WorldWideScience

Sample records for model urethane foams

  1. Urethane foam void filling. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    compares the cost and performance of the baseline segmentation technology and the innovative void filling technology using expanded polyurethane foam

  2. Advanced slab polyurethane foam with feather touch; Soft feather urethane foam no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y.; Ono, H. [Toyota Motor Corp., Aichi (Japan); Mori, A.; Yamaguchi, N.; Nakamura, T. [Bridgestone Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Automotive seat plays an important part, which are not only retention of sitting position, but also comfort and high-class feeling. Wadding, which is a part of the seat, is a key component for the sitting comfortableness. This paper is concerned with advanced slab polyurethane foam with feather touch feeling. The compounding of formation, foaming process and reliability of mass production is studied. 2 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Foam process models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble Co., West Chester, OH); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  4. Urethan foams application for polychlorinated biphenyls adsorption in insulated mineral oil; Aplicacao de espumas uretanicas para adsorcao de bifenilas policloradas em oleo mineral isolante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Analucia L.; Trindade, Eduardo M.; Wilhelm, Helena M.; Mattoso, Mauricio; Patriarca, Percia A.; Farias, Luciano; Ciulik, Claudio; Groszewicz, Pedro B. [LACTEC - Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: analucia@lactec.org.br; Zawadzki, Sonia F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: zawadzki@quimica.ufpr.br

    2005-07-01

    Urethanic foams are applied on several industrial fields, as automobile factories and refrigeration equipment. On specific applications, these foams can be used as filters for organo chlorinated compounds removal, as pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), present on ambient air and aqueous matrices. For this last purpose, the aim of this work was the preparation of special urethanic foams and their evaluation as filtering systems for PCB removal from mineral insulating oil used in electric power transformers. For the foam efficiency improvement it was used a structure modified poli ol in the polymerization reaction. The foams were applied for field removal of PCB from mineral oil and the results showed their applicability for this process. However, it was observed that the results were dependent on the foam homogeneity, on the velocity of oil circulation and on the adsorption processes. (author)

  5. Flexible Foam Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Werner, Brian T.; Scherzinger, William M.; Lo, Chi S.

    2018-03-01

    Experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of a 15 pcf flexible polyurethane foam to large deformation at different strain rates and temperatures. Results from these experiments indicated that at room temperature, flexible polyurethane foams exhibit significant nonlinear elastic deformation and nearly return to their original undeformed shape when unloaded. However, when these foams are cooled to temperatures below their glass transition temperature of approximately -35 o C, they behave like rigid polyurethane foams and exhibit significant permanent deformation when compressed. Thus, a new model which captures this dramatic change in behavior with temperature was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Flex_Foam to describe the mechanical response of both flexible and rigid foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments. Next, development of the Flex Foam model for flexible polyurethane and other flexible foams is described. Selection of material parameters are discussed and finite element simulations with the new Flex Foam model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this new model.

  6. Spin Foam Models

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnov, K V

    1999-01-01

    The term ‘spin foam models’ was invented only a couple years ago by Baez to refer to a new approach to quantization of general relativity that appeared as an offsping of loop quantum gravity. Although this new approach was motivated, both logically and historically, by loop quantum gravity, it became clear by now that the two approaches are rather independent. While loop quantum gravity attempts to give a canonical quantization of general relativity, spin foam model approach is set to make sense of the path integral for gravity. Eventually, the two approaches will probably be shown to be equivalent, but no rigorous result to this effect exists as for now. In this thesis I develop the spin foam quantization of gravity from scratch, referring to results from loop quantum gravity only for comparison. I start from a review of 2 + 1 gravity and discuss different roots to quantize it. While some of them, as, for example, using Chern-Simons theory, only exist in 2 + 1, others can be generalized t...

  7. Short term evaluation of an anatomically shaped polycarbonate urethane total meniscus replacement in a goat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, A.C.T.; Madej, W.; Hannink, G.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; van Tienen, T.G.; Buma, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Since the treatment options for symptomatic total meniscectomy patients are still limited, an anatomically shaped, polycarbonate urethane (PCU), total meniscus replacement was developed. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of the implant in a goat model, with a specific focus on

  8. Numerical modeling of foam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheddadi, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Liquid foam flows are involved in numerous applications, e.g. food and cosmetics industries, oil extraction, nuclear decontamination. Moreover, their study leads to fundamental knowledge: as it is easier to manipulate and analyse, foam is used as a model material to understand the flow of emulsions, polymers, pastes, or cell aggregates, all of which display both solid and liquid behaviour. Systematic experiments performed by Francois Graner et al. provide precise data that emphasize the non Newtonian properties of the foam. Meanwhile, Pierre Saramito proposed a visco-elasto-plastic continuous tensorial model, akin to predict the behaviour of the foam. The goal of this thesis is to understand this complex behaviour, using these two elements. We have built and validated a resolution algorithm based on a bidimensional finite elements methods. The numerical solutions are in excellent agreement with the spatial distribution of all measured quantities, and confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. The dominant parameters have been identified and we evidenced the fact that the viscous, elastic, and plastic contributions to the flow have to be treated simultaneously in a tensorial formalism. We provide a substantial contribution to the understanding of foams and open the path to realistic simulations of complex VEP flows for industrial applications. (author)

  9. Constitutive modelling of aluminium foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, W.M.; Lemmen, P.P.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an aluminium foam model is proposed for a vehicle crash analysis. The model assumes that there is no coupling between stresses and strains in different principal directions. The stress in each principle direction is then interpolated from an experimental recorded uniaxial stress strain

  10. A foam ablation model for lost foam casting of aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, M.R.; Caulk, D.A. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    2005-09-01

    A model is developed for heat transfer, polymer vaporization, and gas diffusion at the interface between the advancing liquid metal and the receding foam pattern during mold filling in lost foam casting of aluminum. Most of the pattern interior decomposes by ablation, but the boundary cells decompose by a collapse mechanism, which creates an undercut in the pattern next to the coating. By regulating how much of the pattern coating is exposed to gas diffusion, the undercut controls the overall filling speed of the metal through the mold. Computed values for the foam decomposition energy from this model compare very well with experimental data on foam pyrolysis, and predicted filling speeds are consistent with observations in published experiments. In addition, the model explains several unusual observations about mold filling that until now have not been understood. (author)

  11. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the

  12. A foam melting model for lost foam casting of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caulk, D.A. [Manufacturing Systems Research Laboratory, General Motors Research and Development Center, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    In lost foam casting of aluminum the liquid metal normally decomposes the foam pattern by ablation. But sometimes polymer vapor bubbling through the liquid metal accumulates along an upward-facing flow front until it opens a finite gap between the liquid metal and the decomposing foam. This changes the foam decomposition mechanism along that front from direct ablation to melting. A mathematical model is formulated for heat conduction, convection, and radiation across the gap, coupled with the vaporization of the excess polymer liquid behind the metal front and the resulting buoyant movement of polymer vapor bubbles through the liquid metal. Both models are combined to obtain an analytical solution for one-dimensional bottom filling of a pattern with uniform thickness. The results from this solution not only compare well with available experimental data, but they also explain how part thickness, metal temperature, and pressure affect filling speeds in bottom-fill situations. (author)

  13. Numerical Modeling of Foam Drilling Hydraulics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Baris

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of foam as a drilling fluid was developed to meet a special set of conditions under which other common drilling fluids had failed. Foam drilling is defined as the process of making boreholes by utilizing foam as the circulating fluid. When compared with conventional drilling, underbalanced or foam drilling has several advantages. These advantages include: avoidance of lost circulation problems, minimizing damage to pay zones, higher penetration rates and bit life. Foams are usually characterized by the quality, the ratio of the volume of gas, and the total foam volume. Obtaining dependable pressure profiles for aerated (gasified fluids and foam is more difficult than for single phase fluids, since in the former ones the drilling mud contains a gas phase that is entrained within the fluid system. The primary goal of this study is to expand the knowledge-base of the hydrodynamic phenomena that occur in a foam drilling operation. In order to gain a better understanding of foam drilling operations, a hydrodynamic model is developed and run at different operating conditions. For this purpose, the flow of foam through the drilling system is modeled by invoking the basic principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The model was designed to allow gas and liquid flow at desired volumetric flow rates through the drillstring and annulus. Parametric studies are conducted in order to identify the most influential variables in the hydrodynamic modeling of foam flow.

  14. Foam Assisted WAG, Snorre Revisit with New Foam Screening Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirov, Pavel; Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Khan, Arif

    2012-01-01

    of the simulation contributes to more precise planning of the schedule of water and gas injection, prediction of the injection results and evaluation of the method efficiency. The testing of the surfactant properties allows making grounded choice of surfactant to use. The analysis of the history match gives insight...... foam model was tested with sensitivity analysis on foam properties to provide a guideline for the history matching process (GOR alteration) of FAWAG Pilot of Snorre Field (Statoil). The aim was to check the authenticity of presented new foam model in commercial software whether it is implementable...... of the fluid flows control inside reservoir. The way; how specific properties control the time of gas arrival and values of GOR are described. The analyses of the improvements in the injection schedule are shown. With increasing number of CO2 and FAWAG methods in preparation worldwide, the use...

  15. Foam Assisted WAG, Snorre Revisit with New Foam Screening Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirov, Pavel; Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Khan, Arif

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with simulation model of Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas (FAWAG) method that had been implemented to two Norwegian Reservoirs. Being studied on number of pilot projects, the method proved successful, but Field Scale simulation was never understood properly. New phenomenologic...

  16. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  17. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  18. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOBBS,MICHAEL L.; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; CHU,TZE YAO

    1999-11-08

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam that contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  19. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hobbs, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer...

  20. Modeling of Sandwich Sheets with Metallic Foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata, H.; Jorge, R. Natal; Fernandes, A. A.; Parente, M. P. L.; Santos, A.; Valente, R. A. F.

    2011-01-01

    World-wide vehicles safety experts agree that significant further reductions in fatalities and injuries can be achieved as a result of the use of new lightweight and energy absorbing materials. On this work, the authors present the development and evaluation of an innovative system able to perform reliable panels of sandwich sheets with metallic foam cores for industrial applications. The mathematical model used to describe the behavior of sandwich shells with metal cores foam is presented and some numerical examples are presented. In order to validate those results mechanical experiments are carried out. Using the crushable foam constitutive model, available on ABAQUS, a set of different mechanical tests were simulated. There are two variants of this model available on ABAQUS: the volumetric hardening model and the isotropic hardening model. As a first approximation we chose the isotropic hardening variant. The isotropic hardening model available uses a yield surface that is an ellipse centered at the origin in the p-q stress plane. Based on this constitutive model for the foam, numerical simulations of the tensile and bulge test will be conducted. The numerical results will be validated using the data obtained from the experimental results.

  1. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  2. Application of an Elongated Kelvin Model to Space Shuttle Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle foams are rigid closed-cell polyurethane foams. The two foams used most-extensively oil space shuttle external tank are BX-265 and NCFL4-124. Because of the foaming and rising process, the foam microstructures are elongated in the rise direction. As a result, these two foams exhibit a nonisotropic mechanical behavior. A detailed microstructural characterization of the two foams is presented. Key features of the foam cells are described and the average cell dimensions in the two foams are summarized. Experimental studies are also conducted to measure the room temperature mechanical response of the two foams in the two principal material directions (parallel to the rise and perpendicular to the rise). The measured elastic modulus, proportional limit stress, ultimate tensile strength, and Poisson's ratios are reported. The generalized elongated Kelvin foam model previously developed by the authors is reviewed and the equations which result from this model are summarized. Using the measured microstructural dimensions and the measured stiffness ratio, the foam tensile strength ratio and Poisson's ratios are predicted for both foams and are compared with the experimental data. The predicted tensile strength ratio is in close agreement with the measured strength ratio for both BX-265 and NCFI24-124. The comparison between the predicted Poisson's ratios and the measured values is not as favorable.

  3. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  4. Short Term Evaluation of an Anatomically Shaped Polycarbonate Urethane Total Meniscus Replacement in a Goat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A C T Vrancken

    Full Text Available Since the treatment options for symptomatic total meniscectomy patients are still limited, an anatomically shaped, polycarbonate urethane (PCU, total meniscus replacement was developed. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of the implant in a goat model, with a specific focus on the implant location in the joint, geometrical integrity of the implant and the effect of the implant on synovial membrane and articular cartilage histopathological condition.The right medial meniscus of seven Saanen goats was replaced by the implant. Sham surgery (transection of the MCL, arthrotomy and MCL suturing was performed in six animals. The contralateral knee joints of both groups served as control groups. After three months follow-up the following aspects of implant performance were evaluated: implant position, implant deformation and the histopathological condition of the synovium and cartilage.Implant geometry was well maintained during the three month implantation period. No signs of PCU wear were found and the implant did not induce an inflammatory response in the knee joint. In all animals, implant fixation was compromised due to suture breakage, wear or elongation, likely causing the increase in extrusion observed in the implant group. Both the femoral cartilage and tibial cartilage in direct contact with the implant showed increased damage compared to the sham and sham-control groups.This study demonstrates that the novel, anatomically shaped PCU total meniscal replacement is biocompatible and resistant to three months of physiological loading. Failure of the fixation sutures may have increased implant mobility, which probably induced implant extrusion and potentially stimulated cartilage degeneration. Evidently, redesigning the fixation method is necessary. Future animal studies should evaluate the improved fixation method and compare implant performance to current treatment standards, such as allografts.

  5. Foam for Enhanced Oil Recovery : Modeling and Analytical Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashoori, E.

    2012-01-01

    Foam increases sweep in miscible- and immiscible-gas enhanced oil recovery by decreasing the mobility of gas enormously. This thesis is concerned with the simulations and analytical solutions for foam flow for the purpose of modeling foam EOR in a reservoir. For the ultimate goal of upscaling our

  6. Plate-Impact Measurements of a Select Model Poly(urethane urea) Elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO)–diethyltoluenediamine ( DETA )-based poly(urethane urea) (PUU) elastomers have demonstrated the composition dependence of tunable...MaterialScience), diethyltoluenediamine ( DETA − Ethacure∗ 100-LC, Albemarle Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana), and poly(tetramethylene oxide) (PTMO... DETA , to complete polymerization. The reaction of HMDI with the DETA diamine resulted in hard segments with urea linkages, which could self-assemble

  7. Processing, Characterization, and Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Choonghee; Naguib, Hani E.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of the material parameters and processing conditions on the foam morphologies, and mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposite foams were studied. Microcellular closed-cell nanocomposite foams were manufactured with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and high density polyethylene (HDPE), where the nanoclay loadings of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt% were used. The effect of clay contents and foaming conditions on the volume expansion ratio, cell size, elastic modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break were investigated and compared between amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. An elastic modulus model for tensile behavior of foams was proposed by using the micromechanics theory. The model was expressed in terms of microstructural properties of polymer and physical properties of the foams. The tensile experimental data of the foams were compared with those predicted by the theoretical model.

  8. Foam rheology: a model of viscous phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraynik, A.M.; Hansen, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical model for foam rheology that includes viscous forces is developed by considering the deformation of two-dimensional, spatially periodic cells in simple shearing and planar extensional flow. The undeformed hexagonal cells are separated by thin liquid films. Plateau border curvature and liquid drainage between films is neglected. Interfacial tension and viscous tractions due to stretching lamellar liquid determine the individual film tensions. The network motion is described by a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for which numerical solutions are obtained. Coalescense and disproportionation of Plateau borders results in the relative separation of cells and provides a mechanism for yielding and flow. This process is assumed to occur when a film's length reduces to its thickness. The time and position dependence of the cell-scale dynamics are computed explicitly. The effective continuum stress of the foam is described by instantaneous and time-averaged quantities. The capillary number, a dimensionless deformation rate, represents the relative importance of viscous and surface tension effects. The small-capillary-number or quasistatic response determines a yield stress. The dependence of the shear and normal stress material functions upon deformation rate, foam structure and physical properties is determined. A plausible mechanism for shear-induced material failure, which would determine a shear strength, is revealed for large capillary numbers. The mechanism involves large cell distortion and film thinning, which provide favorable conditions for film rupture

  9. Modeling of aqueous foam blast wave attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domergue L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of aqueous foams enables the mitigation of blast waves induced by the explosion of energetic materials. The two-phase confinement gives rise to interphase interactions between the gaseous and liquid phases, which role have been emphasized in shock-tube studies with solid foams [1, 2]. Multifluid formalism enables the thermo-mechanical disequilibria between phases to be taken into account. The flow model ensures the correct estimation of the acoustic impedance of the two-phase media. As for the numerical scheme, Riemann solvers are used to describe the microscopic fluid interactions, the summation of which provides the multiphase flux. The role of the different transfer mechanisms is evaluated in the case where the liquid ligaments of the foam matrix have been shattered into droplets by the shock impingement. Characteristics of blast waves in heterogeneous media leads to a decrease of overpressure. The numerical results have been compared favorably to experimental data [3, 4].

  10. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Rekha R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Celina, Mathias C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Giron, Nicholas Henry [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russick, Edward M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150°C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  11. Polyurethane foam scaffold as in vitro model for breast cancer bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeloni, Valentina; Contessi, Nicola; De Marco, Cinzia; Bertoldi, Serena; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Farè, Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Breast cancer (BC) represents the most incident cancer case in women (29%), with high mortality rate. Bone metastasis occurs in 20-50% cases and, despite advances in BC research, the interactions between tumor cells and the metastatic microenvironment are still poorly understood. In vitro 3D models gained great interest in cancer research, thanks to the reproducibility, the 3D spatial cues and associated low costs, compared to in vivo and 2D in vitro models. In this study, we investigated the suitability of a poly-ether-urethane (PU) foam as 3D in vitro model to study the interactions between BC tumor-initiating cells and the bone microenvironment. PU foam open porosity (>70%) appeared suitable to mimic trabecular bone structure. The PU foam showed good mechanical properties under cyclic compression (E=69-109kPa), even if lower than human trabecular bone. The scaffold supported osteoblast SAOS-2 cell line proliferation, with no cytotoxic effects. Human adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) were cultured and differentiated into osteoblast lineage on the PU foam, as shown by alizarin red staining and RT-PCR, thus offering a bone biomimetic microenvironment to the further co-culture with BC derived tumor-initiating cells (MCFS). Tumor aggregates were observed after three weeks of co-culture by e-cadherin staining and SEM; modification in CaP distribution was identified by SEM-EDX and associated to the presence of tumor cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated the suitability of the PU foam to reproduce a bone biomimetic microenvironment, useful for the co-culture of human osteoblasts/BC tumor-initiating cells and to investigate their interaction. 3D in vitro models represent an outstanding alternative in the study of tumor metastases development, compared to traditional 2D in vitro cultures, which oversimplify the 3D tissue microenvironment, and in vivo studies, affected by low reproducibility and ethical issues. Several scaffold-based 3D in vitro models have been proposed

  12. Modelling of Churn-Annular foam flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westende, J.M.C. van 't; Shoeibi Omrani, P.; Vercauteren, F.F.; Nennie, E.D.

    2016-01-01

    Foam assisted lift is a deliquification method in the oil and gas industry, which aims to prevent or postpone countercurrent gas-liquid flow in maturing gas wells or to assist in removing downhole accumulated liquids. According to Nimwegen, who performed experiments with foam flows, foam

  13. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scherzinger, William M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hinnerichs, Terry D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lo, Chi S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  14. Experimental Evaluation of Equivalent-Fluid Models for Melamine Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.

    2016-01-01

    Melamine foam is a soft porous material commonly used in noise control applications. Many models exist to represent porous materials at various levels of fidelity. This work focuses on rigid frame equivalent fluid models, which represent the foam as a fluid with a complex speed of sound and density. There are several empirical models available to determine these frequency dependent parameters based on an estimate of the material flow resistivity. Alternatively, these properties can be experimentally educed using an impedance tube setup. Since vibroacoustic models are generally sensitive to these properties, this paper assesses the accuracy of several empirical models relative to impedance tube measurements collected with melamine foam samples. Diffuse field sound absorption measurements collected using large test articles in a laboratory are also compared with absorption predictions determined using model-based and measured foam properties. Melamine foam slabs of various thicknesses are considered.

  15. Multiscale mass-spring models of carbon nanotube foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraternali, F.; Blesgen, T.; Amendola, A.; Daraio, C.

    This article is concerned with the mechanical properties of dense, vertically aligned CNT foams subject to one-dimensional compressive loading. We develop a discrete model directly inspired by the micromechanical response reported experimentally for CNT foams, where infinitesimal portions of the

  16. Foam flow in a model porous medium: I. The effect of foam coarsening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S A; Getrouw, N; Vincent-Bonnieu, S

    2018-02-02

    Foam structure evolves with time due to gas diffusion between bubbles (coarsening). In a bulk foam, coarsening behaviour is well defined, but there is less understanding of coarsening in confined geometries such as porous media. Previous predictions suggest that coarsening will cause foam lamellae to move to low energy configurations in the pore throats, resulting in greater capillary resistance when restarting flow. Foam coarsening experiments were conducted in both a model-porous-media micromodel and in a sandstone core. In both cases, foam was generated by coinjecting surfactant solution and nitrogen. Once steady state flow had been achieved, the injection was stopped and the system sealed off. In the micromodel, the foam coarsening was recorded using time-lapse photography. In the core flood, the additional driving pressure required to reinitiate flow after coarsening was measured. In the micromodel the bubbles coarsened rapidly to the pore size. At the completion of coarsening the lamellae were located in minimum energy configurations in the pore throats. The wall effect meant that the coarsening did not conform to the unconstricted growth laws. The coreflood tests also showed coarsening to be a rapid process. The additional driving pressure to restart flow reached a maximum after just 2 minutes.

  17. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  18. Shear Moduli for Non-Isotropic, Open Cell Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Equations for calculating the shear modulus of non-isotropic, open cell foams in the plane perpendicular to the rise direction and in a plane parallel to the rise direction are derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model. This Kelvin foam model is more general than that employed by previous authors as the size and shape of the unit cell are defined by specifying three independent cell dimensions. The equations for the shear compliances are derived as a function of three unit cell dimensions and the section properties of the cell edges. From the compliance equations, the shear modulus equations are obtained and written as a function of the relative density and two unit cell shape parameters. The dependence of the two shear moduli on the relative density and the two shape parameters is demonstrated.

  19. Testing of Snorre Field Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas (FAWAG Performance in New Foam Screening Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spirov Pavel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eclipse Functional Foam Model was used in order to provide a guideline for the history matching process (Gas-Oil Ratio (GOR, oil and gas production rates to the Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas method in the Snorre field, Norway, where the surfactant solution was injected in two slugs to control gas mobility and prevent gas breakthrough. The simulation showed that the first short slug was not efficient while significant GOR decrease and incremental oil production was obtained after the second longer slug in some periods. This study shows that the Eclipse foam model is applicable to the planning of water and gas injections, the testing of various surfactant properties, and the evaluation of the efficiency of the method at the field scale.

  20. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  1. A Combined Foam-Spray Model for Ocean Microwave Radiometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raizer, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Passive microwave emissions from oceanic dispersed media are considered. The spray is modeled by the aggregates of spherical water droplets, and the foam is represented by a macroscopic system of hollow spherical water shells...

  2. Use and application of MADYMO 5.3 foam material model for expanded polypropylene foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, A.R.; Suffis, B.; Lüsebrink, H.

    1998-01-01

    The dynamic material characteristics of expanded polypropylene are discussed. The in-depth studies, carried out by JSP International, in cooperation with TNO, are used to validate the MADYMO foam material model. The dynamic compression of expanded polypropylene follows a highly non-linear

  3. MODELING OF TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN FOAMED CONCRETE SLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD AZREE OTHUMAN MYDIN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the basis of one-dimensional Finite Difference method to obtain thermal properties of foamed concrete in order to solve transient heat conduction problems in multi-layer panels. In addition, this paper also incorporates the implementation of the method and the validation of thermal properties model of foamed concrete. A one-dimensional finite difference heat conduction programme has been developed to envisage the temperature development through the thickness of the foamed concrete slab, based on an initial estimate of the thermal conductivity-temperature relationship as a function of porosity and radiation within the voids. The accuracy of the model was evaluated by comparing predicted and experimental temperature profiles obtained from small scale heat transfer test on foamed concrete slabs, so that the temperature history of the specimen calculated by the programme closely matches those recorded during the experiment. Using the thermal properties of foamed concrete, the validated heat transfer program predicts foamed concrete temperatures in close agreement with experimental results obtained from a number of high temperature tests. The proposed numerical and thermal properties are simple yet efficient and can be utilised to aid manufacturers to develop their products without having to conduct numerous large-scale fire tests.

  4. MODELING OF TEMPERATURE FIELD DISTRIBUTION OF THE FOAM GLASS BATCH IN TERMS OF THERMAL TREATMENT OF FOAM GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Fedosov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Applications of foam glass is currently quite wide. This material is applied directly to construction and other human activities. Recent years the attention of scientists aimed at modeling the thermal processes in the production of foamed glass. Appear works in which the developed mathematical model allows to predict the distribution of temperature fields in the foam glass material at various stages of heat treatment of the material. The emergence of these models reveals a number of promising directions in the improvement of technology of producing foamed glass. Within the phenomenological formulation of the problem it is necessary to consider three-dimensional temperature field in the charge of foam-glass and inside the metal mold for foaming. It is necessary to consider the nonstationarity of the process and dynamics of change in macrovisiontm values. It is also worth noting that in the conditions of heat treatment of charge materials occurs difficult the heat transfer. The distribution of temperature fields in the foam glass material is from near-surface regions of the charge to the center. The first objective of the study is to find and describe the distribution of temperature fields in the volume of the foam glass of the charge to reflect changes in microphysically parameters in foam glass batch due to the gradual formation of porosity of the material of the charge from the periphery to the center. The second task is to find conditions for the uniform formation of the pore volume of the material. The paper presents a boundaryvalue problem of heat transfer in foam glass material for the metal mold on the x coordinate. This illustration of temperature field distribution inside the metal mold for foaming.

  5. A kinetic approach to modeling the manufacture of high density strucutral foam: Foaming and polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Rekha R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Mondy, Lisa Ann [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Noble, David R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Brunini, Victor [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Christine Cardinal [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Soehnel, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Celina, Mathias C. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Wyatt, Nicholas B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Thompson, Kyle R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Tinsley, James

    2015-09-01

    We are studying PMDI polyurethane with a fast catalyst, such that filling and polymerization occur simultaneously. The foam is over-packed to tw ice or more of its free rise density to reach the density of interest. Our approach is to co mbine model development closely with experiments to discover new physics, to parameterize models and to validate the models once they have been developed. The model must be able to repres ent the expansion, filling, curing, and final foam properties. PMDI is chemically blown foam, wh ere carbon dioxide is pr oduced via the reaction of water and isocyanate. The isocyanate also re acts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. A new kinetic model is developed and implemented, which follows a simplified mathematical formalism that decouple s these two reactions. The model predicts the polymerization reaction via condensation chemis try, where vitrification and glass transition temperature evolution must be included to correctly predict this quantity. The foam gas generation kinetics are determined by tracking the molar concentration of both water and carbon dioxide. Understanding the therma l history and loads on the foam due to exothermicity and oven heating is very important to the results, since the kinetics and ma terial properties are all very sensitive to temperature. The conservation eq uations, including the e quations of motion, an energy balance, and thr ee rate equations are solved via a stabilized finite element method. We assume generalized-Newtonian rheology that is dependent on the cure, gas fraction, and temperature. The conservation equations are comb ined with a level set method to determine the location of the free surface over time. Results from the model are compared to experimental flow visualization data and post-te st CT data for the density. Seve ral geometries are investigated including a mock encapsulation part, two configur ations of a mock stru ctural part, and a bar geometry to

  6. Modeling Manufacturing Impacts on Aging and Reliability of Polyurethane Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Rekha R.; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Johnson, Kyle; Lorenzo, Henry T.

    2016-10-01

    Polyurethane is a complex multiphase material that evolves from a viscous liquid to a system of percolating bubbles, which are created via a CO2 generating reaction. The continuous phase polymerizes to a solid during the foaming process generating heat. Foams introduced into a mold increase their volume up to tenfold, and the dynamics of the expansion process may lead to voids and will produce gradients in density and degree of polymerization. These inhomogeneities can lead to structural stability issues upon aging. For instance, structural components in weapon systems have been shown to change shape as they age depending on their molding history, which can threaten critical tolerances. The purpose of this project is to develop a Cradle-to-Grave multiphysics model, which allows us to predict the material properties of foam from its birth through aging in the stockpile, where its dimensional stability is important.

  7. On the Mechanical Response of Chopped Glass/Urethane Resin Composite: Data and Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elahi, M.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1999-11-01

    This report presents data on the creep response of a polymeric composite that is a candidate material for automotive applications. The above data were used to establish the basis for the mechanical characterization of the material's response over a wide range of stresses and temperatures, as well as under cyclic loading and due to exposure to distilled water. A constitutive model based upon fundamental principles of irreversible thermodynamics and continuum mechanics was employed to encompass the above mentioned database and to predict the response under more complex inputs. These latter tests verified the validity of the model.

  8. Calibrating the Abaqus Crushable Foam Material Model using UNM Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schembri, Philip E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Matthew W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-27

    Triaxial test data from the University of New Mexico and uniaxial test data from W-14 is used to calibrate the Abaqus crushable foam material model to represent the syntactic foam comprised of APO-BMI matrix and carbon microballoons used in the W76. The material model is an elasto-plasticity model in which the yield strength depends on pressure. Both the elastic properties and the yield stress are estimated by fitting a line to the elastic region of each test response. The model parameters are fit to the data (in a non-rigorous way) to provide both a conservative and not-conservative material model. The model is verified to perform as intended by comparing the values of pressure and shear stress at yield, as well as the shear and volumetric stress-strain response, to the test data.

  9. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  10. Effect of Permeability on Implicit-Texture Foam Model Parameters and the Limiting Capillary Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farajzadeh, R.; Lotfollahi, M.; Eftekhari, A.A.; Rossen, W.R.; Hirasaki, G.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate modeling of foam rheology on the field scale requires detailed understanding of the correlation between the fundamental properties of foam and the scalable parameters of the porous medium. It has been experimentally observed that foam experiences an abrupt coalescence when the capillary

  11. Numerical modeling of aluminium foam on two scales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němeček, J.; Denk, F.; Zlámal, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 267, September (2015), s. 506-516 ISSN 0096-3003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/12/0824 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : closed-cell aluminium foam * Alporas * multiscale modeling * homogenization * FFT * finite element modeling Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 1.345, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0096300315001162

  12. Modeling Study: Mechanism of Foam Propagation in Porous Media at Different Levels of Minimum Mobilization Pressure Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, M.; Kam, S.

