three sensors. The comparison of the two series of calculated values centred at 24 cm shows reliable results for periods longer than 8 days. These results are transformed in infiltration/exfiltration value after determining the soil volumetric heat capacity. The comparison with the rainfall and evaporation data for periods of ten days shows a close accordance with the behaviour of the system governed by rainfall evaporation rate during winter and spring.

  11. Balloon measurements of the vertical ionization profile over southern Israel and comparison to mid-latitude observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Roy; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin; Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, Giles; Artamonov, Anton; Usoskin, Ilya

    2016-11-01

    Airborne measurements using meteorological balloons were conducted for the first time from southern Israel (geographic 30°35'N, 34°45'E geomagnetic 27°6'N 112°23'E) for measuring the vertical ionization profile during solar cycle 24. The results show the differences (increase of 30%) in count rates as we proceed from solar maximum toward solar minimum. The observed altitude of maximum ionization (the Regener-Pfotzer maximum) was between 17-20 km, and it agrees well with results from other simultaneous measurements conducted at different latitudes (Reading, UK and Zaragoza-Barcelona, Spain). When compared with predictions of an analytical model, we find a highly significant correlation (R2=0.97) between our observations and the computed ionization profiles. The difference in count rates can be attributed to the height of the tropopause due to the model using a US standard atmosphere that differs from the measured atmospheric parameters above Israel.

  12. The vertical chloride ion profile at the IODP Site C0002, Kumano Basin, off coast of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toki, Tomohiro; Kinoshita, Masataka; Morita, Sumito; Masuda, Harue; Rashid, Harunur; Yoshinishi, Haruka; Nakano, Takanori; Noguchi, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    The vertical profiles of chloride ion (Cl-) concentration and oxygen and hydrogen isotopic ratios in pore fluids of basin-fill sediments in the southern Kumano Basin were examined. A model has been proposed to explain those profiles in conjunction with published data by invoking diffusion and advection of freshwater from methane hydrate dissolution. The model requires a low initial Cl- concentration in the old accretionary prism below the basin before the basin began to fill with sediments. It also requires little or no methane hydrate formation in the old accretionary prism. Given these requirements, an upward fluid advection rate of 1 × 10-12 m/s has been estimated which is very low compared to other accretionary prisms. Our data suggests that the tectonic compaction of the basin-filling sediments and fault activity under the basin sediments have not been that active recently in the Kumano Basin.

  13. The vertical structure of oceanic Rossby waves: a comparison of high-resolution model data to theoretical vertical structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. K. Hunt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tests of the new Rossby wave theories that have been developed over the past decade to account for discrepancies between theoretical wave speeds and those observed by satellite altimeters have focused primarily on the surface signature of such waves. It appears, however, that the surface signature of the waves acts only as a rather weak constraint, and that information on the vertical structure of the waves is required to better discriminate between competing theories. Due to the lack of 3-D observations, this paper uses high-resolution model data to construct realistic vertical structures of Rossby waves and compares these to structures predicted by theory. The meridional velocity of a section at 24° S in the Atlantic Ocean is pre-processed using the Radon transform to select the dominant westward signal. Normalized profiles are then constructed using three complementary methods based respectively on: (1 averaging vertical profiles of velocity, (2 diagnosing the amplitude of the Radon transform of the westward propagating signal at different depths, and (3 EOF analysis. These profiles are compared to profiles calculated using four different Rossby wave theories: standard linear theory (SLT, SLT plus mean flow, SLT plus topographic effects, and theory including mean flow and topographic effects. Our results support the classical theoretical assumption that westward propagating signals have a well-defined vertical modal structure associated with a phase speed independent of depth, in contrast with the conclusions of a recent study using the same model but for different locations in the North Atlantic. The model structures are in general surface intensified, with a sign reversal at depth in some regions, notably occurring at shallower depths in the East Atlantic. SLT provides a good fit to the model structures in the top 300 m, but grossly overestimates the sign reversal at depth. The addition of mean flow slightly improves the latter issue, but

  14. First characterization and validation of FORLI-HNO3 vertical profiles retrieved from IASI/Metop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsmans, Gaétane; Langerock, Bavo; Wespes, Catherine; Hannigan, James W.; Hase, Frank; Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Schneider, Matthias; Smale, Dan; Hurtmans, Daniel; De Mazière, Martine; Clerbaux, Cathy; Coheur, Pierre-François

    2016-09-01

    Knowing the spatial and seasonal distributions of nitric acid (HNO3) around the globe is of great interest and allows us to comprehend the processes regulating stratospheric ozone, especially in the polar regions. Due to its unprecedented spatial and temporal sampling, the nadir-viewing Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is capable of sounding the atmosphere twice a day globally, with good spectral resolution and low noise. With the Fast Optimal Retrievals on Layers for IASI (FORLI) algorithm, we are retrieving, in near real time, columns as well as vertical profiles of several atmospheric species, among which is HNO3. We present in this paper the first characterization of the FORLI-HNO3 profile products, in terms of vertical sensitivity and error budgets. We show that the sensitivity of IASI to HNO3 is highest in the lower stratosphere (10-20 km), where the largest amounts of HNO3 are found, but that the vertical sensitivity of IASI only allows one level of information on the profile (degrees of freedom for signal, DOFS; ˜ 1). The sensitivity near the surface is negligible in most cases, and for this reason, a partial column (5-35 km) is used for the analyses. Both vertical profiles and partial columns are compared to FTIR ground-based measurements from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) to characterize the accuracy and precision of the FORLI-HNO3 product. The profile validation is conducted through the smoothing of the raw FTIR profiles by the IASI averaging kernels and gives good results, with a slight overestimation of IASI measurements in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) at the six chosen stations (Thule, Kiruna, Jungfraujoch, Izaña, Lauder and Arrival Heights). The validation of the partial columns (5-35 km) is also conclusive with a mean correlation of 0.93 between IASI and the FTIR measurements. An initial survey of the HNO3 spatial and seasonal variabilities obtained from IASI

  15. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties and the solar heating rate estimated by combining sky radiometer and lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Rei; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Aoyagi, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    The SKYLIDAR algorithm was developed to estimate vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties from sky radiometer (SKYNET) and lidar (AD-Net) measurements. The solar heating rate was also estimated from the SKYLIDAR retrievals. The algorithm consists of two retrieval steps: (1) columnar properties are retrieved from the sky radiometer measurements and the vertically mean depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements and (2) vertical profiles are retrieved from the lidar measurements and the results of the first step. The derived parameters are the vertical profiles of the size distribution, refractive index (real and imaginary parts), extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor. Sensitivity tests were conducted by applying the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the simulated sky radiometer and lidar data for vertical profiles of three different aerosols, continental average, transported dust, and pollution aerosols. The vertical profiles of the size distribution, extinction coefficient, and asymmetry factor were well estimated in all cases. The vertical profiles of the refractive index and single-scattering albedo of transported dust, but not those of transported pollution aerosol, were well estimated. To demonstrate the performance and validity of the SKYLIDAR algorithm, we applied the SKYLIDAR algorithm to the actual measurements at Tsukuba, Japan. The detailed vertical structures of the aerosol optical properties and solar heating rate of transported dust and smoke were investigated. Examination of the relationship between the solar heating rate and the aerosol optical properties showed that the vertical profile of the asymmetry factor played an important role in creating vertical variation in the solar heating rate. We then compared the columnar optical properties retrieved with the SKYLIDAR algorithm to those produced with the more established scheme SKYRAD.PACK, and the surface solar irradiance calculated from the SKYLIDAR

  16. Numerical modeling of vertical stratification of Lake Shira in summer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belolipetsky, P.; Belolipetsky, V.M.; Genova, S.N.; Mooij, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model and a two-dimensional numerical model of the hydrodynamic and thermal structure of Lake Shira during summer have been developed, with several original physical and numerical features. These models are well suited to simulate the formation and dynamics of vertical st

  17. Characteristics of ozone vertical profile observed in the boundary layer around Beijing in autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Xiujuan; Meng, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the autumn of 2008, the vertical profiles of ozone and meteorological parameters in the low troposphere (0-1000 m) were observed at two sites around Beijing, specifically urban Nanjiao and rural Shangdianzi. At night and early morning, the lower troposphere divided into two stratified layers due to temperature inversion. Ozone in the lower layer showed a large gradient due to the titration of NO. Air flow from the southwest brought ozone-rich air to Beijing, and the ozone profiles were marked by a continuous increase in the residual layer at night. The accumulated ozone in the upper layer played an important role in the next day's surface peak ozone concentration, and caused a rapid increase in surface ozone in the morning. Wind direction shear and wind speed shear exhibited different influences on ozone profiles and resulted in different surface ozone concentrations in Beijing.

  18. Characteristics of ozone vertical profile observed in the boundary layer around Beijing in autumn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiqiang Ma; Xiaoling Zhang; Jing Xu; Xiujuan Zhao; Wei Meng

    2011-01-01

    In the autumn of 2008,the vertical profiles of ozone and meteorological parameters in the low troposphere (0-1000 m) were observed at two sites around Beijing,specifically urban Nanjiao and rural Shangdianzi.At night and early morning,the lower troposphere divided into two stratified layers due to temperature inversion.Ozone in the lower layer showed a large gradient due to the titration of NO.Air flow from the southwest brought ozone-rich air to Beijing,and the ozone profiles were marked by a continuous increase in the residual layer at night.The accumulated ozone in the upper layer played an important role in the next day's surface peak ozone concentration,and caused a rapid increase in surface ozone in the morning.Wind direction shear and wind speed shear exhibited different influences on ozone profiles and resulted in different surface ozone concentrations in Beijing.

  19. Indoor and outdoor measurements of vertical concentration profiles of airborne particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micallef, A; Deuchar, C N; Colls, J J

    1998-05-04

    Vertical concentration profiles of various particle size ranges of airborne particulate matter were measured from ground level up to 3 m, in outdoor and indoor environments. Indoor measurements were carried out in an electronics workshop, while two outdoor environments were chosen: a street canyon cutting across a town and an open field situated in a semi-rural environment. The novel measurement technique employed in this experimental work, which can also be used to determine vertical concentration gradients of pollutants other than airborne particles in different environments, is given particular attention. Analyses of the collected data for the environments considered are presented and some conclusions and plausible explanations of the profiles are discussed. The workshop and street canyon environments exhibited larger concentrations and vertical concentration gradients as compared to the sports field. This indicates that people breathing at different heights are subjected to different concentrations of airborne particulate matter, which has implications for sitting air pollution monitors intended for protection of public health and estimation of human exposure.

  20. The WZNW model on PSU(1, 1 vertical stroke 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, G. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique; Quella, T. [King' s College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematics]|[Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). KdV Institute for Mathematics; Schomerus, V. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    According to the work of Berkovits, Vafa and Witten, the non-linear sigma model on the supergroup PSU(1,1 vertical stroke 2) is the essential building block for string theory on AdS{sub 3}xS{sup 3}xT{sup 4}. Models associated with a non-vanishing value of the RR flux can be obtained through a psu(1,1 vertical stroke 2) invariant marginal deformation of the WZNW model on PSU(1,1 vertical stroke 2). We take this as a motivation to present a manifestly psu(1,1 vertical stroke 2) covariant construction of the model at the Wess-Zumino point, corresponding to a purely NSNS background 3-form flux. At this point the model possesses an enhanced psu(1,1 vertical stroke 2) current algebra symmetry whose representation theory, including explicit character formulas, is developed systematically in the first part of the paper. The space of vertex operators and a free fermion representation for their correlation functions is our main subject in the second part. Contrary to a widespread claim, bosonic and fermionic fields are necessarily coupled to each other. The interaction changes the supersymmetry transformations, with drastic consequences for the multiplets of localized normalizable states in the model. It is only this fact which allows us to decompose the full state space into multiplets of the global supersymmetry. We analyze these decompositions systematically as a preparation for a forthcoming study of the RR deformation. (orig.)

  1. Improvement of the One-dimensional Vertical Advection-diffusion Model in Seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王保栋; 单宝田; 战闰; 王修林

    2003-01-01

    The classical 1-D vertical advection-diffusion model was improved in this work. Themain advantages of the improved model over the previous one are: 1 ) The applicable condition ofthe 1-D model is made clear in the improved model, in that it is substantively applicable only to avertical domain on which two end-member water masses are mixing. 2) The substitution of parame-ter f(z) in the equation of the classical 1-D model with end-member fraction f1 makes the modelmore precisely and easily solved. 3 ) All the terms in the improved model equation have specificphysical meanings, which makes the model easily understood. Practical application of the improvedmodel to predict the vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen and micronutrients in abyssal ocean waterof the North Pacific proved that the improvement of the 1-D advection-diffusion model is successfuland practicable.

  2. Variability of the vertical profile of wind speed: characterization at various time scales and analytical approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdier, Bénédicte; Plougonven, Riwal; Drobinski, Philippe; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2014-05-01

    Wind measurements are key for the wind resource assessment. But as wind turbines get higher, wind measurement masts are often lower than the future wind turbine hub height. Therefore one of the first steps in the energy yield assessment is the vertical extrapolation of wind measurements. Such extrapolation is often done by approximating the vertical profile of wind speed with an analytical expression: either a logarithmic law which has a theoretical basis in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory; or a power law which is empirical. The present study analyzes the variability of the wind profile and how this variability affects the results of the vertical extrapolation methods. The study is conducted with data from the SIRTA observatory, 20km south of Paris (France). A large set of instrumentation is available, including sonic anemometers at 10 and 30 meters, a LIDAR measuring wind speeds from 40 to 200 meters and a SODAR measuring wind speeds starting from 100m up to 1km. The comparison between the instruments enables to characterize the measurements uncertainties. The observations show that close to the ground the wind is stronger during daytime and weaker at night while higher, around 150 m, the wind is weaker during daytime and stronger at night. Indeed the wind shear has a pronounced diurnal cycle. The vertical extrapolation methods currently used in the industry do not usually take into account the strong variability of the wind profile. The often fit the parameters of the extrapolation law, not on each time step, but on time-averaged profiles. The averaging period may be the whole measurement period or some part of it: there may be one constant parameter computed on the wind profile that was averaged on the whole year of measures, or the year of measures may be divided into a small number of cases (for example into night or daytime data, or into 4 seasons) and the parameter is adjusted for each case. The study analyzes thoroughly the errors generated by both

  3. In situ profiling of eastern Arabian Sea coastal waters using a new autonomous vertical profiler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.; Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N.A.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Navelkar, G.S.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Phaldesai, M.; Maurya, P.

    activates the RF modem and transmits the latest sensor file on the serial digital (SD) card with time- and depth- stamped values of the last dive profile. The data streams are received on the laptop GUI and stored immediately for safety. F. Sensors, Sampling... Rates, and In Situ Comparisons 1) Sensors: The specifications of sensors connected to the science node of the AVP are listed in Table II, showing range, ac- curacy, and the maximum sampling rate. The sensors include an active fluorometer (EcoPuck Wetlabs...

  4. A sensitivity study on the retrieval of aerosol vertical profiles using the oxygen A-band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Colosimo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric absorption in the O2 A-band (12 950–13 200 cm−1 offers a unique opportunity to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from space-borne measurements due to the large dynamic range of optical thickness in that spectral region. Absorptions in strong O2 lines are saturated; therefore, any radiance measured in these lines originates from scattering in the upper part of the atmosphere. Outside of O2 lines, or in weak lines, the atmospheric column absorption is small, and light penetrates to lower atmospheric layers, allowing for the quantification of aerosols and other scatterers near the surface. While the principle of aerosol profile retrieval using O2 A-band absorption from space is well known, a thorough quantification of the information content, i.e., the amount of vertical profile information that can be obtained, and the dependence of the information content on the spectral resolution of the measurements, has not been thoroughly conducted. Here, we use the linearized vector radiative transfer model VLIDORT to perform spectrally resolved simulations of atmospheric radiation in the O2 A-band in the presence of aerosol for four different generic scenarios: Urban, Highly polluted, Elevated layer, and Marine–Arctic. The high-resolution radiances emerging from the top of the atmosphere are degraded to different spectral resolutions, simulating spectrometers with different resolving powers. We use optimal estimation theory to quantify the information content in the aerosol profile retrieval with respect to different aerosol parameters and instrument spectral resolutions. The simulations show that better spectral resolution generally leads to an increase in the total amount of information that can be retrieved, with the number of degrees of freedom (DoF varying between 0.34–2.11 at low resolution (5 cm−1 to 3.43–5.92 at high resolution (0.05 cm−1 for the four different cases. A particularly strong improvement was found in the

  5. Experiments on vertical transverse mixing in a large-scale heterogeneous model aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Arifur; Jose, Surabhin C.; Nowak, Wolfgang; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2005-11-01

    Vertical transverse mixing is known to be a controlling factor in natural attenuation of extended biodegradable plumes originating from continuously emitting sources. We perform conservative and reactive tracer tests in a quasi two-dimensional 14 m long sandbox in order to quantify vertical mixing in heterogeneous media. The filling mimics natural sediments including a distribution of different hydro-facies, made of different sand mixtures, and micro-structures within the sand lenses. We quantify the concentration distribution of the conservative tracer by the analysis of digital images taken at steady state during the tracer-dye experiment. Heterogeneity causes plume meandering, leading to distorted concentration profiles. Without knowledge about the velocity distribution, it is not possible to determine meaningful vertical dispersion coefficients from the concentration profiles. Using the stream-line pattern resulting from an inverse model of previous experiments in the sandbox, we can correct for the plume meandering. The resulting vertical dispersion coefficient is approximately ≈ 4 × 10 - 9 m 2/s. We observe no distinct increase in the vertical dispersion coefficient with increasing travel distance, indicating that heterogeneity has hardly any impact on vertical transverse mixing. In the reactive tracer test, we continuously inject an alkaline solution over a certain height into the domain that is occupied otherwise by an acidic solution. The outline of the alkaline plume is visualized by adding a pH indicator into both solutions. From the height and length of the reactive plume, we estimate a transverse dispersion coefficient of ≈ 3 × 10 - 9 m 2/s. Overall, the vertical transverse dispersion coefficients are less than an order of magnitude larger than pore diffusion coefficients and hardly increase due to heterogeneity. Thus, we conclude for the assessment of natural attenuation that reactive plumes might become very large if they are controlled by

  6. Vertical distribution of organochlorine pesticides in humus along Alpine altitudinal profiles in relation to ambiental parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, M; Faus-Kessler, T; Jakobi, G; Levy, W; Henkelmann, B; Bernhöft, S; Kotalik, J; Zsolnay, A; Bassan, R; Belis, C; Kräuchi, N; Moche, W; Simoncic, P; Uhl, M; Weiss, P; Schramm, K-W

    2009-12-01

    In forest soils along vertical profiles located in different parts of the Alps, concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin and mirex, were measured. Though local characteristics of the sites are influenced by numerous factors like orographic and meteorological parameters, forest stand characteristics and humus parameters, we ascertained a marked vertical increase of concentrations of some organochlorine compounds in the soil. On the basis of climatological values of each site, we found that the contamination increase with altitude can be ascribed to a certain 'cold condensation effect'. In addition, the perennial atmospheric deposition of POPs is controlled by precipitation. Other key parameters explaining the accumulation of POPs are the soil organic carbon stocks, the turnover times, the re-volatilisation and degradation processes, which vary with altitude.

  7. Detection and Classification of Ozone Laminae Using Vertical Profiles of Ozone and Potential Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giljum, A. T., III; Minschwaner, K. R.; Manney, G. L.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    We quantify ozone variability in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) by analyzing lamination features in balloon measurements of ozone mixing ratio and potential temperature. Laminae are identified as sufficiently strong perturbations from basic state vertical profiles, which are derived on a case-by-case basis using smoothing methods applied within a vertical coordinate system relative to the WMO (temperature gradient) tropopause. The perturbations consistently show extensive lamination features in both ozone and potential temperature. We will describe methods that have been developed to minimize the contamination of lamina features by sharp changes in ozone and potential gradients near the tropopause. A laminae correlation technique is used to classify those particular features associated with gravity wave phenomena. We will present results of this analysis for the 25-year record of ozonesonde measurements from Boulder, Colorado, emphasizing the role of gravity waves on ozone variability in the UTLS region.

  8. Simulation modeling of vertical shaft construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershin, V.V.; Sadokhin, A.N. (Kuzbasskii Politekhnicheskii Institut (Russian Federation))

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates use of mathematical models for optimization of shaft excavation in underground black coal mines in the Kuzbass. The shafts are excavated by drilling and blasting. Sequence of drilling and blasting, handling blasted rock strata and hoisting, construction of the final liners is analyzed. A mathematical model developed by the Kuzbass Technical Institute based on the Monte Carlo method is used. Its logical structure is evaluated. All the operations associated with shaft excavation are treated as stochastic processes. In the algorithm developed for shaft excavation by drilling and blasting, types of equipment and number of equipment units change. In the model up to 2 loaders, 10 drilling machines, 2 hoisting machines, 10 units of tracks for mine stone transport and materials transport to a shaft mouth at ground surface are used. Using the maximum number of equipment units, variants of equipment sets are selected.

  9. Seasonal differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over rural Oklahoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andrews

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A small airplane made more than 450 aerosol optical property (light absorption and light scattering vertical profile measurements (up to 4 km over a rural Oklahoma site between March 2000 and July 2005. These profiles suggest significant seasonal differences in aerosol properties. The highest amounts of scattering and absorbing aerosol are observed during the summer, while the relative contribution of aerosol absorption is highest in the winter (i.e., single scattering albedo is lowest in winter. Aerosol absorption generally decreased with altitude below ∼1.5 km and then was relatively constant above that. Aerosol scattering decreased sharply with altitude below ∼1.5 km but, unlike absorption, also decreased at higher altitudes, albeit less sharply. The seasonal variability observed for aerosol loading is consistent with other aerosol measurements in the region including AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD, CALIPSO vertical profiles, and IMPROVE aerosol mass. The column averaged single scattering albedo derived from in situ airplane measurements shows a similar seasonal cycle as the AERONET single scattering albedo inversion product, but a comparison of aerosol asymmetry parameter from airplane and AERONET platforms suggests differences in seasonal variability. The observed seasonal cycle of aerosol loading corresponds with changes in air mass back trajectories: the aerosol scattering was higher when transport was from polluted areas (e.g., the Gulf Coast and lower when the air came from cleaner regions and/or the upper atmosphere.

  10. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  11. Comparison of aerodynamic models for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simao Ferreira, C.J.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Barone, M.; Roscher, B.; Deglaire, P.; Arduin, I.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-megawatt Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are experiencing an increased interest for floating offshore applications. However, VAWT development is hindered by the lack of fast, accurate and validated simulation models. This work compares six different numerical models for VAWTS: a multiple s

  12. Ray Tracing Modelling of Reflector for Vertical Bifacial Panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    Bifacial solar panels have recently become a new attractive building block for PV systems. In this work we propose a reflector system for a vertical bifacial panel, and use ray tracing modelling to model the performance. Particularly, we investigate the impact of the reflector volume being filled...

  13. Geometric Modelling by Recursively Cutting Vertices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕伟; 梁友栋; 等

    1989-01-01

    In this paper,a new method for curve and surface modelling is introduced which generates curves and surfaces by recursively cutting and grinding polygons and polyhedra.It is a generalization of the existing corner-cutting methods.A lot of properties,such as geometric continuity,representation,shape-preserving,and the algorithm are studied which show that such curves and surfaces are suitable for geometric designs in CAD,computer graphics and their application fields.

  14. A Look Inside the San Andreas fault at Parkfield Through Vertical Seismic Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarria, J.A.; Malin, P.; Catchings, R.D.; Shalev, E.

    2003-01-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth pilot hole is located on the southwestern side of the Parkfield San Andreas fault. This observatory includes a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) array. VSP seismograms from nearby micro-earthquakes contain signals between the P and S waves. These signals may be P and S waves scattered by the local geologic structure. The collected scattering points form planar surfaces that we interpret as the San Andreas fault and four other secondary faults. The scattering process includes conversions between P and S waves, the strengths of which suggest large contrasts in material properties, possibly indicating the presence of cracks or fluids.

  15. Vertical spectral representation in primitive equation models of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizzi, A.; Tribbia, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Curry, J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Attempts to represent the vertical structure in primitive equation models of the atmosphere with the spectral method have been unsuccessful to date. Linear stability analysis showed that small time steps were required for computational stability near the upper boundary with a vertical spectral representation and found it necessary to use an artificial constraint to force temperature to zero when pressure was zero to control the upper-level horizontal velocities. This ad hoc correction is undesirable, and an analysis that shows such a correction is unnecessary is presented. By formulating the model in terms of velocity and geopotential and then using the hydrostatic equation to calculate temperature from geopotential, temperature is necessarily zero when pressure is zero. The authors applied this technique to the dry-adiabatic primitive equations on the equatorial {beta} and tropical f planes. Vertical and horizontal normal modes were used as the spectral basis functions. The vertical modes are based on vertical normal modes, and the horizontal modes are normal modes for the primitive equations on a {beta} or f plane. The results show that the upper-level velocities do not necessarily increase, total energy is conserved, and kinetic energy is bounded. The authors found an upper-level temporal oscillation in the horizontal domain integral of the horizontal velocity components that is related to mass and velocity field imbalances in the initial conditions or introduced during the integration. Through nonlinear normal-mode initialization, the authors effectively removed the initial condition imbalance and reduced the amplitude of this oscillation. It is hypothesized that the vertical spectral representation makes the model more sensitive to initial condition imbalances, or it introduces imbalance during the integration through vertical spectral truncation. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  16. A detailed pathway analysis of the chemical reaction system generating the Martian vertical ozone profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Joachim W.; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Ralph; Grenfell, J. Lee; Patzer, A. Beate C.; Rauer, Heike; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric chemical composition is crucial in determining a planet's atmospheric structure, stability, and evolution. Attaining a quantitative understanding of the essential chemical mechanisms governing atmospheric composition is nontrivial due to complex interactions between chemical species. Trace species, for example, can participate in catalytic cycles - affecting the abundance of major and other trace gas species. Specifically, for Mars, such cycles dictate the abundance of its primary atmospheric constituent, carbon dioxide (CO2), but also for one of its trace gases, ozone (O3). The identification of chemical pathways/cycles by hand is extremely demanding; hence, the application of numerical methods, such as the Pathway Analysis Program (PAP), is crucial to analyze and quantitatively exemplify chemical reaction networks. Here, we carry out the first automated quantitative chemical pathway analysis of Mars' atmosphere with respect to O3. PAP was applied to JPL/Caltech's 1-D updated photochemical Mars model's output data. We determine all significant chemical pathways and their contribution to O3 production and consumption (up to 80 km) in order to investigate the mechanisms causing the characteristic shape of the O3 volume mixing ratio profile, i.e. a ground layer maximum and an ozone layer at ∼50 km. These pathways explain why an O3 layer is present, why it is located at that particular altitude and what the different processes forming the near-surface and middle atmosphere O3 maxima are. Furthermore, we show that the Martian atmosphere can be divided into two chemically distinct regions according to the O(3P):O3 ratio. In the lower region (below approximately 24 km altitude) O3 is the most abundant Ox (= O3 + O(3P)) species. In the upper region (above approximately 24 km altitude), where the O3 layer is located, O(3P) is the most abundant Ox species. Earlier results concerning the formation of O3 on Mars can now be explained with the help of chemical

  17. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time ( The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change and CARES (Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCD (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground-based MAX-DOAS instruments (slope = 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ε, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB are presented. These profiles contain ~12 degrees of freedom (DOF over a 3.5 km altitude range, an independent information approximately every 250 m. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD agrees well with nearby ground-based in situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, H2O442, ϵ360, ϵ477 for 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 42 ppm, 0.004 km−1, 0.002 km−1 in the free troposphere (FT, and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 252 ppm, 0.012 km−1, 0.006 km−1

  18. Validation of MODIS liquid water path for oceanic nonraining warm clouds: Implications on the vertical profile of cloud water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lingli; Liu, Qi; Liu, Dongyang; Xie, Lei; Qi, Lin; Liu, Xiantong

    2016-05-01

    Liquid water path (LWP) derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is validated using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) retrievals for global oceanic nonraining warm clouds, with focus on the vertically homogeneous (VH) model and adiabatically stratified (AS) model of liquid water content (LWC) profile used in MODIS retrieval. With respect to AMSR-E LWP that acts as ground truth under a series of constraints, the global average of MODIS-LWPVH and MODIS-LWPAS has a positive (11.8%) and negative (-6.8%) bias, respectively. Most of the oceanic warm clouds tend to have adiabatic origin and correspondingly form AS-like profiles, which could be well retained if drizzle is absent. Besides, the presence of drizzle, cloud top entrainment seems to be another cause that modifies the original LWC profiles to become VH-like, which is notable for the very low clouds that have rather small thickness. These factors jointly determine the appearance of LWP profiles and in turn their spatial pattern across global oceans, with AS-like profiles dominant in the areas where nonraining warm clouds occur very frequently in the form of stratocumulus. The modified MODIS LWP shows significant improvement compared with either MODIS-LWPVH or MODIS-LWPAS. This is achieved by using the two physically explicit models flexibly, in which the elementary MODIS retrievals of cloud top temperature, cloud optical thickness, and droplet effective radius play a determinant role. A combined use of VH and AS model in the MODIS retrieval is demonstrated to be effective for improving the LWP estimation for oceanic nonraining warm clouds.

  19. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 2. Vertical emission profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gerard, J.C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Palmaerts, B. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen (Germany); Badman, S.V. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Khurana, K.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tao, C. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France)

    2015-07-01

    The aurorae at Jupiter are made up of many different features associated with a variety of generation mechanisms. The main auroral emission, also known as the main oval, is the most prominent of them as it accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range. The energy of the precipitating electrons is a crucial parameter to characterize the processes at play which give rise to these auroral emissions, and the altitude of the emissions directly depends on this energy. Here we make use of far-UV (FUV) images acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and spectra acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to measure the vertical profile of the main emissions. The altitude of the brightness peak as seen above the limb is ∝ 400 km, which is significantly higher than the 250 km measured in the post-dusk sector by Galileo in the visible domain. However, a detailed analysis of the effect of hydrocarbon absorption, including both simulations and FUV spectral observations, indicates that FUV apparent vertical profiles should be considered with caution, as these observations are not incompatible with an emission peak located at 250 km. The analysis also calls for spectral observations to be carried out with an optimized geometry in order to remove observational ambiguities.

  20. Enrichment and vertical profiles of 210Po and 210Pb in monazite areas of coastal Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Y; Prakash, V

    2010-06-01

    A study on radiation level and radionuclide distribution in the environment of coastal Karnataka has revealed the presence of low-level monazite deposit in the Ullal beach area. The paper presents systematic studies on the distribution, enrichment and vertical profiles of (210)Po and (210)Pb, important daughter products of (238)U, in Ombattu Kere, Summer Sand and the Bhagavathi Temple region of the Ullal beach area of coastal Karnataka. Sand samples collected at different depths from these locations were analyzed for (210)Po and (210)Pb activities to understand the distribution, enrichment and vertical profiles of these radionuclides in monazite area. The activity of (210)Po in the Ullal region is found to vary from 1.7 to 43.2 Bq kg(-1) with a mean value of 11.2 Bq kg(-1) and that of (210)Pb varies from 1.0 to 66.7 Bq kg(-1) with a mean value of 19.1 Bq kg(-1). The mean (210)Po/(210)Pb ratio was observed to be 0.6. The absorbed gamma dose rate in the region varies in the range 39-460 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 193 nGy h(-1).

  1. Vertical Profiles of Carbonyl Sulfide, Halocarbons, and Benzene Over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, S. A.; Calvert, P.; Hall, B.; Elkins, J. W.; Miller, L.; Watson, A.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P.

    2005-12-01

    A NOAA sampling program to measure vertical profiles of CO{_2}, CH{_4}, N{_2}O, and other gases within the lower atmosphere has been expanded to allow measurements of carbonyl sulfide (COS), CFCs, HCFCs, HFCs, chlorocarbons, bromocarbons, methyl iodide, and benzene. Bimonthly to monthly profiles for these gases have been obtained since September 2004 from flasks collected onboard aircraft at altitudes up to 8 km above sea level at 10 continental and 2 coastal sites in North America. The wide range of gases being measured aid in identifying many different influences on sampled air, such as combustion, input from the oceans, urban emissions, non-urban terrestrial emissions, uptake by vegetation and soils, and vertical mixing. Based upon co-elevated mixing ratios of halocarbons and carbon monoxide or halocarbons and C{_2}Cl{_4}, we anticipate that this sampling program has the potential to provide continental-scale emissions estimates for non-CO{_2} gases that are currently regulated, for example by the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol of Substance that Deplete the Ozone Layer, and for gases listed in the Kyoto Protocol that may be regulated in the future. In addition to the observation of urban pollution and burning plumes, strong and persistent vertical gradients have been observed that vary with season for COS, methyl halides, and chloroform. The results for COS are particularly dramatic, as they show substantially reduced mixing ratios in the continental boundary layer during the growing season. The spatial patterns and seasonality are qualitatively consistent with uptake of COS by photosynthetically active vegetation, though the relative importance of COS loss to soils is poorly constrained. These results will be compared to NOAA ground-based measurements that show strong seasonal variations for COS that are closely tied to those observed for CO{_2}, and the implications of these results on the hypothesis that COS could provide a proxy for gross vegetative

  2. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Höpner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX, conducted in February and March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV to perform vertical in-situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption. These measurements were used together with surface-based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL observations and aerosol in-situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles. Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. Mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717±604 cm−3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo–Gangetic Plain (2247±370 cm−3. Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo–Gangetic Plain. Compared to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX conducted in winter 1999, elevated aerosol layers with increased aerosol number concentration were observed more frequently in 2012. However, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm=8.5±4.2 Wm−1 was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999. By combining vertical in-situ measured particle absorption with scattering calculated with Mie-theory, layers with single-scattering albedo (SSA values of specific source regions were derived and utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for dry conditions were found to be 0.94±0.02 and 0.91±0.02 for air masses from

  3. Vertical profiles of optical and microphysical particle properties above the northern Indian Ocean during CARDEX 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpner, F.; Bender, F. A.-M.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Praveen, P. S.; Bosch, C.; Ogren, J. A.; Andersson, A.; Gustafsson, Ö.; Ramanathan, V.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed analysis of optical and microphysical properties of aerosol particles during the dry winter monsoon season above the northern Indian Ocean is presented. The Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Experiment (CARDEX), conducted from 16 February to 30 March 2012 at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo island (MCOH) in the Republic of the Maldives, used autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAV) to perform vertical in situ measurements of particle number concentration, particle number size distribution as well as particle absorption coefficients. These measurements were used together with surface- based Mini Micro Pulse Lidar (MiniMPL) observations and aerosol in situ and off-line measurements to investigate the vertical distribution of aerosol particles.Air masses were mainly advected over the Indian subcontinent and the Arabian Peninsula. The mean surface aerosol number concentration was 1717 ± 604 cm-3 and the highest values were found in air masses from the Bay of Bengal and Indo-Gangetic Plain (2247 ± 370 cm-3). Investigations of the free tropospheric air showed that elevated aerosol layers with up to 3 times higher aerosol number concentrations than at the surface occurred mainly during periods with air masses originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. This feature is different compared to what was observed during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) conducted in winter 1999, where aerosol number concentrations generally decreased with height. In contrast, lower particle absorption at the surface (σabs(520 nm) = 8.5 ± 4.2 Wm-1) was found during CARDEX compared to INDOEX 1999.Layers with source region specific single-scattering albedo (SSA) values were derived by combining vertical in situ particle absorption coefficients and scattering coefficients calculated with Mie theory. These SSA layers were utilized to calculate vertical particle absorption profiles from MiniMPL profiles. SSA surface values for 550 nm for dry

  4. High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron Density Profile Changes in Response to Large Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2016-01-01

    Large magnetic-storm-induced changes were detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron density profiles Ne(h) in a database of profiles and digital topside ionograms, from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program, that enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained in nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm (Dst -100nT). Storms where Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere had better coverage of solar wind parameters than storms with available Ne(h) profiles in the high-latitude Southern Hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during all storms, with enhancements and depletions sometimes near a factor of 10 and 0.1, respectively, but with substantial differences in the responses in the two hemispheres. Large spatial andor temporal Ne(h) changes were often observed during Dst minimum and during the storm recovery phase. The storm-induced Ne(h) changes were the most pronounced and consistent in the Northern Hemisphere in that large enhancements were observed during winter nighttime and large depletions during winter and spring daytime. The limited available cases suggested that these Northern Hemisphere enhancements increased with increases of the time-shifted solar wind velocity v, magnetic field B, and with more negative values of the B components except for the highest common altitude (1100km) of the profiles. There was also some evidence suggesting that the Northern Hemisphere depletions were related to changes in the solar wind parameters. Southern Hemisphere storm-induced enhancements and depletions were typically considerably less with depletions observed during summer nighttime conditions and enhancements during summer daytime and fall nighttime conditions.

  5. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ZERO-OFFSET AND VERTICAL RADAR PROFILING GPR TECHNIQUES WITH EMPHASIS ON PROBLEMATIC BOREHOLE EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Vignoli, Giulio; Cassiani, Giorgio;

    contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method’s capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows...

  6. Vertical-aware click model-based effectiveness metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Markov; E. Kharitonov; V. Nikulin; P. Serdyukov; M. de Rijke; F. Crestani

    2014-01-01

    Today's web search systems present users with heterogeneous information coming from sources of different types, also known as verticals. Evaluating such systems is an important but complex task, which is still far from being solved. In this paper we examine the hypothesis that the use of models that

  7. Vertical-aware click model-based effectiveness metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markov, I.; Kharitonov, E.; Nikulin, V.; Serdyukov, P.; de Rijke, M.; Crestani, F.; Li, J.; Wang, X.S.

    2014-01-01

    Today's web search systems present users with heterogeneous information coming from sources of different types, also known as verticals. Evaluating such systems is an important but complex task, which is still far from being solved. In this paper we examine the hypothesis that the use of models that

  8. Control and modelling of vertical temperature distribution in greenhouse crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempkes, F.L.K.; Bakker, J.C.; Braak, van de N.J.

