WorldWideScience

Sample records for model users group

  1. An Automatic User Grouping Model for a Group Recommender System in Location-Based Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Khazaei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Spatial group recommendation refers to suggesting places to a given set of users. In a group recommender system, members of a group should have similar preferences in order to increase the level of satisfaction. Location-based social networks (LBSNs provide rich content, such as user interactions and location/event descriptions, which can be leveraged for group recommendations. In this paper, an automatic user grouping model is introduced that obtains information about users and their preferences through an LBSN. The preferences of the users, proximity of the places the users have visited in terms of spatial range, users’ free days, and the social relationships among users are extracted automatically from location histories and users’ profiles in the LBSN. These factors are combined to determine the similarities among users. The users are partitioned into groups based on these similarities. Group size is the key to coordinating group members and enhancing their satisfaction. Therefore, a modified k-medoids method is developed to cluster users into groups with specific sizes. To evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method, its mean intra-cluster distance and its distribution of cluster sizes are compared to those of general clustering algorithms. The results reveal that the proposed method compares favourably with general clustering approaches, such as k-medoids and spectral clustering, in separating users into groups of a specific size with a lower mean intra-cluster distance.

  2. Factors from the transtheoretical model differentiating between solar water disinfection (SODIS) user groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Silvie M; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a sustainable household water treatment technique that could prevent millions of deaths caused by diarrhoea. The behaviour change process necessary to move from drinking raw water to drinking SODIS is analysed with the Transtheoretical Model of Change (TTM). User groups and psychological factors that differentiate between types of users are identified. Results of a 1.5 year longitudinal study in Zimbabwe reveal distinguishing factors between groups, from which it can be deduced that they drive the development of user groups. Implications are drawn for campaigns with the aim of bringing all user types to a regular use.

  3. LDA-Based Unified Topic Modeling for Similar TV User Grouping and TV Program Recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Shinjee; Kim, Eunhui; Kim, Munchurl

    2015-08-01

    Social TV is a social media service via TV and social networks through which TV users exchange their experiences about TV programs that they are viewing. For social TV service, two technical aspects are envisioned: grouping of similar TV users to create social TV communities and recommending TV programs based on group and personal interests for personalizing TV. In this paper, we propose a unified topic model based on grouping of similar TV users and recommending TV programs as a social TV service. The proposed unified topic model employs two latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) models. One is a topic model of TV users, and the other is a topic model of the description words for viewed TV programs. The two LDA models are then integrated via a topic proportion parameter for TV programs, which enforces the grouping of similar TV users and associated description words for watched TV programs at the same time in a unified topic modeling framework. The unified model identifies the semantic relation between TV user groups and TV program description word groups so that more meaningful TV program recommendations can be made. The unified topic model also overcomes an item ramp-up problem such that new TV programs can be reliably recommended to TV users. Furthermore, from the topic model of TV users, TV users with similar tastes can be grouped as topics, which can then be recommended as social TV communities. To verify our proposed method of unified topic-modeling-based TV user grouping and TV program recommendation for social TV services, in our experiments, we used real TV viewing history data and electronic program guide data from a seven-month period collected by a TV poll agency. The experimental results show that the proposed unified topic model yields an average 81.4% precision for 50 topics in TV program recommendation and its performance is an average of 6.5% higher than that of the topic model of TV users only. For TV user prediction with new TV programs, the average

  4. User Modeling Approaches towards Adaptation of Users’ Roles to Improve Group Interaction in Collaborative 3D Games

    OpenAIRE

    OCTAVIA, Johanna; BEZNOSYK, Anastasiia; CONINX, Karin; QUAX, Peter; LUYTEN, Kris

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on how adaptation of users' roles based on a collaborative user model can improve group interaction in collaborative 3D games. We aim to provide adaptation for users based on their individual performance and preferences while collaborating in a 3D puzzle game. Four different user modeling approaches are considered to build collaborative user models. Through an experiment, we present the validation of these approaches for two different cases: co-located collaboration and rem...

  5. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, D.R.F.

    1982-03-01

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base

  6. Fifteenth LAMPF users group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochran, D.R.F. (comp.)

    1982-03-01

    The Fifteenth LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 2-3, 1981 at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physical Facility. The program of papers scheduled to be presented was amended to include a Report from Washington by Clarence R. Richardson, US Department of Energy. The general meeting ended with a round-table working group discussion concerning the Planning for a Kaon Factory. Individual items from the meeting were prepared separately for the data base.

  7. Modeling user navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, E.; Brusilovsky, Peter; Corbett, Albert; de Rosis, Fiorella

    2003-01-01

    For providing users with navigation aids that best serve their needs, user models for adaptive hypermedia should include user navigation patterns. This paper describes elements needed and how these elements can be gathered.

  8. Vector Fields European user group meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The "Vector Fields European user group meeting" will take place at CERN on 26 and 27 September 2007. Within this framework two workshops are organized at the CERN Training Centre: 24 September 2007
 Modelling Magnets with Opera 25 September 2007
Modelling of Charged Particle Beam Devices with Opera If you are interested in attending the workshop or the user group meeting please contact Julie Shepherd (Vector Fields) or Pierre Baehler (CERN) directly at: Julie.Shepherd@vectorfields.co.uk, +44 (0) 1865 854933 or +44 (0) 1865 370151 Pierre.Baehler@cern.ch, 75016 / 160156.

  9. Hospital information system user acceptance factors: User group perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayani, P W; Hidayanto, A N; Pinem, A A; Sandhyaduhita, P I; Budi, I

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and rank user acceptance factors regarding the implementation of hospital information systems (HIS) based on the views of the following user groups: doctors, nurses, hospital management, and administrative staff (operators). The results should provide guidance for hospital management and HIS developers on meeting user requirements. The study was carried out using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The authors conducted interviews and distributed questionnaires to doctors, nurses, hospital management, and administrative staff in a government-owned Indonesian public hospital. Entropy measurements were used to analyze the questionnaire data. The study identified 15 important HIS user acceptance factors, which were ranked differently by each user group. The results show that non-technological dimensions, such as human and organizational dimensions, influence HIS user acceptance to a greater extent than technological dimensions. More work should be carried out to gain a better understanding of the relationship between user acceptance factors in order to increase the success of HIS implementations.

  10. Personal lifelong user model clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolog, Peter; Kay, Judy; Kummerfeld, Bob

    This paper explores an architecture for very long term user modelling, based upon personal user model clouds. These ensure that the individual's applications can access their model whenever it is needed. At the same time, the user can control the use of their user model. So, they can ensure...... which combines both. Finally we discuss implications of our approach for consistency and freshness of the user model information....... it is accessed only when and where they wish, by applications that they wish. We consider the challenges of representing user models so that they can be reused by multiple applications. We indicate potential synergies between distributed and centralised user modelling architectures, proposing an architecture...

  11. Sharing solutions - The users' group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, G.; Winter, K.

    1991-01-01

    Regulatory compliance, operating efficiency, and plant-life extension are common goals shared by all nuclear power plants. To achieve these goals, nuclear utilities must be proactive and responsive to the regulatory agencies, work together with each other in the sharing of operating experiences and solution to problems, and develop long-term working relationships with an even smaller number of quality suppliers. Users' and owners' groups are one of the most effective means of accomplishing these objectives. Users' groups facilitate communication between nuclear power plants and provide an interactive vendor interface. Both the utilities and suppliers benefit through shared information and improved customer feedback. This paper describes the evolution and experiences of the Sorrento Electronics (SE) Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) Users' Group. The authors highlight the group's past successes and plans for the future

  12. Identifying User Profiles from Statistical Grouping Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Kelsen de Oliveira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to group users into subgroups according to their levels of knowledge about technology. Statistical hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering methods were studied, compared and used in the creations of the subgroups from the similarities of the skill levels with these users’ technology. The research sample consisted of teachers who answered online questionnaires about their skills with the use of software and hardware with educational bias. The statistical methods of grouping were performed and showed the possibilities of groupings of the users. The analyses of these groups allowed to identify the common characteristics among the individuals of each subgroup. Therefore, it was possible to define two subgroups of users, one with skill in technology and another with skill with technology, so that the partial results of the research showed two main algorithms for grouping with 92% similarity in the formation of groups of users with skill with technology and the other with little skill, confirming the accuracy of the techniques of discrimination against individuals.

  13. Eighteenth LAMPF users group meeting: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.N. (comp.)

    1985-03-01

    The Eighteenth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 29-30, 1984, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities.

  14. Eighteenth LAMPF users group meeting: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1985-03-01

    The Eighteenth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 29-30, 1984, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities

  15. User and Document Group Approach of Clustering in Tagging Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Rong; Xu, Guandong; Dolog, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a spectral clustering approach for users and documents group modeling in order to capture the common preference and relatedness of users and documents, and to reduce the time complexity of similarity calculations. In experiments, we investigate the selection of the optimal...... amount of clusters. We also show a reduction of the time consuming in calculating the similarity for the recommender systems by selecting a centroid first, and then compare the inside item on behalf of each group....

  16. EURANOS. The Handbook Users Group (HUG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisbet, A.F.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Carlé, B.

    to remain state-of-the-art. To address this need, a handbook users’ group (HUG) was established in 2007 to provide a platform for maintaining the handbooks and to build a network of users for both the generic handbooks and any subsequently customised versions. A web site was set up (www.......eu-neris.net) to facilitate information exchange. Emergency centres in Member States not involved in the development of the handbooks were invited to take part in demonstration activities to establish whether the handbooks were useful for the purposes of contingency planning and accident management. Results from...... with other EURANOS user groups to form the basis of a European platform on post-accident preparedness and management....

  17. The Effects of Cognitive Style on Edmodo Users' Behaviour: A Structural Equation Modeling-Based Multi-Group Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursavas, Omer Faruk; Reisoglu, Ilknur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the validity of extended technology acceptance model (TAM) in explaining pre-service teachers' Edmodo acceptance and the variation of variables related to TAM among pre-service teachers having different cognitive styles. Design/methodology/approach: Structural equation modeling approach was used to…

  18. Mental models and user training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Zupanič

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the functions of the reference service is user training which means teaching users how to use the library and it's information sorces (nowadays mainly computerized systems. While the scientific understanding of teaching/learning process is shifting, changes also affect the methods of user training in libraries.Human-computer interaction (HCI is an interdisciplinary and a very active research area which studies how humans use computers - their mental and behavioral characteristics. The application of psychological theories to HCI are especially great on three areas: psychological (mental, conceptual models, individual differences, and error behavior.The mental models theory is powerful tool for understanding the ways in which users interact with an information system. Claims, based on this theory can affect the methods (conceptualization of user training and the overall design of information systems.

  19. NORTRIP emission model user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, Rolstad Bruce

    2012-07-01

    The NORTRIP emission model has been developed at NILU, in conjunction with other Nordic institutes, to model non-exhaust traffic induced emissions. This short summary document explains how to run the NORTRIP model from the MATLAB environment or by using the executable user interface version. It also provides brief information on input files and the model architecture.(Author)

  20. Unobtrusive user modeling for adaptive hypermedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holz, H.J.; Hofmann, K.; Reed, C.; Uchyigit, G.; Ma, M.Y.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a technique for user modeling in Adaptive Hypermedia (AH) that is unobtrusive at both the level of observable behavior and that of cognition. Unobtrusive user modeling is complementary to transparent user modeling. Unobtrusive user modeling induces user models appropriate for Educational

  1. FORSPAN Model Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, T.R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.

    2003-01-01

    The USGS FORSPAN model is designed for the assessment of continuous accumulations of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids (collectively called petroleum). Continuous (also called ?unconventional?) accumulations have large spatial dimensions and lack well defined down-dip petroleum/water contacts. Oil and natural gas therefore are not localized by buoyancy in water in these accumulations. Continuous accumulations include ?tight gas reservoirs,? coalbed gas, oil and gas in shale, oil and gas in chalk, and shallow biogenic gas. The FORSPAN model treats a continuous accumulation as a collection of petroleumcontaining cells for assessment purposes. Each cell is capable of producing oil or gas, but the cells may vary significantly from one another in their production (and thus economic) characteristics. The potential additions to reserves from continuous petroleum resources are calculated by statistically combining probability distributions of the estimated number of untested cells having the potential for additions to reserves with the estimated volume of oil and natural gas that each of the untested cells may potentially produce (total recovery). One such statistical method for combination of number of cells with total recovery, used by the USGS, is called ACCESS.

  2. Model Manipulation for End-User Modelers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acretoaie, Vlad

    End-user modelers are domain experts who create and use models as part of their work. They are typically not Software Engineers, and have little or no programming and meta-modeling experience. However, using model manipulation languages developed in the context of Model-Driven Engineering often...... of these proposals. To achieve its first goal, the thesis presents the findings of a Systematic Mapping Study showing that human factors topics are scarcely and relatively poorly addressed in model transformation research. Motivated by these findings, the thesis explores the requirements of end-user modelers......, and transformations using their modeling notation and editor of choice. The VM* languages are implemented via a single execution engine, the VM* Runtime, built on top of the Henshin graph-based transformation engine. This approach combines the benefits of flexibility, maturity, and formality. To simplify model editor...

  3. Proceedings of the seventeenth LAMPF Users Group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1984-04-01

    The seventeenth annual LAMPF Users Group meeting was held November 7-8, 1983, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF. A panel discussion on the LAMPF II concept provided an exchange of views among an advisory group, Users, and LAMPF staff. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for each of the secondary beam lines

  4. Proceedings of the seventeenth LAMPF Users Group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.N. (comp.)

    1984-04-01

    The seventeenth annual LAMPF Users Group meeting was held November 7-8, 1983, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF. A panel discussion on the LAMPF II concept provided an exchange of views among an advisory group, Users, and LAMPF staff. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for each of the secondary beam lines.

  5. The Third Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Brian S. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Science Internet (NSI) User Support Office (USO) sponsored the Third Annual NSI User Working Group (NSIUWG) Conference March 30 through April 3, 1992, in Greenbelt, MD. Approximately 130 NSI users attended to learn more about the NSI, hear from projects which use NSI, and receive updates about new networking technologies and services. This report contains material relevant to the conference; copies of the agenda, meeting summaries, presentations, and descriptions of exhibitors. Plenary sessions featured a variety of speakers, including NSI project management, scientists, and NSI user project managers whose projects and applications effectively use NSI, and notable citizens of the larger Internet community. The conference also included exhibits of advanced networking applications; tutorials on internetworking, computer security, and networking technologies; and user subgroup meetings on the future direction of the conference, networking, and user services and applications.

  6. 112 fadama users group characteristics that influence facilitators

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... Key words: Fadama Users group variables, facilitators' role performance effectiveness,. Second ... administrative, financial and implementation functions are ...... Agricultural Strategy (CEFAS). University of Agriculture Makurdi, held at the University Auditorium nd autocratic speaker. The credible leader.

  7. Support for Conference Entitled The Fifth PHANTOM Users Group Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reinig, Karl

    2001-01-01

    The Fifth PHANToM Users Group (PUG2000) brought together, in an intimate setting, participants who are actively engaged in making computer haptics practical and useful through the use of the PHANTOM Haptic Interface...

  8. Distributed Bayesian Networks for User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedesco, Roberto; Dolog, Peter; Nejdl, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web is a popular platform for providing eLearning applications to a wide spectrum of users. However – as users differ in their preferences, background, requirements, and goals – applications should provide personalization mechanisms. In the Web context, user models used...... by such adaptive applications are often partial fragments of an overall user model. The fragments have then to be collected and merged into a global user profile. In this paper we investigate and present algorithms able to cope with distributed, fragmented user models – based on Bayesian Networks – in the context...... of Web-based eLearning platforms. The scenario we are tackling assumes learners who use several systems over time, which are able to create partial Bayesian Networks for user models based on the local system context. In particular, we focus on how to merge these partial user models. Our merge mechanism...

  9. The Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual Omega users and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback to LLE management from the users about ways to improve the facility and future experimental campaigns.

  10. Determinants of dental user groups among an elderly, low-income population.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuthy, R A; Strayer, M S; Caswell, R J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We test whether or not there are differences for selected variables among five dental user groups and one nondental group within an elderly, low-income population. DATA SOURCE: We used ten years of Medicare Part B claims data from the Cincinnati Health Department for all clinic users 62 years of age and older who participated in the Municipal Health Services Program. STUDY DESIGN: A polychotomous logistic regression model determined the ability to differentiate between the groups f...

  11. Insider safeguards effectiveness model (ISEM). User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, D.D.; Engi, D.

    1977-11-01

    A comprehensive presentation of the ISEM computer program is provided. ISEM was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a fixed-site facility safeguards system in coping with the theft, sabotage, or dispersal of radiological material by a single person who has authorized access to the facility. This insider may be aided by a group of insiders who covertly degrade sensor systems. Each ISEM run evaluates safeguards system performance for a particular scenario specified by the user. The dispatching of guards following alarms and their interaction with the insider are explicitly treated by the model

  12. ADASHI: User Survey and Focus Group Process with Final Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckless, Genna

    2004-01-01

    ...; Focus Group Assessment; and Summary of Results. The entire process was successful. The developers gained useful insight into the needs of the responder community. The results of this survey will enable the developers of ADASHI to make necessary improvements in the software making ADASHI a valuable tool for its users.

  13. A bilingual dictionary for a specific user group: Supporting Setswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to discuss the design of a new English to Setswana dictionary for two narrowlydefined target user groups of Setswana learners, i.e. Upper Primary (10 to 12 years old); and JuniorSecondary (13 to 15 years old). The dictionary is intended to be a guide to text and speech productionin the foreign ...

  14. Proceedings of the twenty-first LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    The Twenty-First Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 9-10, 1987, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities

  15. Proceedings of the twentieth LAMPF users group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinuzzi, R.

    1987-04-01

    The Twentieth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 27-28, 1986, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  16. Proceedings of the twentieth LAMPF users group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinuzzi, R. (comp.)

    1987-04-01

    The Twentieth Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held October 27-28, 1986, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  17. Proceedings of the twenty-first LAMPF users group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    The Twenty-First Annual LAMPF Users Group Meeting was held November 9-10, 1987, at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The program included a number of invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. The LAMPF working groups met and discussed plans for the secondary beam lines, experimental programs, and computing facilities.

  18. Modeling and clustering users with evolving profiles in usage streams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chongsheng

    2012-09-01

    Today, there is an increasing need of data stream mining technology to discover important patterns on the fly. Existing data stream models and algorithms commonly assume that users\\' records or profiles in data streams will not be updated or revised once they arrive. Nevertheless, in various applications such asWeb usage, the records/profiles of the users can evolve along time. This kind of streaming data evolves in two forms, the streaming of tuples or transactions as in the case of traditional data streams, and more importantly, the evolving of user records/profiles inside the streams. Such data streams bring difficulties on modeling and clustering for exploring users\\' behaviors. In this paper, we propose three models to summarize this kind of data streams, which are the batch model, the Evolving Objects (EO) model and the Dynamic Data Stream (DDS) model. Through creating, updating and deleting user profiles, these models summarize the behaviors of each user as a profile object. Based upon these models, clustering algorithms are employed to discover interesting user groups from the profile objects. We have evaluated all the proposed models on a large real-world data set, showing that the DDS model summarizes the data streams with evolving tuples more efficiently and effectively, and provides better basis for clustering users than the other two models. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. hiv prevention among drug and alcohol users: models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    HIV PREVENTION AMONG DRUG AND ALCOHOL USERS: MODELS. OF INTERVENTION IN KENYA. Clement S. Deveau. Academy for Educational Development (AED). Capable Partners Program (CAP). Nairobi, Kenya. ABSTRACT. The spread of HIV among drug and alcohol users, as a high-risk group, is a significant ...

  20. VMTL: a language for end-user model transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acretoaie, Vlad; Störrle, Harald; Strüber, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Model transformation is a key enabling technology of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE). Existing model transformation languages are shaped by and for MDE practitioners—a user group with needs and capabilities which are not necessarily characteristic of modelers in general. Consequently, these langua......Model transformation is a key enabling technology of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE). Existing model transformation languages are shaped by and for MDE practitioners—a user group with needs and capabilities which are not necessarily characteristic of modelers in general. Consequently......, these languages are largely ill-equipped for adoption by end-user modelers in areas such as requirements engineering, business process management, or enterprise architecture. We aim to introduce a model transformation language addressing the skills and requirements of end-user modelers. With this contribution, we...... hope to broaden the application scope of model transformation and MDE technology in general. We discuss the profile of end-user modelers and propose a set of design guidelines for model transformation languages addressing them. We then introduce Visual Model Transformation Language (VMTL) following...

  1. XRLSim model specifications and user interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K.D.; Breitfeller, E.; Woodruff, J.P.

    1989-12-01

    The two chapters in this manual document the engineering development leading to modification of XRLSim -- an Ada-based computer program developed to provide a realistic simulation of an x-ray laser weapon platform. Complete documentation of the FY88 effort to develop XRLSim was published in April 1989, as UCID-21736:XRLSIM Model Specifications and User Interfaces, by L. C. Ng, D. T. Gavel, R. M. Shectman. P. L. Sholl, and J. P. Woodruff. The FY89 effort has been primarily to enhance the x-ray laser weapon-platform model fidelity. Chapter 1 of this manual details enhancements made to XRLSim model specifications during FY89. Chapter 2 provides the user with changes in user interfaces brought about by these enhancements. This chapter is offered as a series of deletions, replacements, and insertions to the original document to enable XRLSim users to implement enhancements developed during FY89.

  2. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandrik, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  3. HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

  4. Group Capability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  5. Parallel community climate model: Description and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, J.B.; Flanery, R.E.; Semeraro, B.D.; Worley, P.H. [and others

    1996-07-15

    This report gives an overview of a parallel version of the NCAR Community Climate Model, CCM2, implemented for MIMD massively parallel computers using a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallel implementation was developed on an Intel iPSC/860 with 128 processors and on the Intel Delta with 512 processors, and the initial target platform for the production version of the code is the Intel Paragon with 2048 processors. Because the implementation uses a standard, portable message-passing libraries, the code has been easily ported to other multiprocessors supporting a message-passing programming paradigm. The parallelization strategy used is to decompose the problem domain into geographical patches and assign each processor the computation associated with a distinct subset of the patches. With this decomposition, the physics calculations involve only grid points and data local to a processor and are performed in parallel. Using parallel algorithms developed for the semi-Lagrangian transport, the fast Fourier transform and the Legendre transform, both physics and dynamics are computed in parallel with minimal data movement and modest change to the original CCM2 source code. Sequential or parallel history tapes are written and input files (in history tape format) are read sequentially by the parallel code to promote compatibility with production use of the model on other computer systems. A validation exercise has been performed with the parallel code and is detailed along with some performance numbers on the Intel Paragon and the IBM SP2. A discussion of reproducibility of results is included. A user`s guide for the PCCM2 version 2.1 on the various parallel machines completes the report. Procedures for compilation, setup and execution are given. A discussion of code internals is included for those who may wish to modify and use the program in their own research.

  6. Determinants of dental user groups among an elderly, low-income population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthy, R A; Strayer, M S; Caswell, R J

    1996-02-01

    We test whether or not there are differences for selected variables among five dental user groups and one nondental group within an elderly, low-income population. We used ten years of Medicare Part B claims data from the Cincinnati Health Department for all clinic users 62 years of age and older who participated in the Municipal Health Services Program. A polychotomous logistic regression model determined the ability to differentiate between the groups for each of the selected variables, controlling for race. Next, a polychotomous stepwise logistic regression was used in finding a multivariate model for determining dental user group membership. Logistic regression was used to ascertain which variables were discriminators between any two types of dental users. Mean number of medical visits, mean number of prescriptions filled, and race are determinants of group membership, with the nondental group having more medical visits and more likely to be white. Although year of birth cohort is statistically significant in determining dental user types, the direction of effect is not constant across the comparisons. However, the relative risk for being in the two complete denture groups, compared to both compliant subgroups, increases with each older cohort. Higher levels of medical use may "crowd out" dental use, even when it is without user cost, either because the medical problems are treated as a higher priority, or because dealing with medical needs leaves too little perceived time or energy to seek dental care. Even in a low-income population seeking dental care, there appears to be a birth cohort effect with a decline in the younger elderly who require two complete dentures.

  7. Modeling Users' Experiences with Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Karapanos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade the field of Human-Computer Interaction has evolved from the study of the usability of interactive products towards a more holistic understanding of how they may mediate desired human experiences.  This book identifies the notion of diversity in usersʼ experiences with interactive products and proposes methods and tools for modeling this along two levels: (a) interpersonal diversity in usersʽ responses to early conceptual designs, and (b) the dynamics of usersʼ experiences over time. The Repertory Grid Technique is proposed as an alternative to standardized psychometric scales for modeling interpersonal diversity in usersʼ responses to early concepts in the design process, and new Multi-Dimensional Scaling procedures are introduced for modeling such complex quantitative data. iScale, a tool for the retrospective assessment of usersʼ experiences over time is proposed as an alternative to longitudinal field studies, and a semi-automated technique for the analysis of the elicited exper...

  8. GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouatchou, J.; Molod, A.; Nielsen, J. E.; Auer, B.; Putman, W.; Clune, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) General Circulation Model (GCM) makes use of the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) to enable model configurations with many functions. One of the options of the GEOS-5 GCM is the GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model (GEOS-5 CTM), which is an offline simulation of chemistry and constituent transport driven by a specified meteorology and other model output fields. This document describes the basic components of the GEOS-5 CTM, and is a user's guide on to how to obtain and run simulations on the NCCS Discover platform. In addition, we provide information on how to change the model configuration input files to meet users' needs.

  9. Revised user's guide to the 'DISPOSALS' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laundy, R.S.; James, A.R.; Groom, M.S.; LeJeune, S.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides a User's Guide to the 'DISPOSALS' computer model and includes instructions on how to set up and run a specific problem together with details of the scope, theoretical basis, data requirements and capabilities of the model. The function of the 'DISPOSALS' model is to make assignments of nuclear waste material in an optimum manner to a number of disposal sites each subject to a number of constraints such as limits on the volume and activity. The user is able to vary the number of disposal sites, the range and limits of the constraints to be applied to each disposal site and the objective function for optimisation. The model is based on the Linear Programming technique and uses CAP Scientific's LAMPS and MAGIC packages. Currently the model has been implemented on CAP Scientific's VAX 11/750 minicomputer. (author)

  10. User's guide to the 'DISPOSALS' model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groom, M.S.; James, A.R.; Laundy, R.S.

    1984-03-01

    This report provides a User's Guide to the 'DISPOSALS' computer model and includes instructions on how to set up and run a specific problem together with details of the scope, theoretical basis, data requirements and capabilities of the model. The function of the 'DISPOSALS' model is to make assignments of nuclear waste material in an optimum manner to a number of disposal sites each subject to a number of constraints such as limits on the volume and activity. The user is able to vary the number of disposal sites, the range and limits of the constraints to be applied to each disposal site and the objective function for optimisation. The model is based on the Linear Programming technique and uses CAP Scientific's LAMPS and MAGIC packages. Currently the model has been implemented on CAP Scientific's VAX 11/750 minicomputer. (author)

  11. Internet User Behaviour Model Discovery Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Academy of Economic Studies has more than 45000 students and about 5000 computers with Internet access which are connected to AES network. Students can access internet on these computers through a proxy server which stores information about the way the Internet is accessed. In this paper, we describe the process of discovering internet user behavior models by analyzing proxy server raw data and we emphasize the importance of such models for the e-learning environment.

  12. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  13. Do recreational cannabis users, unlicensed and licensed medical cannabis users form distinct groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznitman, Sharon R

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to gain a more nuanced perspective on the differences between recreationally and medically motivated cannabis use by distinguishing between people who use cannabis for recreational purposes, unlicensed and licensed medical users. Data collection was conducted online from a convenience sample of 1479 Israeli cannabis users. Multinomial regression analysis compared unlicensed medical users (38%) with recreational (42%) and licensed medical (5.6%) users in terms of sociodemographics, mode, frequency and problematic cannabis use. There were more variables distinguishing unlicensed from licensed users than there were distinguishing features between unlicensed and recreational users. Recreational users were more likely to be male, less likely to eat cannabis, to use cannabis frequently and to use alone and before midday than unlicensed users. Licensed users were older than unlicensed users, they reported less hours feeling stoned, less cannabis use problems and they were more likely to report cannabis use patterns analogous of medication administration for chronic problems (frequent use, vaping, use alone and use before midday). This study suggests that a sizable proportion of cannabis users in Israel self-prescribe cannabis and that licensed medical cannabis users differ from unlicensed users. This is, in turn, suggestive of a rigorous medicalized cannabis program that does not function as a backdoor for legal access to recreational use. However, due to methodological limitations this conclusion is only suggestive. The most meaningful differences across recreational, unlicensed and licensed users were mode and patterns of use rather than cannabis use problems. Current screening tools for cannabis use problems may, however, not be well suited to assess such problems in medically motivated users. Indeed, when screening for problematic cannabis use there is a need for a more careful consideration of whether or not cannabis use is medically motivated

  14. A Prototype Graphical User Interface for Co-op: A Group Decision Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    INTRODUCTION 1 A. PURPOSE OF THESIS. ................. 1 B. BACKGROUND ...................... 1. System Overview ................. 1 2. Model Components...74 ix i I. INTRODUCTION A. PURPOSE OF THESIS The purpose of this research is to design a prototype Graphical User Interface (GUI) for Co-oP...which each participant of the group has his own DSS whose model base is based on multiple criteria decision 1 methods ( MCDM ) along with additional

  15. Plan recognition in modelling of users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollnagel, E.

    1988-01-01

    In order for an Intelligent Decision Support System to interact properly with a user, it must know what the user is doing. Accident Sequence Modelling (ASM) provides a possible frame of reference for monitoring operator activities, but it cannot be used directly: (1) operators may deviate from the scenario described in ASM, (2) the actual situation may develop differently from the scenario, (3) operators are normally involved in several activities at the same time, and (4) modelling of operator activities must focus on the level of individual actions, while the ASM only addresses the global view. The reference provided by the ASM scenario must therefore be supplemented by a more direct modelling of what the operator does. This requires a recognition of the operator's current plans, i.e. his goals and the strategies he employs to reach them. The paper describes a programme to develop an expert system that does this, within the ESPRIT project Graphical Dialogue Environment. (author)

  16. Conflict resilience among community forestry user groups: experiences in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Andrea; Sharma, Jeevan Raj

    2014-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of violent conflict in Nepal on the functioning of community forestry user groups (CFUGs), particularly those supported by the Livelihoods and Forestry Programme, funded by the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID). The key questions are: (i) what explains the resilience of CFUGs operating at the time of conflict?; (ii) what institutional arrangements and strategies allowed them to continue working under conflict conditions?; and (iii) what lessons can be drawn for donor-supported development around the world? The study contributes to other research on the everyday experiences of residents of Nepal living in a period of conflict. It suggests that CFUG resilience was the result of the institutional set up of community forestry and the employment of various tactics by the CFUGs. While the institutional design of community forestry (structure) was very important for resilience, it was the ability of the CFUGs to support and use it effectively that was the determining factor in this regard. © 2014 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2014.

  17. Impact of music on the quality of life of cochlear implant users: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dritsakis, Giorgos; van Besouw, Rachel M; O' Meara, Aoife

    2017-07-01

    To study the aspects of the quality of life (QoL) on which music has an impact in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. Thirty adult CI users aged between 18 and 81 years old with a wide range of patient characteristics and musical backgrounds participated in the study. Six focus group discussions about music in everyday life were conducted and data were analysed using template analysis based on the QoL model of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life BREF questionnaire. A theoretical framework of the impact of music on the QoL was developed. Music was reported to contribute to many aspects of physical, psychological, and social well-being in adult CI users. These positive effects of music on QoL were similar to what has been reported in the literature for normal-hearing adults. However, difficulties in music perception and enjoyment were found to have a negative impact on CI users' QoL, especially by causing unpleasant feelings and limited participation in music-related or routine daily activities. These findings suggest that an improvement in music experiences of CI users may lead to improvements in QoL and therefore support the need for music rehabilitation. However, the relative importance of music overall and of specific aspects of music for each individual should be measured for an accurate assessment of the impact of music on the QoL of CI users.

  18. Model driven development of user interface prototypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    the whole UI development life cycle, connect all stakeholders involved, and support a wide range of levels of granularity and abstraction. This is achieved by using Window/Event-Diagrams (WEDs), a UI specification notation based on UML 2 state machines. It affords closer collaboration between different user......Many approaches to interface development apply only to isolated aspects of the development of user interfaces (UIs), e.g., exploration during the early phases, design of visual appearance, or implementation in some technology. In this paper we explore an _integrated_ approach to incorporate...... groups like graphic designers and software developers by integrating traditional pen-and-paper based methods with contemporary MDA-based CASE tools. We have implemented our approach in the Advanced Interaction Design Environemnt (AIDE), an application to support WEDs....

  19. Solid Waste Projection Model: Model user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiles, D.L.; Crow, V.L.

    1990-08-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) specifically to address solid waste management issues at the Hanford Central Waste Complex (HCWC). This document, one of six documents supporting the SWPM system, contains a description of the system and instructions for preparing to use SWPM and operating Version 1 of the model. 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Predicting age groups of Twitter users based on language and metadata features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio A Morgan-Lopez

    Full Text Available Health organizations are increasingly using social media, such as Twitter, to disseminate health messages to target audiences. Determining the extent to which the target audience (e.g., age groups was reached is critical to evaluating the impact of social media education campaigns. The main objective of this study was to examine the separate and joint predictive validity of linguistic and metadata features in predicting the age of Twitter users. We created a labeled dataset of Twitter users across different age groups (youth, young adults, adults by collecting publicly available birthday announcement tweets using the Twitter Search application programming interface. We manually reviewed results and, for each age-labeled handle, collected the 200 most recent publicly available tweets and user handles' metadata. The labeled data were split into training and test datasets. We created separate models to examine the predictive validity of language features only, metadata features only, language and metadata features, and words/phrases from another age-validated dataset. We estimated accuracy, precision, recall, and F1 metrics for each model. An L1-regularized logistic regression model was conducted for each age group, and predicted probabilities between the training and test sets were compared for each age group. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated to examine the relative importance of significant features. Models containing both Tweet language features and metadata features performed the best (74% precision, 74% recall, 74% F1 while the model containing only Twitter metadata features were least accurate (58% precision, 60% recall, and 57% F1 score. Top predictive features included use of terms such as "school" for youth and "college" for young adults. Overall, it was more challenging to predict older adults accurately. These results suggest that examining linguistic and Twitter metadata features to predict youth and young adult Twitter users may

  1. Model driven development of user interface prototypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    the whole UI development life cycle, connect all stakeholders involved, and support a wide range of levels of granularity and abstraction. This is achieved by using Window/Event-Diagrams (WEDs), a UI specification notation based on UML 2 state machines. It affords closer collaboration between different user...... groups like graphic designers and software developers by integrating traditional pen-and-paper based methods with contemporary MDA-based CASE tools. We have implemented our approach in the Advanced Interaction Design Environemnt (AIDE), an application to support WEDs....

  2. An Ontology-Based Framework for Modeling User Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of user modeling and semantically enhanced representations for personalization. This paper presents a generic Ontology-based User Modeling framework (OntobUMf), its components, and its associated user modeling processes. This framework models the behavior of the users...... and classifies its users according to their behavior. The user ontology is the backbone of OntobUMf and has been designed according to the Information Management System Learning Information Package (IMS LIP). The user ontology includes a Behavior concept that extends IMS LIP specification and defines....... The results of this research may contribute to the development of other frameworks for modeling user behavior, other semantically enhanced user modeling frameworks, or other semantically enhanced information systems....

  3. Mobile Games Individualise and Motivate Rehabilitation in Different User Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Antti; Merilampi, Sari; Sirkka, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Trials on Mobile Games are presenting a huge potential in cognitive, physical and mental rehabilitation. This paper is to discuss user viewpoints of trials with mobile games combining cognitive stimulation and physical exercise in rehabilitation: Game#1 controlled by tilting the mobile phone embedded in a balance board; Game#2 controlled by…

  4. Combination of Bayesian Network and Overlay Model in User Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loc Nguyen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The core of adaptive system is user model containing personal information such as knowledge, learning styles, goals… which is requisite for learning personalized process. There are many modeling approaches, for example: stereotype, overlay, plan recognition… but they don’t bring out the solid method for reasoning from user model. This paper introduces the statistical method that combines Bayesian network and overlay modeling so that it is able to infer user’s knowledge from evidences collected during user’s learning process.

  5. ModelMate - A graphical user interface for model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    ModelMate is a graphical user interface designed to facilitate use of model-analysis programs with models. This initial version of ModelMate supports one model-analysis program, UCODE_2005, and one model software program, MODFLOW-2005. ModelMate can be used to prepare input files for UCODE_2005, run UCODE_2005, and display analysis results. A link to the GW_Chart graphing program facilitates visual interpretation of results. ModelMate includes capabilities for organizing directories used with the parallel-processing capabilities of UCODE_2005 and for maintaining files in those directories to be identical to a set of files in a master directory. ModelMate can be used on its own or in conjunction with ModelMuse, a graphical user interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST.

  6. A model of user engagement in medical device development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocott, Patricia; Weir, Heather; Ram, Mala Bridgelal

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address three topical themes: user involvement in health services research; determining the value of new medical technologies in patient care pathways, furthering knowledge related to quality in health and social care; and knowledge exchange between manufacturers, health service supply chain networks and device users. The model is being validated in a case study in progress. The latter is a "proving ground" study for a translational research company. Medical devices play a pivotal role in the management of chronic diseases, across all care settings. Failure to engage users in device development inevitably affects the quality of clinical outcomes. A model of user engagement is presented, turning unmet needs for medical devices into viable commercial propositions. A case study investigating the perceptions of individuals with Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB), their lay and professional carers into unmet needs. EB is an inherited condition affecting the skin and mucosal linings that leads to blistering and wounds. Qualitative data are being collected to generate understanding of unmet needs and wound care products. These needs are being translated into new design concepts and prototypes. Prototypes will be evaluated in an n = 1 experimental design, generating quantitative outcomes data. There are generalisations from the case study, and the model outlined. New products for managing EB wounds can logically benefit other groups. The model is transferable to other clinical problems, which can benefit from research and technological advances that are integral to clinical needs and care.

  7. Using archetypes to create user panels for usability studies: Streamlining focus groups and user studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakos, S-K; Ahmed-Kristensen, S; Goldman, T

    2016-09-01

    Designers at the conceptual phase of products such as headphones, stress the importance of comfort, e.g. executing comfort studies and the need for a reliable user panel. This paper proposes a methodology to issue a reliable user panel to represent large populations and validates the proposed framework to predict comfort factors, such as physical fit. Data of 200 heads was analyzed by forming clusters, 9 archetypal people were identified out of a 200 people's ear database. The archetypes were validated by comparing the archetypes' responses on physical fit against those of 20 participants interacting with 6 headsets. This paper suggests a new method of selecting representative user samples for prototype testing compared to costly and time consuming methods which relied on the analysis of human geometry of large populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Let´s go to the cinema! A movie recommender system for ephemeral groups of users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fernández

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Going to the cinema or watching television are social activities that generally take place in groups. In these cases, a recommender system for ephemeral groups of users is more suitable than (well-studied recommender systems for individuals. In this paper we present a recommendation system for groups of users that go to the cinema. The system uses the Slope One algorithm for computing individual predictions and the Multiplicative Utilitarian Strategy as a model to make a recommendation to an entire group. We show how we solved all practical aspects of the system; including its architecture and a mobile application for the service, the lack of user data (ramp-up and cold-start problems, the scaling fit of the group model strategy, and other improvements in order to reduce the response time. Finally, we validate the performance of the system with a set of experiments with 57 ephemeral groups.

  9. A short-term group with drug users in prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Campo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a short term group, according to the viewpoint of group analysis theory. The experience was made in the prison of Sicily. The group was composed by prisoners in the protected area with issues of addiction. The article highlights the usefulness of a work on the Motivation to change through the device of the group. Furthermore, it underlines how much of the work in this context was to encourage participants in the transition to reflection, critical to work on yourself. We walk through fragments of sessions, those were the main themes emerged: the relationship, responsibility, guilt, punishment.Keywords: Addiction, Motivation to change, Short-term group

  10. RODOS User's Group: Final project report. Contract number: F14P- CT98-0075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkko, K.; Ammann, M.

    2001-03-01

    Prior to 1998, the development of RODOS, a decision support system designed for the management of nuclear emergencies, had been carried out almost entirely by research scientists and engineers. The end-users/operators had little or no input into this development. To redress this situation, the RODOS Users Group (RUG) was established in 1998 under a Concerted Action Contract between the European Commission and STUK. The main objectives of this group were to encourage the emergency management community to use such a system, to provide a forum for end-users to share their experience in the use of such systems and to provide feedback from the end-users to the model and system developers in regard to operational problems and required improvements. The contract, which commenced on 1st September 1998, was for a period of two years. During this period, RUG established a www homepage, planned and performed two nuclear accident exercises and held four meetings. Technically the Web page operated very well. State-of-the-art Internet technology provided an efficient communication channel at low cost. The membership of the RUG was, however, too low to maintain a lively and ongoing discussion in parallel with the RODOS project Web page. This experience would suggest that it might have been better to have operated a Web page for RUG on the RODOS project Web-site rather than an independent RUG Web-site. Exercises based on fixed accident scenarios proved to be an appropriate means of highlighting issues that needed to be discussed between users and developers and to stimulate and motivate the end-users to maintain and further develop the system. Such exercises also promoted further activity in the field of emergency management. The organisation and administration of realistic exercises are time consuming, laborious and expensive. It is therefore very important that the maximum benefit is achieved from such exercises. The use of analytical evaluation methods could be better employed

  11. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    in non-ideal scenarios, we show that generally the estimation of models of this type is both feasible and ecologically informative. We illustrate the approach using real movement data from 11 reindeer (Rangifer tarandus). Results indicate a directional bias towards a group centroid for reindeer......Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However......, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...

  12. A condensed review of the intelligent user modeling of information retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwang

    2001-10-01

    This study discussed theoretical aspects of user modeling, modeling cases of commecial systems and elements that need consideration when constructing user models. The results of this study are 1) Comprehensive and previous analysis of system users is required to bulid user model. 2) User information is collected from users directly and inference. 3) Frame structure is compatible to build user model. 4) Prototype user model is essential to bulid a user model and based on previous user analysis. 5) User model builder has interactive information collection, inference, flexibility, model updating functions. 6) User model builder has to reflect user's feedback

  13. Who Uses Earth Observations? User Types in Group on Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, K. S.

    2011-12-01

    How can we communicate concepts in the physical sciences unless we know our audience? The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) User Interface Committee (UIC) has a responsibility within GEO to support and advocate for the user community in the development of Global Earth Observations System of Systems (GEOSS) and related work. As part of its efforts, the UIC has been working on developing a taxonomy that can be used to characterize the broad spectrum of users of GEOSS and its data, services, and applications. The user type taxonomy is designed to be broad and flexible but aims at describing the needs of the users GEOSS is going to serve. These user types represent a continuum of users of Earth observations from research through to decision support activities, and it includes organizations that use GEOSS as a tool to provide data and services for customers and consumers of the information. The classification scheme includes factors about skills and capacity for using Earth observations, sophistication level, spatial resolution, latency, and frequency of data. As part of the effort to develop a set of User Types, the GEO UIC foresees that those inside and outside GEO can use the typologies to understand how to engage users at a more effective level. This talk presents the GEOSS User Type taxonomy, explaining the development and highlights of key feedback. The talk will highlight possible ways to use the User Type taxonomy to communicate concepts and promote the use of Earth observations to a wide variety of users.

  14. A user experience model for tangible interfaces for children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidsma, Dennis; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Sluis, Frans; Volpe, G; Camurri, A.; Perloy, L.M.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2015-01-01

    Tangible user interfaces allow children to take advantage of their experience in the real world when interacting with digital information. In this paper we describe a model for tangible user interfaces specifically for children that focuses mainly on the user experience during interaction and on how

  15. Mobile phones and social structures: an exploration of a closed user group in rural Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaonga, Nadi Nina; Labrique, Alain; Mechael, Patricia; Akosah, Eric; Ohemeng-Dapaah, Seth; Baah, Joseph Sakyi; Kodie, Richmond; Kanter, Andrew S; Levine, Orin

    2013-09-03

    In the Millennium Villages Project site of Bonsaaso, Ghana, the Health Team is using a mobile phone closed user group to place calls amongst one another at no cost. In order to determine the utilization and acceptability of the closed user group amongst users, social network analysis and qualitative methods were used. Key informants were identified and interviewed. The key informants also kept prospective call journals. Billing statements and de-identified call data from the closed user group were used to generate data for analyzing the social structure revealed by the network traffic. The majority of communication within the closed user group was personal and not for professional purposes. The members of the CUG felt that the group improved their efficiency at work. The methods used present an interesting way to investigate the social structure surrounding communication via mobile phones. In addition, the benefits identified from the exploration of this closed user group make a case for supporting mobile phone closed user groups amongst professional groups.

  16. Experiences from a support group for families of preschool children in the expressive AAC user group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadskleiv, Kristine

    2017-03-01

    Children using aided language need communication partners who are competent in modeling language, but most parents of children who use AAC will not have extensive experience with aided communication and will therefore need support to become competent language models. In this participatory observational study the experiences of a support group for parents of young children with age-expected language comprehension who use aided communication expressively are outlined. The group was established in 2012 at a habilitation unit in a hospital, and involved five families of children who use AAC. Field notes were taken during each group meeting and related activities. Parents and professionals agreed on the following topics for discussion: child development, aided communication, communication devices, and policy affecting AAC implementation. The group developed and implemented a range of innovative interventions: (a) a Children's Day at the hospital, (b) a communication plan template, (c) a school preparation workshop, (d) a network for teachers, (e) education of hospital staff, (f) dissemination of knowledge about AAC, and (g) making aided resources available for the ISAAC-Norway website. The aim of increasing the parents' confidence and competence was achieved through a combination of discussions and teaching. The children benefitted not only from the parents' new knowledge, but also from the interventions implemented.

  17. Proceedings of the nineteenth LAMPF Users Group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for eight invited talks on various aspects of nuclear and particle physics as well as status reports on LAMPF and discussions of upgrade options. Also included in these proceedings are the minutes of the working groups for: energetic pion channel and spectrometer; high resolution spectrometer; high energy pion channel; neutron facilities; low-energy pion work; nucleon physics laboratory; stopped muon physics; solid state physics and material science; nuclear chemistry; and computing facilities. Recent LAMPF proposals are also briefly summarized

  18. An analysis of user engagement in student Facebook groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Lane

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysing the engagement of students in university-based Facebook groups can shed light on the nature of their learning experience and highlight leverage points to build on student success. While post-semester surveys and demographic participation data can highlight who was involved and how they subsequently felt about the experience, these techniques do not necessarily reflect real-time engagement. One way to gain insight into in-situ student experiences is by categorising the original posts and comments into predetermined frameworks of learning. This paper offers a systematic method of coding Facebook contributions within various engagement categories: motivation, discourse, cognition and emotive responses. 