    2017-12-01

    Scope: Numerous laboratory and field tests revealed that foam can effectively control gas mobility and improve sweep efficiency in enhanced-oil-recovery and subsurface-remediation processes, if correctly designed. The objective of this study is to answer (i) how mechanistic foam model parameters can be determined by fitting lab experiments in a step-by-step manner; (ii) how different levels of mobilization pressure gradient for foam generation affects the fundamentals of foam propagation; and (iii) how foam propagation distance can be estimated in the subsurface. This study for the first time shows why, and by how much, supercritical CO2 foams are advantaged over other types of foams such as N2 foam. Methods: First of all, by borrowing experimental data existing in the literature, this study shows how to capture mechanistic foam model parameters. The model, then, is applied to a wide range of mobilization pressure gradient to represent different types of foams that have been applied in the field (Note that supercritical CO2 foams exhibit much lower mobilization pressure compared to other types of foams (N2, steam, air, etc.). Finally, the model and parameters are used to evaluate different types of foam injection scenarios in order to predict how far foams can propagate with what properties in the field condition. Results and Conclusions: The results show that (i) the presence of three different foam states (strong, weak, intermediate) as well as two different strong-foam flow regimes (high-quality and low-quality regimes) plays a key role in model fit and field-scale propagation prediction and (ii) the importance of complex non-Newtonian foam rheology should not be underestimated. More specifically, this study finds that (i) supercritical CO2 foams can propagate a few hundreds of feet easily, which is a few orders of magnitude higher than other foams such as N2 foams; (ii) for dry foams (or, strong foams in the high-quality regime), the higher gas fractions the

  13. Impact of Interfacial Characteristics on Foam Structure: Study on Model Fluids and at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezdour Samir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Foams represent an important area of research because of their relevance to many industrial processes. In continuous foaming operations, foaming ability depends on the process parameters and the characteristics of the raw materials used for foamed products. The effects of fluid viscosity and equilibrium surface tension on foam structure have been studied extensively. Furthermore, as surface active agents diffuse to the interface, they can modify other interface properties through their adsorption, such as interfacial rheology and surface tension kinetics. In order to better understand how these two interfacial properties influence foam structuring, we formulated model foaming solutions with different interface viscoelasticity levels and adsorption rates, but all with the same equilibrium surface tension and viscosity. The solutions were made up of a surface active agent and glucose syrup, so as to maintain a Newtonian behaviour. Five surface active agents were used: Whey Protein Isolate (WPI, sodium caseinate, saponin, cetyl phosphate and Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS, at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 1%. Their molecular characteristics, and their interaction with the glucose syrup, made it possible to obtain a range of interface viscoelasticities and surface tension kinetics for these model solutions. The solutions were whipped in a continuously-operating industrial foaming device in order to control process parameters such as shearing and overrun, and to ensure that the experiment was representative of industrial production. The structure of the foams thus obtained foams was then determined by characterising bubble size using image analysis. For all the model solutions, both the viscoelastic moduli and apparent diffusion coefficient were linked to foam structure. The results showed that both high interface viscoelasticity and rapid diffusion kinetics induced a foam structure containing small bubbles. Both effects, as well as the impact of

  14. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of a polyurethane foam decomposition model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOBBS,MICHAEL L.; ROBINSON,DAVID G.

    2000-03-14

    Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are not commonly performed on complex, finite-element engineering models because the analyses are time consuming, CPU intensive, nontrivial exercises that can lead to deceptive results. To illustrate these ideas, an analytical sensitivity/uncertainty analysis is used to determine the standard deviation and the primary factors affecting the burn velocity of polyurethane foam exposed to firelike radiative boundary conditions. The complex, finite element model has 25 input parameters that include chemistry, polymer structure, and thermophysical properties. The response variable was selected as the steady-state burn velocity calculated as the derivative of the burn front location versus time. The standard deviation of the burn velocity was determined by taking numerical derivatives of the response variable with respect to each of the 25 input parameters. Since the response variable is also a derivative, the standard deviation is essentially determined from a second derivative that is extremely sensitive to numerical noise. To minimize the numerical noise, 50-micron elements and approximately 1-msec time steps were required to obtain stable uncertainty results. The primary effect variable was shown to be the emissivity of the foam.

  15. Testing and modeling the dynamic response of foam materials for blast protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitek, John H.

    The pressure wave released from an explosion can cause injury to the lungs. A personal armor system concept for blast lung injury protection consists of a polymer foam layer behind a rigid armor plate to be worn over the chest. This research develops a method for testing and modeling the dynamic response of foam materials to be used for down-selection of materials for this application. Constitutive equations for foam materials are incorporated into a lumped parameter model of the combined armor plate and foam system. Impact testing and shock tube testing are used to measure the foam model parameters and validate the model response to a pressure wave load. The plate and foam armor model is then coupled to a model of the human thorax. With a blast pressure wave input, the armor model is evaluated based on how it affects the injury-causing mechanism of chest wall motion. Results show that to reduce chest wall motion, the foam must compress at a relatively constant stress level, which requires a sufficient foam thickness.

  16. Material characterization and computer model simulation of low density polyurethane foam used in a rodent traumatic brain injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Gurao, Manish; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2011-05-15

    Computer models of the head can be used to simulate the events associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and quantify biomechanical response within the brain. Marmarou's impact acceleration rodent model is a widely used experimental model of TBI mirroring axonal pathology in humans. The mechanical properties of the low density polyurethane (PU) foam, an essential piece of energy management used in Marmarou's impact device, has not been fully characterized. The foam used in Marmarou's device was tested at seven strain rates ranging from quasi-static to dynamic (0.014-42.86 s⁻¹) to quantify the stress-strain relationships in compression. Recovery rate of the foam after cyclic compression was also determined through the periods of recovery up to three weeks. The experimentally determined stress-strain curves were incorporated into a material model in an explicit Finite Element (FE) solver to validate the strain rate dependency of the FE foam model. Compression test results have shown that the foam used in the rodent impact acceleration model is strain rate dependent. The foam has been found to be reusable for multiple impacts. However the stress resistance of used foam is reduced to 70% of the new foam. The FU_CHANG_FOAM material model in an FE solver has been found to be adequate to simulate this rate sensitive foam. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Conductive polymer foams with carbon nanofillers – Modeling percolation behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Maxian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new numerical model considering nanofiller random distribution in a porous polymeric matrix was developed to predict electrical percolation behavior in systems incorporating 1D-carbon nanotubes (CNTs and/or 2D-graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs. The numerical model applies to porous systems with closed-cell morphology. The percolation threshold was found to decrease with increasing porosity due to filler repositioning as a result of foaming. CNTs were more efficient in forming a percolative network than GNPs. High-aspect ratio (AR and randomly oriented fillers were more prone to form a network. Reduced percolation values were determined for misaligned fillers as they connect better in a network compared to aligned ones. Hybrid CNT-GNP fillers show synergistic effects in forming electrically conductive networks by comparison with single fillers.

  18. Compressive properties of commercially available polyurethane foams as mechanical models for osteoporotic human cancellous bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Duncan ET

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyurethane (PU foam is widely used as a model for cancellous bone. The higher density foams are used as standard biomechanical test materials, but none of the low density PU foams are universally accepted as models for osteoporotic (OP bone. The aim of this study was to determine whether low density PU foam might be suitable for mimicking human OP cancellous bone. Methods Quasi-static compression tests were performed on PU foam cylinders of different lengths (3.9 and 7.7 mm and of different densities (0.09, 0.16 and 0.32 g.cm-3, to determine the Young's modulus, yield strength and energy absorbed to yield. Results Young's modulus values were 0.08–0.93 MPa for the 0.09 g.cm-3 foam and from 15.1–151.4 MPa for the 0.16 and 0.32 g.cm-3 foam. Yield strength values were 0.01–0.07 MPa for the 0.09 g.cm-3 foam and from 0.9–4.5 MPa for the 0.16 and 0.32 g.cm-3 foam. The energy absorbed to yield was found to be negligible for all foam cylinders. Conclusion Based on these results, it is concluded that 0.16 g.cm-3 PU foam may prove to be suitable as an OP cancellous bone model when fracture stress, but not energy dissipation, is of concern.

  19. A model for foam formation, stability, and breakdown in glass-melting furnaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, J. van der; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    A dynamic model for describing the build-up and breakdown of a glass-melt foam is presented. The foam height is determined by the gas flux to the glass-melt surface and the drainage rate of the liquid lamellae between the gas bubbles. The drainage rate is determined by the average gas bubble radius

  20. A nonlinear vertex-based model for animation of two-dimensional dry foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelager, Micky; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    Foam is the natural phenomenon of bubbles that arise due to nucleation of gas in liquids. The current state of art in Computer Graphics rarely includes foam effects on large scales. In this paper we introduce a vertexbased, quasi-static equilibrium model from the field of Computational Physics...

  1. Modeling of Macro-deformation Behavior of Thin-Walled Aluminum Foam by Gas Injection Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chen; Ningzhen, Wang; Jianyu, Yuan; Yanxiang, Li; Huawei, Zhang; Yuan, Liu

    2017-07-01

    The favorable energy absorption characteristics of foam structures originate from their layer-by-layer deformation behavior. In this paper, the effects of cell morphology on the compressive performance of thin-walled aluminum foams were studied by a finite element method using a three-dimensional, thin-shell Kelvin tetrakaidecahedron model. Models with varying cell structure parameters were established so that the effects of relative density, cell size, cell wall thickness, and cell anisotropy on the plateau stress and energy absorption capacity of the foams could be investigated. Both the numerical deformation behavior and stress-strain curves of aluminum foams are found to have good agreement with the experimental results under quasi-static compressive loading. Moreover, the deformation behaviors of those foams with a certain anisotropy ratio are compared for different loading directions. The cell shape is a key factor affecting the plateau stress as well as the relative density.

  2. Characterization and three-dimensional reconstruction of synthetic bone model foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez, S. [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Vlad, M.D. [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, “Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Str. Kogalniceanu 9-13, 700454 Iasi (Romania); López, J. [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Navarro, M. [Centre de Biotecnologia Animal i de Teràpia Gènica (CBATEG), Departament de Sanitat i d' Anatomia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès (Spain); Fernández, E., E-mail: enrique.fernandez@upc.edu [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    Sawbones© open-cell foams with different porosity grades are being used as synthetic bone-like models for in vitro mechanical and infiltration experiments. However, a comprehensive characterization of these foams is not available and there is a lack of reliable information about them. For this reason two of these foams (Refs. 1522-505 and -507) have been characterized at the micro architectural level by scanning electron microscopy, computed tomography and image data analysis. BoneJ open software and ImageJ open software were used to obtain the characteristic histomorphometric parameters and the three dimensional virtual models of the foams. The results showed that both foams, while having different macro porosities, appeared undistinguishable at the micro scale. Moreover, the micro structural features resembled those of osteoporotic rather than healthy trabecular bone. It is concluded that Sawbones© foams behave reasonably as synthetic bone-like models. Consequently, their use is recommended for in vitro comparison purposes of both mechanical and infiltration testing performed in real vertebra. Finally, the virtual models obtained, which are available under request, can favour comparisons between future self-similar in vitro experiments and computer simulations. - Highlights: • Sawbones© model foams have been scanned by μ-CT. • Histomorphometric indices and 3D virtual models have been obtained. • The results will be of use to understand biocement vertebra infiltration studies.

  3. Influence of high power ultrasound on rheological and foaming properties of model ice-cream mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Batur

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research of the high power ultrasound effect on rheological and foaming properties of ice cream model mixtures. Ice cream model mixtures are prepared according to specific recipes, and afterward undergone through different homogenization techniques: mechanical mixing, ultrasound treatment and combination of mechanical and ultrasound treatment. Specific diameter (12.7 mm of ultrasound probe tip has been used for ultrasound treatment that lasted 5 minutes at 100 percent amplitude. Rheological parameters have been determined using rotational rheometer and expressed as flow index, consistency coefficient and apparent viscosity. From the results it can be concluded that all model mixtures have non-newtonian, dilatant type behavior. The highest viscosities have been observed for model mixtures that were homogenizes with mechanical mixing, and significantly lower values of viscosity have been observed for ultrasound treated ones. Foaming properties are expressed as percentage of increase in foam volume, foam stability index and minimal viscosity. It has been determined that ice cream model mixtures treated only with ultrasound had minimal increase in foam volume, while the highest increase in foam volume has been observed for ice cream mixture that has been treated in combination with mechanical and ultrasound treatment. Also, ice cream mixtures having higher amount of proteins in composition had shown higher foam stability. It has been determined that optimal treatment time is 10 minutes.

  4. Empirical Modeling of the Viscosity of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Foam Fracturing Fluid under Different Downhole Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehzad Ahmed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-quality supercritical CO2 (sCO2 foam as a fracturing fluid is considered ideal for fracturing shale gas reservoirs. The apparent viscosity of the fracturing fluid holds an important role and governs the efficiency of the fracturing process. In this study, the viscosity of sCO2 foam and its empirical correlations are presented as a function of temperature, pressure, and shear rate. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the effect of temperature, pressure, and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of sCO2 foam generated by a widely used mixed surfactant system. An advanced high pressure, high temperature (HPHT foam rheometer was used to measure the apparent viscosity of the foam over a wide range of reservoir temperatures (40–120 °C, pressures (1000–2500 psi, and shear rates (10–500 s−1. A well-known power law model was modified to accommodate the individual and combined effect of temperature, pressure, and shear rate on the apparent viscosity of the foam. Flow indices of the power law were found to be a function of temperature, pressure, and shear rate. Nonlinear regression was also performed on the foam apparent viscosity data to develop these correlations. The newly developed correlations provide an accurate prediction of the foam’s apparent viscosity under different fracturing conditions. These correlations can be helpful for evaluating foam-fracturing efficiency by incorporating them into a fracturing simulator.

  5. A PVC-foam material model based on a thermodynamically elasto-plastic-damage framework exhibiting failure and crushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    A well known foam for naval sandwiches is PVC (polyvinyl chloride) foam. This foam exhibits elasto-damage behavior under tension and elasto-plastic behavior under compression. A proper material model is required for the prediction of the failure and post-failure behavior of these sandwiches during

  6. Modeling foam delivery mechanisms in deep vadose-zone remediation using method of characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roostapour, A.; Kam, S.I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new mathematical framework established for vadose-zone foam remediation. ► Graphical solutions presented by Method of Characteristics quantitatively. ► Effects of design parameters in the field applications thoroughly investigated. ► Implication of modeling study for successful field treatment discussed. - Abstract: This study investigates foam delivery mechanisms in vadose-zone remediation by using Method of Characteristics (MoC), a mathematical tool long been used for the analysis of miscible and immiscible flooding in porous media in petroleum industry. MoC converts the governing material-balance partial differential equations into a series of ordinary differential equations, and the resulting solutions are in a form of wave propagation (more specifically, for chemical species and phase saturations) through the system as a function of time and space. Deep vadose-zone remediation has special features compared to other conventional remediation applications. They include, not limited to, a high level of heterogeneity, a very dry initial condition with low water saturation (S w ), pollutants such as metals and radionuclides fully dissolved in groundwater, and a serious concern about downward migration during the remediation treatments. For the vadose-zone remediation processes to be successful, the injected aqueous phase should carry chemicals to react with pollutants and precipitate them for immobilization and stabilization purposes. As a result, foams are believed to be an effective means, and understanding foam flow mechanism in situ is a key to the optimal design of field applications. Results show that foam delivery mechanism is indeed very complicated, making the optimum injection condition field-specific. The five major parameters selected (i.e., initial saturation of the medium, injection foam quality, surfactant adsorption, foam strength, and foam stability) are shown to be all important, interacting with each other. Results also

  7. A nonlinear vertex-based model for animation of two-dimensional dry foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelager, Micky; Erleben, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    Foam is the natural phenomenon of bubbles that arise due to nucleation of gas in liquids. The current state of art in Computer Graphics rarely includes foam effects on large scales. In this paper we introduce a vertexbased, quasi-static equilibrium model from the field of Computational Physics as...... simulations with free dynamic boundary conditions. The presented model is interesting and well suited for 2D graphics applications like video games and procedural or animated textures....

  8. A finite element/level set model of polyurethane foam expansion and polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Rekha R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Long, Kevin Nicholas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, Christine Cardinal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Celina, Mathias C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunini, Victor [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soehnel, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Noble, David R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tinsley, James [Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, Kansas City, MO (United States); Mondy, Lisa [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Polyurethane foams are used widely for encapsulation and structural purposes because they are inexpensive, straightforward to process, amenable to a wide range of density variations (1 lb/ft3 - 50 lb/ft3), and able to fill complex molds quickly and effectively. Computational model of the filling and curing process are needed to reduce defects such as voids, out-of-specification density, density gradients, foam decomposition from high temperatures due to exotherms, and incomplete filling. This paper details the development of a computational fluid dynamics model of a moderate density PMDI structural foam, PMDI-10. PMDI is an isocyanate-based polyurethane foam, which is chemically blown with water. The polyol reacts with isocyanate to produces the polymer. PMDI- 10 is catalyzed giving it a short pot life: it foams and polymerizes to a solid within 5 minutes during normal processing. To achieve a higher density, the foam is over-packed to twice or more of its free rise density of 10 lb/ft3. The goal for modeling is to represent the expansion, filling of molds, and the polymerization of the foam. This will be used to reduce defects, optimize the mold design, troubleshoot the processed, and predict the final foam properties. A homogenized continuum model foaming and curing was developed based on reaction kinetics, documented in a recent paper; it uses a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. The chemo-rheology of PMDI is measured experimentally and fit to a generalized- Newtonian viscosity model that is dependent on the extent of cure, gas fraction, and temperature. The conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and three rate equations are solved via a stabilized finite element method. The equations are combined with a level set method to determine the location of the foam-gas interface as it evolves to fill the mold. Understanding the thermal history and loads on the foam due to exothermicity and oven

  9. Modeling Heat Transfer and Pressurization of Polymeric Methylene Diisocyanate (PMDI) Polyurethane Foam in a Sealed Container.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Sarah Nicole

    2018-01-01

    Polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. It can be advantageous to surround objects of interest, such as electronics, with foams in a hermetically sealed container to protect the electronics from hostile en vironments, such as a crash that produces a fire. However, i n fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of foams can cause mechanical failure of the sealed system . In this work, a detailed study of thermally decomposing polymeric methylene diisocyanate (PMDI) - polyether - polyol based polyurethane foam in a sealed container is presented . Both experimental and computational work is discussed. Three models of increasing physics fidelity are presented: No Flow, Porous Media, and Porous Media with VLE. Each model us described in detail, compared to experiment , and uncertainty quantification is performed. While the Porous Media with VLE model matches has the best agreement with experiment, it also requires the most computational resources.

  10. Modeling of Flexible Polyurethane Foam Shrinkage for Bra Cup Moulding Process Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, moulding technology has become a remarkable manufacturing process in the intimate apparel industry. Polyurethane (PU foam sheets are used to mould three-dimensional (3D seamless bra cups of various softness and shapes, which eliminate bulky seams and reduce production costs. However, it has been challenging to accurately and effectively control the moulding process and bra cup thickness. In this study, the theoretical mechanism of heat transfer and the thermal conductivity of PU foams are first examined. Experimental studies are carried out to investigate the changes in foam materials at various moulding conditions (viz., temperatures, and lengths of dwell time in terms of surface morphology and thickness by using electron and optical microscopy. Based on the theoretical and experimental investigations of the thermal conductivity of the foam materials, empirical equations of shrinkage ratio and thermal conduction of foam materials were established. A regression model to predict flexible PU foam shrinkage during the bra cup moulding process was formulated by using the Levenberg-Marquardt method of nonlinear least squares algorithm and verified for accuracy. This study therefore provides an effective approach that optimizes control of the bra cup moulding process and assures the ultimate quality and thickness of moulded foam cups.

  11. Microstructure based model for sound absorption predictions of perforated closed-cell metallic foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillotte, Fabien; Perrot, Camille; Panneton, Raymond

    2010-10-01

    Closed-cell metallic foams are known for their rigidity, lightness, thermal conductivity as well as their low production cost compared to open-cell metallic foams. However, they are also poor sound absorbers. Similarly to a rigid solid, a method to enhance their sound absorption is to perforate them. This method has shown good preliminary results but has not yet been analyzed from a microstructure point of view. The objective of this work is to better understand how perforations interact with closed-cell foam microstructure and how it modifies the sound absorption of the foam. A simple two-dimensional microstructural model of the perforated closed-cell metallic foam is presented and numerically solved. A rough three-dimensional conversion of the two-dimensional results is proposed. The results obtained with the calculation method show that the perforated closed-cell foam behaves similarly to a perforated solid; however, its sound absorption is modulated by the foam microstructure, and most particularly by the diameters of both perforation and pore. A comparison with measurements demonstrates that the proposed calculation method yields realistic trends. Some design guides are also proposed.

  12. Dielectric and Radiative Properties of Sea Foam at Microwave Frequencies: Conceptual Understanding of Foam Emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Peter W. Gaiser; Magdalena D. Anguelova

    2012-01-01

    Foam fraction can be retrieved from space-based microwave radiometric data at frequencies from 1 to 37 GHz. The retrievals require modeling of ocean surface emissivity fully covered with sea foam. To model foam emissivity well, knowledge of foam properties, both mechanical and dielectric, is necessary because these control the radiative processes in foam. We present a physical description of foam dielectric properties obtained from the foam dielectric constant including foam skin depth; foam ...

  13. Experiments to populate and validate a processing model for polyurethane foam. BKC 44306 PMDI-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondy, Lisa Ann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rao, Rekha Ranjana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelden, Bion [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soehnel, Melissa Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); O' Hern, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grillet, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Celina, Mathias C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wyatt, Nicholas B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Russick, Edward Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hileman, Michael Bryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Urquhart, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, Kyle Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, David Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We are developing computational models to elucidate the expansion and dynamic filling process of a polyurethane foam, PMDI. The polyurethane of interest is chemically blown, where carbon dioxide is produced via the reaction of water, the blowing agent, and isocyanate. The isocyanate also reacts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. Here we detail the experiments needed to populate a processing model and provide parameters for the model based on these experiments. The model entails solving the conservation equations, including the equations of motion, an energy balance, and two rate equations for the polymerization and foaming reactions, following a simplified mathematical formalism that decouples these two reactions. Parameters for the polymerization kinetics model are reported based on infrared spectrophotometry. Parameters describing the gas generating reaction are reported based on measurements of volume, temperature and pressure evolution with time. A foam rheology model is proposed and parameters determined through steady-shear and oscillatory tests. Heat of reaction and heat capacity are determined through differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal conductivity of the foam as a function of density is measured using a transient method based on the theory of the transient plane source technique. Finally, density variations of the resulting solid foam in several simple geometries are directly measured by sectioning and sampling mass, as well as through x-ray computed tomography. These density measurements will be useful for model validation once the complete model is implemented in an engineering code.

  14. Finite Element Modeling of Tensile Deformation Behaviors of Iron Syntactic Foam with Hollow Glass Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yi Je; Lee, Wookjin; Park, Yong Ho

    2017-10-19

    The elastoplastic deformation behaviors of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foam under tension were modeled using a representative volume element (RVE) approach. The three-dimensional microstructures of the iron syntactic foam with 5 wt % glass microspheres were reconstructed using the random sequential adsorption algorithm. The constitutive behavior of the elastoplasticity in the iron matrix and the elastic-brittle failure for the glass microsphere were simulated in the models. An appropriate RVE size was statistically determined by evaluating elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield strength in terms of model sizes and boundary conditions. The model was validated by the agreement with experimental findings. The tensile deformation mechanism of the syntactic foam considering the fracture of the microspheres was then investigated. In addition, the feasibility of introducing the interfacial deboning behavior to the proposed model was briefly investigated to improve the accuracy in depicting fracture behaviors of the syntactic foam. It is thought that the modeling techniques and the model itself have major potential for applications not only in the study of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foams, but also for the design of composites with a high modulus matrix and high strength reinforcement.

  15. Finite Element Modeling of Tensile Deformation Behaviors of Iron Syntactic Foam with Hollow Glass Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Je Cho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The elastoplastic deformation behaviors of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foam under tension were modeled using a representative volume element (RVE approach. The three-dimensional microstructures of the iron syntactic foam with 5 wt % glass microspheres were reconstructed using the random sequential adsorption algorithm. The constitutive behavior of the elastoplasticity in the iron matrix and the elastic-brittle failure for the glass microsphere were simulated in the models. An appropriate RVE size was statistically determined by evaluating elastic modulus, Poisson’s ratio, and yield strength in terms of model sizes and boundary conditions. The model was validated by the agreement with experimental findings. The tensile deformation mechanism of the syntactic foam considering the fracture of the microspheres was then investigated. In addition, the feasibility of introducing the interfacial deboning behavior to the proposed model was briefly investigated to improve the accuracy in depicting fracture behaviors of the syntactic foam. It is thought that the modeling techniques and the model itself have major potential for applications not only in the study of hollow glass microspheres/iron syntactic foams, but also for the design of composites with a high modulus matrix and high strength reinforcement.

  16. Coupled intertwiner dynamics: A toy model for coupling matter to spin foam models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The universal coupling of matter and gravity is one of the most important features of general relativity. In quantum gravity, in particular spin foams, matter couplings have been defined in the past, yet the mutual dynamics, in particular if matter and gravity are strongly coupled, are hardly explored, which is related to the definition of both matter and gravitational degrees of freedom on the discretization. However, extracting these mutual dynamics is crucial in testing the viability of the spin foam approach and also establishing connections to other discrete approaches such as lattice gauge theories. Therefore, we introduce a simple two-dimensional toy model for Yang-Mills coupled to spin foams, namely an Ising model coupled to so-called intertwiner models defined for SU (2 )k. The two systems are coupled by choosing the Ising coupling constant to depend on spin labels of the background, as these are interpreted as the edge lengths of the discretization. We coarse grain this toy model via tensor network renormalization and uncover an interesting dynamics: the Ising phase transition temperature turns out to be sensitive to the background configurations and conversely, the Ising model can induce phase transitions in the background. Moreover, we observe a strong coupling of both systems if close to both phase transitions.

  17. Models and observations of foam coverage and bubble content in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, J. T.; Shi, F.; Holman, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Optical and acoustical observations and communications are hampered in the nearshore by the presence of bubbles and foam generated by breaking waves. Bubble clouds in the water column provide a highly variable (both spatially and temporally) obstacle to direct acoustic and optical paths. Persistent foam riding on the water surface creates a primary occlusion of optical penetration into the water column. In an effort to better understand and predict the level of bubble and foam content in the surfzone, we have been pursuing the development of a detailed phase resolved model of fluid and gaseous components of the water column, using a Navier-Stokes/VOF formulation extended to include a multiphase description of polydisperse bubble populations. This sort of modeling provides a detailed description of large scale turbulent structures and associated bubble transport mechanisms under breaking wave crests. The modeling technique is too computationally intensive, however, to provide a wider-scale description of large surfzone regions. In order to approach the larger scale problem, we are developing a model for spatial and temporal distribution of foam and bubbles within the framework of a Boussinesq model. The basic numerical framework for the code is described by Shi et al (2010, this conference). Bubble effects are incorporated both in the mass and momentum balances for weakly dispersive, fully nonlinear waves, with spatial and temporal bubble distributions parameterized based on the VOF modeling and measurements and tied to the computed rate of dissipation of energy during breaking. A model of a foam layer on the water surface is specified using a shallow water formulation. Foam mass conservation includes source and sink terms representing outgassing of the water column, direct foam generation due to surface agitation, and erosion due to bubble bursting. The foam layer motion in the plane of the water surface arises due to a balance of drag forces due to wind and water

  18. Quasi-steady model for predicting temperature of aqueous foams circulating in geothermal wellbores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell, B.F.; Ortega, A.

    1983-01-01

    A quasi-steady model has been developed for predicting the temperature profiles of aqueous foams circulating in geothermal wellbores. The model assumes steady one-dimensional incompressible flow in the wellbore; heat transfer by conduction from the geologic formation to the foam is one-dimensional radially and time-dependent. The vertical temperature distribution in the undisturbed geologic formation is assumed to be composed of two linear segments. For constant values of the convective heat-transfer coefficient, a closed-form analytical solution is obtained. It is demonstrated that the Prandtl number of aqueous foams is large (1000 to 5000); hence, a fully developed temperature profile may not exist for representative drilling applications. Existing convective heat-transfer-coefficient solutions are adapted to aqueous foams. The simplified quasi-steady model is successfully compared with a more-sophisticated finite-difference computer code. Sample temperature-profile calculations are presented for representative values of the primary parameters. For a 5000-ft wellbore with a bottom hole temperature of 375{sup 0}F, the maximum foam temperature can be as high as 300{sup 0}F.

  19. Short-term in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of a biodegradable polyurethane foam based on 1,4-butanediisocyanate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Minnen, B; Van Leeuwen, MBM; Stegenga, B; Zuidema, J; Hissink, CE; Van Kooten, TG; Bos, RRM

    In this study short-term in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility apects of a biodegradable polyurethane (PU) foam were evaluated. The PU consists of hard urethane segments and amorphous soft segments based on a copolyester of dl-lactide and epsilon-caprolactone. The urethane segments are of uniform

  20. The Soil Foam Drainage Equation - an alternative model for unsaturated flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Lehmann, Peter; Hoogland, Frouke; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    The analogy between the geometry and dynamics of wet foam drainage and gravity drainage of unsaturated porous media expands modeling capabilities for capillary flows and supplements the standard Richards equation representation. The governing equation for draining foam (or a soil variant termed the soil foam drainage equation - SFDE) obviates the need for macroscopic unsaturated hydraulic conductivity function by an explicit account of diminishing flow pathway sizes as the medium gradually drains. Potential advantages of the proposed drainage foam formalism include direct description of transient flow without requiring constitutive functions; evolution of capillary cross sections that provides consistent description of self-regulating internal fluxes (e.g., towards field capacity); and a more intuitive geometrical picture of capillary flow across textural boundaries. We will present new and simple analytical expressions for drainage rates and volumes from unsaturated porous media subjected to different boundary conditions that are in good agreement with the numerical solution of the SFDE and experimental results. The foam drainage methodology expands the range of tools available for describing and quantifying unsaturated flows and provides geometrically tractable links between evolution of liquid configuration and flow dynamics in unsaturated porous media. The resulting geometrical representation of capillary drainage could improve understanding of colloid and pathogen transport. The explicit geometrical interpretation of flow pathways underlying the hydraulic functions used by the Richards equation offers new insights that benefit both approaches.