    1998-01-01

    Based on physical transport processes (radiation, convection and latent heat transfer) a model has been developed to describe the vertical temperature distribution of a greenhouse crop. The radiation exchange factors between heating pipes, crop layers, soil and roof were determined as a function of

  9. Modeling Quantum Transport in Nanoscale Vertical SOI nMOSFET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Jian-nong; ZOU Xue-chang; SHEN Xu-bang

    2004-01-01

    The electron transports in micro-architecture semiconductor are simulated using vertical SOI nMOSFET with different models. Some details in transport can be presented by changing channel length, channel thickness and drain voltage. An interesting phenomenon similar to collimation effect in mesoscopic system is observed. This may suggest the quite intriguing possibility that scattering may open new channel in sufficiently narrow devices.

  10. Horizontal And Vertical Profiling Of Microbial Communities Across Landscape Features At NGEE Site, Barrow, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, J. K.; Tas, N.; Brodie, E. L.; Graham, D. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Torn, M. S.; Wu, Y.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    Low- and high-centered polygons in permafrost-dominated ecosystems have distinct geochemical and hydrological characteristics that are expected to alter microbial processes that govern carbon cycle dynamics in Arctic landscapes. Key questions that must be answered if we are to represent these dynamics and their underlying controls into Earth System Models include: 1) Through which pathways is carbon processed in different areas of these polygons? 2) What regulates the release of C as CO2, or methane, and 3) Which microorganisms are responsible? As part of the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project, we collected samples across a transect of polygon features near Barrow, Alaska. The transect included samples from centers, edges and troughs of high-centered and low-centered polygons, including organic and deeper mineral soil layers. In addition, we took a 1.6 m deep core from our field site and sectioned it vertically to determine the microbial composition at different depths from active layer through upper layers of permafrost. Prior to sectioning, the core was CT-scanned to determine the physical heterogeneity throughout the core. Total DNA was extracted from sub-samples and the microbial community composition in the samples was determined by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The resulting microbial profiles were related to corresponding environmental variables. We found that microbial community composition varied according to location across the polygons. Differences in elevation and moisture content were identified as the primary drivers of the observed changes in microbial composition. Methanogenic archaea were more abundant in the centers of low-centered and wetter polygons than high-centered polygons. These data suggest a potential for increased methane production towards the centers of polygons. By contrast, polygon edges had a greater relative abundance of typically aerobic soil microbes that suggests C loss as CO2 would predominate in these

  11. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barrera-Verdejo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR and a Raman Lidar (RL system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9% with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6% with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation

  12. Ground based lidar and microwave radiometry synergy for high vertically resolved thermodynamic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Verdejo, M.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.; Orlandi, E.; Di Girolamo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of atmospheric humidity and temperature profiles is important for many applications, e.g. assessment of atmospheric stability and cloud formation. While lidar measurements can provide high vertical resolution albeit with limited coverage, microwave radiometers receive information throughout the troposphere though their vertical resolution is poor. In order to overcome these specific limitations the synergy of a Microwave Radiometer (MWR) and a Raman Lidar (RL) system is presented in this work. The retrieval algorithm that combines these two instruments is an Optimal Estimation Method (OEM) that allows for a uncertainty analysis of the retrieved profiles. The OEM combines measurements and a priori information taking the uncertainty of both into account. The measurement vector consists of a set of MWR brightness temperatures and RL water vapor profiles. The method is applied for a two month field campaign around Jülich, Germany for clear sky periods. Different experiments are performed to analyse the improvements achieved via the synergy compared to the individual retrievals. When applying the combined retrieval, on average the theoretically determined absolute humidity error can be reduced by 59.8% (37.9%) with respect to the retrieval using only-MWR (only-RL) data. The analysis in terms of degrees of freedom for signal reveals that most information is gained above the usable lidar range. The retrieved profiles are further evaluated using radiosounding and GPS water vapor measurements. Within a single case study we also explore the potential of the OEM for deriving the relative humidity profile, which is especially interesting to study cloud formation in the vicinity of cloud edges. To do so temperature information is added both from RL and MWR. For temperature, it is shown that the error is reduced by 47.1% (24.6%) with respect to the only-MWR (only-RL) profile. Due to the use of MWR brightness temperatures at multiple elevation angles, the

  13. 3D elastic inversion of vertical seismic profiles in horizontally stratified media; Inversion elastique 3D de profils sismiques verticaux en milieux stratifies horizontalement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J.L.

    1997-07-21

    This thesis is devoted to the inversion of VSP (vertical seismic profile) seismic data in order to determine the elastic properties of horizontally stratified media. The VSP records are computed using the full wave elastic modelling in isotropic and transversely isotropic media using Hankel transform, a finite difference scheme and an inverse Hankel transform algorithm, and the propagation equations are determined and numerically solved; the importance of considering a 3D wave propagation model instead of a 1 D one is emphasized. The theoretical VSP inverse problem is then considered, with the seismic waveform inversion set as a least-squares problem, consisting in recovering the distribution of physical parameters which minimize the misfit between calculated and observed VSP. The corresponding problem requires the knowledge of the source function

  14. [Analysis of the Influence of Temperature on the Retrieval of Ozone Vertical Profiles Using the Thermal Infrared CrIS Sounder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peng-fei; Chen, Liang-fu; Zou, Ming-min; Zhang, Ying; Tao, Ming-hui; Wang, Zi-leng; Su, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Ozone is a particularly critical trace gas in the Earth's atmosphere, since this molecule plays a key role in the photochemical reactions and climate change. The TIR measurements can capture the variability of ozone and are weakly sensitive to the lowermost tropospheric ozone content but can provide accurate measurements of tropospheric ozone and higher vertical resolution ozone profiles, with the additional advantage that measurements are also possible during the night. Because of the influence of atmospheric temperature, the ozone profile retrieval accuracy is severely limited. This paper analyze and discuss the ozone absorption spectra and weighting function sensitivity of temperature and its influence on ozone profile retrieval in detail. First, we simulate the change of atmospheric transmittance and radiance by importing 1 K temperature uncertainty, using line-by-line radiative transfer mode under 6 different atmosphere modes. The results show that the transmittance change ratio for 1 K temperature variation was consistent with the transmittance change ratio for 5%-6% change of ozone density variation in all layers of the profile. Then, we calculate the change of weighting function by a temperature error of 1 K, using the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) for the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and calculate the corresponding change of retrieval result. The results demonstrate that CrIS is sensitive to Ozone in the middle to upper stratosphere, with the peak vertical sensitivity between 10-100 hPa and the change of weighting function for 1 K temperature variation was consistent with 6% change in the ozone profile. Finally, the paper retrieves ozone profiles from the CrIS radiances with a nonlinear Newton iteration method and use the eigenvector regression algorithm to construct the a priori state. In order to resolve the problem of temperature uncertainty and get high accuracy

  15. From the chlorophyll a in the surface layer to its vertical profile: a Greenland Sea relationship for satellite applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cherkasheva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Current estimates of global marine primary production range over a factor of two. Improving these estimates requires an accurate knowledge of the chlorophyll vertical profiles, since they are the basis for most primary production models. At high latitudes, the uncertainty in primary production estimates is larger than globally, because here phytoplankton absorption shows specific characteristics due to the low-light adaptation, and in situ data and ocean colour observations are scarce. To date, studies describing the typical chlorophyll profile based on the chlorophyll in the surface layer have not included the Arctic region, or, if it was included, the dependence of the profile shape on surface concentration was neglected. The goal of our study was to derive and describe the typical Greenland Sea chlorophyll profiles, categorized according to the chlorophyll concentration in the surface layer and further monthly resolved profiles. The Greenland Sea was chosen because it is known to be one of the most productive regions of the Arctic and is among the regions in the Arctic where most chlorophyll field data are available. Our database contained 1199 chlorophyll profiles from R/Vs Polarstern and Maria S. Merian cruises combined with data from the ARCSS-PP database (Arctic primary production in situ database for the years 1957–2010. The profiles were categorized according to their mean concentration in the surface layer, and then monthly median profiles within each category were calculated. The category with the surface layer chlorophyll (CHL exceeding 0.7 mg C m−3 showed values gradually decreasing from April to August. A similar seasonal pattern was observed when monthly profiles were averaged over all the surface CHL concentrations. The maxima of all chlorophyll profiles moved from the greater depths to the surface from spring to late summer respectively. The profiles with the smallest surface values always showed a subsurface chlorophyll

  16. Ray Tracing Modelling of Reflector for Vertical Bifacial Panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    Bifacial solar panels have recently become a new attractive building block for PV systems. In this work we propose a reflector system for a vertical bifacial panel, and use ray tracing modelling to model the performance. Particularly, we investigate the impact of the reflector volume being filled...... with a refractive medium, and shows the refractive medium improves the reflector performance since it directs almost all the light incident on the incoming plane into the PV panel....

  17. Seasonal and vertical distribution of Phyllophaga cuyabana (Moser)(Coleoptera: Melolonthidae) in the soil profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lenita J; Farias, José R B; Hoffmann-Campo, Clara B; Amaral, Maria L B do; Garcia, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    Phyllophaga cuyabana (Moser) temporal and vertical distribution patterns were evaluated in the soil profile, in order to subsidize methodology for population sampling, aiming at its management. In insect surveys carried out during three years, in Boa Esperança County, State of Parana, Brazil, Phyllophaga cuyabana was univoltine, with little overlap of the larval stages. Population peaked during December-February, but declined during the colder months, when larvae were in diapause. Different developmental stages exploited distinct soil depths. Eggs and early first instars tended to concentrate between 5 cm and 10 cm deep, but they spread more uniformly through the soil profile, reaching depths up to 30 cm, as they developed. Adults and eggs occurred in the spring (October to December) when active larvae also started to be observed; feeding larvae occurred up to late-April between 0 to 15 cm deep. Diapausing larvae and pupae were observed from early fall to early spring, mostly from 15 cm to 30 cm deep. Throughout the year, the number of insects in the soil (up to 40 cm deep) showed a positive functional relationship with air temperature and evapotranspiration. The relationship of percent distribution of larvae in the soil profile and soil temperature, however, was positive only above 10 cm. To estimate the insect population from November to April, samples can be collected until 20 cm deep; from May to October, however, samplings should be deeper, up to 30 cm.

  18. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Sheridan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1 measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2 relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. The primary profile location was within 15 km of the NOAA/ESRL surface aerosol monitoring station near Bondville, Illinois. Identical instruments at the surface and on the aircraft ensured that the data from both platforms would be directly comparable and permitted a determination of how representative surface aerosol properties were of the lower column. Aircraft profiles were also conducted occasionally at two other nearby locations to increase the frequency of A-Train satellite underflights for the purpose of comparing in situ and satellite-retrieved aerosol data. Measurements of aerosol properties conducted at low relative humidity over the Bondville site compare well with the analogous surface aerosol data and do not indicate any major sampling issues or that the aerosol is radically different at the surface compared with the lowest flyby altitude of ~ 240 m above ground level. Statistical analyses of the in situ vertical profile data indicate that aerosol light scattering and absorption (related to aerosol amount decreases substantially with increasing altitude. Parameters related to the nature of the aerosol (e.g., single-scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, etc., however, are relatively constant throughout the mixed layer, and do not vary as much as the aerosol amount throughout the profile. While individual profiles often showed more variability, the median in situ single-scattering albedo was 0.93–0.95 for all sampled altitudes. Several parameters (e.g., submicrometer scattering fraction, hemispheric backscattering fraction, and

  19. Vertical distribution and environmental significance of PAHs in soil profiles in Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Q.W.; Zhang, Z.H.; Lu, S.; He, F.P. [China University of Petrology, Beijing (China)

    2009-02-15

    Vertical distribution of both the concentration and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ten profiles in Beijing has been investigated. The results showed that PAH concentrations and compositions in topsoil from different sampling sites were different. PAH concentrations were much higher in topsoil of the investigated urban area, industrial region, and paddy field with wastewater irrigation than in other areas. Moreover, PAH concentrations in topsoil were much higher than those at greater depth, where the concentrations were relatively consistent in most soil profiles. The fingerprints of PAHs in the samples from topsoil (0-30 cm) in the same profiles were similar and were obviously different from those at greater depth, suggesting that PAH sources were consistent in topsoil samples and were discriminating between topsoil and deeper soils. PAHs in topsoil mainly arose from mixed sources of combustion of liquid fuel, coal, and/or wood, as well as wastewater irrigation, while those at greater depth were derived from soil genesis and the process of soil formation.

  20. Comparison of aerodynamic models for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, C. Simão; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Barone, M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-megawatt Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs) are experiencing an increased interest for floating offshore applications. However, VAWT development is hindered by the lack of fast, accurate and validated simulation models. This work compares six different numerical models for VAWTS: a multiple...... streamtube model, a double-multiple streamtube model, the actuator cylinder model, a 2D potential flow panel model, a 3D unsteady lifting line model, and a 2D conformal mapping unsteady vortex model. The comparison covers rotor configurations with two NACA0015 blades, for several tip speed ratios, rotor...... solidity and fixed pitch angle, included heavily loaded rotors, in inviscid flow. The results show that the streamtube models are inaccurate, and that correct predictions of rotor power and rotor thrust are an effect of error cancellation which only occurs at specific configurations. The other four models...

  1. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  2. Clutter and rainfall discrimination by means of doppler-polarimetric measurements and vertical reflectivity profile analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Silvestro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of rainfall rate and other parameters from radar scattering volume is heavily affected by the presence of intense sea and ground clutter and echoes which appears in anomalous propagation condition. To deal with these non meteorological echoes we present a new clutter removal algorithm which combines the results of previous works. The algorithm fully exploits both the Doppler and polarimetric capabilities of the radar used and the analysis of vertical reflectivity profile in order to achieve the better identification of the meteorological and non-meteorological targets. The algorithm has been applied to the C-band radar of Monte Settepani (Savona, Italy, which runs in a high-topography environment. Preliminary results are presented.

  3. Vertical distribution of organochlorine pesticides in humus along Alpine altitudinal profiles in relation to ambiental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, M., E-mail: kirchner@helmholtz-muenchen.d [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, GmbH, Institutes of Ecological Chemistry, Developmental Genetics and Soil Ecology, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Faus-Kessler, T.; Jakobi, G.; Levy, W.; Henkelmann, B.; Bernhoeft, S.; Kotalik, J.; Zsolnay, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, GmbH, Institutes of Ecological Chemistry, Developmental Genetics and Soil Ecology, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Bassan, R. [Regional Agency for Environmental Prevention and Protection of Veneto (Italy); Belis, C. [Regional Agency for Environmental Protection of Lombardy (Italy); Kraeuchi, N. [Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (Switzerland); Moche, W. [Federal Environment Agency Ltd. (Austria); Simoncic, P. [Slovenian Forestry Institute (Slovenia); Uhl, M.; Weiss, P. [Federal Environment Agency Ltd. (Austria); Schramm, K.-W. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, GmbH, Institutes of Ecological Chemistry, Developmental Genetics and Soil Ecology, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    In forest soils along vertical profiles located in different parts of the Alps, concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), namely organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, dieldrin and mirex, were measured. Though local characteristics of the sites are influenced by numerous factors like orographic and meteorological parameters, forest stand characteristics and humus parameters, we ascertained a marked vertical increase of concentrations of some organochlorine compounds in the soil. On the basis of climatological values of each site, we found that the contamination increase with altitude can be ascribed to a certain 'cold condensation effect'. In addition, the perennial atmospheric deposition of POPs is controlled by precipitation. Other key parameters explaining the accumulation of POPs are the soil organic carbon stocks, the turnover times, the re-volatilisation and degradation processes, which vary with altitude. - Caused by temperature-dependent processes regarding deposition, re-volatilization and decomposition of POPs, the concentration of organochlorine pesticides varies in the Alpine region with altitude.

  4. a Comparison Between Zero-Offset and Vertical Radar Profiling Gpr Techniques with Emphasis on Problematic Borehole Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M.; Vignoli, G.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive geophysical techniques are increasingly used to study the unsaturated zone. In particular, cross-hole methods can are able to infer more detailed information about the subsoil than surface measurements. Two borehole Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques are discussed in our contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method's capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows that the dielectric relative permittivity profiles recovered from ZOP and VRP first-break inversions are in strong disagreement, providing very different permittivity profiles. The analysis of synthetic radargrams shows the presence of an electromagnetic (EM) wave established by the joint presence of the air-filled borehole within a higher permittivity surrounding soil. This event has a velocity intermediate between the soil and air speed values, and interferes with the picking of first arrivals in the VRP mode. The numerical simulations are performed with different borehole diameters, confirming that the velocity of the first recorded event depends on the ratio between the wave length in air and the finite dimension of the borehole. Once these arrivals in the simulated VRP radargrams are recognized, their contribution can be removed by picking the "direct" arrivals, that correspond to the waves that directly propagates from source to receiver, through the unsaturated zone. Once the borehole effects are accounted for, the comparison between the ZOP and VRP permittivity profiles is reasonable and reveals the different resolution of these techniques, focusing on the information that can be inferred for hydrological characterizations. Thus, VRP surveys in vadose zone must be accurately interpreted, as the electromagnetic waves may propagate via guided modes along the borehole. Neglecting this

  5. Development of ATLID-MSI synergy for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosol components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, R.; Nishizawa, T.; Higurashi, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Oikawa, E.

    2014-12-01

    EarthCARE is an earth observation satellite and will be launched in 2016. Using its two sensors, ATLID (High spectral resolution lidar) and MSI (Multi-spectral imager), we are developing the synergy algorithm to retrieve the vertical profiles of extinction coefficients at 355 nm of four aerosol components (Water-soluble, black carbon, dust, and sea-salt particles), and the column mean of mode radii of water-soluble and dust particles. The ATLID data are extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, and depolarization ratio for total aerosols at 355 nm. The MSI data are radiances at 670 and 865 nm. The dry volume concentrations of four aerosol components at each altitude and the mode radii of water-soluble and dust particles in the column are simultaneously optimized to ATLID and MSI data by the gauss newton method. After the optimization, the vertical profiles of the extinction coefficient at 355 nm of four aerosol components are obtained. The size distributions of four aerosol components are assumed to be a lognormal distribution. The refractive indices of four aerosol components are given from previously observational studies. The humidity growth is considered for water-soluble and sea-salt particles. The volume concentration and the mode radius of the sea-salt particle are parameterized using the surface wind speed on the ocean. We assumed that the shape of the water-soluble, black carbon, and sea-salt particles are spherical, and the shape of the dust particle is spheroidal. We tested the algorithm using the ATLID and MSI data simulated using clean, dust-transported, and smoke-transported aerosols. The extinction coefficients of each component at 355 nm are retrieved well. The mode radius of water-soluble and dust particles were somehow overestimated.

  6. Qualitative comparison of concurrent vertical optical turbulence profiles from an aircraft and balloons over White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlin, Scott R.; Hahn, Ila L.; Hugo, Ronald J.; Bishop, Kenneth P.

    1999-08-01

    We report simultaneous balloon-borne thermosonde/airborne constant-current anemometer measurements made over a portion of White Sands Missile Range, NM. For the first time, vertical profiles of the refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data generated from shallow slant aircraft flight paths are compared to the balloons vertical Cn2 distributions. We discuss possible adverse effects of meteorology and atmospheric velocity fluctuations. We present conclusions and make recommendations for future similar experimental efforts.

  7. Importance of vertical geochemical processes in controlling the oceanic profiles of dissolved rare earth elements in the northeastern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Alibo, Dia Sotto

    2003-01-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) were obtained in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. The REE concentrations at various depths in the Bay of Bengal are the highest in the Indian Ocean. This is attributable ultimately to the large outflow of the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Irrawaddy rivers, but the dissolved REE flux to surface waters alone cannot explain the large and near-constant REE enrichment throughout the entire water column. The underlying fan sediments serve as not a source but a sink for dissolved REE(III)s. Absence of excess 228Ra in the deep waters suggests that lateral input of dissolved REEs from slope sediments is also small in these regions. Partial (rivers and lateral surface currents and subsequently settle through the water column, appears to be a predominant source for the dissolved REEs. Vertical profiles showing an almost linear increase with depth are common features for the light and middle REEs everywhere, but their concentration levels are variable from basin to basin and from element to element. This suggests that their oceanic distributions respond quickly to the variation of particle flux and its REE composition through reversible exchange equilibrium with suspended and sinking particles much like the case for Th. The relative importance of the vertical geochemical processes of reversible scavenging over the horizontal basin-scale ocean circulation with passive regeneration like nutrients decreases systematically from the light to the heavy REEs. Using a model, the mean oceanic residence times of REEs in the Bay of Bengal are estimated to range from 37 years for Ce to 140-1510 years for the strictly trivalent REEs. In the deep water of the Andaman Sea, isolated from the Bay of Bengal by the Andaman-Nicobar Ridge (maximum sill depth of ˜1800 m), the REE concentrations are almost uniform presumably due to rapid vertical mixing. The REE(III) concentrations are similar to that of ˜1250 m depth water in the Bay of

  8. Vertical bearing capacity of pile based on load transfer model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming-hua; YANG Ming-hui; ZOU Xin-jun

    2005-01-01

    The load transfer analytical method is applied to study the bearing mechanism of piles with vertical load in this paper. According to the different hardening rules of soil or rock around the pile shaft, such as work-softening, ideal elasto-plastic and work-hardening, a universal tri-linear load transfer model is suggested for the development of side and tip resistance by various types of soil (rock) with the consideration of sediment at the bottom of the pile. Based on the model, a formula is derived for the relationship between the settlement and load on the pile top to determine the vertical bearing capacity, taking into account such factors as the characteristics of the stratum, the side resistance along the shaft, and tip resistance under the pile tip. A close agreement of the calculated results with the measured data from a field test pile lends confidence to the future application of the present approach in engineering practice.

  9. Vertical variations of soil hydraulic properties within two soil profiles and its relevance for soil water simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwen, Andreas; Zimmermann, Michael; Bodner, Gernot

    2014-08-01

    Numerical simulations of soil water dynamics can be valuable tools for the assessment of different soil and land management practices. For accurate simulations, the soil hydraulic properties (SHP), i.e. the hydraulic conductivity and water retention function have to be properly known. They can be either estimated from physical soil properties by pedotransfer functions (PTF) or measured. In most studies, soil profiles are analyzed and sampled with respect to their pedogenic horizons. While considerable effort has been put on horizontal spatial SHP variations, vertical changes within soil profiles have not been analyzed in detail. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (i) the SHP measurement along vertical transects within two soil profiles, (ii) to evaluate their spatial variation and correlation with physical soil properties, and (iii) to assess the impact of the SHP determination method and its spatial discretization on simulated soil water balance components. Two soils, an agriculturally used silty-loam Chernozem and a forested sandy Cambisol were sampled in 0.05 m increments along vertical transects. The parameters of a dual porosity model were derived using the evaporation method and scaling was applied to derive representative mean SHP parameters and scaling factors as a measure of spatial variability. State-space models described spatial variations of the scaling factors by physical soil properties. Simulations with HYDRUS 1D delivered the soil water balance for different climatic conditions with the SHP being estimated from horizon-wise PTFs, or discretized either sample-wise, according to the pedogenic horizons, or as hydrologically relevant units (hydropedological approach). Considerable SHP variations were found for both soil profiles. In the Chernozem, variations of the hydraulic conductivity were largest within the ploughed Ap-horizon and could be attributed to variations in soil structure (macropores). In the subsoil, soil water retention showed

  10. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: ground based validation, and vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Baidar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The University of Colorado Airborne Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument uses solar stray light remote sensing to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2, glyoxal (CHOCHO, formaldehyde (HCHO, water vapor (H2O, nitrous acid (HONO, iodine monoxide (IO, bromine monoxide (BrO, and oxygen dimers (O4 at multiple wavelengths (360 nm, 477 nm, 577 nm and 632 nm simultaneously, and sensitively in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique, in that it presents the first systematic implementation of MAX-DOAS on research aircraft, i.e. (1 includes measurements of solar stray light photons from nadir, zenith, and multiple elevation angles forward and below the plane by the same spectrometer/detector system, and (2 features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view (FOV from aircraft movements in real-time (< 0.35° accuracy. Sets of solar stray light spectra collected from nadir to zenith scans provide some vertical profile information within 2 km above and below the aircraft altitude, and the vertical column density (VCD below the aircraft is measured in nadir view. Maximum information about vertical profiles is derived simultaneously for trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients over similar spatial scales and with a vertical resolution of typically 250 m during aircraft ascent/descent.

    The instrument is described, and data from flights over California during the CalNex and CARES air quality field campaigns is presented. Horizontal distributions of NO2 VCDs (below the aircraft maps are sampled with typically 1 km resolution, and show good agreement with two ground based CU MAX-DOAS instruments (slope 0.95 ± 0.09, R2 = 0.86. As a case study vertical profiles of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O mixing ratios and aerosol extinction coefficients

  11. Evaluation of Model-Based Training for Vertical Guidance Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feary, Michael; Palmer, Everett; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Alkin, Marty; McCrobie, Dan; Kelley, Jerry; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper will summarize the results of a study which introduces a structured, model based approach to learning how the automated vertical guidance system works on a modern commercial air transport. The study proposes a framework to provide accurate and complete information in an attempt to eliminate confusion about 'what the system is doing'. This study will examine a structured methodology for organizing the ideas on which the system was designed, communicating this information through the training material, and displaying it in the airplane. Previous research on model-based, computer aided instructional technology has shown reductions in the amount of time to a specified level of competence. The lessons learned from the development of these technologies are well suited for use with the design methodology which was used to develop the vertical guidance logic for a large commercial air transport. The design methodology presents the model from which to derive the training material, and the content of information to be displayed to the operator. The study consists of a 2 X 2 factorial experiment which will compare a new method of training vertical guidance logic and a new type of display. The format of the material used to derive both the training and the display will be provided by the Operational Procedure Methodology. The training condition will compare current training material to the new structured format. The display condition will involve a change of the content of the information displayed into pieces that agree with the concepts with which the system was designed.

  12. Polarimetric remote sensing in oxygen A and B bands: sensitivity study and information content analysis for vertical profile of aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shouguo; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical analysis is conducted to reveal the information content of aerosol vertical profile in space-borne measurements of the backscattered radiance and degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in oxygen (O2) A and B bands. Assuming a quasi-Gaussian shape for aerosol vertical profile characterized by peak height H and half width γ (at half maximum), the Unified Linearized Vector Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM) is used to simulate the Stokes four-vector elements of upwelling radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and their Jacobians with respect to H and γ. Calculations for different aerosol types and different combinations of H and γ values show that the wide range of gas absorption optical depth in O2 A and B band enables the sensitivity of backscattered DOLP and radiance at TOA to the aerosol layer at different altitudes. Quantitatively, DOLP in O2 A and B bands is found to be more sensitive to H and γ than radiance, especially over the bright surfaces (with large visible reflectance). In many O2 absorption wavelengths, the degree of freedom of signal (DFS) for retrieving H (or γ) generally increases with H (and γ) and can be close to unity in many cases, assuming that the composite uncertainty from surface and aerosol scattering properties as well as measurements is less than 5 %. Further analysis demonstrates that DFS needed for simultaneous retrieval of H and γ can be obtained from a combined use of DOLP measurements at ˜ 10-100 O2 A and B absorption wavelengths (or channels), depending on the specific values of H. The higher the aerosol layer, the fewer number of channels for DOLP measurements in O2 A and B bands are needed for characterizing H and γ. Future hyperspectral measurements of DOLP in O2 A and B bands are needed to continue studying their potential and their combination with radiance and DOLP in atmospheric window channels for retrieving the vertical profiles of aerosols, especially highly scattering aerosols, over land.

  13. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001.

    Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events.

    In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations.

    Total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles above Kiev in 2005-2008

    CERN Document Server

    Shavrina, A V; Sheminova, V A; Pavlenko, Ya V; Veles, A A; Synyavski, I I; Romanyuk, Ya O

    2010-01-01

    The study of total ozone columns above Kiev and variations of ozone concentrations in the troposphere at different altitudes above Kiev was carried out using ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometric observations that are taken on a routine basis at the Main Astronomical Observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (MAO NASU). This study was performed within the framework of the international ESA-NIVR-KNMI OMI-AO project no.2907 entitled OMI validation by ground-based remote sensing: ozone columns and atmospheric profiles during the time frame 2005-2008. The infrared FTIR spectral observations of direct solar radiation in the wavelength range of 2-12 micron as transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere were performed during the months of April-October of each year. The aim of the project was the validation of total ozone columns and vertical ozone profiles as obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)) onboard of the NASA EOS-Aura scientific satellite platform. The mode...

  14. Multi-component vertical profile retrievals for ground-based MAX-DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Hitoshi; Kanaya, Yugo; Takashima, Hisahiro; van Roozendael, Michel; Wittrock, Folkard; Piters, Ankie

    2010-05-01

    We attempt to retrieve lower-tropospheric vertical profile information for 8 components from ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements. The components retrieved include aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) at two wavelengths 357 and 476 nm, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, H2O, SO2, and O3 volume mixing ratios (VMRs). This method was applied to MAX-DOAS observations performed at Cabauw, the Netherlands (52.0°N, 4.9°E) in June-July 2009 during the Cabauw Intercomparison campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) campaign. For the lowest layer of retrieved profiles at 0-1 km, two channels of AEC values reveal consistent variations. NO2 showed typical diurnal variations with maximum in early morning and minimum in the afternoon. Positive correlations between HCHO and CHOCHO were often seen. H2O VMR agreed well with that derived from NCEP surface data, and was used to judge cloudy cases after conversion to relative humidity. All these results support the capability of MAX-DOAS observations applicable to various air quality studies. Similar multi-component retrievals applied to observations in Japan are also presented in this talk.

  15. Graded index profiles and loss-induced single-mode characteristics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with petal-shape holey structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu An-Jin; Qu Hong-Wei; Chen Wei; Jiang Bin; Zhou Wen-Jun; Xing Ming-Xin; Zheng Wan-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The 850-nm oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with petal-shape holey structures are presented. An area-weighted average refractive index model is given to analyse their effective index profiles, and the graded index distribution in the holey region is demonstrated. The index step between the optical aperture and the holey region is obtained which is related merely to the etching depth. Four types of holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with different parameters are fabricated as well as the conventional oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. Compared with the conventional oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser without etched holes, the holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser possesses an improved beam quality due to its graded index distribution, but has a lower output power, higher threshold current and lower slope efficiency. With the hole number increased, the holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser can realize the single-mode operation throughout the entire current range, and reduces the beam divergence further. The loss mechanism is used to explain the single-mode characteristic, and the reduced beam divergence is attributed to the shallow etching. High coupling efficiency of 86% to a multi-mode fibre is achieved for the single-mode device in the experiment.

  16. Regional N2O fluxes in Amazonia derived from aircraft vertical profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tans

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Globally, the main sources of N2O are nitrification and denitrification in soils. About two thirds of the soil emissions occur in the tropics and approximately 20% originate in wet rainforest ecosystems, like the Amazon forest. The work presented here involves aircraft vertical profiles of N2O from the surface to 4 km over two sites in the Eastern and Central Amazon: Tapajós National Forest (SAN and Cuieiras Biologic Reserve (MAN, and the estimation of N2O fluxes for regions upwind of these sites. To our knowledge, these regional scale N2O measurements in Amazonia are unique and represent a new approach to looking regional scale emissions. The fluxes upwind of MAN exhibited little seasonality, and the annual mean was 2.1±1.0 mg N2O m−2 day−1, higher than that for fluxes upwind of SAN, which averaged 1.5±1.6 mg N2O m−2 day−1. The higher rainfall around the MAN site could explain the higher N2O emissions. For fluxes from the coast to SAN seasonality is present for all years, with high fluxes in the months of March through May, and in November through December. The first peak of N2O flux is strongly associated with the wet season. The second peak of high N2O flux recorded at SAN occurs during the dry season and can not be easily explained. However, about half of the dry season profiles exhibit significant correlations with CO, indicating a larger than expected source of N2O from biomass burning. The average CO:N2O ratio for all profiles sampled during the dry season is 94±77 mol CO:mol N2O and suggests a larger biomass burning contribution to the global N2O budget than previously reported.

  17. Controlling Guessing Bias in the Dichotomous Rasch Model Applied to a Large-Scale, Vertically Scaled Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, David; Marais, Ida; Humphry, Stephen Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown how the statistical bias in Rasch model difficulty estimates induced by guessing in multiple-choice items can be eliminated. Using vertical scaling of a high-profile national reading test, it is shown that the dominant effect of removing such bias is a nonlinear change in the unit of scale across the continuum. The…

  18. The results of complex optical measurements of vertical temperature profile of the atmos-phere in the winter in Yakutsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolashkin, Semyen; Ignatyev, V. M.; Ammosov, Petr; Koltovskoy, Igor; Titov, Semen; Reshetnikov, Alexander

    The results of simultaneous measurements of atmospheric temperature from 0 to 100 km by lidar, spectrometric and interferometric methods in winter 2008 in Yakutsk are presented. Temperature measurements for the surface layer from 0 to 20-25 km were obtained from radio-sonde data on upper-air station in Yakutsk. Measuring the temperature of the middle atmosphere from 25 to 55-60 km made using Rayleigh Lidar near Yakutsk, with the following parameters: a transmitter Nd-YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm and a pulse energy of 200 mJ receiver - a telescope with a primary mirror diameter of 60 cm and a focal length of 200 cm, with a photon counting system and a spectrum analyzer. The temperature of the upper atmosphere was meas-ured at three altitude levels: by hydroxyl emission layer at the mesopause (6,2 band) , molecular oxygen radiation using an infrared spectrograph with a CCD camera and atomic oxygen emission line 557.7 nm with Fabry-Perot spectrometer (FPS) at the Maimaga optic range. FPS aperture was 15 cm, gap 1.5 cm, plate’s reflectance 0.85 and finess12. Thus, in this work, we covered by the temperature measuring most of the atmosphere ex-cept for a layer of the mesosphere from 60 to 87 km. For comparison, also are used CIRA model and the AURA MLS instrument (MicroLimb Sounder) temperature profiles data. Data analysis showed that there is a wave-like change in the vertical temperature profile, which is the result of vertical transmission features planetary waves during a stratospheric warming. This work is supported by the Integration project of the SB RAS No. 106 and RFBR grant No. 12-05-98547-r-vostok-a.

  19. Velocity measurement of model vertical axis wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.A.; McWilliam, M. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An increasingly popular solution to future energy demand is wind energy. Wind turbine designs can be grouped according to their axis of rotation, either horizontal or vertical. Horizontal axis wind turbines have higher power output in a good wind regime than vertical axis turbines and are used in most commercial class designs. Vertical axis Savonius-based wind turbine designs are still widely used in some applications because of their simplistic design and low wind speed performance. There are many design variables that must be considered in order to optimize the power output in a given wind regime in a typical wind turbine design. Using particle image velocimetry, a study of the air flow around five different model vertical axis wind turbines was conducted in a closed loop wind tunnel. A standard Savonius design with two semi-circular blades overlapping, and two variations of this design, a deep blade and a shallow blade design were among the turbine models included in this study. It also evaluated alternate designs that attempt to increase the performance of the standard design by allowing compound blade curvature. Measurements were collected at a constant phase angle and also at random rotor orientations. It was found that evaluation of the flow patterns and measured velocities revealed consistent and stable flow patterns at any given phase angle. Large scale flow structures are evident in all designs such as vortices shed from blade surfaces. An important performance parameter was considered to be the ability of the flow to remain attached to the forward blade and redirect and reorient the flow to the following blade. 6 refs., 18 figs.

  1. Mathematical model for analysis of recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklarz, Menachem Y; Gross, Amit; Soares, M Ines M; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    The recirculating vertical flow constructed wetland (RVFCW) was developed for the treatment of domestic wastewater (DWW). In this system, DWW is applied to a vertical flow bed through which it trickles into a reservoir located beneath the bed. It is then recirculated back to the root zone of the bed. In this study, a compartmental model was developed to simulate the RVFCW. The model, which addresses transport and removal kinetics of total suspended solids, 5-day biological oxygen demand and nitrogen, was fitted to kinetical results obtained from pilot field setups and a local sensitivity analysis was performed on the model parameters and operational conditions. This analysis showed that after 5h of treatment water quality is affected more by stochastic events than by the model parameter values, emphasizing the stability of the RVFCW system to large variations in operational conditions. Effluent quality after 1h of treatment, when the sensitivity analysis showed the parameter impacts to be largest, was compared to model predictions. The removal rate was found to be dependent on the recirculation rate. The predictions correlated well with experimental observations, leading to the conclusion that the proposed model is a satisfactory tool for studying RVFCWs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A detailed self-consistent vertical Milky Way disc model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao S.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a self-consistent vertical disc model of thin and thick disc in the solar vicinity. The model is optimized to fit the local kinematics of main sequence stars by varying the star formation history and the dynamical heating function. The star formation history and the dynamical heating function are not uniquely determined by the local kinematics alone. For four different pairs of input functions we calculate star count predictions at high galactic latitude as a function of colour. The comparison with North Galactic Pole data of SDSS/SEGUE leads to significant constraints of the local star formation history.

  3. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-06-15

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the /sup 1///sub 5/-scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena.

  4. Comparing Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Profiles and Cloud Vertical Structure from Multiwavelength Raman Lidar Retrievals and Radiosounding Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Surós Montserrat; Stachlewska Iwona S.; Markowicz Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    A study of comparison of water vapor mixing ratio profiles, relative humidity profiles, and cloud vertical structures using two different instruments, a multiwavelength Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman lidar and radiosoundings, is presented. The observations were taken by the lidar located in Warsaw center and the radiosoundings located about 30km to the North in Legionowo (Poland). We compared the ground-based remote sensing technology with in-situ method in order to improve knowledge about wate...

  5. Computer Profiling Based Model for Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Choudhary

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer profiling is used for computer forensic analysis, and proposes and elaborates on a novel model for use in computer profiling, the computer profiling object model. The computer profiling object model is an information model which models a computer as objects with various attributes and inter-relationships. These together provide the information necessary for a human investigator or an automated reasoning engine to make judgments as to the probable usage and evidentiary value of a computer system. The computer profiling object model can be implemented so as to support automated analysis to provide an investigator with the informationneeded to decide whether manual analysis is required.