  19. User Information Fusion Decision Making Analysis with the C-OODA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Observe-Orient-Decide-Act (C- OODA) model as a method of user and team analysis in the context of the Data Fusion Information Group ( DFIG ) Information...Fusion Model. From the DFIG model [as an update to the Joint Directors of the Lab (JDL) model], we look at Level 5 Fusion of “user refinement” in...OODA comparisons to the DFIG model support systems evaluation and analysis as well as coordinating the time interval of interaction between the machine

  20. Towards a new Role of Agent Technology in User Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses resent attempts to employ multi-agent technologies for user modelling purposes. Based on the analysis of recent implemented systems, this contribution provides a general agent definition representing a flexible implementation to employ highly specialized entities for user modelling tasks, and illustrates communication and cooperation approaches. In the overall solution, agent teams cooperate to fulfill the requirements of user modelling in a more appropriate way.

  1. Psacoin level 1A intercomparison probabilistic system assessment code (PSAC) user group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nies, A.; Laurens, J.M.; Galson, D.A.; Webster, S.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes an international code intercomparison exercise conducted by the NEA Probabilistic System Assessment Code (PSAC) User Group. The PSACOIN Level 1A exercise is the third of a series designed to contribute to the verification of probabilistic codes that may be used in assessing the safety of radioactive waste disposal systems or concepts. Level 1A is based on a more realistic system model than that used in the two previous exercises, and involves deep geological disposal concepts with a relatively complex structure of the repository vault. The report compares results and draws conclusions with regard to the use of different modelling approaches and the possible importance to safety of various processes within and around a deep geological repository. In particular, the relative significance of model uncertainty and data variability is discussed

  2. Serum Sodium Changes in Fluoxetine Users at Different Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Talaeizadeh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: Fluoxetine, a widely used antidepressant, can affect the serum sodium level. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare changes in the serum sodium level of depressive patients taking fluoxetine according to age. "n Methods:This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 126 patients with depression, dividing the patients into two age groups of 15 to 35 years, and above 55 years, who referred to psychiatric clinics of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Serum sodium level was measured prior to fluoxetine therapy and at the first and third week after; adverse symptoms were recorded. Serum sodium level, hyponatremia, and other adverse effects were compared between the two age groups. Results: There was a significant decrease in serum sodium levels in the older patients at the first and third week after the therapy; but the serum sodium levels decreased only after the third week of therapy in the younger patients (p < 0.05. Serum sodium level was significantly lower in older than in younger patients at the third week of the therapy (140.8±2.26 vs. 135.2±2.06; p < 0.05, and hyponatremia was detected only in the older patients after the first and third week of therapy, 4.7% and 15.8%, respectively. Conclusions: Using fluoxetine can decrease serum sodium level, which is more frequent, more severe, and more clinically manifested in older than younger patients. Monitoring serum sodium level is recommended in early weeks of fluoxetine therapy especially for patients older than 55 years of age.

  3. User-oriented and cognitive models of information retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvelin, Kalervo; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The domain of user-oriented and cognitive IR is first discussed, followed by a discussion on the dimensions and types of models one may build for the domain.  The focus of the present entry is on the models of user-oriented and cognitive IR, not on their empirical applications. Several models wit...

  4. Large Scale Management of Physicists Personal Analysis Data Without Employing User and Group Quotas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.; Diesbug, M.; Gheith, M.; Illingworth, R.; Lyon, A.; Mengel, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of modern HEP experiments to acquire and process unprecedented amounts of data and simulation have lead to an explosion in the volume of information that individual scientists deal with on a daily basis. Explosion has resulted in a need for individuals to generate and keep large personal analysis data sets which represent the skimmed portions of official data collections, pertaining to their specific analysis. While a significant reduction in size compared to the original data, these personal analysis and simulation sets can be many terabytes or 10s of TB in size and consist of 10s of thousands of files. When this personal data is aggregated across the many physicists in a single analysis group or experiment it can represent data volumes on par or exceeding the official production samples which require special data handling techniques to deal with effectively.In this paper we explore the changes to the Fermilab computing infrastructure and computing models which have been developed to allow experimenters to effectively manage their personal analysis data and other data that falls outside of the typically centrally managed production chains. In particular we describe the models and tools that are being used to provide the modern neutrino experiments like NOvA with storage resources that are sufficient to meet their analysis needs, without imposing specific quotas on users or groups of users. We discuss the storage mechanisms and the caching algorithms that are being used as well as the toolkits are have been developed to allow the users to easily operate with terascale+ datasets. (paper)

  5. Large Scale Management of Physicists Personal Analysis Data Without Employing User and Group Quotas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, A.; Diesbug, M.; Gheith, M.; Illingworth, R.; Lyon, A.; Mengel, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of modern HEP experiments to acquire and process unprecedented amounts of data and simulation have lead to an explosion in the volume of information that individual scientists deal with on a daily basis. Explosion has resulted in a need for individuals to generate and keep large personal analysis data sets which represent the skimmed portions of official data collections, pertaining to their specific analysis. While a significant reduction in size compared to the original data, these personal analysis and simulation sets can be many terabytes or 10s of TB in size and consist of 10s of thousands of files. When this personal data is aggregated across the many physicists in a single analysis group or experiment it can represent data volumes on par or exceeding the official production samples which require special data handling techniques to deal with effectively. In this paper we explore the changes to the Fermilab computing infrastructure and computing models which have been developed to allow experimenters to effectively manage their personal analysis data and other data that falls outside of the typically centrally managed production chains. In particular we describe the models and tools that are being used to provide the modern neutrino experiments like NOvA with storage resources that are sufficient to meet their analysis needs, without imposing specific quotas on users or groups of users. We discuss the storage mechanisms and the caching algorithms that are being used as well as the toolkits are have been developed to allow the users to easily operate with terascale+ datasets.

  6. User satisfaction with public and private dental services for different age groups in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Macarevich

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article aimed to describe the levels of user satisfaction in different age groups and to study the association between user satisfaction and different types of dental services in a representative sample of Brazilians. This study is based on the Brazilian Oral Health Survey, which evaluated the dental health of adolescents, adults and older adults in 177 Brazilian cities. The outcome variable was user satisfaction, related to the last dental visit, evaluated in a five-level Likert-type scale. The main exposure variable was the type of dental service (public service, private service, health plan or insurance. The independent variables were DMFT (decay, missing and filled teeth; pain intensity in the past six months; reason for the last dental visit; perceived need for treatment; frequency of use of dental services; sex; equivalent income; and educational level. An ordered logistic regression analysis was performed separately for each age group. Few participants evaluated the services as bad or very bad (4.3% of adolescents, 6.1% of adults and 4.1% of older adults. In the crude model, the use of public services was associated with lower satisfaction than the use of private services and health plans between all groups. However, after adjusting by covariates, this association remained only in adolescents, who showed lower satisfaction with the public service compared to the private service and health plans. In general, Brazilians are satisfied with dental services, but, among adolescents, the use of public services was associated with lower satisfaction. Public services may be focused on issues related to children, adults and older adults, and not to the adolescent audience, which has specific demands.

  7. Evaluating accessibility to Bangkok Metro Systems using multi-dimensional criteria across user groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duangporn Prasertsubpakij

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metro systems act as fast and efficient transport systems for many modern metropolises; however, enhancing higher usage of such systems often conflicts with providing suitable accessibility options. The traditional approach of metro accessibility studies seems to be an ineffective measure to gage sustainable access in which the equal rights of all users are taken into account. Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR transportation has increasingly relied on the role of two mass rapid transport systems publicly called “BTS Skytrain” and “MRT Subway”, due to limited availability of land and massive road congestion; however, access to such transit arguably treats some vulnerable groups, especially women, the elderly and disabled people unfairly. This study constructs a multi-dimensional assessment of accessibility considerations to scrutinize how user groups access metro services based on BMR empirical case. 600 individual passengers at various stations were asked to rate the questionnaire that simultaneously considers accessibility aspects of spatial, feeder connectivity, temporal, comfort/safety, psychosocial and other dimensions. It was interestingly found by user disaggregated accessibility model that the lower the accessibility perceptions—related uncomfortable and unsafe environment conditions, the greater the equitable access to services, as illustrated by MRT — Hua Lumphong and MRT — Petchaburi stations. The study suggests that, to balance the access priorities of groups on services, policy actions should emphasize acceptably safe access for individuals, cost efficient feeder services connecting the metro lines, socioeconomic influences and time allocation. Insightful discussions on integrated approach balancing different dimensions of accessibility and recommendations would contribute to accessibility-based knowledge and potential propensity to use the public transits towards transport sustainability.

  8. A Collaborative Location Based Travel Recommendation System through Enhanced Rating Prediction for the Group of Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Logesh; Vairavasundaram, Subramaniyaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth of web and its applications has created a colossal importance for recommender systems. Being applied in various domains, recommender systems were designed to generate suggestions such as items or services based on user interests. Basically, recommender systems experience many issues which reflects dwindled effectiveness. Integrating powerful data management techniques to recommender systems can address such issues and the recommendations quality can be increased significantly. Recent research on recommender systems reveals an idea of utilizing social network data to enhance traditional recommender system with better prediction and improved accuracy. This paper expresses views on social network data based recommender systems by considering usage of various recommendation algorithms, functionalities of systems, different types of interfaces, filtering techniques, and artificial intelligence techniques. After examining the depths of objectives, methodologies, and data sources of the existing models, the paper helps anyone interested in the development of travel recommendation systems and facilitates future research direction. We have also proposed a location recommendation system based on social pertinent trust walker (SPTW) and compared the results with the existing baseline random walk models. Later, we have enhanced the SPTW model for group of users recommendations. The results obtained from the experiments have been presented.

  9. A Collaborative Location Based Travel Recommendation System through Enhanced Rating Prediction for the Group of Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logesh Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth of web and its applications has created a colossal importance for recommender systems. Being applied in various domains, recommender systems were designed to generate suggestions such as items or services based on user interests. Basically, recommender systems experience many issues which reflects dwindled effectiveness. Integrating powerful data management techniques to recommender systems can address such issues and the recommendations quality can be increased significantly. Recent research on recommender systems reveals an idea of utilizing social network data to enhance traditional recommender system with better prediction and improved accuracy. This paper expresses views on social network data based recommender systems by considering usage of various recommendation algorithms, functionalities of systems, different types of interfaces, filtering techniques, and artificial intelligence techniques. After examining the depths of objectives, methodologies, and data sources of the existing models, the paper helps anyone interested in the development of travel recommendation systems and facilitates future research direction. We have also proposed a location recommendation system based on social pertinent trust walker (SPTW and compared the results with the existing baseline random walk models. Later, we have enhanced the SPTW model for group of users recommendations. The results obtained from the experiments have been presented.

  10. A Collaborative Location Based Travel Recommendation System through Enhanced Rating Prediction for the Group of Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Logesh; Vairavasundaram, Subramaniyaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth of web and its applications has created a colossal importance for recommender systems. Being applied in various domains, recommender systems were designed to generate suggestions such as items or services based on user interests. Basically, recommender systems experience many issues which reflects dwindled effectiveness. Integrating powerful data management techniques to recommender systems can address such issues and the recommendations quality can be increased significantly. Recent research on recommender systems reveals an idea of utilizing social network data to enhance traditional recommender system with better prediction and improved accuracy. This paper expresses views on social network data based recommender systems by considering usage of various recommendation algorithms, functionalities of systems, different types of interfaces, filtering techniques, and artificial intelligence techniques. After examining the depths of objectives, methodologies, and data sources of the existing models, the paper helps anyone interested in the development of travel recommendation systems and facilitates future research direction. We have also proposed a location recommendation system based on social pertinent trust walker (SPTW) and compared the results with the existing baseline random walk models. Later, we have enhanced the SPTW model for group of users recommendations. The results obtained from the experiments have been presented. PMID:27069468

  11. Macro System Model (MSM) User Guide, Version 1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T.; Goldsby, M.

    2011-09-01

    This user guide describes the macro system model (MSM). The MSM has been designed to allow users to analyze the financial, environmental, transitional, geographical, and R&D issues associated with the transition to a hydrogen economy. Basic end users can use the MSM to answer cross-cutting questions that were previously difficult to answer in a consistent and timely manner due to various assumptions and methodologies among different models.

  12. User-Oriented and Cognitive Models of Information Retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Järvelin, Kalervo; Skov, Mette

    2017-01-01

    The domain of user-oriented and cognitive information retrieval (IR) is first discussed, followed by a discussion on the dimensions and types of models one may build for the domain. The focus of the present entry is on the models of user-oriented and cognitive IR, not on their empirical...

  13. Modeling characteristics of location from user photos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Kumar (Vikas); S. Bakhshi (Saeideh); L. Kennedy (Lyndon); D.A. Shamma (David)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn the past decade, location-based services have grown through geo-tagging and place-tagging. Proliferation of GPS-enabled mobile devices further enabled exponential growth in geotagged user content. On the other hand, location-based applications harness the abundance of geo-tagged

  14. Modeling User Behavior and Attention in Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    In Web search, query and click log data are easy to collect but they fail to capture user behaviors that do not lead to clicks. As search engines reach the limits inherent in click data and are hungry for more data in a competitive environment, mining cursor movements, hovering, and scrolling becomes important. This dissertation investigates how…

  15. AMEM-ADL Polymer Migration Estimation Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The user's guide of the Arthur D. Little Polymer Migration Estimation Model (AMEM) provides the information on how the model estimates the fraction of a chemical additive that diffuses through polymeric matrices.

  16. Assessing content validity and user perspectives on the Team Check-up Tool: expert survey and user focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsteller, Jill A; Hsu, Yea-Jen; Chan, Kitty S; Lubomski, Lisa H

    2017-04-01

    This study assesses content validity and user feedback on the Team Check-up Tool (TCT), an instrument used for measuring dynamic context of quality improvement (QI) teams and their implementation of QI activities. We conducted two focus groups and one larger feedback session with TCT users to assess feasibility, importance of areas of inquiry and barriers to use. A panel of eight QI experts evaluated the item-by-item content (content validity) of TCT by rating the relevance of each item to implementation success. We calculated item-level and scale-level content validity using the content validity index (CVI). Scale-level CVI was 0.872. Highly rated items included implementation of recommended interventions, educational activities, team review of performance data, team sharing of performance data with staff and specific barriers to progress. Four items were rated relatively low: presentation of performance data to the hospital/health system board; manner of provision of feedback of data to staff; to what other units the team attempted to spread and turnover of QI team members. Items identified in user focus groups as important included whether there were events distracting staff from the initiative, number of team meetings and turnover of QI team members. Focus groups also identified barriers to the completion of the tool, including lack of feedback and response fatigue during stable activity periods. The findings support the conclusion that the TCT measures meaningful areas of context and implementation in team-based QI initiatives, particularly intervention activity tracking, review and sharing of performance data and team progress barriers. We offer a modified instrument with a framework for real-time measurement of important elements of implementation and context of QI teams based on the findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. A New User Segmentation Model for E-Government

    OpenAIRE

    Ran Tang; Zhenji Zhang; Xiaolan Guan; Lida Wang

    2013-01-01

    E-government in China has entered the development stage of personalized services, and user segmentation has become an urgent demand. On the basis of systematic interpretation of e-government development stages, in this article, the authors introduce CRM and customer segmentation concept into e-government areas, construct e-government user segmentation model, and obtain user segmentation results by empirical analysis. Comparing with existing segmentation methods based on experience, because of...

  18. End Users and ERP Systems� Success. Three Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina MIHAI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Information systems (IS have an enormous impact on organizations, individual work, and performance in general. As a result, many research works in the field of IS are focused on the interrelationship between individual performance and IS performance. During the last 20 to 30 years many models have been developed and tested by researchers. Their main objective was to investigate IS success and user performance in different environments. Therefore, a number of models appeared, their goal being the studying of the success, usefulness, end user adoption and utilization of IS, and other user and IS-related aspects in different organizations. This research paper presents three of the most important models developed in specialized literature, which deal with measuring IS success and end user adoption of the IS: the TAM model, the D&M model, and the TTF model. The research also provides an overview of some studies that have applied these models in the field of ERP systems.

  19. Artificial intelligence techniques for modeling database user behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Steve; Graves, Sara J.

    1990-01-01

    The design and development of the adaptive modeling system is described. This system models how a user accesses a relational database management system in order to improve its performance by discovering use access patterns. In the current system, these patterns are used to improve the user interface and may be used to speed data retrieval, support query optimization and support a more flexible data representation. The system models both syntactic and semantic information about the user's access and employs both procedural and rule-based logic to manipulate the model.

  20. Site Structure and User Navigation: Models, Measures and Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herder, E.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Chen, S.Y; Magoulas, G.D.

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of the structure of Web sites and patterns of user navigation through these sites is gaining attention from different disciplines, as it enables unobtrusive discovery of user needs. In this chapter we give an overview of models, measures, and methods that can be used for analysis

  1. User experience & user-centered design : Health games user research model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jef Folkerts

    2014-01-01

    This poster sketches the outlines of a theoretical research framework to assess whether and on what grounds certain behavioral effects may be attributed to particular game mechanics and game play aspects. It is founded on the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion (ELM), which is quite

  2. The EU model evaluation group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    The model evaluation group (MEG) was launched in 1992 growing out of the Major Technological Hazards Programme with EU/DG XII. The goal of MEG was to improve the culture in which models were developed, particularly by encouraging voluntary model evaluation procedures based on a formalised and consensus protocol. The evaluation intended to assess the fitness-for-purpose of the models being used as a measure of the quality. The approach adopted was focused on developing a generic model evaluation protocol and subsequent targeting this onto specific areas of application. Five such developments have been initiated, on heavy gas dispersion, liquid pool fires, gas explosions, human factors and momentum fires. The quality of models is an important element when complying with the 'Seveso Directive' requiring that the safety reports submitted to the authorities comprise an assessment of the extent and severity of the consequences of identified major accidents. Further, the quality of models become important in the land use planning process, where the proximity of industrial sites to vulnerable areas may be critical. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. An r-Hiding Revocable Group Signature Scheme: Group Signatures with the Property of Hiding the Number of Revoked Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Emura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available If there are many displaced workers in a company, then a person who goes for job hunting might not select this company. That is, the number of members who quit is quite negative information. Similarly, in revocable group signature schemes, if one knows (or guesses the number of revoked users (say r, then one may guess the reason behind such circumstances, and it may lead to harmful rumors. However, no previous revocation procedure can achieve hiding r. In this paper, we propose the first revocable group signature scheme, where r is kept hidden, which we call r-hiding revocable group signature. To handle this property, we newly define the security notion called anonymity with respect to the revocation which guarantees the unlinkability of revoked users.

  4. Research on potential user identification model for electric energy substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Huaijian; Chen, Meiling; Lin, Haiying; Yang, Shuo; Miao, Bo; Zhu, Xinzhi

    2018-01-01

    The implementation of energy substitution plays an important role in promoting the development of energy conservation and emission reduction in china. Energy service management platform of alternative energy users based on the data in the enterprise production value, product output, coal and other energy consumption as a potential evaluation index, using principal component analysis model to simplify the formation of characteristic index, comprehensive index contains the original variables, and using fuzzy clustering model for the same industry user’s flexible classification. The comprehensive index number and user clustering classification based on constructed particle optimization neural network classification model based on the user, user can replace electric potential prediction. The results of an example show that the model can effectively predict the potential of users’ energy potential.

  5. Effectiveness of group discussions and commitment in improving cleaning behaviour of shared sanitation users in Kampala, Uganda slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumwebaze, Innocent K; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Access to and use of hygienic shared sanitation facilities is fundamental in reducing the high risk of diseases such as diarrhoea and respiratory infections. We evaluated the effectiveness of group discussions and commitment in improving the cleaning behaviour of shared sanitation users in three urban slums in Kampala, Uganda. The study follows the risk, attitudes, norms, abilities and self-regulation (RANAS) model of behaviour change and some factors of the social dilemma theory. A pre-versus post-intervention survey was conducted in three slums of Kampala, Uganda, between December 2012 and September 2013. From the pre-intervention findings, users of dirty sanitation facilities were randomly assigned to discussions, discussions + commitment and control interventions. The interventions were implemented for 3 months with the aim of improving cleaning behaviour. This paper provides an analysis of 119 respondents who belonged to the intervention discussion-only (n = 38), discussions + commitment (n = 41) and the control (no intervention, n = 40) groups. Compared to the control, discussions and discussions + commitment significantly improved shared toilet users' cleaning behaviour. The rate of improvement was observed through behavioural determinants such as cleaning obligation, cleaning ease, cleaning approval and affective beliefs. Our study findings show that group discussions and commitment interventions derived from RANAS model of behaviour change are effective in improving the shared sanitation users' cleaning behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic Trust Models between Users over Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    the- art hTrust and its variants for solving the trust -link prediction problem. In addition to the above main research results, we developed a...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0039 Dynamic Trust Models between Users over Social Networks Kazumi Saito University Of Shizuoka Final Report 04/05/2016...2013 to 30-03-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE (134042) Dynamic Trust Models between Users over Social Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-13-1

  7. Precipitation-runoff modeling system; user's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, G.H.; Lichty, R.W.; Troutman, B.M.; Saindon, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The concepts, structure, theoretical development, and data requirements of the precipitation-runoff modeling system (PRMS) are described. The precipitation-runoff modeling system is a modular-design, deterministic, distributed-parameter modeling system developed to evaluate the impacts of various combinations of precipitation, climate, and land use on streamflow, sediment yields, and general basin hydrology. Basin response to normal and extreme rainfall and snowmelt can be simulated to evaluate changes in water balance relationships, flow regimes, flood peaks and volumes, soil-water relationships, sediment yields, and groundwater recharge. Parameter-optimization and sensitivity analysis capabilites are provided to fit selected model parameters and evaluate their individual and joint effects on model output. The modular design provides a flexible framework for continued model system enhancement and hydrologic modeling research and development. (Author 's abstract)

  8. Computational social dynamic modeling of group recruitment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Nina M.; Lee, Marinna; Pickett, Marc; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Smrcka, Julianne D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wu, Benjamin C.

    2004-01-01

    The Seldon software toolkit combines concepts from agent-based modeling and social science to create a computationally social dynamic model for group recruitment. The underlying recruitment model is based on a unique three-level hybrid agent-based architecture that contains simple agents (level one), abstract agents (level two), and cognitive agents (level three). This uniqueness of this architecture begins with abstract agents that permit the model to include social concepts (gang) or institutional concepts (school) into a typical software simulation environment. The future addition of cognitive agents to the recruitment model will provide a unique entity that does not exist in any agent-based modeling toolkits to date. We use social networks to provide an integrated mesh within and between the different levels. This Java based toolkit is used to analyze different social concepts based on initialization input from the user. The input alters a set of parameters used to influence the values associated with the simple agents, abstract agents, and the interactions (simple agent-simple agent or simple agent-abstract agent) between these entities. The results of phase-1 Seldon toolkit provide insight into how certain social concepts apply to different scenario development for inner city gang recruitment.

  9. An Approach to User Interface Design with Two Indigenous Groups in Namibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Stanley, Colin

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely reported that interactions with and expectations of technology differ across cultural contexts. Concepts such as ‘usability’ have shown to be context-dependent, thus user interfaces intuitive to one group of users appears counter-intuitive to the others. In an attempt to localise...... a user interface of a tablet based system aimed at preserving Indigenous Knowledge for rural Herero communities, we present findings from two sites in Namibia, complementing prior research. Participants who had little or no previous experience with technologies informed our endeavour of aligning local...... on findings and present preliminary evaluations in a collaboration village as well as design export results with another indigenous group....

  10. HYDROCARBON SPILL SCREENING MODEL (HSSM) VOLUME 1: USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This users guide describes the Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM). The model is intended for simulation of subsurface releases of light nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). The model consists of separate modules for LNAPL flow through the vadose zone, spreading in the capil...

  11. USERS MANUAL: LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS MODEL - VERSION 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document is a user's guide for a computer model, Version 2.0 of the Landfill Gas Emissions Model (LandGEM), for estimating air pollution emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The model can be used to estimate emission rates for methane, carbon dioxide, nonmet...

  12. User verification of the FRBR conceptual model

    OpenAIRE

    Pisanski, Jan; Žumer, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - The paper aims to build on of a previous study of mental model s of the bibliographic universe, which found that the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) conceptual model is intuitive. Design/ methodology/approach - A total 120 participants were presented with a list of bibliographic entities and six graphs each. They were asked to choose the graph they thought best represented the relationships between entities described. Findings - The graph bas ed on the FRBR ...

  13. Individualized computer-aided education in mammography based on user modeling: concept and preliminary experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurowski, Maciej A; Baker, Jay A; Barnhart, Huiman X; Tourassi, Georgia D

    2010-03-01

    The authors propose the framework for an individualized adaptive computer-aided educational system in mammography that is based on user modeling. The underlying hypothesis is that user models can be developed to capture the individual error making patterns of radiologists-in-training. In this pilot study, the authors test the above hypothesis for the task of breast cancer diagnosis in mammograms. The concept of a user model was formalized as the function that relates image features to the likelihood/extent of the diagnostic error made by a radiologist-in-training and therefore to the level of difficulty that a case will pose to the radiologist-in-training (or "user"). Then, machine learning algorithms were implemented to build such user models. Specifically, the authors explored k-nearest neighbor, artificial neural networks, and multiple regression for the task of building the model using observer data collected from ten Radiology residents at Duke University Medical Center for the problem of breast mass diagnosis in mammograms. For each resident, a user-specific model was constructed that predicts the user's expected level of difficulty for each presented case based on two BI-RADS image features. In the experiments, leave-one-out data handling scheme was applied to assign each case to a low-predicted-difficulty or a high-predicted-difficulty group for each resident based on each of the three user models. To evaluate whether the user model is useful in predicting difficulty, the authors performed statistical tests using the generalized estimating equations approach to determine whether the mean actual error is the same or not between the low-predicted-difficulty group and the high-predicted-difficulty group. When the results for all observers were pulled together, the actual errors made by residents were statistically significantly higher for cases in the high-predicted-difficulty group than for cases in the low-predicted-difficulty group for all modeling

  14. HTGR Application Economic Model Users' Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.M. Gandrik

    2012-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Application Economic Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Application Economic Model calculates either the required selling price of power and/or heat for a given internal rate of return (IRR) or the IRR for power and/or heat being sold at the market price. The user can generate these economic results for a range of reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for up to 16 reactor modules; and for module ratings of 200, 350, or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Application Economic Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Application Economic Model. This model was designed for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel and engineering economics. Modification of the HTGR Application Economic Model should only be performed by users familiar with the HTGR and its applications, Excel, and Visual Basic.

  15. Do recommender systems benefit users? a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Chi Ho

    2016-04-01

    Recommender systems are present in many web applications to guide purchase choices. They increase sales and benefit sellers, but whether they benefit customers by providing relevant products remains less explored. While in many cases the recommended products are relevant to users, in other cases customers may be tempted to purchase the products only because they are recommended. Here we introduce a model to examine the benefit of recommender systems for users, and find that recommendations from the system can be equivalent to random draws if one always follows the recommendations and seldom purchases according to his or her own preference. Nevertheless, with sufficient information about user preferences, recommendations become accurate and an abrupt transition to this accurate regime is observed for some of the studied algorithms. On the other hand, we find that high estimated accuracy indicated by common accuracy metrics is not necessarily equivalent to high real accuracy in matching users with products. This disagreement between estimated and real accuracy serves as an alarm for operators and researchers who evaluate recommender systems merely with accuracy metrics. We tested our model with a real dataset and observed similar behaviors. Finally, a recommendation approach with improved accuracy is suggested. These results imply that recommender systems can benefit users, but the more frequently a user purchases the recommended products, the less relevant the recommended products are in matching user taste.

  16. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle

  17. Building integral projection models: a user's guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Mark; Childs, Dylan Z; Ellner, Stephen P

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand how changes in individual performance (growth, survival or reproduction) influence population dynamics and evolution, ecologists are increasingly using parameterized mathematical models. For continuously structured populations, where some continuous measure of individual state influences growth, survival or reproduction, integral projection models (IPMs) are commonly used. We provide a detailed description of the steps involved in constructing an IPM, explaining how to: (i) translate your study system into an IPM; (ii) implement your IPM; and (iii) diagnose potential problems with your IPM. We emphasize how the study organism's life cycle, and the timing of censuses, together determine the structure of the IPM kernel and important aspects of the statistical analysis used to parameterize an IPM using data on marked individuals. An IPM based on population studies of Soay sheep is used to illustrate the complete process of constructing, implementing and evaluating an IPM fitted to sample data. We then look at very general approaches to parameterizing an IPM, using a wide range of statistical techniques (e.g. maximum likelihood methods, generalized additive models, nonparametric kernel density estimators). Methods for selecting models for parameterizing IPMs are briefly discussed. We conclude with key recommendations and a brief overview of applications that extend the basic model. The online Supporting Information provides commented R code for all our analyses. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Ecological Society.

  18. Software support: Pre-empting the quick question. [User's support group at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebel, L.

    1987-09-01

    High energy physicists, researchers and graduate students, from universities all around the world come to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to do their experiments. They use our computer facilities to perform all phases of their data-analysis and presentation. We have a large turnover of users and a rather small support group, in a multi-vendor environment. We strive to make our users self-sufficient through the use of well-publicized maintenance procedures, documentation systems, and product support standards. By these pre-emptive measures we attempt to have quick answers at hand for the truly quick questions, leaving us time for the interesting problems.

  19. Discrete Feature Model (DFM) User Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, Joel

    2008-06-01

    This manual describes the Discrete-Feature Model (DFM) software package for modelling groundwater flow and solute transport in networks of discrete features. A discrete-feature conceptual model represents fractures and other water-conducting features around a repository as discrete conductors surrounded by a rock matrix which is usually treated as impermeable. This approximation may be valid for crystalline rocks such as granite or basalt, which have very low permeability if macroscopic fractures are excluded. A discrete feature is any entity that can conduct water and permit solute transport through bedrock, and can be reasonably represented as a piecewise-planar conductor. Examples of such entities may include individual natural fractures (joints or faults), fracture zones, and disturbed-zone features around tunnels (e.g. blasting-induced fractures or stress-concentration induced 'onion skin' fractures around underground openings). In a more abstract sense, the effectively discontinuous nature of pathways through fractured crystalline bedrock may be idealized as discrete, equivalent transmissive features that reproduce large-scale observations, even if the details of connective paths (and unconnected domains) are not precisely known. A discrete-feature model explicitly represents the fundamentally discontinuous and irregularly connected nature of systems of such systems, by constraining flow and transport to occur only within such features and their intersections. Pathways for flow and solute transport in this conceptualization are a consequence not just of the boundary conditions and hydrologic properties (as with continuum models), but also the irregularity of connections between conductive/transmissive features. The DFM software package described here is an extensible code for investigating problems of flow and transport in geological (natural or human-altered) systems that can be characterized effectively in terms of discrete features. With this software, the

  20. Discrete Feature Model (DFM) User Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, Joel (Clearwater Hardrock Consulting, Corvallis, OR (United States))

    2008-06-15

    This manual describes the Discrete-Feature Model (DFM) software package for modelling groundwater flow and solute transport in networks of discrete features. A discrete-feature conceptual model represents fractures and other water-conducting features around a repository as discrete conductors surrounded by a rock matrix which is usually treated as impermeable. This approximation may be valid for crystalline rocks such as granite or basalt, which have very low permeability if macroscopic fractures are excluded. A discrete feature is any entity that can conduct water and permit solute transport through bedrock, and can be reasonably represented as a piecewise-planar conductor. Examples of such entities may include individual natural fractures (joints or faults), fracture zones, and disturbed-zone features around tunnels (e.g. blasting-induced fractures or stress-concentration induced 'onion skin' fractures around underground openings). In a more abstract sense, the effectively discontinuous nature of pathways through fractured crystalline bedrock may be idealized as discrete, equivalent transmissive features that reproduce large-scale observations, even if the details of connective paths (and unconnected domains) are not precisely known. A discrete-feature model explicitly represents the fundamentally discontinuous and irregularly connected nature of systems of such systems, by constraining flow and transport to occur only within such features and their intersections. Pathways for flow and solute transport in this conceptualization are a consequence not just of the boundary conditions and hydrologic properties (as with continuum models), but also the irregularity of connections between conductive/transmissive features. The DFM software package described here is an extensible code for investigating problems of flow and transport in geological (natural or human-altered) systems that can be characterized effectively in terms of discrete features. With this

  1. PWR Users Group 10 CFR 61 Waste Form Requirements Compliance Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenlof, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    In January of 1984, a PWR Users Group was formed to initiate a 10 CFR 61 Waste Form Requirements Compliance Test Program on a shared cost basis. The original Radwaste Solidification Systems sold by ATCOR ENGINEERED SYSTEMS, INC. to the utilities were required to produce a free-standing monolith with no free water. None of the other requirements of 10 CFR 61 had to be met. Current regulations, however, have substantially expanded the scope of the waste form acceptance criteria. These new criteria required that generators of radioactive waste demonstrate the ability to produce waste forms which meet certain chemical and physical requirements. This paper will present the test program used and the results obtained to insure 10 CFR 61 compliance of the three (3) typical waste streams generated by the ATCOR PWR Users Group's plants. The primary objective of the PWR Users Group was not to maximize waste loading within the masonry cement solidification media, but to insure that the users Radwaste Solidification System is capable of producing waste forms which meet the waste form criteria of 10 CFR 61. A description of the laboratory small sample certification program and the actual full scale pilot plant verification approach used is included in this paper. Also included is a discussion of the development of a Process Control Program to ensure the reproducibility of the test results with actual waste

  2. Designing user models in a virtual cave environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hudson, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gokhale, N. [Madge Networks, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, the results of a first study into the use of virtual reality for human factor studies and design of simple and complex models of control systems, components, and processes are described. The objective was to design a model in a virtual environment that would reflect more characteristics of the user`s mental model of a system and fewer of the designer`s. The technology of a CAVE{trademark} virtual environment and the methodology of Neuro Linguistic Programming were employed in this study.

  3. XRLSim model specifications and user interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, L.C.; Gavel, D.T.; Shectman, R.M.; Sholl, P.L.; Woodruff, J.P.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes our FY88 engineering development effort of XRLSim --- an Ada-based computer program developed to provide a realistic simulation of an x-ray laser weapon platform. XRLSim can be used to assess platform requirements in track handoff, target acquisition, tracking, and pointing as well as engagement time line. Development effort continues in FY89 to enhance the model fidelity of the platform and to improve the performance of the tracking algorithms. Simulated targets available in XRLSim include midcourse reentry vehicles and orbiting satellites. At this time, the current version of XRLSim can only simulate a one-on-one engagement scenario. 8 refs., 26 figs.

  4. Comparing injunctive marijuana use norms of salient reference groups among college student marijuana users and nonusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrie, Joseph W; Hummer, Justin F; Lac, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug among college students and has the potential for various negative outcomes. Perceptions of what constitutes typical approval/acceptability of a reference group (i.e. injunctive social norms) have been shown to have strong utility as predictors of health-risk behaviors in the college context, yet this construct remains significantly understudied for marijuana use despite its potential for use in social norms-based interventions. The current research evaluated individuals' marijuana approval level and their perceptions of others' marijuana approval level (i.e. injunctive norms) for various reference groups (typical student on campus, one's close friends, and one's parents) as a function of individual user status (abstainers, experimenters, occasional users, and regular users). A diverse sample of 3553 college students from two universities completed an online survey. Among all user status groups, individual approval yielded mean scores paralleling that of perceived close friends' approval and all groups were relatively uniform in their perception of typical students' approval. Higher levels of marijuana use tended to produce higher endorsements of individual approval, perceived close friends' approval, and perceived parental approval. Among occasional and regular users, there were no differences between one's own approval level for use and the perceptions of close friends' approval, nor did they think the typical student was more approving than themselves. Abstainers and experimenters, however, perceived typical students and close friends to have more permissive attitudes than themselves. Implications and future directions for research regarding the role of injunctive marijuana use norms in the development of social norms intervention are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Upper limb joint motion of two different user groups during manual wheelchair propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Seunghyeon; Son, Jongsang; Lee, Jinbok; Kim, Youngho

    2013-02-01

    Manual wheelchair users have a high risk of injury to the upper extremities. Recent studies have focused on kinematic and kinetic analyses of manual wheelchair propulsion in order to understand the physical demands on wheelchair users. The purpose of this study was to investigate upper limb joint motion by using a motion capture system and a dynamometer with two different groups of wheelchair users propelling their wheelchairs at different speeds under different load conditions. The variations in the contact time, release time, and linear velocity of the experienced group were all larger than they were in the novice group. The propulsion angles of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices under all conditions. The variances in the propulsion force (both radial and tangential) of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices. The shoulder joint moment had the largest variance with the conditions, followed by the wrist joint moment and the elbow joint moment. The variance of the maximum shoulder joint moment was over four times the variance of the maximum wrist joint moment and eight times the maximum elbow joint moment. The maximum joint moments increased significantly as the speed and load increased in both groups. Quick and significant manipulation ability based on environmental changes is considered an important factor in efficient propulsion. This efficiency was confirmed from the propulsion power results. Sophisticated strategies for efficient manual wheelchair propulsion could be understood by observation of the physical responses of each upper limb joint to changes in load and speed. We expect that the findings of this study will be utilized for designing a rehabilitation program to reduce injuries.

  6. Educational Group Practices in Primary Care: Interaction Between Professionals, Users and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Flavia Gazzinelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the concept understood by Family Healthcare Strategy (ESF professionals of knowledge, education and subjects participating in learning activities. METHOD Qualitative study carried out with the ESF professionals with university degree, members of the healthcare staff who undertook educational health group activities at Basic Healthcare Units (UBS in Belo Horizonte. The following triangulation techniques were used: participant observation, photos and field notes; interviews with professionals; and document analysis. RESULTS We identified three interaction patterns that are different from each other. Firstly, the professional questions, listens and provides information to users, trusting in the transmission of knowledge; secondly, the professional questions and listens, trusting that users can learn from each other; thirdly, the professional questions, listens, discusses and produces knowledge with users, both teaching and learning from each other. CONCLUSION There are educational practices that include unique methods capable of creating a militant space for citizenship engagement.

  7. User-centered Design Groups to Engage Patients and Caregivers with a Personalized Health IT Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Molly; Kaziunas, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Mark; Derry, Holly; Forringer, Rachel; Miller, Kristen; O’Reilly, Dennis; An, Larry C.; Tewari, Muneesh; Hanauer, David A.; Choi, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology (IT) has opened exciting avenues for capturing, delivering and sharing data, and offers the potential to develop cost-effective, patient-focused applications. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of health IT applications such as outpatient portals. Rigorous evaluation is fundamental to ensure effectiveness and sustainability, as resistance to more widespread adoption of outpatient portals may be due to lack of user friendliness. Health IT applications that integrate with the existing electronic health record and present information in a condensed, user-friendly format could improve coordination of care and communication. Importantly, these applications should be developed systematically with appropriate methodological design and testing to ensure usefulness, adoption, and sustainability. Based on our prior work that identified numerous information needs and challenges of HCT, we developed an experimental prototype of a health IT tool, the BMT Roadmap. Our goal was to develop a tool that could be used in the real-world, daily practice of HCT patients and caregivers (users) in the inpatient setting. In the current study, we examined the views, needs, and wants of patients and caregivers in the design and development process of the BMT Roadmap through two user-centered Design Groups, conducted in March 2015 and April 2015, respectively: Design Group I utilized a low-fidelity paper-based prototype and Design Group II utilized a high-fidelity prototype presented to users as a web-app on Apple® iPads. There were 11 caregivers (median age 44, range 34–69 years) and 8 patients (median age 18 years, range 11–24 years) in the study population. The qualitative analyses revealed a wide range of responses helpful in guiding the iterative development of the system. Three important themes emerged from the Design Groups: 1) perception of core features as beneficial (views), 2) alerting the design team to potential issues with the user

  8. Solid Waste Projection Model: Database User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburn, C.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Solid Waste Projection Model (SWPM) system is an analytical tool developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) specifically to address Hanford solid waste management issues. This document is one of a set of documents supporting the SWPM system and providing instructions in the use and maintenance of SWPM components. This manual contains instructions for using Version 1.4 of the SWPM database: system requirements and preparation, entering and maintaining data, and performing routine database functions. This document supports only those operations which are specific to SWPM database menus and functions and does not Provide instruction in the use of Paradox, the database management system in which the SWPM database is established

  9. Modeling mutual feedback between users and recommender systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, An; Yeung, Chi Ho; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Recommender systems daily influence our decisions on the Internet. While considerable attention has been given to issues such as recommendation accuracy and user privacy, the long-term mutual feedback between a recommender system and the decisions of its users has been neglected so far. We propose here a model of network evolution which allows us to study the complex dynamics induced by this feedback, including the hysteresis effect which is typical for systems with non-linear dynamics. Despite the popular belief that recommendation helps users to discover new things, we find that the long-term use of recommendation can contribute to the rise of extremely popular items and thus ultimately narrow the user choice. These results are supported by measurements of the time evolution of item popularity inequality in real systems. We show that this adverse effect of recommendation can be tamed by sacrificing part of short-term recommendation accuracy.

  10. Modeling and evaluating user behavior in exploratory visual analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, Khairi; Johnson, Andrew E.; Papka, Michael E.; Leigh, Jason

    2016-07-25

    Empirical evaluation methods for visualizations have traditionally focused on assessing the outcome of the visual analytic process as opposed to characterizing how that process unfolds. There are only a handful of methods that can be used to systematically study how people use visualizations, making it difficult for researchers to capture and characterize the subtlety of cognitive and interaction behaviors users exhibit during visual analysis. To validate and improve visualization design, however, it is important for researchers to be able to assess and understand how users interact with visualization systems under realistic scenarios. This paper presents a methodology for modeling and evaluating the behavior of users in exploratory visual analysis. We model visual exploration using a Markov chain process comprising transitions between mental, interaction, and computational states. These states and the transitions between them can be deduced from a variety of sources, including verbal transcripts, videos and audio recordings, and log files. This model enables the evaluator to characterize the cognitive and computational processes that are essential to insight acquisition in exploratory visual analysis, and reconstruct the dynamics of interaction between the user and the visualization system. We illustrate this model with two exemplar user studies, and demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative analytical tools it affords.

  11. Earthquake Early Warning Beta Users: Java, Modeling, and Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, J. A.; Vinci, M.; Steele, W. P.; Allen, R. M.; Hellweg, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) is a system that can provide a few to tens of seconds warning prior to ground shaking at a user's location. The goal and purpose of such a system is to reduce, or minimize, the damage, costs, and casualties resulting from an earthquake. A demonstration earthquake early warning system (ShakeAlert) is undergoing testing in the United States by the UC Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, Caltech, ETH Zurich, University of Washington, the USGS, and beta users in California and the Pacific Northwest. The beta users receive earthquake information very rapidly in real-time and are providing feedback on their experiences of performance and potential uses within their organization. Beta user interactions allow the ShakeAlert team to discern: which alert delivery options are most effective, what changes would make the UserDisplay more useful in a pre-disaster situation, and most importantly, what actions users plan to take for various scenarios. Actions could include: personal safety approaches, such as drop cover, and hold on; automated processes and procedures, such as opening elevator or fire stations doors; or situational awareness. Users are beginning to determine which policy and technological changes may need to be enacted, and funding requirements to implement their automated controls. The use of models and mobile apps are beginning to augment the basic Java desktop applet. Modeling allows beta users to test their early warning responses against various scenarios without having to wait for a real event. Mobile apps are also changing the possible response landscape, providing other avenues for people to receive information. All of these combine to improve business continuity and resiliency.

  12. Modeling Users, Context and Devices for Ambient Assisted Living Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillejo, Eduardo; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The participation of users within AAL environments is increasing thanks to the capabilities of the current wearable devices. Furthermore, the significance of considering user's preferences, context conditions and device's capabilities help smart environments to personalize services and resources for them. Being aware of different characteristics of the entities participating in these situations is vital for reaching the main goals of the corresponding systems efficiently. To collect different information from these entities, it is necessary to design several formal models which help designers to organize and give some meaning to the gathered data. In this paper, we analyze several literature solutions for modeling users, context and devices considering different approaches in the Ambient Assisted Living domain. Besides, we remark different ongoing standardization works in this area. We also discuss the used techniques, modeled characteristics and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach to finally draw several conclusions about the reviewed works. PMID:24643006

  13. HIV prevention among drug and alcohol users: models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spread of HIV among drug and alcohol users, as a high-risk group, is a significant problem in Africa, as in other parts of the world. Few programs have been implemented in Africa to deal specifically with this issue. Since November 2006, the AED Capable Partners Program in Kenya project has provided technical ...

  14. Evaluating intersectoral collaboration: a model for assessment by service users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt Ahgren

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: DELTA was launched as a project in 1997 to improve intersectoral collaboration in the rehabilitation field. In 2005 DELTA was transformed into a local association for financial co-ordination between the institutions involved. Based on a study of the DELTA service users, the purpose of this article is to develop and to validate a model that can be used to assess the integration of welfare services from the perspective of the service users. Theory: The foundation of integration is a well functioning structure of integration. Without such structural conditions, it is difficult to develop a process of integration that combines the resources and competences of the collaborating organisations to create services advantageous for the service users. In this way, both the structure and the process will contribute to the outcome of integration. Method: The study was carried out as a retrospective cross-sectional survey during two weeks, including all the current service users of DELTA. The questionnaire contained 32 questions, which were derived from the theoretical framework and research on service users, capturing perceptions of integration structure, process and outcome. Ordinal scales and open questions where used for the assessment. Results: The survey had a response rate of 82% and no serious biases of the results were detected. The study shows that the users of the rehabilitation services perceived the services as well integrated, relevant and adapted to their needs. The assessment model was tested for reliability and validity and a few modifications were suggested. Some key measurement themes were derived from the study. Conclusion: The model developed in this study is an important step towards an assessment of service integration from the perspective of the service users. It needs to be further refined, however, before it can be used in other evaluations of collaboration in the provision of integrated welfare services.

  15. e-Government Readiness, Strategy and Two Different User Groups - in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Noella; Hoechtl, Johann; Parycek, Peter

    This paper offers a description of the e-Government Strategy in Austria and its e-Government readiness, and looks at how two different user groups are experiencing e-Government in Austria. Studies conducted show that adolescent citizens are more optimistic and enthusiastic about the possibilities offered whilst the municipalities are more skeptical. The Austrian e-Government strategy, the decisionmakers and IT solution providers must understand the needs of all stakeholders and provide viable solutions accordingly.