  1. In vivo response to an implanted shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Clubb, Fred J; Wilson, Thomas S; Miller, Matthew W; Fossum, Theresa W; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane-based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology, and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy imaging after 0, 30, and 90 days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time 0 (<1 h exposure to blood before euthanization), partial healing was observed at 30 days, and almost complete healing had occurred at 90 days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. In vivo tissue response following implantation of shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Clubb, Fred J.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) imaging after zero, thirty and ninety days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time zero (less than one hour exposure to blood prior to euthanization), partial healing was observed at thirty days, and almost complete healing had occurred at ninety days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. PMID:23650278

  3. One-dimensional thermal response modeling of a transuranic foamed overpack system to a fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchsland, K.E.; Kwong, K.C.; Fretter, E.F.; Boyd, R.D.; Auerbach, I.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures have been established for modeling the thermal response of TRU container walls (TRUPACT) exposed to a fire environment. The effort included simulation testing and thermal modeling of the wall material. In this study, both testing and modeling were directed at determining a one-dimensional thermal model for undamaged polyurethane foam. The foam was assumed to exist in a nonoxidizing environment and was exposed to an almost step change in surface temperature. Results indicate that if the TRU waste container wall includes a polyurethane foam (64 kg/m 3 density) of thickness greater than 20 cm and the wall is otherwise undamaged, there will be no change in the waste content temperature where the container is subjected to a surface temperature as high as 1333 K for times less than 3600 s. Further improvements are needed in the thermal model to include transpiration, better estimates of the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity, effects of damaged wall structure and radiation absorption effects for the charged foam. 10 figures

  4. Fracture of metal foams : In-situ testing and numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; van Merkerk, R.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Schmidt, I

    This paper is on a combined experimental/modeling study on the tensile fracture of open-cell foams. In-situ tensile tests show that individual struts can fail in a brittle or ductile mode, presumably depending on the presence of casting defects. In-situ single strut tests were performed, enabling

  5. Poly(hydroxy urethane)s based on renewable diglycerol dicarbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthoven, van Juliën L.J.; Gootjes, Linda; Es, van Daan S.; Noordover, Bart A.J.; Meuldijk, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we present a series of amorphous non-isocyanate poly(hydroxy urethane)s (PHU) synthesized from diglycerol dicarbonate in bulk conditions at mild temperatures, without using a catalyst. Diglycerol dicarbonate has been synthesized from diglycerol and dimethyl carbonate and

  6. Thermal aging of traditional and additively manufactured foams: analysis by time-temperature-superposition, constitutive, and finite-element models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weisgraber, T. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Small, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lewicki, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Duoss, E. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spadaccini, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearson, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wilson, T. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Maxwell, R. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Cellular solids or foams are a very important class of materials with diverse applications ranging from thermal insulation and shock absorbing support cushions, to light-weight structural and floatation components, and constitute crucial components in a large number of industries including automotive, aerospace, electronics, marine, biomedical, packaging, and defense. In many of these applications the foam material is subjected to long periods of continuous stress, which can, over time, lead to a permanent change in structure and a degradation in performance. In this report we summarize our modeling efforts to date on polysiloxane foam materials that form an important component in our systems. Aging of the materials was characterized by two measured quantities, i.e., compression set and load retention. Results of accelerated aging experiments were analyzed by an automated time-temperaturesuperposition (TTS) approach, which creates a master curve that can be used for long-term predictions (over decades) under ambient conditions. When comparing such master curves for traditional (stochastic) foams with those for recently 3D-printed (i.e., additively manufactured, or AM) foams, it became clear that AM foams have superior aging behavior. To gain deeper understanding, we imaged the microstructure of both foams using X-ray computed tomography, and performed finite-element analysis of the mechanical response within these microstructures. This indicates a wider stress variation in the stochastic foam with points of more extreme local stress as compared to the 3D printed material.

  7. Destabilization, Propagation, and Generation of Surfactant-Stabilized Foam during Crude Oil Displacement in Heterogeneous Model Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Siyang; Zeng, Yongchao; Vavra, Eric D; He, Peng; Puerto, Maura; Hirasaki, George J; Biswal, Sibani L

    2018-01-23

    Foam flooding in porous media is of increasing interest due to its numerous applications such as enhanced oil recovery, aquifer remediation, and hydraulic fracturing. However, the mechanisms of oil-foam interactions have yet to be fully understood at the pore level. Here, we present three characteristic zones identified in experiments involving the displacement of crude oil from model porous media via surfactant-stabilized foam, and we describe a series of pore-level dynamics in these zones which were not observed in experiments involving paraffin oil. In the displacement front zone, foam coalesces upon initial contact with crude oil, which is known to destabilize the liquid lamellae of the foam. Directly upstream, a transition zone occurs where surface wettability is altered from oil-wet to water-wet. After this transition takes place, a strong foam bank zone exists where foam is generated within the porous media. We visualized each zone using a microfluidic platform, and we discuss the unique physicochemical phenomena that define each zone. In our analysis, we also provide an updated mechanistic understanding of the "smart rheology" of foam which builds upon simple "phase separation" observations in the literature.

  8. Investigation of the influence of the open cell foam models geometry on hydrodynamic calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveva, O. V.; Solovev, S. A.; Khusainov, R. R.; Popkova, O. S.; Panenko, D. O.

    2018-01-01

    A geometrical model of the open cell foam was created as an ordered set of intersecting spheres. The proposed model closely describes a real porous cellular structure. The hydrodynamics flow was calculated on the basis of a simple model in the ANSYS Fluent software package. A pressure drop was determined, the value of which was compared with the experimental data of other authors. As a result of the conducted studies, we found that a porous structure with smoothed faces provides the smallest pressure drop with the same porosity of the package. Analysis of the calculated data demonstrated that the approximation of an elementary porous cell substantially distorts the flow field. This is undesirable in detailed modeling of the open cell foam.

  9. Foam Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    William G. Simpson, a NASA/Marshall employee, invented and patented a foam mixing dispensing device. He is supplying his Simpson mixer to a number of foam applications where it is used to apply foam for insulation purposes.

  10. Rheological properties of the soft-disk model of two-dimensional foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlois, Vincent; Hutzler, Stefan; Weaire, Denis

    2008-01-01

    The soft-disk model previously developed and applied by Durian [D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4780 (1995)] is brought to bear on problems of foam rheology of longstanding and current interest, using two-dimensional systems. The questions at issue include the origin of the Herschel-Bulkley re......The soft-disk model previously developed and applied by Durian [D. J. Durian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4780 (1995)] is brought to bear on problems of foam rheology of longstanding and current interest, using two-dimensional systems. The questions at issue include the origin of the Herschel......-Bulkley relation, normal stress effects (dilatancy), and localization in the presence of wall drag. We show that even a model that incorporates only linear viscous effects at the local level gives rise to nonlinear (power-law) dependence of the limit stress on strain rate. With wall drag, shear localization...

  11. OpenFOAM Modeling of Particle Heating and Acceleration in Cold Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, K.-H.; O'Sullivan, M.; Plankensteiner, A.; Kestler, H.; Sigl, L. S.

    2018-01-01

    In cold spraying, a powder material is accelerated and heated in the gas flow of a supersonic nozzle to velocities and temperatures that are sufficient to obtain cohesion of the particles to a substrate. The deposition efficiency of the particles is significantly determined by their velocity and temperature. Particle velocity correlates with the amount of kinetic energy that is converted to plastic deformation and thermal heating. The initial particle temperature significantly influences the mechanical properties of the particle. Velocity and temperature of the particles have nonlinear dependence on the pressure and temperature of the gas at the nozzle entrance. In this contribution, a simulation model based on the reactingParcelFoam solver of OpenFOAM is presented and applied for an analysis of particle velocity and temperature in the cold spray nozzle. The model combines a compressible description of the gas flow in the nozzle with a Lagrangian particle tracking. The predictions of the simulation model are verified based on an analytical description of the gas flow, the particle acceleration and heating in the nozzle. Based on experimental data, the drag model according to Plessis and Masliyah is identified to be best suited for OpenFOAM modeling particle heating and acceleration in cold spraying.

  12. Geometric modeling of Plateau borders using the orthographic projection method for closed cell rigid polyurethane foam thermal conductivity prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Tao; Peng, Chuang; Adegbite, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    The geometric Plateau border model for closed cell polyurethane foam was developed based on volume integrations of approximated 3D four-cusp hypocycloid structure. The tetrahedral structure of convex struts was orthogonally projected into 2D three-cusp deltoid with three central cylinders. The idealized single unit strut was modeled by superposition. The volume of each component was calculated by geometric analyses. The strut solid fraction f s and foam porosity coefficient δ were calculated based on representative elementary volume of Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan structures. The specific surface area Sv derived respectively from packing structures and deltoid approximation model were put into contrast against strut dimensional ratio ɛ. The characteristic foam parameters obtained from this semi-empirical model were further employed to predict foam thermal conductivity.

  13. An approach to model validation and model-based prediction -- polyurethane foam case study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2003-07-01

    Enhanced software methodology and improved computing hardware have advanced the state of simulation technology to a point where large physics-based codes can be a major contributor in many systems analyses. This shift toward the use of computational methods has brought with it new research challenges in a number of areas including characterization of uncertainty, model validation, and the analysis of computer output. It is these challenges that have motivated the work described in this report. Approaches to and methods for model validation and (model-based) prediction have been developed recently in the engineering, mathematics and statistical literatures. In this report we have provided a fairly detailed account of one approach to model validation and prediction applied to an analysis investigating thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. A model simulates the evolution of the foam in a high temperature environment as it transforms from a solid to a gas phase. The available modeling and experimental results serve as data for a case study focusing our model validation and prediction developmental efforts on this specific thermal application. We discuss several elements of the ''philosophy'' behind the validation and prediction approach: (1) We view the validation process as an activity applying to the use of a specific computational model for a specific application. We do acknowledge, however, that an important part of the overall development of a computational simulation initiative is the feedback provided to model developers and analysts associated with the application. (2) We utilize information obtained for the calibration of model parameters to estimate the parameters and quantify uncertainty in the estimates. We rely, however, on validation data (or data from similar analyses) to measure the variability that contributes to the uncertainty in predictions for specific systems or units (unit-to-unit variability). (3) We perform statistical

  14. Bond strength of urethane and epoxy-modified adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childress, F.G.; Zava, A.K.; Miller, C.E.

    1976-04-26

    A number of urethane and epoxy-modified urethane systems were evaluated as room-temperature-curing adhesives. The systems were formulated to yield a variety of modulus levels and to be compatible with certain chemically sensitive materials.

  15. Modeling Large Deformation and Failure of Expanded Polystyrene Crushable Foam Using LS-DYNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim H. Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the initial phase of the research work, quasistatic compression tests were conducted on the expanded polystyrene (EPS crushable foam for material characterisation at low strain rates (8.3×10-3~8.3×10-2 s−1 to obtain the stress strain curves. The resulting stress strain curves are compared well with the ones found in the literature. Numerical analysis of compression tests was carried out to validate them against experimental results. Additionally gravity-driven drop tests were carried out using a long rod projectile with semispherical end that penetrated into the EPS foam block. Long rod projectile drop tests were simulated in LS-DYNA by using suggested parameter enhancements that were able to compute the material damage and failure response precisely. The material parameters adjustment for successful modelling has been reported.

  16. Parametric model of ventilators simulated in OpenFOAM and Elmer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čibera Václav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of presented work was to develop parametric model of a ventilator for CFD and structural analysis. The whole model was designed and scripted in freely available open source programmes in particular in OpenFOAM and Elmer. The main script, which runs or generates other scripts and further control the course of simulation, was written in bash scripting language in Linux environment. Further, the scripts needed for a mesh generation and running of a simulation were prepared using m4 word pre-processor. The use of m4 allowed comfortable set up of the higher amount of scripts. Consequently, the mesh was generated for fluid and solid part of the ventilator within OpenFOAM. Although OpenFOAM offers also a few tools for structural analysis, the mesh of solid parts was transferred into Elmer mesh format with the aim to perform structural analysis in this software. This submitted paper deals namely with part concerning fluid flow through parametrized geometry with different initial conditions. As an example, two simulations were conducted for the same geometric parameters and mesh but for different angular velocity of ventilator rotation.

  17. Parametric model of ventilators simulated in OpenFOAM and Elmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čibera, Václav; Matas, Richard; Sedláček, Jan

    2016-03-01

    The main goal of presented work was to develop parametric model of a ventilator for CFD and structural analysis. The whole model was designed and scripted in freely available open source programmes in particular in OpenFOAM and Elmer. The main script, which runs or generates other scripts and further control the course of simulation, was written in bash scripting language in Linux environment. Further, the scripts needed for a mesh generation and running of a simulation were prepared using m4 word pre-processor. The use of m4 allowed comfortable set up of the higher amount of scripts. Consequently, the mesh was generated for fluid and solid part of the ventilator within OpenFOAM. Although OpenFOAM offers also a few tools for structural analysis, the mesh of solid parts was transferred into Elmer mesh format with the aim to perform structural analysis in this software. This submitted paper deals namely with part concerning fluid flow through parametrized geometry with different initial conditions. As an example, two simulations were conducted for the same geometric parameters and mesh but for different angular velocity of ventilator rotation.

  18. The role of clinically-relevant parameters on the cohesiveness of sclerosing foams in a biomimetic vein model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Dario; Ankrett, Dyan N; O'Byrne, Vincent; Wright, David D I; Lewis, Andrew L; Hill, Martyn; Zhang, Xunli

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported on the development of a biomimetic vein model to measure the performance of sclerosing foams. In this study we employed the model to compare the commercially-available Varithena(®) (polidocanol injectable foam) 1% varicose vein treatment (referred to as polidocanol endovenous microfoam, or PEM) with physician compounded foams (PCFs) made using different foam generation methods (Double Syringe System and Tessari methods) and different foam formulations [liquid to gas ratios of 1:3 or 1:7; gas mixtures composed of 100% CO2, various CO2:O2 mixtures and room air (RA)]. PCFs produced using the DSS method had longer dwell times (DTs) (range 0.54-2.21 s/cm in the 4 mm diameter vein model) than those of the corresponding PCFs produced by the Tessari technique (range 0.29-0.94 s/cm). PEM had the longest DT indicating the best cohesive stability of any of the foams produced (2.92 s/cm). Other biomimetic model variables investigated included effect of vessel size, delayed injection and rate of plug formation (injection speed). When comparing the 4 and 10 mm vessel diameters, the DTs seen in the 10 mm vessel were higher than those observed for the 4 mm vessel, as the vein angle had been reduced to 5° to allow for foam plug formation. PCF foam performance was in the order RA > CO2:O2 (35:65) ≅ CO2:O2 (65:35) > CO2; PEM had a longer DT than all PCFs (22.10 s/cm) except that for RA made by DSS which was similar but more variable. The effect of delayed injection was also investigated and the DT for PEM remained the longest of all foams with the lowest percentage deviation with respect to the mean values, indicating a consistent foam performance. When considering rate of plug formation, PEM consistently produced the longest DTs and this was possible even at low plug expansion rates (mean 29.5 mm/s, minimum 20.9 mm/s). The developed vein model has therefore demonstrated that PEM consistently displays higher foam stability and cohesiveness when compared

  19. Fractional derivative and hereditary combined model for memory effects on flexible polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfarhani, Makram; Jarraya, Abdessalem; Abid, Said; Haddar, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    In a quasi-static regime with cyclic loading, the force-displacement curve of flexible polyurethane exhibits complicated behavior: nonlinearity, visco-elasticity, hysteresis, residual force, etc. Beside nonlinearity and visco-elasticity, this material displays high dependence on the displacement rate and past loading history. Its dependence on compression rate helps to appropriately identify the force-displacement curve. Based on the new curve identification, the overall foam response is assumed to be a composite of a nonlinear elastic component and a visco-elastic component. The elastic component is expressed as a polynomial function in displacement, while the visco-elastic one is formulated according to the hereditary approach to represent the foam visco-elastic damping force during the loading phase and according to the fractional derivative approach during unloading to represent the visco-elastic residual force in the material. The focus of this study was to develop mathematical formulations and identification parameters to faithfully characterize the visco-elastic behavior of flexible polyurethane foam under multi-cycle compressive tests. A parameter calibration methodology based on the separation of the measurement data of each component force was established. This optimization process helps to avoid the parameter values admixture problem during the phase of numeric calculations of the same component force. The validity of the model results is checked according to the simulation accuracy, the physical significance of results and their agreement with the obtained force-displacement curve identification.

  20. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis and Chemical Recycling of Poly(ester-urethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Hayashi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel poly(ester-urethanes were prepared by a synthetic route using a lipase that avoids the use of hazardous diisocyanate. The urethane linkage was formed by the reaction of phenyl carbonate with amino acids and amino alcohols that produced urethane-containing diacids and hydroxy acids, respectively. The urethane diacid underwent polymerization with polyethylene glycol and a,w-alkanediols and also the urethane-containing hydroxy acid monomer was polymerized by the lipase to produce high-molecular-weight poly(ester-urethanes. The periodic introduction of ester linkages into the polyurethane chain by the lipase-catalyzed polymerization afforded chemically recyclable points. They were readily depolymerized in the presence of lipase into cyclic oligomers, which were readily repolymerized in the presence of the same enzyme. Due to the symmetrical structure of the polymers, poly(ester-urethanes synthesized in this study showed higher Tm, Young’s modulus and tensile strength values.

  1. Dielectric and Radiative Properties of Sea Foam at Microwave Frequencies: Conceptual Understanding of Foam Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Gaiser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Foam fraction can be retrieved from space-based microwave radiometric data at frequencies from 1 to 37 GHz. The retrievals require modeling of ocean surface emissivity fully covered with sea foam. To model foam emissivity well, knowledge of foam properties, both mechanical and dielectric, is necessary because these control the radiative processes in foam. We present a physical description of foam dielectric properties obtained from the foam dielectric constant including foam skin depth; foam impedance; wavelength variations in foam thickness, roughness of foam layer interfaces with air and seawater; and foam scattering parameters such as size parameter, and refraction index. Using these, we analyze the scattering, absorption, reflection and transmission in foam and gain insights into why volume scattering in foam is weak; why the main absorption losses are confined to the wet portion of the foam; how the foam impedance matching provides the transmission of electromagnetic radiation in foam and maximizes the absorption; and what is the potential for surface scattering at the foam layers boundaries. We put all these elements together and offer a conceptual understanding for the high, black-body-like emissivity of foam floating on the sea surface. We also consider possible scattering regimes in foam.

  2. mdFoam+: Advanced molecular dynamics in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshaw, S. M.; Borg, M. K.; Ramisetti, S. B.; Zhang, J.; Lockerby, D. A.; Emerson, D. R.; Reese, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper introduces mdFoam+, which is an MPI parallelised molecular dynamics (MD) solver implemented entirely within the OpenFOAM software framework. It is open-source and released under the same GNU General Public License (GPL) as OpenFOAM. The source code is released as a publicly open software repository that includes detailed documentation and tutorial cases. Since mdFoam+ is designed entirely within the OpenFOAM C++ object-oriented framework, it inherits a number of key features. The code is designed for extensibility and flexibility, so it is aimed first and foremost as an MD research tool, in which new models and test cases can be developed and tested rapidly. Implementing mdFoam+ in OpenFOAM also enables easier development of hybrid methods that couple MD with continuum-based solvers. Setting up MD cases follows the standard OpenFOAM format, as mdFoam+ also relies upon the OpenFOAM dictionary-based directory structure. This ensures that useful pre- and post-processing capabilities provided by OpenFOAM remain available even though the fully Lagrangian nature of an MD simulation is not typical of most OpenFOAM applications. Results show that mdFoam+ compares well to another well-known MD code (e.g. LAMMPS) in terms of benchmark problems, although it also has additional functionality that does not exist in other open-source MD codes.

  3. Micromodel foam flow study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  4. Modeling and Validation of the Thermal Response of TDI Encapsulating Foam as a function of Initial Density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, Amanda B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larsen, Marvin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    TDI foams of nominal density from 10 to 45 pound per cubic foot were decomposed within a heated stainless steel container. The pressure in the container and temperatures measured by thermocouples were recorded with each test proceeding to an allowed maximum pressure before venting. Two replicate tests for each of four densities and two orientations in gravity produced very consistent pressure histories. Some thermal responses demonstrate random sudden temperature increases due to decomposition product movement. The pressurization of the container due to the generation of gaseous products is more rapid for denser foams. When heating in the inverted orientation, where gravity is in the opposite direction of the applied heat flux, the liquefied decomposition products move towards the heated plate and the pressure rises more rapidly than in the upright configuration. This effect is present at all the densities tested but becomes more pronounced as density of the foam is decreased. A thermochemical material model implemented in a transient conduction model solved with the finite element method was compared to the test data. The expected uncertainty of the model was estimated using the mean value method and importance factors for the uncertain parameters were estimated. The model that was assessed does not consider the effect of liquefaction or movement of gases. The result of the comparison is that the model uncertainty estimates do not account for the variation in orientation (no gravitational affects are in the model) and therefore the pressure predictions are not distinguishable due to orientation. Temperature predictions were generally in good agreement with the experimental data. Predictions for response locations on the outside of the can benefit from reliable estimates associated with conduction in the metal. For the lighter foams, temperatures measured on the embedded component fall well with the estimated uncertainty intervals indicating the energy transport

  5. Nano-Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund B.; Frances, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Closed cell polyurethane and, particularly, polyisocyanurate foams are a large family of flexible and rigid products the result of a reactive two part process wherein a urethane based polyol is combined with a foaming or "blowing" agent to create a cellular solid at room temperature. The ratio of reactive components, the constituency of the base materials, temperature, humidity, molding, pouring, spraying and many other processing techniques vary greatly. However, there is no known process for incorporating reinforcing fibers small enough to be integrally dispersed within the cell walls resulting in superior final products. The key differentiating aspect from the current state of art resides in the many processing technologies to be fully developed from the novel concept of milled nano pulp aramid fibers and their enabling entanglement capability fully enclosed within the cell walls of these closed cell urethane foams. The authors present the results of research and development of reinforced foam processing, equipment development, strength characteristics and the evolution of its many applications.

  6. Multi-Scale Modeling for Predicting the Stiffness and Strength of Hollow-Structured Metal Foams with Structural Hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was inspired by previous experiments which managed to establish an optimal template-dealloying route to prepare ultralow density metal foams. In this study, we propose a new analytical–numerical model of hollow-structured metal foams with structural hierarchy to predict its stiffness and strength. The two-level model comprises a main backbone and a secondary nanoporous structure. The main backbone is composed of hollow sphere-packing architecture, while the secondary one is constructed of a bicontinuous nanoporous network proposed to describe the nanoscale interactions in the shell. Firstly, two nanoporous models with different geometries are generated by Voronoi tessellation, then the scaling laws of the mechanical properties are determined as a function of relative density by finite volume simulation. Furthermore, the scaling laws are applied to identify the uniaxial compression behavior of metal foams. It is shown that the thickness and relative density highly influence the Young’s modulus and yield strength, and vacancy defect determines the foams being self-supported. The present study provides not only new insights into the mechanical behaviors of both nanoporous metals and metal foams, but also a practical guide for their fabrication and application.

  7. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuard, Adrian M.; Mahmud, Hisham B.; King, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ɷ turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model.

  8. Comparison of Two-Phase Pipe Flow in OpenFOAM with a Mechanistic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuard, Adrian M; Mahmud, Hisham B; King, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase pipe flow is a common occurrence in many industrial applications such as power generation and oil and gas transportation. Accurate prediction of liquid holdup and pressure drop is of vast importance to ensure effective design and operation of fluid transport systems. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study of a two-phase flow of air and water is performed using OpenFOAM. The two-phase solver, interFoam is used to identify flow patterns and generate values of liquid holdup and pressure drop, which are compared to results obtained from a two-phase mechanistic model developed by Petalas and Aziz (2002). A total of 60 simulations have been performed at three separate pipe inclinations of 0°, +10° and -10° respectively. A three dimensional, 0.052m diameter pipe of 4m length is used with the Shear Stress Transport (SST) k - ω turbulence model to solve the turbulent mixtures of air and water. Results show that the flow pattern behaviour and numerical values of liquid holdup and pressure drop compare reasonably well to the mechanistic model. (paper)

  9. Comparison of low-amplitude oscillatory shear in experimental and computational studies of model foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Micah; Krishan, Kapilanjan; Xu, Ning; O'Hern, Corey S; Dennin, Michael

    2009-04-01

    A fundamental difference between fluids and solids is their response to applied shear. Solids possess static shear moduli, while fluids do not. Complex fluids such as foams display an intermediate response to shear with nontrivial frequency-dependent shear moduli. In this paper, we conduct coordinated experiments and numerical simulations of model foams subjected to boundary-driven oscillatory planar shear. Our studies are performed on bubble rafts (experiments) and the bubble model (simulations) in two dimensions. We focus on the low-amplitude flow regime in which T1 events, i.e., bubble rearrangement events where originally touching bubbles switch nearest neighbors, do not occur, yet the system transitions from solid- to liquidlike behavior as the driving frequency is increased. In both simulations and experiments, we observe two distinct flow regimes. At low frequencies omega, the velocity profile of the bubbles increases linearly with distance from the stationary wall, and there is a nonzero total phase shift between the moving boundary and interior bubbles. In this frequency regime, the total phase shift scales as a power law Delta approximately omegan with n approximately 3. In contrast, for frequencies above a crossover frequency omega>omegap, the total phase shift Delta scales linearly with the driving frequency. At even higher frequencies above a characteristic frequency omeganl>omegap, the velocity profile changes from linear to nonlinear. We fully characterize this transition from solid- to liquidlike flow behavior in both the simulations and experiments and find qualitative and quantitative agreements for the characteristic frequencies.

  10. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X H; Kuang, J J; Lu, T J; Han, F S; Kim, T

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase. (paper)

  11. A Novel Foam Contrast Agent Suitable for Fluoroscopic Interventional Procedure: Comparative Study of Physical Properties and Experimental Intervention in Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ho Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In fluoroscopic contrast study for interventional procedure, liquid contrast agent may be diluted in body fluid, losing its contrast effect. We developed a novel contrast agent of “foam state” to maintain contrast effect for enough time and performed a comparative study of physical properties and its usefulness in experimental intervention in animal model. The mean size of microbubble of foam contrast was 13.8±3.6 µm. The viscosity was 201.0±0.624 cP (centipoise and the specific gravity was 0.616. The foam decayed slowly and it had 97.5 minutes of half-life. In terms of the sustainability in a slow flow environment, foam contrast washed out much more slowly than a conventional contrast. In experimental colonic stent placement, foam contrast revealed significantly better results than conventional contrast in procedure time, total amount of contrast usage, and the number of injections (p<0.05. Our foam contrast has high viscosity and low specific gravity and maintains foam state for a sufficient time. Foam contrast with these properties was useful in experimental intervention in animal model. We anticipate that foam contrast may be applied to various kinds of interventional procedures.

  12. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanics of Materials

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  13. SedFoam-2.0: a 3-D two-phase flow numerical model for sediment transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chauchat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a three-dimensional two-phase flow solver, SedFoam-2.0, is presented for sediment transport applications. The solver is extended from twoPhaseEulerFoam available in the 2.1.0 release of the open-source CFD (computational fluid dynamics toolbox OpenFOAM. In this approach the sediment phase is modeled as a continuum, and constitutive laws have to be prescribed for the sediment stresses. In the proposed solver, two different intergranular stress models are implemented: the kinetic theory of granular flows and the dense granular flow rheology μ(I. For the fluid stress, laminar or turbulent flow regimes can be simulated and three different turbulence models are available for sediment transport: a simple mixing length model (one-dimensional configuration only, a k − ε, and a k − ω model. The numerical implementation is demonstrated on four test cases: sedimentation of suspended particles, laminar bed load, sheet flow, and scour at an apron. These test cases illustrate the capabilities of SedFoam-2.0 to deal with complex turbulent sediment transport problems with different combinations of intergranular stress and turbulence models.

  14. Incorporation of the Pore Size Variation to Modeling of the Elastic Behavior of Metallic Open-Cell Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćwieka K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we present the approach for modeling of the elastic behavior of open-cell metallic foams concerning non-uniform pore size distribution. This approach combines design of foam structures and numerical simulations of compression tests using finite element method (FEM. In the design stage, Laguerre-Voronoi tessellations (LVT were performed on several sets of packed spheres with defined variation of radii, bringing about a set of foam structures with porosity ranging from 74 to 98% and different pore size variation quantified by the coefficient of pore volume variation, CV(V, from 0.5 to 2.1. Each structure was numerically subjected to uni-axial compression test along three directions within the elastic region. Basing on the numerical response, the effective Young’s modulus, Eeff, was calculated for each structure. It is shown that the Eeff is not only dependent on the porosity but also on the pore size variation.

  15. Atomic physics modeling of transmission spectra of Sc-doped aerogel foams to support OMEGA experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, H. M., E-mail: hjohns@lanl.gov; Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Fontes, C. J.; Perry, T. S.; Fryer, C. L.; Sherrill, M. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Brown, C. R. D.; Morton, J. W. [AWE Aldermaston, Berkshire, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Hager, J. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lockheed-Martin, 497 Electronics Parkway, Syracuse, New York 13221 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present synthetic transmission spectra generated with PrismSPECT utilizing both the ATBASE model and the Los Alamos opacity library (OPLIB) to evaluate whether an alternative choice in atomic data will impact modeling of experimental data from radiation transport experiments using Sc-doped aerogel foams (ScSi{sub 6}O{sub 12} at 75 mg/cm{sup 3} density). We have determined that in the 50-200 eV T{sub e} range there is a significant difference in the 1s-3p spectra, especially below 100 eV, and for T{sub e} = 200 eV above 5000 eV in photon energy. Examining synthetic spectra generated using OPLIB with 300 resolving power reveals spectral sensitivity to T{sub e} changes of ∼3 eV.

  16. Strain-rate sensitivity of foam materials: A numerical study using 3D image-based finite element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yongle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Realistic simulations are increasingly demanded to clarify the dynamic behaviour of foam materials, because, on one hand, the significant variability (e.g. 20% scatter band of foam properties and the lack of reliable dynamic test methods for foams bring particular difficulty to accurately evaluate the strain-rate sensitivity in experiments; while on the other hand numerical models based on idealised cell structures (e.g. Kelvin and Voronoi may not be sufficiently representative to capture the actual structural effect. To overcome these limitations, the strain-rate sensitivity of the compressive and tensile properties of closed-cell aluminium Alporas foam is investigated in this study by means of meso-scale realistic finite element (FE simulations. The FE modelling method based on X-ray computed tomography (CT image is introduced first, as well as its applications to foam materials. Then the compression and tension of Alporas foam at a wide variety of applied nominal strain-rates are simulated using FE model constructed from the actual cell geometry obtained from the CT image. The stain-rate sensitivity of compressive strength (collapse stress and tensile strength (0.2% offset yield point are evaluated when considering different cell-wall material properties. The numerical results show that the rate dependence of cell-wall material is the main cause of the strain-rate hardening of the compressive and tensile strengths at low and intermediate strain-rates. When the strain-rate is sufficiently high, shock compression is initiated, which significantly enhances the stress at the loading end and has complicated effect on the stress at the supporting end. The plastic tensile wave effect is evident at high strain-rates, but shock tension cannot develop in Alporas foam due to the softening associated with single fracture process zone occurring in tensile response. In all cases the micro inertia of individual cell walls subjected to localised deformation

  17. Rheology of liquid foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehler, R; Cohen-Addad, S

    2005-01-01

    Liquid foams can behave like solids or liquids, depending on the applied stress and on the experimental timescale. Understanding the origin of this complex rheology which gives rise to many applications and which resembles that of many other forms of soft condensed matter made of closely packed soft units requires challenging theoretical questions to be solved. We briefly recall the basic physics and physicochemistry of foams and review the experiments, numerical simulations and theoretical models concerning foam rheology published in recent years. (topical review)

  18. The Effects of Urethane on Rat Outer Hair Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea converts sound vibration into electrical impulses and amplifies the low-level sound signal. Urethane, a widely used anesthetic in animal research, has been shown to reduce the neural responses to auditory stimuli. However, the effects of urethane on cochlea, especially on the function of outer hair cells, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we compared the cochlear microphonic responses between awake and urethane-anesthetized rats. The results revealed that the amplitude of the cochlear microphonic was decreased by urethane, resulting in an increase in the threshold at all of the sound frequencies examined. To deduce the possible mechanism underlying the urethane-induced decrease in cochlear sensitivity, we examined the electrical response properties of isolated outer hair cells using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We found that urethane hyperpolarizes the outer hair cell membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner and elicits larger outward current. This urethane-induced outward current was blocked by strychnine, an antagonist of the α9 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Meanwhile, the function of the outer hair cell motor protein, prestin, was not affected. These results suggest that urethane anesthesia is expected to decrease the responses of outer hair cells, whereas the frequency selectivity of cochlea remains unchanged.