  6. Wintertime characteristics of aerosols over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain: Vertical profile, transport and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M.; Raju, M. P.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2017-01-01

    Winter-specific characteristics of airborne particulates over middle Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) were evaluated in terms of aerosol chemical and micro-physical properties under three-dimensional domain. Emphases were made for the first time to identify intra-seasonal variations of aerosols sources, horizontal and vertical transport, effects of regional meteorology and estimating composite aerosol short-wave radiative forcing over an urban region (25°10‧-25°19‧N; 82°54‧-83°4‧E) at middle-IGP. Space-borne passive (Aqua and Terra MODIS, Aura OMI) and active sensor (CALIPSO-CALIOP) based observations were concurrently used with ground based aerosol mass measurement for entire winter and pre-summer months (December, 1, 2014 to March, 31, 2015). Exceptionally high aerosol mass loading was recorded for both PM10 (267.6 ± 107.0 μg m- 3) and PM2.5 (150.2 ± 89.4 μg m- 3) typically exceeding national standard. Aerosol type was mostly dominated by fine particulates (particulate ratio: 0.61) during pre to mid-winter episodes before being converted to mixed aerosol types (ratio: 0.41-0.53). Time series analysis of aerosols mass typically identified three dissimilar aerosol loading episodes with varying attributes, well resemble to that of previous year's observation representing its persisting nature. Black carbon (9.4 ± 3.7 μg m- 3) was found to constitute significant proportion of fine particulates (2-27%) with a strong diurnal profile. Secondary inorganic ions also accounted a fraction of particulates (PM2.5: 22.5%; PM10: 26.9%) having SO4- 2, NO3- and NH4+ constituting major proportion. Satellite retrieved MODIS-AOD (0.01-2.30) and fine mode fractions (FMF: 0.01-1.00) identified intra-seasonal variation with transport of aerosols from upper to middle-IGP through continental westerly. Varying statistical association of columnar and surface aerosol loading both in terms of fine (r; PM2.5: MODIS-AOD: 0.51) and coarse particulates (PM10: MODIS-AOD: 0.53) was

  7. Actuator line modeling of vertical-axis turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To bridge the gap between high and low fidelity numerical modeling tools for vertical-axis (or cross-flow) turbines (VATs or CFTs), an actuator line model (ALM) was developed and validated for both a high and a medium solidity vertical-axis turbine at rotor diameter Reynolds numbers $Re_D \\sim 10^6$. The ALM is a hybridization of classical blade element theory with Navier--Stokes based flow models, and in this study both $k$--$\\epsilon$ Reynolds-averaged Navier--Stokes (RANS) and Smagorinsky large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence models were tested. The RANS models were able to be run on coarse grids while still providing good convergence behavior in terms of the mean power coefficient, and also approximately four orders of magnitude reduction in computational expense compared with 3-D blade-resolved RANS simulations. Submodels for dynamic stall, end effects, added mass, and flow curvature were implemented, resulting in reasonable performance predictions for the high solidity rotor, more discrepancies for the...

  8. Modelling the diurnal variability of SST and its vertical extent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.; Donlon, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    for the transport of heat, momentum and salt. GOTM is a model resolving the basic hydrodynamic and thermodynamic processes related to vertical mixing in the water column, that includes most of the basic methods for calculating the turbulent fluxes. Surface heat and momentum can be either calculated or externally...... of the modelled output with observations. To improve the surface heat budget calculation and distribution of heat in the water column, the GOTM code was modified to include an additional method for the estimation of the total outgoing long-wave radiation and a 9-band parametrisation for the light extinction...... between in situ and remotely obtained measurements, is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. Models that have been used for this purpose vary from empirical parametrisations mostly based on the wind speed and solar insolation to ocean models that solve the 1 dimensional equations...

  9. Remote sensing the vertical profile of cloud droplet effective radius, thermodynamic phase, and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vanderlei Martins

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-aerosol interaction is no longer simply a radiative problem, but one affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and its consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei.

    Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

    The CLAIM-3D (3-Dimensional Cloud Aerosol Interaction Mission satellite concept proposed here combines several techniques to simultaneously measure the vertical

  10. Imaging blended vertical seismic profiling data using full-wavefield migration in the common-receiver domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soni, A.K.; Verschuur, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    For vertical-seismic-profiling (VSP) measurements, the use of blended acquisition, with time-overlapping shot records, can greatly reduce the downtime and, thereby, provide large cost savings. For directly imaging blended VSP measurements, we have used full-wavefield migration (FWM). FWM is an inver

  11. Total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 and the vertical profiles of atmospheric parameters in the lowest 200M

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical profiles of air temperature, wind and humidity at Raichur (16 degrees 12'N and 77 degrees 21'E) in the lowest 200m of the atmosphere are presented for the period 15-18 February 1980. The effect of the total solar eclipse, on 16 February...

  12. Modelling the observed vertical transport of {sup 7}Be in specific soils with advection dispersion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Astorga, Romina; Velasco, Hugo; Valladares, Diego L.; Lohaiza, Flavia; Ayub, Jimena Juri; Rizzotto, Marcos [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales. Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis - Universidad Nacional de San Luis - CONICET, San Luis (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    {sup 7}Be is a short-lived environmental radionuclide, produced in the upper atmosphere by spallation of nitrogen and oxygen by cosmic rays. After of the production by the nuclear reaction, {sup 7}Be diffuses through the atmosphere until it attaches to atmospheric aerosols. Subsequently, it is deposited on the earth surface mainly as wet fallout. The main physical processes which transport {sup 7}Be in soil are diffusion and advection by water. Migration parameters and measurements confirm that sorption is the main physical process, which confines {sup 7}Be concentration to soil surface. The literature data show that in soils, {sup 7}Be is concentrated near the surface (0-2 cm) as it is adsorbed onto clay minerals after its deposition on the soil surface and does not penetrate deeper into soils due to its short half-life. The maximum mass activity density of {sup 7}Be is found at the point of input of the radionuclide, i.e. at the surface of the soil column, showing a exponential distribution profile typical of a purely diffusive transport. Many studies applying the advection dispersion models have been reported in the literature in order to modelling the transport of {sup 137}Cs in soils. On them, the models are used to achieve information of the mechanisms that govern the transport, i. e. the model is used to explain the soil profile of radionuclide. The effective dispersion coefficient and the apparent advection velocity of radionuclide in soil are also obtained by fitting the analytical solution of the model equation to measured depth distributions of the radionuclide. In this work, the advective dispersive transport model with linear sorption is used to analyze the vertical migration process of {sup 7}Be in soils of undisturbed or reference sites. The deposition history is approximated by pulse-like input functions and time dependent analytical solution of equation model is obtained. The values of dispersion coefficient and apparent advection velocity obtained

  13. Numerical and physical model study of a vertical slot fishway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombač Martin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental and numerical study of a vertical slot fishway (VSF. A 2-D depth-averaged shallow water numerical model PCFLOW2D coupled with three different turbulent models (constant eddy viscosity, Smagorinsky and k - ε was used. A detailed analysis of numerical parameters needed for a correct simulation of the phenomenon was carried out. Besides the velocity field, attention was paid to important hydraulic parameters such as maximum velocity in the slot region and energy dissipation rate ε in order to evaluate the performance of VSF. A scaled physical hydraulic model was built to ensure reliable experimental data for the validation of the numerical model. Simulations of variant configurations of VSF showed that even small changes in geometry can produce more fishfriendly flow characteristics in pools. The present study indicates that the PCFLOW2D program is an appropriate tool to meet the main demands of the VSF design.

  14. A simple model for the design of vertical tube absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patnaik, V.; Perez-Blanco, H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ryan, W.A. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The absorption of water vapor in aqueous solutions of lithium bromide is modelled for a falling-film, vertical-tube absorber. The model is based on the solution of three ordinary differential equations to calculate solution bulk and interface concentration and temperature distributions and the coolant temperature distribution. The heat and mass transfer coefficients employed in the equations are extracted from the literature. In this way, the model incorporates recent information on wavy-laminar flows. Under certain conditions, the solution exhibits instabilities in the entrance region of the absorber tube, which are corrected by the introduction of a dampening factor incorporating relevant thermophysical properties. The usefulness of the model for generating absorber performance charts is demonstrated.

  15. Vertical profiles of ozone between 0 and 400 meters in and above the African equatorial forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Fontan, J.; Minga, A.; Helas, G.; Nganga, D.; Delmas, R.; Chapuis, A.; Benech, B.; Druilhet, A.; Andreae, M. O.

    1992-08-01

    Results are presented of measurements of ozone concentrations in the northern Congo, near Impfondo, as part of the DECAFE experiment in February 1988, during the dry season. The measurements were carried out simultaneously at ground level in a large clearing, inside the forest between 0 and 30 m, and above the forest with a captive balloon flying up to 400 m. The results presented are compared with the data obtained in the Mayombe forest in southern Congo, near Dimonika, in June 1988, during the dry season. For both northern and southern forested areas the ozone concentrations measured at ground level in a large clearing exhibit daily variations with maxima in the afternoon ranging between 10 and 30 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) and minima at the end of the night between 4 and 15 ppbv. The characteristics of each surface ozone cycle are analyzed. Inside the forest, ozone concentrations are found very low near the ground, and rarely exceed 15 ppbv above the canopy. The relationships among the vertical profiles of ozone, temperature, and water vapor are discussed.

  16. Power output in vertical jumps: Does optimum loading depend on activity profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazin, Nemanja; Berjan, Bobana; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Markovic, Goran; Jaric, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    The previously proposed Maximum Dynamic Output hypothesis (MDO; i.e. the optimum load for maximizing the power output during jumping is one's own body) was tested on individuals of various activity profiles. Forty males (10 strength-trained athletes, 10 speed-trained athletes, 10 physically active non-athletes, and 10 sedentary individuals) performed different vertical jumps on a force plate while a pulley system was used to either reduce or increase the subject's body weight by 10–30%. As expected, an increase in external loading resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.001) in force output and a concomitant decrease of peak jumping velocity in all groups of participants. The main finding, however, was that all groups revealed the maximum peak and mean power output at approximately the subjects’ own body weight although their weight represented prominently different percentage of their maximum dynamic strength. While a significant (p < 0.05), albeit moderate, 'group × load' interaction in one jump was observed for the peak power output, the individual optimum load for maximizing the power output number did not differ among the groups. Although apparently further research on various types of movements is needed, the present results provide, so far, the strongest support of the MDO hypothesis. PMID:22864398

  17. A New Approximation of Water Saturation Estimation Based on Vertical Seismic Profiling Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sismanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Water saturation is the ratio between the volumes of fluid in the rock pores. Water saturation is one of the important reservoir parameters to be known in the exploration or exploitation of oil and gas. I have developed a new technique to estimate the distribution of water saturation values based on the seismic wave attenuation analysis, frequency and porosity from the equation of Biot-Turgut-Yamamoto-Sismanto. It is applied to the real data using the vertical seismic profiling (VSP data in Pasir Cantang well, West Java for some layers. The obtained values of water saturation have not been calibrated to the known value of the well. This step needs to be done, so that the results that have been corrected can be performed to estimate the area around the well Pasir Cantang guided by seismic section. Regardless of the calibration factor, the method of the water saturation estimation on VSP data can technically be well done but still needs necessary calibration for the accuracy.

  18. Simulation-Based Optimization of a Vector Showerhead System for the Control of Flow Field Profile in a Vertical Reactor Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanxiong Xia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of a vector showerhead in a vertical reactor involves thousands of holes on the showerhead face plate and the spatial distribution of physical fields, so parameterizing the geometry configuration of the holes in high resolution is very difficult, which makes the conventional optimization methods hard to deal with. To solve this problem, a profile error feedback (PEF optimization solution was proposed to optimize a vector showerhead gas delivery system for the control of mass transport. The gas velocity profile in the reactor and the continuous-feature impedance distribution profile on the showerhead face plate are defined as design objective and variables, respectively. A cyclic iterative approximation idea was implemented in this solution. The algorithm was started from a guessed initial design model and then cyclically adjusted the design variables by the constructed PEF iterative formula to generate a better model and to make the gas velocity profile in the critical domain of the new model continually approximate to the expected profile, until it could be accepted. Finally, the optimized impedance profile was mapped to the holes geometry configuration through the established equivalent impedance model for the showerhead face plate.

  19. Analytical investigation on 3D non-Boussinesq mountain wave drag for wind profiles with vertical variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jin-yun; TANG Jie; WANG Yuan

    2007-01-01

    A new analytical model was developed to predict the gravity wave drag (GWD) induced by an isolated 3-dimensional mountain, over which a stratified, nonrotating non-Boussinesq sheared flow is impinged. The model is confined to small amplitude motion and assumes the ambient velocity varying slowly with height. The modified Taylor-Goldstein equation with variable coefficients is solved with a Wentzel-KramersBrillouin (WKB) approximation, formally valid at high Richardson numbers. With this WKB solution, generic formulae of second order accuracy, for the GWD and surface pressure perturbation (both for hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic flow) are presented, enabling a rigorous treatment on the effects by vertical variations in wind profiles. In an ideal test to the circular bell-shaped mountain, it was found that when the wind is linearly sheared,that the GWD decreases as the Richardson number decreases. However, the GWD for a forward sheared wind (wind increases with height) decreases always faster than that for the backward sheared wind (wind deceases with height). This difference is evident whenever the model is hydrostatic or not.

  20. Bifurcation analysis of vertical transmission model with preventive strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosalamang Ricardo Kelatlhegile

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We formulate and analyze a deterministic mathematical model for the prevention of a disease transmitted horizontally and vertically in a population of varying size. The model incorporates prevention of disease on individuals at birth and adulthood and allows for natural recovery from infection. The main aim of the study is to investigate the impact of a preventive strategy applied at birth and at adulthood in reducing the disease burden. Bifurcation analysis is explored to determine existence conditions for establishment of the epidemic states. The results of the study showed that in addition to the disease-free equilibrium there exist multiple endemic equilibria for the model reproduction number below unity. These results may have serious implications on the design of intervention programs and public health policies. Numerical simulations were carried out to illustrate analytical results.

  1. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Johnson, C. E.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Bauer, S. E.; Bergman, T.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kokkola, H.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; van Noije, T.; Pringle, K. J.; von Salzen, K.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3-UKCA), and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size distribution of

  2. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  3. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  4. Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvageot, Henri

    1996-01-01

    A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds using the observations of a zenith-viewing Doppler radar and of a microwave radiometer is proposed. In this method, the profile of the vertical air velocity deduced from Doppler radar measurements is used to describe the rate of production by the updrafts of water. vapor in excess of saturation with respect to ice. Using a Zi Mi power-law relation with an unknown linear parameter (let i, be this parameter) and initially assuming that Zw is negligible with respect to Zi, (where Zw and Zi are the radar reflectivity factors of liquid water and ice particles respectively), the measured radar reflectivity factor profile Zm ( Zi) is inverted to estimate Ni(D, z). From Ni(D, z), the profile of the rate of water vapor that can be consumed by pure deposition on ice particles is calculated. The difference between the rate of production of the exam water vapor and the rate of deposited water vapor is an expression of the rate of liquid water generation at each level. By writing that the integral of the liquid water along the profile has to be equal to the total liquid water deduced from the microwave radiometer measurement, an estimation of the i parameter is obtained. From i, an estimation of the profiles Mw(z), Mi(z), Zw(z), Zi(z) (=Zm Zw), and Ni(D, z) is calculated. If Zw is effectively negligible with respect to Zi, the computation of the retrieved profiles is ended. If not, Zi(z) is corrected and a new estimation of the profiles is computed. The results of the numerical simulation of the algorithm are presented.

  5. Analytical solution to transient Richards' equation with realistic water profiles for vertical infiltration and parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    A general analytical model for one-dimensional transient vertical infiltration is presented. The model is based on a combination of the Brooks and Corey soil water retention function and a generalized hydraulic conductivity function. This leads to power law diffusivity and convective term for which the exponents are functions of the inverse of the pore size distribution index. Accordingly, the proposed analytical solution covers many existing realistic models in the literature. The general form of the analytical solution is simple and it expresses implicitly the depth as function of water content and time. It can be used to model infiltration through semi-infinite dry soils with prescribed water content or flux boundary conditions. Some mathematical expressions of practical importance are also derived. The general form solution is useful for comparison between models, validation of numerical solutions and for better understanding the effect of some hydraulic parameters. Based on the analytical expression, a complete inverse procedure which allows the estimation of the hydraulic parameters from water content measurements is presented.

  6. New analytic solutions for modeling vertical gravity gradient anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Sep; Wessel, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Modern processing of satellite altimetry for use in marine gravimetry involves computing the along-track slopes of observed sea-surface heights, projecting them into east-west and north-south deflection of the vertical grids, and using Laplace's equation to algebraically obtain a grid of the vertical gravity gradient (VGG). The VGG grid is then integrated via overlapping, flat Earth Fourier transforms to yield a free-air anomaly grid. Because of this integration and associated edge effects, the VGG grid retains more short-wavelength information (e.g., fracture zone and seamount signatures) that is of particular importance for plate tectonic investigations. While modeling of gravity anomalies over arbitrary bodies has long been a standard undertaking, similar modeling of VGG anomalies over oceanic features is not commonplace yet. Here we derive analytic solutions for VGG anomalies over simple bodies and arbitrary 2-D and 3-D sources. We demonstrate their usability in determining mass excess and deficiency across the Mendocino fracture zone (a 2-D feature) and find the best bulk density estimate for Jasper seamount (a 3-D feature). The methodologies used herein are implemented in the Generic Mapping Tools, available from gmt.soest.hawaii.edu.

  7. Implementation of Dynamic Smart Decision Model for Vertical Handoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Nidhi

    2010-11-01

    International Mobile Telecommunications-Advanced (IMT Advanced), better known as 4G is the next level of evolution in the field of wireless communications. 4G Wireless networks enable users to access information anywhere, anytime, with a seamless connection to a wide range of information and services, and receiving a large volume of information, data, pictures, video and thus increasing the demand for High Bandwidth and Signal Strength. The mobility among various networks is achieved through Vertical Handoff. Vertical handoffs refer to the automatic failover from one technology to another in order to maintain communication. The heterogeneous co-existence of access technologies with largely different characteristics creates a decision problem of determining the "best" available network at "best" time for handoff. In this paper, we implemented the proposed Dynamic and Smart Decision model to decide the "best" network interface and "best" time moment to handoff. The proposed model implementation not only demonstrates the individual user needs but also improve the whole system performance i.e. Quality of Service by reducing the unnecessary handoffs and maintain mobility.

  8. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Wagner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol over the southeastern United States (SEUS during the summertime from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO. Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10% larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD, was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10% to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary organic aerosol (SOA aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2–3 times greater than winter over the southeastern United States. In contrast to this hypothesis, the modest enhancement we observed in the transition layer was not dominated by OA and was not a large fraction of the summertime AOD.

  9. Ground truth : vertical seismic profile data enables geophysicists to image ahead of the drill bit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, S. [SR ECO Consultants Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-08-01

    This paper presented a new technology which makes it possible to obtain a vertical seismic profile (VSP) of a wellbore via a wireline tool. Downhole seismic is of extreme importance in cases when there is a discrepancy between the geology in the well and surface seismic data and when drilling has gone deeper than the prognosis for oil or gas. Once VSP data are interpreted, the decision can be made to either abandon the well or sidetrack it to an optimum target position. The VSP data give the geophysicist the opportunity to recalibrate the processing of conventional 2-D or 3-D surface seismic data while drilling. Crucial assumptions for the velocity fields can be tested. This new technology links geology and geophysics, making it possible to quantify subsurface reservoir parameters and to obtain downhole seismic that provides a higher frequency and spatial resolution than conventional surface seismic surveys. The energy source for downhole seismic is situated at ground level. The signal then travels down into the earth where it is recorded in the subsurface by a vertical array of geophones situated in the wellbore. Some of the signal travels past the bottom of the borehole, through the underlying layers that still have to be drilled. Geophysicists with PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. and Baker Atlas state that a VSP gives ground truth because the acquired data enables the geophysicist to image ahead of the drill bit. VSP is the ultimate tool in interval velocity and time to depth conversion. Downhole seismic has 25 per cent higher frequencies than surface seismic. The technology has been successfully used by Talisman Energy Inc., to drill Foothills wells in the Monkman Pass area of northeastern British Columbia. VSP data can be used to predict formation pressures, porosities, lithologies or rock types, and fluid content. The technology has been useful in the drilling of hostile holes offshore Sable Island in Nova Scotia where wells can cost up to $30 million. VSPs are

  10. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, B.; Gysel, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Goger, B.; Poulain, L.; Schlag, P.; Miettinen, P.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Bialek, J.; Klein Baltink, H.; Henzing, J. S.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS) for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer) contained a high nitrate fraction (20%) which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer) small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ) were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0.19 for the

  11. Vertical profiling of aerosol hygroscopic properties in the planetary boundary layer during the PEGASOS campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rosati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements of the aerosol hygroscopic and optical properties as well as chemical composition were performed in the Netherlands and northern Italy on board of a Zeppelin NT airship during the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012. The vertical changes in aerosol properties during the development of the mixing layer were studied. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF at 95% relative humidity were determined using the white-light humidified optical particles spectrometer (WHOPS for dry diameters of 300 and 500 nm particles. These measurements were supplemented by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and an aethalometer providing information on the aerosol chemical composition. Several vertical profiles between 100 and 700 m a.g. were flown just after sunrise close to the San Pietro Capofiume ground station in the Po Valley, Italy. During the early morning hours the lowest layer (newly developing mixing layer contained a high nitrate fraction (20% which was coupled with enhanced hygroscopic growth. In the layer above (residual layer small nitrate fractions of ~ 2% were measured as well as low GFs. After full mixing of the layers, typically around noon and with increased temperature, the nitrate fraction decreased to 2% at all altitudes and led to similar hygroscopicity values as found in the residual layer. These distinct vertical and temporal changes underline the importance of airborne campaigns to study aerosol properties during the development of the mixed layer. The aerosol was externally mixed with 22 and 67% of the 500 nm particles in the range GF 1.5, respectively. Contributors to the non-hygroscopic mode in the observed size range are most likely mineral dust and biological material. Mean hygroscopicity parameters (κ were 0.34, 0.19 and 0.18 for particles in the newly forming mixing layer, residual layer and fully mixed layer, respectively. These results agree well with those from chemical analysis which found values of κ = 0.27, 0.21 and 0

  12. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  13. Biogenic VOC oxidation and organic aerosol formation in an urban nocturnal boundary layer: aircraft vertical profiles in Houston, TX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Brown

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic compounds are a large component of aerosol mass, but organic aerosol (OA sources remain poorly characterized. Recent model studies have suggested nighttime oxidation of biogenic hydrocarbons as a potentially large OA source, but analysis of field measurements to test these predictions is sparse. We present nighttime vertical profiles of nitrogen oxides, ozone, VOCs and aerosol composition measured during low approaches of the NOAA P-3 aircraft to airfields in Houston, TX. This region has large emissions of both biogenic hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides. The latter serves as a source of the nitrate radical, NO3, a key nighttime oxidant. Biogenic VOCs (BVOC and urban pollutants were concentrated within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL, which varied in depth from 100–400 m. Despite concentrated NOx at low altitude, ozone was never titrated to zero, resulting in rapid NO3 radical production rates of 0.2–2.7ppbv h-1 within the NBL. Monoterpenes and isoprene were frequently present within the NBL and underwent rapid oxidation (up to 1ppbv h−1, mainly by NO3 and to a lesser extent O3. Concurrent enhancement in organic and nitrate aerosol on several profiles was consistent with primary emissions and with secondary production from nighttime BVOC oxidation, with the latter equivalent to or slightly larger than the former. Ratios of organic aerosol to CO within the NBL ranged from 14 to 38 μg m−3 OA/ppmv CO. A box model simulation incorporating monoterpene emissions, oxidant formation rates and monoterpene SOA yields suggested overnight OA production of 0.5 to 9 μg m−3.

  14. Seasonal differences in the vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over rural Oklahoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Andrews

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A small airplane made 597 aerosol optical property (light absorption and light scattering vertical profile measurements over a rural Oklahoma site between March 2000 and December 2007. The aerosol profiles obtained during these 8 yr of measurements suggest significant seasonal differences in aerosol loading (scattering and absorption. The highest amounts of scattering and absorbing aerosol are observed during the summer and the lowest loading occurs during the winter. The relative contribution of aerosol absorption is highest in the winter (i.e., single scattering albedo is lowest in winter, particularly aloft. Aerosol absorption generally decreased with altitude below ~1.5 km and then was relatively constant or decreased more gradually above that. Aerosol scattering decreased sharply with altitude below ~1.5 km but, unlike absorption, also decreased at higher altitudes, albeit less sharply. Scattering Ångström exponents suggest that the aerosol was dominated by sub-micron aerosol during the summer at all altitudes, but that larger particles were present, especially in the spring and winter above 1 km. The seasonal variability observed for aerosol loading is consistent with AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD although the AOD values calculated from in situ adjusted to ambient conditions and matching wavelengths are up to a factor of two lower than AERONET AOD values depending on season. The column averaged single scattering albedo derived from in situ airplane measurements are similar in value to the AERONET single scattering albedo inversion product but the seasonal patterns are different – possibly a consequence of the strict constraints on obtaining single scattering albedo from AERONET data. A comparison of extinction Ångström exponent and asymmetry parameter from the airplane and AERONET platforms suggests similar seasonal variability with smaller particles observed in the summer and fall and larger particles observed in spring and

  15. Analysis of laminated structure in ozone vertical profiles in central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mlch

    Full Text Available Using statistical techniques, we study the relationship between the long-term changes in the laminar structure of the ozone vertical profile at two central-European stations - Hohenpeissenberg and Lindenberg - and other quantities potentially affecting the state of the lower stratosphere, and total-ozone content. We consider only positive laminae greater than 30 nbar. Laminae contribute non-negligibly to total ozone, and this contribution varies strongly with season. The maximum laminae-occurrence frequency in late winter/early spring is five-times higher than the minimum in early autumn. The main result of the paper is the discovery of a strong negative trend in the frequency of laminae occurrence, about –15% per decade, and even a slightly stronger negative trend in ozone content in laminae. Strong negative trends in laminae occurrence imply negative changes in total ozone as well. No pronounced effect of the quasi-biennial oscillation and solar cycle on laminae was found, whereas the 100-hPa temperature had a clear effect, and there was an indication of substantial effects of volcanic eruptions and El Niño southern oscillation events. Long-term changes in individual time series of meteorological parameters measured over Hohenpeissenberg do not indicate their significant role in the observed trend in laminae occurrence. On the other hand, there is some increase in the occurrence of very zonal circulation patterns, as well as slight decrease in very meridional circulation patterns. Together with other indications this allows us to say that dynamical effects are expected to be a principal contributor. Thus changes in laminae occurrence will probably be able to serve as an indicator/tracer of long-term changes in lower-stratospheric dynamics.

  16. Remote Sensing the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius, Thermodynamic Phase, and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. V.; Marshak, A.; Remer, L. A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fernandez-Borda, R.; Koren, I.; Correia, A. L.; Zubko, V.; Artaxo, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud-aerosol interaction is a key issue in the climate system, affecting the water cycle, the weather, and the total energy balance including the spatial and temporal distribution of latent heat release. Information on the vertical distribution of cloud droplet microphysics and thermodynamic phase as a function of temperature or height, can be correlated with details of the aerosol field to provide insight on how these particles are affecting cloud properties and their consequences to cloud lifetime, precipitation, water cycle, and general energy balance. Unfortunately, today's experimental methods still lack the observational tools that can characterize the true evolution of the cloud microphysical, spatial and temporal structure in the cloud droplet scale, and then link these characteristics to environmental factors and properties of the cloud condensation nuclei. Here we propose and demonstrate a new experimental approach (the cloud scanner instrument) that provides the microphysical information missed in current experiments and remote sensing options. Cloud scanner measurements can be performed from aircraft, ground, or satellite by scanning the side of the clouds from the base to the top, providing us with the unique opportunity of obtaining snapshots of the cloud droplet microphysical and thermodynamic states as a function of height and brightness temperature in clouds at several development stages. The brightness temperature profile of the cloud side can be directly associated with the thermodynamic phase of the droplets to provide information on the glaciation temperature as a function of different ambient conditions, aerosol concentration, and type. An aircraft prototype of the cloud scanner was built and flew in a field campaign in Brazil.

  17. A New Profile Learning Model for Recommendation System based on Machine Learning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen H. Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems (RSs have been used to successfully address the information overload problem by providing personalized and targeted recommendations to the end users. RSs are software tools and techniques providing suggestions for items to be of use to a user, hence, they typically apply techniques and methodologies from Data Mining. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a new user profile learning model to promote the recommendation accuracy of vertical recommendation systems. The proposed profile learning model employs the vertical classifier that has been used in multi classification module of the Intelligent Adaptive Vertical Recommendation (IAVR system to discover the user’s area of interest, and then build the user’s profile accordingly. Experimental results have proven the effectiveness of the proposed profile learning model, which accordingly will promote the recommendation accuracy.

  18. Modeling of Strip Heating Process in Vertical Continuous Annealing Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Fei; WANG Yong-qin; QIN Shu-ren

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism for heat transfer of radiation is usually adopted to heat strip in vertical continuous annealing furnace. The rate of heat transfer among strip and other objects can be hugely affected by the parameters of strip speed, geometry factors and radiating characteristic of surfaces of strip, radiating tubes and walls of furnace. A model including all parameters is proposed for calculating the heat transfer coefficient, predicting the strip tempera- ture and boundary temperature of strip through analyzing these parameters. The boundary temperature is a important datum and different from average arithmetic value of temperature of strip and temperature in furnace. Also, the model can be used to analyze the relation for temperature of strip and heat transfer coefficient, total heat transfer quantity and heating time. The model is built by using the radiating heat transfer rate, the Newtonrs law of cooling, and lumped system analysis. The results of calculation are compared to the data from production line. The comparisons indicate that the model can well predict the heating process. The model is already applied for process control in pro- duction line. Also, this research will provide a new method for analyzing the radiation heat transfer.

  19. Quantitative model of the growth of floodplains by vertical accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Troutman, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional model is developed to quantitatively predict the change in elevation, over a period of decades, for vertically accreting floodplains. This unsteady model approximates the monotonic growth of a floodplain as an incremental but constant increase of net sediment deposition per flood for those floods of a partial duration series that exceed a threshold discharge corresponding to the elevation of the floodplain. Sediment deposition from each flood increases the elevation of the floodplain and consequently the magnitude of the threshold discharge resulting in a decrease in the number of floods and growth rate of the floodplain. Floodplain growth curves predicted by this model are compared to empirical growth curves based on dendrochronology and to direct field measurements at five floodplain sites. The model was used to predict the value of net sediment deposition per flood which best fits (in a least squares sense) the empirical and field measurements; these values fall within the range of independent estimates of the net sediment deposition per flood based on empirical equations. These empirical equations permit the application of the model to estimate of floodplain growth for other floodplains throughout the world which do not have detailed data of sediment deposition during individual floods. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  20. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area

  1. Stochastic spatial structured model for vertically and horizontally transmitted infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana T. C.; Assis, Vladimir R. V.; Pinho, Suani T. R.; Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2017-02-01

    We study a space structured stochastic model for vertical and horizontal transmitted infection. By means of simple and pair mean-field approximation as well as Monte Carlo simulations, we construct the phase diagram, which displays four states: healthy (H), infected (I), extinct (E), and coexistent (C). In state H only healthy hosts are present, whereas in state I only infected hosts are present. The state E is characterized by the extinction of the hosts whereas in state C there is a coexistence of infected and healthy hosts. In addition to the usual scenario with continuous transition between the I, C and H phases, we found a different scenario with the suppression of the C phase and a discontinuous phase transition between I and H phases.

  2. Model of Vertical Product Differentiation Based on Triangular Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jian-bing; WANG He-ping; SHEN Yun-hong

    2007-01-01

    Supposing that the consumer preference complies with triangular distribution instead of uniform distribution, we establish the model of vertical product differentiation. The simulation shows that there exists stable equilibrium along with unstable equilibrium. In stable equilibrium, high quality products gain an advantage over low quality products. In unstable equilibrium, the former does not possess an apparent advantage in competition, likely to be at a disadvantage. In order to evolve from unstable equilibrium to stable equilibrium, it is necessary for firms to solve such problems as high prices and consumers' perception of scarcity on product qualities. In general, both product qualities and firm profits increase with the consuming capacity and quality perception, and the latter more rapidly.

  3. Vertical Profiles of the 3-D Wind Velocity Retrieved from Multiple Wind Lidars Performing Triple Range-Height-Indicator Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debnath, Mithu; Iungo, G. Valerio; Ashton, Ryan; Brewer, W. Alan; Choukulkar, Aditya; Delgado, Ruben; Lundquist, Julie K.; Shaw, William J.; Wilczak, James M.; Wolfe, Daniel

    2017-02-06

    Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. However, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

  4. Gamma-ray-based measurement of concentration distribution in pipe flow of settling slurry: vertical profiles and tomographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupička Jan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Principles of gamma-ray-based measurement are summarized and their application is demonstrated on an operation of the radiometric facility installed in the test loop for slurry flows at the Institute of Hydrodynamics. The facility is able to measure vertical profiles of chord-averaged concentrations and concentration maps in the pipe cross section. A methodology of measurement is proposed including detection and quantification of random and systematic errors. Experimental results are discussed in the light of the proposed methodology. Experimentally determined vertical profiles of concentration are presented for slurry flows of four different fractions of glass beads. The tomographic application of the radiometric device is demonstrated on a measured concentration map and a suitable image reconstruction method is tested. High reliability of measured concentration distributions is proved except for regions near the pipe wall. The radiometric method is shown to be a useful tool for measurement of concentration distribution in slurry flow through a pipe.

  5. Investigations of the Diurnal Variation of Vertical HCHO Profiles Based on MAX-DOAS Measurements in Beijing: Comparisons with OMI Vertical Column Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanlim Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the diurnal characteristics of vertical formaldehyde (HCHO profiles was conducted based on multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS measurements in Beijing during the CAREBEIJING campaign, covering a month-long period through August and September 2006. Vertical HCHO profiles were retrieved based on a combined differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS technique and an optimal estimation method (OEM. The HCHO volume-mixing ratio (VMR was found to be highest in the layer from the surface up to an altitude of 1 km and to decrease with altitude above this layer. In all retrieved profiles, HCHO was not detected in the layer from 3–4 km. Over the diurnal cycle, the HCHO VMR values were generally highest at 15:00 local time (LT and were lower in the morning and late afternoon. The mean HCHO VMRs were 6.17, 1.82, and 0.80 ppbv for the 0–1, 1–2, and 2–3-km layers, respectively, at 15:00 LT, whereas they were 3.54 (4.79, 1.06 (1.43, and 0.46 (0.63 ppbv for the 0–1, 1–2, and 2–3-km layers, respectively, at 09:00 (17:00 LT. The HCHO VMRs reached their highest values at 15:00 LT on August 19, which were 17.71, 5.20, and 2.31 ppbv for the 0–1, 1–2, and 2–3-km layers, respectively. This diurnal pattern implies that the photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs was most active at 15:00 LT for several days during the campaign period. In a comparison of the derived HCHO VCDs with those obtained from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI measurements, the HCHO vertical column density (VCD values obtained from the OMI measurements tend to be smaller than those from the MAX-DOAS.

  6. Enhancement of a Turbulence Sub-Model for More Accurate Predictions of Vertical Stratifications in 3D Coastal and Estuarine Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrui Huang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improvement of the Mellor and Yamada's 2nd order turbulence model in the Princeton Ocean Model (POM for better predictions of vertical stratifications of salinity in estuaries. The model was evaluated in the strongly stratified estuary, Apalachicola River, Florida, USA. The three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was applied to study the stratified flow and salinity intrusion in the estuary in response to tide, wind, and buoyancy forces. Model tests indicate that model predictions over estimate the stratification when using the default turbulent parameters. Analytic studies of density-induced and wind-induced flows indicate that accurate estimation of vertical eddy viscosity plays an important role in describing vertical profiles. Initial model revision experiments show that the traditional approach of modifying empirical constants in the turbulence model leads to numerical instability. In order to improve the performance of the turbulence model while maintaining numerical stability, a stratification factor was introduced to allow adjustment of the vertical turbulent eddy viscosity and diffusivity. Sensitivity studies indicate that the stratification factor, ranging from 1.0 to 1.2, does not cause numerical instability in Apalachicola River. Model simulations show that increasing the turbulent eddy viscosity by a stratification factor of 1.12 results in an optimal agreement between model predictions and observations in the case study presented in this study. Using the proposed stratification factor provides a useful way for coastal modelers to improve the turbulence model performance in predicting vertical turbulent mixing in stratified estuaries and coastal waters.

  7. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ZERO-OFFSET AND VERTICAL RADAR PROFILING GPR TECHNIQUES WITH EMPHASIS ON PROBLEMATIC BOREHOLE EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Vignoli, Giulio; Cassiani, Giorgio

    contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method’s capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows...... that the dielectric relative permittivity profiles recovered from ZOP and VRP first-break inversions are in strong disagreement, providing very different permittivity profiles. The analysis of synthetic radargrams shows the presence of an electromagnetic (EM) wave established by the joint presence of the air......-filled borehole within a higher permittivity surrounding soil. This event has a velocity intermediate between the soil and air speed values, and interferes with the picking of first arrivals in the VRP mode. The numerical simulations are performed with different borehole diameters, confirming that the velocity...

  8. Ground-Based Remote or In Situ Measurement of Vertical Profiles of Wind in the Lower Troposphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, Andrew; Newman, Jennifer

    2017-02-24

    Knowledge of winds in the lower troposphere is essential for a range of applications, including weather forecasting, transportation, natural hazards, and wind energy. This presentation focuses on the measurement of vertical profiles of wind in the lower troposphere for wind energy applications. This presentation introduces the information that wind energy site development and operations require, how it used, and the benefits and problems of current measurements from in-situ measurements and remote sensing. The development of commercial Doppler wind lidar systems over the last 10 years are shown, along with the lessons learned from this experience. Finally, potential developments in wind profiling aimed at reducing uncertainty and increasing data availability are introduced.