  16. H2A Production Model, Version 2 User Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Ramsden, T.; Zuboy, J.

    2008-09-01

    The H2A Production Model analyzes the technical and economic aspects of central and forecourt hydrogen production technologies. Using a standard discounted cash flow rate of return methodology, it determines the minimum hydrogen selling price, including a specified after-tax internal rate of return from the production technology. Users have the option of accepting default technology input values--such as capital costs, operating costs, and capacity factor--from established H2A production technology cases or entering custom values. Users can also modify the model's financial inputs. This new version of the H2A Production Model features enhanced usability and functionality. Input fields are consolidated and simplified. New capabilities include performing sensitivity analyses and scaling analyses to various plant sizes. This User Guide helps users already familiar with the basic tenets of H2A hydrogen production cost analysis get started using the new version of the model. It introduces the basic elements of the model then describes the function and use of each of its worksheets.

  17. Mental health service user participation in Chinese culture: a model of independence or interdependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jessica Pui-Shan; Tse, Samson Shu-Ki; Davidson, Larry; Cheng, Patrick

    2017-12-22

    Current models of user participation in mental health services were developed within Western culture and thus may not be applicable to Chinese communities. To present a new model of user participation, which emerged from research within a Chinese community, for understanding the processes of and factors influencing user participation in a non-Western culture. Multiple qualitative methods, including focus groups, individual in-depth interviews, and photovoice, were applied within the framework of constructivist grounded theory and collaborative research. Diverging from conceptualizations of user participation with emphasis on civil rights and the individual as a central agent, participants in the study highlighted the interpersonal dynamics between service users and different players affecting the participation intensity and outcomes. They valued a reciprocal relationship with their caregivers in making treatment decisions, cooperated with staff to observe power hierarchies and social harmony, identified the importance of peer support in enabling service engagement and delivery, and emphasized professional facilitation in advancing involvement at the policy level. User participation in Chinese culture embeds dynamic interdependence. The proposed model adds this new dimension to the existing frameworks and calls for attention to the complex local ecology and cultural consistency in realizing user participation.

  18. The Effect of Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Group Intervention on Self Esteem among Drug Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin Huzilil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-esteem is related to the individuals understanding and accepting the existing character and attitude to themselves. Failure to understand and accept their own strengths and weaknesses and in the same time do not have the skills to cope with it will caused them to be classified in the group who have low levels of self esteem. The up and down in self esteem will seriously affect the person emotional development and their reasoning process. Thus, reforming self esteem is an important key to help the rehabilition of drug abuser. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Brief Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy on self-esteem among drug users. The quasi experimental design with one treatment group and one control group and four measurements (Pre Test, Post 1, Post 2 and Post 3 were employed in this study. The sample of 108 drugs users was chosen using purposive sampling procedure. Data were collected using standardized psychometric instruments, including Internal Control Index (Patricia Duttweiler, 1984 and The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and were analysed using descriptive analysis. The findings shows the intervention of group Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy CBT (B are succeed in increasing self-esteem mean score compared to control group in different time interval. As a conclusion, self-esteem among the subjects can be enhanced with an intervention of proper and systematic therapy instead of unplanned therapy sessions

  19. Estimating Spoken Dialog System Quality with User Models

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Spoken dialog systems have the potential to offer highly intuitive user interfaces, as they allow systems to be controlled using natural language. However, the complexity inherent in natural language dialogs means that careful testing of the system must be carried out from the very beginning of the design process.   This book examines how user models can be used to support such early evaluations in two ways:  by running simulations of dialogs, and by estimating the quality judgments of users. First, a design environment supporting the creation of dialog flows, the simulation of dialogs, and the analysis of the simulated data is proposed.  How the quality of user simulations may be quantified with respect to their suitability for both formative and summative evaluation is then discussed. The remainder of the book is dedicated to the problem of predicting quality judgments of users based on interaction data. New modeling approaches are presented, which process the dialogs as sequences, and which allow knowl...

  20. RODOS User's Group: Final project report. Contract number: F14P- CT98-0075

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkko, K.; Ammann, M. (eds.)

    2001-03-01

    Prior to 1998, the development of RODOS, a decision support system designed for the management of nuclear emergencies, had been carried out almost entirely by research scientists and engineers. The end-users/operators had little or no input into this development. To redress this situation, the RODOS Users Group (RUG) was established in 1998 under a Concerted Action Contract between the European Commission and STUK. The main objectives of this group were to encourage the emergency management community to use such a system, to provide a forum for end-users to share their experience in the use of such systems and to provide feedback from the end-users to the model and system developers in regard to operational problems and required improvements. The contract, which commenced on 1st September 1998, was for a period of two years. During this period, RUG established a www homepage, planned and performed two nuclear accident exercises and held four meetings. Technically the Web page operated very well. State-of-the-art Internet technology provided an efficient communication channel at low cost. The membership of the RUG was, however, too low to maintain a lively and ongoing discussion in parallel with the RODOS project Web page. This experience would suggest that it might have been better to have operated a Web page for RUG on the RODOS project Web-site rather than an independent RUG Web-site. Exercises based on fixed accident scenarios proved to be an appropriate means of highlighting issues that needed to be discussed between users and developers and to stimulate and motivate the end-users to maintain and further develop the system. Such exercises also promoted further activity in the field of emergency management. The organisation and administration of realistic exercises are time consuming, laborious and expensive. It is therefore very important that the maximum benefit is achieved from such exercises. The use of analytical evaluation methods could be better employed

  1. Designing visual displays and system models for safe reactor operations based on the user`s perspective of the system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Most designers are not schooled in the area of human-interaction psychology and therefore tend to rely on the traditional ergonomic aspects of human factors when designing complex human-interactive workstations related to reactor operations. They do not take into account the differences in user information processing behavior and how these behaviors may affect individual and team performance when accessing visual displays or utilizing system models in process and control room areas. Unfortunately, by ignoring the importance of the integration of the user interface at the information process level, the result can be sub-optimization and inherently error- and failure-prone systems. Therefore, to minimize or eliminate failures in human-interactive systems, it is essential that the designers understand how each user`s processing characteristics affects how the user gathers information, and how the user communicates the information to the designer and other users. A different type of approach in achieving this understanding is Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP). The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays, NLP, and the user`s perspective model of a reactor system. The studies involve the methodology known as NLP, and its use in expanding design choices from the user`s ``model of the world,`` in the areas of virtual reality, workstation design, team structure, decision and learning style patterns, safety operations, pattern recognition, and much, much more.

  2. Transferring the Malaria Epidemic Prediction Model to Users in East ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Transferring the Malaria Epidemic Prediction Model to Users in East Africa. In the highlands of East Africa, epidemic malaria is an emerging climate-related hazard that urgently needs addressing. Malaria incidence increased by 337% during the 1987 epidemic in Rwanda. In Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya, malaria incidence ...

  3. Relapse Model among Iranian Drug Users: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Amir; Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Peyrovi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is a common problem in drug user's rehabilitation program and reported in all over the country. An in-depth study on patients' experiences can be used for exploring the relapse process among drug users. Therefore, this study suggests a model for relapse process among Iranian drug users. In this qualitative study with grounded theory approach, 22 participants with rich information about the phenomenon under the study were selected using purposive, snowball and theoretical sampling methods. After obtaining the informed consent, data were collected based on face-to-face, in-depth, semi-structured interviews. All interviews were analyzed in three stages of axial, selective and open coding methods. Nine main categories emerged, including avoiding of drugs, concerns about being accepted, family atmosphere, social conditions, mental challenge, self-management, self-deception, use and remorse and a main category, feeling of loss as the core variable. Mental challenge has two subcategories, evoking pleasure and craving. Relapse model is a dynamic and systematic process including from cycles of drug avoidance to remorse with a core variable as feeling of loss.  Relapse process is a dynamic and systematic process that needs an effective control. Determining a relapse model as a clear process could be helpful in clinical sessions. RESULTS of this research have depicted relapse process among Iranian drugs user by conceptual model.

  4. Using Partial Credit and Response History to Model User Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Inwegen, Eric G.; Adjei, Seth A.; Wang, Yan; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2015-01-01

    User modelling algorithms such as Performance Factors Analysis and Knowledge Tracing seek to determine a student's knowledge state by analyzing (among other features) right and wrong answers. Anyone who has ever graded an assignment by hand knows that some answers are "more wrong" than others; i.e. they display less of an understanding…

  5. User Modeling and Personalization in the Microblogging Sphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Microblogging has become a popular mechanism for people to publish, share, and propagate information on the Web. The massive amount of digital traces that people have left in the microblogging sphere, creates new possibilities and poses challenges for user modeling and personalization. How can

  6. Transferring the Malaria Epidemic Prediction Model to Users in East ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will fine-tune the model, incorporate site-specific factors and transfer it to end users in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, and eventually other countries in East Africa. It will enhance the capacity of policymakers and health officials to provide early warning and intervene in an effective manner, and the capacity of ...

  7. MOVES Model Review Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The FACA MOVES Review Work Group was formed under the Mobile Sources Technical Review Subcommittee (MSTRS), and is charged to provide input to EPA via the MSTRS and the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee on specific issues regarding MOVES development.

  8. Decentralization can help reduce deforestation when user groups engage with local government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Glenn D.; Gibson, Clark C.; Evans, Tom P.

    2016-01-01

    Policy makers around the world tout decentralization as an effective tool in the governance of natural resources. Despite the popularity of these reforms, there is limited scientific evidence on the environmental effects of decentralization, especially in tropical biomes. This study presents evidence on the institutional conditions under which decentralization is likely to be successful in sustaining forests. We draw on common-pool resource theory to argue that the environmental impact of decentralization hinges on the ability of reforms to engage local forest users in the governance of forests. Using matching techniques, we analyze longitudinal field observations on both social and biophysical characteristics in a large number of local government territories in Bolivia (a country with a decentralized forestry policy) and Peru (a country with a much more centralized forestry policy). We find that territories with a decentralized forest governance structure have more stable forest cover, but only when local forest user groups actively engage with the local government officials. We provide evidence in support of a possible causal process behind these results: When user groups engage with the decentralized units, it creates a more enabling environment for effective local governance of forests, including more local government-led forest governance activities, fora for the resolution of forest-related conflicts, intermunicipal cooperation in the forestry sector, and stronger technical capabilities of the local government staff. PMID:27956644

  9. Decentralization can help reduce deforestation when user groups engage with local government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Glenn D; Andersson, Krister P; Gibson, Clark C; Evans, Tom P

    2016-12-27

    Policy makers around the world tout decentralization as an effective tool in the governance of natural resources. Despite the popularity of these reforms, there is limited scientific evidence on the environmental effects of decentralization, especially in tropical biomes. This study presents evidence on the institutional conditions under which decentralization is likely to be successful in sustaining forests. We draw on common-pool resource theory to argue that the environmental impact of decentralization hinges on the ability of reforms to engage local forest users in the governance of forests. Using matching techniques, we analyze longitudinal field observations on both social and biophysical characteristics in a large number of local government territories in Bolivia (a country with a decentralized forestry policy) and Peru (a country with a much more centralized forestry policy). We find that territories with a decentralized forest governance structure have more stable forest cover, but only when local forest user groups actively engage with the local government officials. We provide evidence in support of a possible causal process behind these results: When user groups engage with the decentralized units, it creates a more enabling environment for effective local governance of forests, including more local government-led forest governance activities, fora for the resolution of forest-related conflicts, intermunicipal cooperation in the forestry sector, and stronger technical capabilities of the local government staff.

  10. Firewall Mechanism in a User Centric Smart Card Ownership Model

    OpenAIRE

    Akram , Raja Naeem; Markantonakis , Konstantinos; Mayes , Keith

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Multi-application smart card technology facilitates applications to securely share their data and functionality. The security enforcement and assurance in application sharing is provided by the smart card firewall. The firewall mechanism is well defined and studied in the Issuer Centric Smart Card Ownership Model (ICOM), in which a smart card is under total control of its issuer. However, it is not analysed in the User Centric Smart Card Ownership Model (UCOM) that del...

  11. An interoperable and inclusive user modeling concept for simulation and adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Pradipta; Kaklanis, Nick; Mohamad, Yehya; Peissner, Matthias; Langdon, Pat; Tzovaras, D.; Jung, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    User models can be considered as explicit representations of the properties of an individual user including users needs, preferences as well as physical, cognitive and behavioral characteristics. Due to the wide range of applications, it is often difficult to have a common format or even definition of user models. The lack of a common definition also makes different user models even if developed for the same purpose -incompatible to each other. It does not only reduce the portability of user ...

  12. ABAREX -- A neutron spherical optical-statistical-model code -- A user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B. [ed.; Lawson, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    The contemporary version of the neutron spherical optical-statistical-model code ABAREX is summarized with the objective of providing detailed operational guidance for the user. The physical concepts involved are very briefly outlined. The code is described in some detail and a number of explicit examples are given. With this document one should very quickly become fluent with the use of ABAREX. While the code has operated on a number of computing systems, this version is specifically tailored for the VAX/VMS work station and/or the IBM-compatible personal computer.

  13. Rehabilitative online education versus internet discussion group for hearing aid users: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorén, Elisabet; Svensson, Monica; Törnqvist, Anna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Lunner, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    By using the Internet in the audiological rehabilitation process, it might be possible in a cost-effective way to include additional rehabilitation components by informing and guiding hearing aid users about such topics as communication strategies, hearing tactics, and how to handle hearing aids. To evaluate the effectiveness of an online education program for adult experienced hearing aid users including professional guidance by an audiologist and compare it with the effects of participation in an online discussion forum without any professional contact. A randomized controlled study with two groups of participants. Repeated measures at prestudy, immediate follow-up, and a 6 mo follow-up. Fifty-nine experienced hearing aid users participated in the study, ranging in age from 24 to 84 yr (mean 63.5 yr). The intervention group (N = 29) underwent a five-week rehabilitative online education in which activities for each week included information, tasks, and assignments, and contact with a professional audiologist was included. The participants in the control group (N = 30) were referred to an online discussion forum without any audiologist contact. A set of questionnaires administered online were used as outcome measures: (1) Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, (2) International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, (3) Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life, and (4) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Significant improvements measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly were found in both groups of participants, and the effects were maintained at the 6 mo follow-up. The results on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed that the participants in the intervention group showed reduced symptoms of depression immediately/6 mo after the intervention. At the 6 mo follow-up participants in the control group reported fewer symptoms of anxiety than they did before the intervention started. This study provides preliminary evidence that the

  14. Stimulation model for lenticular sands: Volume 2, Users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybicki, E.F.; Luiskutty, C.T.; Sutrick, J.S.; Palmer, I.D.; Shah, G.H.; Tomutsa, L.

    1987-07-01

    This User's Manual contains information for four fracture/proppant models. TUPROP1 contains a Geertsma and de Klerk type fracture model. The section of the program utilizing the proppant fracture geometry data from the pseudo three-dimensional highly elongated fracture model is called TUPROPC. The analogous proppant section of the program that was modified to accept fracture shape data from SA3DFRAC is called TUPROPS. TUPROPS also includes fracture closure. Finally there is the penny fracture and its proppant model, PENNPROP. In the first three chapters, the proppant sections are based on the same theory for determining the proppant distribution but have modifications to support variable height fractures and modifications to accept fracture geometry from three different fracture models. Thus, information about each proppant model in the User's Manual builds on information supplied in the previous chapter. The exception to the development of combined treatment models is the penny fracture and its proppant model. In this case, a completely new proppant model was developed. A description of how to use the combined treatment model for the penny fracture is contained in Chapter 4. 2 refs.

  15. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crum Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57 were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R, and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions.

  16. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Antonio; Löckenhoff, Corinna E; Crum, Rosa M; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Costa, Paul T

    2008-04-11

    Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality in a diverse community sample. Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57) were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions.

  17. Characterizing mobility from the prosthetic limb user's perspective: Use of focus groups to guide development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Abrahamson, Daniel C; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Input from target respondents in the development of patient-reported outcome measures is necessary to ensure that the instrument is meaningful. To solicit perspectives of prosthetic limb users about their mobility experiences and to inform development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility. Qualitative study. Four focus groups of lower limb prosthesis users were held in different regions of the United States. Focus group transcripts were coded, and themes were identified. Feedback from participants was used to develop a framework for measuring mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Focus group participants (N = 37) described mobility as a confluence of factors that included characteristics of the individual, activity, and environment. Identified themes were defined as individual characteristics, forms of movement, and environmental situations. Prosthetic mobility was conceptualized as movement activities performed in an environmental or situational context. Respondent feedback used to guide development of Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility established a foundation for a new person-centered measure of mobility with a prosthetic limb. Perspectives of target respondents are needed to guide development of instruments intended to measure health outcomes. Focus groups of prosthetic limb users were conducted to solicit experiences related to mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Results were used to inform development of a clinically meaningful, person-centered instrument. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  18. Contact lens compliance among a group of young, university-based lens users in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noushad, Babu; Saoji, Yeshwant; Bhakat, Premjit; Thomas, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the rate of compliance with the soft contact lens care and maintenance procedures with a focus on contact lens wearing habits, cleaning and disinfecting procedures, and maintenance of lens care accessories in a group of young, university-based contact lens wearers Two hundred and sixteen young soft contact lens wearers with an age range of 18-22 years were selected conveniently from the student population of Manipal University, Manipal, India. After receiving informed consent from the participants, their level of compliance with contact lenses was assessed using a questionnaire. The mean (±SD) age of the participants was 21.86±2.35 years. Out of 216 subjects, only 34% of the lens users were identified to be compliant with the least level of compliance observed in the maintenance of lens care accessories. Conventional users showed significantly (p=0.001) better level of compliance compared to disposable wearers and so did the users who acquired their lenses from clinicians (p=0.001) compared to over-the-counter lens receipt. The gender (p=0.496) and years of experience in contact lens use (p=0.142) did not show any statistically significant difference in the level of compliance. This study demonstrated that non-compliance with lens care procedures among a group of young, university-based soft contact lens wearers is common. The results indicated that all subjects had some degree of non-compliance and the least level of compliance observed in the care of lens accessories.

  19. Simplified analytical model of penetration with lateral loading -- User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.W.

    1998-05-01

    The SAMPLL (Simplified Analytical Model of Penetration with Lateral Loading) computer code was originally developed in 1984 to realistically yet economically predict penetrator/target interactions. Since the code`s inception, its use has spread throughout the conventional and nuclear penetrating weapons community. During the penetrator/target interaction, the resistance of the material being penetrated imparts both lateral and axial loads on the penetrator. These loads cause changes to the penetrator`s motion (kinematics). SAMPLL uses empirically based algorithms, formulated from an extensive experimental data base, to replicate the loads the penetrator experiences during penetration. The lateral loads resulting from angle of attack and trajectory angle of the penetrator are explicitly treated in SAMPLL. The loads are summed and the kinematics calculated at each time step. SAMPLL has been continually improved, and the current version, Version 6.0, can handle cratering and spall effects, multiple target layers, penetrator damage/failure, and complex penetrator shapes. Version 6 uses the latest empirical penetration equations, and also automatically adjusts the penetrability index for certain target layers to account for layer thickness and confinement. This report describes the SAMPLL code, including assumptions and limitations, and includes a user`s guide.

  20. Using Focus Group Interviews to Analyze the Behavior of Users of New Types of Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyoung; Lee, Sungkyu

    2017-09-01

    To characterize the usage patterns of new types of tobacco products (NTTPs) to develop effective strategies for the regulation of NTTPs in Korea. We conducted focus group interviews to identify the NTTP usage patterns of research subjects. The NTTPs were limited to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), waterpipe tobacco, and rolling tobacco. We categorized 30 research subjects into 4 groups. The e-cigarette group was divided into adult and adolescent groups. Each group contained 7-8 subjects. An interview lasting approximately 2 hours was conducted with each group. Ninety percent of NTTP users used an NTTP in combination with conventional cigarettes. Subjects mostly bought NTTPs online, unlike how they bought cigarettes. Additionally, a great deal of information, such as how to use NTTPs and descriptions of NTTP products, was exchanged through online or offline societies. The primary reason why the subjects used NTTPs was that NTTPs offer a greater range of flavors and aromas than cigarettes. Moreover, NTTPs were felt to be less repulsive than cigarettes. NTTPs were not used as a cigarette substitute; rather, they were mostly used in places and situations where traditional cigarette smoking was not allowed. Based on the results of this study, the government should conduct studies on the effects of the combined use of NTTPs and cigarettes on the human body, obtain and provide accurate data regarding NTTP use, and develop and implement polices to ban NTTP advertising, which may arouse adolescents' curiosity, and the addition of flavoring substances to tobacco products.

  1. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  2. INFORMATION FOR USERS OF NUTS, BOLTS, SCREWS, NAILS AND RIVETS (SCEM GROUP 47)

    CERN Multimedia

    Logistics Group

    2002-01-01

    We should like to remind users that, since the closure of the self-service stores, nuts, bolts, screws, nails and rivets (Group 47 of the Stores Catalogue) can be obtained, in smaller packages than via EDH, from the 'Emergency Counter' in the Central Stores (Building 73, R-002) upon presentation of a duly completed hard-copy Materials Request form. The 'Emergency Counter' is open Mondays to Fridays from 7.30 a.m. to 11.50 a.m. and from 1.00 p.m. to 4.20 p.m. Information concerning the available packages can be found under the appropriate SCEM reference number in the Stores Catalogue. Logistics Group SPL Division

  3. Working group report: Beyond the standard model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The working group on Beyond the Standard Model concentrated on identifying interesting physics issues in models ... In view of the range of current interest in the high energy physics community, this work- ing group was organised ... the computational tools currently relevant for particle phenomenology. Thus in this group,.

  4. Design of personalized search engine based on user-webpage dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihan; Li, Shanglin; Zhu, Yingke; Xiao, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Personalized search engine focuses on establishing a user-webpage dynamic model. In this model, users' personalized factors are introduced so that the search engine is better able to provide the user with targeted feedback. This paper constructs user and webpage dynamic vector tables, introduces singular value decomposition analysis in the processes of topic categorization, and extends the traditional PageRank algorithm.

  5. A Probability-Based Hybrid User Model for Recommendation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of information communication technology, the available information or knowledge is exponentially increased, and this causes the well-known information overload phenomenon. This problem is more serious in product design corporations because over half of the valuable design time is consumed in knowledge acquisition, which highly extends the design cycle and weakens the competitiveness. Therefore, the recommender systems become very important in the domain of product domain. This research presents a probability-based hybrid user model, which is a combination of collaborative filtering and content-based filtering. This hybrid model utilizes user ratings and item topics or classes, which are available in the domain of product design, to predict the knowledge requirement. The comprehensive analysis of the experimental results shows that the proposed method gains better performance in most of the parameter settings. This work contributes a probability-based method to the community for implement recommender system when only user ratings and item topics are available.

  6. Designing with users to meet people needs: a teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Laura; Canina, Marita; Coccioni, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Being in a context of great transformations of the whole system company-product-market, design becomes interpreter of the society and strategic key-point for production realities. Design must assume an ergonomic approach and a methodology oriented to product innovation where people are the main focus of the system. Today it is visible the need for a methodological approach able to include the context of use employing user's "creative skills". In this scenario, a design educational model based only on knowledge doesn't seem to be fulfilling; the traditional "deductive" method doesn't meet the needs of new productive assets, here the urgency to experiment within the "inductive" method for the development of a method where to know and to know how, theory and practice, act synergistically. The aim is to teach a method able to help a young designer to understand people's needs and desires considering both the concrete/cognitive level and the emotional level. The paper presents, through some case studies, an educational model developed combining theoretical/conceptual and practical/applicatory aspects with user experiential aspects. The proposed approach to design enables the students to investigate users' needs and desires and helps them proposing innovative ideas and projects better fitting today's market realities.

  7. User Adoption Tendency Modeling for Social Contextual Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhisheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of studies on the existing recommender system for Netflix-style sites (scenarios with explicit user feedback focus on rating prediction, but few have systematically analyzed users’ motivations to make decisions on which items to rate. In this paper, the authors study the difficult and challenging task Item Adoption Prediction (IAP for predicting the items users will rate or interact with. It is not only an important supplement to previous works, but also a more realistic requirement of recommendation in this scenario. To recommend the items with high Adoption Tendency, the authors develop a unified model UATM based on the findings of Marketing and Consumer Behavior. The novelty of the model in this paper includes: First, the authors propose a more creative and effective optimization method to tackle One-Class Problem where only the positive feedback is available; second, the authors systematically and conveniently integrate the user adoption information (both explicit and implicit feedbacks included and the social contextual information with quantitatively characterizing different users’ personal sensitivity to various social contextual influences.

  8. Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2). User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA has been supporting its Member States in the area of energy planning for sustainable development. Development and dissemination of appropriate methodologies and their computer codes are important parts of this support. This manual has been produced to facilitate the use of the MAED model: Model for Analysis of Energy Demand. The methodology of the MAED model was originally developed by. B. Chateau and B. Lapillonne of the Institute Economique et Juridique de l'Energie (IEJE) of the University of Grenoble, France, and was presented as the MEDEE model. Since then the MEDEE model has been developed and adopted to be appropriate for modelling of various energy demand system. The IAEA adopted MEDEE-2 model and incorporated important modifications to make it more suitable for application in the developing countries, and it was named as the MAED model. The first version of the MAED model was designed for the DOS based system, which was later on converted for the Windows system. This manual presents the latest version of the MAED model. The most prominent feature of this version is its flexibility for representing structure of energy consumption. The model now allows country-specific representations of energy consumption patterns using the MAED methodology. The user can now disaggregate energy consumption according to the needs and/or data availability in her/his country. As such, MAED has now become a powerful tool for modelling widely diverse energy consumption patterns. This manual presents the model in details and provides guidelines for its application

  9. Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2). User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA has been supporting its Member States in the area of energy planning for sustainable development. Development and dissemination of appropriate methodologies and their computer codes are important parts of this support. This manual has been produced to facilitate the use of the MAED model: Model for Analysis of Energy Demand. The methodology of the MAED model was originally developed by. B. Chateau and B. Lapillonne of the Institute Economique et Juridique de l'Energie (IEJE) of the University of Grenoble, France, and was presented as the MEDEE model. Since then the MEDEE model has been developed and adopted to be appropriate for modelling of various energy demand system. The IAEA adopted MEDEE-2 model and incorporated important modifications to make it more suitable for application in the developing countries, and it was named as the MAED model. The first version of the MAED model was designed for the DOS based system, which was later on converted for the Windows system. This manual presents the latest version of the MAED model. The most prominent feature of this version is its flexibility for representing structure of energy consumption. The model now allows country-specific representations of energy consumption patterns using the MAED methodology. The user can now disaggregate energy consumption according to the needs and/or data availability in her/his country. As such, MAED has now become a powerful tool for modelling widely diverse energy consumption patterns. This manual presents the model in details and provides guidelines for its application

  10. Modeling users' activity on Twitter networks: validation of Dunbar's number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Bruno; Perra, Nicola; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Microblogging and mobile devices appear to augment human social capabilities, which raises the question whether they remove cognitive or biological constraints on human communication. In this paper we analyze a dataset of Twitter conversations collected across six months involving 1.7 million individuals and test the theoretical cognitive limit on the number of stable social relationships known as Dunbar's number. We find that the data are in agreement with Dunbar's result; users can entertain a maximum of 100-200 stable relationships. Thus, the ``economy of attention'' is limited in the online world by cognitive and biological constraints as predicted by Dunbar's theory. We propose a simple model for users' behavior that includes finite priority queuing and time resources that reproduces the observed social behavior.

  11. Modeling users' activity on twitter networks: validation of Dunbar's number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Microblogging and mobile devices appear to augment human social capabilities, which raises the question whether they remove cognitive or biological constraints on human communication. In this paper we analyze a dataset of Twitter conversations collected across six months involving 1.7 million individuals and test the theoretical cognitive limit on the number of stable social relationships known as Dunbar's number. We find that the data are in agreement with Dunbar's result; users can entertain a maximum of 100-200 stable relationships. Thus, the 'economy of attention' is limited in the online world by cognitive and biological constraints as predicted by Dunbar's theory. We propose a simple model for users' behavior that includes finite priority queuing and time resources that reproduces the observed social behavior.

  12. Cognitive Modeling of Video Game Player User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohil, Corey J.; Biocca, Frank A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues for the use of cognitive modeling to gain a detailed and dynamic look into user experience during game play. Applying cognitive models to game play data can help researchers understand a player's attentional focus, memory status, learning state, and decision strategies (among other things) as these cognitive processes occurred throughout game play. This is a stark contrast to the common approach of trying to assess the long-term impact of games on cognitive functioning after game play has ended. We describe what cognitive models are, what they can be used for and how game researchers could benefit by adopting these methods. We also provide details of a single model - based on decision field theory - that has been successfUlly applied to data sets from memory, perception, and decision making experiments, and has recently found application in real world scenarios. We examine possibilities for applying this model to game-play data.

  13. User-experience surveys with maternity services: a randomized comparison of two data collection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjertnaes, Oyvind Andresen; Iversen, Hilde Hestad

    2012-08-01

    To compare two ways of combining postal and electronic data collection for a maternity services user-experience survey. Cross-sectional survey. Maternity services in Norway. All women who gave birth at a university hospital in Norway between 1 June and 27 July 2010. Patients were randomized into the following groups (n= 752): Group A, who were posted questionnaires with both electronic and paper response options for both the initial and reminder postal requests; and Group B, who were posted questionnaires with an electronic response option for the initial request, and both electronic and paper response options for the reminder postal request. Response rate, the amount of difference in background variables between respondents and non-respondents, main study results and estimated cost-effectiveness. The final response rate was significantly higher in Group A (51.9%) than Group B (41.1%). None of the background variables differed significantly between the respondents and non-respondents in Group A, while two variables differed significantly between the respondents and non-respondents in Group B. None of the 11 user-experience scales differed significantly between Groups A and B. The estimated costs per response for the forthcoming national survey was €11.7 for data collection Model A and €9.0 for Model B. The model with electronic-only response option in the first request had lowest response rate. However, this model performed equal to the other model on non-response bias and better on estimated cost-effectiveness, and is the better of the two models in large-scale user experiences surveys with maternity services.

  14. Based on user interest level of modeling scenarios and browse content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang

    2017-08-01

    User interest modeling is the core of personalized service, taking into account the impact of situational information on user preferences, the user behavior days of financial information. This paper proposes a method of user interest modeling based on scenario information, which is obtained by calculating the similarity of the situation. The user's current scene of the approximate scenario set; on the "user - interest items - scenarios" three-dimensional model using the situation pre-filtering method of dimension reduction processing. View the content of the user interested in the theme, the analysis of the page content to get each topic of interest keywords, based on the level of vector space model user interest. The experimental results show that the user interest model based on the scenario information is within 9% of the user's interest prediction, which is effective.

  15. MODELLING GROUP ACTION OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Korevanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of modeling and planning group flights of unmanned aerial vehicles are considered. For each stage of the planning procedure of group activates neural network structure is designed.

  16. Felt Stigma in Injection Drug Users and Sex Workers: Focus Group Research with HIV-Risk Populations in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Julio; Puig, Marieva; Sala, Ana Cecilia; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Castro, Eida; Morales, Marangelie; Santiago, Lydia; Zorrilla, Carmen

    Though many studies have conclusively linked felt stigma and HIV, few have focused on the experiences of rejection felt by members of such socially marginalized groups as intravenous drug users (IDU) and sex workers (SW). Using focus groups, our study explored these experiences in 34 individuals (17 male UDUs and 17 female SWs) at risk of becoming infected with HIV, the objective being to discover why they engaged in maladaptive behaviors as a way of coping with felt stigma. We used deductive and inductive analysis to codify the resulting data. Concepts associated with the word stigma, emotional reactions to felt stigma, and the impact of felt stigma on self-schema helped elucidate how the internalization of felt stigma can lead to negative affective states and self-destructive behaviors (e.g., drug use and syringe exchange). Results underline the importance of developing intervention models that reduce stigma as a means of HIV prevention in vulnerable populations.

  17. Model of trust in work groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sidorenkov, Andrey; Sidorenkova, Irina

    2013-01-01

    A multi-dimensional model of trust in a small group has been developed and approved. This model includes two dimensions: trust levels (interpersonal trust, micro-group trust, group trust, trust between subgroups, trust between subgroups and group) and types of trust (activity-coping, information-influential and confidentially-protective trust). Each level of trust is manifested in three types, so there are fifteen varieties of trust. Two corresponding questionnaires were developed for the stu...

  18. Identifying Differences Between Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) and Non-OHV User Groups for Recreation Resource Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Namyun; Holland, Stephen M.; Stein, Taylor V.

    2012-09-01

    Off-highway vehicle (OHV) riding is among the fastest growing recreational activities in the United States. However, little research exists about the central components of outcomes-focused management (OFM) as it relates to motorized recreation. Utilizing a two-activity dichotomy, OHV and non-OHV centric user groups were compared on several key concepts associated with OFM, including desired experiences, perceived and desired recreation opportunity spectrum-type settings, and intentional behaviors (i.e., place-protective behavior, spending-time intentions) toward potential changes in settings. Results indicated that the two groups were different in terms of intensity and relative rankings of their perceived experiences and settings. Although both groups preferred social bonding, stress relief, nostalgia and learning experiences, the OHV user group ranked using equipment and achieving physical fitness experiences as more important than the non-OHV group. The non-OHV user group preferred enjoying nature and solitude/tranquility experiences more strongly than the OHV user group. Further analysis found that both groups perceived settings that they recreated in to be pristine and preferred such conditions, and both groups preferred moderate levels of rules and regulations. Finally, the OHV user group was more reactive to rules and regulations, while the non-OHV user group expressed stronger intentions to protect the environmental quality of recreation areas. The results suggest that planners and managers who understand OHV user's perceptions and behaviors could provide enhanced recreation opportunities potentially providing additional beneficial outcomes for motorized and non-motorized groups in spatially different zones. Additional implications for planners and managers and future studies are discussed.

  19. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  20. The Cognitive Complexity in Modelling the Group Decision Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barna Iantovics

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates for some basic contextual factors (such
    us the problem complexity, the users' creativity and the problem space complexity the cognitive complexity associated with modelling the group decision processes (GDP in e-meetings. The analysis is done by conducting a socio-simulation experiment for an envisioned collaborative software tool that acts as a stigmergic environment for modelling the GDP. The simulation results revels some interesting design guidelines for engineering some contextual functionalities that minimize the cognitive complexity associated with modelling the GDP.

  1. Modeling web-based information seeking by users who are blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsman-Johnson, Carissa; Narayanan, Sundaram; Shebilske, Wayne; Alakke, Ganesh; Narakesari, Shruti

    2011-01-01

    This article describes website information seeking strategies used by users who are blind and compares those with sighted users. It outlines how assistive technologies and website design can aid users who are blind while information seeking. People who are blind and sighted are tested using an assessment tool and performing several tasks on websites. The times and keystrokes are recorded for all tasks as well as commands used and spatial questioning. Participants who are blind used keyword-based search strategies as their primary tool to seek information. Sighted users also used keyword search techniques if they were unable to find the information using a visual scan of the home page of a website. A proposed model based on the present study for information seeking is described. Keywords are important in the strategies used by both groups of participants and providing these common and consistent keywords in locations that are accessible to the users may be useful for efficient information searching. The observations suggest that there may be a difference in how users search a website that is familiar compared to one that is unfamiliar. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  2. ACE2 Global Digital Elevation Model : User Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. G.; Berry, P. A. M.; Benveniste, J.

    2013-12-01

    Altimeter Corrected Elevations 2 (ACE2), first released in October 2009, is the Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) created by fusing the high accuracy of over 100 million altimeter retracked height estimates, derived primarily from the ERS-1 Geodetic Mission, with the high frequency content available within the near-global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. This novel ACE2 GDEM is freely available at 3”, 9”, 30” and 5' and has been distributed via the web to over 680 subscribers. This paper presents the results of a detailed analysis of geographical distribution of subscribed users, along with fields of study and potential uses. Investigations have also been performed to determine the most popular spatial resolutions and the impact these have on the scope of data downloaded. The analysis has shown that, even though the majority of users have come from Europe and America, a significant number of website hits have been received from South America, Africa and Asia. Registered users also vary widely, from research institutions and major companies down to individual hobbyists looking at data for single projects.

  3. Using Focus Group Interviews to Analyze the Behavior of Users of New Types of Tobacco Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyoung Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To characterize the usage patterns of new types of tobacco products (NTTPs to develop effective strategies for the regulation of NTTPs in Korea. Methods We conducted focus group interviews to identify the NTTP usage patterns of research subjects. The NTTPs were limited to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes, waterpipe tobacco, and rolling tobacco. We categorized 30 research subjects into 4 groups. The e-cigarette group was divided into adult and adolescent groups. Each group contained 7-8 subjects. An interview lasting approximately 2 hours was conducted with each group. Results Ninety percent of NTTP users used an NTTP in combination with conventional cigarettes. Subjects mostly bought NTTPs online, unlike how they bought cigarettes. Additionally, a great deal of information, such as how to use NTTPs and descriptions of NTTP products, was exchanged through online or offline societies. The primary reason why the subjects used NTTPs was that NTTPs offer a greater range of flavors and aromas than cigarettes. Moreover, NTTPs were felt to be less repulsive than cigarettes. NTTPs were not used as a cigarette substitute; rather, they were mostly used in places and situations where traditional cigarette smoking was not allowed. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, the government should conduct studies on the effects of the combined use of NTTPs and cigarettes on the human body, obtain and provide accurate data regarding NTTP use, and develop and implement polices to ban NTTP advertising, which may arouse adolescents’ curiosity, and the addition of flavoring substances to tobacco products.

  4. Utility/manufacturers robot user group: a status overview during its first seven years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meieran, H.B.; Roman, H.T.

    1993-01-01

    In the 14 years since the Three Mile Island Accident, many utility organizations have become active in the evaluation testing demonstration of robotic devices. Although these devices have been used primarily in nuclear power plants, they have also found application in fossil-fuelled and hydro-electric power plants and in tasks involving the transmission and distribution of electrical energy, water, and gas. This increasing interest in robotics has promoted the formation of the Utility/Manufacturers Robots Users Group (U/M RUG) in 1986, an organization that fosters the application of cost-effective application of robotic devices within the various utility organizations. Although U/M RUG has been operating for the past seven years, information presented in this paper will concentrate upon the history, efforts, and activities of this organization generated during the last 4 years since U/M RUG was first introduced in 1988. (author)

  5. Modeling metro users' travel behavior in Tehran: Frequency of Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Mamdoohi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transit-oriented development (TOD, as a sustainable supporting strategy, emphasizes the improvement of public transportation coverage and quality, land use density and diversity of around public transportation stations and priority of walking and cycling at station areas. Traffic, environmental and economic problems arising from high growth of personal car, inappropriate distribution of land use, and car-orientation of metropolitan area, necessitate adoption of TOD. In recent years, more researches on urban development and transportation have focused on this strategy. This research considering metro stations as base for development, aims to model metro users' travel behavior and decision-making procedures. In this regard, research question is: what are the parameters or factors affecting in the frequency of travel by metro in half-mile radius from stations. The radius was determine based on TOD definitions and 5 minute walking time to metro stations.  A questionnaire was designed in three sections that including travel features by metro, attitudes toward metro, economic and social characteristics of respondents. Ten stations were selected based on their geographic dispersion in Tehran and a sample of 450 respondents was determined. The questionnaires were surveyed face to face in (half-mile vicinity of metro stations. Based on a refined sample on 400 questionnaires ordered discrete choice models were considered. Results of descriptive statistics show that 38.5 percent of the sample used metro more than 4 times per week. Trip purpose for 45.7 percent of metro users is work. Access mode to the metro stations for nearly half of the users (47.6 percent is bus. Results of ordered logit models show a number of significant variables including: habit of using the metro, waiting time in station, trip purpose (working, shopping and recreation, personal car access mode to the metro station, walking access mode to the metro station and being a housewife.

  6. Modeling user navigation behavior in web by colored Petri nets to determine the user's interest in recommending web pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sadeghzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of existing challenges in personalization of the web is increasing the efficiency of a web in meeting the users' requirements for the contents they require in an optimal state. All the information associated with the current user behavior following in web and data obtained from pervious users’ interaction in web can provide some necessary keys to recommend presentation of services, productions, and the required information of the users. This study aims at presenting a formal model based on colored Petri nets to identify the present user's interest, which is utilized to recommend the most appropriate pages ahead. In the proposed design, recommendation of the pages is considered with respect to information obtained from pervious users' profile as well as the current session of the present user. This model offers the updated proposed pages to the user by clicking on the web pages. Moreover, an example of web is modeled using CPN Tools. The results of the simulation show that this design improves the precision factor. We explain, through evaluation where the results of this method are more objective and the dynamic recommendations demonstrate that the results of the recommended method improve the precision criterion 15% more than the static method.

  7. Comparing linear probability model coefficients across groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Ejrnæs, Mette; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a formal identification analysis of the problem in comparing coefficients from linear probability models between groups. We show that differences in coefficients from these models can result not only from genuine differences in effects, but also from differences in one or more...... of the following three components: outcome truncation, scale parameters and distributional shape of the predictor variable. These results point to limitations in using linear probability model coefficients for group comparisons. We also provide Monte Carlo simulations and real examples to illustrate...... these limitations, and we suggest a restricted approach to using linear probability model coefficients in group comparisons....

  8. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  9. Combining interviewing and modeling for end-user energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldblatt, David L.; Hartmann, Christoph; Duerrenberger, Gregor

    2005-01-01

    Studying energy consumption through the lens of households is an increasingly popular research avenue. This paper focuses on residential end-user energy conservation. It describes an approach that combines energy modeling and in-depth interviews for communicating about energy use and revealing consumer preferences for change at different levels and intervention points. Expert knowledge was embodied in a computer model for householders that calculates an individual's current energy consumption and helps assess personal savings potentials, while also bringing in socio-technical and economic elements beyond the user's direct control. The paper gives a detailed account of this computer information tool developed for interviewing purposes. It then describes the interview guidelines, data analysis, and main results. In general, interview subjects overestimated the environmental friendliness of their lifestyles. After experience with the program, they tended to rate external (technological, societal) factors as somewhat stronger determinants of their consumption levels than personal (behavioral and household investment) factors, with the notable exception of mobility. Concerning long-term energy perspectives, the majority of subjects felt that society has the ability to make a collective choice towards significantly lower energy consumption levels. Interviewees confirmed that the software and interactive sessions helped them think more holistically about the personal, social, and technological dimensions of energy conservation. Lessons can be applied to the development of future energy communication tools

  10. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Benjamin A. Baker; Joseph Grimm

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating “what if” scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., “reactor types” not individual reactors and “separation types” not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several

  11. VISION User Guide - VISION (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, Jacob J.; Jeffers, Robert F.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Piet, Steven J.; Baker, Benjamin A.; Grimm, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R and D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level for U.S. nuclear power. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation of disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. Note that recovered uranium is itself often partitioned: some RU flows with recycled transuranic elements, some flows with wastes, and the rest is designated RU. RU comes out of storage if needed to correct the U/TRU ratio in new recycled fuel. Neither RU nor DU are designated as wastes. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft

  12. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dian-Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-Cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-12-20

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined.

  13. Hanford Soil Inventory Model (SIM) Rev. 1 Users Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Brett C.; Corbin, Rob A.; Anderson, Michael J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

    2006-01-01

    The focus of the development and application of a soil inventory model as part of the Remediation and Closure Science (RCS) Project managed by PNNL was to develop a probabilistic approach to estimate comprehensive, mass balanced-based contaminant inventories for the Hanford Site post-closure setting. The outcome of this effort was the Hanford Soil Inventory Model (SIM). This document is a user's guide for the Hanford SIM. The principal project requirement for the SIM was to provide comprehensive quantitative estimates of contaminant inventory and its uncertainty for the various liquid waste sites, unplanned releases, and past tank farm leaks as a function of time and location at Hanford. The majority, but not all of these waste sites are in the 200 Areas of Hanford where chemical processing of spent fuel occurred. A computer model capable of performing these calculations and providing satisfactory quantitative output representing a robust description of contaminant inventory and uncertainty for use in other subsequent models was determined to be satisfactory to address the needs of the RCS Project. The ability to use familiar, commercially available software on high-performance personal computers for data input, modeling, and analysis, rather than custom software on a workstation or mainframe computer for modeling, was desired

  14. User-Defined Material Model for Progressive Failure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F. Jr.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    An overview of different types of composite material system architectures and a brief review of progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model (or UMAT) for use with the ABAQUS/Standard1 nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details and use of the UMAT subroutine are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented.

  15. Hanford Soil Inventory Model (SIM) Rev. 1 Users Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Brett C.; Corbin, Rob A.; Anderson, Michael J.; Kincaid, Charles T.

    2006-09-25

    The focus of the development and application of a soil inventory model as part of the Remediation and Closure Science (RCS) Project managed by PNNL was to develop a probabilistic approach to estimate comprehensive, mass balanced-based contaminant inventories for the Hanford Site post-closure setting. The outcome of this effort was the Hanford Soil Inventory Model (SIM). This document is a user's guide for the Hanford SIM. The principal project requirement for the SIM was to provide comprehensive quantitative estimates of contaminant inventory and its uncertainty for the various liquid waste sites, unplanned releases, and past tank farm leaks as a function of time and location at Hanford. The majority, but not all of these waste sites are in the 200 Areas of Hanford where chemical processing of spent fuel occurred. A computer model capable of performing these calculations and providing satisfactory quantitative output representing a robust description of contaminant inventory and uncertainty for use in other subsequent models was determined to be satisfactory to address the needs of the RCS Project. The ability to use familiar, commercially available software on high-performance personal computers for data input, modeling, and analysis, rather than custom software on a workstation or mainframe computer for modeling, was desired.

  16. Comparison of user groups' perspectives of barriers and facilitators to implementing electronic health records: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leduc Yvan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic health record (EHR implementation is currently underway in Canada, as in many other countries. These ambitious projects involve many stakeholders with unique perceptions of the implementation process. EHR users have an important role to play as they must integrate the EHR system into their work environments and use it in their everyday activities. Users hold valuable, first-hand knowledge of what can limit or contribute to the success of EHR implementation projects. A comprehensive synthesis of EHR users' perceptions is key to successful future implementation. This systematic literature review was aimed to synthesize current knowledge of the barriers and facilitators influencing shared EHR implementation among its various users. Methods Covering a period from 1999 to 2009, a literature search was conducted on nine electronic databases. Studies were included if they reported on users' perceived barriers and facilitators to shared EHR implementation, in healthcare settings comparable to Canada. Studies in all languages with an empirical study design were included. Quality and relevance of the studies were assessed. Four EHR user groups were targeted: physicians, other health care professionals, managers, and patients/public. Content analysis was performed independently by two authors using a validated extraction grid with pre-established categorization of barriers and facilitators for each group of EHR users. Results Of a total of 5,695 potentially relevant publications identified, 117 full text publications were obtained after screening titles and abstracts. After review of the full articles, 60 publications, corresponding to 52 studies, met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent adoption factors common to all user groups were design and technical concerns, ease of use, interoperability, privacy and security, costs, productivity, familiarity and ability with EHR, motivation to use EHR, patient and health

  17. Proliferation Risk Characterization Model Prototype Model - User and Programmer Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukelow, J.S.; Whitford, D.