  19. Spontaneous sleep-like brain state alternations and breathing characteristics in urethane anesthetized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pagliardini

    Full Text Available Brain state alternations resembling those of sleep spontaneously occur in rats under urethane anesthesia and they are closely linked with sleep-like respiratory changes. Although rats are a common model for both sleep and respiratory physiology, we sought to determine if similar brain state and respiratory changes occur in mice under urethane. We made local field potential recordings from the hippocampus and measured respiratory activity by means of EMG recordings in intercostal, genioglossus, and abdominal muscles. Similar to results in adult rats, urethane anesthetized mice displayed quasi-periodic spontaneous forebrain state alternations between deactivated patterns resembling slow wave sleep (SWS and activated patterns resembling rapid eye movement (REM sleep. These alternations were associated with an increase in breathing rate, respiratory variability, a depression of inspiratory related activity in genioglossus muscle and an increase in expiratory-related abdominal muscle activity when comparing deactivated (SWS-like to activated (REM-like states. These results demonstrate that urethane anesthesia consistently induces sleep-like brain state alternations and correlated changes in respiratory activity across different rodent species. They open up the powerful possibility of utilizing transgenic mouse technology for the advancement and translation of knowledge regarding sleep cycle alternations and their impact on respiration.

  20. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  1. High Strength Wood-based Sandwich Panels reinforced with fiberglass and foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinghao Li; John F. Hunt; Shaoqin Gong; Zhiyong Cai

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical analysis is presented for new high-strengthsandwich panels made from wood-based phenolic impregnated laminated paper assembled with an interlocking tri-axial ribbed core. Four different panel configurations were tested, including panels with fiberglass fabric bonded to both outside faces with self-expanding urethane foam used to fill the ribbed core. The...

  2. Dynamics of poroelastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Yoel; Sobac, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Soft poroelastic structures are widespread in biological tissues such as cartilaginous joints in bones, blood-filled placentae or plant organs. Here we investigate the dynamics of open elastic foams immersed in viscous fluids, as model soft poroelastic materials. The experiment consists in slowly compacting blocs of polyurethane solid foam embedded in silicon oil-tanks and studying their relaxation to equilibrium when the confining stress is suddenly released. Measurements of the local fluid pressure and foam velocity field are compared with a simple two-phase flow approach. For small initial compactions, the results show quantitative agreement with the classical diffusion theory of soil consolidation (Terzaghi, Biot). On the other hand, for large initial compactions, the dynamics exhibits long relaxation times and decompaction fronts, which are mainly controlled by the highly non-linear mechanical response of the foam. The analogy between this process and the evaporation of a polymer melt close to the glass transition will be briefly discussed.

  3. Border-crossing model for the diffusive coarsening of two-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional wet foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimming, C. D.; Durian, D. J.

    2017-09-01

    For dry foams, the transport of gas from small high-pressure bubbles to large low-pressure bubbles is dominated by diffusion across the thin soap films separating neighboring bubbles. For wetter foams, the film areas become smaller as the Plateau borders and vertices inflate with liquid. So-called "border-blocking" models can explain some features of wet-foam coarsening based on the presumption that the inflated borders totally block the gas flux; however, this approximation dramatically fails in the wet or unjamming limit where the bubbles become close-packed spheres and coarsening proceeds even though there are no films. Here, we account for the ever-present border-crossing flux by a new length scale defined by the average gradient of gas concentration inside the borders. We compute that it is proportional to the geometric average of film and border thicknesses, and we verify this scaling by numerical solution of the diffusion equation. We similarly consider transport across inflated vertices and surface Plateau borders in quasi-two-dimensional foams. And we show how the d A /d t =K0(n -6 ) von Neumann law is modified by the appearance of terms that depend on bubble size and shape as well as the concentration gradient length scales. Finally, we use the modified von Neumann law to compute the growth rate of the average bubble area, which is not constant.

  4. Modeling foam delivery mechanisms in deep vadose-zone remediation using method of characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostapour, A; Kam, S I

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates foam delivery mechanisms in vadose-zone remediation by using Method of Characteristics (MoC), a mathematical tool long been used for the analysis of miscible and immiscible flooding in porous media in petroleum industry. MoC converts the governing material-balance partial differential equations into a series of ordinary differential equations, and the resulting solutions are in a form of wave propagation (more specifically, for chemical species and phase saturations) through the system as a function of time and space. Deep vadose-zone remediation has special features compared to other conventional remediation applications. They include, not limited to, a high level of heterogeneity, a very dry initial condition with low water saturation (S(w)), pollutants such as metals and radionuclides fully dissolved in groundwater, and a serious concern about downward migration during the remediation treatments. For the vadose-zone remediation processes to be successful, the injected aqueous phase should carry chemicals to react with pollutants and precipitate them for immobilization and stabilization purposes. As a result, foams are believed to be an effective means, and understanding foam flow mechanism in situ is a key to the optimal design of field applications. Results show that foam delivery mechanism is indeed very complicated, making the optimum injection condition field-specific. The five major parameters selected (i.e., initial saturation of the medium, injection foam quality, surfactant adsorption, foam strength, and foam stability) are shown to be all important, interacting with each other. Results also imply that although dry foam injection is generally recommended, too dry injection condition is found to hurt this process due to slow foam propagation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. FoamVis, A Visualization System for Foam Research: Design and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan R. Lipsa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Liquid foams are used in areas such as mineral separation, oil recovery, food and beverage production, sanitation and fire fighting. To improve the quality of products and the efficiency of processes in these areas, foam scientists wish to understand and control foam behaviour. To this end, foam scientists have used foam simulations to model foam behaviour; however, analysing these simulations presents difficult challenges. We describe the main foam research challenges and present the design of FoamVis, the only existing visualization, exploration and analysis application created to address them. We describe FoamVis’ main features, together with relevant design and implementation notes. Our goal is to provide a global overview and individual feature implementation details that would allow a visualization scientist to extend the FoamVis system with new algorithms and adapt it to new requirements. The result is a detailed presentation of the software that is not provided in previous visualization research papers.

  6. An elasto-visco-plastic model for immortal foams or emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénito, S; Bruneau, C-H; Colin, T; Gay, C; Molino, F

    2008-03-01

    A variety of complex fluids consists in soft, round objects (foams, emulsions, assemblies of copolymer micelles or of multilamellar vesicles--also known as onions). Their dense packing induces a slight deviation from their preferred circular or spherical shape. As a frustrated assembly of interacting bodies, such a material evolves from one conformation to another through a succession of discrete, topological events driven by finite external forces. As a result, the material exhibits a finite yield threshold. The individual objects usually evolve spontaneously (colloidal diffusion, object coalescence, molecular diffusion), and the material properties under low or vanishing stress may alter with time, a phenomenon known as aging. We neglect such effects to address the simpler behaviour of (uncommon) immortal fluids: we construct a minimal, fully tensorial, rheological model, equivalent to the (scalar) Bingham model. Importantly, the model consistently describes the ability of such soft materials to deform substantially in the elastic regime (be it compressible or not) before they undergo (incompressible) plastic creep--or viscous flow under even higher stresses.

  7. Blast wave mitigation by dry aqueous foam: numerical modelling and experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counilh, Denis; Ballanger, Felix; Rambert, Nicolas; Haas, Jean-Francois; Chinnayya, Aschwin; Lefrancois, Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    Dry aqueous foams (two-phase media with water liquid fraction lower than 5%) are known to mitigate blast wave effects induced by an explosion. The CEA has calibrated his numerical multiphase code MOUSSACA from shock tube and high-explosive experiments. The shock tube experiments have highlighted the foam fragmentation into droplets and the momentum transfer between the liquid and gas phases of the foam. More recently, experiments with hemispheric explosive charges from 3 g to 120 g have provided more findings about the pressure and impulse mitigation properties of foams. We have also taken into account the heat and mass transfer, as well as the droplets secondary breakup, characterized by the Weber number, ratio of inertia over surface tension. Good agreement is found between the calculation and the experiments. co-supervisor of the Felix Ballanger 's doctoral thesis.

  8. Reduced material model for closed cell metal foam infiltrated with phase change material based on high resolution numerical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsenbrügge, Christoph; Marth, Wieland; Navarro y de Sosa, Iñaki; Drossel, Welf-Guntram; Voigt, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Closed cell metal foam sandwich structures were investigated. • High resolution numerical studies were conducted using CT scan data. • A reduced model for use in commercial FE software reduces needed degrees of freedom. • Thermal inertia is increased about 4 to 5 times in PCM filled structures. • The reduced material model was verified using experimental data. - Abstract: The thermal behaviour of closed cell metal foam infiltrated with paraffin wax as latent heat storage for application in high precision tool machines was examined. Aluminium foam sandwiches with metallically bound cover layers were prepared in a powder metallurgical process and cross-sectional images of the structures were generated with X-ray computed tomography. Based on the image data a three dimensional highly detailed model was derived and prepared for simulation with the adaptive FE-library AMDiS. The pores were assumed to be filled with paraffin wax. The thermal conductivity and the transient thermal behaviour in the phase-change region were investigated. Based on the results from the highly detailed simulations a reduced model for use in commercial FE-software (ANSYS) was derived. It incorporates the properties of the matrix and the phase change material into a homogenized material. A sandwich-structure with and without paraffin was investigated experimentally under constant thermal load. The results were used to verify the reduced material model in ANSYS.

  9. Foam patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  10. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  11. Some aspects of image processing using foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Freire, M.V.; Tufaile, A.P.B.

    2014-08-28

    We have explored some concepts of chaotic dynamics and wave light transport in foams. Using some experiments, we have obtained the main features of light intensity distribution through foams. We are proposing a model for this phenomenon, based on the combination of two processes: a diffusive process and another one derived from chaotic dynamics. We have presented a short outline of the chaotic dynamics involving light scattering in foams. We also have studied the existence of caustics from scattering of light from foams, with typical patterns observed in the light diffraction in transparent films. The nonlinear geometry of the foam structure was explored in order to create optical elements, such as hyperbolic prisms and filters. - Highlights: • We have obtained the light scattering in foams using experiments. • We model the light transport in foams using a chaotic dynamics and a diffusive process. • An optical filter based on foam is proposed.

  12. A relative permeability model to derive fractional-flow functions of water-alternating-gas and surfactant-alternating-gas foam core-floods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mossawy, Mohammed Idrees; Demiral, Birol; Raja, D M Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Foam is used in enhanced oil recovery to improve the sweep efficiency by controlling the gas mobility. The surfactant-alternating-gas (SAG) foam process is used as an alternative to the water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection. In the WAG technique, the high mobility and the low density of the gas lead the gas to flow in channels through the high permeability zones of the reservoir and to rise to the top of the reservoir by gravity segregation. As a result, the sweep efficiency decreases and there will be more residual oil in the reservoir. The foam can trap the gas in liquid films and reduces the gas mobility. The fractional-flow method describes the physics of immiscible displacements in porous media. Finding the water fractional flow theoretically or experimentally as a function of the water saturation represents the heart of this method. The relative permeability function is the conventional way to derive the fractional-flow function. This study presents an improved relative permeability model to derive the fractional-flow functions for WAG and SAG foam core-floods. The SAG flow regimes are characterized into weak foam, strong foam without a shock front and strong foam with a shock front. (paper)

  13. A relative permeability model to derive fractional-flow functions of water-alternating-gas and surfactant-alternating-gas foam core-floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees Al-Mossawy, Mohammed; Demiral, Birol; Raja, D. M. Anwar

    2013-04-01

    Foam is used in enhanced oil recovery to improve the sweep efficiency by controlling the gas mobility. The surfactant-alternating-gas (SAG) foam process is used as an alternative to the water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection. In the WAG technique, the high mobility and the low density of the gas lead the gas to flow in channels through the high permeability zones of the reservoir and to rise to the top of the reservoir by gravity segregation. As a result, the sweep efficiency decreases and there will be more residual oil in the reservoir. The foam can trap the gas in liquid films and reduces the gas mobility. The fractional-flow method describes the physics of immiscible displacements in porous media. Finding the water fractional flow theoretically or experimentally as a function of the water saturation represents the heart of this method. The relative permeability function is the conventional way to derive the fractional-flow function. This study presents an improved relative permeability model to derive the fractional-flow functions for WAG and SAG foam core-floods. The SAG flow regimes are characterized into weak foam, strong foam without a shock front and strong foam with a shock front.

  14. Derivation of a Vacuum Refractive Index in a Stringy Space-Time Foam Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Nanopoulos, D V

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that energetic photons propagating in vacuo should experience a non-trivial refractive index due to the foamy structure of space-time induced by quantum-gravitational fluctuations. The sensitivity of recent astrophysical observations, particularly of AGN Mk501 by the MAGIC Collaboration, approaches the Planck scale for a refractive index depending linearly on the photon energy. We present here a new derivation of this quantum-gravitational vacuum refraction index, based on a stringy analogue of the interaction of a photon with internal degrees of freedom in a conventional medium. We model the space-time foam as a gas of D-particles in the bulk space-time of a higher-dimensional cosmology where the observable Universe is a D3-brane. The interaction of an open string representing a photon with a D-particle stretches and excites the string, which subsequently decays and re-emits the photon with a time delay that increases linearly with the photon energy and is related to stringy uncertainty...

  15. Thermal characterization and model free kinetics of aged epoxies and foams using TGA and DSC methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Nissen, April

    2013-10-01

    Two classes of materials, poly(methylene diphenyl diisocyanate) or PMDI foam, and cross-linked epoxy resins, were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to help understand the effects of aging and %E2%80%9Cbake-out%E2%80%9D. The materials were evaluated for mass loss and the onset of decomposition. In some experiments, volatile materials released during heating were analyzed via mass spectroscopy. In all, over twenty materials were evaluated to compare the mass loss and onset temperature for decomposition. Model free kinetic (MFK) measurements, acquired using variable heating rate TGA experiments, were used to calculate the apparent activation energy of thermal decomposition. From these compiled data the effects of aging, bake-out, and sample history on the thermal stability of materials were compared. No significant differences between aged and unaged materials were detected. Bake-out did slightly affect the onset temperature of decomposition but only at the highest bake-out temperatures. Finally, some recommendations for future handling are made.

  16. MALDI-TOF and 13C NMR Analysis of Tannin–Furanic–Polyurethane Foams Adapted for Industrial Continuous Lines Application

    OpenAIRE

    Basso , Maria ,; Pizzi , Antonio; Lacoste , Clément; Delmotte , Luc; Al-Marzouki , Fahad ,; Abdalla , Soliman; Celzard , Alain

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Mixed phenolic-polyurethane-type rigid foams were developed using tannin-furfuryl alcohol natural materials co-reacted with polymeric isocyanate in the proportions imposed by the limitations inherent to continuous industrial plants for polyurethane foams. A variety of different copolymerization oligomers formed. Urethanes appeared to have been formed with two flavonoid tannin sites, mainly at the flavonoid hydroxyl group at C3, but also, although less, on the phenolic ...

  17. Temper Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Fabricated by Expanded Rubber & Plastics Corporation, Temper Foam provides better impact protection for airplane passengers and enhances passenger comfort on long flights because it distributes body weight and pressure evenly over the entire contact area. Called a "memory foam" it matches the contour of the body pressing against it and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. As a shock absorber, a three-inch foam pad has the ability to absorb the impact of a 10-foot fall by an adult. Applications include seat cushioning for transportation vehicles, padding for furniture and a variety of athletic equipment medical applications including wheelchair padding, artificial limb socket lining, finger splint and hand padding for burn patients, special mattresses for the bedridden and dental stools. Production and sales rights are owned by Temper Foam, Inc. Material is manufactured under license by the Dewey and Almy Division of Grace Chemical Corporation. Distributors of the product are Kees Goebel Medical Specialties, Inc. and Alimed, Inc. They sell Temper Foam in bulk to the fabricators who trim it to shapes required by their customers.

  18. Analytic Model for Predicting the Permeability of Foam-type Wick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Ich-Long; Byon, Chan [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Wicks play an important role in determining the thermal performance of heat pipes. Foam-type wicks are known to have good potential for enhancing the capillary performance of conventional types of wicks, and this is because of their high porosity and permeability. In this study, we develop an analytic expression for predicting the permeability of a foam-type wick based on extensive numerical work. The proposed correlation is based on the modified Kozeny-Carman’s equation, where the Kozeny-Carman coefficient is given as an exponential function of porosity. The proposed correlations are shown to predict the previous experimental results well for an extensive parametric range. The permeability of the foam-type wick is shown to be significantly higher than that of conventional wicks because of their high porosity.

  19. Comparative stability of sodium tetradecyl sulphate (STD) and polidocanol foam: impact on vein damage in an in-vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAree, B; Ikponmwosa, A; Brockbank, K; Abbott, C; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S; Gough, M J

    2012-06-01

    To compare the half-life of STD and polidocanol air-based foams and the damage they inflict upon human great saphenous vein in an in-vitro model. The time for the volume of 3% STD and polidocanol foams to reduce by 10% (T(90)) and 50% (T(50)) was recorded in an incubator at 37 °C. Segments of proximal GSV harvested during varicose vein surgery were filled with foam for 5 or 15 min. Histological analysis determined percentage endothelial cell loss and depth of media injury. Median (±IQR) T(90) and T(50) for polidocanol were 123.3 s (111.7-165.6) and 266.3 s (245.6-383.1) versus 102.03 s (91.1-112) and 213.13 s (201-231.6) for STD (T(90)p = 0.008, T(50)p = 0.004). Median endothelial loss with polidocanol was; 63.5% (62.2-82.8) and 85.9% (83.8-92.5) versus 86.3% (84.8-93.7) and 97.64% (97.3-97.8) for STD after 5 and 15 min (p = 0.076 and p = 0.009). The median depth and % media thickness injured were 0 μm (0-0 μm) and 0% for both assessments with polidocanol versus 37.4 μm (35.3-45.8 and 43.4 μm (42.1-46.7) and 3.5% (3.1-3.6) and 5.3% (3.7-6.0) after 5 and 15 min for STD (p STD foam perhaps remaining in the vein for longer, endothelial cell loss and damage to the media were significantly greater with STD. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Dynamic Property of Aluminum Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Irie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum in the foam of metallic foam is in the early stage of industrialization. It has various beneficial characteristics such as being lightweight, heat resistance, and an electromagnetic radiation shield. Therefore, the use of aluminum foam is expected to reduce the weight of equipment for transportation such as the car, trains, and aircraft. The use as energy absorption material is examined. Moreover aluminum foam can absorb the shock wave, and decrease the shock of the blast. Many researchers have reported about aluminum foam, but only a little information is available for high strain rates (103 s-1 or more. Therefore, the aluminum foam at high strain rates hasn't been not characterized yet. The purpose in this research is to evaluate the behavior of the aluminum form in the high-strain rate. In this paper, the collision test on high strain rate of the aluminum foam is investigated. After experiment, the numerical analysis model will be made. In this experiment, a powder gun was used to generate the high strain rate in aluminum foam. In-situ PVDF gauges were used for measuring pressure and the length of effectiveness that acts on the aluminum foam. The aluminum foam was accelerated to about 400 m/s from deflagration of single component powder and the foam were made to collide with the PVDF gauge. The high strain rate deformation of the aluminum form was measured at two collision speeds. As for the result, pressure was observed to go up rapidly when about 70% was compressed. From this result, it is understood that complete crush of the cell is caused when the relative volume is about 70%. In the next stage, this data will be compared with the numerical analysis.

  1. Foaming in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-10-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them several properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless, the same mechanism, nucleation by gas pockets trapped in cellulose fibers, responsible for foaming in carbonated drinks is active in stout beers, but at an impractically slow rate. This gentle rate of bubble nucleation makes stout beers an excellent model system for investigating the nucleation of gas bubbles. The equipment needed is modest, putting such experiments within reach of undergraduate laboratories. We also consider the suggestion that a widget could be constructed by coating the inside of a beer can with cellulose fibers.

  2. Implementation of k-kL-omega turbulence model for compressible flow into OpenFOAM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kožíšek, Martin; Fürst, J.; Příhoda, Jaromír; Doerffer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 821, Januar (2016), s. 63-69 ISSN 1662-7482 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/12/1271; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03020277 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : CFD * openFOAM * RANS * transition * turbulence Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  3. Computational modelling of the complex dynamics of chemically blown polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireka, I. E.; Niedziela, D.; Schäfer, K.; Tröltzsch, J.; Steiner, K.; Helbig, F.; Chinyoka, T.; Kroll, L.

    2015-11-01

    This study presents computational analysis of the complex dynamics observed in chemically blown polyurethane foams during reaction injection molding process. The mathematical formulation introduces an experimentally motivated non-divergence free setup for the continuity equations which reflects the self expanding behaviour observed in the physical system. The foam growth phenomena which is normally initiated by adequate pre-mixing of necessary reactant polymers, leading to an exothermic polymerization reaction, bubble nucleation, and gas formation, is captured numerically. We assume the dependence of material viscosity on the degree of cure/polymerization, gas volume fraction, and temperature as well as non-dependence of mixture density on pressure. The set of unsteady nonlinear coupled partial differential equations describing the dynamics of the system are solved numerically for state variables using finite volume techniques such that the front of the flow is tracked with high resolution interface capturing schemes. Graphical representation of the foam volume fraction, evolution of foam heights, and temperature distributions is presented. Results from our simulations are validated with experimental data. These results show good quantitative agreement with observations from experiments.

  4. Skeleton-and-bubble model of polyether-polyurethane elastic open-cell foams for finite element analysis at large deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuwala, Tapan; Gioia, Gustavo

    2013-03-01

    We formulate a new micromechanical model of elastic open-cell (EOC) foams. In this model, the usual skeleton of open-cell foams is supplemented by fitting a thin-walled bubble within each cavity of the skeleton, as a substitute for the membranes that occlude the "windows" of the foam cells in polyether-polyurethane EOC foams. The model has nine parameters; each parameter has a clear geometrical or mechanical significance, and its value may be readily estimated for any given foam. To calibrate the model, we carry out fully nonlinear, three-dimensional finite-element simulations of the experiments of Dai et al. (2011a), in which a set of five polyether-polyurethane EOC foams covering a range of commercially available relative densities was tested under compression along the rise direction, compression along a transverse direction, tension along the rise direction, simple shear combined with compression along the rise direction, and hydrostatic pressure combined with compression along the rise direction. We show that, with a suitable choice of the values of the parameters of the model, the model is capable of reproducing the most salient trends evinced in the experimental stress-stretch curves. Yet the model can no longer reproduce all of these trends if the bubbles be excluded from the model, and we conclude that the bubbles play a crucial role at large deformations. We also show that the stretch fields that obtain in our computational simulations are in good accord with the digital-image-correlation (DIC) measurements of Dai et al. For simple shear combined with compression along the rise direction, the DIC measurements of Dai et al. prove insufficient to our purposes, and we carry out DIC measurements of our own. To demonstrate the performance of the model in a typical application of polyether-polyurethane EOC foams, we carry out experiments and simulations of foam specimens loaded through a cylindrical punch and a spherical punch. We conclude the paper with a

  5. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The

  6. Modeling the progressive axial crushing of foam-filled aluminum tubes using smooth particle hydrodynamics and coupled finite element model/smooth particle hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Aktay, Levent; Johnson, Alastair F.; Toksoy, Ahmet Kaan; Kröplin, Bernd Helmut; Güden, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    As alternatives to the classical finite element model (FEM), a meshless smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, in which the discrete particles represent a solid domain, and a coupled FEM/SPH modeling technique were investigated for the numerical simulation of the quasi-static axial crushing of polystyrene foam-filled aluminum thin-walled aluminum tubes. The results of numerical simulations, load-deformation histories, fold lengths and specific absorbed energies, were found to show satisf...

  7. Modeled and Measured Dynamics of a Composite Beam with Periodically Varying Foam Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Schiller, Noah H.; Roberts Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of a sandwich beam with carbon fiber composite facesheets and foam core with periodic variations in material properties are studied. The purpose of the study is to compare finite element predictions with experimental measurements on fabricated beam specimens. For the study, three beams were fabricated: one with a compliant foam core, a second with a stiffer core, and a third with the two cores alternating down the length of the beam to create a periodic variation in properties. This periodic variation produces a bandgap in the frequency domain where vibrational energy does not readily propagate down the length of the beam. Mode shapes and natural frequencies are compared, as well as frequency responses from point force input to velocity response at the opposite end of the beam.

  8. Stress wave propagation and mitigation in two polymeric foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradel, Pierre; Malaise, Frederic; Cadilhon, Baptiste; Quessada, Jean-Hugues; de Resseguier, Thibaut; Delhomme, Catherine; Le Blanc, Gael

    2017-06-01

    Polymeric foams are widely used in industry for thermal insulation or shock mitigation. This paper investigates the ability of a syntactic epoxy foam and an expanded polyurethane foam to mitigate intense (several GPa) and short duration (buckling of the matrix and damage of the structure. In the epoxy foam, the compaction is due to the crushing of glass microspheres. Two porous material models successfully represent the macroscopic response of these polymeric foams.

  9. Processing and properties of advanced metallic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Alan Harold

    precursors, and the other based on nonuniform chemical milling of uniform foams, and each method is demonstrated through the production of low-density aluminum foams having simple model density gradients.

  10. Modeling Phase Change Material in Micro-Foam Under Constant Temperature Condition (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    is a body -centered-cubic (BCC) lattice embedded with spherical micro-pores. Two different simulation methodologies were applied. One is the high...numerically studied. A high constant temperature was specified at the top surface of the structure. Each unit of the micro-foam is a body -centered-cubic...Methods for predicting the thermal conductivity of composite sytems : a review, Polymer Engineering & Science 16 (9) (1976) 615–625. [16] X. Hu, S.S

  11. Physical and performance properties of coal tar urethanes - pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickney, J.; Hendry, M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review certain physical properties of coal tar extended urethane coatings designed specifically for use in the pipe coatings market. The blend of coal tar and urethane resins provides a novel finished product with properties cumulatively inherent in its constituents. Typically, coal tar and coal tar pitch offer exceptional water resistance and cathodic alkali resistance when blended with other resins. An example is the standard coal tar epoxies used for many years in the marine markets for shipbottoms

  12. Modeling and Simulation of the Hydrogenation of α-Methylstyrene on Catalytically Active Metal Foams as Tubular Reactor Packing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Lali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a one-dimensional reactor model for a tubular reactor packed with a catalytically active foam packing with a pore density of 30 PPI in cocurrent upward flow in the example of hydrogenation reaction of α-methylstyrene to cumene. This model includes material, enthalpy, and momentum balances as well as continuity equations. The model was solved within the parameter space applied for experimental studies under assumption of a bubbly flow. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was applied. For isothermal and polytropic processes and steady state conditions, axial profiles for concentration, temperature, fluid velocities, pressure, and liquid holdup were computed and the conversions for various gas and liquid flow rates were validated with experimental results. The obtained results were also compared in terms of space time yield and catalytic activity with experimental results and stirred tank and also with random packed bed reactor. The comparison shows that the application of solid foams as reactor packing is advantageous compared to the monolithic honeycombs and random packed beds.

  13. Euler-Lagrangian Model of Particle Motion and Deposition Effects in Electro-Static Fields based on OpenFoam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boiger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the powder coating process of metal substrates, a comprehensive, numerical 3D Eulerian-LaGrangian model, featuring two particle sub-models, has been developed. The model considers the effects of electro-static, fluid-dynamic and gravity forces. The code has been implemented in C++ within the open source CFD platform OpenFoam®, is transient in nature with respect to the applied LaGrangian particle implementation and the electro-static field calculation and is stationary regarding fluid-dynamic phenomena. Qualitative validation of the developed solver has already been achieved by comparison to simple coating experiments and will hereby be presented alongside a thorough description of the model itself. Upon combining knowledge of the relevant dimensionless groups and the numerical model, a dimensionless chart, representing all possible states of coating, was populated with comprehensive, exemplary cases, which are shown here as well.

  14. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of gelatin based polyester urethane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Polyester urethane; scaffold; tensile strength; swelling; degradation; cell culture. 1. Introduction. The development of tissue engineering devices and cell- based artificial organs requires a large number of cells to be cultured for the replacement of the damaged tissue. Porous biodegradable polymeric scaffolds would be ideal.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of gelatin based polyester urethane ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    After 48 h, the culture plates were analysed under microscope for cell growth pattern as well as their adhesion and spreading. 3. Results and discussion. 3.1 Synthesis of gelatin based polyester urethane scaffold. The main objective of this investigation was to design and synthesize some novel biodegradable polyurethane.

  17. Role of foam drainage in producing protein aggregates in foam fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhang, Yuran; Chang, Yunkang; Wu, Zhaoliang; Wang, Yanji; Chen, Xiang'e; Wang, Tao

    2017-10-01

    It is essential to obtain a clear understanding of the foam-induced protein aggregation to reduce the loss of protein functionality in foam fractionation. The major effort of this work is to explore the roles of foam drainage in protein aggregation in the entire process of foam fractionation with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein. The results show that enhancing foam drainage increased the desorption of BSA molecules from the gas-liquid interface and the local concentration of desorbed molecules in foam. Therefore, it intensified the aggregation of BSA in foam fractionation. Simultaneously, it also accelerated the flow of BSA aggregates from rising foam into the residual solution along with the drained liquid. Because enhancing foam drainage increased the relative content of BSA molecules adsorbed at the gas-liquid interface, it also intensified the aggregation of BSA during both the defoaming process and the storage of the foamate. Furthermore, enhancing foam drainage more readily resulted in the formation of insoluble BSA aggregates. The results are highly important for a better understanding of foam-induced protein aggregation in foam fractionation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of a new foam formulation of ketoprofen lysine salt in experimental models of inflammation and hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffonchio, L; Bestetti, A; Clavenna, G; Fedele, G; Ferrari, M P; Omini, C

    1995-05-01

    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic profile of a new topical foam formulation of ketoprofen lysine salt (CAS 57469-78-0, Artrosilene Schiuma, KLS-foam) was characterized in comparison with marketed gel formulations containing KLS (KLS-gel) or diclofenac diethylammonium salt (DCF-gel). KLS-foam dose-dependently inhibited oedema formation and hyperalgesia induced by subplantar injection of carrageenan or substance P, being more potent than KLS-gel. At equieffective anti-inflammatory doses, KLS-foam provided a more pronounced analgesic effect than DCF-gel. KLS-foam also markedly inhibited exudate formation and prostaglandin production induced by subcutaneous implantation of carrageenan soaked sponges. In carrageenan induced paw inflammation, KLS-foam provided the same anti-inflammatory effect as orally administered KLS, but induced significantly less gastric damages. Oral administration of KLS resulted in sustained systemic absorption of ketoprofen, whereas after topical application of KLS-foam no appreciable ketoprofen plasma levels were detected. These data support the anti-inflammatory and particularly the analgesic effectiveness of the new foam formulation of KLS, a finding that, together with the high gastric tolerability, further emphasizes the usefulness of KLS-foam in the treatment of localized flogistic diseases and associated pain.