  9. In situ vertical profiles of aerosol extinction, mass, and composition over the southeast United States during SENEX and SEAC4RS: observations of a modest aerosol enhancement aloft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, N. L.; Brock, C. A.; Angevine, W. M.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D.; de Gouw, J. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Graus, M. G.; Holloway, J. S.; Huey, G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Liu, X.; Markovic, M. Z.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Mikoviny, T.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical profiles of submicron aerosol from in situ aircraft-based measurements were used to construct aggregate profiles of chemical, microphysical, and optical properties. These vertical profiles were collected over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during the summer of 2013 as part of two separate field studies: the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study and the Study of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS). Shallow cumulus convection was observed during many profiles. These conditions enhance vertical transport of trace gases and aerosol and create a cloudy transition layer on top of the sub-cloud mixed layer. The trace gas and aerosol concentrations in the transition layer were modeled as a mixture with contributions from the mixed layer below and the free troposphere above. The amount of vertical mixing, or entrainment of air from the free troposphere, was quantified using the observed mixing ratio of carbon monoxide (CO). Although the median aerosol mass, extinction, and volume decreased with altitude in the transition layer, they were ~10 % larger than expected from vertical mixing alone. This enhancement was likely due to secondary aerosol formation in the transition layer. Although the transition layer enhancements of the particulate sulfate and organic aerosol (OA) were both similar in magnitude, only the enhancement of sulfate was statistically significant. The column integrated extinction, or aerosol optical depth (AOD), was calculated for each individual profile, and the transition layer enhancement of extinction typically contributed less than 10 % to the total AOD. Our measurements and analysis were motivated by two recent studies that have hypothesized an enhanced layer of secondary aerosol aloft to explain the summertime enhancement of AOD (2-3 times greater than winter) over the southeastern United States. The first study attributes the layer aloft to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) while

  10. Variations of n /sub e/h/ profiles and of vertical gradients at low latitudes during disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharova, E.E.; Zevakina, R.A.; Palacio, L.

    1979-11-01

    The paper examines the electron density height profile and vertical gradients of electron density distribution as a function of the type and phase of ionospheric disturbances on the basis of data from the Cuban geophysical center for 1968. The difference between low-latitude height variations of electron density and those at midlatitudes is investigated, and possible causes of electron density height variations at low latitudes are discussed.

  11. Gamma-ray-based measurement of concentration distribution in pipe flow of settling slurry: vertical profiles and tomographic maps

    OpenAIRE

    Krupička, Jan; Matoušek, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Principles of gamma-ray-based measurement are summarized and their application is demonstrated on an operation of the radiometric facility installed in the test loop for slurry flows at the Institute of Hydrodynamics. The facility is able to measure vertical profiles of chord-averaged concentrations and concentration maps in the pipe cross section. A methodology of measurement is proposed including detection and quantification of random and systematic errors. Experimental results are disc...

  12. Vertical profiles of lightning-produced NO2 enhancements in the upper troposphere observed by OSIRIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. F. Bernath

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to perform a global search of the upper troposphere (z≥10 km for enhancements of nitrogen dioxide and determine their sources. This is the first application of satellite-based limb scattering to study upper tropospheric NO2. We have searched two years (May 2003–May 2005 of OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System operational NO2 concentrations (version 2.3/2.4 to find large enhancements in the observations by comparing with photochemical box model calculations and by identifying local maxima in NO2 volume mixing ratio. We find that lightning is the main production mechanism responsible for the large enhancements in OSIRIS NO2 observations as expected. Similar patterns in the abundances and spatial distribution of the NO2 enhancements are obtained by perturbing the lightning within the GEOS-Chem 3-dimensional chemical transport model. In most cases, the presence of lightning is confirmed with coincident imagery from LIS (Lightning Imaging Sensor and the spatial extent of the NO2 enhancement is mapped using nadir observations of tropospheric NO2 at high spatial resolution from SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument. The combination of the lightning and chemical sensors allows us to investigate globally the role of lightning to the abundance of NO2 in the upper troposphere (UT. Lightning contributes 60% of the tropical upper tropospheric NO2 in GEOS-Chem simulations. The spatial and temporal distribution of NO2 enhancements from lightning (May 2003–May 2005 is investigated. The enhancements generally occur at 12 to 13 km more frequently than at 10 to 11 km. This is consistent with the notion that most of the NO2 is forming and persisting near the cloud top altitude in the tropical upper troposphere. The latitudinal distribution is mostly as expected. In general, the thunderstorms exhibiting weaker vertical development (e

  13. Vertical profiles of ozone, VOCs and meteorological parameters in within and outside of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, C.; Greenberg, J.; Bueno, E.; Bernabe, R.; Aguilar, J.; Blanco, S.; Wöhrnschimmel, H.; Guenther, A.; Cardenas, B.; Turnipseed, A.

    2007-05-01

    High ozone levels with maxima over 250 ppb have been an air quality problem in Mexico City for more than a decade. This ozone is produced in the daytime by photochemical reactions, initiated by its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation. The objective of this work is to contribute to the understanding of the evolution of these air pollutants at different heights of the boundary layer by means of vertical profile measurements. Ozone, VOCs and meteorological vertical profiles were determined in Northern Mexico City (T0 site) using a tethered balloon for 10 days during the MILAGRO field Campaign 2006, between 4 AM and 4 PM. Measurements were done up to 1000 meter above ground (ozone and meteorological parameters) and up to 200 m above ground for VOCs. VOCs samples were collected during 4 minutes in canisters and analyzed with GC-FID to identify 13 species (ethane, propane, propylene, butane, acetylene, pentane, hexane, heptane, benzene, octane, toluene, nonane and o-xylene). For 4 of the days, VOC integrated samples were also taken using personal pumps and absorbent cartridges at height between 200 and 1000 m. Sample cartridges were analyzed by GC-MS for volatile organic compounds (n-butane, i-pentane, n- pentane, benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, o-xylene, m&p-xylene, 1,2,4-tri-methyl-benzene and C3-benzenes). Ozone vertical profiles, frequently presented high concentrations above 400 m in the early morning. During the daytime, more homogeneous profiles indicate an increased vertical mixing. VOCs profiles show similar concentrations for all heights at dawn. In the morning, highest concentrations were determined at a height of about 100 meter, whereas at noon and in the afternoon concentrations decreased with height. Comparing VOC concentrations during the course of a day, highest values are measured in the morning. The highest VOC concentrations were propane, butane, and toluene. For some

  14. Results of vertical seismic profiling at Well 46-28, Rye Patch Geothermal Field, Pershing County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feighner, M.A.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

    1998-02-25

    A Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was recorded in Rye Patch by LBNL between December 11 and December 13, 1997. Figure 1 shows the location of the Rye Patch Geothermal Field with Well 46-28 located within the marked Rye Patch Anomaly. The VSP in Well 46-28 used a vibroseis source and a single-level, high temperature, hydraulic wall-locking, 3-component seismometer. The vibroseis source was a Mertz P-wave vibrator. The source sweep was 10 Hz to 80 Hz, 10 seconds long, with a 0.2 s cosine taper. The borehole geophone was an SSC model LVHK 6001 using 14 Hz geophones. The recording system was a Geometrics Strataview. Six data channels were recorded: the three geophones, the source pilot, the vibrator reference and the vibrator baseplate accelerometer. The record length was 12,288 samples at a 1 ms sample rate, giving a 2.3 s correlated record length. A 10 Hz low cut filter was used and no high cut filter was used except the anti-alias filter. Results are described.

  15. An extended two-dimensional mathematical model of vertical ring furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, S.; Charette, A.; Bui, R. T.; Tomsett, A.; Potocnik, V.

    1996-04-01

    An extended two-dimensional (2-D+) mathematical model of vertical anode baking furnaces has been developed. The work was motivated by the fact that a previous 2-D model was unable to predict the nonuniform baking in the transverse direction, i.e., perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the furnace. The modeling strategy based on dividing each section in four zones (underlid, pit, underpit, head wall and fire shaft zones) and introducing two symmetry planes in the exterior pits is explained. The basic heat-transfer relations used are also detailed. Selected results shown include draught and oxygen concentration profiles in the flue, gas and anode temperature distributions and fuel consumption in the back fire ramp. Simulation and experimental results are compared.

  16. Vertical variation of particle speed and flux density in aeolian saltation: Measurement and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; SøRensen, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Particle dynamics in aeolian saltation has been studied in a boundary layer wind tunnel above beds composed of quartz grains having diameters of either 242 μm or 320 μm. The cross section of the tunnel is 600 mm × 900 mm, and its thick boundary layer allows precise estimation of the fluid friction speed. Saltation is modeled using a numerical saltation model, and predicted grain speeds agree fairly well with experimental results obtained from laser-Doppler anemometry. The use of laser-Doppler anemometry to study aeolian saltation is thoroughly discussed and some pitfalls are identified. At 80 mm height the ratio between air speed and grain speed is about 1.1 and from there it increases toward the bed so that at 5 mm it is about 2.0. All grain speed profiles converge toward a common value of about 1 m/s at 2-3 mm height. Moreover, the estimated launch velocity distributions depend only very weakly on the friction speed in contrast to what has often been assumed in the literature. Flux density profiles measured with a laser-Doppler appear to be similar to most other density profiles measured with vertical array compartment traps; that is, two exponential segments will fit data between heights from a few millimeters to 100-200 mm. The experimental flux density profiles are found to agree well with model predictions. Generally, validation rates are low from 30 to 50% except at the highest level of 80 mm, where they approach 80%. When flux density profiles based on the validated data are used to estimate the total mass transport rate results are in fair agreement with measured transport rates except for conditions near threshold where as much as 50% difference is observed.

  17. Consistent Static Models of Local Thermospheric Composition Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Picone, J M; Drob, D P

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigate the ideal, nondriven multifluid equations of motion to identify consistent (i.e., truly stationary), mechanically static models for composition profiles within the thermosphere. These physically faithful functions are necessary to define the parametric core of future empirical atmospheric models and climatologies. Based on the strength of interspecies coupling, the thermosphere has three altitude regions: (1) the lower thermosphere (herein z ~200 km), in which the species flows are approximately uncoupled; and (3) a transition region in between, where the effective species particle mass and the effective species vertical flow interpolate between the solutions for the upper and lower thermosphere. We place this view in the context of current terminology within the community, i.e., a fully mixed (lower) region and an upper region in diffusive equilibrium (DE). The latter condition, DE, currently used in empirical composition models, does not represent a truly static composition profile ...

  18. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison and fine-mode fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations and fine-mode fraction. Arctic haze observed in <2 km and 2–4 km over Alaska in April 2008 originated mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively, according to aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements. The Ångström exponent for these air masses is 1.4 ± 0.3 and 1.7 ± 0.1, respectively, when derived at 499 nm from a second-order polynomial fit to the AOD spectra measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 over 354–2139 nm. We examine 55 vertical profiles selected from all phases of the experiment. For two thirds of them, the AOD spectra are within 3% + 0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes from local biomass burning observed in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Ångström exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD > 0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference (in both directions from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within ±0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements between 340–1640 nm for five overpass events.

  19. Retrieval of vertical wind profiles during monsoon from satellite observed winds over the Indian Ocean using complex EOF analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C M Kishtawal; Sujit Basu; S Karthikeyan

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the feasibility of deriving vertical wind profiles from current satellite observations. With this aim, we carried out complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analysis of a large number of radiosonde observations of wind profiles over the Indian Ocean during the monsoon months. It has been found that the first two CEOFs explain 67% of the total variance in wind fields. While the first principal component is well correlated with the winds at 850 mb ( = 0.80), the second one is highly correlated with winds at 200 mb ( = 0.89). This analysis formed the basis of a retrieval algorithm which ensures the retrieval of vertical profiles of winds using satellite tracked cloud motion vector winds. Under the assumption that accurate measurements of wind are available at the above mentioned levels, the r.m.s. error of retrieval of each component of wind is estimated to range between 2ms-1 and 6ms-1 at different levels, which is much less than the natural variance of winds at these levels. For a better visualization of retrieval, we have provided retrieved and true wind profiles side by side for four typical synoptic conditions during the monsoon season.

  20. Modelling clustering of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Clemens F.; Filippov, Alexander E.; Heinlein, Thorsten; Schneider, Jörg J.; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated that arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) exhibit strong frictional properties. Experiments indicated a strong decrease of the friction coefficient from the first to the second sliding cycle in repetitive measurements on the same VACNT spot, but stable values in consecutive cycles. VACNTs form clusters under shear applied during friction tests, and self-organization stabilizes the mechanical properties of the arrays. With increasing load in the range between 300 µN and 4 mN applied normally to the array surface during friction tests the size of the clusters increases, while the coefficient of friction decreases. To better understand the experimentally obtained results, we formulated and numerically studied a minimalistic model, which reproduces the main features of the system with a minimum of adjustable parameters. We calculate the van der Waals forces between the spherical friction probe and bunches of the arrays using the well-known Morse potential function to predict the number of clusters, their size, instantaneous and mean friction forces and the behaviour of the VACNTs during consecutive sliding cycles and at different normal loads. The data obtained by the model calculations coincide very well with the experimental data and can help in adapting VACNT arrays for biomimetic applications. PMID:26464787

  1. Ozone trends derived from the total column and vertical profiles at a northern mid-latitude station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Nair

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The trends and variability of ozone are assessed over a northern mid-latitude station, Haute-Provence Observatory (OHP: 43.93° N, 5.71° E, using total column ozone observations from the Dobson and Système d'Analyse par Observation Zénithale spectrometers, and stratospheric ozone profile measurements from light detection and ranging (lidar, ozonesondes, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II, Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS. A multivariate regression model with quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, solar flux, aerosol optical thickness, heat flux, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO and a piecewise linear trend (PWLT or equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC functions is applied to the ozone anomalies. The maximum variability of ozone in winter/spring is explained by QBO and heat flux in the ranges 15–45 km and 15–24 km, respectively. The NAO shows maximum influence in the lower stratosphere during winter, while the solar flux influence is largest in the lower and middle stratosphere in summer. The total column ozone trends estimated from the PWLT and EESC functions are of −1.47 ± 0.27 and −1.40 ± 0.25 DU yr−1, respectively, over the period 1984–1996 and about 0.55 ± 0.30 and 0.42 ± 0.08 DU yr−1, respectively, over the period 1997–2010. The ozone profiles yield similar and significant EESC-based and PWLT trends for 1984–1996, and are about −0.5 and −0.8% yr−1 in the lower and upper stratosphere, respectively. For 1997–2010, the EESC-based and PWLT estimates are of the order of 0.3 and 0.1% yr−1, respectively, in the 18–28 km range, and at 40–45 km, EESC provides significant ozone trends larger than the insignificant PWLT results. Furthermore, very similar vertical trends for the respective time periods are also deduced from another long-term satellite-based data set (GOZCARDS–Global OZone Chemistry And Related trace gas Data records for the

  2. A two-dimensional parabolic model for vertical annular two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, F.M.; Toledo, A. Alvarez; Paladino, E.E. [Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering, Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)], e-mail: emilio@ct.ufrn.br

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a solution algorithm for predicting hydrodynamic parameters for developing and equilibrium, adiabatic, annular, vertical two-phase flow. It solves mass and momentum transport differential equations for both the core and the liquid film across their entire domains. Thus, the velocity and shear stress distributions from the tube center to the wall are obtained, together with the average film thickness and the pressure gradient, making no use of empirical closure relations nor assuming any known velocity profile to solve the triangular relationship in the liquid film. The model was developed using the Finite Volume Method and an iterative procedure is proposed to solve all flow variables for given phase superficial velocities. The procedure is validated against the analytical solution for laminar flow and experimental data for gas-liquid turbulent flow with entrainment. For the last case, an algebraic turbulence model is used for turbulent viscosity calculation for both, liquid film and gas core. (author)

  3. Numerical evaluation of turbulence models for dense to dilute gas-solid flows in vertical conveyor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salar Azizi; Dariush Mowla; Goodarz Ahmadi

    2012-01-01

    A two-fluid model (TFM) of multiphase flows based on the kinetic theory and small frictional limit boundary condition of granular flow was used to study the behavior of dense to dilute gas-solid flows in vertical pneumatic conveyor.An axisymmetric 2-dimensional,vertical pipe with 5.6 m length and 0.01 m internal diameter was chosen as the computation domain,same to that used for experimentation in the literature.The chosen particles are spherical,of diameter 1.91 mm and density 2500 kg/m3.Turbulence interaction between the gas and particle phases was investigated by Simonin's and Ahmadi's models and their numerical results were validated for dilute to dense conveying of particles.Flow regimes transition and pressure drop were predicted.Voidage and velocity profiles of each phase were calculated in radial direction at different lengths of the conveying pipe.It was found that the voidage has a minimum,and gas and solid velocities have maximum values along the center line of the conveying pipe and pressure drop has a minimum value in transition from dense slugging to dilute stable flow regime.Slug length and pressure fluctuation reduction were predicted with increasing gas velocity,too.It is shown that solid phase turbulence plays a significant role in numerical prediction of hydrodynamics of conveyor and the capability of particles turbulence models depends on tuning parameters of slip-wall boundary condition.

  4. Pi-MAX: a new parametrized algorithm to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases and aerosols from MAX-DOAS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, Julia; Beirle, Steffen; Doerner, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Multi-Axis (MAX-) DOAS instruments observe scattered sunlight under various mostly slant elevation angles. From such observations information on tropospheric profiles of trace gases and aerosols can be retrieved. MAX-DOAS observations can be used to quantify emissions and to study chemical processes in the atmosphere. Measuring (horizontally and vertically) averaged concentrations the technique can be used as a link between in-situ and satellite measurements. Thus satellite observations of tropospheric trace gases can be validated. IMAX (Parametrized Inversion for MAX-DOAS measurements) is a parametrized method to retrieve vertical profiles of trace gases (such as H2O, NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO) and aerosols. No online calculations are necessary, since look-up tables (LUT) calculated with a Monte Carlo based radiative Transport Model are used. In this manner it is user-friendly, easy to distribute and applicable to every measurement location. The here shown measurements took place in the Maldives in March, 2012, during the CARDEX campaign. Simultaneous sun photometry-, Lidar- and UAV-measurements provide the possibility to validate the new algorithm. We present time series of profiles of trace gas concentrations and aerosol extinction We discuss the effects of clouds on the retrieved results.

  5. Investigation the optical and radiative properties of aerosol vertical profile of boundary layer by lidar and ground based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Chou, C.; Lin, P.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    The planetary boundary layer is the air layer near the ground directly affected by diurnal heat, moisture, aerosol, and cloud transfer to or from the surface. In the daytime solar radiation heats the surface, initiating thermal instability or convection. Whereas, the scattering and absorption of aerosols or clouds might decrease the surface radiation or heat atmosphere which induce feedbacks such as the enhanced stratification and change in relative humidity in the boundary layer. This study is aimed to understand the possible radiative effect of aerosols basing on ground based aerosol measurements and lidar installed in National Taiwan University in Taipei. The optical and radiative properties of aerosols are dominated by aerosol composition, particle size, hygroscopicity property, and shape. In this study, aerosol instruments including integrating nephelometer, open air nephelometer, aethalometer are applied to investigate the relationship between aerosol hygroscopicity properties and aerosol types. The aerosol hygroscopicity properties are further applied to investigate the effect of relative humidity on aerosol vertical profiles measured by a dual-wavelength and depolarization lidar. The possible radiative effect of aerosols are approached by vertical atmospheric extinction profiles measured by lidar. Calculated atmospheric and aerosol heating effects was compared with vertical meteorological parameters measured by radiosonde. The result shows light-absorbing aerosol has the potential to affect the stability of planetary boundary layer.

  6. Retrievability of atmospheric water vapour, temperature and vertical windspeed profiles from proposed sub-millimetre instrument ORTIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Jane; Irwin, Patrick; Teanby, Nicholas; de Kok, Remco; Calcutt, Simon; Irshad, Ranah; Ellison, Brian

    2010-05-01

    The sub-millimetre range of the spectrum has been exploited in the field of Earth observation by many instruments over the years and has provided a plethora of information on atmospheric chemistry and dynamics - however, this spectral range has not been fully explored in planetary science. To this end, a sub-millimetre instrument, the Orbiter Terahertz Infrared Spectrometer (ORTIS), is jointly proposed by the University of Oxford and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, to meet the requirements of the European Space Agency's Cosmic Visions Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). ORTIS will consist of an infrared and a sub-millimetre component; however in this study only the sub-millimetre component will be explored. The sub-millimetre component of ORTIS is projected to measure a narrow band of frequencies centred at approximately 2.2 THz, with a spectral resolution varying between approximately 1 kHz and 1 MHz, and having an expected noise magnitude of 2 nW/cm2 sr cm-1. In this spectral region, there are strong water and methane emission lines at most altitudes on Jupiter. The sub-millimetre component of ORTIS is designed to measure the abundance of atmospheric water vapour and atmospheric temperature, as well as vertical windspeed profiles from Doppler-shifted emission lines, measured at high spectral resolution. This study will test to see if, in practice, these science objectives may be met from the planned design, as applied to Jupiter. In order to test the retrievability of atmospheric water vapour, temperature and windspeed with the proposed ORTIS design, it is necessary to have a set of "measurements' for which the input parameters (such as species' concentrations, atmospheric temperature, pressure - and windspeed) are known. This is accomplished by generating a set of radiative transfer simulations using radiative transfer model RadTrans in the spectral range sampled by ORTIS, whereby the atmospheric data pertaining to Jupiter have provided by Cassini

  7. A UML profile for framework modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-liang(徐小良); WANG Le-yu(汪乐宇); ZHOU Hong(周泓)

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendibility adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  8. A UML profile for framework modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-liang; Wang, Le-yu; Zhou, Hong

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendability adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  9. Capturing vertical profiles of aerosols and black carbon over the Indian Ocean using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Corrigan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol properties provide essential information for generating more accurate model estimates of radiative forcing and atmospheric heating rates compared with employing remotely sensed column averaged properties. A month long campaign over the Indian Ocean during March 2006 investigated the interaction of aerosol, clouds, and radiative effects. Routine vertical profiles of aerosol and water vapor were determined using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with miniaturized instruments. Comparisons of these airborne instruments with established ground-based instruments and in aircraft-to-aircraft comparisons demonstrated an agreement within 10%.

    Aerosol absorption optical depths measured directly using the unmanned aircraft differed from columnar AERONET sun-photometer results by only 20%. Measurements of total particle concentration, particle size distributions, aerosol absorption and black carbon concentrations are presented along with the trade wind thermodynamic structure from the surface to 3000 m above sea level. Early March revealed a well-mixed layer up to the cloud base at 500 m above mean sea level (m a.s.l., followed by a decrease of aerosol concentrations with altitude. The second half of March saw the arrival of a high altitude plume existing above the mixed layer that originated from a continental source and increased aerosol concentrations by more than tenfold, yet the surface air mass showed little change in aerosol concentrations and was still predominantly influenced by marine sources. Black carbon concentrations at 1500 m above sea level increased from 70 ng/m3 to more than 800 ng/m3 with the arrival of this polluted plume. The absorption aerosol optical depth increased from as low as 0.005 to as much as 0.035 over the same period. The spectral dependence of the aerosol absorption revealed an absorption Angstrom exponent of 1.0, which is typical

  10. Capturing vertical profiles of aerosols and black carbon over the Indian Ocean using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Corrigan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol properties provide essential information for generating more accurate model estimates of radiative forcing and atmospheric heating rates compared with employing remotely sensed column averaged properties. A month long campaign over the Indian Ocean during March 2006 investigated the interaction of aerosol, clouds, and radiative effects. Routine vertical profiles of aerosol and water vapor were determined using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with miniaturized instruments. Comparisons of these airborne instruments with established ground-based instruments and in aircraft-to-aircraft comparisons demonstrated an agreement within 10%.

    Aerosol absorption optical depths measured directly using the unmanned aircraft differed from columnar AERONET sun-photometer results by only 20%. Measurements of total particle concentration, particle size distributions, aerosol absorption and black carbon concentrations are presented along with the trade wind thermodynamic structure from the surface to 3000 m above sea level. Early March revealed a well-mixed layer up to the cloud base at 500 m above mean seal level (m a.s.l., followed by a decrease of aerosol concentrations with altitude. The second half of March saw the arrival of a high altitude plume existing above the mixed layer that originated from a continental source and increased aerosol concentrations by more than tenfold, yet the surface air mass showed little change in aerosol concentrations and was still predominantly influenced by marine sources. Black carbon concentrations at 1500 m above sea level increased from 70 ng/m³ to more than 800 ng/m³ with the arrival of this polluted plume. The absorption aerosol optical depth increased from as low as 0.005 to as much as 0.035 over the same period. The spectral dependence of the aerosol absorption revealed an absorption Angstrom exponent of 1.0, which is typical of an aerosol with

  11. Radius model of convex vertical curve of freeway based on attachment coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Song-ling; PEI Yu-long

    2008-01-01

    A longitudinal slope brake model was established for the radius calculation of vertical curve of free-way through analyzing the dynamics of brake-running of vehicles running on the longitudinal slope road section. To satisfy the requirement of sight distance, a relation model was established for the attachment coefficient and the convex vertical curve radius. Using MATLAB simulation technique, the convex vertical curve radius at different attachment conditions was calculated accurately and a three-dimensional figure was drawn to describe the relation between the adhesive coefficient, the driving velocity and the radius of vertical curve. The correlation between the convex vertical curve radius and the adhesive coefficient was further analyzed and compared with National Technical Standards. The suggested radius of vertical curve was then put forward to provide a theoretical platform for the security design of the convex vertical curve.

  12. Vertical seismic profiling and integration with reflection seismic studies at Laxemar, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhlin, C.; Bergman, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Cosma, C.; Keskinen, J.; Enescu, N. [Vibrometric Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    Vertical seismic profile (VSP) data were acquired in October 2000 in the 1700 m deep KLX02 borehole, near Laxemar in southeastern Sweden. The objectives of the VSP were to image reflectors in the borehole for correlation with surface seismic and borehole data, study the signal penetration of explosive versus mechanical sources and determine the seismic velocity as a function of depth. Five principal source points were used, one located close to the KLX02 wellhead and 4 others that were offset by about 200 m to 400 m. An explosive source was only used at the wellhead and consisted of 15 grams of dynamite in 90 cm deep shot holes in bedrock. A swept impact seismic source (SIST) was also used at the wellhead, as well as at the other four offset source points. The primary SIST source consisted of a computer controlled mechanical hammer mounted on a tractor. By activating the hammer over a 15 second sweep length, the total energy transferred to the ground is on the same order as that produced by the dynamite. The recorded data are then processed to generate seismic records that are equivalent to a single impact source. A smaller hand held SIST source was also tested at the wellhead. Tests of both the tractor mounted source and dynamite were made at a location offset somewhat from the wellhead at a site containing loose sediments at the surface. Full waveform sonic, resistivity and gamma logs were also acquired in conjunction the VSP survey. A comparison between the explosive and large SIST source shows that comparable energy levels are produced by the two methods. The SIST source appears to be more stable in terms of the energy level, although the frequency content of data are somewhat lower. However, its most significant advantage is the low cost of preparation of the source points and the speed of the acquisition. Numerous reflections are observed on the VSP, as is the case on the surface seismic, implying a complex structure in the vicinity of the KLX02 borehole

  13. Water vapor on Titan: the stratospheric vertical profile from Cassini/CIRS infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, V.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Anderson, C. M.; Gorius, N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Coustenis, A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Teanby, N. A.; de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Bézard, B.; Lellouch, E.; Flasar, F. M.; Bampasidis, G.

    2012-04-01

    Water vapor in Titan’s middle atmosphere has previously been detected only by disk-average observations from the Infrared Space Observatory (Coustenis et al., 1998). We report here the successful detection of stratospheric water vapor using the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS, Flasar et al., 2004) following an earlier null result (de Kok et al., 2007a). CIRS senses water emissions in the far-infrared spectral region near 50 microns, which we have modeled using two independent radiative transfer and inversion codes (NEMESIS, Irwin et al 2008 and ART, Coustenis et al., 2010). From the analysis of nadir spectra we have derived a mixing ratio of (0.14 ± 0.05) ppb at 100 km, corresponding to a column abundance of approximately (3.7 ± 1.3) × 10^14 mol/cm2. Using limb observations, we obtained mixing ratios of (0.13 ± 0.04) ppb at 125 km and (0.45 ± 0.15) ppb at 225 km of altitude, confirming that the water abundance has a positive vertical gradient as predicted by photochemical models. In the latitude range (80˚S - 30˚N) we see no evidence for latitudinal variations in these abundances within the error bars. References: Coustenis, A.; Salama, A.; Lellouch, E.; Encrenaz, Th.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; de Graauw, Th.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Kessler, M. F., 1998. Evidence for water vapor in Titan's atmosphere from ISO/SWS data. Astronomy and Astrophysics, v.336, p.L85-L89 Coustenis, A.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Lavvas, P.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Carlson, R. C.; Piani, L.; Bampasidis, G.; Flasar, F. M.; Romani, P. N., 2010. Titan trace gaseous composition from CIRS at the end of the Cassini-Huygens prime mission. Icarus, Volume 207, Issue 1, p. 461-476. de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Lellouch, E.; Bézard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Nixon, C. A.; Fletcher, L.; Howett, C.; Calcutt, S. B.; Bowles, N. E.; Flasar, F. M.; Taylor, F. W. , 2007a. Oxygen compounds in Titan's stratosphere as observed by

  14. Characteristics and Vertical Profile of Shocked Quartz Grains in the YAX-1 Core: Constraints on Transient Crater Size and Ejecta Deposition Process of the Chicxulub Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.; Goto, K.; Sekine, Y.; Tajika, E.

    2013-08-01

    Characteristics and vertical profiles of PDFs on shocked quartz grains contained in the YAX-1 core derived from the Chicxulub Crater suggest that the core was located outside the transient crater, and that water had invaded into the crater.

  15. Transmission of vertical stress in a real soil profile. Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    of stresses. We quantified the effect of soil water content of topsoil/subsoil layers (wet/wet, wet/dry, and dry/dry) on stress transmission. 3D measurements of vertical stresses under a towed wheel (800/50R34) were performed in situ in a Stagnic Luvisol. The tyre was loaded with 60 kN, and we used...... the recommended tyre inflation pressure for traffic in the field (100 kPa). Seven stress transducers were inserted horizontally from a pit with minimal disturbance of soil at each of three depths (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m) and covering the width of the wheeled area. The vertical stresses at the tyre–soil contact area...... were measured in separate tests. Increase of water content in the topsoil by 114% increased the contact area by 149%, decreased the vertical stresses at the tyre–soil interface by 50%, and decreased the maximum vertical stress at 0.3 and 0.6 m depth by 46 and 63%, respectively. Stress attenuation...

  16. Implications of sensor configuration and topography on vertical plant profiles derived from terrestrial LiDAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Armston, J.; Newnham, G.; Herold, M.; Goodwin, N.

    2014-01-01

    The vertical distribution of plant constituents is a key parameter to describe vegetation structure and influences several processes, such as radiation interception, growth and habitat. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), also referred to as terrestrial LiDAR, has the potential to measure the canopy s

  17. Sub-bottom profiling with ambient noise measured on a drifting vertical array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, C.H.; Schippers, P.; Snellen, M.; Weterings, A.

    2005-01-01

    The angle and frequency dependent reflective properties of the seabed can be determined from beam-steered ambient noise measurements on a vertical array of hydrophones. From the up-to-down ratio the beam-smeared modulus square of the plane wave reflection coefficient is obtained. Geo-acoustic parame

  18. Implications of sensor configuration and topography on vertical plant profiles derived from terrestrial LiDAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calders, K.; Armston, J.; Newnham, G.; Herold, M.; Goodwin, N.

    2014-01-01

    The vertical distribution of plant constituents is a key parameter to describe vegetation structure and influences several processes, such as radiation interception, growth and habitat. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), also referred to as terrestrial LiDAR, has the potential to measure the canopy

  19. High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density-Profile Changes in Response to Large Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fainberg, Joseph; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Truhlik, Vladimir; Wang, Yongli; Bilitza, Dieter; Fung, Shing F.

    2015-01-01

    Large magnetic-storm induced changes have been detected in high-latitude topside vertical electron-density profiles Ne(h). The investigation was based on the large database of topside Ne(h) profiles and digital topside ionograms from the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program available from the NASA Space Physics Data Facility (SPDF) at http://spdf.gsfc.nasa.gov/isis/isis-status.html. This large database enabled Ne(h) profiles to be obtained when an ISIS satellite passed through nearly the same region of space before, during, and after a major magnetic storm. A major goal was to relate the magnetic-storm induced high-latitude Ne(h) profile changes to solar-wind parameters. Thus an additional data constraint was to consider only storms where solar-wind data were available from the NASA/SPDF OMNIWeb database. Ten large magnetic storms (with Dst less than -100 nT) were identified that satisfied both the Ne(h) profile and the solar-wind data constraints. During five of these storms topside ionospheric Ne(h) profiles were available in the high-latitude northern hemisphere and during the other five storms similar ionospheric data were available in the southern hemisphere. Large Ne(h) changes were observed during each one of these storms. Our concentration in this paper is on the northern hemisphere. The data coverage was best for the northern-hemisphere winter. Here Ne(h) profile enhancements were always observed when the magnetic local time (MLT) was between 00 and 03 and Ne(h) profile depletions were always observed between 08 and 10 MLT. The observed Ne(h) deviations were compared with solar-wind parameters, with appropriate time shifts, for four storms.

  20. Vertical profiles of black carbon measured by a micro-aethalometer in summer in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Liang; Deng, Zhaoze; Xu, Xiaobin; Yan, Peng; Lin, Weili; Wang, Ying; Tian, Ping; Wang, Pucai; Pan, Weilin; Lu, Daren

    2016-08-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a dominant absorber in the visible spectrum and a potent factor in climatic effects. Vertical profiles of BC were measured using a micro-aethalometer attached to a tethered balloon during the Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols (VOGA) field campaign, in summer 2014 at a semirural site in the North China Plain (NCP). The diurnal cycle of BC vertical distributions following the evolution of the mixing layer (ML) was investigated for the first time in the NCP region. Statistical parameters including identified mixing height (Hm) and average BC mass concentrations within the ML (Cm) and in the free troposphere (Cf) were obtained for a selected dataset of 67 vertical profiles. Hm was usually lower than 0.2 km in the early morning and rapidly rose thereafter due to strengthened turbulence. The maximum height of the ML was reached in the late afternoon. The top of a full developed ML exceeded 1 km on sunny days in summer, while it stayed much lower on cloudy days. The sunset triggered the collapse of the ML, and a stable nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) gradually formed. Accordingly, the highest level Cm was found in the early morning and the lowest was found in the afternoon. In the daytime, BC was almost uniformly distributed within the ML and significantly decreased above the ML. During the field campaign, Cm averaged about 5.16 ± 2.49 µg m-3, with a range of 1.12 to 14.49 µg m-3, comparable with observational results in many polluted urban areas such as Milan in Italy and Shanghai in China. As evening approached, BC gradually built up near the surface and exponentially declined with height. In contrast to the large variability found both in Hm and Cm, Cf stayed relatively unaffected through the day. Cf was less than 10 % of the ground level under clean conditions, while it amounted to half of the ground level in some polluted cases. In situ measurements of BC vertical profiles would hopefully have an important implication for

  1. Model for natural convective flow of visco-elastic nanofluid past an isothermal vertical plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, M.; Mushtaq, Ammar

    2015-09-01

    The present article addresses the classical problem of the natural convection flow past a vertical plate by considering visco-elastic nanofluid. The mathematical model is constructed by following the constitutive equations of the upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid. The novel aspects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are taken into account. The recently proposed condition of passively controlled wall nanoparticle volume fraction is used. The shooting approach combined with the fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration procedure is utilized for computing the numerical solutions. The results are in agreement with the available studies in limiting sense. Our results indicate that the velocity profile is parabolic and it decreases with an increment in the visco-elastic parameter.

  2. Vertical characterization of soil contamination using multi-way modeling--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwar P; Malik, Amrita; Basant, Ankita; Ojha, Priyanka

    2008-11-01

    This study describes application of chemometric multi-way modeling approach to analyze the dataset pertaining to soils of industrial area with a view to assess the soil/sub-soil contamination, accumulation pathways and mobility of contaminants in the soil profiles. The three-way (sampling depths, chemical variables, sampling sites) dataset on heavy metals in soil samples collected from three different sites in an industrial area, up to a depth of 60 m each was analyzed using three-way Tucker3 model validated for stability and goodness of fit. A two component Tucker3 model, explaining 66.6% of data variance, allowed interpretation of the data information in all the three modes. The interpretation of core elements revealing interactions among the components of different modes (depth, variables, sites) allowed inferring more realistic information about the contamination pattern of soils both along the horizontal and vertical coordinates, contamination pathways, and mobility of contaminants through soil profiles, as compared to the traditional data analysis techniques. It concluded that soils at site-1 and site-2 are relatively more contaminated with heavy metals of both the natural as well as anthropogenic origins, as compared to the soil of site-3. Moreover, the accumulation pathways of metals for upper shallow layers and deeper layers of soils in the area were differentiated. The information generated would be helpful in developing strategies for remediation of the contaminated soils for reducing the subsequent risk of ground-water contamination in the study region.

  3. Estimating Oceanic Primary Production Using Vertical Irradiance and Chlorophyll Profiles from Ocean Gliders in the North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Victoria S; Smyth, Timothy J; Martin, Adrian P; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Thompson, Andrew F; Damerell, Gillian; Painter, Stuart C

    2015-10-06

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (Seaglider) has been used to estimate marine primary production (PP) using a combination of irradiance and fluorescence vertical profiles. This method provides estimates for depth-resolved and temporally evolving PP on fine spatial scales in the absence of ship-based calibrations. We describe techniques to correct for known issues associated with long autonomous deployments such as sensor calibration drift and fluorescence quenching. Comparisons were made between the Seaglider, stable isotope ((13)C), and satellite estimates of PP. The Seaglider-based PP estimates were comparable to both satellite estimates and stable isotope measurements.