    1998-12-01

    A model for the estimation of the risk of diversion of weapons-capable materials was developed. It represents both the threat of diversion and site vulnerability as a product of a small number of variables (two to eight), each of which can take on a small number (two to four) of qualitatively defined (but quantitatively implemented) values. The values of the overall threat and vulnerability variables are then converted to threat and vulnerability categories. The threat and vulnerability categories are used to define the likelihood of diversion, also defined categorically. The evaluator supplies an estimate of the consequences of a diversion, defined categorically, but with the categories based on the IAEA Attractiveness levels. Likelihood and Consequences categories are used to define the Risk, also defined categorically. The threat, vulnerability, and consequences input provided by the evaluator contains a representation of his/her uncertainty in each variable assignment which is propagated all the way through to the calculation of the Risk categories. [Appendix G available on diskette only.

  18. Model of trust in work groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenkov, Andrey V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-dimensional model of trust in a small group has been developed and approved. This model includes two dimensions: trust levels (interpersonal trust, micro-group trust, group trust, trust between subgroups, trust between subgroups and group and types of trust (activity-coping, information-influential and confidentially-protective trust. Each level of trust is manifested in three types, so there are fifteen varieties of trust. Two corresponding questionnaires were developed for the study. 347 persons from 32 work groups participated in the research. It was determined that in a small group there is an asymmetry of trust levels within the group. In particular, micro-group trust is demonstrated the most in comparison with other trust levels. There is also an asymmetry in the manifestation of interpersonal trust in a group structure. This is demonstrated by the fact that in informal subgroups, in comparison with a group as a whole, interpersonal confidential and performance trust is the most manifested. In a small group and in informal subgroups there are relationships between trust levels which have certain regularities.

  19. Proceedings of the Second Annual NASA Science Internet User Working Group Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lenore A. (Editor); Gary, J. Patrick (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Copies of the agenda, list of attendees, meeting summaries, and all presentations and exhibit material are contained. Included are plenary sessions, exhibits of advanced networking applications, and user subgroup meetings on NASA Science Internet policy, networking, security, and user services and applications topics.

  20. Review of ride quality technology needs of industry and user groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, J. R.; Brumaghim, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A broad survey of ride quality technology state-of-the-art and a review of user evaluation of this technology were conducted. During the study 17 users of ride quality technology in 10 organizations representing land, marine and air passenger transportation modes were interviewed. Interim results and conclusions of this effort are reported.

  1. Modeling integrated water user decisions in intermittent supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David E.; Tarawneh, Tarek; Abdel-Khaleq, Rania; Lund, Jay R.

    2007-07-01

    We apply systems analysis to estimate household water use in an intermittent supply system considering numerous interdependent water user behaviors. Some 39 household actions include conservation; improving local storage or water quality; and accessing sources having variable costs, availabilities, reliabilities, and qualities. A stochastic optimization program with recourse decisions identifies the infrastructure investments and short-term coping actions a customer can adopt to cost-effectively respond to a probability distribution of piped water availability. Monte Carlo simulations show effects for a population of customers. Model calibration reproduces the distribution of billed residential water use in Amman, Jordan. Parametric analyses suggest economic and demand responses to increased availability and alternative pricing. It also suggests potential market penetration for conservation actions, associated water savings, and subsidies to entice further adoption. We discuss new insights to size, target, and finance conservation.

  2. GCFM Users Guide Revision for Model Version 5.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keimig, Mark A.; Blake, Coleman

    1981-08-10

    This paper documents alterations made to the MITRE/DOE Geothermal Cash Flow Model (GCFM) in the period of September 1980 through September 1981. Version 4.0 of GCFM was installed on the computer at the DOE San Francisco Operations Office in August 1980. This Version has also been distributed to about a dozen geothermal industry firms, for examination and potential use. During late 1980 and 1981, a few errors detected in the Version 4.0 code were corrected, resulting in Version 4.1. If you are currently using GCFM Version 4.0, it is suggested that you make the changes to your code that are described in Section 2.0. User's manual changes listed in Section 3.0 and Section 4.0 should then also be made.

  3. Computer Agent's Role in Modeling an Online Math Help User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Martinovic

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates perspectives of deployments of open learner model on mathematics online help sites. It proposes enhancing a regular human-to-human interaction with an involvement of a computer agent suitable for tracking users, checking their input and making useful suggestions. Such a design would provide the most support for the interlocutors while keeping the nature of existing environment intact. Special considerations are given to peer-to-peer and expert-to-student mathematics online help that is free of charge and asynchronous. Examples from other collaborative, Web-based environments are also discussed. Suggestions for improving the existing architectures are given, based on the results of a number of studies on on-line learning systems.

  4. Point groups in the Vibron model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leviatan, A.

    1989-08-01

    The question of incorporating the notion of point groups in the algebraic Vibron model for molecular rotation--vibration spectra is addressed. Boson transformations which act on intrinsic states are identified as the algebraic analog of the discrete point group transformations. A prescription for assigning point group labels to states of the Vibron model is obtained. In case of nonlinear triatomic molecules the Jacobi coordinates are found to be a convenient possible choice for the geometric counterparts of the algebraic shape parameters. The work focuses on rigid diatomic and triatomic molecules (linear and bent).

  5. [Comparison of level of satisfaction of users of home care: integrated model vs. dispensaries model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorina, Marta; Limonero, Joaquín T; Peñart, Xavier; Jiménez, Jordi; Gassó, Javier

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of satisfaction of users that receive home health care through two different models of primary health care: integrated model and dispensaries model. cross-sectional, observational study. Two primary care centers in the province of Barcelona. The questionnaire was administered to 158 chronic patients over 65 years old, of whom 67 were receiving health care from the integrated model, and 91 from the dispensaries model. The Evaluation of Satisfaction with Home Health Care (SATISFAD12) questionnaire was, together with other complementary questions about service satisfaction of home health care, as well as social demographic questions (age, sex, disease, etc). The patients of the dispensaries model showed more satisfaction than the users receiving care from the integrated model. There was a greater healthcare continuity for those patients from the dispensaries model, and a lower percentage of hospitalizations during the last year. The satisfaction of the users from both models was not associated to gender, the health perception,or independence of the The user satisfaction rate of the home care by primary health care seems to depend of the typical characteristics of each organisational model. The dispensaries model shows a higher rate of satisfaction or perceived quality of care in all the aspects analysed. More studies are neede to extrapolate these results to other primary care centers belonging to other institutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Beyond the Standard Model: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion within the 'Beyond the Standard Model' working group of WHEPP-6. These problems addressed various extensions of the Standard Model (SM) currently under consideration in the particle physics phenomenology community. Smaller subgroups were formed to focus on each of these problems. The progresstill the end ...

  7. CORCON-MOD3: An integrated computer model for analysis of molten core-concrete interactions. User`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.R.; Gardner, D.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The CORCON-Mod3 computer code was developed to mechanistically model the important core-concrete interaction phenomena, including those phenomena relevant to the assessment of containment failure and radionuclide release. The code can be applied to a wide range of severe accident scenarios and reactor plants. The code represents the current state of the art for simulating core debris interactions with concrete. This document comprises the user`s manual and gives a brief description of the models and the assumptions and limitations in the code. Also discussed are the input parameters and the code output. Two sample problems are also given.

  8. System cost model user's manual, version 1.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.

    1995-06-01

    The System Cost Model (SCM) was developed by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies in Idaho Falls, Idaho and MK-Environmental Services in San Francisco, California to support the Baseline Environmental Management Report sensitivity analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SCM serves the needs of the entire DOE complex for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of mixed low-level, low-level, and transuranic waste. The model can be used to evaluate total complex costs based on various configuration options or to evaluate site-specific options. The site-specific cost estimates are based on generic assumptions such as waste loads and densities, treatment processing schemes, existing facilities capacities and functions, storage and disposal requirements, schedules, and cost factors. The SCM allows customization of the data for detailed site-specific estimates. There are approximately forty TSD module designs that have been further customized to account for design differences for nonalpha, alpha, remote-handled, and transuranic wastes. The SCM generates cost profiles based on the model default parameters or customized user-defined input and also generates costs for transporting waste from generators to TSD sites

  9. Graphical User Interface for Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, R. Caitlyn

    2009-01-01

    The J-2X Engine (built by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne,) in the Upper Stage of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, will only start within a certain range of temperature and pressure for Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen propellants. The purpose of the Simulink Integrated Performance Analysis Model is to verify that in all reasonable conditions the temperature and pressure of the propellants are within the required J-2X engine start boxes. In order to run the simulation, test variables must be entered at all reasonable values of parameters such as heat leak and mass flow rate. To make this testing process as efficient as possible in order to save the maximum amount of time and money, and to show that the J-2X engine will start when it is required to do so, a graphical user interface (GUI) was created to allow the input of values to be used as parameters in the Simulink Model, without opening or altering the contents of the model. The GUI must allow for test data to come from Microsoft Excel files, allow those values to be edited before testing, place those values into the Simulink Model, and get the output from the Simulink Model. The GUI was built using MATLAB, and will run the Simulink simulation when the Simulate option is activated. After running the simulation, the GUI will construct a new Microsoft Excel file, as well as a MATLAB matrix file, using the output values for each test of the simulation so that they may graphed and compared to other values.

  10. A user credit assessment model based on clustering ensemble for broadband network new media service supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Cao, San-xing; Lu, Rui

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes a user credit assessment model based on clustering ensemble aiming to solve the problem that users illegally spread pirated and pornographic media contents within the user self-service oriented broadband network new media platforms. Its idea is to do the new media user credit assessment by establishing indices system based on user credit behaviors, and the illegal users could be found according to the credit assessment results, thus to curb the bad videos and audios transmitted on the network. The user credit assessment model based on clustering ensemble proposed by this paper which integrates the advantages that swarm intelligence clustering is suitable for user credit behavior analysis and K-means clustering could eliminate the scattered users existed in the result of swarm intelligence clustering, thus to realize all the users' credit classification automatically. The model's effective verification experiments are accomplished which are based on standard credit application dataset in UCI machine learning repository, and the statistical results of a comparative experiment with a single model of swarm intelligence clustering indicates this clustering ensemble model has a stronger creditworthiness distinguishing ability, especially in the aspect of predicting to find user clusters with the best credit and worst credit, which will facilitate the operators to take incentive measures or punitive measures accurately. Besides, compared with the experimental results of Logistic regression based model under the same conditions, this clustering ensemble model is robustness and has better prediction accuracy.

  11. Evaluating user interactions with clinical information systems: a model based on human-computer interaction models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despont-Gros, Christelle; Mueller, Henning; Lovis, Christian

    2005-06-01

    This article proposes a model for dimensions involved in user evaluation of clinical information systems (CIS). The model links the dimensions in traditional CIS evaluation and the dimensions from the human-computer interaction (HCI) perspective. In this article, variables are defined as the properties measured in an evaluation, and dimensions are defined as the factors contributing to the values of the measured variables. The proposed model is based on a two-step methodology with: (1) a general review of information systems (IS) evaluations to highlight studied variables, existing models and frameworks, and (2) a review of HCI literature to provide the theoretical basis to key dimensions of user evaluation. The review of literature led to the identification of eight key variables, among which satisfaction, acceptance, and success were found to be the most referenced. Among those variables, IS acceptance is a relevant candidate to reflect user evaluation of CIS. While their goals are similar, the fields of traditional CIS evaluation, and HCI are not closely connected. Combining those two fields allows for the development of an integrated model which provides a model for summative and comprehensive user evaluation of CIS. All dimensions identified in existing studies can be linked to this model and such an integrated model could provide a new perspective to compare investigations of different CIS systems.

  12. Utility/Manufacturers Robots Users Group: a partnership promoting the applications of robots in all utility industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meieran, H.B.; Roman, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to describe the roles and the goals of the recently established Utility/Manufacturers Robots Users Group (U/M RUG), an organization which is dedicated to promoting the employment of robots in all utility facilities. This group is composed of volunteer representatives from the utilities, robot manufacturers, service organizations/consulting groups, academia, national and non-government funding agencies, and national laboratories. Although the Group primarily serves as a forum and a guide for technology transfer, exchanging ideas, and promoting philosophies of applications among its members, it also provides this type of assistance to external groups and agencies. (author)

  13. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding...... the user interface of EESCoolTools these issues led to a series of simulation tools each with a specific purpose and a carefully selected set of input and output variables. To allow a more wide range of questions to be answered by the same model, the user can change between different sets of input...

  14. BPACK -- A computer model package for boiler reburning/co-firing performance evaluations. User`s manual, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.T.; Li, B.; Payne, R.

    1992-06-01

    This manual presents and describes a package of computer models uniquely developed for boiler thermal performance and emissions evaluations by the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The model package permits boiler heat transfer, fuels combustion, and pollutant emissions predictions related to a number of practical boiler operations such as fuel-switching, fuels co-firing, and reburning NO{sub x} reductions. The models are adaptable to most boiler/combustor designs and can handle burner fuels in solid, liquid, gaseous, and slurried forms. The models are also capable of performing predictions for combustion applications involving gaseous-fuel reburning, and co-firing of solid/gas, liquid/gas, gas/gas, slurry/gas fuels. The model package is conveniently named as BPACK (Boiler Package) and consists of six computer codes, of which three of them are main computational codes and the other three are input codes. The three main codes are: (a) a two-dimensional furnace heat-transfer and combustion code: (b) a detailed chemical-kinetics code; and (c) a boiler convective passage code. This user`s manual presents the computer model package in two volumes. Volume 1 describes in detail a number of topics which are of general users` interest, including the physical and chemical basis of the models, a complete description of the model applicability, options, input/output, and the default inputs. Volume 2 contains a detailed record of the worked examples to assist users in applying the models, and to illustrate the versatility of the codes.

  15. Making the Invisible Visible: Personas and Mental Models of Distance Education Library Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cynthia; Contrino, Jacline

    2016-01-01

    Gaps between users' and designers' mental models of digital libraries often result in adverse user experiences. This article details an exploratory user research study at a large, predominantly online university serving non-traditional distance education students with the goal of understanding these gaps. Using qualitative data, librarians created…

  16. User Acceptance of Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Services: An Application of Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunil; Kim, Ki Joon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to propose an integrated path model in order to explore user acceptance of long-term evolution (LTE) services by examining potential causal relationships between key psychological factors and user intention to use the services. Design/methodology/approach: Online survey data collected from 1,344 users are analysed…

  17. Cognitive Support using BDI Agent and Adaptive User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Shabbir

    2012-01-01

    challenges of an ageing population. This thesis work is one attempt towards that. The thesis focused on research the approaches to provide cognitive support for users with cognitive disabilities through ICT-based technological solutions. The recent advancement of Articial Intelligence and wireless sensor...... networks have shown potential to improve the quality of life of elder people with disabilities using current technologies. The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct research on the approach to provide support for the elderly users with cognitive disabilities. In our research conduct, we have dened...... a set of goals for attaining the objective of this thesis. The initial goal is to recognize the activities of the users to assess the need of support for the user during the activity. However, one of the challenges of the recognition process is the adaptability for variant user behaviour due to physical...

  18. Physical and Psychological Harms and Health Consequences of Methamphetamine Use amongst a Group of New Zealand Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rachael; Wheeler, Amanda; Sheridan, Janie

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine has become a drug of concern in many countries. This qualitative study reports on the historical and current psychological and physical health of a group of methamphetamine users in Auckland, New Zealand in 2004, most of whom were in drug treatment. Participants reported they had experienced a range of physical health problems…

  19. User Preferences for Content, Features, and Style for an App to Reduce Harmful Drinking in Young Adults: Analysis of User Feedback in App Stores and Focus Group Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadjesari, Zarnie; Fincham-Campbell, Stephanie; Deluca, Paolo; Watson, Rod; Drummond, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic screening and brief intervention (eSBI) is effective in reducing weekly alcohol consumption when delivered by a computer. Mobile phone apps demonstrate promise in delivering eSBI; however, few have been designed with an evidence-based and user-informed approach. Objective This study aims to explore from a user perspective, preferences for content, appearance, and operational features to inform the design of a mobile phone app for reducing quantity and frequency of drinking in young adults engaged in harmful drinking (18-30 year olds). Methods Phase 1 included a review of user reviews of available mobile phone apps that support a reduction in alcohol consumption. Apps were identified on iTunes and Google Play and were categorized into alcohol reduction support, entertainment, blood alcohol content measurement (BAC), or other. eSBI apps with ≥18 user reviews were subject to a content analysis, which coded praise, criticism, and recommendations for app content, functionality, and esthetics. Phase 2 included four focus groups with young adults drinking at harmful levels and residing in South London to explore their views on existing eSBI apps and preferences for future content, functionality, and appearance. Detailed thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Results In Phase 1, of the 1584 apps extracted, 201 were categorized as alcohol reduction, 154 as BAC calculators, 509 as entertainment, and 720 as other. We classified 32 apps as eSBI apps. Four apps had ≥18 user reviews: Change for Life Drinks Tracker, Drinksmeter, Drinkaware, and Alcohol Units Calculator. The highest proportion of content praises were for information and feedback provided in the apps (12/27, 44%), followed by praise for the monitoring features (5/27, 19%). Many (8/12, 67%) criticisms were for the drinking diary; all of these were related to difficulty entering drinks. Over half (18/32, 56%) of functionality criticisms were descriptions of software bugs, and over

  20. Beyond the Standard Model: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    55, Nos 1 & 2. — journal of. July & August 2000 physics pp. 307–313. Beyond the Standard Model: Working group report. GAUTAM BHATTACHARYYA. ½ .... action: ¯Consider the possibility that these neutrinos are of Majorana nature, i.e. r η И r , where η И. ¦½. Then the initial condition of degeneracy stated above.

  1. Diagrammatic group theory in quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canning, G.P.

    1977-05-01

    A simple and systematic diagrammatic method is presented for calculating the numerical factors arising from group theory in quark models: dimensions, casimir invariants, vector coupling coefficients and especially recoupling coefficients. Some coefficients for the coupling of 3 quark objects are listed for SU(n) and SU(2n). (orig.) [de

  2. Affine Poisson Groups and WZW Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ctirad Klimcík

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a detailed description of a dynamical system which enjoys a Poisson-Lie symmetry with two non-isomorphic dual groups. The system is obtained by taking the q → ∞ limit of the q-deformed WZW model and the understanding of its symmetry structure results in uncovering an interesting duality of its exchange relations.

  3. User Interaction Modeling and Profile Extraction in Interactive Systems: A Groupware Application Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrnăucă, Cristina; Duque, Rafael; Montaña, José L

    2017-07-20

    A relevant goal in human-computer interaction is to produce applications that are easy to use and well-adjusted to their users' needs. To address this problem it is important to know how users interact with the system. This work constitutes a methodological contribution capable of identifying the context of use in which users perform interactions with a groupware application (synchronous or asynchronous) and provides, using machine learning techniques, generative models of how users behave. Additionally, these models are transformed into a text that describes in natural language the main characteristics of the interaction of the users with the system.

  4. OpenDolphin: presentation models for compelling user interfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Shared applications run on the server. They still need a display, though, be it on the web or on the desktop. OpenDolphin introduces a shared presentation model to clearly differentiate between "what" to display and "how" to display. The "what" is managed on the server and is independent of the UI technology whereas the "how" can fully exploit the UI capabilities like the ubiquity of the web or the power of the desktop in terms of interactivity, animations, effects, 3D worlds, and local devices. If you run a server-centric architecture and still seek to provide the best possible user experience, then this talk is for you. About the speaker Dierk König (JavaOne Rock Star) works as a fellow for Canoo Engineering AG, Basel, Switzerland. He is a committer to many open-source projects including OpenDolphin, Groovy, Grails, GPars and GroovyFX. He is lead author of the "Groovy in Action" book, which is among ...

  5. Models of group psychotherapy: sifting through confusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dies, R R

    1992-01-01

    This editorial introduces a series of articles by leading proponents of the ten major models of group psychotherapy to appear in the International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. These theoretical contributions will be published throughout 1992 as a dedication to the American Group Psychotherapy Association's (AGPA) 50th anniversary. In the present article, the author reports results from a recent survey of senior clinicians within AGPA who expressed their opinions about the central issues that practitioners should understand during the working phase of group treatments. Statistical comparisons among action-oriented, interpersonal, and psychodynamic respondents to the questionnaire revealed striking differences in how therapeutic interventions were conceptualized. These findings are outlined as a preface to the first three articles in the series.

  6. Mapping landscape potential for outdoor recreation using different archetypical recreation user groups in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komossa, Franziska; van der Zanden, Emma H.; Schulp, Catharina J.E.; Verburg, Peter H.

    2018-01-01

    Engagement with the natural environment and public enjoyment of access to farmland and woodland often takes the form of outdoor recreation. Numerous studies on landscape preferences of outdoor recreation have focused on individual characteristics and attitudes of recreation users. Although the

  7. A user-oriented model for global enterprise portal design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, X.; Ehrenhard, Michel Léon; Hicks, Jeff; Maathuis, Stephanus Johannes; Maathuis, S.J.; Hou, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Enterprise portals collect and synthesise information from various systems to deliver personalised and highly relevant information to users. Enterprise portals' design and applications are widely discussed in the literature; however, the implications of portal design in a global networked

  8. User Requirements Model for University Timetable Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Althunibat; Mohammad I. Muhairat

    2016-01-01

    Automated timetables are used to schedule courses, lectures and rooms in universities by considering some constraints. Inconvenient and ineffective timetables often waste time and money. Therefore, it is important to investigate the requirements and potential needs of users. Thus, eliciting user requirements of University Timetable Management System (TMS) and their implication becomes an important process for the implementation of TMS. On this note, this paper seeks to propose a m...

  9. Medium-sized Universities Connect to Their Libraries: Links on University Home Pages and User Group Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Harpel-Burk

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available From major tasks—such as recruitment of new students and staff—to the more mundane but equally important tasks—such as providing directions to campus—college and university Web sites perform a wide range of tasks for a varied assortment of users. Overlapping functions and user needs meld to create the need for a Web site with three major functions: promotion and marketing, access to online services, and providing a means of communication between individuals and groups. In turn, college and university Web sites that provide links to their library home page can be valuable assets for recruitment, public relations, and for helping users locate online services.

  10. User-Centered Design Groups to Engage Patients and Caregivers with a Personalized Health Information Technology Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Molly; Kaziunas, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Mark; Derry, Holly; Forringer, Rachel; Miller, Kristen; O'Reilly, Dennis; An, Larry C; Tewari, Muneesh; Hanauer, David A; Choi, Sung Won

    2016-02-01

    Health information technology (IT) has opened exciting avenues for capturing, delivering and sharing data, and offers the potential to develop cost-effective, patient-focused applications. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of health IT applications such as outpatient portals. Rigorous evaluation is fundamental to ensure effectiveness and sustainability, as resistance to more widespread adoption of outpatient portals may be due to lack of user friendliness. Health IT applications that integrate with the existing electronic health record and present information in a condensed, user-friendly format could improve coordination of care and communication. Importantly, these applications should be developed systematically with appropriate methodological design and testing to ensure usefulness, adoption, and sustainability. Based on our prior work that identified numerous information needs and challenges of HCT, we developed an experimental prototype of a health IT tool, the BMT Roadmap. Our goal was to develop a tool that could be used in the real-world, daily practice of HCT patients and caregivers (users) in the inpatient setting. Herein, we examined the views, needs, and wants of users in the design and development process of the BMT Roadmap through user-centered Design Groups. Three important themes emerged: 1) perception of core features as beneficial (views), 2) alerting the design team to potential issues with the user interface (needs); and 3) providing a deeper understanding of the user experience in terms of wider psychosocial requirements (wants). These findings resulted in changes that led to an improved, functional BMT Roadmap product, which will be tested as an intervention in the pediatric HCT population in the fall of 2015 (ClinicalTrials.govNCT02409121). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. APEX user`s guide - (Argonne production, expansion, and exchange model for electrical systems), version 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Veselka, T.D.; Guziel, K.A.; Blodgett, D.W.; Hamilton, S.; Kavicky, J.A.; Koritarov, V.S.; North, M.J.; Novickas, A.A.; Paprockas, K.R. [and others

    1994-11-01

    This report describes operating procedures and background documentation for the Argonne Production, Expansion, and Exchange Model for Electrical Systems (APEX). This modeling system was developed to provide the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Fossil Energy, Office of Coal and Electricity with in-house capabilities for addressing policy options that affect electrical utilities. To meet this objective, Argonne National Laboratory developed a menu-driven programming package that enables the user to develop and conduct simulations of production costs, system reliability, spot market network flows, and optimal system capacity expansion. The APEX system consists of three basic simulation components, supported by various databases and data management software. The components include (1) the investigation of Costs and Reliability in Utility Systems (ICARUS) model, (2) the Spot Market Network (SMN) model, and (3) the Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model. The ICARUS model provides generating-unit-level production-cost and reliability simulations with explicit recognition of planned and unplanned outages. The SMN model addresses optimal network flows with recognition of marginal costs, wheeling charges, and transmission constraints. The PACE model determines long-term (e.g., longer than 10 years) capacity expansion schedules on the basis of candidate expansion technologies and load growth estimates. In addition, the Automated Data Assembly Package (ADAP) and case management features simplify user-input requirements. The ADAP, ICARUS, and SMN modules are described in detail. The PACE module is expected to be addressed in a future publication.

  12. Training in the e-groups application for ex-Simba and current e-groups users

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of e-groups to replace and extend the functionality of the Simba application and the migration of Simba lists to e-groups have now been completed. As is often the case with changes like these, the way of working with the new system is not exactly the same: new features and functions are available that improve efficiency and also extend the capacity and use of the system. To help you and your colleagues to become familiar with the new system, we have organised a hands-on course in conjunction with the application developers (IT/IS and GS/AIS), which will present e-groups in detail and explain its features and how to get the most out of it. This is a first-level course. It will take place in the technical training rooms and will run from 09.00 till 12.30. For the time being the following sessions of the course have been organised: · 26 May (in English), · 27 May (in French). You can enrol at the following link: http://eGroups training course Participa...

  13. Training in the e-groups application for ex-Simba and current e-groups users

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of e-groups to replace and extend the functionality of the Simba application and the migration of Simba lists to e-groups have now been completed. As is often the case with changes like these, the way of working with the new system is not exactly the same: new features and functions are available that improve efficiency and also extend the capacity and use of the system. To help you and your colleagues to become familiar with the new system, we have organised a hands-on course in conjunction with the application developers (IT/IS and GS/AIS), which will present e-groups in detail and explain its features and how to get the most out of it. This is a first-level course. It will take place in the technical training rooms and will run from 09.00 till 12.30. For the time being the following sessions of the course have been organised: 26 May (in English), 27 May (in French). You can enrol at the following link: eGroups training course Participation in the cours...

  14. Training in the e-groups application for ex-Simba and current e-groups users

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of e-groups to replace and extend the functionality of the Simba application and the migration of Simba lists to e-groups have now been completed. As is often the case with changes like these, the way of working with the new system is not exactly the same: new features and functions are available that improve efficiency and also extend the capacity and use of the system. To help you and your colleagues to become familiar with the new system, we have organised a hands-on course in conjunction with the application developers (IT/IS and GS/AIS), which will present e-groups in detail and explain its features and how to get the most out of it. This is a first-level course. It will take place in the technical training rooms and will run from 09.00 till 12.30. For the time being the following sessions of the course have been organised: · 26 May (in English), · 27 May (in French). You can enrol at the following link: http://eGroups training course Participation in the course is free of charg...

  15. SWAT Check: A Screening Tool to Assist Users in the Identification of Potential Model Application Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J; Harmel, R Daren; Arnold, Jeff G; Williams, Jimmy R

    2014-01-01

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is a basin-scale hydrologic model developed by the United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. SWAT's broad applicability, user-friendly model interfaces, and automatic calibration software have led to a rapid increase in the number of new users. These advancements also allow less experienced users to conduct SWAT modeling applications. In particular, the use of automated calibration software may produce simulated values that appear appropriate because they adequately mimic measured data used in calibration and validation. Autocalibrated model applications (and often those of unexperienced modelers) may contain input data errors and inappropriate parameter adjustments not readily identified by users or the autocalibration software. The objective of this research was to develop a program to assist users in the identification of potential model application problems. The resulting "SWAT Check" is a stand-alone Microsoft Windows program that (i) reads selected SWAT output and alerts users of values outside the typical range; (ii) creates process-based figures for visualization of the appropriateness of output values, including important outputs that are commonly ignored; and (iii) detects and alerts users of common model application errors. By alerting users to potential model application problems, this software should assist the SWAT community in developing more reliable modeling applications. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. User Instructions for the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.

    2018-03-13

    PAMS uses country-specific and product-specific data to calculate estimates of impacts of a Minimum Efficiency Performance Standard (MEPS) program. The analysis tool is self-contained in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet, and requires no links to external data, or special code additions to run. The analysis can be customized to a particular program without additional user input, through the use of the pull-down menus located on the Summary page. In addition, the spreadsheet contains many areas into which user-generated input data can be entered for increased accuracy of projection. The following is a step-by-step guide for using and customizing the tool.

  17. Building social participation with a support group users: challenges of care qualification in a Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Corrêa Detomini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature points out a lack of studies describing practical experiences approaching the role of social participation, even though, the subject Brazilian Health System (SUS as a principle is valued by theoretical-conceptual works. The lack of studies is especially observed in mental health care services, where the existing studies focus on the users’ management engagement as part of psychosocial rehabilitation. Thus, this article introduces an experience developed in a Center for Psycho-Social Attention (CAPS, in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, aiming to address the issue of social participation in care qualification, in accordance to legislation and technical standards. Thisstudy focused on two types of sources. 1 Internship Final Report of a Psycology Student including 54 sessions of a support group, 2 technical and legal documents concerning the SUS and the National Mental Health Policy and Humanization. The service aspects were analyzed through technical and legislative foundations - focusing the needs and claims on group discussions, classified as structure and process, used to assess the health care quality. Most concerns were listed on normative Ordinances and Regulations. Achieving social participation was not an institutional premise and, among the main difficulties was the medical/outpatient centered model and the representation of “crazy”/”CAPS users” as incapable. It requires: i integration of “clinic” and “politics”; ii intensification of interdisciplinary and psychological care; iii respect the citizenship of mental health users, and, finally, iv that the collective participation spaces do not exhaust themselves. Therefore, the collective participation spaces need practical recommendations in order to improve the structures and work processes and meet the users’ needs.

  18. User-driven Cloud Implementation of environmental models and data for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, R. J.; Percy, B. J.; Elkhatib, Y.; Blair, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental data and models come from disparate sources over a variety of geographical and temporal scales with different resolutions and data standards, often including terabytes of data and model simulations. Unfortunately, these data and models tend to remain solely within the custody of the private and public organisations which create the data, and the scientists who build models and generate results. Although many models and datasets are theoretically available to others, the lack of ease of access tends to keep them out of reach of many. We have developed an intuitive web-based tool that utilises environmental models and datasets located in a cloud to produce results that are appropriate to the user. Storyboards showing the interfaces and visualisations have been created for each of several exemplars. A library of virtual machine images has been prepared to serve these exemplars. Each virtual machine image has been tailored to run computer models appropriate to the end user. Two approaches have been used; first as RESTful web services conforming to the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Processing Service (WPS) interface standard using the Python-based PyWPS; second, a MySQL database interrogated using PHP code. In all cases, the web client sends the server an HTTP GET request to execute the process with a number of parameter values and, once execution terminates, an XML or JSON response is sent back and parsed at the client side to extract the results. All web services are stateless, i.e. application state is not maintained by the server, reducing its operational overheads and simplifying infrastructure management tasks such as load balancing and failure recovery. A hybrid cloud solution has been used with models and data sited on both private and public clouds. The storyboards have been transformed into intuitive web interfaces at the client side using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, utilising plug-ins such as jQuery and Flot (for graphics), and Google Maps

  19. Deriving user-informed climate information from climate model ensemble results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Huebener

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Communication between providers and users of climate model simulation results still needs to be improved. In the German regional climate modeling project ReKliEs-De a midterm user workshop was conducted to allow the intended users of the project results to assess the preliminary results and to streamline the final project results to their needs. The user feedback highlighted, in particular, the still considerable gap between climate research output and user-tailored input for climate impact research. Two major requests from the user community addressed the selection of sub-ensembles and some condensed, easy to understand information on the strengths and weaknesses of the climate models involved in the project.

  20. Development of a user-friendly interface version of the Salmonella source-attribution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Lund, Jan

    with a user-manual, which is also part of this report. Users of the interface are recommended to read this report before starting using the interface to become familiar with the model principles and the mathematics behind, which is required in order to interpret the model results and assess the validity...

  1. Stated choice models for predicting the impact of user fees at public recreation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert W. Schroeder; Jordan Louviere

    1999-01-01

    A crucial question in the implementation of fee programs is how the users of recreation sites will respond to various levels and types of fees. Stated choice models can help managers anticipate the impact of user fees on people's choices among the alternative recreation sites available to them. Models developed for both day and overnight trips to several areas and...

  2. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. (author)

  3. Simulation Architecture for Modelling Interaction Between User and Elbow-articulated Exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, B.J. de; Schmidhauser, E.; Stadler, K.S.; O'Sullivan, L.W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our work is to improve the existing user-exoskeleton models by introducing a simulation architecture that can simulate its dynamic interaction, thereby altering the initial motion of the user. A simulation architecture is developed that uses the musculoskeletal models from OpenSim, and

  4. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator's perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne's Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting

  5. Exploring User Engagement in Information Networks: Behavioural – based Navigation Modelling, Ideas and Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Kumbaroska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Revealing an endless array of user behaviors in an online environment is a very good indicator of the user’s interests either in the process of browsing or in purchasing. One such behavior is the navigation behavior, so detected user navigation patterns are able to be used for practical purposes such as: improving user engagement, turning most browsers into buyers, personalize content or interface, etc. In this regard, our research represents a connection between navigation modelling and user engagement. A usage of the Generalized Stochastic Petri Nets concept for stochastic behavioral-based modelling of the navigation process is proposed for measuring user engagement components. Different types of users are automatically identified and clustered according to their navigation behaviors, thus the developed model gives great insight into the navigation process. As part of this study, Peterson’s model for measuring the user engagement is explored and a direct calculation of its components is illustrated. At the same time, asssuming that several user sessions/visits are initialized in a certain time frame, following the Petri Nets dynamics is indicating that the proposed behavioral – based model could be used for user engagement metrics calculation, thus some basic ideas are discussed, and initial directions are given.

  6. What’s all the talk about? Topic modelling in a mental health Internet support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Carron-Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of content in an Internet Support Group (ISG is contributed by 1 % of the users (‘super users’. Computational methods, such as topic modelling, can provide a large-scale quantitative objective description of this content. Such methods may provide a new perspective on the nature of engagement on ISGs including the role of super users and their possible effect on other users. Methods A topic model was computed for all posts (N = 131,004 in the ISG BlueBoard using Latent Dirichlet Allocation. A model containing 25 topics was selected on the basis of intelligibility as determined by diagnostic metrics and qualitative investigation. This model yielded 21 substantive topics for further analysis. Two chi-square tests were conducted separately for each topic to ascertain: (i if the odds of super users’ and other users’ posting differed for each topic; and (ii if for super users the odds of posting differed depending on whether the response was to a super user or to another user. Results The 21 substantive topics covered a range of issues related to mental health and peer-support. There were significantly higher odds that super users wrote content on 13 topics, with the greatest effects being for Parenting Role (OR [95%CI] = 7.97 [7.85–8.10], Co-created Fiction (4.22 [4.17–4.27], Mental Illness (3.13 [3.11–3.16] and Positive Change (2.82 [2.79–2.84]. There were significantly lower odds for super users on 7 topics, with the greatest effects being for the topics Depression (OR = 0.27 [0.27–0.28], Medication (0.36 [0.36–0.37], Therapy (0.55 [0.54–0.55] and Anxiety (0.55 [0.55–0.55]. However, super users were significantly more likely to write content on 5 out of these 7 topics when responding to other users than when responding to fellow super users. Conclusions The findings suggest that super users serve the role of emotionally supportive companions with a focus on topics broadly

  7. Evaluating Author and User Experience for an Audio-Haptic System for Annotation of Physical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, James M; Miele, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    We describe three usability studies involving a prototype system for creation and haptic exploration of labeled locations on 3D objects. The system uses a computer, webcam, and fiducial markers to associate a physical 3D object in the camera's view with a predefined digital map of labeled locations ("hotspots"), and to do real-time finger tracking, allowing a blind or visually impaired user to explore the object and hear individual labels spoken as each hotspot is touched. This paper describes: (a) a formative study with blind users exploring pre-annotated objects to assess system usability and accuracy; (b) a focus group of blind participants who used the system and, through structured and unstructured discussion, provided feedback on its practicality, possible applications, and real-world potential; and (c) a formative study in which a sighted adult used the system to add labels to on-screen images of objects, demonstrating the practicality of remote annotation of 3D models. These studies and related literature suggest potential for future iterations of the system to benefit blind and visually impaired users in educational, professional, and recreational contexts.

  8. Structural equation modeling of users' response to wilderness recreation fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams; Christine A. Vogt; Joar Vitterso

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines wilderness users' response to recently established overnight camping fees at the Desolation Wilderness in California. Fee program evaluations have typically focused on economic or revenue issues, distributional or equity impacts of various pricing strategies, and questions of price fairness. In the case of wilderness recreation fees, it is also...

  9. Semiotic user interface analysis of building information model systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Timo

    2013-01-01

    To promote understanding of how to use building information (BI) systems to support communication, this paper uses computer semiotic theory to study how user interfaces of BI systems operate as a carrier of meaning. More specifically, the paper introduces a semiotic framework for the analysis of BI

  10. Documentation, User Support, and Verification of Wind Turbine and Plant Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Zavadil; Vadim Zheglov; Yuriy Kazachkov; Bo Gong; Juan Sanchez; Jun Li

    2012-09-18

    As part of the Utility Wind Energy Integration Group (UWIG) and EnerNex's Wind Turbine Modeling Project, EnerNex has received ARRA (federal stimulus) funding through the Department of Energy (DOE) to further the progress of wind turbine and wind plant models. Despite the large existing and planned wind generation deployment, industry-standard models for wind generation have not been formally adopted. Models commonly provided for interconnection studies are not adequate for use in general transmission planning studies, where public, non-proprietary, documented and validated models are needed. NERC MOD (North American Electric Reliability Corporation) reliability standards require that power flow and dynamics models be provided, in accordance with regional requirements and procedures. The goal of this project is to accelerate the appropriate use of generic wind turbine models for transmission network analysis by: (1) Defining proposed enhancements to the generic wind turbine model structures that would allow representation of more advanced; (2) Comparative testing of the generic models against more detailed (and sometimes proprietary) versions developed by turbine vendors; (3) Developing recommended parameters for the generic models to best mimic the performance of specific commercial wind turbines; (4) Documenting results of the comparative simulations in an application guide for users; (5) Conducting technology transfer activities in regional workshops for dissemination of knowledge and information gained, and to engage electric power and wind industry personnel in the project while underway; (6) Designing of a "living" homepage to establish an online resource for transmission planners.

  11. Models for User Access Patterns on the Web: Semantic Content versus Access History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Arun; Owen, Charles B.; Vailaya, Aditya

    This paper focuses on clustering a World Wide Web site (i.e., the 1998 World Cup Soccer site) into groups of documents that are predictive of future user accesses. Two approaches were developed and tested. The first approach uses semantic information inherent in the documents to facilitate the clustering process. User access history is then used…

  12. Research on user behavior authentication model based on stochastic Petri nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyuan; Xu, Haishui

    2017-08-01

    A behavioural authentication model based on stochastic Petri net is proposed to meet the randomness, uncertainty and concurrency characteristics of user behaviour. The use of random models in the location, changes, arc and logo to describe the characteristics of a variety of authentication and game relationships, so as to effectively implement the graphical user behaviour authentication model analysis method, according to the corresponding proof to verify the model is valuable.

  13. Determination of the Static Anthropometric Characteristics of Iranian Microscope Users Via Regression Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toktam Balandeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthropometry is a branch of Ergonomics that considers the measurement and description of the human body dimensions. Accordingly, equipment, environments, and workstations should be designed using user-centered design processes. Anthropometric dimensions differ considerably across gender, race, ethnicity and age, taking into account ergonomic and anthropometric principles. The aim of this study was to determine anthropometric characteristics of microscope users and provide a regression model for anthropometric dimensions. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, anthropometric dimensions (18 dimensions of the microscope users (N=174; 78 males and 96 females in Shiraz were measured. Instruments included a Studio meter, 2 type calipers, adjustable seats, a 40-cm ruler, a tape measure, and scales. The study data were analyzed using SPSS, version 20. Results: The means of male and female microscope users’ age were 31.64±8.86 and 35±10.9 years, respectively and their height were 161.03±6.87cm and 174.81±5.45cm, respectively. The results showed that sitting and standing eye height and sitting horizontal range of accessibility had a significant correlation with stature. Conclusion: The established anthropometric database can be used as a source for designing workstations for working with microscopes in this group of users. The regression analysis showed that three dimensions, i.e. standing eye height, sitting eye height, and horizontal range of accessibility sitting had a significant correlation with stature. Therefore, given one’s stature, these dimensions can be obtained with less measurement.

  14. INTERLINE, a railroad routing model: program description and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, B.E.

    1985-11-01

    INTERLINE is an interactive computer program that finds likely routes for shipments over the US railroad system. It is based on a shortest path algorithm modified both to reflect the nature of railroad company operations and to accommodate computer resource limitations in dealing with a large transportation network. The first section of the report discusses the nature of railroad operations and routing practices in the United States, including the tendency to concentrate traffic on a limited number of mainlines, the competition for traffic by different companies operating in the same corridors, and the tendency of originating carriers to retain traffic on their systems before transferring it to terminating carriers. The theoretical foundation and operation of shortest path algorithms are described, as well as the techniques used to simulate actual operating practices within this framework. The second section is a user's guide that describes the program operation and data structures, program features, and user access. 11 refs., 11 figs

  15. AASHTO, 26 other groups urge lawmakers not to divert user fees in climate and energy legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    In a letter to three senators who are crafting climate change legislation, the American Association of the State Highway and Transportation Officials along with 26 other groups urged the lawmakers to resist diverting funding derived from fuel taxes t...

  16. The impact of an online Facebook support group for people with multiple sclerosis on non-active users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui Steadman

    2014-11-01

    Objectives: This study therefore aimed to explore the experiences of non-active users of an online Facebook support group for PwMS. Emphasis was placed on the facilitators and the barriers that were associated with membership to this group. Method: An exploratory qualitative research design was implemented, whereby thematic analysis was utilised to examine the ten semi-structured interviews that were conducted. Results: Several facilitators were acquired through the online support group; namely emotional support (constant source of support, exposure to negative aspects of the disease,informational support (group as a source of knowledge, quality of information and social companionship (place of belonging. Some barriers were also identified; namely emotional support (emotions lost online, response to messages, exposure to negative aspects of the disease, informational support (information posted on the group, misuse of group and social companionship (non-active status. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that the non-active members of the online support group for PwMS have valid reasons for their non-active membership status. More important,the findings suggest that the online Facebook support group provided the group members with an important support network in the form of emotional support, informational support and social companionship, despite their non-active membership status or the barriers that have been identified.

  17. Merging assistance function with task distribution model to enhance user performance in collaborative virtual environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, S.; Alam, A.

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs) falls under Virtual Reality (VR) where two or more users manipulate objects collaboratively. In this paper we have made some experiments to make assembly from constituents parts scattered in Virtual Environment (VE) based on task distribution model using assistance functions for checking and enhancing user performance. The CVEs subjects setting on distinct connected machines via local area network. In this perspective, we consider the effects of assistance function with oral communication on collaboration, co-presence and users performance. Twenty subjects performed collaboratively an assembly task on static and dynamic based task distribution. We examine the degree of influence of assistance function with oral communications on user's performance based on task distribution model. The results show that assistance functions with oral communication based on task distribution model not only increase user performance but also enhance the sense of copresence and awareness. (author)

  18. 10th Annual CMMI Technology Conference and User Group Tutorial Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Standards include ISO 9001 and ISO 9126  Techniques / approaches include Six Sigma, SCRUM and Agile  Lifecycle models include Waterfall, Incremental...was refined through much effort, as neither ISO 25030 (SQuaRE) nor the original SEI definitions were quite satisfactory. DEFINITION A property of a...and often are packaged into models and standards such as CMMI, SPICE, and ISO 9001 Process improvements constantly challenge the models and process

  19. Relationship between Otolaryngologic Complaints and Systemic Comorbidities Observed in a Group of Hearing Aid Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribas, Angela

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Optimization of the selection, adaptation, and benefit of hearing aids is necessary to characterize and manage hearing loss, user expectations, otolaryngologic symptoms, and systemic comorbidities. Objective To compare the occurrence of otologic complaints, systemic diseases, and effective use of hearing aids in men and women with deafness. Methods Patients from a Unified Health System–accredited hearing health service, who reported problems in adapting to their hearing aids, were evaluated by a physician and audiologist. An anamnesis, ENT evaluation, and audiological evaluation were performed. Results During the data collection period, 278 subjects came in for follow-up visits; of these, 61 (21% reported otologic or operational problems with their equipment. The most prevalent type of hearing loss was basocochlear, a characteristic of presbycusis, in both men and women; the most frequently reported comorbidities were hypercholesterolemia (more significant in women and hypertension (more significant in men. Fourteen subjects reported using their device discontinuously, with no significant difference between genders; the reasons for discontinuation of use were itching and ringing, with more complaints from women. Conclusion The incidence of systemic and audiological complaints is high in this population. These patients should be evaluated thoroughly, as resolutions of these complaints can contribute to improving the quality of life and assist in the process of hearing aid fitting.

  20. Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) model documentation and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloyd, C.; Camp, J.; Conzelmann, G. [and others

    1996-12-01

    With passage of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the United States embarked on a policy for controlling acid deposition that has been estimated to cost at least $2 billion. Title IV of the Act created a major innovation in environmental regulation by introducing market-based incentives - specifically, by allowing electric utility companies to trade allowances to emit sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) has been tasked by Congress to assess what Senator Moynihan has termed this {open_quotes}grand experiment.{close_quotes} Such a comprehensive assessment of the economic and environmental effects of this legislation has been a major challenge. To help NAPAP face this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored development of an integrated assessment model, known as the Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF). This section summarizes TAF`s objectives and its overall design.