  19. Analysis of Effective Interconnectivity of DegraPol-foams Designed for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Hall

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many wounds heal slowly and are difficult to manage. Therefore Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT was developed where polymer foams are applied and a defined negative pressure removes wound fluid, reduces bacterial burden and increases the formation of granulation tissue. Although NPWT is used successfully, its mechanisms are not well understood. In particular, different NPWT dressings were never compared. Here a poly-ester urethane Degrapol® (DP-foam was produced and compared with commercially available dressings (polyurethane-based and polyvinyl-alcohol-based in terms of apparent pore sizes, swelling and effective interconnectivity of foam pores. DP-foams contain relatively small interconnected pores; PU-foams showed large pore size and interconnectivity; whereas PVA-foams displayed heterogeneous and poorly interconnected pores. PVA-foams swelled by 40 %, whereas DP- and PU-foams remained almost without swelling. Effective interconnectivity was investigated by submitting fluorescent beads of 3, 20 and 45 mm diameter through the foams. DP- and PU-foams removed 70-90 % of all beads within 4 h, independent of the bead diameter or bead pre-adsorption with serum albumin. For PVA-foams albumin pre-adsorbed beads circulated longer, where 20 % of 3 mm and 10 % of 20 mm diameter beads circulated after 96 h. The studies indicate that efficient bead perfusion does not only depend on pore size and swelling capacity, but effective interconnectivity might also depend on chemical composition of the foam itself. In addition due to the efficient sieve-effect of the foams uptake of wound components in vivo might occur only for short time suggesting other mechanisms being decisive for success of NPWT.

  20. Nanostructured metal foams: synthesis and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Erik P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tappan, Bryce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mueller, Alex [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volz, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cardenas, Andreas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veauthier, Jackie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of monolithic metallic nanoporous materials is difficult using conventional methodology. Here they report a relatively simple method of synthesizing monolithic, ultralow density, nanostructured metal foams utilizing self-propagating combustion synthesis of novel metal complexes containing high nitrogen energetic ligands. Nanostructured metal foams are formed in a post flame-front dynamic assembly with densities as low as 0.011 g/cc and surface areas as high as 270 m{sup 2}/g. They have produced metal foams via this method of titanium, iron, cobalt, nickel, zirconium, copper, palladium, silver, hafnium, platinum and gold. Microstructural features vary as a function of composition and process parameters. Applications for the metal foams are discussed including hydrogen absorption in palladium foams. A model for the sorption kinetics of hydrogen in the foams is presented.

  1. Finite element modeling for predicting the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wookjin; Won, Byeong Hee; Cho, Seong Wook

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we generated finite element (FE) models to predict the contact pressure between a foam mattress and the human body in a supine position. Twenty-year-old males were used for three-dimensional scanning to produce the FE human models, which was composed of skin and muscle tissue. A linear elastic isotropic material model was used for the skin, and the Mooney-Rivlin model was used for the muscle tissue because it can effectively represent the nonlinear behavior of muscle. The contact pressure between the human model and the mattress was predicted by numerical simulation. The human models were validated by comparing the body pressure distribution obtained from the same human subject when he was lying on two different mattress types. The experimental results showed that the slope of the lower part of the mattress caused a decrease in the contact pressure at the heels, and the effect of bone structure was most pronounced in the scapula. After inserting a simple structure to function as the scapula, the contact pressure predicted by the FE human models was consistent with the experimental body pressure distribution for all body parts. These results suggest that the models proposed in this paper will be useful to researchers and designers of products related to the prevention of pressure ulcers.

  2. dsmcFoam+: An OpenFOAM based direct simulation Monte Carlo solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Borg, M. K.; Scanlon, T. J.; Longshaw, S. M.; John, B.; Emerson, D. R.; Reese, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    dsmcFoam+ is a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solver for rarefied gas dynamics, implemented within the OpenFOAM software framework, and parallelised with MPI. It is open-source and released under the GNU General Public License in a publicly available software repository that includes detailed documentation and tutorial DSMC gas flow cases. This release of the code includes many features not found in standard dsmcFoam, such as molecular vibrational and electronic energy modes, chemical reactions, and subsonic pressure boundary conditions. Since dsmcFoam+ is designed entirely within OpenFOAM's C++ object-oriented framework, it benefits from a number of key features: the code emphasises extensibility and flexibility so it is aimed first and foremost as a research tool for DSMC, allowing new models and test cases to be developed and tested rapidly. All DSMC cases are as straightforward as setting up any standard OpenFOAM case, as dsmcFoam+ relies upon the standard OpenFOAM dictionary based directory structure. This ensures that useful pre- and post-processing capabilities provided by OpenFOAM remain available even though the fully Lagrangian nature of a DSMC simulation is not typical of most OpenFOAM applications. We show that dsmcFoam+ compares well to other well-known DSMC codes and to analytical solutions in terms of benchmark results.

  3. Adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  4. Faraday instability at foam-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfort, A; Caps, H

    2012-12-01

    A nearly two-dimensional foam is generated inside a Hele-shaw cell and left at rest on its liquid bath. The system is then vertically shaken and, above a well-defined acceleration threshold, surface waves appear at the foam-liquid interface. Those waves are shown to be subharmonic. The acceleration threshold is studied and compared to the common liquid-gas case, emphasizing the energy dissipation inside the foam. An empirical model is proposed for this energy loss, accounting for the foam characteristics such as the bubble size but also the excitation parameter, namely the linear velocity.

  5. Degradation Mechanisms of Poly(ester urethane) Elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgar, Alexander S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-30

    This report describes literature regarding the degradation mechanisms associated with a poly(ester urethane) block copolymer, Estane® 5703 (Estane), used in conjunction with Nitroplasticizer (NP), and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane, also known as high molecular weight explosive (HMX) to produce polymer bonded explosive PBX 9501. Two principal degradation mechanisms are reported: NO2 oxidative reaction with the urethane linkage resulting in crosslinking and chain scission events, and acid catalyzed hydrolysis of the ester linkage. This report details future work regarding this PBX support system, to be conducted in late 2017 and 2018 at Engineered Materials Group (MST-7), Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. This is the first of a series of three reports on the degradation processes and trends of the support materials of PBX 9501.

  6. Preparation of Novel Hydrolyzing Urethane Modified Thiol-Ene Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    water to cleave covalent bonds and result in the degradation of the local network. If designed to erode at the coating-water interface rather than in...chloroform at 50 wt %. The dibutyltin dilaurate catalyst was added at 0.1 wt % of total solids to the ethylene glycol vinyl ether solution. The...elastomers, copolymers and ionomers . Prog. Mater. Sci. 2007, 52, 915-1015. 19. Bruchmann, B. Dendritic polymers based on urethane chemistry—Syntheses

  7. Implementation and application of the actuator line model by OpenFOAM for a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, L.; Giljarhus, K.-E.; Hjertager, B.; Kalvig, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    University of Stavanger has started The Smart Sustainable Campus & Energy Lab project, to gain knowledge and facilitate project based education in the field of renewable and sustainable energy and increase the research effort in the same area. This project includes the future installation of a vertical axis wind turbine on the campus roof. A newly developed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model by OpenFOAM have been implemented to study the wind behavior over the building and the turbine performance. The online available wind turbine model case from Bachant, Goude and Wosnik from 2016 is used as the starting point. This is a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) case set up that uses the Actuator Line Model. The available test case considers a water tank with controlled external parameters. Bachant et al.’s model has been modified to study a VAWT in the atmospheric boundary layer. Various simulations have been performed trying to verify the models use and suitability. Simulation outcomes help to understand the impact of the surroundings on the turbine as well as its reaction to parameters changes. The developed model can be used for wind energy and flow simulations for both onshore and offshore applications.

  8. Bubble and foam chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pugh, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    This indispensable guide will equip the reader with a thorough understanding of the field of foaming chemistry. Assuming only basic theoretical background knowledge, the book provides a straightforward introduction to the principles and properties of foams and foaming surfactants. It discusses the key ideas that underpin why foaming occurs, how it can be avoided and how different degrees of antifoaming can be achieved, and covers the latest test methods, including laboratory and industrial developed techniques. Detailing a variety of different kinds of foams, from wet detergents and food foams, to polymeric, material and metal foams, it connects theory to real-world applications and recent developments in foam research. Combining academic and industrial viewpoints, this book is the definitive stand-alone resource for researchers, students and industrialists working on foam technology, colloidal systems in the field of chemical engineering, fluid mechanics, physical chemistry, and applied physics.

  9. Comparison of thiopental, urethane, and pentobarbital in the study of experimental cardiology in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorniak, Michal; Mitrega, Katarzyna; Bialka, Szymon; Porc, Maurycy; Krzeminski, Tadeusz F

    2010-07-01

    Despite earlier research studying the influence of anesthetics in arrhythmia models, a lot of controversy remains. The aim was to compare the influence of three anesthetics (60 mg/kg thiopental, 1200 mg/kg urethane, 60 mg/kg pentobarbital intraperitoneally) on ventricular arrhythmias and to combine it with measured hemodynamic parameters to find the most suitable agent for such experiments. In the model of ischemia- and reperfusion-induced arrhythmias in Sprague-Dawley rats, after left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion (7 minutes) and reperfusion (15 minutes), the following parameters have been measured or calculated: mortality index; ventricular fibrillation and tachycardia incidence and duration; systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure; heart rate; myocardial index of oxygen consumption; and plasma creatine kinase concentration. Evident depressive action of urethane on heart rate, blood pressures, and myocardial index of oxygen consumption should be reason enough to exclude it from use in such studies. Pentobarbital had no effect on arrhythmias, whereas thiopental was antiarrhythmic. Pentobarbital is the most suitable anesthetic offering stable hemodynamic values during arrhythmia studies. These hemodynamic values, which were similar to physiological values in awake rats, the long arrhythmia duration during reperfusion and approximately 50% mortality index are crucial parameters for evaluating antiarrhythmic drugs.

  10. Global Functional Connectivity Differences between Sleep-Like States in Urethane Anesthetized Rats Measured by fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Zhurakovskaya

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for nervous system functioning and sleep disorders are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the macroscale connectivity changes in brain networking during different sleep states are poorly understood. One of the hindering factors is the difficulty to combine functional connectivity investigation methods with spontaneously sleeping animals, which prevents the use of numerous preclinical animal models. Recent studies, however, have implicated that urethane anesthesia can uniquely induce different sleep-like brain states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM (NREM sleep, in rodents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess changes in global connectivity and topology between sleep-like states in urethane anesthetized rats, using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging. We detected significant changes in corticocortical (increased in NREM-like state and corticothalamic connectivity (increased in REM-like state. Additionally, in graph analysis the modularity, the measure of functional integration in the brain, was higher in NREM-like state than in REM-like state, indicating a decrease in arousal level, as in normal sleep. The fMRI findings were supported by the supplementary electrophysiological measurements. Taken together, our results show that macroscale functional connectivity changes between sleep states can be detected robustly with resting-state fMRI in urethane anesthetized rats. Our findings pave the way for studies in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases where sleep abnormalities are often one of the first markers for the disorder development.

  11. Fluorocarbon chain end-capped poly(carbonate urethane)s as biomaterials: blood compatibility and chemical stability assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xingyi; Wang, Ruifang; Li, Jiehua; Luo, Liang; Wen, Da; Zhong, Yinping; Zhao, Changsheng

    2009-04-01

    Previous work has shown the synthesis of fluorocarbon chain (CF(3)(CF(2))(6)CH(2)O-) end-capped poly(carbonate urethane)s (FPCUs) and confirmed the presence of a novel bilayered surface structure in FPCUs, that is, the top fluorocarbon and subsurface hard segment layers (Xie et al., J Biomed Mater Res Part A 2008; 84:30-43). In this work, the effects of such surface structure on blood compatibility were investigated using hemolytic test and platelet adhesion analysis. The chemical stability of the polymers was also determined by Zhao's glass wool-H(2)O(2)/CoCl(2) test and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH = 3.1-3.3) treatment. One of the FPCUs, FPCU-A, and two control materials, a poly(ether urethane) (PEU) and a poly(carbonate urethane) (PCU), were investigated. No significant difference in hemolytic indices was observed among the three materials, whereas the adherent density and deformation of platelets were much lower on FPCU-A compared with on PCU and PEU. Severe surface cracking and surface buckling developed in prestressed PEU and PCU films after H(2)O(2)/CoCl(2) treatment, respectively, whereas smooth surface was observed for the FPCU-A. PBS incubation resulted in parallel ridge-like morphology in PCU whereas PEU and FPCU-A retained their smooth surfaces. Under relatively high stress conditions, all the materials developed well-oriented strip-like surface patterns. Results from ATR-FTIR spectra revealed a surface oxidation mechanism as described in literature. However, observations of universal decrease of molecular weights under stress conditions further suggested the presence of another bulk stress oxidation mechanism. Regardless the degradation mechanisms involved, the unique bilayered surface structure really improved the blood compatibility and chemical stability of FPCU-A, indicating that further in vivo investigations are worthwhile.

  12. Synthesis of phosphorus-containing polyurethanes and poly(urethane-acrylate)s

    OpenAIRE

    SÜDEMEN, MAHİR BURAK; ÖNEN, HACER AYŞEN

    2017-01-01

    Solvent-based polyurethanes and poly(urethane-acrylate)s were synthesized using phosphorus-containing polyester polyols in order to compare the thermal properties of different polymer types. Since the location of the phosphorus group might have vital importance when comparing the thermal properties, phosphorus groups were kept on the pendant chains in poly(urethane-acrylate)s using phosphorus-containing urethane macromonomers while they were kept on the backbone in polyurethanes. The effect o...

  13. Foams theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Saad A

    1996-01-01

    This volume discusses the physics and physical processes of foam and foaming. It delineates various measurement techniques for characterizing foams and foam properties as well as the chemistry and application of foams. The use of foams in the textile industry, personal care products, enhanced oil recovery, firefighting and mineral floatation are highlighted, and the connection between the microstructure and physical properties of foam are detailed. Coverage includes nonaqueous foams and silicone antifoams, and more.

  14. Rigid polyurethane/oil palm fibre biocomposite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alis, Adilah; Majid, Rohah A.; Nasir, Izzah Athirah Ahmad; Mustaffa, Nor Syatika; Hassan, Wan Hasamuddin Wan

    2017-07-01

    Rigid polyurethane (PU) biocomposite foam had been successfully prepared by reacting palm oil-derived polyol (PO-p) with polymeric 4, 4-diphenylmethane diisocynate (p-MDI). Two types of alkali-treated oil palm fibres namely, empty fruit bunch (EFB) and palm pressed fibre (PPF) were used as fillers to be incorporated into PU foam at 2.5 wt%, 5 wt% and 7.5 wt% fibre loadings. The effects of these fibres on surface morphology, compressive strength and thermal transition behaviours of biocomposite foams were investigated. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis confirmed the formation of urethane linkages (-NHCOO) in all samples at 1530-1540 cm-1. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed the average melting peak temperature (Tm) of biocomposite foams (132°C) were lower Tm than that of pure PU foam (161.67°C) and the increase amount of fibres did not give significant effect on the Tm of both biocomposite systems. Meanwhile, the microscopic images of PU-PPF foams exhibited smaller and uniform cell size morphologies compared with the PU-EFB foams that had coarse and irregular cell sizes, especially at 7.5wt% EFB. These findings were manifested with the gradually increase of compressive strength of PU-PPF at all PPF ratios while for PU-EFB system, the compressive strength increased up to 5 wt% before reduced at 7.5 wt% loading. It was thought due to the residual oil in PPF fibre had plasticized the PU matrix to a little extent, thus helping the dispersion of PPF fibre across the matrix.

  15. MALDI-TOF and 13C NMR Analysis of Tannin–Furanic–Polyurethane Foams Adapted for Industrial Continuous Lines Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecilia Basso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed phenolic-polyurethane-type rigid foams were developed using tannin-furfuryl alcohol natural materials co-reacted with polymeric isocyanate in the proportions imposed by the limitations inherent to continuous industrial plants for polyurethane foams. A variety of different copolymerization oligomers formed. Urethanes appeared to have been formed with two flavonoid tannin sites, mainly at the flavonoid hydroxyl group at C3, but also, although less, on the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the flavonoid oligomers. Urethanes are also formed with (i glyoxal in the formulation, be it pre-reacted or not with the tannin; (ii with phenolsulfonic acid and (iii with furfural. This latter one, however, greatly favors reaction with the A-ring of the flavonoids through a methylene bridge rather than reaction with the isocyanate groups to form urethanes. All of the materials appeared to have co-reacted in a manner to form urethane and methylene bridges between all of the main components used. Thus, the tannin, the furfuryl alcohol, the isocyanate, the glyoxal and even the phenol sulfonic acid hardener formed a number of mixed species linked by the two bridge types. Several mixed species comprised of 2, 3 and even 4 co-reacted different components have been observed.

  16. Characterization of the degradation mechanisms of lysine-derived aliphatic poly(ester urethane) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeman, Andrea E; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Zachman, Angela L; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of the viscoelastic mechanical properties of polycarbonate urethane for medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Agnes; Heider, Yousef; Stoffel, Marcus; Markert, Bernd

    2018-03-09

    The underlying research work introduces a study of the mechanical properties of polycarbonate urethane (PCU), used in the construction of various medical devices. This comprises the discussion of a suitable material model, the application of elemental experiments to identify the related parameters and the numerical simulation of the applied experiments in order to calibrate and validate the mathematical model. In particular, the model of choice for the simulation of PCU response is the non-linear viscoelastic Bergström-Boyce material model, applied in the finite-element (FE) package Abaqus®. For the parameter identification, uniaxial tension and unconfined compression tests under in-laboratory physiological conditions were carried out. The geometry of the samples together with the applied loadings were simulated in Abaqus®, to insure the suitability of the modelling approach. The obtained parameters show a very good agreement between the numerical and the experimental results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Rossen

    2003-03-31

    . We find that such behavior is consistent with earlier models of foam viscosity in tubes, and a modified model for the low-quality regime can account for this behavior. It is not yet clear why this new regime appears in some cases and not in others. Simple modeling suggests that the answer may have to do with the sensitivity of gas trapping to pressure gradient. Research on Task 3 continued to focus on foam generation at limited pressure gradient in sandpacks. We investigated the effects of permeability, surfactant concentration and liquid injection rates on foam generation. In addition, a careful review of published studies showed that repeated snap-off is not a plausible mechanism of foam generation in homogeneous porous media beyond the stage of initial drainage from a fully liquid-saturated state. Snap-off has been the focus of much research on foam generation and is incorporated into most mechanistic foam simulators. This finding should force a reconsideration of its role in foam generation and properties in porous media.

  19. Vacuum forming of thermoplastic foam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; Pronk, Ruud

    1999-01-01

    The process of thermoforming of foam sheet is analyzed using both finite element modeling and experiments. A simple constitutive model for finite tensile deformations of closed cellular material around its glass transition temperature is proposed, starting from well-known results from Gibson and

  20. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  1. Characterization of Steel Foams for Structural Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R. Arwade

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally measured mechanical properties of hollow sphere steel foam are the subject of this paper. The characterization of the hollow sphere foam encompasses compressive yield stress and densification strain, compressive plastic Poisson’s ratio, and compressive unloading modulus, as well as tensile elastic modulus, tensile unloading modulus, tensile yield stress, and tensile fracture strain. Shear properties are also included. These tests provide sufficient information to allow calibration of a macroscopic, continuum constitutive model. Calibrated foam plasticity parameters are tabulated, and unique feature of foam plasticity are explained. Also, initial development of mesoscale simulations, which explicitly model voids and sintered hollow spheres, is reported. This work is part of a larger effort to help the development of steel foam as a material with relevance to civil engineering applications.

  2. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  3. Modeling, kinetic, and equilibrium characterization of paraquat adsorption onto polyurethane foam using the ion-pairing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lage, Mateus R; Carneiro, José Walkimar M; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2015-06-01

    We studied the adsorption of paraquat onto polyurethane foam (PUF) when it was in a medium containing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The adsorption efficiency was dependent on the concentration of SDS in solution, because the formation of an ion-associate between the cationic paraquat and the dodecylsulfate anion was found to be a fundamental step in the process. A computational study was carried out to identify the possible structure of the ion-associate in aqueous medium. The obtained data demonstrated that the structure is probably formed from four units of dodecylsulfate bonded to one paraquat moiety. The results showed that 94% of the paraquat present in 45 mL of a solution containing 3.90 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) could be retained by 300 mg of PUF, resulting in the removal of 2.20 mg of paraquat. The experimental data were reasonably adjusted to the Freundlich isotherm and to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Also, the application of Morris-Weber and Reichenberg models indicated that both film-diffusion and intraparticle-diffusion processes were active during the control of the adsorption kinetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Foam Glass for Construction Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is to make...... the foaming process for foam glass with closed pores. In addition, it is shown that melt foaming should preferably be performed in a viscosity limited regime. Finally, it is suggested that the foaming agent contributes significantly to the solid conductivity of foam glass....

  5. Foam engineering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Containing contributions from leading academic and industrial researchers, this book provides a much needed update of foam science research. The first section of the book presents an accessible summary of the theory and fundamentals of foams. This includes chapters on morphology, drainage, Ostwald ripening, coalescence, rheology, and pneumatic foams. The second section demonstrates how this theory is used in a wide range of industrial applications, including foam fractionation, froth flotation and foam mitigation. It includes chapters on suprafroths, flotation of oil sands, foams in enhancing petroleum recovery, Gas-liquid Mass Transfer in foam, foams in glass manufacturing, fire-fighting foam technology and consumer product foams.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Cellulose Nanofibril-Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqi Leng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, traditional polyol was partially replaced with green, environmentally friendly cellulose nanofibrils (CNF. The effects of CNF on the performance of CNF-reinforced polyurethane foam nanocomposites were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, and a compression test. The results showed that the introduction of CNF into the polyurethane matrix not only created stronger urethane bonding between the hydroxyl groups in the cellulose chain and isocyanate groups in polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate, but also developed an additional filler–matrix interaction between CNF and polyurethane. With the increase of the CNF replacement ratio, a higher glass transition temperature was obtained, and a higher amount of char residue was generated. In addition, an increase of up to 18-fold in compressive strength was achieved for CNF-PUF (polyurethane foam nanocomposites with a 40% CNF replacement ratio. CNF has proved to be a promising substitute for traditional polyols in the preparation of polyurethane foams. This study provides an interesting method to synthesize highly green bio-oriented polyurethane foams.

  7. Failure mechanism of PMI foam core sandwich beam in bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymethacrylimide (PMI foams have been widely applied in aerospace engineering as the core material of sandwich structures. This paper proposes a modified model to predict the constitutive relation of PMI foams and compares it to existing testing data. The study is then applied to the investigation of the failure mechanism of PMI foam core sandwich beams in bending. Corresponding bending tests were carried out where a complex failure process was observed through a high-speed camera. Numerical model of the foregoing sandwich beam is developed, in which the maximum principal stress criteria is used to predict damage propagation in PMI foam core. Both results from tests and numerical simulation validate the reliability of the theoretical prediction of the failure of PMI foam core sandwich beam using the proposed modified model of PMI foams. This study provides a theoretic tool for the design of sandwich structures with PMI foam core.

  8. The 3D structure of real polymer foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, Matthew D; Tannenbaum, Allen R; Macosko, Christopher W

    2004-12-01

    The intricate structure of polymeric foams may be examined using 3D imaging techniques such as MRI or X-ray tomography followed by image processing. Using a new 3D image processing technique, six images of polyurethane foams were analyzed to create computerized 3D models of the samples. Measurements on these models yielded distributions of many microstructural features, including strut length and window and cell shape distributions. Nearly 8000 struts, 4000 windows, and 376 cells were detected and measured in six polyurethane foam samples. When compared against previous theories and studies, these measurements showed that the structure of real polymeric foams differs significantly from both equilibrium models and aqueous foams. For example, previous studies of aqueous foams showed that about 70% of foam windows were pentagons. In the polymeric sample studied here, only 55% of windows were pentagonal.

  9. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, A.; Boulogne, F.; Cappello, J.; Dressaire, E.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-02-01

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus, we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  10. Effect of Rigid Polyurethane Foam Core Density on Flexural and Compressive Properties of Sandwich Panels with Glass/Epoxy Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    saeed Nemati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich panels as composite materials have two external walls of either metallic or polymer type. The space between these walls is filled by hard foam or other materials and the thickness of different layers is based on the final application of the panel. In the present work, the extent of variation in core density of polyether urethane foam and subsequent flexural and compressive changes in sandwich panels with glass or epoxy face sheets are tested and investigated. A number of hard polyether urethane foams with different middle panel layers density 80-295 kg/m3 are designed to study the effect of foam density on mechanical properties including flexural and compressive properties. Flexural and compressive test resultsshow that increased core density leads to improved mechanical properties. The slope of the curve decreases beyond density of 235 kg/m3. The reason may be explained on the limitation of shear intensity in increasing the mechanical properties. In this respect an optimum density of 235 kg/m3 is obtained for the system under examinations and for reaching higher strength panels, foams of different core materials should be selected.

  11. Experimental study and modeling of the rheology and hydraulics in the foam drilling; Estudos experimentais e modelagem da reologia e da hidraulica na perfuracao com espuma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Andre L.; Sa, Carlos H.M. de; Lourenco, Affonso M.F.; S. Junior, Valter [PETROBRAS, S.A, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas]. E-mails: aleibsohn@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; chsa@cenpes.petrobras.com.br; affonso-lourenco@utulsa.edu; vsj@cenpes.petrobras.com.br

    2000-07-01

    This article describes the extense experimental effort for analyzing the foam stability and rheological properties for application as light drilling fluid. The study considered the influence of the foaming and concentration on the foam rheology and the gas volumetric fraction on the foam rheological properties. Simple correlations were proposed for quantification of the experimental behaviour. Field tests were performed to evaluate one of the foaming agents analyzed in laboratory by using 16 combinations of the gas-fluid flow.

  12. Modeling avian exposures to perfluoroalkyl substances in aquatic habitats impacted by historical aqueous film forming foam releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Emily S; Conder, Jason M; Arblaster, Jennifer A

    2018-06-01

    Releases of Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) associated with Aqueous Film Forming Foams (AFFFs) have the potential to impact on-site and downgradient aquatic habitats. Dietary exposures of aquatic-dependent birds were modeled for seven PFASs (PFHxA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFHxS, PFOS, and PFDS) using five different scenarios based on measurements of PFASs obtained from five investigations of sites historically-impacted by AFFF. Exposure modeling was conducted for four avian receptors representing various avian feeding guilds: lesser scaup (Aythya affinis), spotted sandpiper (Actitis macularia), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), and osprey (Pandion haliaetus). For the receptor predicted to receive the highest PFAS exposure (spotted sandpiper), model-predicted exposure to PFOS exceeded a laboratory-based, No Observed Adverse Effect Level exposure benchmark in three of the five model scenarios, confirming that risks to aquatic-dependent avian wildlife should be considered for investigations of historic AFFF releases. Perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFHxS, PFOS, and PFDS) represented 94% (on average) of total PFAS exposures due to their prevalence in historical AFFF formulations, and increased bioaccumulation in aquatic prey items and partitioning to aquatic sediment relative to perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids. Sediment-associated PFASs (rather than water-associated PFASs) were the source of the highest predicted PFAS exposures, and are likely to be very important for understanding and managing AFFF site-specific ecological risks. Additional considerations for research needs and site-specific ecological risk assessments are discussed with the goal of optimizing ecological risk-based decision making at AFFF sites and prioritizing research needs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Budget impact model in moderate-to-severe psoriasis vulgaris assessing effects of calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate foam on per-patient standard of care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asche, Carl V; Kim, Minchul; Feldman, Steven R; Zografos, Panagiotis; Lu, Minyi

    2017-09-01

    To develop a budget impact model (BIM) for estimating the financial impact of formulary adoption and uptake of calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (C/BD) foam (0.005%/0.064%) on the costs of biologics for treating moderate-to-severe psoriasis vulgaris in a hypothetical US healthcare plan with 1 million members. This BIM incorporated epidemiologic data, market uptake assumptions, and drug utilization costs, simulating the treatment mix for patients who are candidates for biologics before (Scenario #1) and after (Scenario #2) the introduction of C/BD foam. Predicted outcomes were expressed in terms of the annual cost of treatment (COT) and the COT per member per month (PMPM). At year 1, C/BD foam had the lowest per-patient cost ($9,913) necessary to achieve a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI)-75 response compared with etanercept ($73,773), adalimumab ($92,871), infliximab ($34,048), ustekinumab ($83,975), secukinumab ($113,858), apremilast ($47,960), and ixekizumab ($62,707). Following addition of C/BD foam to the formulary, the annual COT for moderate-to-severe psoriasis would decrease by $36,112,572 (17.91%, from $201,621,219 to $165,508,647). The COT PMPM is expected to decrease by $3.00 (17.86%, from $16.80 to $13.80). Drug costs were based on Medi-Span reference pricing (January 21, 2016); differences in treatment costs for drug administration, laboratory monitoring, or adverse events were not accounted for. Potentially confounding were the definition of "moderate-to-severe" and the heterogeneous efficacy data. The per-patient cost for PASI-75 response at year 1 was estimated from short-term efficacy data for C/BD foam and apremilast only. The introduction of C/BD foam is expected to decrease the annual COT for moderate-to-severe psoriasis treatable with biologics by $36,112,572 for a hypothetical US healthcare plan with 1 million plan members, and to lower the COT PMPM by $3.00.

  14. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baez, John C; Christensen, J Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (e iS ) rather than imaginary-time e -S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model

  15. A field-theoretic approach to Spin Foam models in Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    We present an introduction to Group Field Theory models, motivating them on the basis of their relationship with discretized BF models of gravity. We derive the Feynmann rules and compute quantum corrections in the coherent states basis.

  16. Structure and mechanics of solid foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erin Ashley

    Solid foams appear in a variety of settings, including impact absorption, sound damping, and structural components. However, the cellular structure of a solid foam allows it to deform in a much more complicated manner than a typical continuum solid material, leading to both interesting physics questions and also unique engineering challenges. There has been considerable work in the physics community in recent years with regards to non-traditional theories of elasticity, particularly in the context of disordered materials with some kind of "mesoscale" structure such as sandpiles, cytoskeletal networks in cells, and weakly interacting glasses. Here, we seek to address several issues. First, what is the structure of a solid foam and how it is similar or different from the structure of liquid froths? Second, how does the structure of solid foam affects its mechanical properties? Third, under what conditions can a continuum model be used to describe a solid foam? We address these questions using a combination of experiment and simulation. We have developed an x-ray microtomography apparatus to image foams in 3-D, and assembled a series of computational tools to enable machine vision recognition of foam structures. We present here a case study of the structure of an open-cell carbon foam sample, and compare its structure to that of a liquid froth. We have also carried out a series of solid mechanics simulations in order to observe how model disordered foam structures deform, both on the microscale and in an ensemble average. Based on this, we find that 2-D disordered model foams spontaneously form fluctuations in response to a constant strain perturbation. The fluctuation in the displacement field has a characteristic length scale of around 10 edge lengths; above this length scale, or averaged over many realizations of disorder, solid foams are well-described by continuum elasticity theory. The combination of experiment, analysis, and simulation described here can

  17. Mechanical behaviour of nickel foams: three-dimensional morphology, non-linear models and fracture; Caracterisation et simulation numerique du comportement mecanique des mousses de nickel: morphologie tridimensionnelle, reponse elastoplastique et rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillard, Th.