  4. Seasonal Transport in Mars' Mesosphere revealed by Nitric Oxide Nightglow vertical profiles and global images from IUVS/MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiepen, Arnaud; Stewart, Ian; Jain, Sonal; Schneider, Nicholas; Deighan, Justin; Gonzàlez-Galindo, Francisco; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Stevens, Michael; Bougher, Stephen; Milby, Zachariah; Evans, Scott; Chaffin, Michael; McClintock, William; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefèvre, Franck; Lo, Daniel; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the ultraviolet nightglow in the atmosphere of Mars through Nitric Oxide (NO) δ and γ bands emissions. On the dayside thermosphere of Mars, solar extreme ultraviolet radiation partly dissociates CO2 and N2 molecules. O(3P) and N(4S) atoms are carried by the day-to-night hemispheric transport. They preferentially descend in the nightside mesosphere in the winter hemisphere, where they can radiatively recombine to form NO(C2Π). The excited molecules promptly relax by emitting photons in the UV δ bands and in the γ bands through cascades via the A2Σ, v' = 0 state. These emissions are thus indicators of the N and O atom fluxes transported from the dayside to Mars' nightside and the winter descending circulation pattern from the nightside thermosphere to the mesosphere (e.g. Bertaux et al., 2005 ; Bougher et al., 1990 ; Cox et al., 2008 ; Gagné et al., 2013 ; Gérard et al., 2008 ; Stiepen et al., 2015). Observations of these emissions have been accumulated on a large dataset of nightside disk images and vertical profiles obtained at the limb by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS, McClintock et al., 2015) instrument when the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is at its apoapsis and its periapsis phases along its orbit, respectively. We present discussion on the variability in the brightness, altitude and topside scale height of the emission with season, geographical position and local time and possible interpretation for local and global changes in the mesosphere dynamics. IUVS images and limb scans reveal unexpected complex structure of the emission. The brightest emission is observed close to the winter pole. The emission is also surprisingly more intense in some sectors located close to the equator : at 120˚ and 150˚ longitude. Observations also reveal spots and streaks, indicating irregularities in the wind circulation pattern and possible impact of waves and tides. The disk images and limb profiles are compared to

  5. Computational models for analyzing lipoprotein profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, A.A. de; Schalkwijk, D.B. van

    2011-01-01

    At present, several measurement technologies are available for generating highly detailed concentration-size profiles of lipoproteins, offering increased diagnostic potential. Computational models are useful in aiding the interpretation of these complex datasets and making the data more accessible f

  6. A simple hydrodynamic model of a laminar free-surface jet in horizontal or vertical flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Herman D.; Harnik, Ron S.; Rohlfs, Wilko

    2017-08-01

    A useable model for laminar free-surface jet evolution during flight, for both horizontal and vertical jets, is developed through joint analytical, experimental, and simulation methods. The jet's impingement centerline velocity, recently shown to dictate stagnation zone heat transfer, encompasses the entire flow history: from pipe-flow velocity profile development to profile relaxation and jet contraction during flight. While pipe-flow is well-known, an alternative analytic solution is presented for the centerline velocity's viscous-driven decay. Jet-contraction is subject to influences of surface tension (We), pipe-flow profile development, in-flight viscous dissipation (Re), and gravity (Nj = Re/Fr). The effects of surface tension and emergence momentum flux (jet thrust) are incorporated analytically through a global momentum balance. Though emergence momentum is related to pipe flow development, and empirically linked to nominal pipe flow-length, it can be modified to incorporate low-Re downstream dissipation as well. Jet contraction's gravity dependence is extended beyond existing uniform-velocity theory to cases of partially and fully developed profiles. The final jet-evolution model relies on three empirical parameters and compares well to present and previous experiments and simulations. Hence, micro-jet flight experiments were conducted to fill-in gaps in the literature: jet contraction under mild gravity-effects, and intermediate Reynolds and Weber numbers (Nj = 5-8, Re = 350-520, We = 2.8-6.2). Furthermore, two-phase direct numerical simulations provided insight beyond the experimental range: Re = 200-1800, short pipes (Z = L/d . Re ≥ 0.01), variable nozzle wettability, and cases of no surface tension and/or gravity.

  7. Cooperative Suction by Vertical Capillary Array Pump for Controlling Flow Profiles of Microfluidic Sensor Chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Tamechika

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A passive pump consisting of integrated vertical capillaries has been developed for a microfluidic chip as an useful component with an excellent flow volume and flow rate. A fluidic chip built into a passive pump was used by connecting the bottoms of all the capillaries to a top surface consisting of a thin layer channel in the microfluidic chip where the thin layer channel depth was smaller than the capillary radius. As a result the vertical capillaries drew fluid cooperatively rather than independently, thus exerting the maximum suction efficiency at every instance. This meant that a flow rate was realized that exhibited little variation and without any external power or operation. A microfluidic chip built into this passive pump had the ability to achieve a quasi-steady rather than a rapidly decreasing flow rate, which is a universal flow characteristic in an ordinary capillary.

  8. Examining the Bifactor IRT Model for Vertical Scaling in K-12 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepfler, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, educational policy trends have shifted to a focus on examining students' growth from kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). One way states can track students' growth is with a vertical scale. Presently, every state that uses a vertical scale bases the scale on a unidimensional IRT model. These models make a…

  9. Retrieval of stratospheric O3 and NO2 vertical profiles using zenith scattered light observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Meena; C S Bhosale; D B Jadhav

    2006-06-01

    Daily zenith scattered light intensity observations were carried out in the morning twilight hours using home-made UV-visible spectrometer over the tropical station Pune (18° 31′, 73° 51′)for the years 2000-2003.These observations are obtained in the spectral range 462-498 nm for the solar zenith angles (SZAs)varying from 87° to 91.5°. An algorithm has been developed to retrieve vertical profiles of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from ground-based measurements using the Chahine iteration method.This retrieval method has been checked using measured and recalculated slant column densities (SCDs)and they are found to be well matching. O3 and NO2 vertical profiles have been retrieved using a set of their air mass factors (AMFs)and SCDs measured over a range of 87-91.5° SZA during the morning.The vertical profiles obtained by this method are compared with Umkehr profiles and ozonesondes and they are found to be in good agreement.The bulk of the column density is found near layer 20-25 km.Daily total column densities (TCDs)of O3 and NO2 along with their stratospheric and tropospheric counterparts are derived using their vertical profiles for the period 2000-2003.The total column,stratospheric column and tropospheric column amounts of both trace gases are found to be maximum in summer and minimum in the winter season.Increasing trend is found in column density of NO2 in stratospheric,tropospheric and surface layers,but no trend is observed in O3 columns for above layers during the period 2000-2003.

  10. On the SU(2 vertical stroke 1) WZNW model and its statistical mechanics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleur, H. [CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique]|[University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Schomerus, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Motivated by a careful analysis of the Laplacian on the supergroup SU(2 vertical stroke 1) we formulate a proposal for the state space of the SU(2 vertical stroke 1) WZNW model. We then use properties of sl(2 vertical stroke 1) characters to compute the partition function of the theory. In the special case of level k=1 the latter is found to agree with the properly regularized partition function for the continuum limit of the integrable sl(2 vertical stroke 1)3- anti 3 super-spin chain. Some general conclusions applicable to other WZNW models (in particular the case k=-1/2) are also drawn. (orig.)

  11. The CU Airborne MAX-DOAS instrument: vertical profiling of aerosol extinction and trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Dix, B.; Ortega, I.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2013-03-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument uses solar stray light to detect and quantify multiple trace gases, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), formaldehyde (HCHO), water vapor (H2O), nitrous acid (HONO), iodine monoxide (IO), bromine monoxide (BrO), and oxygen dimers (O4) at multiple wavelengths (absorption bands at 360, 477, 577, 632 nm) simultaneously in the open atmosphere. The instrument is unique as it (1) features a motion compensation system that decouples the telescope field of view from aircraft movements in real time (CHOCHO, HCHO, and H2O concentrations and aerosol extinction coefficients, ɛ, at 477 nm calculated from O4 measurements from a low approach at Brackett airfield inside the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) are presented. These profiles contain ~12 degrees of freedom (DOF) over a 3.5 km altitude range, an independent information approximately every 250 m. The boundary layer NO2 concentration, and the integral aerosol extinction over height (aerosol optical depth, AOD) agrees well with nearby ground-based in situ NO2 measurement, and AERONET station. The detection limits of NO2, CHOCHO, HCHO, H2O442, ϵ360, ϵ477 for 30 s integration time spectra recorded forward of the plane are 5 ppt, 3 ppt, 100 ppt, 42 ppm, 0.004 km-1, 0.002 km-1 in the free troposphere (FT), and 30 ppt, 16 ppt, 540 ppt, 252 ppm, 0.012 km-1, 0.006 km-1 inside the boundary layer (BL), respectively. Mobile column observations of trace gases and aerosols are complimentary to in situ observations, and help bridge the spatial scales that are probed by satellites and ground-based observations, and predicted by atmospheric models.

  12. Airborne observation of aerosol optical depth during ARCTAS: vertical profiles, inter-comparison, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shinozuka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe aerosol optical depth (AOD measured during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS experiment, conducted in North America in April and June–July 2008, focusing on vertical profiles, inter-comparison with correlative observations, fine-mode fraction and horizontal variability. The AOD spectra spanning 354–2139 nm measured with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14 are generally less wavelength-dependent below 2 km (499-nm Angstrom exponent 1.4 ± 0.3 than in 2–4 km (1.6–1.8 for Alaska in April 2008. Together with concurrent aerosol mass spectrometry and black carbon incandescence measurements, this corroborates the hypothesis that Arctic haze in these layers originates mainly from anthropogenic emission and biomass burning, respectively. The spectra are within 3%+0.02 of the vertical integral of local visible-light scattering and absorption for two thirds of the 55 vertical profiles examined. The horizontal structure of smoke plumes in central Canada in June and July 2008 explains most outliers. The differences in mid-visible Angstrom exponent are <0.10 for 63% of the profiles with 499-nm AOD>0.1. The retrieved fine-mode fraction of AOD is mostly between 0.7 and 1.0, and its root mean square difference from column-integral submicron fraction (measured with nephelometers, absorption photometers and an impactor is 0.12. These AOD measurements from the NASA P-3 aircraft, after compensation for below-aircraft light attenuation by vertical extrapolation, mostly fall within 0.02 of AERONET ground-based measurements for five overpass events. Evidently, the fresh local emission in Canada in June and July makes the horizontal distribution of AOD highly heterogeneous (standard deviation ~19% of the mean over 20 km and random (autocorrelation r=0.37 across 20 km, in contrast to long-range transport to Alaska in April (std~2%, r=0.95. The

  13. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  14. Enrichment and vertical profiles of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb in monazite areas of coastal Karnataka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayana, Y. [Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri 574199 (India)], E-mail: narayanay@yahoo.com; Prakash, V. [Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangothri 574199 (India)

    2010-06-15

    A study on radiation level and radionuclide distribution in the environment of coastal Karnataka has revealed the presence of low-level monazite deposit in the Ullal beach area. The paper presents systematic studies on the distribution, enrichment and vertical profiles of {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb, important daughter products of {sup 238}U, in Ombattu Kere, Summer Sand and the Bhagavathi Temple region of the Ullal beach area of coastal Karnataka. Sand samples collected at different depths from these locations were analyzed for {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb activities to understand the distribution, enrichment and vertical profiles of these radionuclides in monazite area. The activity of {sup 210}Po in the Ullal region is found to vary from 1.7 to 43.2 Bq kg{sup -1} with a mean value of 11.2 Bq kg{sup -1} and that of {sup 210}Pb varies from 1.0 to 66.7 Bq kg{sup -1} with a mean value of 19.1 Bq kg{sup -1}. The mean {sup 210}Po/{sup 210}Pb ratio was observed to be 0.6. The absorbed gamma dose rate in the region varies in the range 39-460 nGy h{sup -1} with a mean value of 193 nGy h{sup -1}.

  15. Model simulations and aircraft measurements of vertical, seasonal and latitudinal O3 and CO distributions over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fischer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available During a series of 8 measurement campaigns within the SPURT project (2001-2003, vertical profiles of CO and O3 have been obtained at subtropical, middle and high latitudes over western Europe, covering the troposphere and lowermost stratosphere up to ~14 km altitude during all seasons. The seasonal and latitudinal variation of the measured trace gas profiles are compared to simulations with the chemical transport model MATCH. In the troposphere reasonable agreement between observations and model predictions is achieved for CO and O3, in particular at subtropical and mid-latitudes, while the model overestimates (underestimates CO (O3 in the lowermost stratosphere particularly at high latitudes, indicating too strong simulated bi-directional exchange across the tropopause. By the use of tagged tracers in the model, long-range transport of Asian air masses is identified as the dominant source of CO pollution over Europe in the free troposphere.

  16. Base Transport and Vertical Profile Engineering in SILICON/SILICON(1-X) Germanium(x)/silicon Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Erwin Josef

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in low-temperature epitaxial growth of strained silicon-germanium alloys on silicon substrates allow bandgap engineering in silicon-based devices, with profound consequences for device design. In this thesis the improved control by Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition of the vertical profile of a Si/Si_{1-x}Ge _{x}/Si heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) is used to study the effect of the shape of the conduction band in the base on device performance. Near-ideal base currents in Si/Si_ {1-x}Ge_{x}/Si HBT's, limited by hole injection into the emitter, are achieved using a non-ultra-high vacuum (UHV) technique for the first time, proving that high-lifetime Si_{1-x}Ge _{x} material can be fabricated using processes compatible with standard silicon technology. Graded-base Si/Si_{1-x}Ge_{x} /Si HBT's are fabricated in a non-UHV epitaxial technology for the first time, and their electrical characteristics are modeled analytically. The formation of parasitic potential barriers for electrons in the base of HBT's resulting from base dopant outdiffusion or non-abrupt interfaces is studied, together with the concurrent degradation of the electrical performance of the devices. This deleterious effect is especially severe in devices with narrow, heavily doped bases fabricated in an integrated circuit (IC) process because of the thermal budget employed. To alleviate this problem, intrinsic Si_{1-x}Ge_{x}^acer layers can be inserted on both sides of the base to greatly improve device performance. The tradeoff between the common-emitter current gain beta and the Early voltage V_{A} (output resistance) in heterojunction bipolar transistors is investigated for the first time. This tradeoff is important for analog application of HBT's, and it is shown that thin, narrow -gap layers in the base close to the base-collector junction reduce the Early effect dramatically leading to a high Early voltage. It is further demonstrated that even small amounts of dopant

  17. Thermal modeling of a vertical dry storage cask for used nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie, E-mail: jieli@anl.gov; Liu, Yung Y., E-mail: yyliu@anl.gov

    2016-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Thermal performance of a 3-D vertical dry cask under various conditions has been numerically studied by using ANSYS/FLUENT code. • The simulation was validated by comparing the results against data obtained from the temperature measurements of a commercial cask. • The results indicated that the basket with higher thermal conductivity dissipates decay heat out of the cask more efficiently than that with a lower thermal conductivity (aluminum composite vs. stainless steel). A heavier cooling gas is also helpful to enhance heat transfer via enhanced natural convection (N{sub 2} vs. He). • Coolant release from the fuel canister results in temperature change of the canister external surfaces. The simulation shows that such a change is large enough and detectable, which can provide a mechanism for leak detection by continuously monitoring this temperature change at the top center of the canister surface. • Partial blockage of the cask air inlets affects the temperature profiles marginally for both the fuel canister and those components inside. In contrast, fully blocked air inlets will lead to remarkable increases of the component temperatures. - Abstract: Thermal modeling of temperature profiles of dry casks has been identified as a high-priority item in a U.S. Department of Energy gap analysis. In this work, a three-dimensional model of a vertical dry cask has been constructed for computer simulation by using the ANSYS/FLUENT code. The vertical storage cask contains a welded canister for 32 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) used-fuel assemblies with a total decay heat load of 34 kW. To simplify thermal calculations, an effective thermal conductivity model for a 17 × 17 PWR used (or spent)-fuel assembly was developed and used in the simulation of thermal performance. The effects of canister fill gas (helium or nitrogen), internal pressure (1–6 atm), and basket material (stainless steel or aluminum alloy) were studied to

  18. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy

  19. La sismique de puits. Première partie : le profil sismique vertical. Principes de base, applications et mise en oeuvre Well Seismic Surveying. Part One : Vertical Seismic Profiling. Basic Principles, Applications and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari J. L.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La sismique réflexion de surface fournit une image en temps du sous-sol. Pour obtenir un calage en profondeur plus précis que celui obtenu en utilisant les vitesses déduites des données sismiques, les géophysiciens utilisent des données de puits telles que carottage sismique et diagraphie sonique, et plus récemment le profil sismique vertical (PSV. La nécessité de mieux connaître les réservoirs pour les exploiter de façon optimale a conduit les géophysiciens à développer des techniques particulières de sismique de puits à plus haute résolution que la sismique conventionnelle de surface. Cet article, composé de trois chapitres, présente de façon pratique les différentes méthodes utilisées en sismique de puits et leurs applications en exploration pétrolière ou en géophysique de gisement. Le premier chapitre traite des principes de base, des applications et de la mise en oeuvre du PSV. Le deuxième chapitre est consacré au traitement du PSV et à ses applications particulières à la connaissance du gisement. Le troisième chapitre traite du profil sismique vertical déporté et de la sismique de puits à puits. Surface seismic reflection provides a time image of the subsurface. To obtain a more accurate depth calibration than that is obtained by using velocities deduced from seismic data, geophysicists are now using well data such as uphole surveys and sonic logs, and more recently vertical seismic profiling (VSP. . The need to have a better understanding of reservoirs so as to exploit them to the optimum has led geophysicists to develop specific well seismic techniques having higher resolution than conventional surface seismic surveying. This article gives a practical description of the methods used in well seismic surveying and their applications in petroleum exploration or reservoir geophysics. It is made up of three parts. The first part deals with the basic principles, applications and implementation of VSP. The

  20. Sampling and characterization of the turbulence vertical distribution. statistics of scidar profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Fuensalida

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A diferencia de los procedimientos de sondeo, una caracterización fiable de la distribución vertical de la turbulencia en un lugar debería basarse en criterios de muestreo sin sesgo estadístico. El tamaño de la muestra es tan importante como los criterios bajo los cuales se llevan a cabo. Presentamos aquí los resultados estadísticos de los perfiles de turbulencia ópticos en el Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Islas Canarias en periodos anuales (2004 y 2005, as__ como la instrumentación desarrollada para satisfacer los criterios establecidos. Los datos se obtuvieron usando la técnica generalicé d-SCIDAR en el telescopio \\Jacobus Kapteyn" y las campañas se llevaron a cabo mensualmente. Para extender la estadística de los perfiles a otros parámetros importantes para los sistemas de Óptica Adaptativa, mostramos el comportamiento promedio mensual, estudiando la variación estacional de la distribución vertical de la turbulencia

  1. Production of lightning NOx and its vertical distribution calculated from three-dimensional cloud-scale chemical transport model simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Ott, Lesley E.

    2010-02-18

    A three-dimensional (3-D) cloud-scale chemical transport model that includes a parameterized source of lightning NOx on the basis of observed flash rates has been used to simulate six midlatitude and subtropical thunderstorms observed during four field projects. Production per intracloud (PIC) and cloud-to-ground (PCG) flash is estimated by assuming various values of PIC and PCG for each storm and determining which production scenario yields NOx mixing ratios that compare most favorably with in-cloud aircraft observations. We obtain a mean PCG value of 500 moles NO (7 kg N) per flash. The results of this analysis also suggest that on average, PIC may be nearly equal to PCG, which is contrary to the common assumption that intracloud flashes are significantly less productive of NO than are cloud-to-ground flashes. This study also presents vertical profiles of the mass of lightning NOx after convection based on 3-D cloud-scale model simulations. The results suggest that following convection, a large percentage of lightning NOx remains in the middle and upper troposphere where it originated, while only a small percentage is found near the surface. The results of this work differ from profiles calculated from 2-D cloud-scale model simulations with a simpler lightning parameterization that were peaked near the surface and in the upper troposphere (referred to as a “C-shaped” profile). The new model results (a backward C-shaped profile) suggest that chemical transport models that assume a C-shaped vertical profile of lightning NOx mass may place too much mass near the surface and too little in the middle troposphere.

  2. Vertical Profiles of Soil Water Content as Influenced by Environmental Factors in a Small Catchment on the Hilly-Gully Loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Wen, Fenxiang; Wu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaojun; Hu, Yani

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of soil water content (SWC) profiles at catchment scale has profound implications for understanding hydrological processes of the terrestrial water cycle, thereby contributing to sustainable water management and ecological restoration in arid and semi-arid regions. This study described the vertical profiles of SWC at the small catchment scale on the hilly and gully Loess Plateau in Northeast China, and evaluated the influences of selected environmental factors (land-use type, topography and landform) on average SWC within 300 cm depth. Soils were sampled from 101 points across a small catchment before and after the rainy season. Cluster analysis showed that soil profiles with high-level SWC in a stable trend (from top to bottom) were most commonly present in the catchment, especially in the gully related to terrace. Woodland soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in a descending or stable trend. Most abandoned farmland and grassland soil profiles had medium-level SWC with vertical variations in varying trends. No soil profiles had low-level SWC with vertical variations in an ascending trend. Multi-regression analysis showed that average SWC was significantly affected by land-use type in different soil layers (0–20, 20–160, and 160–300 cm), generally in descending order of terrace, abandoned farmland, grassland, and woodland. There was a significant negative correlation between average SWC and gradient along the whole profile (Pcatchments on the Loess Plateau as well as in other complex terrains with similar settings. PMID:25313829

  3. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-Visible spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, J. B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-04-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which uses stars and Moon as light source, respectively, were involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the validation of the GOMOS algorithm dedicated to the correction of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l’Adour, France. The night-time SALOMON and GOMOS measurements were conducted at the same time (around 21h30 TU) and with a spatial coincidence less than 250 km. Comparison of vertical profiles was done for an altitude in the 15-40 km range. While the global shape of the GOMOS and SALOMON ozone profiles are quite in agreement, the GOMOS NO2 and NO3 profiles are unrealistic when compared to SALOMON profiles. A reanalysis of the GOMOS transmission using algorithms already developed for SALOMON shows that accurate NO2 and NO3 profiles can be retrieved if DOAS technique and dedicated spectral windows are used. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight and a new SALOMON flight should occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) in January and March 2003, respectively. The same analyses as for the September 2002 flight will be conducted, including this time the OClO and aerosols extinction coefficient retrievals. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  4. Algorithm for vertical ozone profile determination for the Nimbus-4 BUV data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Klenk, K. F.; Kaveeshwar, V. G.; Ahmad, S.; Fleig, A. J.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Mateer, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is provided of the algorithm used by the Ozone Processing Team at NASA to process seven years of Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) ozone profile data. The algorithm is a modification of the original retrieval algorithm developed by Mateer (1972) to process some of the early data from the BUV experiment. Principal changes made are in the first guess selection scheme, the use of all wavelengths in the inversion, and the weighting of the various wavelengths according to the errors in the radiance estimation. It is found that the described BUV ozone profile algorithm is an extremely efficient algorithm for retrieving large amounts of satellite data. The algorithm makes full use of all the available information from the measured radiances including the longer wavelength radiances which previously had not been used.

  5. Electric Circuit Model for the Aerodynamic Performance Analysis of a Three-Blade Darrieus-Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine: The Tchakoua Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Tchakoua

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The complex and unsteady aerodynamics of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs pose significant challenges for simulation tools. Recently, significant research efforts have focused on the development of new methods for analysing and optimising the aerodynamic performance of VAWTs. This paper presents an electric circuit model for Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine (DT-VAWT rotors. The novel Tchakoua model is based on the mechanical description given by the Paraschivoiu double-multiple streamtube model using a mechanical‑electrical analogy. Model simulations were conducted using MATLAB for a three-bladed rotor architecture, characterized by a NACA0012 profile, an average Reynolds number of 40,000 for the blade and a tip speed ratio of 5. The results obtained show strong agreement with findings from both aerodynamic and computational fluid dynamics (CFD models in the literature.

  6. Validation of GOMOS vertical profiles using the stratospheric balloon-borne AMON and SALOMON UV-visible spetrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, J.-B.; Chartier, M.; Berthet, G.; Robert, C.; Lemaire, T.; Pepe, F.; George, M.; Pirre, M.

    2003-08-01

    The stratospheric balloon-borne UV-visible spectrometers AMON and SALOMON, which use stars and Moon as light source, respectively, are involved in the validation of the UV-visible spectrometer GOMOS onboard ENVISAT, which uses also stars as light source. A low spectral resolution UV-visible spectrometer, AMON-RA, is also implanted in the AMON gondola, for the analysis of the chromatic scintillation effect. A flight of SALOMON occurred in September 19, 2002, at mid latitude from Aire sur l'Adour, France. An AMON (and AMON-RA) flight occurred at high latitude from Kiruna (northern Sweden) on March 1, 2003. The vertical profiles are compared to those obtained by GOMOS. Taking into account the effect of the chromatic scintillation on the transmission spectra, recommendations will be proposed in order to improve the GOMOS retrievals.

  7. Tethered balloon-based particle number concentration, and size distribution vertical profiles within the lower troposphere of Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dongfang; Bian, Qinggen; Duan, Yusen; Zhao, Mengfei; Fei, Dongnian; Xiu, Guangli; Fu, Qingyan

    2017-04-01

    A tethered balloon-based measurement campaign of particle number concentration (PNC) and particle number size distribution (PNSD) in the size range of 15.7-661.2 nm was conducted within the lower troposphere of 1000 m in Shanghai, a Chinese megacity, during December of 2015. The meteorological conditions, PNC, and PNSD were synchronously measured at the ground-based station as well as by the tethered balloon. On ground level, the 88.2 nm particles were found to have the highest PNC. The Pearson correlation analysis based on the ground level data showed NO2 had a strong correlation with PNC. The synchronous measurement of PNC and PNSD at the ground station and on the tethered balloon showed that the 15.7-200 nm particles had higher PNC on ground level, but the PNC of 200-661.2 nm particles was higher at 400 m. One haze event (Dec 22nd-Dec 23rd) was selected for detailed discussion on the variation of vertical profiles of PNSD and PNC. The vertical distribution of characteristics of PNC and PNSD were observed and compared. Results indicated that the highest MaxDm (the diameter with the highest PNC) during those three launches all appeared at a high altitude, usually above 300 m. Compared to the clean days, the relatively bigger MaxDm at each height in the haze days also indicated regional transport of pollutants might contribute to more to that haze event.

  8. Numerical simulation of vertical ground-water flux of the Rio Grande from ground-water temperature profiles, central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolino, James R.; Niswonger, Richard G.

    1999-01-01

    An important gap in the understanding of the hydrology of the Middle Rio Grande Basin, central New Mexico, is the rate at which water from the Rio Grande recharges the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Several methodologies-including use of the Glover-Balmer equation, flood pulses, and channel permeameters- have been applied to this problem in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In the work presented here, ground-water temperature profiles and ground-water levels beneath the Rio Grande were measured and numerically simulated at four sites. The direction and rate of vertical ground-water flux between the river and underlying aquifer was simulated and the effective vertical hydraulic conductivity of the sediments underlying the river was estimated through model calibration. Seven sets of nested piezometers were installed during July and August 1996 at four sites along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area, though only four of the piezometer nests were simulated. In downstream order, these four sites are (1) the Bernalillo site, upstream from the New Mexico State Highway 44 bridge in Bernalillo (piezometer nest BRN02); (2) the Corrales site, upstream from the Rio Rancho sewage treatment plant in Rio Rancho (COR01); (3) the Paseo del Norte site, upstream from the Paseo del Norte bridge in Albuquerque (PDN01); and (4) the Rio Bravo site, upstream from the Rio Bravo bridge in Albuquerque (RBR01). All piezometers were completed in the inner-valley alluvium of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Ground-water levels and temperatures were measured in the four piezometer nests a total of seven times in the 24-month period from September 1996 through August 1998. The flux between the surface- and ground-water systems at each of the field sites was quantified by one-dimensional numerical simulation of the water and heat exchange in the subsurface using the heat and water transport model VS2DH. Model calibration was aided by the use of PEST, a model-independent computer program that uses

  9. Transmission of vertical stress in a real soil profile. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    cereals. The tests took place in the spring at field capacity when the topsoil had not been tilled for 1 1/2 years. Two Nokian ELS Radial-ply tyres (800/50R34 and 560/45R22.5) were loaded with two specific loads (30 kN and 60 kN), leading to four treatments labelled 800-30, 800-60, 560-30 and 560-60. We...... used rated tyre inflation pressures for traffic in the field (≤10 km h−1 driving speed). Seven load cells were inserted horizontally from a pit with minimal disturbance of soil at each of three depths (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m), covering the width of the wheeled area. The position of the wheel relative...... to the transducers was recorded using a laser sensor. Finally, the vertical stresses near the tyre–soil interface were measured in separate tests by 17 stress transducers across the width of the tyres. The level of maximum stress at 0.3 m depth was related to the surface-related stress expressions like the mean...

  10. Vertical profile of δ18OOO from middle stratosphere to lower mesosphere derived by retrieval algorithm developed for SMILES spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Sato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is known to have large oxygen isotopic enrichments of about 10 % in the middle stratosphere, however, there have been no reports on ozone isotopic enrichments above the middle stratosphere. We derived an enrichment δ18OOO by a retrieval algorithm specified for the isotopic ratio from the stratosphere to the lower mesosphere based on observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb–Emission Sounder (SMILES onboard the International Space Station (ISS. The retrieval algorithm includes (i an a priori covariance matrix constrained by oxygen isotopic ratios in ozone, (ii an optimization of spectral windows for ozone isotopomers and isotopologues, and (iii a common tangent height information for all windows. The δ18OOO obtained by averaging the SMILES measurements at the latitude range of 20° N to 40° N from February to March in 2010 with solar zenith angle 18OOO increasing with altitude between 30 and 40 km. The vertical profile of δ18OOO obtained in this study showed an increase and a decrease with altitude in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. Stratopause is the peak-height of the δ18OOO value, and it rose to 18%. The δ18OOO has a positive correlation with temperature in the range of 220–255 K, indicating that temperature can be a dominant factor to control the vertical profile of δ18OOO in the stratosphere and mesosphere. This is the first report of the observation of δ18OOO over a wide range extending from the stratosphere to the mesosphere.

  11. Assessing the microbial community and functional genes in a vertical soil profile with long-term arsenic contamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Xiong

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As contamination in soil and groundwater has become a serious problem to public health. To examine how microbial communities and functional genes respond to long-term arsenic contamination in vertical soil profile, soil samples were collected from the surface to the depth of 4 m (with an interval of 1 m after 16-year arsenic downward infiltration. Integrating BioLog and functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0 technologies, we showed that microbial metabolic potential and diversity substantially decreased, and community structure was markedly distinct along the depth. Variations in microbial community functional genes, including genes responsible for As resistance, carbon and nitrogen cycling, phosphorus utilization and cytochrome c oxidases were detected. In particular, changes in community structures and activities were correlated with the biogeochemical features along the vertical soil profile when using the rbcL and nifH genes as biomarkers, evident for a gradual transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyles. The C/N showed marginally significant correlations with arsenic resistance (p = 0.069 and carbon cycling genes (p = 0.073, and significant correlation with nitrogen fixation genes (p = 0.024. The combination of C/N, NO(3 (- and P showed the highest correlation (r = 0.779, p = 0.062 with the microbial community structure. Contradict to our hypotheses, a long-term arsenic downward infiltration was not the primary factor, while the spatial isolation and nutrient availability were the key forces in shaping the community structure. This study provides new insights about the heterogeneity of microbial community metabolic potential and future biodiversity preservation for arsenic bioremediation management.

  12. Assessing the microbial community and functional genes in a vertical soil profile with long-term arsenic contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinbo; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Luo, Guosheng; Tu, Shuxin; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Gejiao

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in soil and groundwater has become a serious problem to public health. To examine how microbial communities and functional genes respond to long-term arsenic contamination in vertical soil profile, soil samples were collected from the surface to the depth of 4 m (with an interval of 1 m) after 16-year arsenic downward infiltration. Integrating BioLog and functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0) technologies, we showed that microbial metabolic potential and diversity substantially decreased, and community structure was markedly distinct along the depth. Variations in microbial community functional genes, including genes responsible for As resistance, carbon and nitrogen cycling, phosphorus utilization and cytochrome c oxidases were detected. In particular, changes in community structures and activities were correlated with the biogeochemical features along the vertical soil profile when using the rbcL and nifH genes as biomarkers, evident for a gradual transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyles. The C/N showed marginally significant correlations with arsenic resistance (p = 0.069) and carbon cycling genes (p = 0.073), and significant correlation with nitrogen fixation genes (p = 0.024). The combination of C/N, NO(3) (-) and P showed the highest correlation (r = 0.779, p = 0.062) with the microbial community structure. Contradict to our hypotheses, a long-term arsenic downward infiltration was not the primary factor, while the spatial isolation and nutrient availability were the key forces in shaping the community structure. This study provides new insights about the heterogeneity of microbial community metabolic potential and future biodiversity preservation for arsenic bioremediation management.

  13. Vertical profiles of aerosol and black carbon in the Arctic: a seasonal phenomenology along 2 years (2011-2012) of field campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Luca; Cappelletti, David; Busetto, Maurizio; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Lanconelli, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Caiazzo, Laura; Giardi, Fabio; Moroni, Beatrice; Crocchianti, Stefano; Fierz, Martin; Močnik, Griša; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria G.; Maturilli, Marion; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a systematic study of vertical profiles of aerosol number size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations conducted in the Arctic, over Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard). The campaign lasted 2 years (2011-2012) and resulted in 200 vertical profiles measured by means of a tethered balloon (up to 1200 m a.g.l.) during the spring and summer seasons. In addition, chemical analysis of filter samples, aerosol size distribution and a full set of meteorological parameters were determined at ground. The collected experimental data allowed a classification of the vertical profiles into different typologies, which allowed us to describe the seasonal phenomenology of vertical aerosol properties in the Arctic. During spring, four main types of profiles were found and their behavior was related to the main aerosol and atmospheric dynamics occurring at the measuring site. Background conditions generated homogenous profiles. Transport events caused an increase of aerosol concentration with altitude. High Arctic haze pollution trapped below thermal inversions promoted a decrease of aerosol concentration with altitude. Finally, ground-based plumes of locally formed secondary aerosol determined profiles with decreasing aerosol concentration located at different altitude as a function of size. During the summer season, the impact from shipping caused aerosol and BC pollution plumes to be constrained close to the ground, indicating that increasing shipping emissions in the Arctic could bring anthropogenic aerosol and BC in the Arctic summer, affecting the climate.

  14. Vertical profiling of atmospheric refractivity using GPS STD data from a single ground-based station: Simulations and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zus, F.; Dick, G.; Heise, S.; Wickert, J.; Ramatschi, M.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a ray-tracing operator to compute the signal travel time delay due to the neutral atmosphere, known as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a GPS satellite and a ground-based receiving station. Having developed a rapid and precise forward operator we constructed the tangent-linear (adjoint) operator to estimate refractivity in the vicinity of a single station. The refractivity retrievals potentially complement refractivity retrievals from radio occultation data and can be considered a valuable input for Numerical Weather Prediction. In a first experiment (simulation) we study the feasibility for vertical profiling of refractivity using STDs from a single station. The simulation cycle consists of the computation of STDs given a refractivity profile, the addition of noise to mimic observation errors and the retrieval of a refractivity profile from the artificial STDs by a non-linear least-square analysis. Clearly, besides the noise level, the elevation range plays an important role regarding the quality of the refractivity retrieval; near-horizon STDs corrupted by noise allow a significantly better refractivity retrieval than STDs close to the zenith without any noise. The simulation study suggests that near-horizon STDs provide additional information when compared to Zenith Total Delays (ZTDs). In a second experiment (application) we replace the artificial STDs in the simulation by STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations. The procedure is repeated station-by-station for 200 stations in Germany. We do not find a significant benefit from STDs over ZTDs in the retrieved refractivity profile since near-horizon STDs are rarely available and representative errors due to asymmetry are non-negligable. We attempt to mitigate the latter problem by the additional estimation of horizontal gradients, and indeed, we find strong evidence that STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations contain asymmetric information. The former problem still poses a serious limitation

  15. RESEARCH AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT OF DRILLING AND BLASTING TECHNOLOGY PENETRATIONS OF VERTICAL SHAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Rubleva

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The model of destruction of rocks by explosion in vertical shafts is presented. On its basis the most important parameters of technical-and-economical indices of the drilling-and-blasting technology are calculated.

  16. Three-dimensional models of conventional and vertical junction laser-photovoltaic energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Walker, Gilbert H.

    1988-01-01

    Three-dimensional models of both conventional planar junction and vertical junction photovoltaic energy converters have been constructed. The models are a set of linear partial differential equations and take into account many photoconverter design parameters. The model is applied to Si photoconverters; however, the model may be used with other semiconductors. When used with a Nd laser, the conversion efficiency of the Si vertical junction photoconverter is 47 percent, whereas the efficiency for the conventional planar Si photoconverter is only 17 percent. A parametric study of the Si vertical junction photoconverter is then done in order to describe the optimum converter for use with the 1.06-micron Nd laser. The efficiency of this optimized vertical junction converter is 44 percent at 1 kW/sq cm.

  17. Structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) WZNW model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikida, Y.; Schomerus, V.

    2007-11-15

    We propose exact formulas for the 2- and 3-point functions of the WZNW model on the non-compact supergroup OSP(1 vertical stroke 2). Using the path integral approach that was recently developed in arXiv:0706.1030 we show how local correlation functions in the OSP(p vertical stroke 2) WZNW models can be obtained from those of N=p supersymmetric Liouville field theory for p=1,2. We then employ known results on correlators in N=1 Liouville theory to determine the structure constants of the OSP(1 vertical stroke 2) theory. (orig.)

  18. Importance of vertical geochemical processes in controlling the oceanic profiles of dissolved rare earth elements inferred from the study in the northeastern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Y.