  1. User's manual for the Simulated Life Analysis of Vehicle Elements (SLAVE) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The simulated life analysis of vehicle elements model was designed to perform statistical simulation studies for any constant loss rate. The outputs of the model consist of the total number of stages required, stages successfully completing their lifetime, and average stage flight life. This report contains a complete description of the model. Users' instructions and interpretation of input and output data are presented such that a user with little or no prior programming knowledge can successfully implement the program.

  2. Communications network design and costing model users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, K. P.; Somes, S. S.; Clark, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The information and procedures needed to exercise the communications network design and costing model for performing network analysis are presented. Specific procedures are included for executing the model on the NASA Lewis Research Center IBM 3033 computer. The concepts, functions, and data bases relating to the model are described. Model parameters and their format specifications for running the model are detailed.

  3. Effects of Group Drumming Interventions on Anxiety, Depression, Social Resilience and Inflammatory Immune Response among Mental Health Service Users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Fancourt

    Full Text Available Growing numbers of mental health organizations are developing community music-making interventions for service users; however, to date there has been little research into their efficacy or mechanisms of effect. This study was an exploratory examination of whether 10 weeks of group drumming could improve depression, anxiety and social resilience among service users compared with a non-music control group (with participants allocated to group by geographical location. Significant improvements were found in the drumming group but not the control group: by week 6 there were decreases in depression (-2.14 SE 0.50 CI -3.16 to -1.11 and increases in social resilience (7.69 SE 2.00 CI 3.60 to 11.78, and by week 10 these had further improved (depression: -3.41 SE 0.62 CI -4.68 to -2.15; social resilience: 10.59 SE 1.78 CI 6.94 to 14.24 alongside significant improvements in anxiety (-2.21 SE 0.50 CI -3.24 to -1.19 and mental wellbeing (6.14 SE 0.92 CI 4.25 to 8.04. All significant changes were maintained at 3 months follow-up. Furthermore, it is now recognised that many mental health conditions are characterised by underlying inflammatory immune responses. Consequently, participants in the drumming group also provided saliva samples to test for cortisol and the cytokines interleukin (IL 4, IL6, IL17, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP 1. Across the 10 weeks there was a shift away from a pro-inflammatory towards an anti-inflammatory immune profile. Consequently, this study demonstrates the psychological benefits of group drumming and also suggests underlying biological effects, supporting its therapeutic potential for mental health.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01906892.

  4. Latent Feature Models for Uncovering Human Mobility Patterns from Anonymized User Location Traces with Metadata

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Basma Mohammed

    2017-04-10

    In the mobile era, data capturing individuals’ locations have become unprecedentedly available. Data from Location-Based Social Networks is one example of large-scale user-location data. Such data provide a valuable source for understanding patterns governing human mobility, and thus enable a wide range of research. However, mining and utilizing raw user-location data is a challenging task. This is mainly due to the sparsity of data (at the user level), the imbalance of data with power-law users and locations check-ins degree (at the global level), and more importantly the lack of a uniform low-dimensional feature space describing users. Three latent feature models are proposed in this dissertation. Each proposed model takes as an input a collection of user-location check-ins, and outputs a new representation space for users and locations respectively. To avoid invading users privacy, the proposed models are designed to learn from anonymized location data where only IDs - not geophysical positioning or category - of locations are utilized. To enrich the inferred mobility patterns, the proposed models incorporate metadata, often associated with user-location data, into the inference process. In this dissertation, two types of metadata are utilized to enrich the inferred patterns, timestamps and social ties. Time adds context to the inferred patterns, while social ties amplifies incomplete user-location check-ins. The first proposed model incorporates timestamps by learning from collections of users’ locations sharing the same discretized time. The second proposed model also incorporates time into the learning model, yet takes a further step by considering time at different scales (hour of a day, day of a week, month, and so on). This change in modeling time allows for capturing meaningful patterns over different times scales. The last proposed model incorporates social ties into the learning process to compensate for inactive users who contribute a large volume

  5. Novel Virtual User Models of Mild Cognitive Impairment for Simulating Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segkouli, Sofia; Paliokas, Ioannis; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Tsakiris, Thanos; Tsolaki, Magda; Karagiannidis, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Virtual user modeling research has attempted to address critical issues of human-computer interaction (HCI) such as usability and utility through a large number of analytic, usability-oriented approaches as cognitive models in order to provide users with experiences fitting to their specific needs. However, there is demand for more specific modules embodied in cognitive architecture that will detect abnormal cognitive decline across new synthetic task environments. Also, accessibility evaluation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) requires considerable effort for enhancing ICT products accessibility for older adults. The main aim of this study is to develop and test virtual user models (VUM) simulating mild cognitive impairment (MCI) through novel specific modules, embodied at cognitive models and defined by estimations of cognitive parameters. Well-established MCI detection tests assessed users' cognition, elaborated their ability to perform multitasks, and monitored the performance of infotainment related tasks to provide more accurate simulation results on existing conceptual frameworks and enhanced predictive validity in interfaces' design supported by increased tasks' complexity to capture a more detailed profile of users' capabilities and limitations. The final outcome is a more robust cognitive prediction model, accurately fitted to human data to be used for more reliable interfaces' evaluation through simulation on the basis of virtual models of MCI users.

  6. Exploring the persona model as a tool to generate user insight through co-creation with users in the early phase of a design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jane Holm; Haase, Louise Møller

    2017-01-01

    The persona model is a widely know tool for synthesizing user research. A persona is a hypothetical archetype based on actual users, which is typically created to create a shared understanding of the user in the design team. Previous research has focused on the personal model as a consensus......-making tool. However, in this paper the aim is to explore, whether the persona model can also be useful and valuable for collecting user insights. More specifically, the paper investigates the potentials and challenges of using the persona model as a generative tool to achieve user insight, when co...... as a generative tool and so far the empirical study includes only two co-creation-workshops, which is too few to make any solid conclusions. Still, the study indicates some interesting insights about the potentials and challenges the persona model has, when used as a generative tool....

  7. One decade of the Data Fusion Information Group (DFIG) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasch, Erik

    2015-05-01

    The revision of the Joint Directors of the Laboratories (JDL) Information Fusion model in 2004 discussed information processing, incorporated the analyst, and was coined the Data Fusion Information Group (DFIG) model. Since that time, developments in information technology (e.g., cloud computing, applications, and multimedia) have altered the role of the analyst. Data production has outpaced the analyst; however the analyst still has the role of data refinement and information reporting. In this paper, we highlight three examples being addressed by the DFIG model. One example is the role of the analyst to provide semantic queries (through an ontology) so that vast amount of data available can be indexed, accessed, retrieved, and processed. The second idea is reporting which requires the analyst to collect the data into a condensed and meaningful form through information management. The last example is the interpretation of the resolved information from data that must include contextual information not inherent in the data itself. Through a literature review, the DFIG developments in the last decade demonstrate the usability of the DFIG model to bring together the user (analyst or operator) and the machine (information fusion or manager) in a systems design.

  8. [Development and evaluation of a therapeutic community model in Japan: Use of an encounter group method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikitsuchi, Emi; Okazaki, Shigeto; Yamasaki, Akiyoshi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a therapeutic community (TC) model in the Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Center (DARC), the rehabilitation facility group managed by recovered drug users in Japan, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the model. The TC model is a drug-free self-help program that is significant for its use of the peer community to facilitate social and psychological change in individuals. Although the TC model has been developed around the world in a variety of settings, its use in Japan is not well known. We introduced the therapy group with an encounter group method representing the TC model at the Kawasaki DARC, and conducted pre- and post-evaluations using the modified Self-Actualization Scale (SEAS2000). Results showed that the scores of the subscale "sobering of self-affirmation" were remarkably high among those who experienced encounter groups for six months. However, the scores of the subscale "release from biased view" declined among the users at the DARC who have experienced encounter group. for a short-term, while .the scores increased among those who have a medium-term and a long-term experience. These results suggest that the encounter group may be effective especially for the medium- and long-term users in the DARC. The development of a more effective TC model is required.

  9. Experience, Challenges, and Opportunities of Being Fully Embedded in a User Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin; Thornton, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Embedded librarian models can assume different forms and levels, depending on patron needs and a library's choice of delivery services. An academic health sciences library decided to enhance its service delivery model by integrating a librarian into the College of Pharmacy, approximately 250 miles away from the main library. This article describes the embedded librarian's first-year experience, challenges, and opportunities working as a library faculty in the college. The comparison of one-year recorded statistics on preembedded and postembedded activities demonstrated the effectiveness and impact of such an embedded librarian model.

  10. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 6: User's manual for 1-dimensional numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth (e.g., natural or man-made inland lakes) because surface elevation has been removed as a parameter.

  11. User's guide to the LIRAQ model: an air pollution model for the San Francisco Bay Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCracken, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    The Livermore Regional Air Quality (LIRAQ) model comprises a set of computer programs that have been integrated into an easily used tool for the air quality planner. To assemble and modify the necessary data files and to direct model execution, a problem formulation program has been developed that makes possible the setup of a wide variety of studies involving perturbation of the emission inventory, changes to the initial and boundary conditions, and different choices of grid size and problem domain. In addition to describing the types of air quality problems for which the LIRAQ model may be used, this User's Guide provides detailed information on how to set up and conduct model simulations. Also included are descriptions of the formats of input data files so that the LIRAQ model may be applied to regions other than the San Francisco Bay Area

  12. Policy based traffic light control – Balancing weights of user groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Wismans, Luc Johannes Josephus; Tutert, Bas

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of policy-based target groups, we developed a prioritization strategy for traffic streams and applied it with the adaptive urban traffic control (UTC) ImFlow. Our main aim was to gain understanding of the possibilities of a policy driven prioritization in an urban context. We conclude

  13. The impact of an online Facebook support group for people with multiple sclerosis on non-active users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Jacqui; Pretorius, Chrisma

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease and there is little research on support networks for people with MS (PwMS). More specifically, most studies on online support groups focus on those who actively participate in the group, whereas the majority of those who utilise online support groups do so in a passive way. This study therefore aimed to explore the experiences of non-active users of an online Facebook support group for PwMS. Emphasis was placed on the facilitators and the barriers that were associated with membership to this group. An exploratory qualitative research design was implemented, whereby thematic analysis was utilised to examine the ten semi-structured interviews that were conducted. Several facilitators were acquired through the online support group; namely emotional support (constant source of support, exposure to negative aspects of the disease), informational support (group as a source of knowledge, quality of information) and social companionship (place of belonging). Some barriers were also identified; namely emotional support (emotions lost online, response to messages, exposure to negative aspects of the disease), informational support (information posted on the group, misuse of group) and social companionship (non-active status). These findings demonstrate that the non-active members of the online support group for PwMS have valid reasons for their non-active membership status. More important, the findings suggest that the online Facebook support group provided the group members with an important support network in the form of emotional support, informational support and social companionship, despite their non-active membership status or the barriers that have been identified.

  14. Multilevel Modeling for Research in Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, James P.; Trott, Arianna; Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers in group counseling often encounter complex data from individual clients who are members of a group. Clients in the same group may be more similar than clients from different groups and this can lead to violations of statistical assumptions. The complexity of the data also means that predictors and outcomes can be measured at both the…

  15. Self-expression, group affiliation, pleasure and memory as predictors of consumer product attachment and satisfaction among mobile phone users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kagiso Tlhabano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the post-purchase behaviour of a product, there are challenges with change in the degree of consumer product attachment, and these challenges affect consumer product satisfaction overtime. This study investigated how self-expression, group affiliation, memory, and demographic variables predicted consumer product attachment and satisfaction among mobile phone users in Ibadan. Three hundred students of the University of Ibadan were selected using convenient random selection. Their mean age was 20.7 and standard deviation of 2.52. A structured questionnaire consisting of the socio demographic section, measure of self-expression, group affiliation, memory, pleasure, consumer attachment and product satisfaction was used to collect the data. Using multiple regression analysis, the results showed that self-expression, group affiliation, memories and pleasure jointly predicted consumer attachment among mobile phone users, F (4,299 = 48.47; P<0.05 and they contributed 40% to the variance of consumer attachment. Self-expression (β = 0.26, t = 4.44, P<0.05, memory (β = 0.29, t = 4.97, P<0.05, and pleasure (β = 0.28, t =5.01, P<0.05 independently predicted consumer attachment while group affiliation did not. In addition, self- expression, group affiliation, memories and pleasure jointly predicted product satisfaction, F (4,299 =39.79; P<0.05 and they contributed 35% to the variance of product satisfaction. Pleasure (β=0.596, t =10.35, P<0.05 independently predicted product satisfaction while self-expression, group affiliation and memory did not. Furthermore, age, gender, mobile type, ethnicity and religion did not jointly and independently predict consumer product satisfaction. These findings have implication for mobile phone manufacturers in terms of product improvement and building a strategic marketing channel that would meet the needs of global consumers.

  16. Public Auditing with Privacy Protection in a Multi-User Model of Cloud-Assisted Body Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Cui, Jie; Zhong, Hong; Liu, Lu

    2017-05-05

    Wireless Body Sensor Networks (WBSNs) are gaining importance in the era of the Internet of Things (IoT). The modern medical system is a particular area where the WBSN techniques are being increasingly adopted for various fundamental operations. Despite such increasing deployments of WBSNs, issues such as the infancy in the size, capabilities and limited data processing capacities of the sensor devices restrain their adoption in resource-demanding applications. Though providing computing and storage supplements from cloud servers can potentially enrich the capabilities of the WBSNs devices, data security is one of the prevailing issues that affects the reliability of cloud-assisted services. Sensitive applications such as modern medical systems demand assurance of the privacy of the users' medical records stored in distant cloud servers. Since it is economically impossible to set up private cloud servers for every client, auditing data security managed in the remote servers has necessarily become an integral requirement of WBSNs' applications relying on public cloud servers. To this end, this paper proposes a novel certificateless public auditing scheme with integrated privacy protection. The multi-user model in our scheme supports groups of users to store and share data, thus exhibiting the potential for WBSNs' deployments within community environments. Furthermore, our scheme enriches user experiences by offering public verifiability, forward security mechanisms and revocation of illegal group members. Experimental evaluations demonstrate the security effectiveness of our proposed scheme under the Random Oracle Model (ROM) by outperforming existing cloud-assisted WBSN models.

  17. Spud and FLML: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, D. A.; Farrell, P. E.; Maddison, J. R.; Gorman, G. J.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Shipton, J.; Collins, G. S.; Cotter, C. J.; Piggott, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    The interfaces by which users specify the scenarios to be simulated by scientific computer models are frequently primitive, under-documented and ad-hoc text files which make using the model in question difficult and error-prone and significantly increase the development cost of the model. We present a model-independent system, Spud[1], which formalises the specification of model input formats in terms of formal grammars. This is combined with an automatically generated graphical user interface which guides users to create valid model inputs based on the grammar provided, and a generic options reading module which minimises the development cost of adding model options. We further present FLML, the Fluidity Markup Language. FLML applies Spud to the Imperial College Ocean Model (ICOM) resulting in a graphically driven system which radically improves the usability of ICOM. As well as a step forward for ICOM, FLML illustrates how the Spud system can be applied to an existing complex ocean model highlighting the potential of Spud as a user interface for other codes in the ocean modelling community. [1] Ham, D. A. et.al, Spud 1.0: generalising and automating the user interfaces of scientific computer models, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 1, 125-146, 2008.

  18. The USEtox story: A survey of model developer visions and user requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Torbjørn Bochsen; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Birkved, Morten

    2015-01-01

    into LCA software and methods, (4) improve update/testing procedures, (5) strengthen communication between developers and users, and (6) extend model scope. By generalizing our recommendations to guide scientific model development in a broader context, we emphasize to acknowledge different levels of user......, we analyzed user expectations and experiences and compared them with the developers’ visions. Methods We applied qualitative and quantitative data collection methods including an online questionnaire, semistructured user and developer interviews, and review of scientific literature. Questionnaire...... and interview results were analyzed in an actor-network perspective in order to understand user needs and to compare these with the developers’ visions. Requirement engineering methods, more specifically function tree, system context, and activity diagrams, were iteratively applied and structured to develop...

  19. Modeling Integrated Water-User Decisions with Intermittent Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, J. R.; Rosenberg, D.

    2006-12-01

    We present an economic-engineering method to estimate urban water use demands with intermittent water supplies. A two-stage, probabilistic optimization formulation includes a wide variety of water supply enhancement and conservation actions that individual households can adopt to meet multiple water quality uses with uncertain water availability. We embed the optimization in Monte-Carlo simulations to show aggregate effects at a utility (citywide) scale for a population of user conditions and decisions. Parametric analysis provides derivations of supply curves to subsidize conservation, demand responses to alternative pricing, and customer willingness-to-pay to avoid shortages. Results show a good empirical fit for the average and distribution of billed residential water use in Amman, Jordan. Additional outputs give likely market penetration rates for household conservation actions, associated water savings, and subsidies required to entice further adoption. We discuss new insights to size, target, market, and finance conservation programs and interpret a demand curve with block pricing.

  20. Users guide for the hydroacoustic coverage assessment model (HydroCAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, T., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    A model for predicting the detection and localization performance of hydroacoustic monitoring networks has been developed. The model accounts for major factors affecting global-scale acoustic propagation in the ocean. including horizontal refraction, travel time variability due to spatial and temporal fluctuations in the ocean, and detailed characteristics of the source. Graphical user interfaces are provided to setup the models and visualize the results. The model produces maps of network detection coverage and localization area of uncertainty, as well as intermediate results such as predicted path amplitudes, travel time and travel time variance. This Users Guide for the model is organized into three sections. First a summary of functionality available in the model is presented, including example output products. The second section provides detailed descriptions of each of models contained in the system. The last section describes how to run the model, including a summary of each data input form in the user interface.

  1. Model based estimation for multi-modal user interface component selection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available for inter- action are well understood, the general problem of integrated multi-modal systems are yet to be understood to the same level. User modelling plays an important role within user- adaptive systems. Kobsa [5] presents a review on the devel... and providers of services and therefore user modelling tools will continue to play an important role in computer systems. Even though the utilisation of multiple modalities to break down the access barrier has been addressed by several re- searchers...

  2. Modeling Goal-Directed User Exploration in Human-Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    sculptures architecture Theater Musicians & Composers Cinema , Television, & Broadcasting Music Dance Musical Instruments” The text entered for the...example, if LSA is selected, one can select the appropriate LSA semantic space (corpus) to best match the demographics of the type of users the modeler...semantic space (corpus) to best match the demographics of the type of users the modeler wants predictions for. In the “Eagerness to Choose” field

  3. Modelling Psychological Needs for User-dependent Contextual Suggestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    gallery, bakery, bar, book store, bowling alley, cafe, casino, church, city hall, department store, food, library , mosque, movie theater, museum...district, place of worship, library as another group, and park, zoo, aquarium, natural reserve as yet another group. We have manually dis- tributed...Sacramento, Anchorage, Honolulu and Lawton. And for Erie, Lancaster , Kalamazoo, Homosassa Springs, Toledo, Albuquerque and Kansas City, our system per

  4. Development, implementation and evaluation of an information model for archetype based user responsive medical data visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanitsa, Georgy; Veseli, Hasan; Yampolsky, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    When medical data have been successfully recorded or exchanged between systems there appear a need to present the data consistently to ensure that it is clearly understood and interpreted. A standard based user interface can provide interoperability on the visual level. The goal of this research was to develop, implement and evaluate an information model for building user interfaces for archetype based medical data. The following types of knowledge were identified as important elements and were included in the information model: medical content related attributes, data type related attributes, user-related attributes, device-related attributes. In order to support flexible and efficient user interfaces an approach that represents different types of knowledge with different models separating the medical concept from a visual concept and interface realization was chosen. We evaluated the developed approach using Guideline for Good Evaluation Practice in Health Informatics (GEP-HI). We developed a higher level information model to complement the ISO 13606 archetype model. This enabled the specification of the presentation properties at the moment of the archetypes' definition. The model allows realizing different users' perspectives on the data. The approach was implemented and evaluated within a functioning EHR system. The evaluation involved 30 patients of different age and IT experience and 5 doctors. One month of testing showed that the time required reading electronic health records decreased for both doctors (from average 310 to 220s) and patients (from average 95 to 39s). Users reported a high level of satisfaction and motivation to use the presented data visualization approach especially in comparison with their previous experience. The introduced information model allows separating medical knowledge and presentation knowledge. The additional presentation layer will enrich the graphical user interface's flexibility and will allow an optimal presentation of

  5. Solar Advisor Model User Guide for Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P.; Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Christensen, C.; Janzou, S.; Cameron, C.

    2008-08-01

    The Solar Advisor Model (SAM) provides a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, from photovoltaic systems for residential and commercial markets to concentrating solar power and large photovoltaic systems for utility markets. This manual describes Version 2.0 of the software, which can model photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies for electric applications for several markets. The current version of the Solar Advisor Model does not model solar heating and lighting technologies.

  6. EFNEP graduates' perspectives on social media to supplement nutrition education: focus group findings from active users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Tashara M; Benavente, Lisa; Goodell, L Suzanne; Lassiter, Annie; Jones, Lorelei; Bowen, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    To identify ways to effectively use social media to communicate nutrition-related information to low-income populations. The authors conducted 4 focus groups with female Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program graduates who used social media at least twice a week (n = 26 total). Transcripts were analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify key themes. For participants, page content, page maintenance, and networking opportunities with others were important aspects of a nutrition education social media page. Trust emerged as a central theme, because participants expressed a need for reliable information from known, credible sources and safe places to share ideas. Using social media to provide nutrition-related messages may be an effective way to encourage sustained positive behavior changes resulting from educational programming and to engage participants beyond class time. Establishing the trustworthiness of the social media site is essential to its use among low-income participants. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The System Dynamics Model User Sustainability Explorer (SD-MUSE): a user-friendly tool for interpreting system dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    System Dynamics (SD) models are useful for holistic integration of data to evaluate indirect and cumulative effects and inform decisions. Complex SD models can provide key insights into how decisions affect the three interconnected pillars of sustainability. However, the complexi...

  8. Evaluating a web-based health risk assessment with tailored feedback: what does an expert focus group yield compared to a web-based end-user survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbergen, Sandra; Mahieu, Guy R; Laan, Eva K; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Jaspers, Monique Wm; Peek, Niels

    2014-01-02

    Increasingly, Web-based health applications are developed for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, their reach and utilization is often disappointing. Qualitative evaluations post-implementation can be used to inform the optimization process and ultimately enhance their adoption. In current practice, such evaluations are mainly performed with end-user surveys. However, a review approach by experts in a focus group may be easier to administer and might provide similar results. The aim of this study was to assess whether industrial design engineers in a focus group would address the same issues as end users in a Web-based survey when evaluating a commercial Web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with tailored feedback. Seven Dutch companies used the HRA as part of their corporate health management strategy. Employees using the HRA (N=2289) and 10 independent industrial designers were invited to participate in the study. The HRA consisted of four components: (1) an electronic health questionnaire, (2) biometric measurements, (3) laboratory evaluation, and (4) individually tailored feedback generated by decision support software. After participating in the HRA as end users, both end users and designers evaluated the program. End users completed an evaluation questionnaire that included a free-text field. Designers participated in a focus group discussion. Constructs from user satisfaction and technology acceptance theories were used to categorize and compare the remarks from both evaluations. We assessed and qualitatively analyzed 294 remarks of 189 end users and 337 remarks of 6 industrial designers, pertaining to 295 issues in total. Of those, 137 issues were addressed in the end-user survey and 148 issues in the designer focus group. Only 7.3% (10/137) of the issues addressed in the survey were also addressed in the focus group. End users made more remarks about the usefulness of the HRA and prior expectations that were not met. Designers made

  9. User's guide for waste tank corrosion data model code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, D.B.; Divine, J.R.

    1986-12-01

    Corrosion tests were conducted on A-516 and A-537 carbon steel in simulated Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities wastes. The corrosion rate data, gathered between 25 and 180 0 C, were statistically ''modeled'' for each waste; a fourth model was developed that utilized the combined data. The report briefly describes the modeling procedure and details on how to access information through a computerized data system. Copies of the report and operating information may be obtained from the author (DB Mackey) at 509-376-9844 of FTS 444-9844

  10. Awareness about antibiotic resistance in a self-medication user group from Eastern Romania: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, Gabi; Grosu, Ionela-Alina; Ghiciuc, Cristina Mihaela; Strat, Aurel Lulu; Lupuşoru, Cătălina Elena

    2017-01-01

    Awareness about antibiotic resistance depends on the attitudes and information about antibiotic resistance of both patients and physicians. Persons who practice self-medication are at high risk of also self-medicating with antibiotics. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the awareness about antibiotic resistance by investigating the practice in a group of self-medication users in a sample of adults in Romania and the variables associated with such practice. A cross-sectional self-filled questionnaire based study was conducted from December 2016 through January 2017 amongst 218 self-medication users (SMUG). The attitudes, the level of knowledge, the perceptions, about antibiotic use (ABU) and about antibiotic resistance (ABR) were compared to a reference group represented by medical residents group in their specialty training (MRG) considered to have a higher level of knowledge and awareness about ABU and ABR. The response rate was 87.2% in the SMUG group and 100% in the MRG group. The SMUG group reported self-medication practices for antibiotics with a high frequency at any time in life (72%), but with a very low frequency from the month previous to the date of the study (12%), comparative with the MRG group (75% and 7%, respectively). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that self-medication with antibiotics at any time in life in the SMUG group could be predicted by the answers to two questions regarding the practices and knowledge about ABU (Q13 and Q20). On the other hand, in the MRG group, a question about ABR perception (Q23), could be predictor for self-medication with antibiotics. Self-medication with antibiotics in the month previous to the date of the study in the SMUG group could be predicted with three questions: one about ABU practice (Q14), one about ABR perception (Q26) and one referring to ABR knowledge (Q28). On the other hand, in the MRG group, a question about ABR knowledge (Q32) could be predictor for self

  11. Combining Unsupervised and Supervised Classification to Build User Models for Exploratory Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amershi, Saleema; Conati, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a data-based user modeling framework that uses both unsupervised and supervised classification to build student models for exploratory learning environments. We apply the framework to build student models for two different learning environments and using two different data sources (logged interface and eye-tracking data).…

  12. User's Guide for the Agricultural Non-Point Source (AGNPS) Pollution Model Data Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Michael P.; Scheidt, Douglas J.; Jaromack, Gregory M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Throughout this user guide, we refer to datasets that we used in conjunction with developing of this software for supporting cartographic research and producing the datasets to conduct research. However, this software can be used with these datasets or with more 'generic' versions of data of the appropriate type. For example, throughout the guide, we refer to national land cover data (NLCD) and digital elevation model (DEM) data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at a 30-m resolution, but any digital terrain model or land cover data at any appropriate resolution will produce results. Another key point to keep in mind is to use a consistent data resolution for all the datasets per model run. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) developed the Agricultural Nonpoint Source (AGNPS) pollution model of watershed hydrology in response to the complex problem of managing nonpoint sources of pollution. AGNPS simulates the behavior of runoff, sediment, and nutrient transport from watersheds that have agriculture as their prime use. The model operates on a cell basis and is a distributed parameter, event-based model. The model requires 22 input parameters. Output parameters are grouped primarily by hydrology, sediment, and chemical output (Young and others, 1995.) Elevation, land cover, and soil are the base data from which to extract the 22 input parameters required by the AGNPS. For automatic parameter extraction, follow the general process described in this guide of extraction from the geospatial data through the AGNPS Data Generator to generate input parameters required by the pollution model (Finn and others, 2002.)

  13. Headwater Benefits Energy Gains (HWBEG) model description and users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlack, R D; Turhollow, Jr, A F; Cohn, S M; Das, S; Rizy, C G; Tulley, Jr, J H; Kraemer, R D

    1984-02-01

    The Headwater Benefits Energy Gains (HWBEG) Model was developed for computing energy gains in complex regulated river basins. The model requires daily data on streamflows, storage changes at reservoirs, and power generation at hydroelectric plants. Mathematical relationships are derived from these data to explain the operation of storage reservoirs and the rating of hydropower plants. The HWBEG model assembles streamflows that would have been theoretically available for energy production under varying conditions of upstream reservoir operation. The model first eliminates all upstream storage changes to simulate an unregulated natural flow condition. The storage changes of upstream reservoirs are then added back to the unregulated natural flow in a sequence corresponding to the time the reservoirs began affecting streamflows. As each reservoir is added back to the river system, the hydropower generation attributable to that particular flow is calculated using the reservoir operating rules and the hydropower plant rating curves. Energy gains are determined by subtracting generation with from generation without the chronologically sequenced and combinatorial effects of the upstream storage reservoirs. The energy gains attributable to each storage reservoir are totalled yearly and become the basis for apportioning the cost of operating the upstream federal reservoir or headwater improvement. This report describes the operation of the model including the assembly of the requisite data bases and the use of the computer code.

  14. A Neural Network Approach to Intention Modeling for User-Adapted Conversational Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griol, David; Callejas, Zoraida

    2016-01-01

    Spoken dialogue systems have been proposed to enable a more natural and intuitive interaction with the environment and human-computer interfaces. In this contribution, we present a framework based on neural networks that allows modeling of the user's intention during the dialogue and uses this prediction to dynamically adapt the dialogue model of the system taking into consideration the user's needs and preferences. We have evaluated our proposal to develop a user-adapted spoken dialogue system that facilitates tourist information and services and provide a detailed discussion of the positive influence of our proposal in the success of the interaction, the information and services provided, and the quality perceived by the users.

  15. LEEM - a lake energy and evaporation model user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.J.; Robertson, E.

    1983-11-01

    LEEM is a simplified one-dimensional computer model of the energy budgets of lakes. It is intended to be used operationally to estimate evaporation rates averaged over several days using synoptic meteorological data with only the initial water temperatures being specified. These may usually be taken to be 4 deg. C a few days after spring break-up. This report describes the theoretical basis of the model and the algorithms by which these are converted to computer code. The code itself is included together with an exemplary set of data cards and the corresponding output

  16. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 Version: Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2010 (Mars-GRAM 2010) and its new features. Mars-GRAM is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Additionally, this TM includes instructions on obtaining the Mars-GRAM source code and data files as well as running Mars-GRAM. It also contains sample Mars-GRAM input and output files and an example of how to incorporate Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  17. Offshore and coastal dispersion (OCD) model. Users guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.; Schulman, L.L.; Paine, R.J.; Pleim, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model was adapted from the EPA guideline model MPTER to simulate the effect of offshore emissions from point sources in coastal regions. Modifications were made to incorporate overwater plume transport and dispersion as well as changes that occur as the plume crosses the shoreline. Hourly meteorological data are needed from overwater and overland locations. Turbulence intensities are used but are not mandatory. For overwater dispersion, the turbulence intensities are parameterized from boundary-layer similarity relationships if they are not measured. Specifications of emission characteristics and receptor locations are the same as for MPTER; 250 point sources and 180 receptors may be used

  18. Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling (TCM): User's Guide and Reference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehne, F.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    1997-01-01

    The Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling (TCM) is a suite of graphical editors for a number of graphical notation systems that are used in software specification methods. The notations can be used to represent the conceptual structure of the software - hence the name of the suite. This manual describes

  19. Expanding the Work Phases Model: User and Expert Involvement in the Construction of Online Specialised Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroyer, Patrick

    The purpose of this article is to establish new proposals for the lexicographic process and the involvement of experts and users in the construction of online specialised dictionaries. It is argued that the ENeL action should also have a view to the development of innovative theories...... and methodologies for the construction of online specialised dictionaries, and a new model for user and expert involvement is proposed....

  20. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Marshall [MRG and Associates, Nevada City, CA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  1. Novel Virtual User Models of Mild Cognitive Impairment for Simulating Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Segkouli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual user modeling research has attempted to address critical issues of human-computer interaction (HCI such as usability and utility through a large number of analytic, usability-oriented approaches as cognitive models in order to provide users with experiences fitting to their specific needs. However, there is demand for more specific modules embodied in cognitive architecture that will detect abnormal cognitive decline across new synthetic task environments. Also, accessibility evaluation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs requires considerable effort for enhancing ICT products accessibility for older adults. The main aim of this study is to develop and test virtual user models (VUM simulating mild cognitive impairment (MCI through novel specific modules, embodied at cognitive models and defined by estimations of cognitive parameters. Well-established MCI detection tests assessed users’ cognition, elaborated their ability to perform multitasks, and monitored the performance of infotainment related tasks to provide more accurate simulation results on existing conceptual frameworks and enhanced predictive validity in interfaces’ design supported by increased tasks’ complexity to capture a more detailed profile of users’ capabilities and limitations. The final outcome is a more robust cognitive prediction model, accurately fitted to human data to be used for more reliable interfaces’ evaluation through simulation on the basis of virtual models of MCI users.

  2. Working group report: Beyond the standard model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Superstring-inspired phenomenology: This included. – models of low-scale quantum gravity with one or more extra dimensions,. – noncommutative geometry and gauge theories,. – string-inspired grand unification. • Models of supersymmetry-breaking: This included. – Supersymmetry-breaking in minimal supergravity ...

  3. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland. OBJECTIVES: This sub-study addressed the question: what...... is the lay user perspective on pharmaceuticals and pharmacy services, including their perception of risk? METHODS: To answer this question, seven focus group discussions were conducted with pharmacy customers in different locations in Iceland following new drug distribution legislation in 1996. RESULTS......: The lay perspective emphasizes a definite split between lay and expert views on the value and quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services, as well as in their assessment of risk. Participants voiced spontaneous criticism of the roles of both physicians and pharmacists in drug therapy...

  4. User manual of nuclide dispersion in phreatic aquifers model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rives, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclide Dispersion in Phreatic Aquifers (DRAF) model was developed in the 'Division Estudios Ambientales' of the 'Gerencia de Seguridad Radiologica y Nuclear, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica' (1991), for the Safety Assessment of Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities. Afterwards, it was modified in several opportunities, adapting it to a number of application conditions. The 'Manual del usuario del codigo DRAF' here presented is a reference document for the use of the last three versions of the code developed for the 'Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear' between 1995 and 1996. The DRAF model solves the three dimension's solute transport equation for porous media by the finite differences method. It takes into account the advection, dispersion, radioactive decay, and retention in the solid matrix processes, and has multiple possibilities for the source term. There are three versions of the model, two of them for the saturated zone and one for the unsaturated zone. All the versions have been verified in different conditions, and have been applied in exercises of the International Atomic Energy Agency and also in real cases. (author)

  5. A 3D City Model Used as User-interface for an Energy-system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Erik

    2011-01-01

    At CUPUM 2009 the project “Object Oriented Visualization of Urban Energy Consumption” was presented, explaining the technology behind the visualization of an energy-model connected to a 3D city model. This paper presents the subsequent work involving the final design, the user involvement...... and the overall results after the system has been used at the Bright Green Exhibition connected to the COP15 conference in Copenhagen. This paper presents the empirical findings of the attempt to use a 3D city model as user-interface. The system gave the user the possibility to try out different scenarios...... of combinations of the energy-consumption and energy-production for an entire city. The interface was supposed to help especially nonprofessionals, among them politicians, to better perceive the numbers and graphs adjoining the 3D model in a combined view. Only very few systems have been developed for this kind...

  6. Group Modeling in Social Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankov, Slavomir; Glavinic, Vlado; Krpan, Divna

    2012-01-01

    Students' collaboration while learning could provide better learning environments. Collaboration assumes social interactions which occur in student groups. Social theories emphasize positive influence of such interactions on learning. In order to create an appropriate learning environment that enables social interactions, it is important to…

  7. IoT-Based User-Driven Service Modeling Environment for a Smart Space Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-01-01

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service. PMID:25420153

  8. IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment for a smart space management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-11-20

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  9. User-driven health care: answering multidimensional information needs in individual patients utilizing post-EBM approaches: an operational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Rakesh; Maniam, Jayanthy; Lee, Edwin Wen Huo; Gopal, Premalatha; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Dahiya, Sumit; Ahmed, Sayeed

    2008-10-01

    The hypothesis in the conceptual model was that a user-driven innovation in presently available information and communication technology infrastructure would be able to meet patient and health professional users information needs and help them attain better health outcomes. An operational model was created to plan a trial on a sample diabetic population utilizing a randomized control trial design, assigning one randomly selected group of diabetics to receive electronic information intervention and analyse if it would improve their health outcomes in comparison with a matched diabetic population who would only receive regular medical intervention. Diabetes was chosen for this particular trial, as it is a major chronic illness in Malaysia as elsewhere in the world. It is in essence a position paper for how the study concept should be organized to stimulate wider discussion prior to beginning the study.

  10. Enhanced UWB Radio Channel Model for Short-Range Communication Scenarios Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2005-01-01

    channel model represents an enhancement of the existing IEEE 802.15.3a/4a PAN channel model, where antenna and user-proximity effects are not included. Our investigations showed that significant variations of the received wideband power and time-delay signal clustering are possible due the human body...

  11. Featuring Multiple Local Optima to Assist the User in the Interpretation of Induced Bayesian Network Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Jens; Pena, Jose; Kocka, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    We propose a method to assist the user in the interpretation of the best Bayesian network model indu- ced from data. The method consists in extracting relevant features from the model (e.g. edges, directed paths and Markov blankets) and, then, assessing the con¯dence in them by studying multiple...

  12. Disconfirming User Expectations of the Online Service Experience: Inferred versus Direct Disconfirmation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Martin; Palmer, Adrian; Wright, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Disconfirmation models of online service measurement seek to define service quality as the difference between user expectations of the service to be received and perceptions of the service actually received. Two such models-inferred and direct disconfirmation-for measuring quality of the online experience are compared (WebQUAL, SERVQUAL). Findings…

  13. Introducing a new open source GIS user interface for the SWAT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is a robust watershed modelling tool. It typically uses the ArcSWAT interface to create its inputs. ArcSWAT is public domain software which works in the licensed ArcGIS environment. The aim of this paper was to develop an open source user interface ...

  14. A user-friendly model for spray drying to aid pharmaceutical product development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasmeijer, Niels; de Waard, Hans; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a user-friendly model for spray drying that can aid in the development of a pharmaceutical product, by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach. To achieve this, a spray dryer model was developed in commercial and open source

  15. The System Dynamics Model User Sustainability Explorer (SD-MUSE) user interface: a user-friendly tool for interpreting system dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainability-based decision making is a challenging process that requires balancing trade-offs among social, economic, and environmental components. System Dynamic (SD) models can be useful tools to inform sustainability-based decision making because they provide a holistic co...

  16. An integrated user-friendly ArcMAP tool for bivariate statistical modeling in geoscience applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebur, M. N.; Pradhan, B.; Shafri, H. Z. M.; Yusof, Z.; Tehrany, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Modeling and classification difficulties are fundamental issues in natural hazard assessment. A geographic information system (GIS) is a domain that requires users to use various tools to perform different types of spatial modeling. Bivariate statistical analysis (BSA) assists in hazard modeling. To perform this analysis, several calculations are required and the user has to transfer data from one format to another. Most researchers perform these calculations manually by using Microsoft Excel or other programs. This process is time consuming and carries a degree of uncertainty. The lack of proper tools to implement BSA in a GIS environment prompted this study. In this paper, a user-friendly tool, BSM (bivariate statistical modeler), for BSA technique is proposed. Three popular BSA techniques such as frequency ratio, weights-of-evidence, and evidential belief function models are applied in the newly proposed ArcMAP tool. This tool is programmed in Python and is created by a simple graphical user interface, which facilitates the improvement of model performance. The proposed tool implements BSA automatically, thus allowing numerous variables to be examined. To validate the capability and accuracy of this program, a pilot test area in Malaysia is selected and all three models are tested by using the proposed program. Area under curve is used to measure the success rate and prediction rate. Results demonstrate that the proposed program executes BSA with reasonable accuracy. The proposed BSA tool can be used in numerous applications, such as natural hazard, mineral potential, hydrological, and other engineering and environmental applications.

  17. Prediction of Speech Recognition in Cochlear Implant Users by Adapting Auditory Models to Psychophysical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svante Stadler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Users of cochlear implants (CIs vary widely in their ability to recognize speech in noisy conditions. There are many factors that may influence their performance. We have investigated to what degree it can be explained by the users' ability to discriminate spectral shapes. A speech recognition task has been simulated using both a simple and a complex models of CI hearing. The models were individualized by adapting their parameters to fit the results of a spectral discrimination test. The predicted speech recognition performance was compared to experimental results, and they were significantly correlated. The presented framework may be used to simulate the effects of changing the CI encoding strategy.

  18. User-defined Material Model for Thermo-mechanical Progressive Failure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Previously a user-defined material model for orthotropic bimodulus materials was developed for linear and nonlinear stress analysis of composite structures using either shell or solid finite elements within a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. Extensions of this user-defined material model to thermo-mechanical progressive failure analysis are described, and the required input data are documented. The extensions include providing for temperature-dependent material properties, archival of the elastic strains, and a thermal strain calculation for materials exhibiting a stress-free temperature.

  19. Geothermal loan guaranty cash flow model: description and users' manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keimig, M.A.; Rosenberg, J.I.; Entingh, D.J.

    1980-11-01

    This is the users guide for the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Cash Flow Model (GCFM). GCFM is a Fortran code which designs and costs geothermal fields and electric power plants. It contains a financial analysis module which performs life cycle costing analysis taking into account various types of taxes, costs and financial structures. The financial module includes a discounted cash flow feature which calculates a levelized breakeven price for each run. The user's guide contains descriptions of the data requirements and instructions for using the model.

  20. Multiloop functional renormalization group for general models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, Fabian B.; von Delft, Jan

    2018-02-01

    We present multiloop flow equations in the functional renormalization group (fRG) framework for the four-point vertex and self-energy, formulated for a general fermionic many-body problem. This generalizes the previously introduced vertex flow [F. B. Kugler and J. von Delft, Phys. Rev. Lett. 120, 057403 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.120.057403] and provides the necessary corrections to the self-energy flow in order to complete the derivative of all diagrams involved in the truncated fRG flow. Due to its iterative one-loop structure, the multiloop flow is well suited for numerical algorithms, enabling improvement of many fRG computations. We demonstrate its equivalence to a solution of the (first-order) parquet equations in conjunction with the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the self-energy.

  1. Formal Model for Data Dependency Analysis between Controls and Actions of a Graphical User Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SKVORC, D.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available End-user development is an emerging computer science discipline that provides programming paradigms, techniques, and tools suitable for users not trained in software engineering. One of the techniques that allow ordinary computer users to develop their own applications without the need to learn a classic programming language is a GUI-level programming based on programming-by-demonstration. To build wizard-based tools that assist users in application development and to verify the correctness of user programs, a computer-supported method for GUI-level data dependency analysis is necessary. Therefore, formal model for GUI representation is needed. In this paper, we present a finite state machine for modeling the data dependencies between GUI controls and GUI actions. Furthermore, we present an algorithm for automatic construction of finite state machine for arbitrary GUI application. We show that proposed state aggregation scheme successfully manages state explosion in state machine construction algorithm, which makes the model applicable for applications with complex GUIs.

  2. The impact of group model building on behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouwette, E.A.J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Group model building refers to a process of building system dynamics models with decision makers, experts, and other stakeholders. Involving stakeholders in building system dynamics models has a long history going back several decades (Andersen, Vennix, Richardson, & Rouwette, 2007). In

  3. A Global User-Driven Model for Tile Prefetching in Web Geographical Information Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoming Pan

    Full Text Available A web geographical information system is a typical service-intensive application. Tile prefetching and cache replacement can improve cache hit ratios by proactively fetching tiles from storage and replacing the appropriate tiles from the high-speed cache buffer without waiting for a client's requests, which reduces disk latency and improves system access performance. Most popular prefetching strategies consider only the relative tile popularities to predict which tile should be prefetched or consider only a single individual user's access behavior to determine which neighbor tiles need to be prefetched. Some studies show that comprehensively considering all users' access behaviors and all tiles' relationships in the prediction process can achieve more significant improvements. Thus, this work proposes a new global user-driven model for tile prefetching and cache replacement. First, based on all users' access behaviors, a type of expression method for tile correlation is designed and implemented. Then, a conditional prefetching probability can be computed based on the proposed correlation expression mode. Thus, some tiles to be prefetched can be found by computing and comparing the conditional prefetching probability from the uncached tiles set and, similarly, some replacement tiles can be found in the cache buffer according to multi-step prefetching. Finally, some experiments are provided comparing the proposed model with other global user-driven models, other single user-driven models, and other client-side prefetching strategies. The results show that the proposed model can achieve a prefetching hit rate in approximately 10.6% ~ 110.5% higher than the compared methods.

  4. A Global User-Driven Model for Tile Prefetching in Web Geographical Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shaoming; Chong, Yanwen; Zhang, Hang; Tan, Xicheng

    2017-01-01

    A web geographical information system is a typical service-intensive application. Tile prefetching and cache replacement can improve cache hit ratios by proactively fetching tiles from storage and replacing the appropriate tiles from the high-speed cache buffer without waiting for a client's requests, which reduces disk latency and improves system access performance. Most popular prefetching strategies consider only the relative tile popularities to predict which tile should be prefetched or consider only a single individual user's access behavior to determine which neighbor tiles need to be prefetched. Some studies show that comprehensively considering all users' access behaviors and all tiles' relationships in the prediction process can achieve more significant improvements. Thus, this work proposes a new global user-driven model for tile prefetching and cache replacement. First, based on all users' access behaviors, a type of expression method for tile correlation is designed and implemented. Then, a conditional prefetching probability can be computed based on the proposed correlation expression mode. Thus, some tiles to be prefetched can be found by computing and comparing the conditional prefetching probability from the uncached tiles set and, similarly, some replacement tiles can be found in the cache buffer according to multi-step prefetching. Finally, some experiments are provided comparing the proposed model with other global user-driven models, other single user-driven models, and other client-side prefetching strategies. The results show that the proposed model can achieve a prefetching hit rate in approximately 10.6% ~ 110.5% higher than the compared methods.