    2004-03-15

    The deformation behaviour and failure of nickel foams were studied during loading by using X-ray microtomography. Strut alignment and stretching are observed in tension whereas strut bending followed by strut buckling are observed in compression. Strain localisation, that occurs during compression tests, depends on nickel weight distribution in the foam. Fracture in tension first takes place at cell nodes and the crack propagates cell by cell. The damaged area in front of a crack is about five cells wide. A detailed description of the three-dimensional morphology is also presented. One third of the cells are dodecahedral and 57 % of the faces are pentagonal. The most frequent cell is composed of two quadrilaterals, two hexagons and eight pentagons. The dimensions of the equivalent ellipsoid of each cell are identified and cell orientation are determined. The geometrical aspect ratio is linked to the mechanical anisotropy of the foam. In tension, a uniaxial analytical model, based on elastoplastic strut bending, is developed. The whole stress-strain curve of the foam is predicted according to its specific weight and its anisotropy. It is found that the non-linear regime of the macroscopic curve of the foam is not only due to the elastoplastic bending of the struts. The model is also extended to two-phase foams and the influence of the hollow struts is analysed. The two-phase foams model is finally applied to oxidized nickel foams and compared with experimental data. The strong increase in the rigidity of nickel foams with an increasing rate of oxidation, is well described by the model. However, a fracture criterion must also be introduced to take into account the oxide layer cracking. A phenomenological compressible continuum plasticity model is also proposed and identified in tension. The identification of the model is carried out using experimental strain maps obtained by a photo-mechanical technique. A validation of the model is provided by investigating the

  18. Effect of Immobilized Antithrombin III on the Thromboresistance of Polycarbonate Urethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Karin; Stadtherr, Karin; Gessner, Andre; Wehner, Daniel; Schmid, Thomas; Wendel, Hans Peter; Schmid, Christof; Lehle, Karla

    2017-03-24

    The surface of foils and vascular grafts made from a thermoplastic polycarbonate urethanes (PCU) (Chronoflex AR) were chemically modified using gas plasma treatment, binding of hydrogels-(1) polyethylene glycol bisdiamine and carboxymethyl dextran (PEG-DEX) and (2) polyethyleneimine (PEI)-and immobilization of human antithrombin III (AT). Their biological impact was tested in vitro under static and dynamic conditions. Static test methods showed a significantly reduced adhesion of endothelial cells, platelets, and bacteria, compared to untreated PCU. Modified PCU grafts were circulated in a Chandler-Loop model for 90 min at 37 °C with human blood. Before and after circulation, parameters of the hemostatic system (coagulation, platelets, complement, and leukocyte activation) were analyzed. PEI-AT significantly inhibited the activation of both coagulation and platelets and prevented the activation of leukocytes and complement. In conclusion, both modifications significantly reduce coagulation activation, but only PEI-AT creates anti-bacterial and anti-thrombogenic functionality.

  19. Experimental Investigations of Space Shuttle BX-265 Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a variety of experimental studies on the polyurethane foam, BX-265. This foam is used as a close-out foam insulation on the space shuttle external tank. The purpose of this work is to provide a better understanding of the foam s behavior and to support advanced modeling efforts. The following experiments were performed: Thermal expansion was measured for various heating rates. The in situ expansion of foam cells was documented by heating the foam in a scanning electron microscope. Expansion mechanisms are described. Thermogravimetric analysis was performed at various heating rates and for various environments. The glass transition temperature was also measured. The effects of moisture on the foam were studied. Time-dependent effects were measured to give preliminary data on viscoelastoplastic properties.

  20. A thermo-electro-mechanical simulation model for hot wire cutting of EPS foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical mathematical model describing the effects taking place within a Ni-Cr20% wire used in a hot-wire cutting process for free forming and rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is investigated and simulated. The model implements and solves three semi...... cutting of EPS in contact with a cutting tool made of an electrically heated metal wire attached to a robot device. The finite difference method is used to solve the coupled equations in the two environments (domains) in which the hot-wire operates, namely air and EPS. The model is calibrated against...

  1. The foamed structures in numerical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Antoni; John, Małgorzata

    2018-01-01

    In the paper numerical simulation of the foamed metal structures using numerical homogenization algorithm is prescribed. From the beginning, numerical model of heterogeneous porous simplified structures of typical foamed metal, based on the FEM was built and material parameters (coefficients of elasticity matrix of the considered structure) were determined with use of numerical homogenization algorithm. During the work the different RVE models of structure were created and their properties were compared at different relative density, different numbers and the size and structure of the arrangement of voids. Finally, obtained results were used in modeling of typical elements made from foam metals structures - sandwich structure and profile filled with metal foam. Simulation were performed for different dimensions of cladding and core. Additionally, the test of influence material orientation (arrangement of voids in RVE element) on the maximum stresses and displacement during bending test was performed.

  2. Auxetic foam for snowsport safety devices

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Tom; Duncan, Olly; Foster, Leon; Senior, Terry; Zampieri, Davide; Edeh, Victor; Alderson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Skiing and snowboarding are popular snow-sports with inherent risk of injury. There is potential to reduce the prevalence of injuries by improving and implementing snow-sport safety devices with the application of advanced materials. This paper investigates the application of auxetic foam to snow-sport safety devices. Composite pads - consisting of foam covered with a semi-rigid shell - were investigated as a simple model of body armour and a large 70 x 355 x 355 mm auxetic foam sample was fa...

  3. High performance polymeric foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy

  4. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  5. Sensing strain and damage in polyurethane/MWCNT nano-composite foams using electrical measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baltopoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the damage identification in polymeric foams through the monitoring of the electrical resistance of the system. To assess this idea electrically conductive rigid Poly-Urethane (PUR foams at various densities were prepared. Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT were dispersed in the host polymer at various concentrations through high shear mixing to provide electrical conductivity to the system. The PUR/MWCNT foams exhibited varying electrical conductivity on a wide range of densities and nano-filler contents. The prepared foams were subject to compression tests. Electrical resistance was recorded online during the tests to monitor the change of the bulk property of the materials. A structural-electrical cross-property relation was exhibited. The distinctive phases of foam compression were successfully identified from the electrical resistance profile recorded during the tests. A characteristic master curve of the change of electrical resistivity with respect to load and damage is proposed and analyzed. It was shown that the found electrical resistance profile is a characteristic of all the MWCNT contents and depends on density and conductivity. MWCNT content contributes mainly to the sensitivity of electrical sensing in the initial stage of compression. Later compression stages are dominated by foam microstructural damage which mask any effect of CNT dispersion. Micro-structural observations were employed to verify the experimental findings and curves.

  6. Effect of commercial saccharin preparations on urethan-induced lung tumorigenesis in strain A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, J C; Arnold, L J; Shimkin, M B

    1980-11-01

    The effect of commercial saccharin preparations on urethan-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed by gavaging groups of male strain A mice with 1-g/kg doses of each saccharin preparation on a daily basis 5 days/week. Gavage was initiated 1 week before i.p. injection of either a low (0.1 mg/g) or a high (1 mg/g) dose of urethan and continued until the mice were sacrificed 16 weeks after urethan administration. The average number of surface lung tumors per mouse for each group of mice was determined and was compared statistically with the appropriate control group. The commercial saccharin preparations did not produce an elevated lung tumor response when administered alone. One of the four saccharin preparations enhanced the lung tumor response to urethan when given in conjunction with the low dose of urethan, but this enhancement was not statistically significant. At the high urethan dose, all saccharin preparations produced a statistically significant enhancement of the lung tumor response to urethan.

  7. A water blown urethane insulation for use in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon

    1995-01-01

    Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) of NASA's Space Shuttle External Tank include polyurethane and polyisocyanurate modified polyurethane foam insulations. These insulations, currently foamed with CFC 11 blowing agent, serve to maintain cryogenic propellant quality, maintain the external tank structural temperature limits, and minimize the formation of ice and frost that could potentially damage the ceramic insulation on the space shuttle orbiter. During flight the external tank insulations are exposed to mechanical, thermal and acoustical stresses. TPS must pass cryogenic flexure and substrate adhesion tests at -253 C, aerothermal and radiant heating tests at fluxes up to approximately 14 kilowatts per square meter, and thermal conductivity tests at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. Due to environmental concerns, the polyurethane insulation industry and the External Tank Project are tasked with replacing CFC 11. The flight qualification of foam insulations employing HCFC 141b as a foaming agent is currently in progress; HCFC 141b blown insulations are scheduled for production implementation in 1995. Realizing that the second generation HCFC blowing agents are an interim solution, the evaluation of third generation blowing agents with zero ozone depletion potential is underway. NASA's TPS Materials Research Laboratory is evaluating third generation blowing agents in cryogenic insulations for the External Tank; one option being investigated is the use of water as a foaming agent. A dimensionally stable insulation with low friability, good adhesion to cryogenic substrates, and acceptable thermal conductivity has been developed with low viscosity materials that are easily processed in molding applications. The development criteria, statistical experimental approach, and resulting foam properties will be presented.

  8. Theoretical Evaluation of Foam Proppant Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Holt, H.; Kam, S.; Williams, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing in oil wells results in a large amount of produced water which must be properly disposed of and is currently a key environmental issue preventing further development in US domestic oil and gas production. The primary function of this liquid is to carry particulates, a.k.a. Proppant, into the stress fractures in order to hold open a pathway in which petroleum can flow into the wellbore. A potential superior technique is to use foam instead of liquid; liquids rely on turbulence to suspend proppant while foams carry particulates on the surfaces. Therefore, foams can carry more proppant deeper into the fractures while typically using 50%-90% less liquid, depending on foam quality. This comparative analysis uses the vorticity equation for a liquid to approximate the base case of particle suspension. This is then compared to a multitude of foam transport models in order to demonstrate the efficacy of foams when used in hydraulic fracturing. This work serves as the basis for future laboratory and hopefully field scale studies of foam proppant carriers.

  9. Fluorescent aggregates in naphthalene containing poly(urethane-urea)s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simas, E.R.; Akcelrud, Leni

    2003-01-01

    A series of segmented poly(urethane-urea)s containing naphthalene in the hard block and hexamethylene spacers in the soft block was prepared. The hard to soft segment ratio was varied systematically, to afford a series of polymers with various chromophore concentrations and a constant length of the chromophoric block, using a three-step synthetic procedure. The absorption, fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectra of solutions and films of the block copolymers provide strong evidence for aggregation. A red-shifted fluorescence spectrum peaking at 420 nm gains in intensity as the naphthalene concentration is increased. The excitation spectrum of this new emission is well to the red of the normal naphthalene absorption spectrum, consistent with the UV spectrum. Formation of a fluorescent ground state dimer (or higher aggregate) is proposed to account for these observations

  10. Protic Cationic Oligomeric Ionic Liquids of the Urethane Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Stryutsky, A. V.; Klymenko, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    temperature, but ethanesulfonate imidazolium and pyridinium oligomeric ionic liquids form a low melting crystalline phase. The proton conductivities of the oligomeric ionic liquids are determined by the type of cation in the temperature range 80-120 degrees C under anhydrous conditions and vary within five......Protic oligomeric cationic ionic liquids of the oligo(ether urethane) type are synthesized via the reaction of an isocyanate prepolymer based on oligo(oxy ethylene)glycol with M = 1000 with hexamethylene-diisocyanate followed by blocking of the terminal isocyanate groups with the use of amine...... derivatives of imidazole, pyridine, and 3-methylpyridine and neutralization of heterocycles with ethanesulfonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid. The structures and properties of the synthesized oligomeric ionic liquids substantially depend on the structures of the ionic groups. They are amorphous at room...

  11. Characterization and Lifetime Performance Modeling of Acrylic Foam Tape for Structural Glazing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, Benjamin William

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of testing and modeling conducted to characterize the performance of 3Mâ ¢ VHBâ ¢ structural glazing tape in both shear and tension. Creep rupture testing results provided the failure time at a given static load and temperature, and ramp-to-fail testing results provided the ultimate load resistance at a given rate of strain and temperature. Parallel testing was conducted on three structural silicone sealants to compare performance. Using the time temperature ...

  12. Foam Flows in Analog Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meheust, Y.; Géraud, B.; Jones, S. A.; Cantat, I.; Dollet, B.

    2015-12-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for EOR and aquifer remediation, and more recently as carriers of chemical amendments for the remediation of the vadose zone. Apart from various interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams are better injection fluids due to their low sensitivity to gravity and their peculiar rheology: for foams with bubbles on the order of at least the typical pore size, viscous dissipation arises mostly from the contact zones between the soap films and the walls. In most experimental studies no local information of the foam structure is possible, and only global quantities such as the effective viscosity can be measured. We investigate foam flow through a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a horizontal transparent Hele-Shaw cell. The local foam structure is recorded in situ, which provides a measure of the spatial distribution of bubble velocities and sizes at regular time intervals. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology including preferential flow paths and local flow intermittency/non-stationarity despite the imposed permanent global flow rate. Moreover, the medium selects the bubble size distribution through lamella division-triggered bubble fragmentation. Varying the mean bubble size of the injected foam, its water content, and mean velocity, we characterize those processes systematically and show that the distributions of bubble sizes and velocities are to some extent correlated. We furthermore measure the evolution, along the flow direction, of the distribution of bubble sizes, and measure the efficiency of bubble fragmentation as a function of the control parameters. The bubble fragmentation can be modeled numerically and to some extent analytically, based on statistical measures inferred from the experimental data. This study sheds new light on the local rheology of foams in porous media and opens the way towards quantitative characterization of the

  13. Dynamic Behavior of Hybrid APM (Advanced Pore Morphology Foam and Aluminum Foam Filled Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Weise

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of different densities of hybrid aluminum polymer foam on the frequency behavior of a foam filled steel structure with different ratios between steel and foam masses. The foam filled structure is composed of three steel tubes with a welded flange at both ends bolted together to form a portal grounded by its free ends. Structure, internal and ground constraints have been designed and manufactured in order to minimize nonlinear effects and to guarantee optimal constraint conditions. Mode shapes and frequencies were verified with finite elements models (FEM to be in the range of experimental modal analysis, considering the frequency measurement range limits for instrumented hammer and accelerometer. Selected modes have been identified with suitable modal parameters extraction techniques. Each structure has been tested before and after filling, in order to compute the percentage variation of modal parameters. Two different densities of hybrid aluminum polymer foam have been tested and compared with structures filled with aluminum foams produced using the powder compact melting technique. All the foam fillings were able to suppress high frequency membrane modes which results in a reduction of environmental noise and an increase in performance of the components. Low frequency modes show an increase in damping ratio only when small thickness steel frames are filled with either Hybrid APM or Alulight foam.

  14. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  15. Beer foam physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronteltap, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    The physical aspects of beer foam behavior were studied in terms of the four physical processes, mainly involved in the formation and breakdown of foam. These processes are, bubble formation, drainage, disproportionation and coalescence. In detail, the processes disproportionation and

  16. Formation fracturing with foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauer, R.E.; Kohlhaas, C.A.

    1974-01-01

    Over 60 wells have been treated with hydraulic fracturing techniques, with foam as the fracturing fluid. These foams contained as much as 95% gaseous phase; most treatments used foams with gas contents in the 65% to 85% range. Foam has several desirable properties for use as a fracturing fluid: high sand-carrying and sand-suspending capability, low fluid loss, low hydrostatic head, low pressure drops due to friction, quick fluid recovery, low formation damage, and no reduction of fracture conductivity due to fluid ingredients. Most applications of foam as a fracturing fluid have been in low permeability gas reservoirs. However, several oil reservoirs also have been successfully treated. Cost of the treatment is approx. the same or slightly less than a treatment with conventional fluids of comparable volume and rate. (25 refs.)

  17. Biodegradable Poly (Ester Urethane) Urea Biomaterials For Applications in Combat Casualty Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guelcher, S. A; Sriniwasan, A; Hollinger, J. O

    2006-01-01

    A family of biocompatible, biodegradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUUR) biomaterials has been developed that degrade to non-toxic by-products and support the attachment and proliferation of cells...

  18. Cold recycle pavement using urea urethane dispersion agent and rubber : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This research study was a joint venture of the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), Evans, Loosely, Inc., and Roseburg Paving Company, to evaluate the use of Urea Urethane Dispersion (UUD) agent, with finely ground tire rubber, high float emul...

  19. Effects of selenium on Pteridium aquilinum and urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Sheila B R; Sanches, Daniel S; Caniceiro, Beatriz D; Wysochi, Harry L; da Silva, Graziela B; Latorre, Andreia O

    2013-10-01

    The results of our previous study demonstrated that ptaquiloside, the main toxic agent found in Pteridium aquilinum, suppresses natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity. However, the ability of ptaquiloside to suppress the cytotoxicity of NK cells was prevented by selenium supplementation. NK cells play an important role in the innate immune response and have the ability to kill tumor cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that selenium may prevent the higher susceptibility to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis that has been observed in mice treated with P. aquilinum. The immunosuppressive effects of ptaquiloside have been associated with a higher number of urethane-induced lung nodules in mice. Hence, we assessed the effects of P. aquilinum-induced immunosuppression on urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis in C57BL/6 mice that had been supplemented with selenium. For these experiments, mice were treated with both an aqueous extract of P. aquilinum (20 g/kg/day) and selenium (1.3 mg/kg) by gavage once daily for 14 days followed by a once-weekly intraperitoneal injection of urethane (1 g/kg) for 10 weeks that was accompanied by gavage 5 days a week. Lung adenomas in mice that had been treated with P. aquilinum plus urethane occurred with a frequency that was 44% higher than that in mice that had been treated with only urethane. In mice that had been supplemented with selenium and treated with P. aquilinum plus urethane, the occurrence of lung adenomas was reduced to 26%. These results suggest that selenium prevents the immunosuppressive effects of P. aquilinum on urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis.

  20. The anesthetics influence (ethilic-eter and urethane) on renal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramoto, E.; Achando, S.S.; Araujo, E.B. de; Hamada, H.S.; Silva Valente Goncalves, R. da; Pereira, N.P.S. de; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1990-01-01

    A comparative study was done using anesthetics like ether ethilic and urethane, in rats (Wistar). A significative variation was observed in the results obtained when renal radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. Using urethane, the renal uptake increase progressivelly due to the inhibition of the renal filtration and it starts to recuperate when the anesthetic effect was eliminated. Using ether ethilic the radiopharmaceuticals are quickly eliminated from the kidneys (tubular or glomerular filtration), showing that the renal function was protected. (author) [pt

  1. Foam film permeability: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Krastev, R; Zitha, Pacelli L J

    2008-02-28

    The mass transfer of gas through foam films is a prototype of various industrial and biological processes. The aim of this paper is to give a perspective and critical overview of studies carried out to date on the mass transfer of gas through foam films. Contemporary experimental data are summarized, and a comprehensive overview of the theoretical models used to explain the observed effects is given. A detailed description of the processes that occur when a gas molecule passes through each layer that forms a foam film is shown. The permeability of the film-building surfactant monolayers plays an important role for the whole permeability process. It can be successfully described by the models used to explain the permeability of surfactant monolayers on aqueous sub-phase. For this reason, the present paper briefly discusses the surfactant-induced resistance to mass transfer of gases through gas-liquid interface. One part of the paper discusses the experimental and theoretical aspects of the foam film permeability in a train of foam films in a matrix or a cylinder. This special case is important to explain the gas transfer in porous media or in foams. Finally, this paper will highlight the gaps and challenges and sketch possible directions for future research.

  2. Wall effects in Stokes experiment with a liquid foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haijing; Subramani, Hariprasad; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2011-11-01

    Liquid foams are widely used in numerous applications ranging from the oil and gas industry to beauty, healthcare, and household products industries. A fundamental understanding of the relationships between the properties of liquid foams and their flow responses is, however, still in its infancy compared to that involving the fluid dynamics of simple fluids. In this talk, the flow of a dry liquid foam around a spherical bead, i.e. the Stokes problem for liquid foams, is studied experimentally. In contrast to previous work (cf. Cantat 2006), the focus of the present research is to probe the effect of a solid wall that is located a few bubble radii from the bead. The new experimental results show that the elastic modulus of dry liquid foams is directly proportional to the surface tension of the foaming agents and inversely proportional to the average bubble size in the foams, in agreement with previous theoretical and experimental studies. The experiments further show that the close proximity of the solid wall causes profound structural changes to the gas bubbles as the foam flows past the bead. A good understanding of these structural changes and how they can affect the elastic modulus of foams can be indispensable in formulating improved models for accurately describing the dynamical response of foams within the realm of continuum mechanics.

  3. Injectable silk foams for the treatment of cervical insufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Eric P.

    Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal mortality, resulting in over 4,000 deaths each year. A significant risk factor for preterm birth is cervical insufficiency, the weakening and subsequent deformation of cervical tissue. Cervical insufficiency is both detectable and treatable but current treatments are lacking. The most common approach requires multiple invasive procedures. This work investigates the injection of silk foams, a minimally-invasive method for supporting cervical tissue. Silk offers many advantages for use as a biomaterial including strength, versatility, and biocompatibility. Injectable silk foams will minimize patient discomfort while also providing more targeted and personalized treatment. A battery of mechanical testing was undertaken to determine silk foam response under physiologically relevant loading and environmental conditions. Mechanical testing was paired with analysis of foam morphology and structure that illustrated the effects of injection on pore geometry and size. Biological response to silk foams was evaluated using an in vitro degradation study and subcutaneous in vivo implantation in a mouse model. Results showed that foams exceeded the mechanical requirements for stiffening cervical tissue, although the current injection process limits foam size. Injection was shown to cause measurable but localized foam deformation. This work indicates that silk foams are a feasible treatment option for cervical insufficiency but challenges remain with foam delivery.

  4. Numerical simulation of heat transfer in metal foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangapatnam, Priyatham; Kurian, Renju; Venkateshan, S. P.

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports a numerical study of forced convection heat transfer in high porosity aluminum foams. Numerical modeling is done considering both local thermal equilibrium and non local thermal equilibrium conditions in ANSYS-Fluent. The results of the numerical model were validated with experimental results, where air was forced through aluminum foams in a vertical duct at different heat fluxes and velocities. It is observed that while the LTE model highly under predicts the heat transfer in these foams, LTNE model predicts the Nusselt number accurately. The novelty of this study is that once hydrodynamic experiments are conducted the permeability and porosity values obtained experimentally can be used to numerically simulate heat transfer in metal foams. The simulation of heat transfer in foams is further extended to find the effect of foam thickness on heat transfer in metal foams. The numerical results indicate that though larger foam thicknesses resulted in higher heat transfer coefficient, this effect weakens with thickness and is negligible in thick foams.

  5. Biomass derived novel functional foamy materials - BIO-FOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suurnaekki, A.; Boer, H.; Forssell, P. (and others) (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)), Email: anna.suurnakki@vtt.fi

    2010-10-15

    BIO-FOAM has aimed at exploiting the potential of biomaterials in replacing synthetic polymers in solid foamy materials. The target applications have been various, including food, packaging, construction and insulation. The project activities during the second project year have focused on characterisation of the solid model foams and on modeling the behaviour of polymers at liquid- liquid interfaces. In the modelling study the intrinsic consistence of the applied thermodynamic approach was confirmed. The experimentally obtained solubility parameters of polymers were in good agreement with the calculated solubility parameters. The polymers were, however, found to posses too little surface activity to alone provide stable foams, but they were able to act as co-surfactants. In the model polymer foam work both expanded polymer foams and wood fibre based foams were prepared. Supercritical CO{sub 2}-gas chamber was found to be a useful tool to prepare expanded polymer foams in small scale. Only partial replacement of synthetic polymers could, however, be obtained with native biomaterials indicating the need of tailoring of biopolymer properties and suitable formulations including surfactants or stabilizing particles. In wood fibre-based foams both nanocellulose and lignin showed potential as additives or reinforcing components.The outcome of the extruded food snacks study was that the processing parameters were related with the equipmentvariables. Furthermore, glycerol was shown to facilitate greatly extrusion processing. In foam concrete work concrete pore structure was shown to correlate with its strength and stability. At optimum concentration wood fibres affected positively the concrete processing performance. (orig.)

  6. Properties of Syntactic Foam for Simulation of Mechanical Insults.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Neal Benson [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haulenbeek, Kimberly K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spletzer, Matthew A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ortiz, Lyndsy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Syntactic foam encapsulation protects sensitive components. The energy mitigated by the foam is calculated with numerical simulations. The properties of a syntactic foam consisting of a mixture of an epoxy-rubber adduct and glass microballoons are obtained from published literature and test results. The conditions and outcomes of the tests are discussed. The method for converting published properties and test results to input for finite element models is described. Simulations of the test conditions are performed to validate the inputs.

  7. Suture anchor fixation strength with or without augmentation in osteopenic and severely osteoporotic bones in rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study on polyurethane foam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Mehmet Serhan; Altinel, Levent; Eroglu, Mehmet; Verim, Ozgur; Demir, Teyfik; Atmaca, Halil

    2014-08-22

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of various types of anchor applications with or without augmentation in both osteopenic and severely osteoporotic bone models. Two different types of suture anchors were tested in severely osteoporotic (SOP) and osteopenic polyurethane (PU) foam blocks using an established protocol. An Instron machine applied static loading parallel to the axis of insertion until failure, and the mean anchor failure strengths were calculated. The mode of failure (anchor pullout, suture tear) was recorded. The anchors tested included the Corkscrew (CS) (Arthrex Inc., Naples, FL, USA) (without augmentation, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented, and bioabsorbable tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cement-augmented) and Corkscrew FT II (CS FT II) 5.5 mm (without augmentation as used routinely). The mean failure loads for both SOP and osteopenic PU foam blocks, respectively, were as follows: CS, 16.2 and 212.4 N; CS with TCP, 75.2 and 396 N; CS with PMMA, 101.2 and 528.8 N; CS FT II, 13.8 and 339.8 N. Augmentation of CS with TCP or PMMA would be essential to SOP bones. In the osteopenic bone model, although anchor fixation augmented with PMMA is the best fixation method, CS augmented with TCP cement or CS FT II without any need for augmentation may also be used as an alternative.

  8. Sulfonation of crosslinked styrene/divinyl benzene copolymer beads formed from porous foam and ion adsorption of copper by them: column adsorption modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlik, Necla; Keskinler, Bülent

    2014-01-01

    The porous foam is made by the polymerisation of a high internal phase emulsion and it is a highly porous, low density, open cellular material. Surface properties of the foam were chemically modified via a sulfonation process. Sulfonation added ‒SO3(‒)H(+) groups to the polymer matrix. The ion adsorption behavior of copper ions on sulfonated polymer beads, depending on inlet concentration (10-60 mg/L), pH of inlet solution (2.00-5.20) and flow velocity (1.7-11.4 m/h) was studied. It was shown that the amount of copper adsorbed was not affected with increasing concentration of feed solutions and flow velocity. Also the process was highly pH dependent. The maximum removal was 117.96 mg Cu/g dry adsorbent at flow velocity 11.4 m/h. Column experimental tests were conducted to provide data for theoretical modeling and to verify the system performance of the process. A theoretical column model adopted in this work was found to describe well the ion adsorption breakthrough characteristics.

  9. Kelvin's ideal foam structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaire, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Among his many extraordinary accomplishments, Kelvin was a pioneer of crystallography, elasticity and materials science. These interests came together to inspire his speculation on the nature of the ether in 1887. He conceived it to be an ordered liquid foam, of minimal surface area. Kelvin's ideal structure of foam has been realised in the laboratory only recently. In the meantime it was surpassed (in terms of surface area minimisation) by the Weaire-Phelan foam, which is the basis for one of the main buildings of the Beijing Olympics.

  10. Data characterizing tensile behavior of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B R Bharath; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Zeltmann, Steven E; Gupta, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-03-01

    The data set presented is related to the tensile behavior of cenosphere reinforced high density polyethylene syntactic foam composites "Processing of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foams using an industrial scale polymer injection molding machine" (Bharath et al., 2016) [1]. The focus of the work is on determining the feasibility of using an industrial scale polymer injection molding (PIM) machine for fabricating syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are investigated for microstructure and tensile properties. The data presented in this article is related to optimization of the PIM process for syntactic foam manufacture, equations and procedures to develop theoretical estimates for properties of cenospheres, and microstructure of syntactic foams before and after failure. Included dataset contains values obtained from the theoretical model.

  11. Data characterizing tensile behavior of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.R. Bharath Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data set presented is related to the tensile behavior of cenosphere reinforced high density polyethylene syntactic foam composites “Processing of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foams using an industrial scale polymer injection molding machine” (Bharath et al., 2016 [1]. The focus of the work is on determining the feasibility of using an industrial scale polymer injection molding (PIM machine for fabricating syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are investigated for microstructure and tensile properties. The data presented in this article is related to optimization of the PIM process for syntactic foam manufacture, equations and procedures to develop theoretical estimates for properties of cenospheres, and microstructure of syntactic foams before and after failure. Included dataset contains values obtained from the theoretical model.

  12. Challenges in adjoint-based optimization of a foam EOR process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namdar Zanganeh, M.; Kraaijevanger, J.F.B.M.; Buurman, H.W.; Jansen, J.D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    We apply adjoint-based optimization to a Surfactant-Alternating-Gas foam process using a linear foam model introducing gradual changes in gas mobility and a nonlinear foam model giving abrupt changes in gas mobility as function of oil and water saturations and surfactant concentration. For the

  13. Foaming Behaviour, Structure, and Properties of Polypropylene Nanocomposites Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antunes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the preparation and characterization of compression-moulded montmorillonite and carbon nanofibre-polypropylene foams. The influence of these nanofillers on the foaming behaviour was analyzed in terms of the foaming parameters and final cellular structure and morphology of the foams. Both nanofillers induced the formation of a more isometric-like cellular structure in the foams, mainly observed for the MMT-filled nanocomposite foams. Alongside their crystalline characteristics, the nanocomposite foams were also characterized and compared with the unfilled ones regarding their dynamic-mechanical thermal behaviour. The nanocomposite foams showed higher specific storage moduli due to the reinforcement effect of the nanofillers and higher cell density isometric cellular structure. Particularly, the carbon nanofibre foams showed an increasingly higher electrical conductivity with increasing the amount of nanofibres, thus showing promising results as to produce electrically improved lightweight materials for applications such as electrostatic painting.