    2001-12-01

    The vertical profiles of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) were obtained in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea. The REE concentrations at various depths in the Bay of Bengal are the highest in the Indian Ocean. This is attributable ultimately to the large outflow of the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Irrawaddy Rivers, but the dissolved REE flux to surface waters alone can not explain the REE enrichment throughout the entire water column. The underlying fan sediments serve as not a source but a sink for dissolved REE(III)s. Partial dissolution of detrital partilces which are carried by the rivers and lateral currents and subsequently settling through the water column appears to be a predominant source for dissolved REEs. The vertical profiles showing an almost linear increase with depth are common features for the light and middle REEs everywhere, but their concentration levels are variable from basin to basin and from element to element. This suggest that their oceanic distributions are quickly responding to the variation of detrital particle flux and its REE composition through a reversible exchange equilibirum with suspended and sinking particles much like the case for Th. The relative importance of the vertical geochemical processes of reversible scavenging over the horizontal basin-scale ocean circulation with passive regeneration like nutrients systematically decreases from the light to the heavy REEs. Using a model, the mean oceanic residence times of REEs in the Bay of Bengal are estimated to range from 37 years for Ce to 140-1510 years for the strictly trivalent REEs. In the deep water of the Andaman Sea isolated from the Bay of Bengal by the Andaman-Nicobar Ridge (maximum sill depth of sim1800 m), the REE concentrations are almost uniform presumably due to rapid vertical mixing. The REE(III) concentrations are similar to that of ~1250 m depth water in the Bay of Bengal being consistent with other oceanographic properties. However, the REE composition of the

  19. Evaluation of Vertical Lacunarity Profiles in Forested Areas Using Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, B.; Kania, A.; Standovár, T.; Heilmeier, H.

    2016-06-01

    The horizontal variation and vertical layering of the vegetation are important properties of the canopy structure determining the habitat; three-dimensional (3D) distribution of objects (shrub layers, understory vegetation, etc.) is related to the environmental factors (e.g., illumination, visibility). It has been shown that gaps in forests, mosaic-like structures are essential to biodiversity; various methods have been introduced to quantify this property. As the distribution of gaps in the vegetation is a multi-scale phenomenon, in order to capture it in its entirety, scale-independent methods are preferred; one of these is the calculation of lacunarity. We used Airborne Laser Scanning point clouds measured over a forest plantation situated in a former floodplain. The flat topographic relief ensured that the tree growth is independent of the topographic effects. The tree pattern in the plantation crops provided various quasi-regular and irregular patterns, as well as various ages of the stands. The point clouds were voxelized and layers of voxels were considered as images for two-dimensional input. These images calculated for a certain vicinity of reference points were taken as images for the computation of lacunarity curves, providing a stack of lacunarity curves for each reference points. These sets of curves have been compared to reveal spatial changes of this property. As the dynamic range of the lacunarity values is very large, the natural logarithms of the values were considered. Logarithms of lacunarity functions show canopy-related variations, we analysed these variations along transects. The spatial variation can be related to forest properties and ecology-specific aspects.

  20. Anthropometric profile, vertical jump, and throwing velocity in elite female handball players by playing positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Helena; Manchado, Carmen; Rodriguez, Nuria; Abraldes, José Arturo; Alcaraz, Pedro Emilio; Ferragut, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Women's handball is a sport, which has seen an accelerated development over the last decade. Although anthropometric and physical characteristics have been studied for male sports teams, in women's handball, studies are scarce. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to describe the anthropometric characteristics, throwing velocity, hand grip, and muscular power of the lower limbs in female handball players and second, to identify the possible differences in these parameters in terms of individual playing positions (center, back, wing, pivot, and goalkeeper). A total of 130 elite female Spanish handball players participated in the study (age 25.74 ± 4.84 years; playing experience 14.92 ± 4.88 years). Anthropometric assessment was performed for all the subjects following the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry protocols. Furthermore, all the subjects performed a vertical jump test (squat jump and countermovement jump). Hand grip and throwing velocity in several situations were also assessed. A 1-way analysis of variance and a Tukey post hoc test were used to study the differences among individual playing positions. Wings were less heavy, shorter, and showed a smaller arm span than did goalkeepers, backs and pivots (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, pivots were heavier than centers. Backs and pivots exhibited higher muscular mass than did wings. Total players' somatotype was mesomorphy endomorphy (3.89-4.28-2.29). Centers showed higher throwing velocity levels than did wings in 9-m throws from just behind the line, with a goalkeeper. Backs exhibited higher hand-grip values than did wings. Statistical differences have been established between wings and other specific playing positions, especially with pivot and backs. Coaches can use this information to select players for the different specific positions.

  1. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool.

  2. Combined analysis of surface reflection imaging and vertical seismic profiling at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.; Karageorgi, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents results from surface and borehole seismic profiling performed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) on Yucca Mountain. This work was performed as part of the site characterization effort for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository. Their objective was to provide seismic imaging from the near surface (200 to 300 ft. depth) to the repository horizon and below, if possible. Among the issues addressed by this seismic imaging work are location and depth of fracturing and faulting, geologic identification of reflecting horizons, and spatial continuity of reflecting horizons. The authors believe their results are generally positive, with tome specific successes. This was the first attempt at this scale using modem seismic imaging techniques to determine geologic features on Yucca Mountain. The principle purpose of this report is to present the interpretation of the seismic reflection section in a geologic context. Three surface reflection profiles were acquired and processed as part of this study. Because of environmental concerns, all three lines were on preexisting roads. Line 1 crossed the mapped surface trace of the Ghost Dance fault and it was intended to study the dip and depth extent of the fault system. Line 2 was acquired along Drill Hole wash and was intended to help the ESF north ramp design activities. Line 3 was acquired along Yucca Crest and was designed to image geologic horizons which were thought to be less faulted along the ridge. Unfortunately, line 3 proved to have poor data quality, in part because of winds, poor field conditions and limited time. Their processing and interpretation efforts were focused on lines 1 and 2 and their associated VSP studies.

  3. Analysis of Vertical Dynamics in the Northern Baltic Sea based on 3D Modelling and Data from Shallow-Water Argo Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Antti; Tuomi, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Vertical mixing is a challenge for ocean models. 3D hydrodynamic models often produce considerable errors in mixed layer depths and vertical temperature structure that can be related to the vertical turbulence parameterisation. These errors can be pronounced in areas with complex hydrography. In the Baltic Sea, for example, there are high horizontal and vertical salinity gradients. Furthermore, thermocline and halocline are located at different depths. This produces stratification conditions challenging for all ocean models. We studied vertical mixing with modelling experiments and new observational data. NEMO 3D ocean model has been set up at Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) for the Baltic Sea, based on the NEMO Nordic configuration. The model has been discretized on a Baltic Sea - North Sea grid with 2 nautical mile resolution and 56 vertical layers, using FMI-HIRLAM atmospheric forcing. The observational data for Baltic Sea off-shore areas is sparse and new methods are needed to collect data for model validation and development. FMI has been testing Argo floats in the Baltic Sea since 2011 in order to increase the amount of observed vertical profiles of salinity and temperature. This is the first time Argo floats have been successfully used in the brackish, shallow waters of the Baltic Sea. This new data set is well suited for evaluating the capability of hydrodynamic models to produce the vertical structure of temperature. It provides a time series of profiles from the area of interest with good temporal resolution, showing the structure of temperature in the water column throughout the summer. We found that NEMO was able to reproduce the general features of the seasonal temperature variations in the study area, when meteorological forcing was accurate. We ran the model with different vertical turbulence parameterisations. The k-ɛ and k-ω schemes showed clear differences, but neither proved superior. While sea surface temperature was better simulated

  4. Retrieval of vertical profiles of multiple trace gases from MAX-DOAS observations during the MADCAT Campaign in Mainz, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Xie, Pinhua; Wagner, Thomas; Li, Ang; Luo, Yuhan; Remmers, Julia; Horbanski, Martin; Friess, Udo

    2014-05-01

    In order to promote the development of passive DOAS technique and solve some critical problems including e.g. accurate retrievals of trace gas slant column densities (SCD), profile retrievals of trace gases and aerosol, and the effects of cloud, the Multi Axis DOAS-Comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases (MAD-CAT) was held at the Max-Planck institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany from June to August 2013. Within this campaign, spectra of scattered sun light were taken by our two-dimensional scanning MAX-DOAS (2D-MAX-DOAS) instrument and a Mini-MAX-DOAS instrument from the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this presentation, firstly we show the retrieved differential SCDs of O4, NO2, HCHO, HONO and CHOCHO based on the observations of the 2D-MAX-DOAS. Based on these dSCDs we acquired the vertical profiles of these trace gases and aerosol extinction using optimal estimation method. We compare the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MAX-DOAS with simultaneous observations from an AERONET instrument as well as the near surface volume mixing ratio (VMR) of NO2 from MAX-DOAS with those from a CE-DOAS instrument from the IUP Heidelberg group and found in general good agreement. In addition we apply a cloud classification scheme based on our MAX-DOAS observations to identify different kinds of weather during the MAD-CAT campaign.

  5. Vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis blooms in a Lagrangian particle tracking model for short-term forecasts in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, M. D.; Anderson, E. J.; Wynne, T. T.; Stumpf, R. P.; Fanslow, D. L.; Kijanka, K.; Vanderploeg, H. A.; Strickler, J. R.; Davis, T. W.

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs) are a problem in western Lake Erie, and in eutrophic fresh waters worldwide. Western Lake Erie is a large (3000 km2), shallow (8 m mean depth), freshwater system. CHABs occur from July to October, when stratification is intermittent in response to wind and surface heating or cooling (polymictic). Existing forecast models give the present location and extent of CHABs from satellite imagery, then predict two-dimensional (surface) CHAB movement in response to meteorology. In this study, we simulated vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis colonies, and 3-D advection, using a Lagrangian particle model forced by currents and turbulent diffusivity from the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). We estimated the frequency distribution of Microcystis colony buoyant velocity from measured size distributions and buoyant velocities. We evaluated several random-walk numerical schemes to efficiently minimize particle accumulation artifacts. We selected the Milstein scheme, with linear interpolation of the diffusivity profile in place of cubic splines, and varied the time step at each particle and step based on the curvature of the local diffusivity profile to ensure that the Visser time step criterion was satisfied. Inclusion of vertical mixing with buoyancy significantly improved model skill statistics compared to an advection-only model, and showed greater skill than a persistence forecast through simulation day 6, in a series of 26 hindcast simulations from 2011. The simulations and in situ observations show the importance of subtle thermal structure, typical of a polymictic lake, along with buoyancy in determining vertical and horizontal distribution of Microcystis.

  6. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3–UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3–UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment.

    In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models.

    In HadGEM3–UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only.

    In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e

  7. Monitoring atmospheric turbulence profiles with high vertical resolution using PML/PBL instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blary, F.; Ziad, A.; Borgnino, J.; Fantéï-Caujolle, Y.; Aristidi, Eric; Lantéri, H.

    2014-07-01

    Wide-Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) have been proposed for the next generation of telescopes. In order to be efficient, correction using WFAO require knowledge of atmospheric turbulence parameters. The structure constant of index-of-refraction fluctuations (C2 N ) being one of them. Indirect methods implemented in instruments as SCIDAR, MASS, SLODAR, CO-SLIDAR and MOSP have been proposed to measure C2 N (h) pro le through different layers of the atmosphere. A new monitor called the Profiler of Moon Limb (PML) is presented. In this instrument, C2 N (h) pro les are retrieved from the transverse covariance via minimization of a maximum likelihood criterion under positivity constraint using an iterative gradient method. An other approach using a regularization method (RM) is also studied. Instrument errors are mainly related to the detection of the Moon limb position and are mostly due to photon noise. Numerical simulations have been used to evaluate the error on the extracted pro le and its propagation from the detection to the inverse technique.

  8. ANN valuation model of material LCIA profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei-ping; LIU Hua; ZHAO Hai-dong; ZHU Quan-li; LI Yuan-yuan

    2005-01-01

    Weighting model is the only valuation model of life cycle impact assessment(LCIA) profile now.It simplifies evaluation function into linear function,and makes the determination of weighting factor complicated.Therefore the valuation of LCIA profile is the most critical and controversial step in life cycle assessment(LCA).Development on valuation models,which are understood easily and accepted widely,is urgently needed in the field of LCA.The modeling approaches for the linear evaluation function were summed up.The modeling approaches for the nonlinear evaluation function were set up by function approximation theory,which include choosing preference products,forming preference data,establishing artificial neural network(ANN) and training ANN by preference data.By selecting 7 material products as preference product,experience was done with modeling approaches of the nonlinear evaluation function.The results show that the modeling approaches and valuation model of the nonlinear evaluation function are more practical than the weighting model.

  9. A system for vertical profile measurements of sensible heat and chemical concentrations near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyppoenen, M.; Walden, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The design, construction and measurements of a computer controlled system applicable to flux measurements of a scalar quantity by the gradient technique are described. Accuracy requirements for the measured variables which are used for flux calculations are considered, together with some practical aspects concerning data storage and control. The construction includes the hardware and the data acquisition, sample intake, and temperature measurement systems. The measurements comprise laboratory tests of the temperature probes and the hardware as well as field tests over wheat and grass land for temperature and wind speed and ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentration profiles. The hardware takes care of most of the operation and only the necessary part is done by the software. The data acquisition system is flexible, accepting the input of either digital and/or analog signals. It also controls the whole system, storing all the data in a single data file. The sample intake unit is designed to take continuous samples in to the monitors as well as grab samples into the canisters. Samples can be selected from one to four levels with no dead volumes in the sampling tubes. The temperature measurement system is constructed using a pair of temperature probes, Pt-100, which are connected to the same signal processing card, in order to remove the offset of the electronic components as well as the bias associated with single probes. This ensures the accuracy of the probes down to 0.005 deg C. According to the field measurements, the relative error limits for the sensible heat fluxes varied from 7 to 20 % in an unstable atmospheric situation. For the ozone flux, the error limits varied from 20 to 100 %, indicating a much poorer accuracy of the monitor compared to the temperature probes. (orig.) 16 refs.

  10. Aerosols and lightning activity: The effect of vertical profile and aerosol type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proestakis, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Price, C.; Kazantzidis, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite has been utilized for the first time in a study regarding lightning activity modulation due to aerosols. Lightning activity observations, obtained by the ZEUS long range Lightning Detection Network, European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) data and Cloud Fraction (CF) retrieved by MODIS on board Aqua satellite have been combined with CALIPSO CALIOP data over the Mediterranean basin and for the period March to November, from 2007 to 2014. The results indicate that lightning activity is enhanced during days characterized by higher Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values, compared to days with no lightning. This study contributes to existing studies on the link between lightning activity and aerosols, which have been based just on columnar AOD satellite retrievals, by performing a deeper analysis into the effect of aerosol profiles and aerosol types. Correlation coefficients of R = 0.73 between the CALIPSO AOD and the number of lightning strikes detected by ZEUS and of R = 0.93 between ECMWF CAPE and lightning activity are obtained. The analysis of extinction coefficient values at 532 nm indicates that at an altitudinal range exists, between 1.1 km and 2.9 km, where the values for extinction coefficient of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases are statistically significantly different. Finally, based on the CALIPSO aerosol subtype classification, we have investigated the aerosol conditions of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases. According to the results polluted dust aerosols are more frequently observed during non-lightning-active days, while dust and smoke aerosols are more abundant in the atmosphere during the lightning-active days.

  11. Expanding Curtain Observations of Cloud Vertical Structure and Layering to Model-Relevant Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Bankert, R.; Forsythe, J.; Mitrescu, C.; Reinke, D.; Austin, R.

    2007-12-01

    Clouds, representing perhaps the most obvious physical manifestations of atmospheric dynamics at work, remain in many ways an enigmatic and unifying intellectual challenge to researchers of all disciplines within the atmospheric sciences. Given the universally acknowledged importance of cloud systems in determining the state of current and future climate through radiative, chemical, dynamic, and thermodynamic processes tied intimately to the hydrological cycle, it is no wonder that so much recent attention has been given to better understanding the non-linear feedbacks involving clouds and ways to improve their handling in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In terms of operational community interests, knowledge of cloud vertical structure, ceiling (cloud base) height, and phase is key to aviation safety assurance in the private, commercial, and defense-agency sectors alike. The launch of the NASA Earth System Science Pathfinder CloudSat (cloud radar; 3 mm wavelength) mission in 2006 changed forever the way we view cloud systems from the space platform--providing vertically-resolved 'cuts' through the cloudy troposphere. The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) system resolves nearly all radiatively significant cloud structures present in the column at vertical resolutions sufficient to afford scientists the opportunity to examine new hypotheses on cloud formation (leading potentially to new/improved cloud process parameterizations) and make observationally-based discoveries bordering on the frontiers of our current understanding. At the same time, the non-scanning nature of the CPR (providing so-called 'curtain' observations) represents in some respects a frustrating tease to the potential of a three-dimensional scanning system, relegating its utility to the realms of research as opposed to full spatial environmental characterization and data assimilation. This research examines ways to extend via statistical methods the curtain slices provided by CloudSat into the

  12. Geoid Height and Deflection of the Vertical Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of the National Geodetic Survey has produced a series of high-resolution gravimetric geoid models, hybrid geoid models, and associated deflection of the...

  13. GrundRisk - Coupling of vertical and horizontal transport models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locatelli, Luca; Rosenberg, Louise; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    This report presents the development of the GrundRisk model for contaminated site risk assessment.......This report presents the development of the GrundRisk model for contaminated site risk assessment....

  14. Revisiting Vertical Models To Simulate the Line Shape of Electronic Spectra Adopting Cartesian and Internal Coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Javier; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-10-11

    Vertical models for the simulation of spectroscopic line shapes expand the potential energy surface (PES) of the final state around the equilibrium geometry of the initial state. These models provide, in principle, a better approximation of the region of the band maximum. At variance, adiabatic models expand each PES around its own minimum. In the harmonic approximation, when the minimum energy structures of the two electronic states are connected by large structural displacements, adiabatic models can breakdown and are outperformed by vertical models. However, the practical application of vertical models faces the issues related to the necessity to perform a frequency analysis at a nonstationary point. In this contribution we revisit vertical models in harmonic approximation adopting both Cartesian (x) and valence internal curvilinear coordinates (s). We show that when x coordinates are used, the vibrational analysis at nonstationary points leads to a deficient description of low-frequency modes, for which spurious imaginary frequencies may even appear. This issue is solved when s coordinates are adopted. It is however necessary to account for the second derivative of s with respect to x, which here we compute analytically. We compare the performance of the vertical model in the s-frame with respect to adiabatic models and previously proposed vertical models in x- or Q1-frame, where Q1 are the normal coordinates of the initial state computed as combination of Cartesian coordinates. We show that for rigid molecules the vertical approach in the s-frame provides a description of the final state very close to the adiabatic picture. For sizable displacements it is a solid alternative to adiabatic models, and it is not affected by the issues of vertical models in x- and Q1-frames, which mainly arise when temperature effects are included. In principle the G matrix depends on s, and this creates nonorthogonality problems of the Duschinsky matrix connecting the normal

  15. Branes in the GL(1 vertical stroke 1) WZNW-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutzig, T.; Schomerus, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Quella, T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). KdV Inst. for Mathematics

    2007-08-15

    We initiate a systematic study of boundary conditions in conformal field theories with target space supersymmetry. The WZNW model on GL(1 vertical stroke 1) is used as a prototypical example for which we find the complete set of maximally symmetric branes. This includes a unique brane of maximal super-dimension 2 vertical stroke 2, a 2-parameter family of branes with super-dimension 0 vertical stroke 2 and an infinite set of fully localized branes possessing a single modulus. Members of the latter family can only exist along certain lines on the bosonic base, much like fractional branes at orbifold singularities. Our results establish that all essential algebraic features of Cardy-type boundary theories carry over to the non-rational logarithmic WZNW model on GL(1 vertical stroke 1). (orig.)

  16. Measurement of water column primary production using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical chlorophyll profile, and underwater light intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, A. B.; Gagarin, V. I.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A method has been developed to measure water column integrated primary production (PPint) in the water column using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical profile of chlorophyll a concentration, and the underwater light intensity. Good correlation has been found for the results calculated with this method and light dependences in situ. The advantages of this method are the independence of PPint calculation from CTD profiling and water sampling, and thus optimization (reduction) of the station working time.

  17. Vertical profiles of fine and coarse aerosol particles over Cyprus: Comparison between in-situ drone measurements and remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamali, Dimitra; Marinou, Eleni; Pikridas, Michael; Kottas, Michael; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Tsekeri, Aleksandra; Amiridis, Vasilis; Sciare, Jean; Keleshis, Christos; Engelmann, Ronny; Ansmann, Albert; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.; Biskos, George

    2017-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) measurements were compared to airborne dried optical particle counter (OPC MetOne; Model 212) measurements during the INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS campaign. The campaign took place in April 2016 and its main focus was the study of aerosol dust particles. During the campaign the NOA Polly-XT Raman lidar located at Nicosia (35.08° N, 33.22° E) was providing round-the-clock vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) carrying an OPC flew on 7 days during the first morning hours. The flights were performed at Orounda (35.1018° N, 33.0944° E) reaching altitudes of 2.5 km a.s.l, which allows comparison with a good fraction of the recorded lidar data. The polarization lidar photometer networking method (POLIPHON) was used for the estimation of the fine (non-dust) and coarse (dust) mode aerosol mass concentration profiles. This method uses as input the particle backscatter coefficient and the particle depolarization profiles of the lidar at 532 nm wavelength and derives the aerosol mass concentration. The first step in this approach makes use of the lidar observations to separate the backscatter and extinction contributions of the weakly depolarizing non-dust aerosol components from the contributions of the strongly depolarizing dust particles, under the assumption of an externally mixed two-component aerosol. In the second step, sun photometer retrievals of the fine and the coarse modes aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and volume concentration are used to calculate the associated concentrations from the extinction coefficients retrieved from the lidar. The estimated aerosol volume concentrations were converted into mass concentration with an assumption for the bulk aerosol density, and compared with the OPC measurements. The first results show agreement within the experimental uncertainty. This project received funding from the

  18. Techniques of Ozone Monitoring in a Mountain Forest Region: Passive and Continuous Sampling, Vertical and Canopy Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Gerosa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is the most harmful air pollutant for plant ecosystems in the Mediterranean and Alpine areas due to its biological and economic damage to crops and forests. In order to evaluate the relation between ozone exposure and vegetation injury under on-field conditions, suitable ozone monitoring techniques were investi-gated. In the framework of a 5-year research project aimed at ozone risk assessment on forests, both continuous analysers and passive samplers were employed during the summer seasons (1994�1998 in different sites of a wide mountain region (80 x 40 km2 on the southern slope of the European Alps. Continuous analysers allowed the recording of ozone hourly concentration means necessary both to calculate specific exposure indexes (such as AOT, SUM, W126 and to record daily time-courses. Passive samplers, even though supplied only weekly mean concentration values, made it possible to estimate the altitude concentration gradient useful to correct the altitude dependence of ozone concentrations to be inserted into exposure indexes. In-canopy ozone profiles were also determined by placing passive samplers at different heights inside the forest canopy. Vertical ozone soundings by means of tethered balloons (kytoons allowed the measurement of the vertical concentration gradient above the forest canopy. They also revealed ozone reservoirs aloft and were useful to explain the ozone advection dynamic in mountain slopes where ground measurement proved to be inadequate. An intercomparison between passive (PASSAM, CH and continuous measurements highlighted the necessity to accurately standardize all the exposure operations, particularly the pre- and postexposure conservation at cold temperature to avoid dye (DPE activity. Advantages and disadvantages from each mentioned technique are discussed.

  19. Soil-Pile Interaction in the Pile Vertical Vibration Based on Fictitious Soil-Pile Model

    OpenAIRE

    Guodong Deng; Jiasheng Zhang; Wenbing Wu; Xiong Shi; Fei Meng

    2014-01-01

    By introducing the fictitious soil-pile model, the soil-pile interaction in the pile vertical vibration is investigated. Firstly, assuming the surrounding soil of pile to be viscoelastic material and considering its vertical wave effect, the governing equations of soil-pile system subjected to arbitrary harmonic dynamic force are founded based on the Euler-Bernoulli rod theory. Secondly, the analytical solution of velocity response in frequency domain and its corresponding semianalytical solu...

  20. Vertical Seismic Profiling at riser drilling site in the rupture area of the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake, Japan (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, R.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T. B.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D. M.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    A series of scientific drilling expeditions is in operation in the Nankai Trough to reveal the faulting mechanism of the magathrust earthquakes, through clarifying composition, fine structure, mechanical behavior, and environmental variables of the seismogenic faults. In the studied area, extensive seismic surveys for site characterization have been made to image detailed geometry of the fault complex in the accretionary prism as well as Vp distribution around the faults. Although these previous surveys provided invaluable information for understanding seismotectonic processes in this subduction zone, more complete knowledge is needed to be acquired to predict dynamic behavior of the faults, such as geometrical irregularities in short wavelength, Vs and seismic attenuation which are sensitive to fluid distribution in and around fault zones. It is expected that estimation of these parameters would be improved considerably by a seismic exploration using a vertical array of seismographs installed in a deep borehole (VSP: vertical seismic profiling). In July 2009, we made a VSP at one of the drilling sites located just above the rupture area of the 1994 Tonankai Earthquake (M 8.1), during the IODP Exp.319. The well site of our VSP was made by the riser drilling of D/V Chikyu. The seismic array, lowered from Chikyu into the hole, was composed of a three-component accelerometer and vertical separation of the array elements was 15.12 m. The VSP was composed of offset VSP and zero-offset VSP. In the offset VSP, a tuned airgun array towed by R/V Kairei was shot along one straight line (walk-away VSP) and another circular line (walk-around VSP) and seismic signals were recorded by an array consisting of 16 elements installed from 907 to 1,135 m in depth from seafloor. The object of the walk-away VSP is to obtain fine image of the faults using reflection arrivals with less attenuation. It is also expected to obtain spatial variation of Vs from arrival time tomography of

  1. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  2. Exploring the Full-Information Bifactor Model in Vertical Scaling with Construct Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lissitz, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    To address the lack of attention to construct shift in item response theory (IRT) vertical scaling, a multigroup, bifactor model was proposed to model the common dimension for all grades and the grade-specific dimensions. Bifactor model estimation accuracy was evaluated through a simulation study with manipulated factors of percentage of common…

  3. An Observational and Model Characterization of Vertical Structure of Wind Fields over Eastern United States: A Case Study of Sterling, Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sium Gebremariam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of twenty GCMs that participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 5 (CMIP5 is evaluated at Sterling, Virginia, by comparing model outputs with radiosonde observational dataset and reanalysis dataset. We evaluated CMIP5 models in their ability to simulate wind climatology, seasonal cycle, interannual variability, and trends at the pressure levels from 850 hPa to 30 hPa. We also addressed the question of the number of years required to detect statistically significant wind trends using radiosonde wind measurements. Our results show that CMIP5 models and reanalysis successfully reproduced the observed climatological annual mean zonal wind and wind speed vertical distribution. They also capture the observed seasonal zonal, meridional, and wind speed vertical distribution with stronger (weaker wind during the winter (summer season. However, there is some disagreement in the magnitude of vertical profiles among CMIP5 models, reanalysis, and radiosonde observation. Overall, the number of years to obtain statistically significant trend decreases with increasing pressure level except for upper troposphere. Although the vertical profile of interannual variability of CMIP5 models and reanalysis agree with the radiosonde observation, the wind trend is not statistically significant. This indicates that detection of trends on local scale is challenging because of small signal-to-noise ratio problems.

  4. Modelling Soil Profiles in their Landscape Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Through models, explores the relationships between the interacting drivers of soil profile evolution. Soil hydrology drives the partition of precipitation between overland flow, shallow subsurface flow and deeper percolation/ lateral flow. Critical parts of this interchange occurs close to the surface, within the zone of strong bioturbation, where inorganic composition is determined by the balance between erosion and weathering rates expressed in the chemical depletion ratio. The intensity of organic matter cycling may also limit the final composition of weathering products. Erosion rates are partly driven by the geomorphic environment, through gradient and hydrology, but also constrained by the degree of soil weathering, through particle size and mineralogy. Weathering rates are determined by water movement below the bioturbation zone and ionic diffusion from parent material, which control the rate of decline with soil depth. These interactions are explored through simple equilibrium and evolutionary models for the soil profile that are applicable across a wide range of geological and climatic environments.

  5. Global dynamics behaviors for new delay SEIR epidemic disease model with vertical transmission and pulse vaccination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A robust SEIR epidemic disease model with a profitless delay and vertical transmission is formulated, and the dynamics behaviors of the model under pulse vaccination are analyzed.By use of the discrete dynamical system determined by the the model are under appropriate conditions.Using the theory on delay functional and impulsive differential equation, the sufficient condition with time delay for the permanence of the system is obtained, and it is proved that time delays, pulse vaccination and vertical transmission can bring obvious effects on the dynamics behaviors of the model.

  6. Asymptotic solutions of the axisymmetric moist Hadley circulation in a model with two vertical modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Samuel P. [Columbia University, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, New York, NY (United States); New York University, Courant Institute, New York, NY (United States); Sobel, Adam H.; Polvani, Lorenzo M. [Columbia University, Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-11-15

    A simplified model of the moist axisymmetric Hadley circulation is examined in the asymptotic limit in which surface drag is strong and the meridional wind is weak compared to the zonal wind. Our model consists of the quasi-equilibrium tropical circulation model (QTCM) equations on an axisymmetric aquaplanet equatorial beta-plane. This model includes two vertical momentum modes, one baroclinic and one barotropic. Prior studies use either continuous stratification, or a shallow water system best viewed as representing the upper troposphere. The analysis here focuses on the interaction of the baroclinic and barotropic modes, and the way in which this interaction allows the constraints on the circulation known from the fully stratified case to be satisfied in an approximate way. The dry equations, with temperature forced by Newtonian relaxation towards a prescribed radiative equilibrium, are solved first. To leading order, the resulting circulation has a zonal wind profile corresponding to uniform angular momentum at a level near the tropopause, and zero zonal surface wind, owing to the cancelation of the barotropic and baroclinic modes there. The weak surface winds are calculated from the first-order corrections. The broad features of these solutions are similar to those obtained in previous studies of the dry Hadley circulation. The moist equations are solved next, with a fixed sea surface temperature at the lower boundary and simple parameterizations of surface fluxes, deep convection, and radiative transfer. The solutions yield the structure of the barotropic and baroclinic winds, as well as the temperature and moisture fields. In addition, we derive expressions for the width and strength of the equatorial precipitating region (ITCZ) and the width of the entire Hadley circulation. The ITCZ width is on the order of a few degrees in the absence of any horizontal diffusion and is relatively insensitive to parameter variations. (orig.)

  7. Modelling of a non-buoyant vertical jet in waves and currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐振山; 陈永平; 陶建峰; 潘毅; 张长宽; 李志伟

    2016-01-01

    A generic numerical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) technique is developed to simulate a non-buoyant vertical jet in wave and/or current environments. The experimental data obtained in five different cases, i.e., one case of the jet in a wave only environment, two cases of the jet in a cross-flow only environment and two cases of the jet in a wave and cross-flow coexisting environment, are used to validate the model. The grid sensitivity tests are conducted based on four different grid systems and the results illustrate that the non-uniform grid system C (205×99×126 nodes with the minimum size of 1/10 jet diameter) is sufficiently fine for the modelling. The comparative study shows that the wave-current non-linear interaction should be taken into account at the inflow boundary while modelling the jet in wave and cross-flow coexisting environments. All numerical results agree well with the experimental data, showing that: (1) the jet under the influence of the wave action has a faster centerline velocity decay and a higher turbulence level than that in the stagnant ambience, meanwhile the “twin peaks” phenomenon exists on the cross-sectional velocity profiles, (2) the jet under a cross-flow scenario is deflected along the cross-flow with the node in the downstream, (3) the jet in wave and cross-flow coexisting environments has a flow structure of “effluent clouds”, which enhances the mixing of the jet with surrounding waters.

  8. Reduced-order models for vertical human-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nimmen, Katrien; Lombaert, Geert; De Roeck, Guido; Van den Broeck, Peter

    2016-09-01

    For slender and lightweight structures, the vibration serviceability under crowd- induced loading is often critical in design. Currently, designers rely on equivalent load models, upscaled from single-person force measurements. Furthermore, it is important to consider the mechanical interaction with the human body as this can significantly reduce the structural response. To account for these interaction effects, the contact force between the pedestrian and the structure can be modelled as the superposition of the force induced by the pedestrian on a rigid floor and the force resulting from the mechanical interaction between the structure and the human body. For the case of large crowds, however, this approach leads to models with a very high system order. In the present contribution, two equivalent reduced-order models are proposed to approximate the dynamic behaviour of the full-order coupled crowd-structure system. A numerical study is performed to evaluate the impact of the modelling assumptions on the structural response to pedestrian excitation. The results show that the full-order moving crowd model can be well approximated by a reduced-order model whereby the interaction with the pedestrians in the crowd is modelled using a single (equivalent) SDOF system.

  9. The HAWK Highway: A Vertical Model for Student IEP Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quann, Monica; Lyman, Jennifer; Crumlish, Jamie; Hines, Sally; Williams, Lynn; Pleet-Odle, Amy; Eisenman, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Special educators at an inclusive career-technical high school created a model to support annually increasing expectations for self-determination and levels of student participation in Individualized Education Program (IEP) planning and implementation. The grade-specific components of the model and supporting context are described. Students were…

  10. The HAWK Highway: A Vertical Model for Student IEP Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quann, Monica; Lyman, Jennifer; Crumlish, Jamie; Hines, Sally; Williams, Lynn; Pleet-Odle, Amy; Eisenman, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Special educators at an inclusive career-technical high school created a model to support annually increasing expectations for self-determination and levels of student participation in Individualized Education Program (IEP) planning and implementation. The grade-specific components of the model and supporting context are described. Students were…

  11. Evaluating intuitiveness of vertical-aware click models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.; Zhou, K.; Schuth, A.; Sietsma, F.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    Modeling user behavior on a search engine result page is important for understanding the users and supporting simulation experiments. As result pages become more complex, click models evolve as well in order to capture additional aspects of user behavior in response to new forms of result presentati

  12. Continuous on-line calibration of diffusive soil-atmosphere trace gas transport using vertical {sup 220}Rn- and {sup 222}Rn-activity profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, B.E. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Physics Inst.; Neftel, A. [Inst. of Environmental Protection and Agriculture, Bern (Switzerland); Tarakanov, S.V. [Inst. of Silicate Chemistry, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of {sup 220}Rn- and {sup 222}Rn-activities above and below the soil surface combined with sporadic direct {sup 222}Rn-flux measurements is used to quantify diffusive trace gas transport in the air-filled pore space of soil, through the soil-atmosphere interface and in the lowest layers of the atmosphere. In a calm night, {sup 222}Rn-activities above the surface first build-up near the ground (z < 10 cm) and subsequently with a delay of 2-3 hours at higher altitudes (z < 5 m). Knowing (1) the {sup 222}Rn-flux from activity profiles measured in soil gas, (2) from direct flux determinations and (3) using information about atmospheric diffusion parameters from {sup 220}Rn-activities measured near the surface it is possible to model the temporal evolution of the vertical {sup 222}Rn-profiles in a night with stable weather and constant soil conditions. The system operates automatically for extended periods of time in the field enabling a better understanding of transport processes in response to changing environmental conditions (wind, rain, soil humidity). (orig.)

  13. Vertical heat flux in the ocean: Estimates from observations and from a coupled general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Patrick F.; Masson, Diane; Saenko, Oleg A.

    2016-06-01

    The net heat uptake by the ocean in a changing climate involves small imbalances between the advective and diffusive processes that transport heat vertically. Generally, it is necessary to rely on global climate models to study these processes in detail. In the present study, it is shown that a key component of the vertical heat flux, namely that associated with the large-scale mean vertical circulation, can be diagnosed over extra-tropical regions from global observational data sets. This component is estimated based on the vertical velocity obtained from the geostrophic vorticity balance, combined with estimates of absolute geostrophic flow. Results are compared with the output of a non-eddy resolving, coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Reasonable agreement is found in the latitudinal distribution of the vertical heat flux, as well as in the area-integrated flux below about 250 m depth. The correspondence with the coupled model deteriorates sharply at depths shallower than 250 m due to the omission of equatorial regions from the calculation. The vertical heat flux due to the mean circulation is found to be dominated globally by the downward contribution from the Southern Hemisphere, in particular the Southern Ocean. This is driven by the Ekman vertical velocity which induces an upward transport of seawater that is cold relative to the horizontal average at a given depth. The results indicate that the dominant characteristics of the vertical transport of heat due to the mean circulation can be inferred from simple linear vorticity dynamics over much of the ocean.

  14. Convective Signatures in Ozone Profiles: Guidance for Cloud Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Miller, S. K.; Witte, J. C.; Pickering, K. E.; Tao, W. K.

    2006-05-01

    Ozone throughout the free troposphere is a tracer for convection, stratospheric exchange and pollution. Convective influences are typically manifested in two ways: (1) redistribution of ozone from the boundary-layer to free troposphere. In unpolluted regions, this usually means decreasing ozone in the upper troposphere (UT) or UT/LS (upper troposphere-lower stratosphere). Over polluted regions, the opposite may occur. (2) enhancing O3 precursors (NO, CO, hydrocarbons) in the free troposphere, through redistribution, or in the case of lightning, through direct production of NO, adds to photochemical ozone formation. Since about 1990 we have studied ozone dynamics and photochemistry with cloud-resolving (CRM) and larger-scale models. Aircraft profiles of O3, ozone precursors (NO, CO, hydrocarbons) and photochemically related constituents guide model input and are used to evaluate model output. Recently, we have used a semi-empirical approach ("lamina-layering," after Pierce and Grant [1998]) to identifying convective impacts on ozone profiles taken with soundings. The latter are measured by ozonesondes that are flown with radiosondes, to collect PTU data. The advantage of ozonesondes is consistent vertical sampling of ozone into the UT/LS with 5- 25 m resolution, and regular frequency at stations where they are launched. Examples of convective influence in ozone profiles - case studies and climatology at selected locations - will be shown for mid-latitudes and tropics. In mid-latitudes convective ozone budgets are compared to influences of stratospheric exchange and pollution. In the tropics, convective impacts reflect El Nino, the MJO and possible trends in a cooling UT/LS.