  5. Interprofessional learning in primary care: an exploration of the service user experience leads to a new model for co-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worswick, Louise; Little, Christine; Ryan, Kath; Carr, Eloise

    2015-01-01

    Research about service user involvement in research and education focuses on the purpose, the methods, the barriers and the impact of their involvement. Few studies report on the experience of the service users who get involved. This paper reports an exploration of the experience of service users who participated in an interprofessional educational initiative in primary care - the Learning to Improve the Management of Back Pain in the Community (LIMBIC) project. Service users attended workshops with practice teams and assisted them in developing small scale quality improvement projects to improve their provision of care for people with back pain. To explore the experience of service users involved in the LIMBIC project. Using the philosophical and methodological approaches of pragmatism this study analysed data from the wider LIMBIC project and collected primary data through semi structured interviews with service users. Secondary data were reanalysed and integrated with primary data to address the research question. The study was undertaken in the primary health care setting. Patients participated as service users in workshops and quality improvement projects with members from their practice teams. Interviews with service users were transcribed and analysed thematically. Document and thematic analyses of secondary data from the LIMBIC project included focus group transcripts, patient stories, film, emails, meeting notes, a wiki and educational material such as presentations. Themes identified through the analyses illustrated the importance, to the service users, of the sense of community, of clear communication, and of influencing change through involvement. A model for co-learning with service users resulted from the analyses. The experience of service users can be optimised by planning, preparation and support so that their wealth of expertise can be recognised and utilised. A model for co-learning was developed and is presented in this paper. Copyright © 2014

  6. Do Stochastic Traffic Assignment Models Consider Differences in Road Users Utility Functions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Anker

    1996-01-01

    The early stochastic traffic assignment models (e.g. Dial, 1971) build on the assump-tion that different routes are independent (the logit-model concept). Thus, the models gave severe problems in networks with overlapping routes. Daganzo & Sheffi (1977) suggested to use probit based models...... to overcome this problem. Sheffi & Powell (1981) presented a practically operational solution algorithm in which the travel resistance for each road segment is adjusted according to a Monte Carlo simulation following the Normal-distribution. By this the road users’ ‘perceived travel resistances’ are simulated....... A similar concept is used as a part of the Sto-chastic User Equilibrium model (SUE) suggested by Daganzo and Sheffi (1977) and operationalized by Sheffi & Powell (1982). In the paper it is discussed whether this way of modelling the ‘perceived travel resistance’ is sufficient to describe the road users...

  7. The Models of Applying Online Privacy Literacy Strategies: A Case Study of Instagram Girl Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollah Bicharanlou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Social networks affect remarkably in the lives of virtual space users. These networks like most human relations involve compromising between self-disclosure and privacy protection. A process which is realized through improving privacy and empowering the user at the personal level. This study aimed to assess strategies based on online privacy literacy. In particular, strategies that Instagram young girls users should employ to achieve the optimum level of privacy. For this purpose, firstly the paradox of privacy, benefits and risks of self-disclosure are explained, then according to online privacy literacy, some social and technological strategies are introduced by which users can solve the “paradox of privacy.” In the result section, after describing the main benefits and risks of self-disclosure by girl users, the current models of using these social and technological strategies to solve the mentioned paradox are discussed. The research method is ethnography based on non-collaborative observation of Instagram pages and semi-structured interviews with 20 girl users of social networks.

  8. User Modeling for Point-of-Interest Recommendations in Location-Based Social Networks: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth of location-based services (LBSs has greatly enriched people’s urban lives and attracted millions of users in recent years. Location-based social networks (LBSNs allow users to check-in at a physical location and share daily tips on points of interest (POIs with their friends anytime and anywhere. Such a check-in behavior can make daily real-life experiences spread quickly through the Internet. Moreover, such check-in data in LBSNs can be fully exploited to understand the basic laws of humans’ daily movement and mobility. This paper focuses on reviewing the taxonomy of user modeling for POI recommendations through the data analysis of LBSNs. First, we briefly introduce the structure and data characteristics of LBSNs, and then we present a formalization of user modeling for POI recommendations in LBSNs. Depending on which type of LBSNs data was fully utilized in user modeling approaches for POI recommendations, we divide user modeling algorithms into four categories: pure check-in data-based user modeling, geographical information-based user modeling, spatiotemporal information-based user modeling, and geosocial information-based user modeling. Finally, summarizing the existing works, we point out the future challenges and new directions in five possible aspects.

  9. Social Fingerprinting: detection of spambot groups through DNA-inspired behavioral modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresci, Stefano; Di Pietro, Roberto; Petrocchi, Marinella

    2017-01-01

    it with three state-of-the-art detection algorithms. Among the peculiarities of our approach is the possibility to apply off-the-shelf DNA analysis techniques to study online users behaviors and to efficiently rely on a limited number of lightweight account characteristics....... to go undetected even by current state-of-the-art algorithms. In this paper, we show that efficient spambots detection can be achieved via an in-depth analysis of their collective behaviors exploiting the digital DNA technique for modeling the behaviors of social network users. Inspired by its...... biological counterpart, in the digital DNA representation the behavioral lifetime of a digital account is encoded in a sequence of characters. Then, we define a similarity measure for such digital DNA sequences. We build upon digital DNA and the similarity between groups of users to characterize both genuine...

  10. Exploring the Nature and Implementation Process of User-Centric Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hienerth, Christoph; Keinz, Peter; Lettl, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Recent ICT advances have allowed companies to interact with external stakeholders, especially users, in more efficient and effective ways, with the result that more and more companies are striving to take advantage of these new opportunities and harness their users’ creative potential by integrat......Recent ICT advances have allowed companies to interact with external stakeholders, especially users, in more efficient and effective ways, with the result that more and more companies are striving to take advantage of these new opportunities and harness their users’ creative potential...... by integrating them into core business processes. Successful companies like Threadless or Dell - which were designed to allow user innovation and co-creation from the outset - have clearly demonstrated the potential value of such approaches. However, introducing user-centric value creation processes...... at established companies is a complex task, requiring major adaptations to traditional manufacturer-centered business models. At present, little is known about how such companies can successfully implement user-centric business models: this article explores (1) the success factors for attracting and engaging...

  11. Modeling the heterogeneity of human dynamics based on the measurements of influential users in Sina Microblog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxu; Guan, Xiaohong; Qin, Tao; Yang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Online social network has become an indispensable communication tool in the information age. The development of microblog also provides us a great opportunity to study human dynamics that play a crucial role in the design of efficient communication systems. In this paper we study the characteristics of the tweeting behavior based on the data collected from Sina Microblog. The user activity level is measured to characterize how often a user posts a tweet. We find that the user activity level follows a bimodal distribution. That is, the microblog users tend to be either active or inactive. The inter-tweeting time distribution is then measured at both the aggregate and individual levels. We find that the inter-tweeting time follows a piecewise power law distribution of two tails. Furthermore, the exponents of the two tails have different correlations with the user activity level. These findings demonstrate that the dynamics of the tweeting behavior are heterogeneous in different time scales. We then develop a dynamic model co-driven by the memory and the interest mechanism to characterize the heterogeneity. The numerical simulations validate the model and verify that the short time interval tweeting behavior is driven by the memory mechanism while the long time interval behavior by the interest mechanism.

  12. Involving mental health service users in suicide-related research: a qualitative inquiry model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, David; Procter, Nicholas; Fassett, Denise; Handley, Christine

    2016-03-01

    To describe the research model developed and successfully deployed as part of a multi-method qualitative study investigating suicidal service-users' experiences of mental health nursing care. Quality mental health care is essential to limiting the occurrence and burden of suicide, however there is a lack of relevant research informing practice in this context. Research utilising first-person accounts of suicidality is of particular importance to expanding the existing evidence base. However, conducting ethical research to support this imperative is challenging. The model discussed here illustrates specific and more generally applicable principles for qualitative research regarding sensitive topics and involving potentially vulnerable service-users. Researching into mental health service users with first-person experience of suicidality requires stakeholder and institutional support, researcher competency, and participant recruitment, consent, confidentiality, support and protection. Research with service users into their experiences of sensitive issues such as suicidality can result in rich and valuable data, and may also provide positive experiences of collaboration and inclusivity. If challenges are not met, objectification and marginalisation of service-users may be reinforced, and limitations in the evidence base and service provision may be perpetuated.

  13. User Defined Data in the New Analysis Model of the BaBar Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nardo, G.

    2005-04-06

    The BaBar experiment has recently revised its Analysis Model. One of the key ingredient of BaBar new Analysis Model is the support of the capability to add to the Event Store user defined data, which can be the output of complex computations performed at an advanced stage of a physics analysis, and are associated to analysis objects. In order to provide flexibility and extensibility with respect to object types, template generic programming has been adopted. In this way the model is non-intrusive with respect to reconstruction and analysis objects it manages, not requiring changes in their interfaces and implementations. Technological details are hidden as much as possible to the user, providing a simple interface. In this paper we present some of the limitations of the old model and how they are addressed by the new Analysis Model.

  14. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  15. Group therapy model for refugee and torture survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, Ibrahim A; Ahmed, Asha; Mahmoud, Vanessa; Wasim, Fatima

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the Center for Torture and Trauma Survivors' therapy group model for torture survivors and describes two of its variants: The Bashal group for African and Somali women and the Bhutanese multi-family therapy group. Group therapies in this model extend to community healing. Groups develop their cohesion to graduate to a social community club or initiate a community organization. New graduates from the group join the club and become part of the social advocacy process and of group and individual support and community healing. The BASHAL Somali women's group that developed spontaneously into a socio-political club for African women, and the Bhutanese family group that consciously developed into a Bhutanese community organization are discussed as two variants of this new model of group therapy with torture survivors.

  16. Using a Reference Corpus as a User Model for Focused Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mishne, G.A.; de Rijke, M.; Jijkoun, V.; van Zwol, R.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a method for ranking short information nuggets extracted from a text corpus, using another, reliable reference corpus as a user model. We argue that the availability and usage of such additional corpora is common in a number of IR tasks, and apply the method to answering a form of

  17. Using a Reference Corpus as a User Model for Focused Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mishne, G.A.; de Rijke, M.; Jijkoun, V.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a method for ranking short information nuggets extracted from a text corpus, using another, reliable reference corpus as a user model. We argue that the availability and usage of such additional corpora is common in a number of IR, tasks, and apply the method to answering a form of

  18. Support of surgical process modeling by using adaptable software user interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumuth, T.; Kaschek, B.; Czygan, M.; Goldstein, D.; Strauß, G.; Meixensberger, J.; Burgert, O.

    2010-03-01

    Surgical Process Modeling (SPM) is a powerful method for acquiring data about the evolution of surgical procedures. Surgical Process Models are used in a variety of use cases including evaluation studies, requirements analysis and procedure optimization, surgical education, and workflow management scheme design. This work proposes the use of adaptive, situation-aware user interfaces for observation support software for SPM. We developed a method to support the modeling of the observer by using an ontological knowledge base. This is used to drive the graphical user interface for the observer to restrict the search space of terminology depending on the current situation. In the evaluation study it is shown, that the workload of the observer was decreased significantly by using adaptive user interfaces. 54 SPM observation protocols were analyzed by using the NASA Task Load Index and it was shown that the use of the adaptive user interface disburdens the observer significantly in workload criteria effort, mental demand and temporal demand, helping him to concentrate on his essential task of modeling the Surgical Process.

  19. Please do not disturb : Modeling user experience for considerate home products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vastenburg, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Products in the home offer ever more functionality. Advances in sensor technology, embedded processing power, and modeling and reasoning software, have enabled everyday products to sense their environment and eventually anticipate user needs. The enabling technology for ambient intelligence is now

  20. A Study on Intelligent User-Centric Logistics Service Model Using Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraswathi Sivamani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been undergone in the smart logistics environment for the prompt delivery of the product in the right place at the right time. Most of the services were based on time management, routing technique, and location based services. The services in the recent logistics environment aim for situation based logistics service centered around the user by utilizing various information technologies such as mobile devices, computer systems, and GPS. This paper proposes a smart logistics service model for providing user-centric intelligent logistics service by utilizing smartphones in a smart environment. We also develop an OWL based ontology model for the smart logistics for the better understanding among the context information. In addition to basic delivery information, the proposed service model makes use of the location and situation information of the delivery vehicle and user, to draw the route information according to the user’s requirement. With the increase of internet usage, the real-time situations are received which helps to create a more reliable relationship, owing to the Internet of Things. Through this service model, it is possible to engage in the development of various IT and logistics convergence services based on situation information between the deliverer and user which occurs in real time.

  1. From the mouths of social media users: A focus group study exploring the social casino gaming–online gambling link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun S.; Wohl, Michael J. A.; Gupta, Rina; Derevensky, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The potential link between social casino gaming and online gambling has raised considerable concerns among clinicians, researchers and policy makers. Unfortunately, however, there is a paucity of research examining this potential link, especially among young adults. This represents a significant gap given young adults are frequently exposed to and are players of social casino games. Methods To better understand the potential link between social casino games and online gambling, we conducted three focus groups (N = 30) at two large Canadian Universities with college students who were avid social media users (who are regularly exposed to social casino games). Results Many participants spontaneously mentioned that social casino games were a great opportunity to build gambling skills before playing for real money. Importantly, some participants expressed a belief that there is a direct progression from social casino gaming to online gambling. Conversely, others believed the transition to online gambling depended on a person’s personality, rather than mere exposure to social casino games. While many young adults in our focus groups felt immune to the effects of social casino games, there was a general consensus that social casino games may facilitate the transition to online gambling among younger teenagers (i.e., 12–14 yr olds), due to the ease of accessibility and early exposure. Discussion The results of the present research point to the need for more study on the effects of social casino gambling as well as a discussion concerning regulation of social casino games in order to minimize their potential risks. PMID:28092197

  2. From the mouths of social media users: A focus group study exploring the social casino gaming-online gambling link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoun S; Wohl, Michael J A; Gupta, Rina; Derevensky, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Background and aims The potential link between social casino gaming and online gambling has raised considerable concerns among clinicians, researchers and policy makers. Unfortunately, however, there is a paucity of research examining this potential link, especially among young adults. This represents a significant gap given young adults are frequently exposed to and are players of social casino games. Methods To better understand the potential link between social casino games and online gambling, we conducted three focus groups (N = 30) at two large Canadian Universities with college students who were avid social media users (who are regularly exposed to social casino games). Results Many participants spontaneously mentioned that social casino games were a great opportunity to build gambling skills before playing for real money. Importantly, some participants expressed a belief that there is a direct progression from social casino gaming to online gambling. Conversely, others believed the transition to online gambling depended on a person's personality, rather than mere exposure to social casino games. While many young adults in our focus groups felt immune to the effects of social casino games, there was a general consensus that social casino games may facilitate the transition to online gambling among younger teenagers (i.e., 12-14 yr olds), due to the ease of accessibility and early exposure. Discussion The results of the present research point to the need for more study on the effects of social casino gambling as well as a discussion concerning regulation of social casino games in order to minimize their potential risks.

  3. Sexuality and the Elderly: A Group Counseling Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzi, Dave; Gossman, Larry

    1982-01-01

    Describes a 10-session group counseling model to facilitate awareness of sexuality and the legitimacy of its expression for older adults. Considers member selection, session length and setting, and group leadership. (Author/MCF)

  4. Switch Based Opportunistic Spectrum Access for General Primary User Traffic Model

    KAUST Repository

    Gaaloul, Fakhreddine

    2012-06-18

    This letter studies cognitive radio transceiver that can opportunistically use the available channels of primary user (PU). Specifically, we investigate and compare two different opportunistic channel access schemes. The first scheme applies when the secondary user (SU) has access to only one channel. The second scheme, based on channel switching mechanism, applies when the SU has access to multiple channels but can at a given time monitor and access only one channel. For these access schemes, we derive the exact analytical results for the novel performance metrics of average access time and average waiting time under general PU traffic models.

  5. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) User Reference Guide: Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yimin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Goldberg, Marshall [MRG and Associates, Nevada City, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This guide -- the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model User Reference Guide -- was developed to assist users in operating and understanding the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model. The guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and data sources used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model estimates local (e.g., county- or state-level) job creation, earnings, and output from total economic activity for a given fast pyrolysis biorefinery. These estimates include the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the construction and operation phases of biorefinery projects.Local revenue and supply chain impacts as well as induced impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from the IMPLAN software program. By determining the local economic impacts and job creation for a proposed biorefinery, the JEDI Fast Pyrolysis Biorefinery Model can be used to field questions about the added value biorefineries might bring to a local community.

  6. Teaching Photovoltaic Array Modelling and Characterization Using a Graphical User Interface and a Flash Solar Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Sera, Dezso; Kerekes, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a set of laboratory tools aimed to support students with various backgrounds (no programming) to understand photovoltaic array modelling and characterization techniques. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed in Matlab, for modelling PV arrays and characterizing t...... the effect of different types of parameters and operating conditions, on the current-voltage and power-voltage curves. The GUI is supported by experimental investigation and validation on PV module level, with the help of an indoor flash solar simulator.......This paper presents a set of laboratory tools aimed to support students with various backgrounds (no programming) to understand photovoltaic array modelling and characterization techniques. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed in Matlab, for modelling PV arrays and characterizing...

  7. Exploring views about mindfulness groups for voice-hearing from the perspective of service users and staff: A Q-methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Tirma; Bucci, Sandra; Randal, Chloe; Barrett, Moya; Pratt, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Despite prevailing beliefs about the potential benefits and harmfulness of mindfulness for people who hear voices, there is a paucity of research into staff and service user views. Q-methodology was used to explore views about mindfulness groups for voice-hearers. Opportunistic sampling of mental healthcare staff (N = 14) and service users with psychosis (N = 17). Both samples were analysed using principle components factor analysis to identify the range of attitudes held by staff and service users. Staff participants were particularly knowledgeable and interested in mindfulness. A single staff consensus factor was found suggesting mindfulness is helpful, and not harmful for mental health, but uncertainty surrounded its usefulness for voice-hearers. Service users held four distinct attitudes: (i) mindfulness helps to calm a racing mind; (ii) mindfulness helps to manage stress; (iii) mindfulness improves well-being, and does not alter the brain, reality beliefs, or cause madness; and (iv) mindfulness helps with managing thoughts, fostering acceptance, and is acceptable when delivered in a group format. Staff viewed mindfulness groups for psychosis as helpful, not harmful, but were uncertain about their utility. Consistent with previous research, service users viewed mindfulness groups as useful to promote well-being and reduce distress for individuals experiencing psychosis.

  8. The dynamical modeling and simulation analysis of the recommendation on the user-movie network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujuan; Jin, Zhen; Zhang, Juan

    2016-12-01

    At present, most research about the recommender system is based on graph theory and algebraic methods, but these methods cannot predict the evolution of the system with time under the recommendation method, and cannot dynamically analyze the long-term utility of the recommendation method. However, these two aspects can be studied by the dynamical method, which essentially investigates the intrinsic evolution mechanism of things, and is widely used to study a variety of actual problems. So, in this paper, network dynamics is used to study the recommendation on the user-movie network, which consists of users and movies, and the movies are watched either by the personal search or through the recommendation. Firstly, dynamical models are established to characterize the personal search and the system recommendation mechanism: the personal search model, the random recommendation model, the preference recommendation model, the degree recommendation model and the hybrid recommendation model. The rationality of the models established is verified by comparing the stochastic simulation with the numerical simulation. Moreover, the validity of the recommendation methods is evaluated by studying the movie degree, which is defined as the number of the movie that has been watched. Finally, we combine the personal search and the recommendation to establish a more general model. The change of the average degree of all the movies is given with the strength of the recommendation. Results show that for each recommendation method, the change of the movie degree is different, and is related to the initial degree of movies, the adjacency matrix A representing the relation between users and movies, the time t. Additionally, we find that in a long time, the degree recommendation is not as good as that in a short time, which fully demonstrates the advantage of the dynamical method. For the whole user-movie system, the preference recommendation is the best.

  9. MPEG-7 low level image descriptors for modeling users' web pages visual appeal opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Uribe Mayoral, Silvia; Alvarez Garcia, Federico; Menendez Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The study of the users' web pages first impression is an important factor for interface designers, due to its influence over the final opinion about a site. In this regard, the analysis of web aesthetics can be considered as an interesting tool for evaluating this early impression, and the use of low level image descriptors for modeling it in an objective way represents an innovative research field. According to this, in this paper we present a new model for website aesthetics evaluation and ...

  10. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  11. The predictive model on the user reaction time using the information similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Jin; Heo, Gyun Young; Chang, Soon Heung

    2005-01-01

    Human performance is frequently degraded because people forget. Memory is one of brain processes that are important when trying to understand how people process information. Although a large number of studies have been made on the human performance, little is known about the similarity effect in human performance. The purpose of this paper is to propose and validate the quantitative and predictive model on the human response time in the user interface with the concept of similarity. However, it is not easy to explain the human performance with only similarity or information amount. We are confronted by two difficulties: making the quantitative model on the human response time with the similarity and validating the proposed model by experimental work. We made the quantitative model based on the Hick's law and the law of practice. In addition, we validated the model with various experimental conditions by measuring participants' response time in the environment of computer-based display. Experimental results reveal that the human performance is improved by the user interface's similarity. We think that the proposed model is useful for the user interface design and evaluation phases

  12. A Grammar-based Approach for Modeling User Interactions and Generating Suggestions During the Data Exploration Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabek, Filip; Caban, Jesus J

    2017-01-01

    Despite the recent popularity of visual analytics focusing on big data, little is known about how to support users that use visualization techniques to explore multi-dimensional datasets and accomplish specific tasks. Our lack of models that can assist end-users during the data exploration process has made it challenging to learn from the user's interactive and analytical process. The ability to model how a user interacts with a specific visualization technique and what difficulties they face are paramount in supporting individuals with discovering new patterns within their complex datasets. This paper introduces the notion of visualization systems understanding and modeling user interactions with the intent of guiding a user through a task thereby enhancing visual data exploration. The challenges faced and the necessary future steps to take are discussed; and to provide a working example, a grammar-based model is presented that can learn from user interactions, determine the common patterns among a number of subjects using a K-Reversible algorithm, build a set of rules, and apply those rules in the form of suggestions to new users with the goal of guiding them along their visual analytic process. A formal evaluation study with 300 subjects was performed showing that our grammar-based model is effective at capturing the interactive process followed by users and that further research in this area has the potential to positively impact how users interact with a visualization system.

  13. WORK GROUP DEVELOPMENT MODELS – THE EVOLUTION FROM SIMPLE GROUP TO EFFECTIVE TEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca ZOLTAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, work teams are increasingly studied by virtue of the advantages they have compared to the work groups. But a true team does not appear overnight but must complete several steps to overcome the initial stage of its existence as a group. The question that arises is at what point a simple group is turning into an effective team. Even though the development process of group into a team is not a linear process, the models found in the literature provides a rich framework for analyzing and identifying the features which group acquires over time till it become a team in the true sense of word. Thus, in this article we propose an analysis of the main models of group development in order to point out, even in a relative manner, the stage when the simple work group becomes an effective work team.

  14. An integrated user-friendly ArcMAP tool for bivariate statistical modelling in geoscience applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebur, M. N.; Pradhan, B.; Shafri, H. Z. M.; Yusoff, Z. M.; Tehrany, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    Modelling and classification difficulties are fundamental issues in natural hazard assessment. A geographic information system (GIS) is a domain that requires users to use various tools to perform different types of spatial modelling. Bivariate statistical analysis (BSA) assists in hazard modelling. To perform this analysis, several calculations are required and the user has to transfer data from one format to another. Most researchers perform these calculations manually by using Microsoft Excel or other programs. This process is time-consuming and carries a degree of uncertainty. The lack of proper tools to implement BSA in a GIS environment prompted this study. In this paper, a user-friendly tool, bivariate statistical modeler (BSM), for BSA technique is proposed. Three popular BSA techniques, such as frequency ratio, weight-of-evidence (WoE), and evidential belief function (EBF) models, are applied in the newly proposed ArcMAP tool. This tool is programmed in Python and created by a simple graphical user interface (GUI), which facilitates the improvement of model performance. The proposed tool implements BSA automatically, thus allowing numerous variables to be examined. To validate the capability and accuracy of this program, a pilot test area in Malaysia is selected and all three models are tested by using the proposed program. Area under curve (AUC) is used to measure the success rate and prediction rate. Results demonstrate that the proposed program executes BSA with reasonable accuracy. The proposed BSA tool can be used in numerous applications, such as natural hazard, mineral potential, hydrological, and other engineering and environmental applications.

  15. An Iterative Algorithm to Determine the Dynamic User Equilibrium in a Traffic Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, C.

    An iterative algorithm to determine the dynamic user equilibrium with respect to link costs defined by a traffic simulation model is presented. Each driver's route choice is modeled by a discrete probability distribution which is used to select a route in the simulation. After each simulation run, the probability distribution is adapted to minimize the travel costs. Although the algorithm does not depend on the simulation model, a queuing model is used for performance reasons. The stability of the algorithm is analyzed for a simple example network. As an application example, a dynamic version of Braess's paradox is studied.

  16. Quantitative agent based model of user behavior in an Internet discussion forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobkowicz, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an agent based simulation of opinion evolution, based on a nonlinear emotion/information/opinion (E/I/O) individual dynamics, to an actual Internet discussion forum. The goal is to reproduce the results of two-year long observations and analyses of the user communication behavior and of the expressed opinions and emotions, via simulations using an agent based model. The model allowed to derive various characteristics of the forum, including the distribution of user activity and popularity (outdegree and indegree), the distribution of length of dialogs between the participants, their political sympathies and the emotional content and purpose of the comments. The parameters used in the model have intuitive meanings, and can be translated into psychological observables.

  17. Quantitative agent based model of user behavior in an Internet discussion forum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Sobkowicz

    Full Text Available The paper presents an agent based simulation of opinion evolution, based on a nonlinear emotion/information/opinion (E/I/O individual dynamics, to an actual Internet discussion forum. The goal is to reproduce the results of two-year long observations and analyses of the user communication behavior and of the expressed opinions and emotions, via simulations using an agent based model. The model allowed to derive various characteristics of the forum, including the distribution of user activity and popularity (outdegree and indegree, the distribution of length of dialogs between the participants, their political sympathies and the emotional content and purpose of the comments. The parameters used in the model have intuitive meanings, and can be translated into psychological observables.

  18. Agent-based and phylogenetic analyses reveal how HIV-1 moves between risk groups: injecting drug users sustain the heterosexual epidemic in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, Frederik; Leitner, Thomas; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2012-06-01

    Injecting drug users (IDUs) are a driving force for the spread of HIV-1 in Latvia and other Baltic States, accounting for a majority of cases. However, in recent years, heterosexual cases have increased disproportionately. It is unclear how the changes in incidence patterns in Latvia can be explained, and how important IDUs are for the heterosexual sub-epidemic. We introduce a novel epidemic model and use phylogenetic analyses in parallel to examine the spread of HIV-1 in Latvia between 1987 and 2010. Using a hybrid framework with a mean-field description for the susceptible population and an agent-based model for the infecteds, we track infected individuals and follow transmission histories dynamically formed during the simulation. The agent-based simulations and the phylogenetic analysis show that more than half of the heterosexual transmissions in Latvia were caused by IDU, which sustain the heterosexual epidemic. Indeed, we find that heterosexual clusters are characterized by short transmission chains with up to 63% of the chains dying out after the first introduction. In the simulations, the distribution of transmission chain sizes follows a power law distribution, which is confirmed by the phylogenetic data. Our models indicate that frequent introductions reduced the extinction probability of an autonomously spreading heterosexual HIV-1 epidemic, which now has the potential to dominate the spread of the overall epidemic in the future. Furthermore, our model shows that social heterogeneity of the susceptible population can explain the shift in HIV-1 incidence in Latvia over the course of the epidemic. Thus, the decrease in IDU incidence may be due to local heterogeneities in transmission, rather than the implementation of control measures. Increases in susceptibles, through social or geographic movement of IDU, could lead to a boost in HIV-1 infections in this risk group. Targeting individuals that bridge social groups would help prevent further spread of the

  19. Collaborative Tools' Quality in Web-Based Learning Systems — A Model of User Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoli, Paolo; Monari, Matteo

    The importance of collaborative tools is increasing in e-learning practice, both in educational institutions and enterprises. E-learning is nowadays much more than file downloading: both in distance and blended learning, group interactions are showing their didactic relevance. Specific contexts and needs are to be taken into account when evaluating didactic collaborative tools, since they present peculiar aspects. For instance, e-learning platforms are not pure groupware, but didactic systems hosting both groupware facilities and single-user features.

  20. A cellular automation model accounting for bicycle's group behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Rui, Ying-Xu; Zhang, Jian; Shang, Hua-Yan

    2018-02-01

    Recently, bicycle has become an important traffic tool in China, again. Due to the merits of bicycle, the group behavior widely exists in urban traffic system. However, little effort has been made to explore the impacts of the group behavior on bicycle flow. In this paper, we propose a CA (cellular automaton) model with group behavior to explore the complex traffic phenomena caused by shoulder group behavior and following group behavior on an open road. The numerical results illustrate that the proposed model can qualitatively describe the impacts of the two kinds of group behaviors on bicycle flow and that the effects are related to the mode and size of group behaviors. The results can help us to better understand the impacts of the bicycle's group behaviors on urban traffic system and effectively control the bicycle's group behavior.

  1. Information support model and its impact on utility, satisfaction and loyalty of users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sead Šadić

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In today’s modern age, information systems are of vital importance for successful performance of any organization. The most important role of any information system is its information support. This paper develops an information support model and presents the results of the survey examining the effects of such model. The survey was performed among the employees of Brčko District Government and comprised three phases. The first phase assesses the influence of the quality of information support and information on information support when making decisions. The second phase examines the impact of information support when making decisions on the perceived availability and user satisfaction with information support. The third phase examines the effects of perceived usefulness as well as information support satisfaction on user loyalty. The model is presented using six hypotheses, which were tested by means of a multivariate regression analysis. The demonstrated model shows that the quality of information support and information is of vital importance in the decision-making process. The perceived usefulness and customer satisfaction are of vital importance for continuous usage of information support. The model is universal, and if slightly modified, it can be used in any sphere of life where satisfaction is measured for clients and users of some service.

  2. A student-facilitated community-based support group initiative for Mental Health Care users in a Primary Health Care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leana Meiring

    2017-12-01

    Methods: Qualitative research methods were applied. Data were collected using semistructured interviews and a collage-making and storytelling method. Thematic analysis highlighted the main themes representing the meaning the five participants ascribed to the group. Results: The findings suggest that the group offered the participants a sense of belonging and a means of social and emotional support. The group also created opportunity for learning, encouraged mental and physical mobilisation and stimulation, and served as an additional link to professional services. Conclusion: The findings suggest that student-facilitated support groups could offer a viable supplement for offering support to service users in PHC settings. The group assisted MHC users to cope with symptoms, social integration, and participating in meaningful activities as part of rehabilitation services.

  3. The LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Kristopher M.; Luke, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Although supervision of group work has been linked to the development of multicultural and social justice competencies, there are no models for supervision of group work specifically designed to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons. This manuscript presents the LGBTQ Responsive Model for…

  4. Kinematics effectively delineate accomplished users of endovascular robotics with a physical training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Cassidy; Estrada, Sean; O'Malley, Marcia; Lumsden, Alan B; Bismuth, Jean

    2015-02-01

    Endovascular robotics systems, now approved for clinical use in the United States and Europe, are seeing rapid growth in interest. Determining who has sufficient expertise for safe and effective clinical use remains elusive. Our aim was to analyze performance on a robotic platform to determine what defines an expert user. During three sessions, 21 subjects with a range of endovascular expertise and endovascular robotic experience (novices 20 hours) performed four tasks on a training model. All participants completed a 2-hour training session on the robot by a certified instructor. Completion times, global rating scores, and motion metrics were collected to assess performance. Electromagnetic tracking was used to capture and to analyze catheter tip motion. Motion analysis was based on derivations of speed and position including spectral arc length and total number of submovements (inversely proportional to proficiency of motion) and duration of submovements (directly proportional to proficiency). Ninety-eight percent of competent subjects successfully completed the tasks within the given time, whereas 91% of noncompetent subjects were successful. There was no significant difference in completion times between competent and noncompetent users except for the posterior branch (151 s:105 s; P = .01). The competent users had more efficient motion as evidenced by statistically significant differences in the metrics of motion analysis. Users with >20 hours of experience performed significantly better than those newer to the system, independent of prior endovascular experience. This study demonstrates that motion-based metrics can differentiate novice from trained users of flexible robotics systems for basic endovascular tasks. Efficiency of catheter movement, consistency of performance, and learning curves may help identify users who are sufficiently trained for safe clinical use of the system. This work will help identify the learning curve and specific movements that

  5. Group Membership, Group Change, and Intergroup Attitudes: A Recategorization Model Based on Cognitive Consistency Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Roth

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article introduces a model based on cognitive consistency principles to predict how new identities become integrated into the self-concept, with consequences for intergroup attitudes. The model specifies four concepts (self-concept, stereotypes, identification, and group compatibility as associative connections. The model builds on two cognitive principles, balance–congruity and imbalance–dissonance, to predict identification with social groups that people currently belong to, belonged to in the past, or newly belong to. More precisely, the model suggests that the relative strength of self-group associations (i.e., identification depends in part on the (incompatibility of the different social groups. Combining insights into cognitive representation of knowledge, intergroup bias, and explicit/implicit attitude change, we further derive predictions for intergroup attitudes. We suggest that intergroup attitudes alter depending on the relative associative strength between the social groups and the self, which in turn is determined by the (incompatibility between social groups. This model unifies existing models on the integration of social identities into the self-concept by suggesting that basic cognitive mechanisms play an important role in facilitating or hindering identity integration and thus contribute to reducing or increasing intergroup bias.

  6. Group Membership, Group Change, and Intergroup Attitudes: A Recategorization Model Based on Cognitive Consistency Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jenny; Steffens, Melanie C; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2018-01-01

    The present article introduces a model based on cognitive consistency principles to predict how new identities become integrated into the self-concept, with consequences for intergroup attitudes. The model specifies four concepts (self-concept, stereotypes, identification, and group compatibility) as associative connections. The model builds on two cognitive principles, balance-congruity and imbalance-dissonance, to predict identification with social groups that people currently belong to, belonged to in the past, or newly belong to. More precisely, the model suggests that the relative strength of self-group associations (i.e., identification) depends in part on the (in)compatibility of the different social groups. Combining insights into cognitive representation of knowledge, intergroup bias, and explicit/implicit attitude change, we further derive predictions for intergroup attitudes. We suggest that intergroup attitudes alter depending on the relative associative strength between the social groups and the self, which in turn is determined by the (in)compatibility between social groups. This model unifies existing models on the integration of social identities into the self-concept by suggesting that basic cognitive mechanisms play an important role in facilitating or hindering identity integration and thus contribute to reducing or increasing intergroup bias.

  7. Dynamics of group knowledge production in facilitated modelling workshops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Franco, L. Alberto

    2015-01-01

    , the workshop. Drawing on the knowledge-perspective of group communication, we conducted a micro-level analysis of a transcript of a facilitated modelling workshop held with the management team of an Alternative Food Network in the UK. Our analysis suggests that facilitated modelling interactions can take......The term ‘facilitated modelling’ is used in the literature to characterise an approach to structuring problems, developing options and evaluating decisions by groups working in a model-supported workshop environment, and assisted by a facilitator. The approach involves an interactive process...... by which models are jointly developed with group members interacting face-to-face, with or without computer support. The models produced are used to inform negotiations about the nature of the issues faced by the group, and how to address them. While the facilitated modelling literature is impressive...

  8. Models for Ballistic Wind Measurement Error Analysis. Volume II. Users’ Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    TEST CHART NATIONAL li ’A il (If IANP) ARDl A -CR-83-0008-1 Reports Control Symbol OSO - 1366 MODELS FOR BALLISTIC WIND MEASUREMENTERROR ANALYSIS...AD-A129 360 MODELS FOR BALLSTIC WIND MEASUREMENT ERROR ANALYSIS VO UME 11USERS’ MAN..U) NEW REXICO STATE UNIV LAS U SS CRUCES PHYSICAL SCIENCE LAR...ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER SASL-CR-83-0008-1 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED MODELS FOR BALLISTIC WIND

  9. User's Manual for Data for Validating Models for PV Module Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, W.; Anderberg, A.; Deline, C.; Glick, S.; Muller, M.; Perrin, G.; Rodriguez, J.; Rummel, S.; Terwilliger, K.; Silverman, T. J.

    2014-04-01

    This user's manual describes performance data measured for flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in Cocoa, Florida, Eugene, Oregon, and Golden, Colorado. The data include PV module current-voltage curves and associated meteorological data for approximately one-year periods. These publicly available data are intended to facilitate the validation of existing models for predicting the performance of PV modules, and for the development of new and improved models. For comparing different modeling approaches, using these public data will provide transparency and more meaningful comparisons of the relative benefits.

  10. User characteristics and usage of an open access moderated internet support group for depression and other mental disorders: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Griffiths

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: A small minority of active users are sufficient to ensure the sustainability and growth of an online mental health ISG. Further research is required to understand why so many support group members limit their contributions to one or a very small number of posts and what factors predict and promote active engagement and long-term retention in virtual mental health communities.

  11. Delimitation of the user in the creation stages, modeling and prototyping of the clothing product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Makara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of complaints of clothes that do not fit well and bother, or even the difficulty of acquiring a suitable outfit for an occasion, to the clothing industry may be failing to consider the user in developing their products. The aim of this paper was to determine whether the steps for creating, modeling and prototyping of garment products the user is being considered, as for a design project is right to consider it at all stages of development. For this a literature review and interviews with professionals was held. With the results we can see the difficulty that professionals have to define the public to create the pieces. We also found that most professionals understand the importance of measures table however end up adjusting the empirically, and the realization of prototype testing many choose models that does not match the reality of the public company

  12. EpiPOD : community vaccination and dispensing model user's guide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, M.; Samsa, M.; Walsh, D.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2009-01-09

    EpiPOD is a modeling system that enables local, regional, and county health departments to evaluate and refine their plans for mass distribution of antiviral and antibiotic medications and vaccines. An intuitive interface requires users to input as few or as many plan specifics as are available in order to simulate a mass treatment campaign. Behind the input interface, a system dynamics model simulates pharmaceutical supply logistics, hospital and first-responder personnel treatment, population arrival dynamics and treatment, and disease spread. When the simulation is complete, users have estimates of the number of illnesses in the population at large, the number of ill persons seeking treatment, and queuing and delays within the mass treatment system--all metrics by which the plan can be judged.

  13. [Health care models for users of alcohol and other drugs: political discourse, knowledge, and practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Vânia Sampaio

    2009-11-01

    This article aims to characterize health care models for users of alcohol and other drugs in the Brazilian context. Discourse analysis was performed on public drug policy in Brazil from the 1970s. This analysis was contextualized by a brief digression on the main political positions identified in several countries of the world in relation to drug use problems. Beginning in the current decade, drug policies in Brazil have been receptive to harm reduction approaches, resulting in reorientation of the health care model. In conclusion, the structuring and strengthening of a network of care for users of alcohol and other drugs and their families, based on community care and the harm reduction approach and combined with other social and health services, is now a key public health challenge for the country.

  14. Towards Patient-Centric Telehealth: a Journey into ICT Infrastructures and User Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring

    behavior? Results: A draft of an ICT infrastructure, intended as a research platform for telehealth applications, has been implemented. Integration to the ICT infrastructure is easily achieved through an ontological framework, provided by an agent-based façade library. User modeling is employed to store...... the state of the art was conducted. Discussions are provided of the advantages and disadvantages of the Continua framework (the foundation of the ongoing national initiatives) and how context information can be used and included on the national level. Conclusions: The agent, ontology and user modeling...... paradigms were applied to successfully implement a flexible and open ICT infrastructure where telehealth applications can be tested. One such application is the prediction algorithm whose prediction ability is ~70% of a smart home resident’s next activity making it the state of the art in predicting ADL...

  15. A Neural Network Approach to Intention Modeling for User-Adapted Conversational Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Griol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spoken dialogue systems have been proposed to enable a more natural and intuitive interaction with the environment and human-computer interfaces. In this contribution, we present a framework based on neural networks that allows modeling of the user’s intention during the dialogue and uses this prediction to dynamically adapt the dialogue model of the system taking into consideration the user’s needs and preferences. We have evaluated our proposal to develop a user-adapted spoken dialogue system that facilitates tourist information and services and provide a detailed discussion of the positive influence of our proposal in the success of the interaction, the information and services provided, and the quality perceived by the users.

  16. Streamflow forecasting using the modular modeling system and an object-user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeton, A.E.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), developed a computer program to provide a general framework needed to couple disparate environmental resource models and to manage the necessary data. The Object-User Interface (OUI) is a map-based interface for models and modeling data. It provides a common interface to run hydrologic models and acquire, browse, organize, and select spatial and temporal data. One application is to assist river managers in utilizing streamflow forecasts generated with the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System running in the Modular Modeling System (MMS), a distributed-parameter watershed model, and the National Weather Service Extended Streamflow Prediction (ESP) methodology.

  17. How the group affects the mind : A cognitive model of idea generation in groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Bernard A.; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    A model called search for ideas in associative memory (SIAM) is proposed to account for various research findings in the area of group idea generation. The model assumes that idea generation is a repeated search for ideas in associative memory, which proceeds in 2 stages (knowledge activation and

  18. Does the Model of Evaluation Based on Fair Value Answer the Requests of Financial Information Users?

    OpenAIRE

    Mitea Neluta; Sarac Aldea Laura

    2010-01-01

    Does the model of evaluation based on the fair value answers the requests of the financial information users? The financial situations have as purposes the presentation of the information concerning the enterprise financial position, the performances and modifications of this position which, according to IASB and FASB, must be credible and useful. Both referential maintain the existence of several conventions regarding assessment, like historical cost, actual cost, the realizable value or act...

  19. Report of the advisory group meeting on the establishment of regional ion accelerator centers and user networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    In this report it is shown that ion accelerators have had a tremendous economic and technological impact on most developed countries, and are beginning to have a significant impact on developing countries. Through the formation of Accelerator Centers and User Networks (which may be national, regional or inter-regional) a mechanism will be outlined by which scientists and other users from developing countries can receive the necessary training and have available the necessary accelerator facilities to use these machines for economic improvement and technological development in their countries

  20. What do service users with bipolar disorder want from a web-based self-management intervention? A qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nicholas J; Jones, Steven H; Lobban, Fiona A

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and recurrent severe mental health problem. A web-based self-management intervention provides the opportunity to widen access to psychological interventions. This qualitative study aims to identify what an ideal web-based intervention would look like for service users with BD. Twelve service users with BD were recruited in the UK and took part in a series of focus groups to inform and refine the development of a web-based self-management intervention. Reported here is a subset analysis of data gathered with the primary aim of identifying the needs and desires of service users for such an intervention for BD. We analysed service users' responses to questions about content, outcomes, format, barriers and support. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was employed. The data were ordered into four key themes: (1) gaining an awareness of and managing mood swings; (2) not just about managing mood swings: the importance of practical and interpersonal issues; (3) managing living within mood swings without losing the experience; (4) internet is the only format: freely accessible, instant and interactive; (5) professional and peer support to overcome low motivation and procrastination difficulties. The small group of participants are not representative of those living with BD. These findings have significantly enhanced our understanding of what service users with BD want from a web-based self-management intervention and have clear implications for the future development of such approaches. Service users desire a web-based self-management approach that gives them the techniques they need to not only manage their moods but also manage their lives alongside the disorder, including interpersonal and practical issues. Service users describe their primary outcome, not as a cure or reduction in their symptoms, but instead being able to live a fulfilling life alongside their condition. Service users see the internet as their

  1. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. User Modeling and Planning for Improving Self-efficacy and Goal Adherence in mHealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pirolli

    2015-10-01

    Our user modeling efforts have been primarily focused on refining predictions of psychosocial changes that underlie the achievement of behavior-change goals. We have chosen to use the ACT-R neurocognitive theory and simulation environment as a way of driving the user modeling efforts because we believe that: (a neurocognitive architectures provide a unified account of how the modules of the mind function together to produce coherent behavior, and provide an integrative explanation of data produced across specialized domains of psychology; (b longer-term behavior change occurring over days, weeks, or months, can be decomposed to learning events occupying much briefer units of time; and (c models in neurocognitive architectures provide a basis for bridging the events at the small scale to the dynamics of behavior change occurring at the large scale. Our planner is an adaptive, computational approach to the problem of interactive planning for health-behavior change. The approach ensures that the generated plan is tailored to each individual user and is reactive to their experience with it. This can lead to better compliance and long-term goal achievement.

  3. LIANA Model Integration System - architecture, user interface design and application in MOIRA DSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hofman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The LIANA Model Integration System is the shell application supporting model integration and user interface functionality required for the rapid construction and run-time support of the environmental decision support systems (EDSS. Internally it is constructed as the framework of C++ classes and functions covering most common tasks performed by the EDSS (such as managing of and alternative strategies, running of the chain of the models, supporting visualisation of the data with tables and graphs, keeping ranges and default values for input parameters etc.. EDSS is constructed by integration of LIANA system with the models or other applications such as GIS or MAA software. The basic requirements to the model or other application to be integrated is minimal - it should be a Windows or DOS .exe file and receive input and provide output as text files. For the user the EDSS is represented as the number of data sets describing scenario or giving results of evaluation of scenario via modelling. Internally data sets correspond to the I/O files of the models. During the integration the parameters included in each the data sets as well as specifications necessary to present the data set in GUI and export or import it to/from text file are provided with MIL_LIANA language. Visual C++ version of LIANA has been developed in the frame of MOIRA project and is used as the basis for the MOIRA Software Framework - the shell and user interface component of the MOIRA Decision Support System. At present, the usage of LIANA for the creation of a new EDSS requires changes to be made in its C++ code. The possibility to use LIANA for the new EDSS construction without extending the source code is achieved by substituting MIL_LIANA with the object-oriented LIANA language.

  4. Keep Using My Health Apps: Discover Users' Perception of Health and Fitness Apps with the UTAUT2 Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shupei; Ma, Wenjuan; Kanthawala, Shaheen; Peng, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Health and fitness applications (apps) are one of the major app categories in the current mobile app market. Few studies have examined this area from the users' perspective. This study adopted the Extended Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2) Model to examine the predictors of the users' intention to adopt health and fitness apps. A survey (n=317) was conducted with college-aged smartphone users at a Midwestern university in the United States. Performance expectancy, hedonic motivations, price value, and habit were significant predictors of users' intention of continued usage of health and fitness apps. However, effort expectancy, social influence, and facilitating conditions were not found to predict users' intention of continued usage of health and fitness apps. This study extends the UTATU2 Model to the mobile apps domain and provides health professions, app designers, and marketers with the insights of user experience in terms of continuously using health and fitness apps.

  5. 2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User's Conference Proceedings (CD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markel, T.

    2001-01-01

    The 2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User Conference provided an opportunity for engineers in the automotive industry and the research environment to share their experiences in vehicle systems modeling using ADVISOR and PSAT. ADVISOR and PSAT are vehicle systems modeling tools developed and supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory respectively with the financial support of the US Department of Energy. During this conference peers presented the results of studies using the simulation tools and improvements that they have made or would like to see in the simulation tools. Focus areas of the presentations included Control Strategy, Model Validation, Optimization and Co-Simulation, Model Development, Applications, and Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis. Attendees were offered the opportunity to give feedback on future model development plans

  6. 2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User's Conference Proceedings (CD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, T.