  14. Dynamic mechanical and molecular weight measurements on polymer bonded explosives from thermally accelerated aging tests. II. A poly(ester-urethane) binder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.M.; Caley, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The molecular weight distribution and dynamic mechanical properties of an experimental polymer-bonded explosive, X-0282, maintained at 23, 60, and 74 0 C for 3.75 y were examined, X-0282 is 95.5% 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclo-octane explosive and 4.5% Estane 5703, a segmented poly(ester-urethane). Two mechanical relaxations at about -24 and 42 0 C were found in the X-0282 aged at room temperature for 3.75 years. A third relaxation at about 85 0 C was found in X-0282 aged at 60 and 74 0 C. The relaxation at -24 0 C is associated with the soft segment glass transition of the binder. The relaxation at 42 0 C is associated with the soft segment melting and may also contain a component due to the hard segment glass transition. The relaxation at 85 0 C is probably associated with improved soft segment crystallite perfection. The molecular weight of the poly(ester-urethane) binder decreased significantly with increasing accelerated aging temperature. A simple random chain scission model of the urethane degradation kinetics in the presence of explosive yields an activation energy of 11.6 kcal/mole. This model predicts a use life of about 17.5 years under the worst military operating conditions

  15. Dynamic mechanical and molecular weight measurements on polymer bonded explosives from thermally accelerated aging tests. II. A poly(ester-urethane) binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.M.; Caley, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The molecular weight distribution and dynamic mechanical properties of an experimental polymer-bonded explosive, X-0282, maintained at 23, 60, and 74/sup 0/C for 3.75 y were examined, X-0282 is 95.5% 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclo-octane explosive and 4.5% Estane 5703, a segmented poly(ester-urethane). Two mechanical relaxations at about -24 and 42/sup 0/C were found in the X-0282 aged at room temperature for 3.75 years. A third relaxation at about 85/sup 0/C was found in X-0282 aged at 60 and 74/sup 0/C. The relaxation at -24/sup 0/C is associated with the soft segment glass transition of the binder. The relaxation at 42/sup 0/C is associated with the soft segment melting and may also contain a component due to the hard segment glass transition. The relaxation at 85/sup 0/C is probably associated with improved soft segment crystallite perfection. The molecular weight of the poly(ester-urethane) binder decreased significantly with increasing accelerated aging temperature. A simple random chain scission model of the urethane degradation kinetics in the presence of explosive yields an activation energy of 11.6 kcal/mole. This model predicts a use life of about 17.5 years under the worst military operating conditions (continuous operation at 74/sup 0/C).

  16. Dynamical mechanical analysis of photocrosslinked hyperbranched urethane acrylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANKO DUNJIC

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of acrylate functionalized samples based on hyperbranched hydroxy-terminated polyesters with different molecular weights and different degrees of acrylation were synthesized. The obtained urethane acrylates were slightly yellow viscose liquids. Their composition was characterized by FTIR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy and their molecular weights were measured by GPC. All the synthesized samples were diluted with 25 wt.% 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate (BDDM. The rheological properties of the uncured samples and the dynamic mechanical properties of the UV cured samples were examined. All the samples exhibit Newtonian behavior, which indicates the absence of physical entanglements in these polymers. The viscosity increases with increasing number of acrylic groups per molecule. The glass transition temperature of the UV cured samples increases with increasing the number of acrylic groups per molecule. The value of the storage modulus in the rubber-elastic plateau and the cross-link density increase with increasing number of acrylic groups per molecule. The formed networks are inhomogeneous and the residual unsaturation is the highest in the samples with the largest number of acrylic groups per molecule.

  17. Shape memory polymers based on uniform aliphatic urethane networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Herberg, J L; Marion III, J E; Wright, W J; Evans, C L; Maitland, D J

    2007-01-19

    Aliphatic urethane polymers have been synthesized and characterized, using monomers with high molecular symmetry, in order to form amorphous networks with very uniform supermolecular structures which can be used as photo-thermally actuable shape memory polymers (SMPs). The monomers used include hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), trimethylhexamethylenediamine (TMHDI), N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine (HPED), triethanolamine (TEA), and 1,3-butanediol (BD). The new polymers were characterized by solvent extraction, NMR, XPS, UV/VIS, DSC, DMTA, and tensile testing. The resulting polymers were found to be single phase amorphous networks with very high gel fraction, excellent optical clarity, and extremely sharp single glass transitions in the range of 34 to 153 C. Thermomechanical testing of these materials confirms their excellent shape memory behavior, high recovery force, and low mechanical hysteresis (especially on multiple cycles), effectively behaving as ideal elastomers above T{sub g}. We believe these materials represent a new and potentially important class of SMPs, and should be especially useful in applications such as biomedical microdevices.

  18. Multiple-shape memory polymers from benzoxazine-urethane copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathumrat, Peerawat; Tiptipakorn, Sunan; Rimdusit, Sarawut

    2017-06-01

    In this research, multiple-shape memory polymers were prepared from benzoxazine (BA-a) resin and a urethane prepolymer (PU). The effects of BA-a resin content on the thermal, mechanical and multiple-shape memory properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis, dynamic mechanical analysis, a flexural test and a multiple-shape memory test. The results revealed that the suitable curing conversions of BA-a:PU resin mixtures affect the shape memory behaviors. The BA-a/PU copolymers demonstrated an increase in flexural strength and flexural modulus at various deformation temperatures with an increase in the BA-a mass ratio from 55%-80%, whereas the thermal properties of these binary systems, i.e. glass transition temperature (T g), degradation temperature (T d) and char yield, were also found to increase with an increase in BA-a content. In addition, the two-step bending test was carried out using a universal testing machine to evaluate the multiple-shape memory properties. The results revealed that the BA-a/PU samples exhibited high values of shape fixity (70%-96% for the first temporary shape and 83%-99% for the second temporary shape) and shape recovery (88%-96% for the first temporary shape and 97%-99% for the original shape).

  19. Application and Analysis of the New Functional Materials of Foam Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guifang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a typical metal foams materials, aluminum foam which is a new type of functional materials has excellent properties of sound absorption and damping. In view of its complex internal micro-structure, on the basis of microcosmic cell theory, the paper set a BCC model of sound absorption of aluminum foam that can control its structure and size parameters such as porosity and aperture in micro-structural. The paper gets parameter factors of aluminum foam structure and size and studies its effect to sound absorption of aluminum foam though micro-modeling and proceeds experiment verification. Its turn out that this BCC model can apply to the research of aluminum foam sound absorption, and it can control the sound absorption of aluminum foam through controlling the microcosmic size of aluminum foam cell.

  20. Determination of Acreage Thermal Protection Foam Loss From Ice and Foam Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Lawrence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to establish Thermal Protection System (TPS) loss from foam and ice impact conditions similar to what might occur on the Space Launch System. This study was based upon the large amount of testing and analysis that was conducted with both ice and foam debris impacts on TPS acreage foam for the Space Shuttle Project External Tank. Test verified material models and modeling techniques that resulted from Space Shuttle related testing were utilized for this parametric study. Parameters varied include projectile mass, impact velocity and impact angle (5 degree and 10 degree impacts). The amount of TPS acreage foam loss as a result of the various impact conditions is presented.

  1. Towards a phase diagram for spin foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcamp, Clement; Dittrich, Bianca

    2017-11-01

    One of the most pressing issues for loop quantum gravity and spin foams is the construction of the continuum limit. In this paper, we propose a systematic coarse-graining scheme for three-dimensional lattice gauge models including spin foams. This scheme is based on the concept of decorated tensor networks, which have been introduced recently. Here we develop an algorithm applicable to gauge theories with non-Abelian groups, which for the first time allows for the application of tensor network coarse-graining techniques to proper spin foams. The procedure deals efficiently with the large redundancy of degrees of freedom resulting from gauge invariance. The algorithm is applied to 3D spin foams defined on a cubical lattice which, in contrast to a proper triangulation, allows for non-trivial simplicity constraints. This mimics the construction of spin foams for 4D gravity. For lattice gauge models based on a finite group we use the algorithm to obtain phase diagrams, encoding the continuum limit of a wide range of these models. We find phase transitions for various families of models carrying non-trivial simplicity constraints.

  2. A quantitative model and the experimental evaluation of the liquid fuel layer for the downward flame spread of XPS foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shengfeng; Xie, Qiyuan; Tang, Xinyi; Qiu, Rong; Yang, Yun

    2017-05-05

    The objective of this work is to investigate the distinctive mechanisms of downward flame spread for XPS foam. It was physically considered as a moving down of narrow pool fire instead of downward surface flame spread for normal solids. A method was developed to quantitatively analyze the accumulated liquid fuel based on the experimental measurement of locations of flame tips and burning rates. The results surprisingly showed that about 80% of the generated hot liquid fuel remained in the pool fire during a certain period. Most of the consumed solid XPS foam didn't really burn away but transformed as the liquid fuel in the downward moving pool fire, which might be an important promotion for the fast fire development. The results also indicated that the dripping propensity of the hot liquid fuel depends on the total amount of the hot liquid accumulated in the pool fire. The leading point of the flame front curve might be the breach of the accumulated hot liquid fuel if it is enough for dripping. Finally, it is suggested that horizontal noncombustible barriers for preventing the accumulation and dripping of liquid fuel are helpful for vertical confining of XPS fire. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultralight metal foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-08

    Ultralight (battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  4. Studi Eksperimental Pengaruh Model Sistem Saluran Dan Variasi Temperatur Tuang Terhadap Prosentase Porositas, Kekerasan Dan Harga Impact Pada Pengecoran Adc 12 Dengan Metode Lost Foam Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restu Yanuar Salam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Metode pengecoran lost foam merupakan metode yang tergolong baru dalam industri pengecoran logam. Pada saat ini belum banyak industri pengecoran logam yang menggunakan metode ini dalam memproduksi benda cor. Sedikitnya industri yang menerapkan metode pengecoran ini, yang mendorong untuk melakukan percobaan pengecoran dengan menggunakan metode lost foam, dengan melakukan perbedaan variasi temperatur tuang dan variasi model sistem saluran. Proses pengecoran dengan metode lost foam ini menggunakan styrofoam sebagai polanya, yang ditanam dalam cetakan yang berisi pasir silika kering (tanpa pengikat kemudian cetakan digetarkan untuk memadatkan pasir. Ketika logam cair dimasukkan ke dalam cetakan, maka styrofoam akan menguap sampai cetakan tersebut terisi penuh oleh logam cair. Dalam penelitian ini, parameter yang digunakan adalah model sistem saluran dan variasi temperatur tuang terhadap kualitas hasil coran, diantaranya kekerasan, harga impact, prosentase porositas dan struktur mikro. Material yang digunakan dalam pengecoran ini adalah ADC (Aluminium Die Casting 12. Parameter pertama yaitu model sistem saluran meliputi saluran samping, saluran bawah, saluran bawah dengan 2 gate dan saluran bawah dengan 3 gate dengan temperatur tuang konstan 700°C. Parameter kedua yaitu variasi perbedaan temperatur tuang antara 700°C, 750°C, 800°C dan 850°C dengan sistem saluran samping. Dari hasil penelitian ini diperoleh bahwa sistem saluran samping memiliki prosentase cacat porositas paling sedikit dibanding sistem saluran lainnya yaitu sebesar 2,7535% dan memiliki harga impact rata-rata paling besar yaitu 0,0275 J/mm2 pada potongan 1 dan 0,0660 J/mm2 pada potongan 2. Variasi temperatur tuang berpengaruh terhadap banyaknya cacat porositas dan harga impact rata-rata. Temperatur tuang 700°C dibanding temperatur tuang yang lain memiliki cacat porositas paling sedikit dan harga impact rata-rata paling besar yaitu 0,0275 J/mm2 pada potongan 1 dan 0,0660 J/mm2

  5. Application of a drainage film reduces fibroblast ingrowth into large-pored polyurethane foam during negative-pressure wound therapy in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Springer, Steffen; Abel, Martin; Wesarg, Falko; Ruth, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2013-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an advantageous treatment option in wound management to promote healing and reduce the risk of complications. NPWT is mainly carried out using open-cell polyurethane (PU) foams that stimulate granulation tissue formation. However, growth of wound bed tissue into foam material, leading to disruption of newly formed tissue upon dressing removal, has been observed. Consequently, it would be of clinical interest to preserve the positive effects of open-cell PU foams while avoiding cellular ingrowth. The study presented analyzed effects of NPWT using large-pored PU foam, fine-pored PU foam, and the combination of large-pored foam with drainage film on human dermal fibroblasts grown in a collagen matrix. The results showed no difference between the dressings in stimulating cellular migration during NPWT. However, when NPWT was applied using a large-pored PU foam, the fibroblasts continued to migrate into the dressing. This led to significant breaches in the cell layers upon removal of the samples after vacuum treatment. In contrast, cell migration stopped at the collagen matrix edge when fine-pored PU foam was used, as well as with the combination of PU foam and drainage film. In conclusion, placing a drainage film between collagen matrix and the large-pored PU foam dressing reduced the ingrowth of cells into the foam significantly. Moreover, positive effects on cellular migration were not affected, and the effect of the foam on tissue surface roughness in vitro was also reduced. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Novel Crack Stopper Concept for Lightweight Foam Cored Sandwich Structures – Experimental Validation, Fe-Modelling and Potential for Use in Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, Georgios; Andreasen, Jens H.; Berggreen, Christian

    A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in foam cored composite sandwich beams panels and tested under both static and fatigue loading conditions. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect...... of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich beams and panels. Finite element (FE) modelling of the experimental setups was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE model predicts the energy...... sandwich beam and panel specimens subjected to fatigue loading conditions. The effect of the crack arresters on the fatigue life is analysed, and the predictive results are subsequently compared with the observations from fatigue tests. Overall it was demonstrated that the proposed crack arrester device...

  7. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, J.M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J.N.; Maitland, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present within the pre-treatment aneurysms. An estimation of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The Newtonian viscosity model and the porous media model capture similar qualitative trends, though both yield a smaller volume of thrombus within the SMP foam. PMID:23329002

  8. Optimization of foam-filled bitubal structures for crashworthiness criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yong; Sun, Guangyong; Li, Guangyao; Luo, Zhen; Li, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The paper aims to optimize foam-filled bitubal squared column for crashworthiness. ► It explores different formulations and configurations of design. ► The optimal foam-filled bitubal column is better than foam-filled monotubal column. ► The optimal foam-filled bitubal column is better than empty bitubal column. -- Abstract: Thin-walled structures have been widely used as key components in automobile and aerospace industry to improve the crashworthiness and safety of vehicles while maintaining overall light-weight. This paper aims to explore the design issue of thin-walled bitubal column structures filled with aluminum foam. As a relatively new filler material, aluminum foam can increase crashworthiness without sacrificing too much weight. To optimize crashworthiness of the foam-filled bitubal square column, the Kriging meta-modeling technique is adopted herein to formulate the objective and constraint functions. The genetic algorithm (GA) and Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA II) are used to seek the optimal solutions to the single and multiobjective optimization problems, respectively. To compare with other thin-walled configurations, the design optimization is also conducted for empty bitubal column and foam-filled monotubal column. The results demonstrate that the foam-filled bitubal configuration has more room to enhance the crashworthiness and can be an efficient energy absorber.

  9. Investigation of non-isocyanate urethane functional latexes and carbon nanofiller/epoxy coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lei

    This dissertation consists of two parts. In the first part, a new class of non-isocyanate urethane methacrylates was synthesized and the effect of the new monomers on the urethane functional latex was investigated. The second part focused on a comparison of carbon nanofillers in inorganic/organic epoxy coating system for anticorrosive applications. A new class of non-isocyanate urethane methacrylates (UMAs) monomers was synthesized through an environmentally friendly non-isocyanate pathway. The kinetics of seeded semibatch emulsion polymerization of UMAs with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and butyl acrylate (BA) was monitored. The particle size and morphology were investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), ultrasound acoustic attenuation spectroscopy (UAAS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minimum film formation temperature (MFFT), mechanical and viscoelastic properties were studied. It was found that the emulsion polymerization processes all proceeded via Smith-Ewart control, leading to the uniform morphology and particle size. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and the mechanical properties of poly(MMA/BA/UMA) decreased with the increasing chain length of urethane methacrylate monomers due to the increasing flexibility of side chains. Without the effect of Tg, lower MFFT and improved mechanical properties were observed from urethane functional latexes. The improved mechanical properties were due to the increasing particle interaction by forming hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, the effect of urethane functionality in terms of the polymer composition, the location and the concentration was investigated by the batch, single-stage and two-stage semibatch polymerization of 2-[(butylcarbamoyl)oxy]ethyl methacrylate (BEM) with MMA and BA. The core-shell and homogeneous structures were evaluated by TEM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR). The compositional drift was observed from the batch

  10. Class B Fire-Extinguishing Performance Evaluation of a Compressed Air Foam System at Different Air-to-Aqueous Foam Solution Mixing Ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Rie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to evaluate the fire-extinguishing performance of a compressed air foam system at different mixing ratios of pressurized air. In this system, compressed air is injected into an aqueous solution of foam and then discharged. The experimental device uses an exclusive fire-extinguishing technology with compressed air foam that is produced based on the Canada National Laboratory and UL (Underwriters Laboratories 162 standards, with a 20-unit oil fire model (Class B applied as the fire extinguisher. Compressed air is injected through the air mixture, and results with different air-to-aqueous solution foam ratios of 1:4, 1:7, and 1:10 are studied. In addition, comparison experiments between synthetic surfactant foam and a foam type which forms an aqueous film are carried out at an air-to-aqueous solution foam ratio of 1:4. From the experimental results, at identical discharging flows, it was found that the fire-extinguishing effect of the aqueous film-forming foam is greatest at an air-to-aqueous solution foam ratio of 1:7 and weakest at 1:10. Moreover, the fire-extinguishing effect of the aqueous film-forming foam in the comparison experiments between the aqueous film-forming foam and the synthetic surfactant foam is greatest.

  11. Technological parameters influence on the non-autoclaved foam concrete characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartenjeva, Ekaterina; Mashkin, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Foam concretes are used as effective heat-insulating materials. The porous structure of foam concrete provides good insulating and strength properties that make them possible to be used as heat-insulating structural materials. Optimal structure of non-autoclaved foam concrete depends on both technological factors and properties of technical foam. In this connection, the possibility to manufacture heat-insulation structural foam concrete on a high-speed cavity plant with the usage of protein and synthetic foamers was estimated. This experiment was carried out using mathematical planning method, and in this case mathematical models were developed that demonstrated the dependence of operating performance of foam concrete on foaming and rotation speed of laboratory plant. The following material properties were selected for the investigation: average density, compressive strength, bending strength and thermal conductivity. The influence of laboratory equipment technological parameters on technical foam strength and foam stability coefficient in the cement paste was investigated, physical and mechanical properties of non-autoclaved foam concrete were defined based on investigated foam. As a result of investigation, foam concrete samples were developed with performance parameters ensuring their use in production. The mathematical data gathered demonstrated the dependence of foam concrete performance on the technological regime.

  12. Flow transitions in two-dimensional foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreth, Christopher; Sullivan, Scott; Dennin, Michael

    2006-11-01

    For sufficiently slow rates of strain, flowing foam can exhibit inhomogeneous flows. The nature of these flows is an area of active study in both two-dimensional model foams and three dimensional foam. Recent work in three-dimensional foam has identified three distinct regimes of flow [S. Rodts, J. C. Baudez, and P. Coussot, Europhys. Lett. 69, 636 (2005)]. Two of these regimes are identified with continuum behavior (full flow and shear banding), and the third regime is identified as a discrete regime exhibiting extreme localization. In this paper, the discrete regime is studied in more detail using a model two-dimensional foam: a bubble raft. We characterize the behavior of the bubble raft subjected to a constant rate of strain as a function of time, system size, and applied rate of strain. We observe localized flow that is consistent with the coexistence of a power-law fluid with rigid-body rotation. As a function of applied rate of strain, there is a transition from a continuum description of the flow to discrete flow when the thickness of the flow region is approximately ten bubbles. This occurs at an applied rotation rate of approximately 0.07 s-1.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower thermal conductivity compared to air are entrapped in the glass melt, the derived foam glass will contain...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...... with different gas compositions. The foam glasses were characterised concerning densities, open/closed porosity and crystallinity. We find out, through analytical calculations and experiments, how the thermal conductivity of foam glass depends on density, glass composition and gas composition. Certain glass...

  14. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevremovic, M.; Milosevic, B.; Lazarevic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating system, which are used for painting of military equipment. Samples for testing are painted aluminum plates contaminated with liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60 Co, 133 Ba, 152 Eu and 241 Am. The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. Comparison of the results is done in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the effectiveness of decontamination. Samples with alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. (author) [sr

  15. Applications of Foamed Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sari Kamarul Aini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of foamed concrete is increasing at present due to high demand on foamed concrete structures with good mechanical and physical properties. This paper discusses on the use of basic raw materials, their characteristics, production process, and their application in foamed lightweight concrete with densities between 300 kg/m3 and 1800 kg/m3. It also discusses the factors that influence the strengths and weaknesses of foamed concrete based on studies that were conducted previously.

  16. Urethane anesthesia depresses activities of thalamocortical neurons and alters its response to nociception in terms of dual firing modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeowool eHuh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anesthetics are often used to characterize the activity of single neurons in-vivo for its advantages such as reduced noise level and convenience in noxious stimulations. Of the anesthetics, urethane had been widely used in some thalamic studies under the assumption that sensory signals are still relayed to the thalamus under urethane anesthesia and that thalamic response would therefore reflect the response of the awake state. We tested whether this assumption stands by comparing thalamic activity in terms of tonic and burst firing modes during ‘the awake state’ or under ‘urethane anesthesia’ utilizing the extracellular single unit recording technique. First we have tested how thalamic relay neurons respond to the introduction of urethane and then tested how urethane influences thalamic discharges under formalin-induced nociception. Urethane significantly depressed overall firing rates of thalamic relay neurons, which was sustained despite the delayed increase of burst activity over the 4 hour recording period. Thalamic response to nociception under anesthesia was also similar overall except for the slight and transient increase of burst activity. Overall, results demonstrated that urethane suppresses the activity of thalamic relay neurons and that, despite the slight fluctuation of burst firing, formalin-induced nociception cannot significantly change the firing pattern of thalamic relay neurons that was caused by urethane.

  17. Foam Cells and the Pathogenesis of Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Minseob; Hudkins, Kelly L.; Alpers, Charles E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Foam cells in human glomeruli can be encountered in various renal diseases including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and diabetic nephropathy. Although foam cells are a key participant in atherosclerosis, surprisingly little is known about their pathogenicity in the kidney. We review our understanding (or lack thereof) of foam cells in the kidney as well as insights gained in studies of foam cells and macrophages involved in atherosclerosis, to suggest areas of investigation that will allow better characterization of the role of these cells in renal disease. Recent findings There is a general dearth of animal models of disease with renal foam cell accumulation, limiting progress in our understanding of the pathobiology of these cells. Recent genetic modifications of hyperlipidemic mice have resulted in some new disease models with renal foam cell accumulation. Recent studies have challenged older paradigms by findings that indicate many tissue macrophages are derived from cells permanently residing in the tissue from birth rather than circulating monocytes. Summary Renal foam cells remain an enigma. Extrapolating from studies of atherosclerosis suggests that therapeutics targeting mitochondrial ROS production or modulating cholesterol and lipoprotein uptake or egress from these cells may prove beneficial for kidney diseases in which foam cells are present. PMID:25887903

  18. Foams in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  19. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  20. Urethane influence in the urine formation in swiss rats and syrian hamster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marina F.; Silva, Natanael G.; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de, E-mail: mflima@ipen.br, E-mail: ngsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: chmesqui@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Urethane is an anaesthetic agent with minimal cardiovascular and respiratory system depression with long-lasting (6-10h) effects. Its carcinogenic potential avoids it from veterinary use. Either, the knowledge of its effects over the circulating catecholamines (cortisone and corticosterone), with reflects in the muscles physiology, it is widely used in pharmacological studies in laboratory species. At the first minutes, Urethane induces a hyperglycaemia condition due the insulin concentration decrease, later than, the insulin concentration and the condition becomes in hypoglycaemia, but the Urethane interfering in the urine production mechanisms has not been described. It is accepted that the glycolic level would not interferes in the kidney function, except in chronic states, notably associated with insulin related diseases. The relative high biological half-life of {sup 177}Lu-Dotatate allows its use in biodistribution studies among small animals whose metabolic rates are so fast that would be impossible observe them with the most part of the labeled molecules. During the performance of a cross-species extrapolation study using Urethane as anaesthesia and {sup 177}Lu-Dotatate as metabolic tracer, was observed the Urethane influence over urine formation in Swiss rats and Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). The objective of this work is only describes the Urethane action over the urine production. Firstly, four male inbread Wistar Swiss rats ({+-}250 g), are anesthetized, with around 1200 mg/kg, i.p., in groups of two. One rat from each group get ahead to the injection of {sup 177}Lu-Dotatate and Gamma camera in vivo study, the second ones, anesthetized, waited under warming lights until more than one hour to initiate the biodistribution study. The scintillographical images shown the radiopeptide stopped at the kidneys and the urinary empty in the animals who attempt more than one hour before enter to radiopharmaceutical injection and Gamma camera imaging

  1. Urethane influence in the urine formation in swiss rats and syrian hamster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Marina F.; Silva, Natanael G.; Mesquita, Carlos Henrique de

    2011-01-01

    Urethane is an anaesthetic agent with minimal cardiovascular and respiratory system depression with long-lasting (6-10h) effects. Its carcinogenic potential avoids it from veterinary use. Either, the knowledge of its effects over the circulating catecholamines (cortisone and corticosterone), with reflects in the muscles physiology, it is widely used in pharmacological studies in laboratory species. At the first minutes, Urethane induces a hyperglycaemia condition due the insulin concentration decrease, later than, the insulin concentration and the condition becomes in hypoglycaemia, but the Urethane interfering in the urine production mechanisms has not been described. It is accepted that the glycolic level would not interferes in the kidney function, except in chronic states, notably associated with insulin related diseases. The relative high biological half-life of 177 Lu-Dotatate allows its use in biodistribution studies among small animals whose metabolic rates are so fast that would be impossible observe them with the most part of the labeled molecules. During the performance of a cross-species extrapolation study using Urethane as anaesthesia and 177 Lu-Dotatate as metabolic tracer, was observed the Urethane influence over urine formation in Swiss rats and Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). The objective of this work is only describes the Urethane action over the urine production. Firstly, four male inbread Wistar Swiss rats (±250 g), are anesthetized, with around 1200 mg/kg, i.p., in groups of two. One rat from each group get ahead to the injection of 177 Lu-Dotatate and Gamma camera in vivo study, the second ones, anesthetized, waited under warming lights until more than one hour to initiate the biodistribution study. The scintillographical images shown the radiopeptide stopped at the kidneys and the urinary empty in the animals who attempt more than one hour before enter to radiopharmaceutical injection and Gamma camera imaging procedures. The rates

  2. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  3. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  4. Carbonate-Foaming Agents in Aluminum Foams: Advantages and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloki, Ali; Esmailian, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Aluminum foams are commonly produced using hydride foaming agents. Carbonates are inexpensive and more convenient to handle than hydrides. In this review article, the replacement of titanium hydride by carbonate foaming agents in aluminum and aluminum alloys was studied. Carbonate-foaming agents including calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, and dolomite were investigated for the production of aluminum and aluminum alloys. The thermal decomposition behavior of the foaming agents was evaluated in conjunction with the cell structure of the aluminum foams produced. From the results, magnesium carbonate and dolomite were selected as suitable foaming agents for aluminum alloys because of lower decomposition temperature than calcium carbonate. It was clarified that dolomite resulted in a fine and homogenous cell structures.

  5. Transport of CO2 foam stabilized with engineered nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Worthen, A. J.; Aroonsri, A.; Huh, C.; Bryant, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Foam injection into the subsurface is performed to improve gas control mobility for residual oil extraction in, e.g., enhanced oil recovery and contaminated site remediation. Foam improves the gas mobility control as the gas viscosity is increased through its dispersion into a liquid phase. Finer the bubbles the lower the gas apparent viscosity (or foam viscosity) and the better is the sweep efficiency of the residual oil. A chemical surfactant adsorbed at the gas-liquid interface is generally used to maintain an optimal foam texture (number of bubbles for unit volume) however it can be desorbed making the foam coarser. Here, we present an experimental and modeling study on the effect of nanoparticles on foam stability. Nanoparticles are adsorbed onto the bubble interface irreversibly and therefore they are expected to keep the desired texture of the foam for the entire time of its application. In this study, we use silica nanoparticles in conjunction with a surfactant to study the transport behavior of a CO2 foam in a porous medium. Experiments were performed using a glass-bead pack and Boise sandstone with foam quality (fg) 0.1-0.9 until steady-state. Foam flow was described by a mechanistic population balance model coupled with the fractional flow equation and constitutive equations for foam generation and destruction based on lamella division and bubble coalescence mechanisms, respectively. In order to minimize the uncertainty, model parameters were estimated by combining experimental data of pressure gradient during steady-state and transient. Experiments and theory agree very well and the overall results show a significant increase in foam texture and stability when nanoparticles and surfactant are added to a foam flow in a low permeability porous medium. Data from tests with various nanoparticle concentrations (cn) show that gas apparent viscosity changes with fg and cn. But its optimal value does not vary with cn and it is already attained at fg equal to 0

  6. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    result in viscous sintering and subsequent foaming of the glass melt. The porous glass melt is cooled down to room temperature to freeze-in the foam structure. The resulting foam glass is applied in constructions as a light weight material to reduce load bearing capacity and as heat insulating material......The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, which...... in buildings and industry. We foam panel glass from old televisions with different foaming agents. We discuss the foaming ability and the foaming mechanism of different foaming systems. We compare several studies to define a viscous window for preparing low density foam glass. However, preparing foam glass...

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Poly(hexamethylene-urethane and PEG-Poly(hexamethylene-urethane and Their Cholesteryl Oleyl Carbonate Composites for Human Blood Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yuh Cherng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new urethane-based acrylates (UAA and PEG-UAA were synthesized as polymer blocks. The chemical composition of the two monomers was confirmed by IR and NMR. After cross-linking these blockers by radical polymerization, “hexamethylene PU” [poly(hexamethylene-urethane] and “PEG-hexamethylene PU” [PEG-poly(hexa-methylene-urethane] were obtained. The platelet adhesion and platelet activation of these polymers were evaluated in the presence of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP blood. The relative blood clotting indexes of the polymers were determined to measure their capability of reducing thrombogenicity. The hemolysis of red blood cells was also assessed to examine the haemocompatibility of the polymers. The hexamethylene PU and PEG-hexamethylene PU showed less platelet adhesion, platelet activation, blood clotting and hemolysis than a commercial PU (Tecoflex. The liquid crystal molecule, cholesteryl oleyl carbonate (COC, showed further improved biocompatibility to human blood, after COC was embedded in the PU polymers. PEG-hexamethylene PU + 10% COC demonstrated the best activity in reducing thrombogenicity and the best haemocompatibility. The inclusion of PEG segments into the PEG-UAA structure increased its hydrophilicity. The methylene bis(cyclohexyl segments in Tecoflex PU decreased haemocompatibility. These observations are in good agreement with performed contact angle measurements. The PEG-hexamethylene PU loaded with COC might be a promising material for applications in bioengineering.

  8. Foaming in manure based digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming is one of the major problems that occasionally occurred in the Danish full-scale biogas plants, affecting negatively the overall digestion process. The foam is typically formatted in the main biogas reactor or in the pre-storage tank and the entrapped solids in the foam....... Moreover, foaming presents adverse environmental impacts owing to the overflowing of the pre-storage or digester tanks. So far, there has never been thoroughly investigation of foaming problem in manure-based digester, which is the main anaerobic digestion applied in Denmark. The purpose of the present...... study was to identify potential causes of foaming in manure based digesters. Moreover, it was also an aim to investigate possible solutions to counteract foam formation with the use of antifoam agents. Thus, the impact of organic loading rate and content of feeding substrate on anaerobic digestion...