  15. Vertical partitioning and controlling factors of gradient-based soil carbon dioxide fluxes in two contrasted soil profiles along a loamy hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiaux, F.; Vanclooster, M.; Van Oost, K.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aim to elucidate the role of physical conditions and gas transfer mechanism along soil profiles in the decomposition and storage of soil organic carbon (OC) in subsoil layers. We use a qualitative approach showing the temporal evolution and the vertical profile description of CO2 fluxes and abiotic variables. We assessed soil CO2 fluxes throughout two contrasted soil profiles (i.e. summit and footslope positions) along a hillslope in the central loess belt of Belgium. We measured the time series of soil temperature, soil moisture and CO2 concentration at different depths in the soil profiles for two periods of 6 months. We then calculated the CO2 flux at different depths using Fick's diffusion law and horizon specific diffusivity coefficients. The calculated fluxes allowed assessing the contribution of different soil layers to surface CO2 fluxes. We constrained the soil gas diffusivity coefficients using direct observations of soil surface CO2 fluxes from chamber-based measurements and obtained a good prediction power of soil surface CO2 fluxes with an R2 of 92 %. We observed that the temporal evolution of soil CO2 emissions at the summit position is mainly controlled by temperature. In contrast, at the footslope, we found that long periods of CO2 accumulation in the subsoil alternates with short peaks of important CO2 release. This was related to the high water filled pore space that limits the transfer of CO2 along the soil profile at this slope position. Furthermore, the results show that approximately 90 to 95 % of the surface CO2 fluxes originate from the first 10 cm of the soil profile at the footslope. This indicates that soil OC in this depositional context can be stabilized at depth, i.e. below 10 cm. This study highlights the need to consider soil physical properties and their dynamics when assessing and modeling soil CO2 emissions. Finally, changes in the physical environment of depositional soils (e.g. longer dry periods) may affect the

  16. Modeling difference of reference surfaces of the Earth's body to solve the problem of vertical positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucikešić Sanja S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is modeling difference of reference surfaces of the Earth's body to solve the problem of vertical positioning. With development of GNSS technology determining geoid undulation obtained scientific and practical significance especially in the vertical position with the aim of replacing the traditional geometrical leveling. The paper presents the modeling corrective surface based on GNSS measurements through a practical example of Local Spatial Reference Network (PLRM Mrkonjic Grad where the measurements were made with GNSS observations. The modeling was performed onedimensional similarity transformation and the average differences between orthometric height of a GNSS measurements and transformed height were determined.

  17. Interpreting metabolomic profiles using unbiased pathway models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul C Deo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Human disease is heterogeneous, with similar disease phenotypes resulting from distinct combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Small-molecule profiling can address disease heterogeneity by evaluating the underlying biologic state of individuals through non-invasive interrogation of plasma metabolite levels. We analyzed metabolite profiles from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in 50 individuals, 25 with normal (NGT and 25 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT. Our focus was to elucidate underlying biologic processes. Although we initially found little overlap between changed metabolites and preconceived definitions of metabolic pathways, the use of unbiased network approaches identified significant concerted changes. Specifically, we derived a metabolic network with edges drawn between reactant and product nodes in individual reactions and between all substrates of individual enzymes and transporters. We searched for "active modules"--regions of the metabolic network enriched for changes in metabolite levels. Active modules identified relationships among changed metabolites and highlighted the importance of specific solute carriers in metabolite profiles. Furthermore, hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis demonstrated that changed metabolites in OGTT naturally grouped according to the activities of the System A and L amino acid transporters, the osmolyte carrier SLC6A12, and the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporter SLC25A13. Comparison between NGT and IGT groups supported blunted glucose- and/or insulin-stimulated activities in the IGT group. Using unbiased pathway models, we offer evidence supporting the important role of solute carriers in the physiologic response to glucose challenge and conclude that carrier activities are reflected in individual metabolite profiles of perturbation experiments. Given the involvement of transporters in human disease, metabolite profiling may contribute to improved

  18. Characteristics of aerosol size distribution and vertical backscattering coefficient profile during 2014 APEC in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaoshi; Chen, Zhenyi; Lu, Yihuai; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Wang, Jie; Yu, Tongzhu; Cheng, Yin; Chen, Yong; Ge, Baozhu; Fan, Yu; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference period, Beijing's air quality was greatly improved as a result of a series of tough emission control measures being implemented in Beijing and its surrounding provinces. However, a moderate haze occurred during the period of 4-5 November. In order to evaluate the emission control measures and study the formation mechanism of the haze, a comprehensive field observation based on a supersite and a lidar network was carried out from 25 October 2014 to 20 January 2015. By investigating the variations in aerosol number concentration and mean backscattering coefficient before, during and after the APEC period, it was found that number concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode particles experienced the most significant decrease by 47% and 68%, and mean backscattering coefficient below 1 km decreased by 34% during the APEC period. Being characterized as "rapidly accumulating and rapidly dispersing", the moderate haze occurred during the APEC period was probably initiated by a wind direction change to south and an increase of wind speed to 4 m/s. Sulfur dioxide involved plume nucleation without growth in size as well as a burst of particles ranging between 100 and 300 nm were observed simultaneously during the haze episode. The elevation of sulfur dioxide concentration and particle number concentration was highly correlated with the southerly wind, signifying the contribution of regional transport. It was observed by the lidar network that the aerosol backscattering coefficient increased in sequence among three sites along the southwest pathway, suggesting that aerosols might be transported from the southwest to the northeast of Beijing with a speed of approximately 17 km/h, which agreed with the movement of air masses modeled by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT). The dual-wavelength lidar (355 and 532 nm) observation suggested that transportation of fine particles

  19. An evaluation of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke and precise tests of the standard model from world data on leptonic and semileptonic kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, M.; Isidori, G.; Moulson, M.; Palutan, M.; Sciascia, B. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati, RM (Italy); Cirigliano, V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mescia, F. [Universitat de Barcelona, Dep. ECM and ICC, Barcelona (Spain); Neufeld, H. [Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Vienna (Austria); Passemar, E. [Universitat de Valencia - CSIC, Departament de Fisica Teorica, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Sozzi, M. [Universita di Pisa e Sezione dell' INFN di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Pisa (Italy); Wanke, R. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Yushchenko, O.P. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    We present a global analysis of leptonic and semileptonic kaon decay data, including all recent results published by the BNL-E865, KLOE, KTeV, ISTRA+ and NA48 experiments. This analysis, in conjunction with precise lattice calculations of the hadronic matrix elements now available, leads to a very precise determination of vertical stroke V{sub us} vertical stroke and allows us to perform several stringent tests of the standard model. (orig.)

  20. Vertical microphysical profiles of convective clouds as a tool for obtaining aerosol cloud-mediated climate forcings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2015-12-23

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting weather satellite. Our methodology uses such clouds as an effective analog for CCN chambers. The cloud base supersaturation (S) is determined by Wb and the satellite-retrieved cloud base drop concentrations (Ndb), which is the same as CCN(S). Developing and validating this methodology was possible thanks to the ASR/ARM measurements of CCN and vertical updraft profiles. Validation against ground-based CCN instruments at the ARM sites in Oklahoma, Manaus, and onboard a ship in the northeast Pacific showed a retrieval accuracy of ±25% to ±30% for individual satellite overpasses. The methodology is presently limited to boundary layer not raining convective clouds of at least 1 km depth that are not obscured by upper layer clouds, including semitransparent cirrus. The limitation for small solar backscattering angles of <25º restricts the satellite coverage to ~25% of the world area in a single day. This methodology will likely allow overcoming the challenge of quantifying the aerosol indirect effect and facilitate a substantial reduction of the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  1. Vertical profiles of dioxin-like and estrogenic activities associated with a sediment core from Tokyo Bay, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, K.; Villeneuve, D.L.; Yamashita, N.; Imagawa, T.; Hashimoto, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Giesy, J.P. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA). Dept. of Zoology

    2000-09-01

    In vitro bioassays were used to measure dioxin-like and estrogenic activities associated with florisil fractions of extracts from a sediment core collected from Tokyo Bay, Japan. Florisil fractions 2(F2) and 3(F3) elicited significant dioxin-like responses in vitro. Dioxin-like activity of F2 samples were correlated with the vertical profile of PAH concentrations (R{sup 2} = 0.85). Contribution of PAHs to Ah receptor-mediated activities in sediments was greater than those by PCDDs/DFs, PCBs, and PCNs. The dioxin-like activity of F3 samples suggests the presence of relatively polar, Ah receptor-active compounds in the Tokyo Bay sediment core. Significant estrogenic activities, which may be related to the presence of certain estrogenic PAHs, were observed for F2 samples. Estrogen equivalents (E2-EQs) calculated from the concentrations and relative potencies of known estrogenic compounds in F2 were greater than bioassay-derived E2-EQs. This suggests that complex interactions between estrogenic and antiestrogenic compounds (PAHs, PCDD/DFs, and PCNs) may have modulated the activity. F3 samples were toxic to MVLN cells; therefore, their estrogenic activities could not be estimated. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Modelling vertical uniform contact stress of heavy vehicle tyres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steenkamp, Anton J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The field of tyre dynamics is a relatively new, but highly complex field of engineering. The testing and modelling of various tyres in order to determine stress distributions of tyres on the road surface, under varying conditions, remains a relevant...

  3. Vertical Profiles of Latent Heat Release over the Global Tropics using TRMM Rainfall Products from December 1997 to November 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.-K.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.; Meneghini, R.; Halverson, J.; Johnson, R.; Adler, R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) derived rainfall information will be used to estimate the four-dimensional structure of global monthly latent heating and rainfall profiles over the global tropics from December 1997 to November 2000. Rainfall, latent heating and radar reflectivity structures between El Nino (DJF 1997-98) and La Nina (DJF 1998-99) will be examined and compared. The seasonal variation of heating over various geographic locations (i.e., oceanic vs continental, Indian ocean vs west Pacific, Africa vs. S. America ) will also be analyzed. In addition, the relationship between rainfall, latent heating (maximum heating level), radar reflectivity and SST is examined and will be presented in the meeting. The impact of random error and bias in stratiform percentage estimates from PR on latent heating profiles is studied and will also be presented in the meeting. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model is being used to simulate various mesoscale convective systems that developed in different geographic locations. Specifically, the model estimated rainfall, radar reflectivity and latent heating profiles will be compared to observational data collected from TRMM field campaigns over the South China Sea in 1998 (SCSMEX), Brazil in 1999 (TRMM-LBA), and the central Pacific in 1999 (KWAJEX). Sounding diagnosed heating budgets and radar reflectivity from these experiments can provide the means to validate (heating product) as well as improve the GCE model. Review of other latent heating algorithms will be discussed in the workshop.

  4. Simulating high ebb currents in the North Passage of the Yangtze estuary using a vertical 1-D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuyang; Shen, Xiaoteng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.; Shen, Jian

    2017-09-01

    A strong maximum ebb current (>3 m/s) in the upper water column was observed at Station CS3 in the middle of the North Passage of the Yangtze River Estuary during the wet season, which was higher than either its upstream or downstream counterparts. To better understand the mechanisms and factors causing the strong ebb current, a vertical one-dimensional (1-D) model was used to conduct a diagnostic study. The model used time series of observed tidal amplitudes, vertical salinity, and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) profiles to compute the density and turbulence. Two tunable parameters, the tidal amplitude attenuation coefficient (i.e., the phase lag) and the background surface pressure gradient that represents the net pressure gradient induced by the freshwater discharge and baroclinic effect, were used to determine the best match with the observed high velocity amplitudes in addition to the bottom roughness height. Three hypotheses of possible causes are tested: (1) the large freshwater discharge, (2) the bottom stratification effects (which were caused by a possible high near-bed suspended sediment gradient), and (3) the unique location of the CS3 station that was influenced by local geometry. The findings show that neither of the first two factors has much influence on the pronounced ebb velocities. Instead, the energy loss caused by the change of channel geometry and a maximum convex bathymetry in the North Passage of the Yangtze River Estuary are the main reasons behind the extremely high observed ebb current velocity profiles. The high near-bottom SSC and gradient located within 0.5 m above the bed only slightly alters the velocity profiles. This 1-D model is convenient for testing a different hypothesis and for coupling with other selected variables to account for the floc size distributions in future studies.

  5. Vertical Equating: An Empirical Study of the Consistency of Thurstone and Rasch Model Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schratz, Mary K.

    To explore the appropriateness of the Rasch model for the vertical equating of a multi-level, multi-form achievement test series, both the Rasch model and the traditional Thurstone procedures were applied to the Listening Comprehension subtest scores of the Stanford Achievement Test. Two adjacent levels of these tests were administered in 1981 to…

  6. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  7. Numerical experiments on consistent horizontal and vertical resolution for atmospheric models and observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1993-01-01

    Simple numerical experiments are performed in order to determine the effects of inconsistent combinations of horizontal and vertical resolution in both atmospheric models and observing systems. In both cases, we find that inconsistent spatial resolution is associated with enhanced noise generation. A rather fine horizontal resolution in a satellite-data observing system seems to be excessive when combined with the usually available relatively coarse vertical resolution. Using horizontal filters of different strengths, adjusted in such a way as to render the effective horizontal resolution more consistent with vertical resolution for the observing system, may result in improvement of the analysis accuracy. The increase of vertical resolution for a satellite data observing system with better vertically resolved data, the results are different in that little or no horizontal filtering is needed to make spatial resolution more consistent for the system. The obtained experimental estimates of consistent vertical and effective horizontal resolution are in a general agreement with consistent resolution estimates previously derived theoretically by the authors.

  8. The constraint of CO2 measurements made onboard passenger aircraft on surface-atmosphere fluxes: the impact of transport model errors in vertical mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shreeya; Marshall, Julia; Gerbig, Christoph; Rödenbeck, Christian; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2017-05-01

    Inaccurate representation of atmospheric processes by transport models is a dominant source of uncertainty in inverse analyses and can lead to large discrepancies in the retrieved flux estimates. We investigate the impact of uncertainties in vertical transport as simulated by atmospheric transport models on fluxes retrieved using vertical profiles from aircraft as an observational constraint. Our numerical experiments are based on synthetic data with realistic spatial and temporal sampling of aircraft measurements. The impact of such uncertainties on the flux retrieved using the ground-based network and those retrieved using the aircraft profiles are compared. We find that the posterior flux retrieved using aircraft profiles is less susceptible to errors in boundary layer height, compared to the ground-based network. This finding highlights a benefit of utilizing atmospheric observations made onboard aircraft over surface measurements for flux estimation using inverse methods. We further use synthetic vertical profiles of CO2 in an inversion to estimate the potential of these measurements, which will be made available through the IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) project in the future, in constraining the regional carbon budget. Our results show that the regions of tropical Africa and temperate Eurasia, that are under-constrained by the existing surface-based network, will benefit the most from these measurements, with a reduction of posterior flux uncertainty of about 7 to 10 %.

  9. Advantages of vertically adaptive coordinates in numerical models of stratified shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräwe, Ulf; Holtermann, Peter; Klingbeil, Knut; Burchard, Hans

    2015-08-01

    Shelf seas such as the North Sea and the Baltic Sea are characterised by spatially and temporally varying stratification that is highly relevant for their physical dynamics and the evolution of their ecosystems. Stratification may vary from unstably stratified (e.g., due to convective surface cooling) to strongly stratified with density jumps of up to 10 kg/m3 per m (e.g., in overflows into the Baltic Sea). Stratification has a direct impact on vertical turbulent transports (e.g., of nutrients) and influences the entrainment rate of ambient water into dense bottom currents which in turn determine the stratification of and oxygen supply to, e.g., the central Baltic Sea. Moreover, the suppression of the vertical diffusivity at the summer thermocline is one of the limiting factors for the vertical exchange of nutrients in the North Sea. Due to limitations of computational resources and since the locations of such density jumps (either by salinity or temperature) are predicted by the model simulation itself, predefined vertical coordinates cannot always reliably resolve these features. Thus, all shelf sea models with a predefined vertical coordinate distribution are inherently subject to under-resolution of the density structure. To solve this problem, Burchard and Beckers (2004) and Hofmeister et al. (2010) developed the concept of vertically adaptive coordinates for ocean models, where zooming of vertical coordinates at locations of strong stratification (and shear) is imposed. This is achieved by solving a diffusion equation for the position of the coordinates (with the diffusivity being proportional to the stratification or shear frequencies). We will show for a coupled model system of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea (resolution ˜ 1.8 km) how numerical mixing is substantially reduced and model results become significantly more realistic when vertically adaptive coordinates are applied. We additionally demonstrate that vertically adaptive coordinates perform well

  10. Modelling of asymmetric nebulae. II. Line profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Morisset, C

    2006-01-01

    We present a tool, VELNEB_3D, which can be applied to the results of 3D photoionization codes to generate emission line profiles, position-velocity maps and 3D maps in any emission line by assuming an arbitrary velocity field. We give a few examples, based on our pseudo-3D photoionization code NEBU_3D (Morisset, Stasinska and Pena, 2005) which show the potentiality and usefulness of our tool. One example shows how complex line profiles can be obtained even with a simple expansion law if the nebula is bipolar and the slit slightly off-center. Another example shows different ways to produce line profiles that could be attributed to a turbulent velocity field while there is no turbulence in the model. A third example shows how, in certain circumstances, it is possible to discriminate between two very different geometrical structures -- here a face-on blister and its ``spherical impostor'' -- when using appropriate high resolution spectra. Finally, we show how our tool is able to generate 3D maps, similar to the ...

  11. Modeling Bivariate Longitudinal Hormone Profiles by Hierarchical State Space Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyue; Cappola, Anne R; Crofford, Leslie J; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is crucial in coping with stress and maintaining homeostasis. Hormones produced by the HPA axis exhibit both complex univariate longitudinal profiles and complex relationships among different hormones. Consequently, modeling these multivariate longitudinal hormone profiles is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a bivariate hierarchical state space model, in which each hormone profile is modeled by a hierarchical state space model, with both population-average and subject-specific components. The bivariate model is constructed by concatenating the univariate models based on the hypothesized relationship. Because of the flexible framework of state space form, the resultant models not only can handle complex individual profiles, but also can incorporate complex relationships between two hormones, including both concurrent and feedback relationship. Estimation and inference are based on marginal likelihood and posterior means and variances. Computationally efficient Kalman filtering and smoothing algorithms are used for implementation. Application of the proposed method to a study of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia reveals that the relationships between adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in the patient group are weaker than in healthy controls.

  12. H2 vertical profiles in the continental boundary layer: measurements at the Cabauw tall tower in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zahorowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In-situ, quasi-continuous measurements of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 have been performed since October 2007 at the Cabauw tall tower station in the Netherlands. Mole fractions of H2, CO and several greenhouse gases are determined simultaneously in air sampled successively at four heights, between 20 and 200 m above ground level. 222Rn measurements are performed in air sampled at 20 and 200 m. This H2 dataset represents the first in-situ, quasi-continuous long-term measurement series of vertical profiles of H2 in the lower continental boundary layer. Seasonal cycles are present at all heights in both H2 and CO, and their amplitude varies with the sampling height. The seasonality is evident in both the "baseline" values and in the short term (diurnal to synoptic time scales variability, the latter being significantly larger during winter. The observed H2 short term signals and vertical gradients are in many cases well correlated to other species, especially to CO. On the other hand, H2 has at times a unique behaviour, due to its particular distribution of sources and sinks. Our estimation for the regional H2 soil uptake flux, using the radon tracer method, is (−1.89 ± 0.26 × 10−5 g/(m2 h, significantly smaller than other recent results from Europe. H2/CO ratios of the traffic emissions computed from our data, with an average of 0.54 ± 0.07 mol:mol, are larger and more variable than estimated in some of the previous studies in Europe. This difference can be explained by a different driving regime, due to the frequent traffic jams in the influence area of Cabauw. The H2/CO ratios of the large scale pollution events have an average of 0.36 ± 0.05 mol:mol; these ratios were observed to slightly increase with sampling height, possibly due to a stronger influence of soil uptake at the lower sampling heights.

  13. A Vertically Flow-Following, Icosahedral Grid Model for Medium-Range and Seasonal Prediction. Part 1: Model Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleck, Rainer; Bao, Jian-Wen; Benjamin, Stanley G.; Brown, John M.; Fiorino, Michael; Henderson, Thomas B.; Lee, Jin-Luen; MacDonald, Alexander E.; Madden, Paul; Middlecoff, Jacques; hide

    2015-01-01

    A hydrostatic global weather prediction model based on an icosahedral horizontal grid and a hybrid terrain following/ isentropic vertical coordinate is described. The model is an extension to three spatial dimensions of a previously developed, icosahedral, shallow-water model featuring user-selectable horizontal resolution and employing indirect addressing techniques. The vertical grid is adaptive to maximize the portion of the atmosphere mapped into the isentropic coordinate subdomain. The model, best described as a stacked shallow-water model, is being tested extensively on real-time medium-range forecasts to ready it for possible inclusion in operational multimodel ensembles for medium-range to seasonal prediction.

  14. H2 vertical profiles in the continental boundary layer: measurements at the Cabauw tall tower in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zahorowski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ, quasi-continuous measurements of atmospheric hydrogen (H2 have been performed since 2007 at the Cabauw tall tower station in the Netherlands. Mole fractions of H2, CO and several greenhouse gases are determined simultaneously in air sampled successively at four heights, between 20 and 200 m above ground level. 222Rn measurements are performed in air sampled at 20 and 200 m. This H2 dataset represents the first in-situ, quasi-continuous measurement series of vertical profiles of H2 in the lower continental boundary layer. From the three-year long time series, we characterize the main features and variability patterns of H2 and CO on various time scales; the time series is too short to justify an attempt to determine multi-annual trends. Seasonal cycles are present in both H2 and CO, and their amplitude varies with the sampling height. The seasonality is evident in both the "baseline" values and in the short term (diurnal to synoptic time scales variability, the latter being significantly larger during winter. The observed H2 short term signals and vertical gradients are in many cases well correlated to other species, especially to CO. On the other hand, H2 has at times a behaviour which differentiates it from all the other species measured, due to its particular distribution of sources and sinks, that is, with the main source in our area (anthropogenic emissions and the main sink (soil uptake both near ground level. The local to regional soil sink of H2 is observable as H2 depletion at the lower sampling levels in some of the stable nights, although the signals at Cabauw are smaller than observed at other stations. Positive vertical gradients are another consequence of the soil uptake. Our estimation for the regional H2 soil uptake flux, using the radon tracer method, is (−1.89 ± 0.26 × 10−5 g/(m2h, significantly smaller than other recent results from Europe. Local soil and weather characteristics might be responsible for the very

  15. Atmospheric dust charging, vertical profiles and optical properties measured in the Arabian Peninsula during the DREAME campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Sabbah, I.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Al-Abbadi, N.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    Polarimetric observations of atmospheric Saharan dust over the Canary Islands have provided strong evidence for the presence of vertically aligned particles. The alignment was thought to be due to the electric field present because of dust charging. It was concluded that the charging and consequent partial alignment could be a common feature of atmospheric mineral dust layers, influencing the optical properties of dust layers and possibly also dust transport (Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 6161, 2007). We show preliminary results from the DREAME campaign, aimed at investigating these phenomena. DREAME used simultaneous and collocated measurements from specially developed aerosol radiosondes, and ground-based sun photometers and electric field meters. The radiosondes provided vertical profiles of dust size distribution and electric charge density, in addition to standard meteorological parameters (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS3.16). The electric field was measured in Kuwait between late April and November 2009, and at Solar Village (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) between May and June 2009. The measurements were supplemented by satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. Similar measurements but without electric field meters were carried out on Cape Verde Islands in August 2009 (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7). The electric field measured on the ground in Kuwait showed strong variability, particularly in the presence of atmospheric dust, when polarity reversals from the normal positive potential gradient (PG) clear-sky pattern were frequently observed. In the absence of clouds the negative PG excursions were often down to -800 V/m and reached -1300 V/m. The PG was strongly correlated with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the sun photometer: the correlation coefficient was about -0.51 at visible and near infra-red wavelengths and a few percent less in the UV. Slightly lower correlation was present for satellite AOT: -0.4 for MODIS AOT at 550 nm, and -0.3 for OMI AOT at 483.5 nm

  16. The effects of vehicle emissions and nucleation events on vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Quang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle concentrations (PN and PM2.5 at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PN size distribution, PN and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks each at three office buildings.

    The results showed that both PN and PM2.5 concentrations around building envelope were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During the nucleation event, PN concentrations increased (21–46%, while PM2.5 concentrations decreased (36–52% with height at all three buildings.

    This study has shown an underappreciated role of nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for studies of

  17. A new method to measure bowen ratios using high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Euser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bowen ratio surface energy balance method is a relatively simple method to determine the latent heat flux and the actual land surface evaporation. Despite its simplicity, the Bowen ratio method is generally considered to be unreliable due to the use of two-level sensors that are installed by default in operational Bowen ratio systems. In this paper we present the concept of a new measurement methodology to estimate the Bowen ratio from high resolution vertical dry and wet bulb temperature profiles. A short field experiment with Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS in a fibre optic cable having 13 levels was undertaken. A dry and a wetted section of a fibre optic cable were suspended on a 6 m high tower installed over a sugar beet trial near Pietermaritzburg (South Africa. Using the DTS cable as a psychrometer, a near continuous observation of vapour pressure and temperature at 0.20 m intervals was established. These data allows the computation of the Bowen ratio with a high precision. By linking the Bowen ratio to net radiation and soil heat flux, the daytime latent heat flux was estimated. The latent heat flux derived from DTS-based Bowen ratio (BR-DTS showed consistent agreement (correlation coefficients between 0.97 and 0.98 with results derived from eddy covariance, surface layer scintillometer and surface renewal techniques. The latent heat from BR-DTS overestimated the latent heat derived with the eddy covariance by 4% and the latent heat derived with the surface layer scintillometer by 8%. Through this research, a new window is opened to engage on simplified, inexpensive and easy to interpret in situ measurement techniques for measuring evaporation.

  18. The use of oblique and vertical images for 3D urban modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Hamruni, Ahmed Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional data are useful for various applications such as visualization for planning, simulation for training and environmental studies, presentations, decision making and many more. The existing methods of texturing 3-D city models use conventional vertical imagery and libraries of generic textures which are sufficient for some applications of 3-D models like training simulation, gaming, and telecommunication planning. However, the needs for photo-realistic, modelling of the co...

  19. A rational fraction polynomials model to study vertical dynamic wheel-rail interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Correa García, Nekane; García Vadillo, Ernesto; Santamaría Manrique, Javier; Gómez López, Josu

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model designed to study vertical interactions between wheel and rail when the wheel moves over a rail welding. The model focuses on the spatial domain, and is drawn up in a simple fashion from track receptances. The paper obtains the receptances from a full track model in the frequency domain already developed by the authors, which includes deformation of the rail section and propagation of bending, elongation and torsional waves along an infinite track. Transformation b...

  20. Interpretation of ozone vertical profiles and their variations in the Northern hemisphere on the basis of GOME satellite data. Final report; Interpretation von Ozon-Vertikalprofilen und deren Variationen in der noerdlichen Hemisphaere unter Benutzung von GOME Satellitendaten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichmann, K.U.; Bramstedt, K.; Weber, M.; Rozanov, V.; Debeek, R.; Hoogen, R.; Burrows, J.P.

    2000-07-04

    Semiglobal ozone vertical profiles based on GOME measurements were established and evaluated systematically. GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment), carried by the ERS-2 satellite, is the first European passive optical sensor for long-term monitoring of ozone, other trace elements, and aerosols. Especially the vertical distribution of ozone in the Arctic region was measured and interpreted with a view to enhanced ozone degradation in the Arctic winter and spring seasons. Apart from the regional variations, also the time variations of the profiles are to provide further information on the dynamics and chemical processes in the polar vortex. The retrieval algorithm used for assessing the ozone vertical profiles, FURM (FUll Retrieval Method), is based on the GOMETRAN radiation transport model developed at Bremen university especially for evaluation of the GOME data. The GOME ozone profiles were validated with ozone probes and other satellite experiments. [German] Ziel des Projektes war eine systematische Bestimmung und Auswertung von semiglobalen Ozonvertikalprofilen aus den Messdaten von GOME. Das auf dem Satelliten ERS-2 fliegende Spektrometer GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) ist der erste europaeische, passive, optische Sensor, der fuer Langzeitmessungen von Ozon, anderen Spurenstoffen und Aerosolen konzipiert wurde. Im Projekt wurde insbesondere die vertikale Verteilung von Ozon in der Arktis bestimmt und interpretiert hinsichtlich des verstaerkten Ozonabbaus im arktischen Winter und Fruehjahr. Neben der raeumlichen Variation sollen auch die zeitlichen Ablaeufe und Veraenderungen der Profile weitere Erkenntnise hinsichtlich der Dynamik und der chemischen Prozesse im Polarwirbel liefern. Der Retrievalalgorithmus zur Bestimmung des Ozonhoehenprofils, FURM (Full Retrieval Method) genannt, basiert auf dem Strahlungstransportmodell GOMETRAN, das an der Universitaet Bremen speziell fuer die Auswertung der Daten des GOME Instrumentes entwickelt wurde

  1. Vertical Integration of Geographic Information Sciences: A Recruitment Model for GIS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jaehyung; Huynh, Niem Tu; McGehee, Thomas Lee

    2011-01-01

    An innovative vertical integration model for recruiting to GIS education was introduced and tested following four driving forces: curriculum development, GIS presentations, institutional collaboration, and faculty training. Curriculum development was a useful approach to recruitment, student credit hour generation, and retention-rate improvement.…

  2. Reliability Based Optimal Design of Vertical Breakwaters Modelled as a Series System Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiani, E.; Burcharth, H. F.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1996-01-01

    Reliability based design of monolithic vertical breakwaters is considered. Probabilistic models of important failure modes such as sliding and rupture failure in the rubble mound and the subsoil are described. Characterisation of the relevant stochastic parameters are presented, and relevant design...... variables are identified and an optimal system reliability formulation is presented. An illustrative example is given....

  3. Creating a benchmark of vertical axis wind turbines in dynamic stall for validating numerical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castelein, D.; Ragni, D.; Tescione, G.;

    2015-01-01

    An experimental campaign using Particle Image Velocimetry (2C-PIV) technique has been conducted on a H-type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) to create a benchmark for validating and comparing numerical models. The turbine is operated at tip speed ratios (TSR) of 4.5 and 2, at an average chord-ba...

  4. Vertical sorting and the morphodynamics of bed form-dominated rivers: a sorting evolution model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Astrid; Ribberink, Jan S.; Parker, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Existing sediment continuity models for nonuniform sediment suffer from a number of shortcomings, as they fail to describe vertical sorting fluxes other than through net aggradation or degradation of the bed and are based on a discrete representation of the bed material interacting with the flow. We

  5. Vertical Integration of Geographic Information Sciences: A Recruitment Model for GIS Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jaehyung; Huynh, Niem Tu; McGehee, Thomas Lee

    2011-01-01

    An innovative vertical integration model for recruiting to GIS education was introduced and tested following four driving forces: curriculum development, GIS presentations, institutional collaboration, and faculty training. Curriculum development was a useful approach to recruitment, student credit hour generation, and retention-rate improvement.…

  6. Vertical Instability in EAST: Comparison of Model Predictions with Experimental Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Jinping; WAN Baonian; SHEN Biao; XIAO Bingjia; SUN Youwen; SHI Yuejiang; LIN Shiyao; LI Jiangang; GONG Xianzu

    2008-01-01

    Growth rates of the axisymmetric mode in elongated plasmas in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) are measured with zero feedback gains and then compared with numerically calculated growth rates for the reconstructed shapes. The comparison is made after loss of vertical position control. The open-loop growth rates were scanned with the number of vessel eigenmodes, which up to 20 is enough to make the growth rates settled. The agreement between the growth rates measured experimentally and the growth rates determined numerically is good. The results show that a linear RZIP model is essentially good enough for the vertical position feedback control.

  7. Modeling Electron Transport in Vertical-SOI NMOSFET by Directly Solving BTE with FEA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Jian-nong; ZOU Xue-cheng; SHEN Xu-bang

    2004-01-01

    A numerical schemes applicable to the direct solution of Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) in vertical-SOI NMOSFET are investigated by means of the finite element analysis (FEA).The solution gives the electron distribution function,electrostatic potential,carriers concentration,drift velocity,average energy and drain current by directly solving the BTE and the Poisson equation self-consistency.The result shows that the direct numerical solution of the BTE with the aid of FEA and vertical SOI NMOSFET is a promising approach for ultra short channel transistors modeling.

  8. Exploring Vertical Turbulence Structure in Neutrally and Stably Stratified Flows Using the Weather Research and Forecasting-Large-Eddy Simulation (WRF-LES) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Mireia; Sun, Jielun; Kosović, Branko; Soler, Maria Rosa

    2016-11-01

    Following Sun et al. (J Atmos Sci 69(1):338-351, 2012), vertical variations of turbulent mixing in stably stratified and neutral environments as functions of wind speed are investigated using the large-eddy simulation capability in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The simulations with a surface cooling rate for the stable boundary layer (SBL) and a range of geostrophic winds for both stable and neutral boundary layers are compared with observations from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 (CASES-99). To avoid the uncertainty of the subgrid scheme, the investigation focuses on the vertical domain when the ratio between the subgrid and the resolved turbulence is small. The results qualitatively capture the observed dependence of turbulence intensity on wind speed under neutral conditions; however, its vertical variation is affected by the damping layer used in absorbing undesirable numerical waves at the top of the domain as a result of relatively large neutral turbulent eddies. The simulated SBL fails to capture the observed temperature variance with wind speed and the observed transition from the SBL to the near-neutral atmosphere with increasing wind speed, although the vertical temperature profile of the simulated SBL resembles the observed profile. The study suggests that molecular thermal conduction responsible for the thermal coupling between the surface and atmosphere cannot be parameterized through the Monin-Obukhov bulk relation for turbulent heat transfer by applying the surface radiation temperature, as is common practice when modelling air-surface interactions.

  9. Modeling field-scale vertical movement of zinc and copper in a pig slurry-amended soil in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; dos Santos, Danilo Rheinheimer; Ceretta, Carlos Alberto; Cella, Cesar; Simůnek, Jirka; van Oort, Folkert

    2012-12-01

    Organic amendments often represent a source of trace metals (TMs) in soils, which may partly leach into the groundwater. The objectives of this study were (1) to validate Hydrus-2D for modeling the transport of Zn and Cu in an Alfisol amended with pig slurry (PS) by comparing numerical simulations and experimental field data, and (2) to model the next 50 years of TM movements under scenarios of suspended or continued PS amendments. First, between 2000 and 2008, we collected detailed Zn and Cu data from a soil profile in Santa Maria, Brazil. Two hypotheses about Zn and Cu reactivity with the solid phase were tested, considering physical, hydraulic, and chemical characteristics of six soil layers. Using a two-site sorption model with a sorption kinetic rate adjusted based on laboratory EDTA extractions, Hydrus simulations of the vertical TM transport were found to satisfactorily describe the soil Zn and Cu concentration profiles. Second, the long-term fate of Zn and Cu in the soil was assessed using the validated parameterized model. Numerical simulations showed that Zn and Cu did not present risks for groundwater pollution. However, future Cu accumulation in the surface soil layer would exceed the Brazilian threshold for agricultural soils.

  10. The influence of snow grain size and impurities on the vertical profiles of actinic flux and associated NOx emissions on the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Zatko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We use observations of the absorption properties of black carbon and non-black carbon impurities in near-surface snow collected near the research stations at South Pole and Dome C, Antarctica, and Summit, Greenland, combined with a snowpack actinic flux parameterization to estimate the vertical profile and e-folding depth of ultraviolet/near-visible (UV/near-vis actinic flux in the snowpack at each location. We have developed a simple and broadly applicable parameterization to calculate depth and wavelength dependent snowpack actinic flux that can be easily integrated into large-scale (e.g., 3-D models of the atmosphere. The calculated e-folding depths of actinic flux at 305 nm, the peak wavelength of nitrate photolysis in the snowpack, are 8–12 cm near the stations and 15–31 cm away (>11 km from the stations. We find that the e-folding depth is strongly dependent on impurity content and wavelength in the UV/near-vis region, which explains the relatively shallow e-folding depths near stations where local activities lead to higher snow impurity levels. We calculate the lifetime of NOx in the snowpack interstitial air produced by photolysis of snowpack nitrate against wind pumping (τwind pumping from the snowpack, and compare this to the calculated lifetime of NOx against chemical conversion to HNO3 (τchemical to determine whether the NOx produced at a given depth can escape from the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Comparison of τwind pumping and τchemical suggests efficient escape of photoproduced NOx in the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere throughout most of the photochemically active zone. Calculated vertical actinic flux profiles and observed snowpack nitrate concentrations are used to estimate the potential flux of NOx from the snowpack. Calculated NOx fluxes of 4.4 × 108–3.8 × 109 molecules cm−2 s−1 in remote polar locations and 3.2–8.2 × 108 molecules cm−2 s−1 near polar stations for January at Dome C and

  11. The influence of snow grain size and impurities on the vertical profiles of actinic flux and associated NOx emissions on the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We use observations of the absorption properties of black carbon and non-black-carbon impurities in near-surface snow collected near the research stations at South Pole and Dome C, Antarctica and Summit, Greenland combined with a snowpack actinic flux parameterization to estimate the vertical profile and e-folding depth of ultraviolet/near-visible (UV/near-vis actinic flux in the snowpack at each location. We have developed a simple and broadly applicable parameterization to calculate depth and wavelength dependent snowpack actinic flux that can be easily integrated into large scale (e.g. 3-D models of the atmosphere. The calculated e-folding depths of actinic flux at 305 nm, the peak wavelength of nitrate photolysis in the snowpack, are 8–12 cm near the stations and 15–31 cm away (>11 km from the stations. We find that the e-folding depth is strongly dependent on impurity content and wavelength in the UV/near-vis region, which explains the relatively shallow e-folding depths near stations where local activities lead to higher impurity levels. We calculate the lifetime of NOx in the snowpack interstitial air produced by photolysis of snowpack nitrate against escape (τescape from the snowpack via diffusion and windpumping and compare this to the calculated lifetime of NOx against chemical conversion to HNO3 (τchemical to determine whether the NOx produced at a given depth can escape from the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Comparison of τescape and τchemical suggests efficient escape of photoproduced NOx in the snowpack to the overlying atmosphere. Calculated vertical actinic flux profiles and observed snowpack nitrate concentrations are used to determine the flux of NOx from the snowpack. Calculated NOx fluxes of 4.4 × 108–2.8 × 109 molecules cm−2 s7−1 in remote polar locations and 3.2–8.2 × 108 molecules cm−2 s−1 near polar stations for January at Dome C and South Pole and June at Summit suggest that NOx flux

  12. Vertical Distribution of Suspended Sediment under Steady Flow: Existing Theories and Fractional Derivative Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqian Nie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractional advection-diffusion equation (fADE model is a new approach to describe the vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentration in steady turbulent flow. However, the advantages and parameter definition of the fADE model in describing the sediment suspension distribution are still unclear. To address this knowledge gap, this study first reviews seven models, including the fADE model, for the vertical distribution of suspended sediment concentration in steady turbulent flow. The fADE model, among others, describes both Fickian and non-Fickian diffusive characteristics of suspended sediment, while the other six models assume that the vertical diffusion of suspended sediment follows Fick’s first law. Second, this study explores the sensitivity of the fractional index of the fADE model to the variation of particle sizes and sediment settling velocities, based on experimental data collected from the literatures. Finally, empirical formulas are developed to relate the fractional derivative order to particle size and sediment settling velocity. These formulas offer river engineers a substitutive way to estimate the fractional derivative order in the fADE model.