    2001-08-01

    The 2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User Conference provided an opportunity for engineers in the automotive industry and the research environment to share their experiences in vehicle systems modeling using ADVISOR and PSAT. ADVISOR and PSAT are vehicle systems modeling tools developed and supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory respectively with the financial support of the US Department of Energy. During this conference peers presented the results of studies using the simulation tools and improvements that they have made or would like to see in the simulation tools. Focus areas of the presentations included Control Strategy, Model Validation, Optimization and Co-Simulation, Model Development, Applications, and Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis. Attendees were offered the opportunity to give feedback on future model development plans.

  7. Integrating Model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume III. User's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.L.; Hutzler, M.J.

    1979-03-01

    Volume III of the six-volume series documenting the Integrating Model of PIES provides a potential PIES user with a description of how PIES operates with particular emphasis on the possible variations in assumptions and data that can be made in specifying alternative scenarios. PIES is described as it existed on January 1, 1978. The introductory chapter is followed by Section II, an overview of the structure and components of PIES. Section III discusses each of the PIES components in detail; describes the Demand Model; contains a description of the models, assumptions, and data which provide supply side inputs to the PIES Integrating Model; and concludes with a discussion of those aspects of PIES which extend the scope of the analysis beyond the national energy market. Section IV discusses two reports produced by the PIES Integrating Model: the PIES Integrating Model Report and the Coal Transportation Report. (MCW)

  8. SegWeigh: a mixed-method approach to segmenting potential contraceptive user groups and meeting Family Planning 2020 goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichwein, Barbara; Wolmarans, Liezel; Nantayi, Lois; Nassali, Faith; Kakinda, Allan; Musumba, Duncan; Nguyen, Thang H; Baatsen, Pam

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate a low-cost mixed-method research tool (SegWeigh) that informs awareness raising and family planning interventions for potential contraceptive users. A pilot study of SegWeigh was conducted in Uganda and Vietnam between September 3, 2012, and February 21, 2013. User archetypes were produced in four steps by triangulating Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data; a secondary literature review; family planning service provision data; and primary qualitative investigation. Triangulation of DHS analysis, secondary literature and service data revealed three potential user profiles: Ugandan women wanting to space pregnancies; Ugandan men wanting to limit pregnancies; and unmarried Vietnamese women having infrequent sex. Archetypes were subsequently created of "Kibuuka," a 52-year-old semi-literate subsistence farmer in rural Uganda, and "Anh," a 20-year-old student in Hanoi, Vietnam. SegWeigh rapidly produced data-rich "real life" user profiles that might help to tailor family planning interventions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. International Cursor on Target (CoT) User Group Meeting (1st), 2-3 April 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    that multicast did not work across the VPN tunnel . While multicast was used within the ACME Lab for those who attended in person, it was necessary...all remote users. In the future it may be possible to use Generic Routing Encapsulation (GRE) tunnels to send multicast over IPSec . 3.3.2...22 VPN Participants

  10. Chaos in a dynamic model of urban transportation network flow based on user equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Meng; Gao Ziyou

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the dynamical behavior of network traffic flow. We first build a two-stage mathematical model to analyze the complex behavior of network flow, a dynamical model, which is based on the dynamical gravity model proposed by Dendrinos and Sonis [Dendrinos DS, Sonis M. Chaos and social-spatial dynamic. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1990] is used to estimate the number of trips. Considering the fact that the Origin-Destination (O-D) trip cost in the traffic network is hard to express as a functional form, in the second stage, the user equilibrium network assignment model was used to estimate the trip cost, which is the minimum cost of used path when user equilibrium (UE) conditions are satisfied. It is important to use UE to estimate the O-D cost, since a connection is built among link flow, path flow, and O-D flow. The dynamical model describes the variations of O-D flows over discrete time periods, such as each day and each week. It is shown that even in a system with dimensions equal to two, chaos phenomenon still exists. A 'Chaos Propagation' phenomenon is found in the given model.

  11. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2000 Version (Mars-GRAM 2000): Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; James, B. F.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2000 Version (Mars-GRAM 2000) and its new features. All parameterizations for temperature, pressure, density, and winds versus height, latitude, longitude, time of day, and L(sub s) have been replaced by input data tables from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) for the surface through 80-km altitude and the University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for 80 to 170 km. A modified Stewart thermospheric model is still used for higher altitudes and for dependence on solar activity. "Climate factors" to tune for agreement with GCM data are no longer needed. Adjustment of exospheric temperature is still an option. Consistent with observations from Mars Global Surveyor, a new longitude-dependent wave model is included with user input to specify waves having 1 to 3 wavelengths around the planet. A simplified perturbation model has been substituted for the earlier one. An input switch allows users to select either East or West longitude positive. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAM source code and data files and for running the program. It also provides sample input and output and an example for incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  12. User Guide for VISION 3.4.7 (Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Robert F. Jeffers; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; Wendell D. Hintze

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a guide for using the current version of the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) model. This is a complex model with many parameters and options; the user is strongly encouraged to read this user guide before attempting to run the model. This model is an R&D work in progress and may contain errors and omissions. It is based upon numerous assumptions. This model is intended to assist in evaluating 'what if' scenarios and in comparing fuel, reactor, and fuel processing alternatives at a systems level. The model is not intended as a tool for process flow and design modeling of specific facilities nor for tracking individual units of fuel or other material through the system. The model is intended to examine the interactions among the components of a fuel system as a function of time varying system parameters; this model represents a dynamic rather than steady-state approximation of the nuclear fuel system. VISION models the nuclear cycle at the system level, not individual facilities, e.g., 'reactor types' not individual reactors and 'separation types' not individual separation plants. Natural uranium can be enriched, which produces enriched uranium, which goes into fuel fabrication, and depleted uranium (DU), which goes into storage. Fuel is transformed (transmuted) in reactors and then goes into a storage buffer. Used fuel can be pulled from storage into either separation or disposal. If sent to separations, fuel is transformed (partitioned) into fuel products, recovered uranium, and various categories of waste. Recycled material is stored until used by its assigned reactor type. VISION is comprised of several Microsoft Excel input files, a Powersim Studio core, and several Microsoft Excel output files. All must be co-located in the same folder on a PC to function. You must use Powersim Studio 8 or better. We have tested VISION with the Studio 8 Expert, Executive, and Education versions

  13. The supersymmetric t-J model with quantum group invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, A.; Karowski, M.

    1993-04-01

    An integrable quantum group deformation of the supersymmetric t-J model is introduced. Open boundary conditions lead to an spl q (2, 1) invariant hamiltonian. A general procedure to obtain such invariant models is proposed. To solve the model a generalized nested algebraic Bethe ansatz is constructed and the Bethe ansatz equations are obtained. The quantum supergroup structure of the model is investigated. (orig.)

  14. Capturing Public Opinion on Public Health Topics: A Comparison of Experiences from a Systematic Review, Focus Group Study, and Analysis of Online, User-Generated Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Emma Louise; Adams, Jean M

    2015-01-01

    Capturing public opinion toward public health topics is important to ensure that services, policy, and research are aligned with the beliefs and priorities of the general public. A number of approaches can be used to capture public opinion. We are conducting a program of work on the effectiveness and acceptability of health promoting financial incentive interventions. We have captured public opinion on financial incentive interventions using three methods: a systematic review, focus group study, and analysis of online user-generated comments to news media reports. In this short editorial-style piece, we compare and contrast our experiences with these three methods. Each of these methods had their advantages and disadvantages. Advantages include tailoring of the research question for systematic reviews, probing of answers during focus groups, and the ability to aggregate a large data set using online user-generated content. However, disadvantages include needing to update systematic reviews, participants conforming to a dominant perspective in focus groups, and being unable to collect respondent characteristics during analysis of user-generated online content. That said, analysis of user-generated online content offers additional time and resource advantages, and we found it elicited similar findings to those obtained via more traditional methods, such as systematic reviews and focus groups. A number of methods for capturing public opinions on public health topics are available. Public health researchers, policy makers, and practitioners should choose methods appropriate to their aims. Analysis of user-generated online content, especially in the context of news media reports, may be a quicker and cheaper alternative to more traditional methods, without compromising on the breadth of opinions captured.

  15. Capturing public opinion on public health topics: a comparison of experiences from a systematic review, focus group study, and analysis of online, user-generated content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Louise Giles

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCapturing public opinion towards public health topics is important to ensure that services, policy and research are aligned with the beliefs and priorities of the general public. A number of approaches can be used to capture public opinion. MethodsWe are conducting a programme of work on the effectiveness and acceptability of health promoting financial incentive interventions. We have captured public opinion on financial incentive interventions using three methods: a systematic review, focus group study, and analysis of online user-generated comments to news media reports. In this short, editorial-style, piece we compare and contrast our experiences with these three methods.ResultsEach of these methods had their advantages and disadvantages. Advantages include tailoring of the research question for systematic reviews, probing of answers during focus groups, and the ability to aggregate a large data set using online user-generated content. However, disadvantages include needing to update systematic reviews, participants conforming to a dominant perspective in focus groups, and being unable to collect respondent characteristics during analysis of user-generated online content. That said, analysis of user-generated online content offers additional time and resource advantages, and we found it elicited similar findings to those obtained via more traditional methods, such as systematic reviews and focus groups. ConclusionsA number of methods for capturing public opinions on public health topics are available. Public health researchers, policy makers and practitioners should choose methods appropriate to their aims. Analysis user-generated online content, especially in the context of news media reports, may be a quicker and cheaper alternative to more traditional methods, without compromising on the breadth of opinions captured.

  16. The Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-08-08

    Various theoretical aspects of physics beyond the Standard Model at hadron colliders are discussed. Our focus will be on those issues that most immediately impact the projects pursued as part of the BSM group at this meeting.

  17. AMPO Travel Modeling Working Group Meeting on Dynamic Traffic Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    On December 17-18, 2015, the Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations (AMPO) convened a travel modeling working group meeting for the purpose of discussing Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA). Participants discussed the uses of DTA, challenges...

  18. An Enhanced Dynamic User Optimal Passenger Flow Assignment Model for Metro Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanchuan Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By considering the difference between a car driver’s route choice behavior on the road and a passenger’s route choice behavior in urban rail transit (URT, this paper proposes an enhanced Dynamic User Optimal (DUO passenger flow assignment model for metro networks. To capture realistic URT phenomena, the model has integrated the train operation disturbance constraint. Real passenger and train data are used to verify the proposed model and algorithm. The results indicate that the DUO-based model is more suitable for describing passenger route choice behavior under uncertain conditions compared to a static model. Moreover, this paper found that passengers under oversaturated conditions are more sensitive to train operation disturbances compared to undersaturated passengers.

  19. Requirements for UML and OWL Integration Tool for User Data Consistency Modeling and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nytun, J. P.; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Oleshchuk, V. A.

    2003-01-01

    The amount of data available on the Internet is continuously increasing, consequentially there is a growing need for tools that help to analyse the data. Testing of consistency among data received from different sources is made difficult by the number of different languages and schemas being used....... In this paper we analyze requirements for a tool that support integration of UML models and ontologies written in languages like the W3C Web Ontology Language (OWL). The tool can be used in the following way: after loading two legacy models into the tool, the tool user connects them by inserting modeling......, an important part of this technique is attaching of OCL expressions to special boolean class attributes that we call consistency attributes. The resulting integration model can be used for automatic consistency testing of two instances of the legacy models by automatically instantiate the whole integration...

  20. Lake Representations in Global Climate Models: An End-User Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, R. B.; Briley, L.; Steiner, A.; Wells, K.

    2017-12-01

    The weather and climate in the Great Lakes region of the United States and Canada are strongly influenced by the lakes. Within global climate models, lakes are incorporated in many ways. If one is interested in quantitative climate information for the Great Lakes, then it is a first principle requirement that end-users of climate model simulation data, whether scientists or practitioners, need to know if and how lakes are incorporated into models. We pose the basic question, how are lakes represented in CMIP models? Despite significant efforts by the climate community to document and publish basic information about climate models, it is unclear how to answer the question about lake representations? With significant knowledge of the practice of the field, then a reasonable starting point is to use the ES-DOC Comparator (https://compare.es-doc.org/ ). Once at this interface to model information, the end-user is faced with the need for more knowledge about the practice and culture of the discipline. For example, lakes are often categorized as a type of land, a counterintuitive concept. In some models, though, lakes are specified in ocean models. There is little evidence and little confidence that the information obtained through this process is complete or accurate. In fact, it is verifiably not accurate. This experience, then, motivates identifying and finding either human experts or technical documentation for each model. The conclusion from this exercise is that it can take months or longer to provide a defensible answer to if and how lakes are represented in climate models. Our experience with lake finding is that this is not a unique experience. This talk documents our experience and explores barriers we have identified and strategies for reducing those barriers.

  1. Path sets size, model specification, or model estimation: Which one matters most in predicting stochastic user equilibrium traffic flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Haghani

    2016-06-01

    Further investigations with respect to the relative importance of STA model estimation (or equivalently, parameter calibration and model specification (or equivalently, error term formulation are also conducted. A paired combinatorial logit (PCL assignment model with an origin–destination-specific-parameter, along with a heuristic method of model estimation (calibration, is proposed. The proposed model cannot only accommodate the correlation between path utilities, but also accounts for the fact that travelling between different origin–destination (O–D pairs can correspond to different levels of stochasticity and choice randomness. Results suggest that the estimation of the stochastic user equilibrium (SUE models can affect the outcome of the flow prediction far more meaningfully than the complexity of the choice model (i.e., model specification.

  2. Integrating pro-environmental behavior with transportation network modeling: User and system level strategies, implementation, and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, H. M. Abdul

    Personal transport is a leading contributor to fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse (GHG) emissions in the U.S. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that light-duty vehicles (LDV) are responsible for 61% of all transportation related energy consumption in 2012, which is equivalent to 8.4 million barrels of oil (fossil fuel) per day. The carbon content in fossil fuels is the primary source of GHG emissions that links to the challenge associated with climate change. Evidently, it is high time to develop actionable and innovative strategies to reduce fuel consumption and GHG emissions from the road transportation networks. This dissertation integrates the broader goal of minimizing energy and emissions into the transportation planning process using novel systems modeling approaches. This research aims to find, investigate, and evaluate strategies that minimize carbon-based fuel consumption and emissions for a transportation network. We propose user and system level strategies that can influence travel decisions and can reinforce pro-environmental attitudes of road users. Further, we develop strategies that system operators can implement to optimize traffic operations with emissions minimization goal. To complete the framework we develop an integrated traffic-emissions (EPA-MOVES) simulation framework that can assess the effectiveness of the strategies with computational efficiency and reasonable accuracy. The dissertation begins with exploring the trade-off between emissions and travel time in context of daily travel decisions and its heterogeneous nature. Data are collected from a web-based survey and the trade-off values indicating the average additional travel minutes a person is willing to consider for reducing a lb. of GHG emissions are estimated from random parameter models. Results indicate that different trade-off values for male and female groups. Further, participants from high-income households are found to have higher trade-off values

  3. User Acceptance of Social Learning Systems in Higher Education: An Application of the Extended Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ibrahim; Turhan, Cigdem

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the users' behaviour and acceptance of social media for learning in higher educational institutions with the help of the extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). TAM has been extended to investigate how ethical and security awareness of users affect the actual usage of social learning applications. For this purpose, a…

  4. An investigation on the relationship between the user model and graphic representations for the automated generation of multimedia presentations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Schwarz

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis investigates a possible solution to adapting an automatically generated presentation to an anonymous user. We will explore the field of User Modeling, specifically Adaptive Hypermedia, to find suitable methods. In our case study, we combine the methods we find to develop a

  5. An Online Causal Inference Framework for Modeling and Designing Systems Involving User Preferences: A State-Space Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Delibalta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide a causal inference framework to model the effects of machine learning algorithms on user preferences. We then use this mathematical model to prove that the overall system can be tuned to alter those preferences in a desired manner. A user can be an online shopper or a social media user, exposed to digital interventions produced by machine learning algorithms. A user preference can be anything from inclination towards a product to a political party affiliation. Our framework uses a state-space model to represent user preferences as latent system parameters which can only be observed indirectly via online user actions such as a purchase activity or social media status updates, shares, blogs, or tweets. Based on these observations, machine learning algorithms produce digital interventions such as targeted advertisements or tweets. We model the effects of these interventions through a causal feedback loop, which alters the corresponding preferences of the user. We then introduce algorithms in order to estimate and later tune the user preferences to a particular desired form. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithms through experiments in different scenarios.

  6. Typelets - a rule-based evaluation model for dynamic, statically typed user interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsman, Martin; Schack-Nielsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    specification language allows layout programmers (e.g., end-users) to reorganize layouts in a type-safe way without being allowed to alter the rule machinery. The resulting framework is highly flexible and allows for creating highly maintainable modules. It is used with success in the context of SimCorp's high......-end performance-critical financial asset-management system with screens containing several hundreds of GUI controls located in group-boxes, sub-tabs, and menu structures and with very complex dependency structures defined using declarative rule composition....

  7. CO{sub 2}MPARE. CO2 Model for Operational Programme Assessment in EU Regions. User Tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekkenberg, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vincent-Genod, C. [Energies Demain, Montreuil Sous Bois (France); Regina, P. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development ENEA, Rome (Italy); Keppo, I. [University College London UCL, London (United Kingdom); Papagianni, S. [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources and Saving CRES, Pikermi Attiki (Greece); Harnych, J. [ENVIROS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-03-15

    The CO2MPARE model supports national and regional authorities in making balanced decisions for their investment portfolio under their regional development programmes, in particular under their Operational Programmes of EU Regional Policy. This document is a tutorial for users of the CO2MPARE model and provides step by step guidance on the different functionalities of the model for both basic and expert users.

  8. User's guide to the MESOI diffusion model and to the utility programs UPDATE and LOGRVU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athey, G.F.; Allwine, K.J.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1981-11-01

    MESOI is an interactive, Lagrangian puff trajectory diffusion model. The model is documented separately (Ramsdell and Athey, 1981); this report is intended to provide MESOI users with the information needed to successfully conduct model simulations. The user is also provided with guidance in the use of the data file maintenance and review programs; UPDATE and LOGRVU. Complete examples are given for the operaton of all three programs and an appendix documents UPDATE and LOGRVU.

  9. Pile group program for full material modeling and progressive failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Strain wedge (SW) model formulation has been used, in previous work, to evaluate the response of a single pile or a group of piles (including its : pile cap) in layered soils to lateral loading. The SW model approach provides appropriate prediction f...

  10. A Creative Therapies Model for the Group Supervision of Counsellors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Sets forth a model of group supervision, drawing on a creative therapies approach which provides an effective way of delivering process issues, conceptualization issues, and personalization issues. The model makes particular use of techniques drawn from art therapy and from psychodrama, and should be applicable to therapists of many orientations.…

  11. Investigating the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision of Group Work, a trans-theoretical supervisory framework to address the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) persons (Goodrich & Luke, 2011). Findings partially supported applicability of the LGBTQ Responsive Model for Supervision…

  12. MobRISK: a model for assessing the exposure of road users to flash flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shabou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent flash flood impact studies highlight that road networks are often disrupted due to adverse weather and flash flood events. Road users are thus particularly exposed to road flooding during their daily mobility. Previous exposure studies, however, do not take into consideration population mobility. Recent advances in transportation research provide an appropriate framework for simulating individual travel-activity patterns using an activity-based approach. These activity-based mobility models enable the prediction of the sequence of activities performed by individuals and locating them with a high spatial–temporal resolution. This paper describes the development of the MobRISK microsimulation system: a model for assessing the exposure of road users to extreme hydrometeorological events. MobRISK aims at providing an accurate spatiotemporal exposure assessment by integrating travel-activity behaviors and mobility adaptation with respect to weather disruptions. The model is applied in a flash-flood-prone area in southern France to assess motorists' exposure to the September 2002 flash flood event. The results show that risk of flooding mainly occurs in principal road links with considerable traffic load. However, a lag time between the timing of the road submersion and persons crossing these roads contributes to reducing the potential vehicle-related fatal accidents. It is also found that sociodemographic variables have a significant effect on individual exposure. Thus, the proposed model demonstrates the benefits of considering spatiotemporal dynamics of population exposure to flash floods and presents an important improvement in exposure assessment methods. Such improved characterization of road user exposures can present valuable information for flood risk management services.

  13. MobRISK: a model for assessing the exposure of road users to flash flood events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabou, Saif; Ruin, Isabelle; Lutoff, Céline; Debionne, Samuel; Anquetin, Sandrine; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Beaufils, Xavier

    2017-09-01

    Recent flash flood impact studies highlight that road networks are often disrupted due to adverse weather and flash flood events. Road users are thus particularly exposed to road flooding during their daily mobility. Previous exposure studies, however, do not take into consideration population mobility. Recent advances in transportation research provide an appropriate framework for simulating individual travel-activity patterns using an activity-based approach. These activity-based mobility models enable the prediction of the sequence of activities performed by individuals and locating them with a high spatial-temporal resolution. This paper describes the development of the MobRISK microsimulation system: a model for assessing the exposure of road users to extreme hydrometeorological events. MobRISK aims at providing an accurate spatiotemporal exposure assessment by integrating travel-activity behaviors and mobility adaptation with respect to weather disruptions. The model is applied in a flash-flood-prone area in southern France to assess motorists' exposure to the September 2002 flash flood event. The results show that risk of flooding mainly occurs in principal road links with considerable traffic load. However, a lag time between the timing of the road submersion and persons crossing these roads contributes to reducing the potential vehicle-related fatal accidents. It is also found that sociodemographic variables have a significant effect on individual exposure. Thus, the proposed model demonstrates the benefits of considering spatiotemporal dynamics of population exposure to flash floods and presents an important improvement in exposure assessment methods. Such improved characterization of road user exposures can present valuable information for flood risk management services.

  14. Deciphering the Crowd: Modeling and Identification of Pedestrian Group Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Hagita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation.

  15. Deciphering the crowd: modeling and identification of pedestrian group motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Zeynep; Zanlungo, Francesco; Ikeda, Tetsushi; Miyashita, Takahiro; Hagita, Norihiro

    2013-01-14

    Associating attributes to pedestrians in a crowd is relevant for various areas like surveillance, customer profiling and service providing. The attributes of interest greatly depend on the application domain and might involve such social relations as friends or family as well as the hierarchy of the group including the leader or subordinates. Nevertheless, the complex social setting inherently complicates this task. We attack this problem by exploiting the small group structures in the crowd. The relations among individuals and their peers within a social group are reliable indicators of social attributes. To that end, this paper identifies social groups based on explicit motion models integrated through a hypothesis testing scheme. We develop two models relating positional and directional relations. A pair of pedestrians is identified as belonging to the same group or not by utilizing the two models in parallel, which defines a compound hypothesis testing scheme. By testing the proposed approach on three datasets with different environmental properties and group characteristics, it is demonstrated that we achieve an identification accuracy of 87% to 99%. The contribution of this study lies in its definition of positional and directional relation models, its description of compound evaluations, and the resolution of ambiguities with our proposed uncertainty measure based on the local and global indicators of group relation.

  16. User Utility Oriented Queuing Model for Resource Allocation in Cloud Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resource allocation is one of the most important research topics in servers. In the cloud environment, there are massive hardware resources of different kinds, and many kinds of services are usually run on virtual machines of the cloud server. In addition, cloud environment is commercialized, and economical factor should also be considered. In order to deal with commercialization and virtualization of cloud environment, we proposed a user utility oriented queuing model for task scheduling. Firstly, we modeled task scheduling in cloud environment as an M/M/1 queuing system. Secondly, we classified the utility into time utility and cost utility and built a linear programming model to maximize total utility for both of them. Finally, we proposed a utility oriented algorithm to maximize the total utility. Massive experiments validate the effectiveness of our proposed model.

  17. An evolving user-oriented model of Internet health information seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaie, Martha J

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an evolving user-oriented model of Internet health information seeking (IS) based on qualitative data collected from 22 lung cancer (LC) patients and caregivers. This evolving model represents information search behavior as more highly individualized, complex, and dynamic than previous models, including pre-search psychological activity, use of multiple heuristics throughout the process, and cost-benefit evaluation of search results. This study's findings suggest that IS occurs in four distinct phases: search initiation/continuation, selective exposure, message processing, and message evaluation. The identification of these phases and the heuristics used within them suggests a higher order of complexity in the decision-making processes that underlie IS, which could lead to the development of a conceptual framework that more closely reflects the complex nature of contextualized IS. It also illustrates the advantages of using qualitative methods to extract more subtle details of the IS process and fill in the gaps in existing models.

  18. Dynamic energy conservation model REDUCE. Extension with experience curves, energy efficiency indicators and user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyterlinde, M.A.; Rijkers, F.A.M.

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of the energy conservation model REDUCE (Reduction of Energy Demand by Utilization of Conservation of Energy) is the evaluation of the effectiveness of economical, financial, institutional, and regulatory measures for improving the rational use of energy in end-use sectors. This report presents the results of additional model development activities, partly based on the first experiences in a previous project. Energy efficiency indicators have been added as an extra tool for output analysis in REDUCE. The methodology is described and some examples are given. The model has been extended with a method for modelling the effects of technical development on production costs, by means of an experience curve. Finally, the report provides a 'users guide', by describing in more detail the input data specification as well as all menus and buttons. 19 refs

  19. What is special about the group of the standard model?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Brene, N.

    1989-03-01

    The standard model is based on the algebra of U 1 xSU 2 xSU 3 . The systematics of charges of the fundamental fermions seems to suggest the importance of a particular group having this algebra, viz. S(U 2 xU 3 ). This group is distinguished from all other connected compact non semisimple groups with dimensionality up to 12 by a characteristic property: it is very 'skew'. By this we mean that the group has relatively few 'generalised outer automorphisms'. One may speculate about physical reasons for this fact. (orig.)

  20. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 4: User's manual for three-dimensional rigid-lid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Nwadike, E. V.; Sinha, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of a three dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one dimensional (1-D) model are described. Model verification at two sites, a separate user's manual for each model are included. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth, estuaries and coastal regions. The latter is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth because surface elevation was removed as a parameter. These models allow computation of time dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions. The free surface model also provides surface height variations with time.

  1. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, 35, Universitetskii prospekt, Petrodvorets, 198504 Email:elenaneverowa@gmail.com, malafeyevoa@mail.ru (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-10

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game.

  2. A model of interaction between anticorruption authority and corruption groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neverova, Elena G.; Malafeyef, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper provides a model of interaction between anticorruption unit and corruption groups. The main policy functions of the anticorruption unit involve reducing corrupt practices in some entities through an optimal approach to resource allocation and effective anticorruption policy. We develop a model based on Markov decision-making process and use Howard’s policy-improvement algorithm for solving an optimal decision strategy. We examine the assumption that corruption groups retaliate against the anticorruption authority to protect themselves. This model was implemented through stochastic game

  3. User-Friendly Predictive Modeling of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Fluxes and Carbon Storage in Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, K. S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2015-12-01

    We developed user-friendly empirical models to predict instantaneous fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from coastal wetlands based on a small set of dominant hydro-climatic and environmental drivers (e.g., photosynthetically active radiation, soil temperature, water depth, and soil salinity). The dominant predictor variables were systematically identified by applying a robust data-analytics framework on a wide range of possible environmental variables driving wetland greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes. The method comprised of a multi-layered data-analytics framework, including Pearson correlation analysis, explanatory principal component and factor analyses, and partial least squares regression modeling. The identified dominant predictors were finally utilized to develop power-law based non-linear regression models to predict CO2 and CH4 fluxes under different climatic, land use (nitrogen gradient), tidal hydrology and salinity conditions. Four different tidal wetlands of Waquoit Bay, MA were considered as the case study sites to identify the dominant drivers and evaluate model performance. The study sites were dominated by native Spartina Alterniflora and characterized by frequent flooding and high saline conditions. The model estimated the potential net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) both in gC/m2 and metric tonC/hectare by up-scaling the instantaneous predicted fluxes to the growing season and accounting for the lateral C flux exchanges between the wetlands and estuary. The entire model was presented in a single Excel spreadsheet as a user-friendly ecological engineering tool. The model can aid the development of appropriate GHG offset protocols for setting monitoring plans for tidal wetland restoration and maintenance projects. The model can also be used to estimate wetland GHG fluxes and potential carbon storage under various IPCC climate change and sea level rise scenarios; facilitating an appropriate management of carbon stocks in tidal wetlands and their incorporation into a

  4. Extended Group Contribution Model for Polyfunctional Phase Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens

    -liquid equilibria from data on binary mixtures, composed of structurally simple molecules with a single functional group. More complex is the situation with mixtures composed of structurally more complicated molecules or molecules with more than one functional group. The UNIFAC method is extended to handle...... on ideas applied to modelling of pure component properties. Chapter 2 describes the conceptual background of the approach. Three extensions of the present first-order UNIFAC model are formulated in chapter 3. These obey the Gibbs-Duhem restriction, and satisfy other traditional consistency requirements....... In chapter 4 parameters are estimated for the first-order UNIFAC model, based on which parameters are estimated for one of the second-order models described in chapter 3. The parameter estimation is based on measured binary data on around 4000 systems, covering 11 C-, H- and O-containing functional groups...

  5. Designing visual displays and system models for safe reactor operations based on the user's perspective of the system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Most designers are not schooled in the area of human-interaction psychology and therefore tend to rely on the traditional ergonomic aspects of human factors when designing complex human-interactive workstations related to reactor operations. They do not take into account the differences in user information processing behavior and how these behaviors may affect individual and team performance when accessing visual displays or utilizing system models in process and control room areas. Unfortunately, by ignoring the importance of the integration of the user interface at the information process level, the result can be sub-optimization and inherently error- and failure-prone systems. Therefore, to minimize or eliminate failures in human-interactive systems, it is essential that the designers understand how each user's processing characteristics affects how the user gathers information, and how the user communicates the information to the designer and other users. A different type of approach in achieving this understanding is Neuro Linguistic Programming (NLP). The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving the design of visual displays, NLP, and the user's perspective model of a reactor system. The studies involve the methodology known as NLP, and its use in expanding design choices from the user's ''model of the world,'' in the areas of virtual reality, workstation design, team structure, decision and learning style patterns, safety operations, pattern recognition, and much, much more

  6. LISA package user guide. Part III: SPOP (Statistical POst Processor). Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for model output. Program description and user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltelli, A.; Homma, T.

    1992-01-01

    This manual is subdivided into three parts. In the third part, the SPOP (Statistical POst Processor) code is described as a tool to perform Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses on the output of a User implemented model. It has been developed at the joint Research Centre of Ispra as part of the LISA package. SPOP performs Sensitivity Analysis (SA) and Uncertainty Analysis (UA) on a sample output from a Monte Carlo simulation. The sample is generated by the User and contains values of the output variable (in the form of a time series) and values of the input variables for a set of different simulations (runs), which are realised by varying the model input parameters. The User may generate the Monte Carlo sample with the PREP pre-processor, another module of the LISA package. The SPOP code is completely written in FORTRAN 77 using structured programming. Among the tasks performed by the code are the computation of Tchebycheff and Kolmogorov confidence bounds on the output variable (UA), and the use of effective non-parametric statistics to rank the influence of model input parameters (SA). The statistics employed are described in the present manual. 19 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs. Note: This PART III is a revised version of the previous EUR report N.12700EN (1990)

  7. Crossed categorization beyond the two-group model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urada, Darren; Stenstrom, Douglas M; Miller, Norman

    2007-04-01

    Four studies examined processing of in-group and out-group information with stimuli that are more complex than those used in previous crossed categorization studies. A diverse set of predictions is generated by previous theoretical work to account for how participants will integrate information stemming from multiple group memberships. Heuristic, threshold-based processing of information was supported over algebraic processing. Participants appeared to divide stimuli into "in-grouplike" and "out-grouplike" metacategories. However, the threshold at which this distinction was made, and whether it was based on in-group favoritism or out-group derogation, was influenced by the nature of the situation and the task participants performed. Advantages of crossed categorization research that moves beyond the traditional two-group model are discussed.

  8. New Pathways between Group Theory and Model Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László; Goldsmith, Brendan; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    This volume focuses on group theory and model theory with a particular emphasis on the interplay of the two areas. The survey papers provide an overview of the developments across group, module, and model theory while the research papers present the most recent study in those same areas. With introductory sections that make the topics easily accessible to students, the papers in this volume will appeal to beginning graduate students and experienced researchers alike. As a whole, this book offers a cross-section view of the areas in group, module, and model theory, covering topics such as DP-minimal groups, Abelian groups, countable 1-transitive trees, and module approximations. The papers in this book are the proceedings of the conference “New Pathways between Group Theory and Model Theory,” which took place February 1-4, 2016, in Mülheim an der Ruhr, Germany, in honor of the editors’ colleague Rüdiger Göbel. This publication is dedicated to Professor Göbel, who passed away in 2014. He was one of th...

  9. Classifiers as a model-free group comparison test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bommae; Oertzen, Timo von

    2018-02-01

    The conventional statistical methods to detect group differences assume correct model specification, including the origin of difference. Researchers should be able to identify a source of group differences and choose a corresponding method. In this paper, we propose a new approach of group comparison without model specification using classification algorithms in machine learning. In this approach, the classification accuracy is evaluated against a binomial distribution using Independent Validation. As an application example, we examined false-positive errors and statistical power of support vector machines to detect group differences in comparison to conventional statistical tests such as t test, Levene's test, K-S test, Fisher's z-transformation, and MANOVA. The SVMs detected group differences regardless of their origins (mean, variance, distribution shape, and covariance), and showed comparably consistent power across conditions. When a group difference originated from a single source, the statistical power of SVMs was lower than the most appropriate conventional test of the study condition; however, the power of SVMs increased when differences originated from multiple sources. Moreover, SVMs showed substantially improved performance with more variables than with fewer variables. Most importantly, SVMs were applicable to any types of data without sophisticated model specification. This study demonstrates a new application of classification algorithms as an alternative or complement to the conventional group comparison test. With the proposed approach, researchers can test two-sample data even when they are not certain which statistical test to use or when data violates the statistical assumptions of conventional methods.

  10. A user-friendly model for spray drying to aid pharmaceutical product development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Grasmeijer

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a user-friendly model for spray drying that can aid in the development of a pharmaceutical product, by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach. To achieve this, a spray dryer model was developed in commercial and open source spreadsheet software. The output of the model was first fitted to the experimental output of a Büchi B-290 spray dryer and subsequently validated. The predicted outlet temperatures of the spray dryer model matched the experimental values very well over the entire range of spray dryer settings that were tested. Finally, the model was applied to produce glassy sugars by spray drying, an often used excipient in formulations of biopharmaceuticals. For the production of glassy sugars, the model was extended to predict the relative humidity at the outlet, which is not measured in the spray dryer by default. This extended model was then successfully used to predict whether specific settings were suitable for producing glassy trehalose and inulin by spray drying. In conclusion, a spray dryer model was developed that is able to predict the output parameters of the spray drying process. The model can aid the development of spray dried pharmaceutical products by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach.

  11. A user-friendly model for spray drying to aid pharmaceutical product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmeijer, Niels; de Waard, Hans; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a user-friendly model for spray drying that can aid in the development of a pharmaceutical product, by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach. To achieve this, a spray dryer model was developed in commercial and open source spreadsheet software. The output of the model was first fitted to the experimental output of a Büchi B-290 spray dryer and subsequently validated. The predicted outlet temperatures of the spray dryer model matched the experimental values very well over the entire range of spray dryer settings that were tested. Finally, the model was applied to produce glassy sugars by spray drying, an often used excipient in formulations of biopharmaceuticals. For the production of glassy sugars, the model was extended to predict the relative humidity at the outlet, which is not measured in the spray dryer by default. This extended model was then successfully used to predict whether specific settings were suitable for producing glassy trehalose and inulin by spray drying. In conclusion, a spray dryer model was developed that is able to predict the output parameters of the spray drying process. The model can aid the development of spray dried pharmaceutical products by shifting from a trial-and-error towards a quality-by-design approach.

  12. User modeling and adaptation for daily routines providing assistance to people with special needs

    CERN Document Server

    Martín, Estefanía; Carro, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines is motivated by the need to bring attention to how people with special needs can benefit from adaptive methods and techniques in their everyday lives. Assistive technologies, adaptive systems and context-aware applications are three well-established research fields. There is, in fact, a vast amount of literature that covers HCI-related issues in each area separately. However, the contributions in the intersection of these areas have been less visible, despite the fact that such synergies may have a great impact on improving daily living.Presentin

  13. ITS Version 3.0: Powerful, user-friendly software for radiation modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kensek, R.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Valdez, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    ITS (the Integrated Tiger Series) is a powerful, but user-friendly, software package permitting state-of-the-art modelling of electron and/or photon radiation effects. The programs provide Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields. The ITS system combines operational simplicity and physical accuracy in order to provide experimentalist and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems

  14. Verification and transfer of thermal pollution model. Volume 2: User's manual for 3-dimensional free-surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Tuann, S. Y.; Lee, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    The six-volume report: describes the theory of a three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical thermal discharge model and a related one-dimensional (1-D) model, includes model verification at two sites, and provides a separate user's manual for each model. The 3-D model has two forms: free surface and rigid lid. The former, verified at Anclote Anchorage (FL), allows a free air/water interface and is suited for significant surface wave heights compared to mean water depth; e.g., estuaries and coastal regions. The latter, verified at Lake Keowee (SC), is suited for small surface wave heights compared to depth. These models allow computation of time-dependent velocity and temperature fields for given initial conditions and time-varying boundary conditions.

  15. User Friendly Open GIS Tool for Large Scale Data Assimilation - a Case Study of Hydrological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P. K.

    2012-08-01

    Open source software (OSS) coding has tremendous advantages over proprietary software. These are primarily fuelled by high level programming languages (JAVA, C++, Python etc...) and open source geospatial libraries (GDAL/OGR, GEOS, GeoTools etc.). Quantum GIS (QGIS) is a popular open source GIS package, which is licensed under GNU GPL and is written in C++. It allows users to perform specialised tasks by creating plugins in C++ and Python. This research article emphasises on exploiting this capability of QGIS to build and implement plugins across multiple platforms using the easy to learn - Python programming language. In the present study, a tool has been developed to assimilate large spatio-temporal datasets such as national level gridded rainfall, temperature, topographic (digital elevation model, slope, aspect), landuse/landcover and multi-layer soil data for input into hydrological models. At present this tool has been developed for Indian sub-continent. An attempt is also made to use popular scientific and numerical libraries to create custom applications for digital inclusion. In the hydrological modelling calibration and validation are important steps which are repetitively carried out for the same study region. As such the developed tool will be user friendly and used efficiently for these repetitive processes by reducing the time required for data management and handling. Moreover, it was found that the developed tool can easily assimilate large dataset in an organised manner.

  16. PLEXFIN a computer model for the economic assessment of nuclear power plant life extension. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA developed PLEXFIN, a computer model analysis tool aimed to assist decision makers in the assessment of the economic viability of a nuclear power plant life/licence extension. This user's manual was produced to facilitate the application of the PLEXFIN computer model. It is widely accepted in the industry that the operational life of a nuclear power plant is not limited to a pre-determined number of years, sometimes established on non-technical grounds, but by the capability of the plant to comply with the nuclear safety and technical requirements in a cost effective manner. The decision to extend the license/life of a nuclear power plant involves a number of political, technical and economic issues. The economic viability is a cornerstone of the decision-making process. In a liberalized electricity market, the economics to justify a nuclear power plant life/license extension decision requires a more complex evaluation. This user's manual was elaborated in the framework of the IAEA's programmes on Continuous process improvement of NPP operating performance, and on Models for analysis and capacity building for sustainable energy development, with the support of four consultants meetings

  17. Fuzzy classification of phantom parent groups in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikse Freddy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic evaluation models often include genetic groups to account for unequal genetic level of animals with unknown parentage. The definition of phantom parent groups usually includes a time component (e.g. years. Combining several time periods to ensure sufficiently large groups may create problems since all phantom parents in a group are considered contemporaries. Methods To avoid the downside of such distinct classification, a fuzzy logic approach is suggested. A phantom parent can be assigned to several genetic groups, with proportions between zero and one that sum to one. Rules were presented for assigning coefficients to the inverse of the relationship matrix for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. This approach was illustrated with simulated data from ten generations of mass selection. Observations and pedigree records were randomly deleted. Phantom parent groups were defined on the basis of gender and generation number. In one scenario, uncertainty about generation of birth was simulated for some animals with unknown parents. In the distinct classification, one of the two possible generations of birth was randomly chosen to assign phantom parents to genetic groups for animals with simulated uncertainty, whereas the phantom parents were assigned to both possible genetic groups in the fuzzy classification. Results The empirical prediction error variance (PEV was somewhat lower for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. The ranking of animals with unknown parents was more correct and less variable across replicates in comparison with distinct genetic groups. In another scenario, each phantom parent was assigned to three groups, one pertaining to its gender, and two pertaining to the first and last generation, with proportion depending on the (true generation of birth. Due to the lower number of groups, the empirical PEV of breeding values was smaller when genetic groups were fuzzy-classified. Conclusion Fuzzy

  18. Group Elevator Peak Scheduling Based on Robust Optimization Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG, J.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling of Elevator Group Control System (EGCS is a typical combinatorial optimization problem. Uncertain group scheduling under peak traffic flows has become a research focus and difficulty recently. RO (Robust Optimization method is a novel and effective way to deal with uncertain scheduling problem. In this paper, a peak scheduling method based on RO model for multi-elevator system is proposed. The method is immune to the uncertainty of peak traffic flows, optimal scheduling is realized without getting exact numbers of each calling floor's waiting passengers. Specifically, energy-saving oriented multi-objective scheduling price is proposed, RO uncertain peak scheduling model is built to minimize the price. Because RO uncertain model could not be solved directly, RO uncertain model is transformed to RO certain model by elevator scheduling robust counterparts. Because solution space of elevator scheduling is enormous, to solve RO certain model in short time, ant colony solving algorithm for elevator scheduling is proposed. Based on the algorithm, optimal scheduling solutions are found quickly, and group elevators are scheduled according to the solutions. Simulation results show the method could improve scheduling performances effectively in peak pattern. Group elevators' efficient operation is realized by the RO scheduling method.

  19. Game-Theoretic Model of Incentivizing Privacy-Aware Users to Consent to Location Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Panaousis, Emmanouil; Laszka, Aron; Pohl, Johannes; Noack, Andreas; Alpcan, Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mobile users have a vast number of applications and services at their disposal. Each of these might impose some privacy threats on users' "Personally Identifiable Information" (PII). Location privacy is a crucial part of PII, and as such, privacy-aware users wish to maximize it. This privacy can be, for instance, threatened by a company, which collects users' traces and shares them with third parties. To maximize their location privacy, users can decide to get offline so that the co...

  20. Pelagic functional group modeling: Progress, challenges and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Raleigh R.; Laws, Edward A.; Armstrong, Robert A.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Brown, Christopher W.; Carlson, Craig A.; Chai, Fei; Doney, Scott C.; Falkowski, Paul G.; Feely, Richard A.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Landry, Michael R.; Keith Moore, J.; Nelson, David M.; Richardson, Tammi L.; Salihoglu, Baris; Schartau, Markus; Toole, Dierdre A.; Wiggert, Jerry D.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art and major challenges in current efforts to incorporate biogeochemical functional groups into models that can be applied on basin-wide and global scales, with an emphasis on models that might ultimately be used to predict how biogeochemical cycles in the ocean will respond to global warming. We define the term "biogeochemical functional group" to refer to groups of organisms that mediate specific chemical reactions in the ocean. Thus, according to this definition, "functional groups" have no phylogenetic meaning—these are composed of many different species with common biogeochemical functions. Substantial progress has been made in the last decade toward quantifying the rates of these various functions and understanding the factors that control them. For some of these groups, we have developed fairly sophisticated models that incorporate this understanding, e.g. for diazotrophs (e.g. Trichodesmium), silica producers (diatoms) and calcifiers (e.g. coccolithophorids and specifically Emiliania huxleyi). However, current representations of nitrogen fixation and calcification are incomplete, i.e., based primarily upon models of Trichodesmium and E. huxleyi, respectively, and many important functional groups have not yet been considered in open-ocean biogeochemical models. Progress has been made over the last decade in efforts to simulate dimethylsulfide (DMS) production and cycling (i.e., by dinoflagellates and prymnesiophytes) and denitrification, but these efforts are still in their infancy, and many significant problems remain. One obvious gap is that virtually all functional group modeling efforts have focused on autotrophic microbes, while higher trophic levels have been completely ignored. It appears that in some cases (e.g., calcification), incorporating higher trophic levels may be essential not only for representing a particular biogeochemical reaction, but also for modeling export. Another serious problem is our

  1. GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE WITH APPLICATIONS IN SUSCEPTIBLE-INFECTIOUS-SUSCEPTIBLE MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Arotăriţei, D; Rotariu, Mariana; Popescu, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    Practical significance of understanding the dynamics and evolution of infectious diseases increases continuously in contemporary world. The mathematical study of the dynamics of infectious diseases has a long history. By incorporating statistical methods and computer-based simulations in dynamic epidemiological models, it could be possible for modeling methods and theoretical analyses to be more realistic and reliable, allowing a more detailed understanding of the rules governing epidemic spreading. To provide the basis for a disease transmission, the population of a region is often divided into various compartments, and the model governing their relation is called the compartmental model. To present all of the information available, a graphical user interface provides icons and visual indicators. The graphical interface shown in this paper is performed using the MATLAB software ver. 7.6.0. MATLAB software offers a wide range of techniques by which data can be displayed graphically. The process of data viewing involves a series of operations. To achieve it, I had to make three separate files, one for defining the mathematical model and two for the interface itself. Considering a fixed population, it is observed that the number of susceptible individuals diminishes along with an increase in the number of infectious individuals so that in about ten days the number of individuals infected and susceptible, respectively, has the same value. If the epidemic is not controlled, it will continue for an indefinite period of time. By changing the global parameters specific of the SIS model, a more rapid increase of infectious individuals is noted. Using the graphical user interface shown in this paper helps achieving a much easier interaction with the computer, simplifying the structure of complex instructions by using icons and menus, and, in particular, programs and files are much easier to organize. Some numerical simulations have been presented to illustrate theoretical

  2. Discrete time duration models with group-level heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Honoré, Bo; Hu, Loujia

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic discrete choice panel data models have received a great deal of attention. In those models, the dynamics is usually handled by including the lagged outcome as an explanatory variable. In this paper we consider an alternative model in which the dynamics is handled by using the duration...... in the current state as a covariate. We propose estimators that allow for group-specific effect in parametric and semiparametric versions of the model. The proposed method is illustrated by an empirical analysis of job durations allowing for firm-level effects....

  3. Repository Integration Program: RIP performance assessment and strategy evaluation model theory manual and user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the theory and capabilities of RIP (Repository Integration Program). RIP is a powerful and flexible computational tool for carrying out probabilistic integrated total system performance assessments for geologic repositories. The primary purpose of RIP is to provide a management tool for guiding system design and site characterization. In addition, the performance assessment model (and the process of eliciting model input) can act as a mechanism for integrating the large amount of available information into a meaningful whole (in a sense, allowing one to keep the ``big picture`` and the ultimate aims of the project clearly in focus). Such an integration is useful both for project managers and project scientists. RIP is based on a `` top down`` approach to performance assessment that concentrates on the integration of the entire system, and utilizes relatively high-level descriptive models and parameters. The key point in the application of such a ``top down`` approach is that the simplified models and associated high-level parameters must incorporate an accurate representation of their uncertainty. RIP is designed in a very flexible manner such that details can be readily added to various components of the model without modifying the computer code. Uncertainty is also handled in a very flexible manner, and both parameter and model (process) uncertainty can be explicitly considered. Uncertainty is propagated through the integrated PA model using an enhanced Monte Carlo method. RIP must rely heavily on subjective assessment (expert opinion) for much of its input. The process of eliciting the high-level input parameters required for RIP is critical to its successful application. As a result, in order for any project to successfully apply a tool such as RIP, an enormous amount of communication and cooperation must exist between the data collectors, the process modelers, and the performance. assessment modelers.

  4. Technical documentation and user's guide for City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, L.T. Jr.; Scott, M.J.; Hammer, P.

    1986-05-01

    The City-County Allocation Model (CCAM) was developed as part of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program. The CCAM model was designed to allocate population changes forecasted by the MASTER model to specific local communities within commuting distance of the MRS facility. The CCAM model was designed to then forecast the potential changes in demand for key community services such as housing, police protection, and utilities for these communities. The CCAM model uses a flexible on-line data base on demand for community services that is based on a combination of local service levels and state and national service standards. The CCAM model can be used to quickly forecast the potential community service consequence of economic development for local communities anywhere in the country. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. The purpose of this manual is to assist the user in understanding and operating the City-County Allocation Model (CCAM). The annual explains the data sources for the model and code modifications as well as the operational procedures

  5. Group Elevator Peak Scheduling Based on Robust Optimization Model

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, J.; ZONG, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Scheduling of Elevator Group Control System (EGCS) is a typical combinatorial optimization problem. Uncertain group scheduling under peak traffic flows has become a research focus and difficulty recently. RO (Robust Optimization) method is a novel and effective way to deal with uncertain scheduling problem. In this paper, a peak scheduling method based on RO model for multi-elevator system is proposed. The method is immune to the uncertainty of peak traffic flows, optimal scheduling is re...

  6. Ising model for collective decision making during group motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkoviezky, Itai; Gov, Nir; Couzin, Iain

    Collective decision making is a key feature during natural motion of animal groups and is also crucial for human groups. This phenomenon can be exemplified by the scenario of two subgroups that hold conflicting preferred directions of motion. The constraint of group cohesion drives the motion either towards a compromise or towards one of the preferred targets. The transition between compromise and decision has been found in simulations of flock models, but the nature of this transition is not well understood. We present a minimal spin model for this system where we interpret the spin-spin interaction as a social force. This model exhibits both first and second order transitions. The group motion changes from size-dependent diffusion at high temperatures to run-and-tumble motion below the critical temperature. In the presence of minority and majority subgroups, we find that there is a trade-off between the speed of reaching a target and the accuracy. We then compare the results of the spin model to detailed simulations of a flock model, and find overall very similar dynamics, with the role of the temperature taken by the inverse of the number of uninformed individuals.

  7. Multilevel Modeling of Individual and Group Level Mediated Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, J L; MacKinnon, D P

    2001-04-01

    This article combines procedures for single-level mediational analysis with multilevel modeling techniques in order to appropriately test mediational effects in clustered data. A simulation study compared the performance of these multilevel mediational models with that of single-level mediational models in clustered data with individual- or group-level initial independent variables, individual- or group-level mediators, and individual level outcomes. The standard errors of mediated effects from the multilevel solution were generally accurate, while those from the single-level procedure were downwardly biased, often by 20% or more. The multilevel advantage was greatest in those situations involving group-level variables, larger group sizes, and higher intraclass correlations in mediator and outcome variables. Multilevel mediational modeling methods were also applied to data from a preventive intervention designed to reduce intentions to use steroids among players on high school football teams. This example illustrates differences between single-level and multilevel mediational modeling in real-world clustered data and shows how the multilevel technique may lead to more accurate results.

  8. Novel web service selection model based on discrete group search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jie; Shao, Zhiqing; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Haiteng

    2014-01-01

    In our earlier work, we present a novel formal method for the semiautomatic verification of specifications and for describing web service composition components by using abstract concepts. After verification, the instantiations of components were selected to satisfy the complex service performance constraints. However, selecting an optimal instantiation, which comprises different candidate services for each generic service, from a large number of instantiations is difficult. Therefore, we present a new evolutionary approach on the basis of the discrete group search service (D-GSS) model. With regard to obtaining the optimal multiconstraint instantiation of the complex component, the D-GSS model has competitive performance compared with other service selection models in terms of accuracy, efficiency, and ability to solve high-dimensional service composition component problems. We propose the cost function and the discrete group search optimizer (D-GSO) algorithm and study the convergence of the D-GSS model through verification and test cases.

  9. Model for Analysis of the Energy Demand (MAED) users' manual for version MAED-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This manual is organized in two major parts. The first part includes eight main sections describing how to use the MAED-1 computer program and the second one consists of five appendices giving some additional information about the program. Concerning the main sections of the manual, Section 1 gives a summary description and some background information about the MAED-1 model. Section 2 extends the description of the MAED-1 model in more detail. Section 3 introduces some concepts, mainly related to the computer requirements imposed by the program, that are used throughout this document. Sections 4 to 7 describe how to execute each of the various programs (or modules) of the MAED-1 package. The description for each module shows the user how to prepare the control and data cards needed to execute the module and how to interpret the printed output produced. Section 8 recapitulates about the use of MAED-1 for carrying out energy and electricity planning studies, describes the several phases normally involved in this type of study and provides the user with practical hints about the most important aspects that need to be verified at each phase while executing the various MAED modules

  10. Incentivizing biodiversity conservation in artisanal fishing communities through territorial user rights and business model innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelcich, Stefan; Donlan, C Josh

    2015-08-01

    Territorial user rights for fisheries are being promoted to enhance the sustainability of small-scale fisheries. Using Chile as a case study, we designed a market-based program aimed at improving fishers' livelihoods while incentivizing the establishment and enforcement of no-take areas within areas managed with territorial user right regimes. Building on explicit enabling conditions (i.e., high levels of governance, participation, and empowerment), we used a place-based, human-centered approach to design a program that will have the necessary support and buy-in from local fishers to result in landscape-scale biodiversity benefits. Transactional infrastructure must be complex enough to capture the biodiversity benefits being created, but simple enough so that the program can be scaled up and is attractive to potential financiers. Biodiversity benefits created must be commoditized, and desired behavioral changes must be verified within a transactional context. Demand must be generated for fisher-created biodiversity benefits in order to attract financing and to scale the market model. Important design decisions around these 3 components-supply, transactional infrastructure, and demand-must be made based on local social-ecological conditions. Our market model, which is being piloted in Chile, is a flexible foundation on which to base scalable opportunities to operationalize a scheme that incentivizes local, verifiable biodiversity benefits via conservation behaviors by fishers that could likely result in significant marine conservation gains and novel cross-sector alliances. © 2015, Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. An evaluation of high-risk behaviors among female drug users based on Health Belief Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilika, F; Jamshidimanesh, M; Hoseini, M; Saffari, M; Peyravi, H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Because of the physiological nature of the female reproductive system, women are susceptible to infectious diseases, especially STD and AIDS. Addiction and high-risk behaviors also grow danger of these diseases. The reason of this paper was to examine high-risk behaviors among female drug users based on the Health Belief Model. Methods. Participants of this study were 106 female drug users aged 18 years and older; by the undermost level of literacy skills and been involved in sexual relationships. They came to Drop-In-Centers (DIC) in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Data study was controlled by using a logistic reflux investigation and Pearson correlation analysis. Results. The conclusion showed that women's overall awareness was moderate. There were a considerable relationship among awareness and years old (p=0.006), awareness and education (p> 0.0001), and awareness and conjugal situation (p=0.062). Perceived sensitivity and severity were clearly compared by education level (p=0.007) and (p=0.014), respectively. Mean scores of perceived benefits and perceived severity of high-risk behaviors were estimated to be superior to other components. Conclusion. Awareness and perceived susceptibility must be raised regarding the educational schedule, which is according to the health belief model in the addiction field, to reduce perceived barriers to risky behavior prevention of women who use drugs.

  12. Dimensional reduction of Markov state models from renormalization group theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orioli, S.; Faccioli, P.

    2016-09-01

    Renormalization Group (RG) theory provides the theoretical framework to define rigorous effective theories, i.e., systematic low-resolution approximations of arbitrary microscopic models. Markov state models are shown to be rigorous effective theories for Molecular Dynamics (MD). Based on this fact, we use real space RG to vary the resolution of the stochastic model and define an algorithm for clustering microstates into macrostates. The result is a lower dimensional stochastic model which, by construction, provides the optimal coarse-grained Markovian representation of the system's relaxation kinetics. To illustrate and validate our theory, we analyze a number of test systems of increasing complexity, ranging from synthetic toy models to two realistic applications, built form all-atom MD simulations. The computational cost of computing the low-dimensional model remains affordable on a desktop computer even for thousands of microstates.

  13. Evaluation of custom energy expenditure models for SenseWear armband in manual wheelchair users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, KaLai; Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Cooper, Rory A; Ding, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity monitors are increasingly used to help the general population lead a healthy lifestyle by keeping track of their daily physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE). However, none of the commercially available activity monitors can accurately estimate PA and EE in people who use wheelchairs as their primary means of mobility. Researchers have recently developed custom EE prediction models for manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) based on a commercial activity monitor--the SenseWear armband. This study evaluated the performance of two custom EE prediction models, including a general model and a set of activity-specific models among 45 MWUs with SCI. The estimated EE was obtained by using the two custom models and the default manufacturer's model, and it was compared with the gold standard measured by the K4b2 portable metabolic cart. The general, activity-specific, and default models had a mean signed percent error (mean +/- standard deviation) of -2.8 +/- 26.1%, -4.8 +/- 25.4%, and -39.6 +/- 37.8%, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82 to 0.89) for the general model, 0.83 (95% CI = 0.79 to 0.87) for the activity-specific model, and 0.62 (95% CI = 0.16 to 0.81) for the default model. The custom models for the SenseWear armband significantly improved the EE estimation accuracy for MWUs with SCI.

  14. HIGHWAY, a transportation routing model: program description and revised users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

    1983-10-01

    A computerized transportation routing model has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be used for predicting likely routes for shipping radioactive materials. The HIGHWAY data base is a computerized road atlas containing descriptions of the entire Interstate System, the federal highway system, and most of the principal state roads. In addition to its prediction of the most likely commercial route, options incorporated in the HIGHWAY model can allow for maximum use of Interstate highways or routes that will bypass urbanized areas containing populations greater than 100,000 persons. The user may also interactively modify the data base to predict routes that bypass any particular state, city, town, or specific highway segment

  15. User's guide to Model Viewer, a program for three-dimensional visualization of ground-water model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Paul A.; Winston, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    Model Viewer is a computer program that displays the results of three-dimensional groundwater models. Scalar data (such as hydraulic head or solute concentration) may be displayed as a solid or a set of isosurfaces, using a red-to-blue color spectrum to represent a range of scalar values. Vector data (such as velocity or specific discharge) are represented by lines oriented to the vector direction and scaled to the vector magnitude. Model Viewer can also display pathlines, cells or nodes that represent model features such as streams and wells, and auxiliary graphic objects such as grid lines and coordinate axes. Users may crop the model grid in different orientations to examine the interior structure of the data. For transient simulations, Model Viewer can animate the time evolution of the simulated quantities. The current version (1.0) of Model Viewer runs on Microsoft Windows 95, 98, NT and 2000 operating systems, and supports the following models: MODFLOW-2000, MODFLOW-2000 with the Ground-Water Transport Process, MODFLOW-96, MOC3D (Version 3.5), MODPATH, MT3DMS, and SUTRA (Version 2D3D.1). Model Viewer is designed to directly read input and output files from these models, thus minimizing the need for additional postprocessing. This report provides an overview of Model Viewer. Complete instructions on how to use the software are provided in the on-line help pages.

  16. Working group report: Flavor physics and model building

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While activities in flavor physics have been mainly focused on -physics, those in model building have been primarily devoted to neutrino physics. We present summary of working group discussions carried out during the workshop in the above fields, and also briefly review the progress made in some projects subsequently ...

  17. User's guide to the weather model: a component of the western spruce budworm modeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. P. Kemp; N. L. Crookston; P. W. Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A stochastic model useful in simulating daily maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation developed by Bruhn and others has been adapted for use in the western spruce budworm modeling system. This document describes how to use the weather model and illustrates some aspects of its behavior.

  18. Users Manual for the Geospatial Stream Flow Model (GeoSFM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artan, Guleid A.; Asante, Kwabena; Smith, Jodie; Pervez, Md Shahriar; Entenmann, Debbie; Verdin, James P.; Rowland, James

    2008-01-01

    The monitoring of wide-area hydrologic events requires the manipulation of large amounts of geospatial and time series data into concise information products that characterize the location and magnitude of the event. To perform these manipulations, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS), with the cooperation of the U.S. Agency for International Development, Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA), have implemented a hydrologic modeling system. The system includes a data assimilation component to generate data for a Geospatial Stream Flow Model (GeoSFM) that can be run operationally to identify and map wide-area streamflow anomalies. GeoSFM integrates a geographical information system (GIS) for geospatial preprocessing and postprocessing tasks and hydrologic modeling routines implemented as dynamically linked libraries (DLLs) for time series manipulations. Model results include maps that depicting the status of streamflow and soil water conditions. This Users Manual provides step-by-step instructions for running the model and for downloading and processing the input data required for initial model parameterization and daily operation.

  19. Using of Group-Modeling in Predesign Phase of New Healthcare Environments: Stakeholders Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, Marie; Eldh, Ann Catrine; Malmqvist, Inga; Öhrn, Kerstin; von Koch, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Current research shows a relationship between healthcare architecture and patient-related outcomes. The planning and designing of new healthcare environments is a complex process. The needs of the various end users of the environment must be considered, including the patients, the patients' significant others, and the staff. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of healthcare professionals participating in group modeling utilizing system dynamics in the predesign phase of new healthcare environments. We engaged healthcare professionals in a series of workshops using system dynamics to discuss the planning of healthcare environments in the beginning of a construction and then interviewed them about their experience. An explorative and qualitative design was used to describe participants' experiences of participating in the group-modeling projects. Participants (N = 20) were recruited from a larger intervention study using group modeling and system dynamics in planning and designing projects. The interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Two themes were formed, representing the experiences in the group-modeling process: "Participation in the group modeling generated knowledge and was empowering" and "Participation in the group modeling differed from what was expected and required the dedication of time and skills." The method can support participants in design teams to focus more on their healthcare organization, their care activities, and their aims rather than focusing on detailed layout solutions. This clarification is important when decisions about the design are discussed and prepared and will most likely lead to greater readiness for future building process. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C in special population groups (migrants, intravenous drug users and prison inmates).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasio, Piero L; Babudieri, Sergio; Barbarini, Giorgio; Brunetto, Maurizia; Conte, Dario; Dentico, Pietro; Gaeta, Giovanni B; Leonardi, Claudio; Levrero, Massimo; Mazzotta, Francesco; Morrone, Aldo; Nosotti, Lorenzo; Prati, Daniele; Rapicetta, Maria; Sagnelli, Evangelista; Scotto, Gaetano; Starnini, Giulio

    2011-08-01

    The global spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), their high chronicity rates and their progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, are major public health problems. Research and intervention programmes for special population groups are needed in order to assess their infection risk and set up suitable prevention and control strategies. Aim of this paper is to give health care professionals information on HBV and HCV infections amongst migrants, drug users and prison inmates. The manuscript is an official Position Paper on behalf of the following Scientific Societies: Italian Association for the Study of the Liver (A.I.S.F.), Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Diseases (S.I.M.I.T.), Italian Federation Department's Operators and Addiction Services (FederSerD), Italian Prison Medicine and Healthcare Society (S.I.M.S.Pe.). The considered population groups, having a high prevalence HBV and HCV infections, require specific interventions. In this context, the expression "special population" refers to specific vulnerable groups at risk of social exclusion, such as migrants, prison inmates, and intravenous drug users. When dealing with special population groups, social, environmental and clinical factors should be considered when selecting candidates for therapy as indicated by national and international guidelines. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Renormalisation group improved leptogenesis in family symmetry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Iain K.; King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    We study renormalisation group (RG) corrections relevant for leptogenesis in the case of family symmetry models such as the Altarelli-Feruglio A 4 model of tri-bimaximal lepton mixing or its extension to tri-maximal mixing. Such corrections are particularly relevant since in large classes of family symmetry models, to leading order, the CP violating parameters of leptogenesis would be identically zero at the family symmetry breaking scale, due to the form dominance property. We find that RG corrections violate form dominance and enable such models to yield viable leptogenesis at the scale of right-handed neutrino masses. More generally, the results of this paper show that RG corrections to leptogenesis cannot be ignored for any family symmetry model involving sizeable neutrino and τ Yukawa couplings.

  2. Descriptive epidemiology of intravenous heroin users--a new risk group for transmission of HIV in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, S; Mookerjee, P; Roy, A; Naik, T N; Singh, J K; Sharma, A R; Singh, Y I; Singh, P K; Tripathy, S P; Pal, S C

    1991-09-01

    India is considered to have a low incidence of HIV infection so far. Nevertheless, an epidemic of HIV infection has been reported recently among intra-venous drug users (IVDUs) in Manipur, a north-eastern state of India, bordering Myanmar (Burma). This report describes the epidemiology of intravenous drug abuse in the state of Manipur. Four hundred and fifty IVDUs were interviewed. Their age (median 24 years) and sex patterns (95% male) differ from those reported from western countries. It is estimated that there may be approximately 15,000 such addicts in a population of 1.8 million and 50% of them could be positive for HIV. Knowledge of AIDS and its transmission is significantly higher among the addicts than non-addict controls. Free availability of heroin was found to be the major factor responsible for the high rate of addiction. It is presumed that two other neighbouring States which are well-connected to Manipur and also have a common border with Myanmar (part of the 'Golden Triangle') may have a similar problem with HIV infection.

  3. Hybrid2: The hybrid system simulation model, Version 1.0, user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baring-Gould, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    In light of the large scale desire for energy in remote communities, especially in the developing world, the need for a detailed long term performance prediction model for hybrid power systems was seen. To meet these ends, engineers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Massachusetts (UMass) have spent the last three years developing the Hybrid2 software. The Hybrid2 code provides a means to conduct long term, detailed simulations of the performance of a large array of hybrid power systems. This work acts as an introduction and users manual to the Hybrid2 software. The manual describes the Hybrid2 code, what is included with the software and instructs the user on the structure of the code. The manual also describes some of the major features of the Hybrid2 code as well as how to create projects and run hybrid system simulations. The Hybrid2 code test program is also discussed. Although every attempt has been made to make the Hybrid2 code easy to understand and use, this manual will allow many organizations to consider the long term advantages of using hybrid power systems instead of conventional petroleum based systems for remote power generation.

  4. FINDING POTENTIALLY UNSAFE NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS FROM USER REVIEWS WITH TOPIC MODELING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ryan; Sarker, Abeed; O'Connor, Karen; Goodin, Amanda; Karlsrud, Mark; Gonzalez, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Although dietary supplements are widely used and generally are considered safe, some supplements have been identified as causative agents for adverse reactions, some of which may even be fatal. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for monitoring supplements and ensuring that supplements are safe. However, current surveillance protocols are not always effective. Leveraging user-generated textual data, in the form of Amazon.com reviews for nutritional supplements, we use natural language processing techniques to develop a system for the monitoring of dietary supplements. We use topic modeling techniques, specifically a variation of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), and background knowledge in the form of an adverse reaction dictionary to score products based on their potential danger to the public. Our approach generates topics that semantically capture adverse reactions from a document set consisting of reviews posted by users of specific products, and based on these topics, we propose a scoring mechanism to categorize products as "high potential danger", "average potential danger" and "low potential danger." We evaluate our system by comparing the system categorization with human annotators, and we find that the our system agrees with the annotators 69.4% of the time. With these results, we demonstrate that our methods show promise and that our system represents a proof of concept as a viable low-cost, active approach for dietary supplement monitoring.

  5. User Guide for the International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Uriarte, Caroline [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cox, Sadie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The International Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (I-JEDI) model is a freely available economic model that estimates gross economic impacts from wind, solar, and geothermal energy projects for several different countries. Building on the original JEDI model, which was developed for the United States, I-JEDI was developed under the USAID Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program to support countries in assessing economic impacts of LEDS actions in the energy sector. I-JEDI estimates economic impacts by characterizing the construction and operation of energy projects in terms of expenditures and the portion of these expenditures made within the country of analysis. These data are then used in a country-specific input-output (I-O) model to estimate employment, earnings, gross domestic product (GDP), and gross output impacts. Total economic impacts are presented as well as impacts by industry. This user guide presents general information about how to use I-JEDI and interpret results as well as detailed information about methodology and model limitations.

  6. User's guide for GSMP, a General System Modeling Program. [In PL/I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J. M.

    1979-10-01

    GSMP is designed for use by systems analysis teams. Given compiled subroutines that model the behavior of components plus instructions as to how they are to be interconnected, this program links them together to model a complete system. GSMP offers a fast response to management requests for reconfigurations of old systems and even initial configurations of new systems. Standard system-analytic services are provided: parameter sweeps, graphics, free-form input and formatted output, file storage and recovery, user-tested error diagnostics, component model and integration checkout and debugging facilities, sensitivity analysis, and a multimethod optimizer with nonlinear constraint handling capability. Steady-state or cyclic time-dependence is simulated directly, initial-value problems only indirectly. The code is written in PL/I, but interfaces well with FORTRAN component models. Over the last five years GSMP has been used to model theta-pinch, tokamak, and heavy-ion fusion power plants, open- and closed-cycle magneto-hydrodynamic power plants, and total community energy systems.

  7. INTERLINE 5.0 -- An expanded railroad routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Transportation Center

    1993-03-01

    A rail routine model, INTERLINE, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate potential routes for transporting radioactive materials. In Version 5.0, the INTERLINE routing algorithms have been enhanced to include the ability to predict alternative routes, barge routes, and population statistics for any route. The INTERLINE railroad network is essentially a computerized rail atlas describing the US railroad system. All rail lines, with the exception of industrial spurs, are included in the network. Inland waterways and deep water routes along with their interchange points with the US railroadsystem are also included. The network contains over 15,000 rail and barge segments (links) and over 13,000 stations, interchange points, ports, and other locations (nodes). The INTERLINE model has been converted to operate on an IBM-compatible personal computer. At least a 286 computer with a hard disk containing approximately 6 MB of free space is recommended. Enhanced program performance will be obtained by using arandom-access memory drive on a 386 or 486 computer.

  8. Functional renormalisation group approach for tensorial group field theory: a rank-3 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, Dario [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute,Am Mühlenberg 1, Potsdam, 14476 (Germany); Geloun, Joseph Ben [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute,Am Mühlenberg 1, Potsdam, 14476 (Germany); International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications, ICMPA-UNESCO Chair,University of Abomey-Calavi, Cotonou (Benin); Oriti, Daniele [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Albert Einstein Institute,Am Mühlenberg 1, Potsdam, 14476 (Germany)

    2015-03-17

    We set up the Functional Renormalisation Group formalism for Tensorial Group Field Theory in full generality. We then apply it to a rank-3 model over U(1){sup 3}, endowed with a kinetic term linear in the momenta and with nonlocal interactions. The system of FRG equations turns out to be non-autonomous in the RG flow parameter. This feature is explained by the existence of a hidden scale, the radius of the group manifold. We investigate in detail the opposite regimes of large cut-off (UV) and small cut-off (IR) of the FRG equations, where the system becomes autonomous, and we find, in both case, Gaussian and non-Gaussian fixed points. We derive and interpret the critical exponents and flow diagrams associated with these fixed points, and discuss how the UV and IR regimes are matched. Finally, we discuss the evidence for a phase transition from a symmetric phase to a broken or condensed phase, from an RG perspective, finding that this seems to exist only in the approximate regime of very large radius of the group manifold, as to be expected for systems on compact manifolds.

  9. Accelerator System Model (ASM) user manual with physics and engineering model documentation. ASM version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The Accelerator System Model (ASM) is a computer program developed to model proton radiofrequency accelerators and to carry out system level trade studies. The ASM FORTRAN subroutines are incorporated into an intuitive graphical user interface which provides for the open-quotes constructionclose quotes of the accelerator in a window on the computer screen. The interface is based on the Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC) software technology written for the Macintosh operating system in the C programming language. This User Manual describes the operation and use of the ASM application within the SPARC interface. The Appendix provides a detailed description of the physics and engineering models used in ASM. ASM Version 1.0 is joint project of G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc. and the Accelerator Technology (AT) Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Neither the ASM Version 1.0 software nor this ASM Documentation may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of both the Los Alamos National Laboratory and G. H. Gillespie Associates, Inc

  10. Graphs of groups on surfaces interactions and models

    CERN Document Server

    White, AT

    2001-01-01

    The book, suitable as both an introductory reference and as a text book in the rapidly growing field of topological graph theory, models both maps (as in map-coloring problems) and groups by means of graph imbeddings on sufaces. Automorphism groups of both graphs and maps are studied. In addition connections are made to other areas of mathematics, such as hypergraphs, block designs, finite geometries, and finite fields. There are chapters on the emerging subfields of enumerative topological graph theory and random topological graph theory, as well as a chapter on the composition of English

  11. Model-driven user interfaces for bioinformatics data resources: regenerating the wheel as an alternative to reinventing it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swainston Neil

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proliferation of data repositories in bioinformatics has resulted in the development of numerous interfaces that allow scientists to browse, search and analyse the data that they contain. Interfaces typically support repository access by means of web pages, but other means are also used, such as desktop applications and command line tools. Interfaces often duplicate functionality amongst each other, and this implies that associated development activities are repeated in different laboratories. Interfaces developed by public laboratories are often created with limited developer resources. In such environments, reducing the time spent on creating user interfaces allows for a better deployment of resources for specialised tasks, such as data integration or analysis. Laboratories maintaining data resources are challenged to reconcile requirements for software that is reliable, functional and flexible with limitations on software development resources. Results This paper proposes a model-driven approach for the partial generation of user interfaces for searching and browsing bioinformatics data repositories. Inspired by the Model Driven Architecture (MDA of the Object Management Group (OMG, we have developed a system that generates interfaces designed for use with bioinformatics resources. This approach helps laboratory domain experts decrease the amount of time they have to spend dealing with the repetitive aspects of user interface development. As a result, the amount of time they can spend on gathering requirements and helping develop specialised features increases. The resulting system is known as Pierre, and has been validated through its application to use cases in the life sciences, including the PEDRoDB proteomics database and the e-Fungi data warehouse. Conclusion MDAs focus on generating software from models that describe aspects of service capabilities, and can be applied to support rapid development of repository

  12. Uncertainty in geological linework: communicating the expert's tacit model to the data user(s) by expert elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Russell; Barron, Mark; Lark, Murray

    2015-04-01

    At BGS, expert elicitation has been used to evaluate uncertainty of surveyed boundaries in several, common, geological scenarios. As a result, a 'collective' understanding of the issues surrounding each scenario has emerged. The work has provoked wider debate in three key areas: a) what can we do to resolve those scenarios where a 'consensus' of understanding cannot be achieved b) what does it mean for survey practices and subsequent use of maps in 3D models c) how do we communicate the 'collective' understanding of geological mapping (with or without consensus for specific scenarios). Previous work elicited expert judgement for uncertainty in six contrasting mapping scenarios. In five cases it was possible to arrive at a consensus model; in a sixth case experts with different experience (length of service, academic background) took very different views of the nature of the mapping problem. The scenario concerned identification of the boundary between two contrasting tills (one derived from Triassic source materials being red in colour; the other, derived from Jurassic materials being grey in colour). Initial debate during the elicitation identified that the colour contrast should provide some degree of confidence in locating the boundary via traditional auger-traverse survey methods. However, as the elicitation progressed, it became clear that the complexities of the relationship between the two Tills were not uniformly understood across the experts and the panel could not agree a consensus regarding the spatial uncertainty of the boundary. The elicitation process allowed a significant degree of structured knowledge-exchange between experts of differing backgrounds and was successful in identifying a measure of uncertainty for what was considered a contentious scenario. However, the findings have significant implications for a boundary-scenario that is widely mapped across the central regions of Great Britain. We will discuss our experience of the use of

  13. User group attitudes toward forest management treatments on the Shawnee National Forest: application of a photo-evaluation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Cohen; Jean C. Mangun; Mae A. Davenport; Andrew D. Carver

    2008-01-01

    Diverse public opinions, competing management goals, and polarized interest groups combine with problems of scale to create a complex management arena for managers in the Central Hardwood Forest region. A mixed-methods approach that incorporated quantitative analysis of data from a photo evaluation-attitude scale survey instrument was used to assess attitudes toward...

  14. User Behavior Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Juston Shane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-28

    User Behaviour Analytics is the tracking, collecting and assessing of user data and activities. The goal is to detect misuse of user credentials by developing models for the normal behaviour of user credentials within a computer network and detect outliers with respect to their baseline.

  15. Description of the new version 4.0 of the tritium model UFOTRI including user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1993-08-01

    In view of the future operation of fusion reactors the release of tritium may play a dominant role during normal operation as well as after accidents. Because of its physical and chemical properties which differ significantly from those of other radionuclides, the model UFOTRI for assessing the radiological consequences of accidental tritium releases has been developed. It describes the behaviour of tritium in the biosphere and calculates the radiological impact on individuals and the population due to the direct exposure and by the ingestion pathways. Processes such as the conversion of tritium gas into tritiated water (HTO) in the soil, re-emission after deposition and the conversion of HTO into organically bound tritium, are considered. The use of UFOTRI in its probabilistic mode shows the spectrum of the radiological impact together with the associated probability of occurrence. A first model version was established in 1991. As the ongoing work on investigating the main processes of the tritium behaviour in the environment shows up new results, the model has been improved in several points. The report describes the changes incorporated into the model since 1991. Additionally provides the up-dated user guide for handling the revised UFOTRI version which will be distributed to interested organizations. (orig.) [de

  16. User's guide for simulation of waste treatment (SWAT) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macal, C.M.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a user's guide for the Simulation of Waste Treatment (SWAT) model computer code. (A detailed description of the logic and assumptions of the model was published previously.) A flow diagram depicting the logic of the SWAT computer code is included. Several river basins or regions can be simulated in a single computer run, with each region having numerous treatment plants. Treatment plants are simulated sequentially to reduce computer storage requirements. All input to the model is in the form of cards and all output is to a line printer. The code is written in FORTRAN IV and consists of approximately 3000 statements. Using the IBM 370/195 under OS, a Gl compiler requires a region of 220K. Execution time is under two minutes for a typical run for a river basin with 23 treatment plants, with each plant having an average of one technology modification over a simulation period of 25 years. In the first section of this report a brief description of the subroutines in the model is given along with an explanation of how the subroutines function in the context of the whole program. The third section indicates formatting for input data; sample input data for a test problem are also presented. Section 4 describes the output resulting from the sample input data. A program listing appears in the appendix.

  17. Adoption of mobile learning among 3g-enabled handheld users using extended technology acceptance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadare Oluwaseun Gbenga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines various constructs of an extended TAM, Technology Acceptance Model, that are theoretically influencing the adoption and acceptability of mobile learning among 3G enabled mobile users. Mobile learning activity- based, used for this study were drawn from behaviourist and “learning and teaching support” educational paradigms. An online and manual survey instruments were used to gather data. The structural equation modelling techniques were then employed to explain the adoption processes of hypothesized research model. A theoretical model ETAM is developed based on TAM. Our result proved that psychometric constructs of TAM can be extended and that ETAM is well suited, and of good pedagogical tool in understanding mobile learning among 3G enabled handheld devices in southwest part of Nigeria. Cognitive constructs, attitude toward m-learning, self-efficacy play significant roles in influencing behavioural intention for mobile learning, of which self-efficacy is the most importance construct. Implications of results and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. User Acceptance Model on E-Billing Adoption: A Study of Tax Payment by Government Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maulana Yusup

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of information technology is to create the paradigm shift in public services by government agencies, particularly in the payment of taxes. The purpose of this study is to determine the user's perception of e-billing in paying taxes. The study population were employees of the 17 companies in the textile and garment industry in Bandung, West Java and the sample was taken by simple random sampling with as many as 269 people involved from 17 industries in textile and garment units. Analysis of data was using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. The results showed that there was a significant effect of perceived ease of use, subjective norm, perceived usefulness, facilitating condition of the attitude, toward the attitude and the intention to use. Thus, it is evidence that e-billing based services may be one way to improve service of government agencies to facilitate the payment of taxes.

  19. The monster sporadic group and a theory underlying superstring models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.

    1996-09-01

    The pattern of duality symmetries acting on the states of compactified superstring models reinforces an earlier suggestion that the Monster sporadic group is a hidden symmetry for superstring models. This in turn points to a supersymmetric theory of self-dual and anti-self-dual K3 manifolds joined by Dirac strings and evolving in a 13 dimensional spacetime as the fundamental theory. In addition to the usual graviton and dilaton this theory contains matter-like degrees of freedom resembling the massless states of the heterotic string, thus providing a completely geometric interpretation for ordinary matter. 25 refs

  20. A model for amalgamation in group decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Montero, Javier

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we present a generalization of the model proposed by Montero, by allowing non-complete fuzzy binary relations for individuals. A degree of unsatisfaction can be defined in this case, suggesting that any democratic aggregation rule should take into account not only ethical conditions or some degree of rationality in the amalgamating procedure, but also a minimum support for the set of alternatives subject to the group analysis.

  1. A simplistic model for identifying prominent web users in directed multiplex social networks: a case study using Twitter networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucif, Hemza; Boubetra, Abdelhak; Akrouf, Samir

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to describe a new simplistic model dedicated to gauge the online influence of Twitter users based on a mixture of structural and interactional features. The model is an additive mathematical formulation which involves two main parts. The first part serves to measure the influence of the Twitter user on just his neighbourhood covering his followers. However, the second part evaluates the potential influence of the Twitter user beyond the circle of his followers. Particularly, it measures the likelihood that the tweets of the Twitter user will spread further within the social graph through the retweeting process. The model is tested on a data set involving four kinds of real-world egocentric networks. The empirical results reveal that an active ordinary user is more prominent than a non-active celebrity one. A simple comparison is conducted between the proposed model and two existing simplistic approaches. The results show that our model generates the most realistic influence scores due to its dealing with both explicit (structural and interactional) and implicit features.

  2. Comparing Indirect Effects in Different Groups in Single-Group and Multi-Group Structural Equation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehri Ryu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we evaluated the performance of statistical methods in single-group and multi-group analysis approaches for testing group difference in indirect effects and for testing simple indirect effects in each group. We also investigated whether the performance of the methods in the single-group approach was affected when the assumption of equal variance was not satisfied. The assumption was critical for the performance of the two methods in the single-group analysis: the method using a product term for testing the group difference in a single path coefficient, and the Wald test for testing the group difference in the indirect effect. Bootstrap confidence intervals in the single-group approach and all methods in the multi-group approach were not affected by the violation of the assumption. We compared the performance of the methods and provided recommendations.

  3. The EGEE user support infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Antoni, T; Mills, A

    2007-01-01

    User support in a grid environment is a challenging task due to the distributed nature of the grid. The variety of users and VOs adds further to the challenge. One can find support requests by grid beginners, users with specific applications, site administrators, or grid monitoring operators. With the GGUS infrastructure, EGEE provides a portal where users can find support in their daily use of the grid. The current use of the system has shown that the goal has been achieved with success. The grid user support model in EGEE can be captioned ‘regional support with central coordination’. Users can submit a support request to the central GGUS service, or to their Regional Operations' Centre (ROC) or to their Virtual Organisation helpdesks. Within GGUS there are appropriate support groups for all support requests. The ROCs and VOs and the other project wide groups such as middleware groups (JRA), network groups (NA), service groups (SA) and other grid infrastructures (OSG, NorduGrid, etc.) are connected via a...

  4. 75 FR 54627 - ICLUS v1.3 User's Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... AGENCY ICLUS v1.3 User's Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth... (GIS) tool and final user's guide titled, ``ICLUS v1.3 User's Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for.... ADDRESSES: ``ICLUS v1.3 User's Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth...

  5. A 3D City Model as User Interface Connected to an Energy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Erik; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2014-01-01

    the green energy balance is possible to achieve, it was necessary to create energy scenarios for the whole city and also give the possibility to alter the current energy production and consumption. At the same time the city decided to involve as many people living in the city as possible, making...... production of the city using sliders and buttons as part of the interface. While the 3D model gives an immediate visual result, a connection to an underlying numerical energy model developed in earlier years at the University delivers a quite precise calculation on all vital data involved in the overall...

  6. PREDICTING ATTENUATION OF VIRUSES DURING PERCOLATION IN SOILS: 2. USER'S GUIDE TO THE VIRULO 1.0 COMPUTER MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the EPA document Predicting Attenuation of Viruses During Percolation in Soils 1. Probabilistic Model the conceptual, theoretical, and mathematical foundations for a predictive screening model were presented. In this current volume we present a User's Guide for the computer mo...

  7. An analytical approach to thermal modeling of Bridgman type crystal growth: One dimensional analysis. Computer program users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, E. K.

    1982-01-01

    The computer program written in support of one dimensional analytical approach to thermal modeling of Bridgman type crystal growth is presented. The program listing and flow charts are included, along with the complete thermal model. Sample problems include detailed comments on input and output to aid the first time user.

  8. Evaluation of agents and study of end-user needs and behaviour for e-commerce. COGITO focus group experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V.; Hansen, C.B.; Andersen, H.H.K.

    2001-01-01

    The process of buying products and services on the Internet often implies a high degree of complexity and uncertainty about the conditions of information seeking, about items for sale, the purchase of wanted products and the actual navigation on a site.Some important problems concerning e-commerce......, as this domain has been selected as the application domain for the e-commerce in COGITO, but the requirements are mostly common covering e-commerce ingeneral. One of the main features to consider, analyse and specify in COGITO was the use of .intelligent personalised agents. Therefore, a focus group experiment...

  9. User's manual for BGS GISGroundwater: a numerical model to simulate groundwater levels for ArcGIS 10.0

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, L.; Pachocka, M.; Jackson, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    This is a user manual of BGS GISGroundwater that produces the depth to groundwater beneath the land surface. BGS GISGroundwater uses standard GIS datasets as inputs and implements data preparation, numerical modelling, post-processing and the visualisation of the modelled results all within the GIS environment. It allows non-modellers, such as scientists and students, to easily and efficiently build up groundwater flow models in ArcMap using GIS layers. For example, only few hours are needed ...

  10. End-user satisfaction analysis on library management system unnes using technology acceptance model towards national standard of integrated library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyanto, W.; Purwinarko, A.; Adhi, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The library which is the gate of the University should be supported by the existence of an adequate information system, to provide excellent service and optimal to every user. Library management system that has been in existence since 2009 needs to be re-evaluated so that the system can meet the needs of both operator and Unnes user in particular, and users from outside Unnes in general. This study aims to evaluate and improve the existing library management system to produce a system that is accountable and able to meet the needs of end users, as well as produce a library management system that is integrated Unnes. Research is directed to produce evaluation report with Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) approach and library management system integrated with the national standard.

  11. Architecture and User-Context Models of CoCare: A Context-Aware Mobile Recommender System for Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Rios, Gineth; López, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Recommender systems (RS) are useful tools for filtering and sorting items and information for users. There is a wide diversity of approaches that help creating personalized recommendations. Context-aware recommender systems (CARS) are a kind of RS which provide adaptation capabilities to the user's environment, e.g., by sensing data through wearable devices or other biomedical sensors. In healthcare and wellbeing, CARS can support health promotion and health education, considering that each individual requires tailored intervention programs. Our research aims at proposing a context-aware mobile recommender system for the promotion of healthy habits. The system is adapted to the user's needs, his/her health information, interests, time, location and lifestyles. In this paper, the CARS computational architecture and the user and context models of health promotion are presented, which were used to implement and test a prototype recommender system.

  12. Modeling the Equilibrium Bus Line Choice Behavior and Transit System Design with Oblivious Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Lin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most of transportation literature, users are assumed to be perfectly rational in minimizing their own travel costs or perceived travel costs. However, users may not be perfectly rational in implementing their choices in reality. There exists a kind of boundedly rational users, that is, oblivious users. These oblivious users make their route choices by simple criteria, for example, selecting the shortest (or the most direct route only based on physical distance or simply following routes recommended by a GPS system. This paper investigates how the existence of oblivious users affects the equilibrium bus line choice behavior in a public transit system. And we propose a method to design a more realistic system.

  13. Guidance for the Model User on Representing Human Behavior in Egress Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Erica D; Gwynne, Steven M V; Kinsey, Michael J; Hulse, Lynn

    2017-03-01

    Structures are currently designed and constructed in accordance with prescriptive and performance-based (PBD) methodologies to ensure a certain level of occupant safety during fire emergencies. The performance-based approach requires the quantification of both ASET (Available Safe Egress Time) and RSET (Required Safe Egress Time) to determine the degree of safety provided. This article focuses on the RSET side of the equation, for which a fire protection or fire safety engineer would use some type of egress modelling approach to estimate evacuation performance. Often, simple engineering equations are applied to estimate the RSET value. Over time, more sophisticated computational tools have appeared-that go beyond basic flow calculations; e.g. simulating individual agent movement. Irrespective of the approach adopted, appropriate and accurate representation of human behavior in response to fire within these approaches is limited, mainly due to the lack of a comprehensive conceptual model of evacuee decision-making and behavior during fire emergencies. This article initially presents the set of behavioral statements, or mini-theories, currently available from various fire and disaster studies, organized using the overarching theory of decision-making and human behavior in disasters. Once presented, guidance is provided on how these behavioral statements might be incorporated into an evacuation model, in order to better represent human behavior in fire within the safety analysis being performed. The intent here is to improve the accuracy of the results produced by performance-based calculations and analyses.

  14. Downsizer - A Graphical User Interface-Based Application for Browsing, Acquiring, and Formatting Time-Series Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Garrison, Christian; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Downsizer is a computer application that selects, downloads, verifies, and formats station-based time-series data for environmental-resource models, particularly the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. Downsizer implements the client-server software architecture. The client presents a map-based, graphical user interface that is intuitive to modelers; the server provides streamflow and climate time-series data from over 40,000 measurement stations across the United States. This report is the Downsizer user's manual and provides (1) an overview of the software design, (2) installation instructions, (3) a description of the graphical user interface, (4) a description of selected output files, and (5) troubleshooting information.

  15. The Models of Applying Online Privacy Literacy Strategies: A Case Study of Instagram Girl Users

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollah Bicharanlou; Seyedeh farzaneh Siasi rad

    2017-01-01

    Social networks affect remarkably in the lives of virtual space users. These networks like most human relations involve compromising between self-disclosure and privacy protection. A process which is realized through improving privacy and empowering the user at the personal level. This study aimed to assess strategies based on online privacy literacy. In particular, strategies that Instagram young girls users should employ to achieve the optimum level of privacy. For this purpose, firstly the...

  16. Transferring Approaches from Experience Oriented Disciplines to User Experience Design: The ExodUX Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Simon; Hoffmann, Andreas; Lindemann, Udo

    2015-01-01

    User Experience Design (UXD) addresses the increasing importance of emotional aspects in user product interaction and aims at creating holistic experiences. Within product development UXD is a rather young discipline. But other disciplines outside engineering design traditionally focus on creating experiences. We aim at transferring knowledge from those disciplines to support the design of fascinating User Experience (UX). We identified relevant experience disciplines and selected the three m...

  17. Social media fundamentals, models, and ranking of user-generated content

    CERN Document Server

    Wyrwoll, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The increasing amount of user-generated content available on social media platforms requires new methods to find, evaluate, and to compare. To this day, existing ranking approaches to user-generated content do not allow for evaluation across platforms by exploiting its metadata. User-generated content, such as blog postings, forum discussions, shared videos etc. does however contain information that can be used for its evaluation independent of specific search interests. Claudia Wyrwoll presents a query- and language-independent ranking approach that allows for global evaluation of user-genera

  18. Eye gaze in intelligent user interfaces gaze-based analyses, models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Yukiko I; Bader, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Remarkable progress in eye-tracking technologies opened the way to design novel attention-based intelligent user interfaces, and highlighted the importance of better understanding of eye-gaze in human-computer interaction and human-human communication. For instance, a user's focus of attention is useful in interpreting the user's intentions, their understanding of the conversation, and their attitude towards the conversation. In human face-to-face communication, eye gaze plays an important role in floor management, grounding, and engagement in conversation.Eye Gaze in Intelligent User Interfac

  19. User manual of the multicompenent variably - saturated flow and transport model HP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, D.; Simunek, J.

    2005-06-01

    (iii) calculations obtained from an independent geochemical transport model (CRUNCH) for several relatively complex problems. Nine verification examples of increasing complexity are described in this report. This report serves as both a user manual and reference document. Detailed instructions for input data preparation and interpretation of output data are given in the manuals of the original HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC codes. The graphical user interfaces of both HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC can be used for easy input data preparation and output display in the MS Windows environment. (author)

  20. GROUP GUIDANCE SERVICES MANAGEMENT OF BEHAVIORAL TECHNIC HOMEWORK MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhri A M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This simple paper describes the implementation of management guidance service groups using the model home visits behavioral techniques (behavior technic homework. The ideas outlined in this paper are intended to add insight for counselors in the management of the implementation of counseling services group that carried out effectively. This simple paper is expected to be used as reference studies in theoretical matters relating to the management guidance services group, for counselors to students both need guidance services and those who passively as they face various problems difficulties martial jar and obstacles in the achievement of learning , In general, this study aims to provide insight in particular in the development of social skills for students, especially the ability to communicate with the participants of the service (students more While specifically to encourage the development of feelings, thoughts, perceptions, insights and attitudes that support embodiments behavior Iebih creative and effective in improving communication skills both verbal and non-verbal for students. Keyword: counselor, counseling, group, student