  13. Instrumental intercomparison investigating vertical profiles of optical turbulence and wind speed in the lower atmospheric boundary layer during frontal passages in northwestern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprung, Detlev; Stein, Karin; Sucher, Erik; Englander, Abraham; Fastig, Salomon; Porat, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The German-Israeli intercomparison experiment on the investigation of vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence in the lower atmospheric boundary layer from 4th to 7th May 2015 was characterized by frontal activity in the atmosphere. The newly developed remote LIDAR-device of the Soreq institute for the investigation of the vertical wind and turbulence field was compared to the routinely performed measurements at the VerTurM (Vertical Turbulence Measurements) field site in Meppen, Germany. The long-term experiment VerTurM is focused on measurements of the optical turbulence and comprises scintillometer measurements close to the ground (1.15 m height), sonic anemometer measurements on a tall tower at 4 m, 8 m, 32 m, and 64 m and a SODAR-RASS-system. The temporal development of the vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed and optical turbulence Cn 2 during the frontal passage is investigated. Additional radiosonde measurements were performed to characterize the boundary layer height during the day.

  14. A Simple Model for the Vertical Transport of Reactive Species in the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, Donald H.; Gurarie, David

    2010-01-01

    with standard parameterizations. This leads to formulations for profiles of the turbulent diffusivity and the ratio of temperature-scalar covariance to the flux of the passive scalar. The model is then extended to solving, in terms of profiles of mean concentrations and fluxes, the NO x –O3 triad problem...

  15. Modeling the Interaction between Quasi-Geostrophic Vertical Motion and Convection in a Single Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    A single-column modeling approach is proposed to study interaction between convection and large-scale dynamics using the quasi-geostrophic (QG) framework. Vertical motion is represented by the QG omega equation with the diabatic heating term included. This approach extends the notion of ``parameterization of large scale dynamics", previously applied in the tropics using the weak temperature gradient approximation and other comparable methods, to the extratropics, where balanced adiabatic dynamics plays a larger role in inducing large-scale vertical motion. The diabatic heating term in the QG-omega equation represents the feedback from convection, coupling the convection and large-scale vertical motion. The strength of the coupling depends on the characteristic wavelength of the large-scale disturbances, a free parameter in the system. This approach is demonstrated using two representations of convection: a single- column model with a convective parameterization, and linear response functions derived by Z. Kuang from a large set of cloud-resolving simulations. The results are qualitatively similar in both cases, though the linear response functions allow for a more thorough analysis of the system dynamics. The behavior of convection that is strongly coupled to large-scale vertical motion is significantly different from that in the uncoupled case in which large-scale dynamics is not present. The positive feedback of the diabatic heating on the large-scale vertical motion reduces the stability of the system, extends the decay time scale after initial perturbations, and increases the amplitude of the convective response to transient large-scale perturbations or imposed forcings. The diabatic feedback of convection on vertical motion is strongest for horizontal wavelengths roughly between 2000 km and 1000 km.

  16. A direct detection 1.6μm DIAL with three wavelengths for high accuracy measurements of vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2013-10-01

    The accurate vertical CO2 profiles in the troposphere are highly desirable in the inverse techniques to improve quantification and understanding of the global budget of CO2 and also global climate changes. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is an attractive method for obtaining vertical CO2 profiles and we have developed an 1.6μm DIAL system to perform simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration, atmospheric temperature profile and wind profile. The absorption cross sections of gas and air density depends on atmospheric temperature and pressure. Then precise temperature and pressure profiles are necessary for accurate CO2 mixing ratio measurement by DIAL. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption line are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature. The receiving optics include the near-infrared photomultiplier tube and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift.

  17. Characteristics of tropospheric ozone variability over an urban site in Southeast Asia: A study based on MOZAIC and MOZART vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, L. K.; Sheel, Varun; Kajino, M.; Gunthe, Sachin S.; Thouret, Valérie; Nedelec, P.; Smit, Herman G.

    2013-08-01

    Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) profiles of O3 and CO were analyzed to study their variation in the troposphere over Bangkok. Mixing ratios of O3 and CO were enhanced in planetary boundary layer (PBL) being highest in winter followed by summer and wet seasons. The daytime profiles of O3 show higher values compared to nighttime observations in PBL region, but little differences were observed in the free troposphere. The decreasing mixing ratios of O3 in the lower and upper troposphere were associated with shallow and deep convections, respectively. Back trajectory and fire count data indicate that the seasonal variations in trace gases were caused mainly by the regional shift in long-range transport and biomass-burning patterns. In wet season, flow of oceanic air and negligible presence of local biomass burning resulted in lowest O3 and CO, while their high levels in dry season were due to extensive biomass burning and transport of continental air masses. The Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART) underestimated both O3 and CO in the PBL region but overestimated these in the free troposphere. Simulations of O3 and CO also show the daytime/nighttime differences but do not capture several key features observed in the vertical distributions. The observed and simulated values of O3 and CO during September-November 2006 were significantly higher than the same period of 2005. The year-to-year differences were mainly due to El Niño-led extensive fires in Indonesia during 2006 but normal condition during 2005.

  18. Treatability of volatile chlorinated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils of different textures along a vertical profile by mechanical soil aeration: A laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Shi, Yi; Hou, Deyi; Zhang, Xi; Chen, Jiaqi; Wang, Zhifen; Xu, Zhu; Li, Fasheng; Du, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical soil aeration is a simple, effective, and low-cost soil remediation technology that is suitable for sites contaminated with volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHs). Conventionally, this technique is used to treat the mixed soil of a site without considering the diversity and treatability of different soils within the site. A laboratory test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical soil aeration for remediating soils of different textures (silty, clayey, and sandy soils) along a vertical profile at an abandoned chloro-alkali chemical site in China. The collected soils were artificially contaminated with chloroform (TCM) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Mechanical soil aeration was effective for remediating VCHs (removal efficiency >98%). The volatilization process was described by an exponential kinetic function. In the early stage of treatment (0-7hr), rapid contaminant volatilization followed a pseudo-first order kinetic model. VCH concentrations decreased to low levels and showed a tailing phenomenon with very slow contaminant release after 8hr. Compared with silty and sandy soils, clayey soil has high organic-matter content, a large specific surface area, a high clay fraction, and a complex pore structure. These characteristics substantially influenced the removal process, making it less efficient, more time consuming, and consequently more expensive. Our findings provide a potential basis for optimizing soil remediation strategy in a cost-effective manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A Simple Ideal MHD Model of Vertical Disruption Events in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2008-11-01

    A simple model of axisymmetric vertical disruption events (VDEs) in tokamaks is presented in which the halo current force exerted on the vacuum vessel is calculated directly from linear, marginally stable, ideal-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) stability analysis. The basic premise of the model is that the halo current force modifies pressure balance at the edge of the plasma, and therefore also modifies ideal-MHD plasma stability. In order to prevent the ideal vertical instability, responsible for the VDE, from growing on the very short Alfv'en time- scale, the halo current force must adjust itself such that the instability is rendered marginally stable. The model predicts halo currents which are similar in magnitude to those observed experimentally. An approximate non-axisymmetric version of the model is developed in order to calculate the toroidal peaking factor of the halo current force.

  20. A simple ideal magnetohydrodynamical model of vertical disruption events in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    2009-01-01

    A simple model of axisymmetric vertical disruption events (VDEs) in tokamaks is presented in which the halo current force exerted on the vacuum vessel is calculated directly from linear, marginally stable, ideal-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) stability analysis. The basic premise of the model is that the halo current force modifies pressure balance at the edge of the plasma, and therefore also modifies ideal-MHD plasma stability. In order to prevent the ideal vertical instability, responsible for the VDE, from growing on the very short Alfvén time scale, the halo current force must adjust itself such that the instability is rendered marginally stable. The model predicts halo currents which are similar in magnitude to those observed experimentally. An approximate nonaxisymmetric version of the model is developed in order to calculate the toroidal peaking factor for the halo current force.

  1. Airborne in situ vertical profiling of HDO / H216O in the subtropical troposphere during the MUSICA remote sensing validation campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyroff, C.; Sanati, S.; Christner, E.; Zahn, A.; Balzer, M.; Bouquet, H.; McManus, J. B.; Gonzalez-Ramos, Y.; Schneider, M.

    2015-05-01

    Vertical profiles of water vapor (H2O) and its isotope ratio D / H expressed as δD(H2O) were measured in situ by the ISOWAT II diode-laser spectrometer during the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA) airborne campaign. We present recent modifications of the instrument design. The instrument calibration on the ground as well as in flight is described. Based on the calibration measurements, the humidity-dependent uncertainty of our airborne data is determined. For the majority of the airborne data we achieved an accuracy (uncertainty of the mean) of Δ(δD) ≈10‰. Vertical profiles between 150 and ~7000 m were obtained during 7 days in July and August 2013 over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean near Tenerife. The flights were coordinated with ground-based (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change, NDACC) and space-based (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer, IASI) FTIR remote sensing measurements of δD(H2O) as a means to validate the remote sensing humidity and δD(H2O) data products. The results of the validation are presented in detail in a separate paper (Schneider et al., 2014). The profiles were obtained with a high vertical resolution of around 3 m. By analyzing humidity and δD(H2O) correlations we were able to identify different layers of air masses with specific isotopic signatures. The results are discussed.

  2. Multiple axis DOAS measurements for the retrieval of nitrogen dioxide and ozone vertical profiles in the presidential estate of Castel Porziano, Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Elisa; Petritoli, Andrea; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Masieri, Samuele; Premuda, Margherita; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for the retrieval of the vertical profile of atmospheric gas pollutants in the boundary layer from ground based remote sensing measurements. Nitrogen dioxide (NO II) and ozone (O 3) slant column amounts have been obtained with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique used in the multiple axis configuration (the so called MAX-DOAS). The measurements have been carried out in the Presidential Estate at Castel Porziano (Rome) in the period from September to November 2006 in the frame of a programme started in 1994 for studying and monitoring the Estate's environment. The retrieval of information on the vertical profile of trace gases from their slant column amounts requires: (1) the simulation of the radiative transfer in the atmosphere for Air Mass Factor (AMF) calculation; (2) the application of inversion schemes. In this paper the vertical profiles of NO II and O 3 obtained from multiple axis DOAS measurements and their daily evolution are presented and discussed. The day under study is the 29th of October, 2006.

  3. Geological affinity of reflecting boundaries in the intermediate structural stage of the Chu Sarysuyskiy depression based on results of vertical seismic profilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, N.G.; Kiselevskiy, Yu.N.

    1983-01-01

    A computer (EVM) and an ASOI-VSP-SK program complex are used to analyze data from seismic exploration and acoustical logging with interval by interval calculation of the velocity every four meters. Vertical seismic profilling (VSP) results are used to identify all the upper layers as reference layers. The basic reference level, the third, which corresponds to the floor of the carbonate middle to upper Visean series, is not sustained due to the thin layered state of the terrigeneous section. Based on data from vertical seismic profilling, the reflected wave method (MOV) and the common depth point method (MOGT), the reference 3-a and 6-a levels are identified. Deep reflections of the seventh, 7-a and Rf, approximately confined to the roof and floor of the lower Paleozoic deposits and the upper part of the upper reef series, are noted in the series of the Caledonian cap of the Prebaykal massifs based on vertical seismic profilling. Collector levels are noted on the basis of the frequency of the wave spectra and from the absorption coefficient in the Testas structure and in other low amplitude structures. The insufficiency of the depth capability of the common depth point method and the poor knowledge level of seismic exploration of the section of the lower Paleozoa and the upper Proterozoa of the Chu Sarysuyskiy depresion are noted.

  4. Sea level and vertical motion of continents from dynamic earth models since the Late Cretaceous

    OpenAIRE

    Spasojevic, Sonja; Gurnis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic earth models are used to better understand the impact of mantle dynamics on the vertical motion of continents and regional and global sea level change since the Late Cretaceous. A hybrid approach combines inverse and forward models of mantle convection and accounts for the principal contributors to long-term sea level change: the evolving distribution of ocean floor age, dynamic topography in oceanic and continental regions, and the geoid. We infer the relative importance of dynamic v...

  5. Design and modeling of a transistor vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Wei; Greenberg, Mark; Berggren, Jesper; Xiang, Yu; Hammar, Mattias; Lestrade, Michel; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Z M Simon; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    A multiple quantum well (MQW) transistor vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (T-VCSEL) is designed and numerically modeled. The important physical models and parameters are discussed and validated by modeling a conventional VCSEL and comparing the results with the experiment. The quantum capture/escape process is simulated using the quantum-trap model and shows a significant effect on the electrical output of the T-VCSEL. The parameters extracted from the numerical simulation are imported into the analytic modeling to predict the frequency response and simulate the large-signal modulation up to 40 Gbps.

  6. Modeling of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional etch profiles in high density plasma reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sukharev, V. [LSI Logic Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In order to model the plasma etching process from plasma generation to etch profile evolution, processes from the macroscopic reactor scale to the microscopic feature scale must be simulated. An integrated monte Carlo feature Profile Model (MCFPM) has been developed to examine the time evolution of etch profiles in high density plasma systems. By integrating the MCFPM with the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM), the authors are able to self-consistently determine the etch profiles for specific regions on the wafer in specific reactor geometry with specified parameters for power, chemistry, gas flow, etc. The latest improvements of the model include the effects of incoming particle angle and energy on reaction and reflection based on the results of molecular dynamics simulations. Increase the specular reflection of high energy particles leads to more vertical sidewalls and corner clearing but can also cause deformation of the bottom of the profile surface. For Chlorine etching of 2D and 3D profiles in polysilicon, the model results will be compared to experimental results in an inductively couple etching reactor. The changes due to radial location as well as sub wafer and superwafer topography be examined.

  7. Experimental investigation and numerical simulations of void profile development in a vertical cylindrical pipe; Caracterisation experimentale et simulations de l`evolution d`un ecoulement diphasique a bulles ascendant dans une conduite verticale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossetete, C.

    1995-12-01

    We present here an experimental investigation and some numerical simulations of void profile development in a vertical cylindrical pipe. This study is motivated by the lack of information dealing with the influence of entrance effects and bubble size evolution upon the multidimensional development of upward bubbly flow in pipe. The axial development of two-phase air-water upward bubbly and bubbly-to-slug transition flows in a vertical pipe is investigated experimentally first. Profiles of liquid mean velocity, liquid axial turbulent intensity, void fraction, bubble frequency, bubble velocity, mean equivalent bubble diameter and volumetric interfacial area are determined along the same test section at three axial locations. It is found that the bubbly-to-slug transition can be deduced from the simultaneous analysis of the different measured profiles. Local analysis of the studied bubbly flows shows that their development does not depend on the shape of the void distribution at the inlet. However, it is found that the bubble size evolution strongly affects the void distribution. Secondly, multidimensional numerical simulations of bubbly flows with very different gas injection modes are made with the help of the tridimensional two-fluid ASTRID code. It is shown that the classical models used to close the transverse momentum equations of the two-fluid model (lift and dispersion forces) do not capture the physical phenomena of bubble migration in pipe flows.

  8. A New Approach for Modeling Darrieus-Type Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Rotors Using Electrical Equivalent Circuit Analogy: Basis of Theoretical Formulations and Model Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierre Tchakoua; Rene Wamkeue; Mohand Ouhrouche; Tommy Andy Tameghe; Gabriel Ekemb

    2015-01-01

    .... Thus, models can significantly reduce design, development and optimization costs. This paper proposes a novel equivalent electrical model for Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbines (DTVAWTs...

  9. Optimizing the design of vertical seismic profiling (VSP) for imaging fracture zones over hardrock basement geothermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Fabienne; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Hellwig, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    A primary focus of geothermal seismic imaging is to map dipping faults and fracture zones that control rock permeability and fluid flow. Vertical seismic profiling (VSP) is therefore a most valuable means to image the immediate surroundings of an existing borehole to guide, for example, the placing of new boreholes to optimize production from known faults and fractures. We simulated 2D and 3D acoustic synthetic seismic data and processed it through to pre-stack depth migration to optimize VSP survey layouts for mapping moderately to steeply dipping fracture zones within possible basement geothermal reservoirs. Our VSP survey optimization procedure for sequentially selecting source locations to define the area where source points are best located for optimal imaging makes use of a cross-correlation statistic, by which a subset of migrated shot gathers is compared with a target or reference image from a comprehensive set of source gathers. In geothermal exploration at established sites, it is reasonable to assume that sufficient à priori information is available to construct such a target image. We generally obtained good results with a relatively small number of optimally chosen source positions distributed over an ideal source location area for different fracture zone scenarios (different dips, azimuths, and distances from the surveying borehole). Adding further sources outside the optimal source area did not necessarily improve the results, but rather resulted in image distortions. It was found that fracture zones located at borehole-receiver depths and laterally offset from the borehole by 300 m can be imaged reliably for a range of the different dips, but more source positions and large offsets between sources and the borehole are required for imaging steeply dipping interfaces. When such features cross-cut the borehole, they are particularly difficult to image. For fracture zones with different azimuths, 3D effects are observed. Far offset source positions

  10. Numerical modeling and preliminary validation of drag-based vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysiński Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to verify and validate the mathematical description of the airflow around a wind turbine with vertical axis of rotation, which could be considered as representative for this type of devices. Mathematical modeling of the airflow around wind turbines in particular those with the vertical axis is a problematic matter due to the complex nature of this highly swirled flow. Moreover, it is turbulent flow accompanied by a rotation of the rotor and the dynamic boundary layer separation. In such conditions, the key aspects of the mathematical model are accurate turbulence description, definition of circular motion as well as accompanying effects like centrifugal force or the Coriolis force and parameters of spatial and temporal discretization. The paper presents the impact of the different simulation parameters on the obtained results of the wind turbine simulation. Analysed models have been validated against experimental data published in the literature.

  11. Development and Evaluation of an Aerodynamic Model for a Novel Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Shires

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a resurgence of interest in the development of vertical axis wind turbines which have several inherent attributes that offer some advantages for offshore operations, particularly their scalability and low over-turning moments with better accessibility to drivetrain components. This paper describes an aerodynamic performance model for vertical axis wind turbines specifically developed for the design of a novel offshore V-shaped rotor with multiple aerodynamic surfaces. The model is based on the Double-Multiple Streamtube method and includes a number of developments for alternative complex rotor shapes. The paper compares predicted results with measured field data for five different turbines with both curved and straight blades and rated powers in the range 100–500 kW. Based on these comparisons, the paper proposes modifications to the Gormont dynamic stall model that gives improved predictions of rotor power for the turbines considered.

  12. Dynamic model of vertical vehicle-subgrade coupled system under secondary suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Bo; LUO Hong; MA Xue-ning

    2007-01-01

    As it is known, track transportation can be divided into track system above and track system below. While the train is moving, the parts above and below are interacted and influenced. Therefore, in fact, the problem of track transportation is the match between the vehicle and the railway line system. In this paper, on a basis of dynamic analysis of the vehicle-subgrade model of vertical coupled system under primary suspension,utilizing track maintenance standard and simulating track irregularity excitation, the dynamic interaction of vehicle-track-subgrade system is researched in theory and dynamic model of the vertical vehicle-track-subgrade coupled system under secondary suspension is established by compatibility condition of deformation. Even this model considers the actual structure of a vehicle, also considers vibration characteristic of the substructure of track including subgrade and foundation. All these work want to be benefit for understanding and design about the dynamic characters of subgrade in high speed railway.

  13. Effective index model predicts modal frequencies of vertical-cavity lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SERKLAND,DARWIN K.; HADLEY,G. RONALD; CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; GEIB,KENT M.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-04-18

    Previously, an effective index optical model was introduced for the analysis of lateral waveguiding effects in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The authors show that the resultant transverse equation is almost identical to the one typically obtained in the analysis of dielectric waveguide problems, such as a step-index optical fiber. The solution to the transverse equation yields the lateral dependence of the optical field and, as is recognized in this paper, the discrete frequencies of the microcavity modes. As an example, they apply this technique to the analysis of vertical-cavity lasers that contain thin-oxide apertures. The model intuitively explains the experimental data and makes quantitative predictions in good agreement with a highly accurate numerical model.

  14. Predictions of bubbly flows in vertical pipes using two-fluid models in CFDS-FLOW3D code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banas, A.O.; Carver, M.B. [Chalk River Laboratories (Canada); Unrau, D. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary study exploring the performance of two sets of two-fluid closure relationships applied to the simulation of turbulent air-water bubbly upflows through vertical pipes. Predictions obtained with the default CFDS-FLOW3D model for dispersed flows were compared with the predictions of a new model (based on the work of Lee), and with the experimental data of Liu. The new model, implemented in the CFDS-FLOW3D code, included additional source terms in the {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} {kappa}-{epsilon} transport equations for the liquid phase, as well as modified model coefficients and wall functions. All simulations were carried out in a 2-D axisymmetric format, collapsing the general multifluid framework of CFDS-FLOW3D to the two-fluid (air-water) case. The newly implemented model consistently improved predictions of radial-velocity profiles of both phases, but failed to accurately reproduce the experimental phase-distribution data. This shortcoming was traced to the neglect of anisotropic effects in the modelling of liquid-phase turbulence. In this sense, the present investigation should be considered as the first step toward the ultimate goal of developing a theoretically sound and universal CFD-type two-fluid model for bubbly flows in channels.

  15. A diffusive model for halo width growth during vertical displacement events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.

    2011-07-01

    The electromagnetic loads produced by halo currents during vertical displacement events (VDEs) impose stringent requirements on the strength of ITER in-vessel components. A predictive understanding of halo current evolution is essential for ensuring the robust design of these components. A significant factor determining that evolution is the plasma resistance, which is a function of three quantities: the resistivities of the core and halo regions, and the halo region width. A diffusive model of halo width growth during VDEs has been developed, which provides one part of a physics basis for predictive halo current simulations. The diffusive model was motivated by DIII-D observations that VDEs with cold post-thermal quench plasma and a current decay time much faster than the vertical motion (type I VDE) possess much wider halo region widths than warmer plasma VDEs, where the current decay is much slower than the vertical motion (type II). A 2D finite element code is used to model the diffusion of toroidal halo current during selected type I and type II DIII-D VDEs. The model assumes a core plasma region within the last closed flux surface (LCFS) diffusing current into a halo plasma filling the vessel outside the LCFS. LCFS motion and plasma temperature are prescribed from experimental observations. The halo width evolution produced by this model compares favourably with experimental measurements of type I and type II toroidal halo current width evolution.

  16. Vertical temperature dynamics in the Northern Baltic Sea based on 3D modelling and data from shallow-water Argo floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Antti; Tuomi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    3D hydrodynamic models often produce errors in the depth of the mixed layer and the vertical density structure. We used the 3D hydrodynamic model NEMO to investigate the effect of vertical turbulence parameterisations on seasonal temperature dynamics in the Bothnian Sea, Baltic Sea for the years 2012 and 2013. We used vertical profiles from new shallow-water Argo floats, operational in the area since 2012, to validate our model. We found that NEMO was able to reproduce the general features of the seasonal temperature variations in the study area, when meteorological forcing was accurate. The k-ε and k-ω schemes were selected for a more detailed analysis. Both schemes showed clear differences, but neither proved superior. While sea surface temperature was better simulated with the k-ω scheme, thermocline depth was clearly better with the k-ε scheme. We investigated the effect of wave-breaking on the mixing of the surface layer. The Craig and Banner parameterisation clearly improved the representation of thermocline depth. However, further tuning of the mixing parameterisations for the Baltic Sea is needed to better simulate the vertical temperature structure. We found the autonomous Baltic Sea Argo floats valuable for model validation and performance evaluation.

  17. Solution profiles for some simple combustion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bebernes, J.; Eberly, D.; Fulks, W.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, the shape (solution profile) of the solutions of the Gelfand problem and the perturbed Gelfand problem are studied. Both of these models play a fundamental role in the mathematical theory of thermal explosions for finite rigid and gaseous systems. For rigid systems the physical processes are determined by a pointwise balance between chemical heat addition and heat loss by conduction. During the inductive period, with a duration measured by the conduction time scale of the bounding container, the heat released by the chemical reaction is redistributed by thermal conduction. As the temperature of the container increases, the reaction rate grows dramatically. Eventually, the characteristic time for heat release becomes significantly smaller than the conduction time in a well-defined hot spot embedded in the system. Then the heat released is used almost entirely to increase the hot-spot temperature. The purpose of this paper is to show that both models detect this hot-spot development in a very precise manner. This hot-spot development had previously been detected only numerically.

  18. Technical Note: Variance-covariance matrix and averaging kernels for the Levenberg-Marquardt solution of the retrieval of atmospheric vertical profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ceccherini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The variance-covariance matrix (VCM and the averaging kernel matrix (AKM are widely used tools to characterize atmospheric vertical profiles retrieved from remote sensing measurements. Accurate estimation of these quantities is essential for both the evaluation of the quality of the retrieved profiles and for the correct use of the profiles themselves in subsequent applications such as data comparison, data assimilation and data fusion. We propose a new method to estimate the VCM and AKM of vertical profiles retrieved using the Levenberg-Marquardt iterative technique. We apply the new method to the inversion of simulated limb emission measurements. Then we compare the obtained VCM and AKM with those resulting from other methods already published in the literature and with accurate estimates derived using statistical and numerical estimators. The proposed method accounts for all the iterations done in the inversion and provides the most accurate VCM and AKM. Furthermore, it correctly estimates the VCM and the AKM also if the retrieval iterations are stopped when a physically meaningful convergence criterion is fulfilled, i.e. before achievement of the numerical convergence at machine precision. The method can be easily implemented in any Levenberg-Marquardt iterative retrieval scheme, either constrained or unconstrained, without significant computational overhead.

  19. HMMEditor: a visual editing tool for profile hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jianlin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profile Hidden Markov Model (HMM is a powerful statistical model to represent a family of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. Profile HMM has been widely used in bioinformatics research such as sequence alignment, gene structure prediction, motif identification, protein structure prediction, and biological database search. However, few comprehensive, visual editing tools for profile HMM are publicly available. Results We develop a visual editor for profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMEditor. HMMEditor can visualize the profile HMM architecture, transition probabilities, and emission probabilities. Moreover, it provides functions to edit and save HMM and parameters. Furthermore, HMMEditor allows users to align a sequence against the profile HMM and to visualize the corresponding Viterbi path. Conclusion HMMEditor provides a set of unique functions to visualize and edit a profile HMM. It is a useful tool for biological sequence analysis and modeling. Both HMMEditor software and web service are freely available.

  20. New analytical and numerical models of solar coronal loop: I. Application to forced vertical kink oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, K; Kraskiewicz, J; Srivastava, A K

    2014-01-01

    Aims. We construct a new analytical model of a solar coronal loop that is embedded in a gravitationally stratified and magnetically confined atmosphere. On the basis of this analytical model, we devise a numerical model of solar coronal loops. We adopt it to perform the numerical simulations of its vertical kink oscillations excited by an external driver. Methods. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting a realistic temperature distribution and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute a coronal loop. This loop is described by 2D, ideal magnetohydro- dynamic equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Results. The vertical kink oscillations are excited by a periodic driver in the vertical component of velocity, acting at the top of the photosphere. For this forced driver with its amplitude 3 km/s, the excited oscillations exhibit about 1.2 km/s amplitude in their velocity and the loop apex oscillates with its amplitude in displacement of about 100 km. Conclusi...

  1. Empirical profile mixture models for phylogenetic reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Si Quang, Le; Gascuel, Olivier; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Previous studies have shown that accounting for site-specific amino acid replacement patterns using mixtures of stationary probability profiles offers a promising approach for improving...

  2. Vertical structure and turbulent saturation level in fully radiative protoplanetary disc models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, M.; Kley, W.; Kissmann, R.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate a massive (Sigma ~ 10 000 g cm-2 at 1 au) protoplanetary disc model by means of 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The vertical structure of the disc is determined self-consistently by a balance between turbulent heating caused by the magnetorotational turbulence and radiative cooling. Concerning the vertical structure, two different regions can be distinguished: a gas-pressure-dominated, optically thick mid-plane region where most of the dissipation takes place, and a magnetically dominated, optically thin corona which is dominated by strong shocks. At the location of the photosphere, the turbulence is supersonic (M ~ 2), which is consistent with previous results obtained from the fitting of spectra of young stellar objects. It is known that the turbulent saturation level in simulations of MRI-induced turbulence does depend on numerical factors such as the numerical resolution and the box size. However, by performing a suite of runs at different resolutions (using up to 64 x 128 x 512 grid cells) and with varying box sizes (with up to 16 pressure scaleheights in the vertical direction), we find that both the saturation levels and the heating rates show a clear trend to converge once a sufficient resolution in the vertical direction has been achieved.

  3. Improving climate model simulation of tropical Atlantic sea surface temperature: The importance of enhanced vertical atmosphere model resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaß, Jan; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-04-01

    A long-standing problem in climate modeling is the inaccurate simulation of tropical Atlantic (TA) sea surface temperature (SST), known as the TA SST bias. It has far-reaching consequences for climate prediction in that area as it goes along, among others, with erroneous precipitation patterns. We show that the TA SST bias can be largely reduced by increasing both the atmospheric horizontal and vertical resolutions in a climate model. At high horizontal resolution, enhanced vertical resolution is indispensable to substantially improve the simulation of TA SST by enhancing surface wind stress. This also reduces biases in the upper ocean thermal structure and precipitation patterns. Although, enhanced horizontal resolution alone leads to some improvement in the mean climate, typical bias patterns characterized by a reversed zonal SST gradient at the equator and too warm SST in the Benguela upwelling region are mostly unchanged at a coarser vertical resolution.

  4. Particle settling and vertical mixing in the Saharan Air Layer as seen from an integrated model, lidar, and in situ perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke; Sauer, Daniel; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2017-01-01

    Long-range transport of aerosol in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) across the Atlantic plays an important role for weather, climate, and ocean fertilization. However, processes occurring within the SAL and their effects on aerosol properties are still unclear. In this work we study particle settling and vertical mixing within the SAL based on measured and modeled vertical aerosol profiles in the upper 1 km of the transported SAL. We use ground-based lidar measurements and airborne particle counter measurements over the western Atlantic, collected during the SALTRACE campaign, as well as space-based CALIOP lidar measurements from Africa to the western Atlantic in the summer season. In our model we take account of the optical properties and the Stokes gravitational settling of irregularly shaped Saharan dust particles.We test two hypotheses about the occurrence of vertical mixing within the SAL over the Atlantic to explain the aerosol profiles observed by the lidars and the particle counter. Our first hypothesis (H1) assumes that no mixing occurs in the SAL leading to a settling-induced separation of particle sizes. The second hypothesis (H2) assumes that vertical mixing occurs in the SAL allowing large super-micron dust particles to stay airborne longer than without mixing. The uncertainties of the particle linear depolarization ratio (δl) profiles measured by the ground-based lidars are comparable to the modeled differences between H1 and H2 and do not allow us to conclude which hypothesis fits better. The SALTRACE in situ data on size-resolved particle number concentrations show a presence of large particles near the SAL top that is inconsistent with H1. The analysis of the CALIOP measurements also reveals that the average δl profile over the western Atlantic is inconsistent with H1. Furthermore, it was found that the average δl profile in the upper 1 km of the SAL does not change along its transport path over the Atlantic. These findings give evidence that

  5. A nodal model to predict vertical temperature distribution in a room with floor heating and displacement ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Fang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the development of a nodal model that predicts vertical temperature distribution in a typical office room with floor heating and displacement ventilation (FHDV) is described. The vertical air flow distribution is first determined according to the principle of displacement ventilation.......5. The proposed vertical temperature distribution can be used in the design and analysis of hybrid systems with floor heating and displacement ventilation....

  6. Comparative modeling of vertical and planar organic phototransistors with 2D drift-diffusion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzeccheri, E.; Colasanti, S.; Falco, A.; Liguori, R.; Rubino, A.; Lugli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Vertical Organic Transistors and Phototransistors have been proven to be promising technologies due to the advantages of reduced channel length and larger sensitive area with respect to planar devices. Nevertheless, a real improvement of their performance is subordinate to the quantitative description of their operation mechanisms. In this work, we present a comparative study on the modeling of vertical and planar Organic Phototransistor (OPT) structures. Computer-based simulations of the devices have been carried out with Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD in a 2D Drift-Diffusion framework. The photoactive semiconductor material has been modeled using the virtual semiconductor approach as the archetypal P3HT:PC61BM bulk heterojunction. It has been found that both simulated devices have comparable electrical and optical characteristics, accordingly to recent experimental reports on the subject.

  7. A VERTICAL 2D MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR HYDRODYNAMIC FLOWS WITH FREE SURFACE IN σ COORDINATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Numerical models with hydrostatic pressure have been widely utilized in studying flows in rivers, estuaries and coastal areas. The hydrostatic assumption is valid for the large-scale surface flows where the vertical acceleration can be ignored, but for some particular cases the hydrodynamic pressure is important. In this paper, a vertical 2D mathematical model with non-hydrostatic pressure was implemented in the σ coordinate. A fractional step method was used to enable the pressure to be decomposed into hydrostatic and hydrodynamic components and the predictor-corrector approach was applied to integration in time domain. Finally, several computational cases were studied to validate the importance of contributions of the hydrodynamic pressure.

  8. Economic Integration and Quality Standards in a Duopoly Model with Horizontal and Vertical Product Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller; Hansen, Jørgen Drud

    This paper examines the effects of trade barriers on quality levels in a duopoly model for two countries with one producer in each country. The products are both vertically and horizontally differentiated. In absence of quality regulation, the two producers determine prices and quality levels...... the quality levels in favour of the small country. Furthermore, in case of implementation of a minimum quality standard, which forces the low quality producer from the small country to increase the quality level, the producer from the large country reacts strategically by lowering the quality level of his...... standards are also ambiguous depending on the parameters of the model. Keywords: Vertical product differentiation; horizontal product differentiation; market integration; duopoly; minimum quality standard. JEL: F12, F13, F14....

  9. Economic Integration and Quality Standards in a Duopoly Model with Horizontal and Vertical Product Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller; Hansen, Jørgen Drud

    This paper examines the effects of trade barriers on quality levels in a duopoly model for two countries with one producer in each country. The products are both vertically and horizontally differentiated. In absence of quality regulation, the two producers determine prices and quality levels...... product. On the unregulated markets, integration increases welfare in both countries if they are almost of similar size. However, if the countries are very asymmetrical with respect to size, market integration may harm welfare in the large country. Welfare effects by introduction of minimum quality...... standards are also ambiguous depending on the parameters of the model. Keywords: Vertical product differentiation; horizontal product differentiation; market integration; duopoly; minimum quality standard. JEL: F12, F13, F14....

  10. Violent wave impacts on vertical and inclined walls: Large scale model tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obhrai, C.; Bullock, G.; Wolters, G.

    2005-01-01

    New data is presented from large scale model tests where combined measurements of wave pressure and aeration have been made on the front of a vertical and an inclined wall. The shape of the breaking wave was found to have a significant effect on the distribution of the wave impact pressures...... on the wall. The characteristics of violent wave impacts are discussed and related to the impulse on the structure....

  11. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gallice

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ~30–35 km altitude is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s−1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s−1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study in the orographically unperturbed mid-latitude middle troposphere.

  12. Forward-looking infrared imaging predicts ultimate burn depth in a porcine vertical injury progression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Joseph; Parikh, Shruti; Marinaro, Xavier; Prasad, Atulya; McClain, Steven; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2016-03-01

    Current methods of assessing burn depth are limited and are primarily based on visual assessments by burn surgeons. This technique has been shown to have only 60% accuracy and a more accurate, simple, noninvasive method is needed to determine burn wound depth. Forward-looking infrared (FLIR) thermography is both noninvasive and user-friendly with the potential to rapidly assess burn depth. The purpose of this paper is to determine if early changes in burn temperature (first 3 days) can be a predictor of burn depth as assessed by vertical scarring 28 days after injury. While under general anesthesia, 20 burns were created on the backs of two female Yorkshire swine using a 2.5cm×2.5cm×7.5cm, 150g aluminum bar, for a total of 40 burns. FLIR imaging was performed at both early (1, 2 and 3 days) and late (7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28 days) time points. Burns were imaged from a height of 12 inches from the skin surface. FLIR ExaminIR(©) software was used to examine the infrared thermographs. One hundred temperature points from burn edge to edge across the center of the burn were collected for each burn at all time points and were exported as a comma-separated values (CSV) file. The CSV file was processed and analyzed using a MATLAB program. The temperature profiles through the center of the burns generated parabo