  9. Synchrotron tomography on metallic foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haibel, A.; Banhart, J.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic foams are a class of materials with unique properties. In contrast to most aqueous foams which are stable due to surface active agents, the liquid state of metallic foams can be stabilized by admixing small non-soluble particles. We present the results of our investigations on such materials consisting three different components: an aluminium alloy, silicon carbide particles for foam stabilization, and titanium hydride acting as blowing agent. By means of synchrotron-tomography we visualized the three dimensional distribution of the silicon carbide and the titanium hydride particles in the unfoamed cast solid precursor, in the fully foamed liquid state, and in the solidified final state of the foam. We analyzed the silicon carbide formation in these three foaming stages and its influence of the pore stability

  10. Polyurethane foam impregnated with lignin as a filler for the removal of crude oil from contaminated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, O.S.H. [Departamento de Química, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP: 31.270-901 (Brazil); Coelho da Silva, Mercês [Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Itajubá—UNIFEI, Campus Universitário de Itabira. Itabira, Minas Gerais, CEP: 35.903-087 (Brazil); Silva, V.R.; Mussel, W.N. [Departamento de Química, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP: 31.270-901 (Brazil); Yoshida, M.I., E-mail: mirene@ufmg.br [Departamento de Química, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, CEP: 31.270-901 (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The presence of lignin in polyurethane foams increased oil sorption capacity. • The presence of lignin resulted in a decrease in the hydrophobicity of the foams. • Langmuir isotherm predicted a maximum oil adsorption of 28.9 g g{sup −1} by the PUF-10. • ΔG° (−4.4 kJ mol{sup −1}) indicated that adsorption process by PUF-10 was spontaneous. • The recyclability of the foam showed efficiency greater than 95% after five cycles. - Abstract: The present study describes the influence of the concentration of lignin when used as a filler in polyurethane foam for crude oil sorption. The foams (lignin 0–20 wt%) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis, contact angle and density. The FTIR analysis confirmed urethane linkage formation, showing that the chemical structure of the polymer was preserved, despite the addition of different lignin concentrations. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that the presence of lignin has altered the onset temperature (T{sub onset}) of the foams, decreasing as the concentration of lignin is increased. The contact angle analysis showed a decrease in the hydrophobicity of the foams with increasing lignin concentration. All modified foams showed an improvement in the oil sorption capacity in a PUF/oil/water system, and the PUF-10 showed an improvement of about 35.5% compared to the PUF-blank. The Langmuir isotherm showed a better fit to the data and predicted a maximum oil adsorption of 28.9 g g{sup −1} by the PUF-10. The ΔG° value of −4.4 kJ mol{sup −1} indicated that crude oil adsorption process by PUF-10 was spontaneous. The results of reuse of the PUF-10 showed that oil removal efficiency remained greater than 95% after five consecutive cycles.

  11. Production of urethane group containing coatings by curing with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoor, H.; Demmler, K.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the manufacture of coatings by applying ionizing radiation to a composition which contains olefinically unsaturated polymeric materials having urethane groups and which has been applied to a substrate. The polymeric materials may be used in combination with olefinically unsaturated monomeric compounds and conventional additives. (U.S.)

  12. Structure-property correlation study of novel poly(urethane-ester-siloxane) networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pergal, M. V.; Džunuzović, J. V.; Poreba, Rafal; Steinhart, Miloš; Pergal, M. M.; Vodnik, V. V.; Špírková, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 18 (2013), s. 6164-6176 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/0195 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : urethane-siloxane copolymers * hyperbranched poly ester * mechanical - properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2013

  13. Measurement of the responses of polyurethane and CONFOR(TM) foams and the development of a system identification technique to estimate polyurethane foam parameters from experimental impulse responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Vaidyanadan

    Flexible polyurethane foam is the main cushioning element used in car seats. Optimization of an occupied seat's static and dynamic behavior requires models of foam that are accurate over a wide range of excitation and pre-compression conditions. Experiments were conducted to measure the response of foam over a wide range of excitation which include slowly varying uniaxial compression tests on a 3 inch cube foam sample, base excitation and impulse excitation test on a foam-mass system. The foam used was the same in all of the experiments, thus obtaining all the responses on the same foam sample which helps eliminate the sample to sample variation. Similar efforts were taken to conduct impulse and base excitation tests on CONFOR(TM) foam to help in future modeling efforts of CONFOR(TM) foam. All the experimental protocols and data pre-processing protocols along with results are presented. Previous researcher developed a linear model for a single-degree of freedom foam-mass system subjected to an impulsive excitation. Free response data from impulse tests on a foam-mass system with different masses was used to identify model parameters at various pre-compression levels (settling points). The free response of the system was modeled as a Prony series (sum of exponentials) whose parameters can be related to the parameters in the foam-mass system model. Models identified from tests at one settling point performed poorly when used to predict the response at other settling points. In this research, a method is described to estimate the parameters of a global model of the foam behavior from data gathered in a series of impulse tests at different settling points. The global model structure includes a nonlinear elastic term and a hereditary viscoelastic term. The model can be used to predict the settling point for each mass used and, by expanding the model about that settling point, local linear models of the response to impulsive excitation can be derived. From this analysis

  14. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ∼ 30 m/s was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ∼10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ∼10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  15. Thermo-mechanical characterization of silicone foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Nickolaus A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cady, Carl M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Matthew W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Cellular solids such as elastomeric foams are used in many structural applications to absorb and dissipate energy, due to their light weight (low density) and high energy absorption capability. In this paper we will discuss foams derived from S5370, a silicone foam formulation developed by Dow Corning. In the application presented, the foam is consolidated into a cushion component of constant thickness but variable density. A mechanical material model developed by Lewis (2013), predicts material response, in part, as a function of relative density. To determine the required parameters for this model we have obtained the mechanical response in compression for ambient, cold and hot temperatures. The variable density cushion provided samples sufficient samples so that the effect of sample initial density on the mechanical response could be studied. The mechanical response data showed extreme sensitivity to relative density. We also observed at strains corresponding to 1 MPa a linear relationship between strain and initial density for all temperatures. Samples taken from parts with a history of thermal cycling demonstrated a stiffening response that was a function of temperature, with the trend of more stiffness as temperature increased above ambient. This observation is in agreement with the entropic effects on the thermo-mechanical behavior of silicone polymers. In this study, we present the experimental methods necessary for the development of a material model, the testing protocol, analysis of test data, and a discussion of load (stress) and gap (strain) as a function of sample initial densities and temperatures

  16. Thermo-mechanical interaction effects in foam cored sandwich panels-correlation between High-order models and Finite element analysis results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Santiuste, Carlos; Thomsen, Ole Thybo

    2010-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical interaction effects including thermal material degradation in polymer foam cored sandwich structures is investigated using the commercial Finite Element Analysis (FEA) package ABAQUS/Standard. Sandwich panels with different boundary conditions in the form of simply supported...

  17. Characterization of methacrylate-based composites containing thio-urethane oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Nelson, Morgan; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the ability of thio-urethane oligomers to improve the properties of restorative composite resins. Oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 0-20 wt% to BisGMA-TEGDMA (70-30 wt%). Silanated inorganic fillers were added (70 wt%). Materials were photoactivated at 800 mW/cm(2) filtered to 320-500 nm. Near-IR was used to follow degree of methacrylate conversion (DC). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending with 2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm bars for flexural strength/modulus and toughness (FS/E, and T) according to ISO 4049, and 2 mm × 5 mm × 25 mm notched specimens for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). Significant increase in DC was observed in thio-urethane-containing materials especially for the group with 20 wt% of aliphatic version. Materials composed by oligomers also promoted higher FS, E, and KIC in comparison to controls irrespective of thio-urethane type. A significant increase in toughness was detected by ANOVA, but not distinguished in the groups. The PS was significantly reduced by the presence of thio-urethane for almost all groups. The use of thio-urethane oligomer to compose methacrylate-based restorative composite promote increase in DC, FS, E and KIC while significant reduces PS. A simple additive was shown to reduce stress while increasing convrersion and mechanical properties, mainly fracture toughness. This has he potential of increasing the service life of dental composites, without changing current operatory procedures. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Griffiths, S.K.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some reactor loss-of-coolant reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. Because the foam would be generated using the combustible gaseous contents of the containment vessel, combustion occurs inside the foam cells. Although foams generated with inert gas have been well studied for use in fire fighting, little is known about combustion in foams generated with flammable mixtures. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, the authors have conducted open tube tests and closed vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion with and without foam. At low and intermediate hydrogen concentrations, the foam has little effect on the ultimate isochoric pressure rise. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen where the peak overpressure is reduced by two and one-half. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increased by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  19. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Griffiths, S.K.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some loss of coolant nuclear reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. Because, in practice, the foam would be generated using the combustible gaseous contents of the containment vessel, combustion occurs inside the foam cells. Although foams generated with inert gas have been well studied for use in fire fighting, little is known about combustion in foams generated with flammable mixtures. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, several open-tube tests and more than 100 closed-vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion, with and without foam were conducted. At low and intermediate hydrogen concentrations, the foam has little effect on the ultimate isochoric pressure rise. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen (the stoichiometric limit is 29.6% hydrogen) where the peak overpressure is reduced by 2 1/2. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increased by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam, and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  20. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.; Griffiths, S.; Shepherd, J.

    1983-01-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some loss-of-coolant nuclear reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. Because, in practice, the foam would be generated using the combustible gaseous contents of the containment vessel, combustion occurs inside the foam cells. Although foams generated with inert gas have been well studied for use in fire fighting, little is known about combustion in foams generated with flammable mixtures. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, we have conducted several open tube tests and over one hundred closed vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion with and without foam. At low and intermediate hydrogen concentrations, the foam has little effect on the ultimate isochoric pressure rise. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen (the stoichiometric limit is 29.6% hydrogen) where the peak overpressure is reduced by a factor of two and one-half. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increase by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  1. Tuneable micro- and nano-periodic structures in a free-standing flexible urethane/urea elastomer film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, M H; Trindade, A C; Figueirinhas, J L; Melo, L V; Brogueira, P; Deus, A M; Teixeira, P I C

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the control and manipulation of tuneable equilibrium structures in a free-standing urethane/urea elastomer film by means of atomic force microscopy, small-angle light scattering and polarising optical microscopy. The urethane/urea elastomer was prepared by reacting a poly(propyleneoxide)-based triisocyanate-terminated prepolymer (PU) with poly(butadienediol) (PBDO), with a weight ratio of 60% PU/40% PBDO. An elastomer film was shear-cast onto a glass plate and allowed to cure, first in an oven, then in air. Latent micro- and nano-periodic patterns are induced by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation of the film and can be "developed" by applying a plane uniaxial stress or by immersing the elastomer in an appropriate solvent and then drying it. For this elastomer we describe six pattern states, how they are related and how they can be manipulated. The morphological features of the UV-exposed film surface can be tuned, reproducibly and reversibly, by switching the direction of the applied mechanical field. Elastomers extracted in toluene exhibit different surface patterns depending upon the state in which they were developed. Stress-strain data collected for the films before and after UV irradiation reveal anisotropy induced by the shear-casting conditions and enhanced by the mechanical field. We have interpreted our results by assuming the film to consist of a thin, stiff surface layer ("skin") lying atop a thicker, softer substrate ("bulk"). The skin's higher stiffness is hypothesised to be due to the more extensive cross-linking of chains located near the surface by the UV radiation. Patterns would thus arise as a competition between the effects of bending the skin and stretching/compressing the bulk, as in the work of Cerda and Mahadevan (Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 074302 (2003)). We present some preliminary results of a simulation of this model using the Finite Element package ABAQUS.

  2. Earth/Mars Landing Impact Attenuation Using Foam

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Used results from extensive foam testing performed on a previous JSC Innovation Charge Account (ICA) project to develop material models in MSC/Marc commercial finite...

  3. Open cell conducting foams for high synchrotron radiation accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Petracca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible use of open cell conductive foams in high synchrotron radiation particle accelerators is considered. Available materials and modeling tools are reviewed, potential pros and cons are discussed, and preliminary conclusions are drawn.

  4. An overview of polyurethane foams in higher specification foam mattresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soppi, Esa; Lehtiö, Juha; Saarinen, Hannu

    2015-02-01

    Soft polyurethane foams exist in thousands of grades and constitute essential components of hospital mattresses. For pressure ulcer prevention, the ability of foams to control the immersion and envelopment of patients is essential. Higher specification foam mattresses (i.e., foam mattresses that relieve pressure via optimum patient immersion and envelopment while enabling patient position changes) are claimed to be more effective for preventing pressure ulcers than standard mattresses. Foam grade evaluations should include resiliency, density, hardness, indentation force/load deflection, progressive hardness, tensile strength, and elongation along with essential criteria for higher specification foam mattresses. Patient-specific requirements may include optimal control of patient immersion and envelopment. Mattress cover characteristics should include breathability, impermeability to fluids, and fire safety and not affect mattress function. Additional determinations such as hardness are assessed according to the guidelines of the American Society for Testing and Materials and the International Organization for Standardization. At this time, no single foam grade provides an optimal combination of the above key requirements, but the literature suggests a combination of at least 2 foams may create an optimal higher specification foam mattress for pressure ulcer prevention. Future research and the development of product specification accuracy standards are needed to help clinicians make evidence-based decisions about mattress use.

  5. Foam injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers: Blowing agents, foaming process and characterization of structural foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, S.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer foams play an important role caused by the steadily increasing demand to light weight design. In case of soft polymers, like thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), the haptic feeling of the surface is affected by the inner foam structure. Foam injection molding of TPEs leads to so called structural foam, consisting of two compact skin layers and a cellular core. The properties of soft structural foams like soft-touch, elastic and plastic behavior are affected by the resulting foam structure, e.g. thickness of the compact skins and the foam core or density. This inner structure can considerably be influenced by different processing parameters and the chosen blowing agent. This paper is focused on the selection and characterization of suitable blowing agents for foam injection molding of a TPE-blend. The aim was a high density reduction and a decent inner structure. Therefore DSC and TGA measurements were performed on different blowing agents to find out which one is appropriate for the used TPE. Moreover a new analyzing method for the description of processing characteristics by temperature dependent expansion measurements was developed. After choosing suitable blowing agents structural foams were molded with different types of blowing agents and combinations and with the breathing mold technology in order to get lower densities. The foam structure was analyzed to show the influence of the different blowing agents and combinations. Finally compression tests were performed to estimate the influence of the used blowing agent and the density reduction on the compression modulus.

  6. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  7. Foams structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cantat, Isabelle; Graner, François; Pitois, Olivier; Höhler, Reinard; Elias, Florence; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Rouyer, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This book is the first to provide a thorough description of all aspects of the physico-chemical properties of foams. It sets out what is known about their structure, their stability, and their rheology. Engineers, researchers and students will find descriptions of all the key concepts, illustrated by numerous applications, as well as experiments and exercises for the reader. A solutions manual for lecturers is available via the publisher's web site.

  8. Modelling Adsorption of Foam-Forming Surfactants Modélisation de l'adsorption des produits tensio-actifs moussants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannhardt K.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the use of foam-forming surfactants for mobility control in gas flooding enhanced oil recovery processes. The success of any such process is strongly affected by the rate of propagation of the surfactant through the reservoir. A sound understanding of surfactant adsorption on rock surfaces at reservoir conditions is therefore essential. This paper describes a model for the evaluation of adsorption during flow of surfactant solutions through porous media. The adsorption term in the flow equation is expressed in terms of the surface excess which proves to be more generally applicable than, for example, the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption isotherms of three types of commercially available foam-forming surfactants are determined from core flooding data at different temperatures and brine salinities. L'utilisation de produits tensio-actifs moussants pour le contrôle de mobilité dans les procédés de récupération assistée du pétrole par injection de gaz suscite actuellement un grand intérêt. Mais le succès d'un tel procédé dépend largement de la vitesse de propagation du tensioactif dans le réservoir. Il est donc indispensable d'avoir une bonne connaissance de l'adsorption du tensio-actif sur les surfaces de la roche, dans les conditions de réservoir. Cet article décrit un modèle qui permet d'évaluer l'adsorption pendant l'écoulement de solutions tensio-actives en milieu poreux. Le terme qui représente l'adsorption dans l'équation de l'écoulement est exprimé en fonction de l'excédent de surface, concept qui s'est révélé d'une application plus générale que, par exemple, l'isotherme d'adsorption de Langmuir. Les isothermes d'adsorption de trois types de tensio-actifs moussants disponibles sur le marché sont déterminées à partir de données obtenues lors d'essais de déplacement dans des carottes, à différentes températures et avec des saumures de différentes salinités.

  9. Mixing foams and grains in Hele-Shaw cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A P B; Tufaile, A; Haddad, T A S, E-mail: tufaile@usp.b [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades da Universidade de Sao Paulo, R. Arlindo Bettio, 1000, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-01

    We have observed some features of the coexistence of foams and granular materials in Hele-Shaw cells. The most part of the liquid and granular material stays at the bottom of the cell, with only a small quantity of the mixture resting on the froth. The fractal dimensions of the final states of the foams are close to the values obtained from the Random Apollonian Packing model. The disperse structure of the granular material affects the probability distribution of number of sides of the foam bubbles. The nearest neighbor distances between the peaks of the sand piles at the bottom of the cell are close to a lognormal distribution.

  10. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  11. Efficacy of a prehospital self-expanding polyurethane foam for noncompressible hemorrhage under extreme operational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Adam P; Larentzakis, Andreas; Marini, John; Picard, Abby; Duggan, Michael J; Busold, Rany; Helmick, Marc; Zugates, Greg; Beagle, John; Sharma, Upma; King, David R

    2015-02-01

    Noncompressible abdominal hemorrhage is a significant cause of battlefield and civilian mortality. We developed a self-expanding polyurethane foam intended to provide temporary hemorrhage control and enable evacuation to a definitive surgical capability, for casualties who would otherwise die. We hypothesized that foam treatment would be efficacious over a wide range of out-of-hospital operational conditions. The foam was tested in an established lethal, closed-cavity hepatoportal injury model in four groups as follows. Group 1 involved baseline conditions, wherein foam was deployed from a pneumatically driven, first-generation delivery device at room temperature (n = 6). Group 2 involved foam deployment from a field-relevant, handheld delivery prototype (n = 12). Group 3 involved foam components that were conditioned to simulate 1-year shelf-life (n = 6). Group 4 involved foam that was conditioned to a range of temperatures (10 °C and 50 °C; n = 6 per group). In all studies, survival was monitored for up to 180 minutes and compared with an ongoing and accumulating control group with no intervention (n = 14). In Group 1 with a first-generation delivery system, foam treatment resulted in a significant survival advantage relative to the control group (p foam groups was significantly lower than in the control group (p foam treatment resulted in a survival advantage relative to the control group. This supports the feasibility of foam treatment as a prehospital hemostatic bridge to surgery for severely bleeding causalities.

  12. Sclerosant foam structure and stability is strongly influenced by liquid air fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, E; Chen, T; Connor, D E; Behnia, M; Parsi, K

    2013-10-01

    To determine the effects of sclerosant foam preparation and composition on foam structure, the time course of liquid drainage, and foam coarsening. Sodium tetradecyl sulphate (STS) and polidocanol (POL) foams were investigated in a range of concentrations (0.5-3%) and liquid-plus-air fractions (LAF; 1 + 2 to 1 + 8). Foam was injected into a vein simulation model (polyvinyl chloride tubing, inner diameter 3 mm, constant pressure 5-7 mmHg) filled with saline or blood. Liquid drainage, bubble count, and diameter were measured and documented by serial photography. Liquid drainage was faster in the vertical position than the horizontal one. In all variations, very small bubbles (diameter foams (foams (>250 μm) and by 7.5 minutes macro-foams (>500 μm) were formed. Following injection, the upper regions of foam coarsened faster as liquid drained to the bottom of the vessel. Wet preparations produced significantly smaller bubbles. Low concentration POL foam produced significantly higher bubble counts and coarsened slower than STS. Foam structure is strongly influenced by the LAF. Despite the initial formation of micro-bubbles in the syringe, mini- and macro-bubbles are formed in target vessels with time post-injection. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benefits of polidocanol endovenous microfoam (Varithena®) compared with physician-compounded foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Dario; Ankrett, Dyan N; Zhao, Xuefeng; Zhang, Xunli; Hill, Martyn; O’Byrne, Vincent; Hoad, James; Arif, Mehreen; Wright, David DI

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare foam bubble size and bubble size distribution, stability, and degradation rate of commercially available polidocanol endovenous microfoam (Varithena®) and physician-compounded foams using a number of laboratory tests. Methods Foam properties of polidocanol endovenous microfoam and physician-compounded foams were measured and compared using a glass-plate method and a Sympatec QICPIC image analysis method to measure bubble size and bubble size distribution, Turbiscan™ LAB for foam half time and drainage and a novel biomimetic vein model to measure foam stability. Physician-compounded foams composed of polidocanol and room air, CO2, or mixtures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (O2:CO2) were generated by different methods. Results Polidocanol endovenous microfoam was found to have a narrow bubble size distribution with no large (>500 µm) bubbles. Physician-compounded foams made with the Tessari method had broader bubble size distribution and large bubbles, which have an impact on foam stability. Polidocanol endovenous microfoam had a lower degradation rate than any physician-compounded foams, including foams made using room air (p foams. In all tests performed, CO2 foams were the least stable and different O2:CO2 mixtures had intermediate performance. In the biomimetic vein model, polidocanol endovenous microfoam had the slowest degradation rate and longest calculated dwell time, which represents the length of time the foam is in contact with the vein, almost twice that of physician-compounded foams using room air and eight times better than physician-compounded foams prepared using equivalent gas mixes. Conclusion Bubble size, bubble size distribution and stability of various sclerosing foam formulations show that polidocanol endovenous microfoam results in better overall performance compared with physician-compounded foams. Polidocanol endovenous microfoam offers better stability and cohesive properties in a biomimetic vein model compared to

  14. Polyurethane Foams with Pyrimidine Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kania Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligoetherols based on pyrimidine ring were obtained upon reaction of barbituric acid with glycidol and alkylene carbonates. These oligoetherols were then used to obtain polyurethane foams in the reaction of oligoetherols with isocyanates and water. The protocol of foam synthesis was optimized by the choice of proper kind of oligoetherol and synthetic composition. The thermal resistance was studied by dynamic and static methods with concomitant monitoring of compressive strength. The polyurethane foams have similar physical properties as the classic ones except their enhanced thermal resistance. They stand long-time heating even at 200°C. Moreover thermal exposition of foams results generally in increase of their compressive strength.

  15. Steam foam studies in the presence of residual oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.A.; Demiral, B.; Castanier, L.M.

    1992-05-01

    The lack of understanding regarding foam flow in porous media necessitates further research. This paper reports on going work at Stanford University aimed at increasing our understanding in the particular area of steam foams. The behavior of steam foam is investigated with a one dimensional (6 ft. {times} 2.15 in.) sandpack under residual oil conditions of approximately 12 percent. The strength of the in-situ generated foam, indicated by pressure drops, is significantly affected by injection procedure, slug size, and steam quality. The surfactant concentration effect is minor in the range studied. In the presence of residual oil the simultaneous injection of steam and surfactant fails to generate foam in the model even though the same procedure generates a strong foam in the absence of oil. Nevertheless when surfactant is injected as a slug ahead of the steam using a surfactant alternating (SAG) procedure, foam is generated. The suggested reason for the success of SAG is the increased phase mixing that results from steam continually having to reestablish a path through a slug of surfactant solution.

  16. Microstructure and properties of LZSA glass-ceramic foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, E. de [Graduate Program on Materials Science and Engineering-PGMAT, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Rambo, C.R. [Graduate Program on Materials Science and Engineering-PGMAT, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Department of Chemical Engineering-EQA, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: Rambo@enq.ufsc.br; Hotza, D. [Graduate Program on Materials Science and Engineering-PGMAT, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Department of Chemical Engineering-EQA, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, A.P. Novaes de [Graduate Program on Materials Science and Engineering-PGMAT, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Department of Mechanical Engineering-EMC, Federal University of Santa Catarina-UFSC, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Fey, T.; Greil, P. [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstrasse 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Commercial polyurethane foams with a monomodal pore size distribution were used to produce LZSA glass-ceramic foams by the polymeric sponge method. A suspension containing LZSA glass powder, bentonite and sodium silicate was prepared in isopropanol to impregnate the polymeric foams by dip coating. The sintering conditions were varied in the range of 700-850 deg. C for 30-180 min. The cellular microstructure of glass-ceramic foams was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro-computer X-ray tomography ({mu}CT). Optimum physical, mechanical and fluidynamic properties of the LZSA glass-ceramic foams were obtained at 750 deg. C for 60 min. Main crystalline phases detected were {beta}-spodumene and zirconium silicate. The compressive strength of the foams (0.1-10 MPa) is strongly dependent on their overall porosity and their behaviour could be explained using the Gibson-Ashby model. The Darcyan permeability of LZSA foams was found to be in the range of 0.1-4 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}, which is in the order of magnitude of cellular supports for aerosol filters, and, therefore, suitable for several other technological applications.

  17. Resin cements formulated with thio-urethanes can strengthen porcelain and increase bond strength to ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro; de Oliveira, Gabriel Rodrigues; Pfeifer, Carmem; Cesar, Paulo Francisco

    2018-04-06

    The use of thio-urethane oligomers has been shown to significantly improve the mechanical properties of resin cements (RCs). The aim of this study was to use thio-urethane-modified RC to potentially reinforce the porcelain-RC structure and to improve the bond strength to zirconia and lithium disilicate. Six oligomers were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP, P) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP, T) - with di-functional isocyanates - 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic, AL) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic, AR) or Dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-Diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic, CC). Thio-urethanes (20 wt%) were added to a BisGMA/UDMA/TEGDMA organic matrix. Filler was introduced at 60 wt%. The microshear bond strength (μSBS), Weibull modulus (m), and failure pattern of RCs bonded to zirconia (ZR) and lithium disilicate (LD) ceramics was evaluated. Biaxial flexural test and fractographic analysis of porcelain discs bonded to RCs were also performed. The biaxial flexural strength (σ bf ) and m were calculated in the tensile surfaces of porcelain and RC structures (Z = 0 and Z = -t 2 , respectively). The μSBS was improved with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL or T_AL bonded to LD and P_AL, P_AR or T_CC bonded to zirconia in comparison to controls. Mixed failures predominated in all groups. σ bf had superior values at Z = 0 with RCs formulated with oligomers P_AL, P_AR, T_AL, or T_CC in comparison to control; σ bf increased with all RCs composed by thio-urethanes at Z = -t 2 . Fractographic analysis revealed all fracture origins at Z = 0. The use of specific thio-urethane oligomers as components of RCs increased both the biaxial flexural strength of the porcelain-RC structure and the μSBS to LD and ZR. The current investigation suggests that it is possible to reinforce the porcelain-RC pair and obtain higher bond strength to LD and ZR with RCs

  18. Bi-liquid foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneville, Odile

    1997-01-01

    Concentrated emulsions have structures similar to foams; for this reason they are also called 'bi-liquid foams'. For oil in water emulsions, they are made of polyhedral oil cells separated by aqueous surfactant films. The limited stability of these Systems is a major nuisance in their applications. In this work, we tried to understand and to control the mechanisms through which bi-liquid foams can loose their stability. In a first stage, we characterized the states of surfactant films in bi-liquid foams submitted to different pressures. We determined their hydration, the surfactant density at interfaces as well as their thicknesses. The bi-liquid foams were made by concentrating hexadecane-in-water emulsions through centrifugation. The initial emulsions contained submicron oil droplets that were completely covered with surfactant. We measured the resistance of the films to dehydration, and we represented it by pressure-film thickness curves or pressure-film hydration curves. We also obtained evidence that the interfacial surfactant density increases when the film thickness is decreased (SDS case). The Newton Black Film state is the most dehydrated metastable state that can be reached. In this state, the films can be described as surfactant bilayers that only contain the hydration water of the surfactant polar heads. Two different processes are involved the destabilization of bi-liquid foams: Ostwald ripening (oil transfer from small cells to large cells) and coalescence (films rupture). The first mechanism can be controlled by choosing oils that are very insoluble in water, avoiding ethoxylated nonionic surfactants of low molecular weight, and making emulsions that are not too fine. The second mechanism is responsible for the catastrophic destabilization of bi-liquid foams made of droplets above one micron or with a low coverage in surfactant. In these cases, destabilization occurs in the early stages of concentration, when the films are still thick. It

  19. Rheology of milk foams produced by steam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Junca, Carlos A; Gumy, Jean C; Sher, Alexander; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2011-01-01

    Rheology of milk foams generated by steam injection was studied during the transient destabilization process using steady flow and dynamic oscillatory techniques: yield stress (τ(y) ) values were obtained from a stress ramp (0.2 to 25 Pa) and from strain amplitude sweep (0.001 to 3 at 1 Hz of frequency); elastic (G') and viscous (G″) moduli were measured by frequency sweep (0.1 to 10 Hz at 0.05 of strain); and the apparent viscosity (η(a) ) was obtained from the flow curves generated from the stress ramp. The effect of plate roughness and the sweep time on τ(y) was also assessed. Yield stress was found to increase with plate roughness whereas it decreased with the sweep time. The values of yield stress and moduli-G' and G″-increased during foam destabilization as a consequence of the changes in foam properties, especially the gas volume fraction, ϕ, and bubble size, R(32) (Sauter mean bubble radius). Thus, a relationship between τ(y) , ϕ, R(32) , and σ(surface tension) was established. The changes in the apparent viscosity, η, showed that the foams behaved like a shear thinning fluid beyond the yield point, fitting the modified Cross model with the relaxation time parameter (λ) also depending on the gas volume fraction. Overall, it was concluded that the viscoelastic behavior of the foam below the yield point and liquid-like behavior thereafter both vary during destabilization due to changes in the foam characteristics. Studying the transient rheology of milk foams during destabilization contributes to our knowledge of the relationships between the changes in foam properties: texture and mouth feel during the consumption of hot foamed beverages. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Antineoplastic and immunomodulatory effect of polyphenolic components of Achyranthes aspera (PCA) extract on urethane induced lung cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Chandradeo; Kumar, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds of Achyranthes aspera (PCA) extract is evaluated for anti-cancerous and cytokine based immunomodulatory effects. The PCA extract contains known components of phenolic acid and flavonoids such as mixture of quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and chrysin along with many unknown components. PCA has been orally feed to urethane (ethyl carbamate) primed lung cancerous mice at a dosage of 100 mg/kg body weight for 30 consecutive days. 100 mg powder of A. aspera contains 2.4 mg phenolic acid and 1.1 mg flavonoid (2:1 ratio). Enhanced activities and expression of antioxidant enzymes GST, GR, CAT, SOD, while down regulated expression and activation of LDH enzymes in PCA feed urethane primed lung cancerous tissues as compared to PCA non-feed urethane primed lung cancerous tissues were observed. PCA feed urethane primed lung tissues showed down regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α along with TFs, NF-κB and Stat3 while the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and p53 were enhanced in PCA feed urethane primed lung tissues. FTIR and CD spectroscopy data revealed that PCA resisted the urethane mediated conformational changes of DNA which is evident by the shift in guanine and thymine bands in FTIR from 1,708 to 1,711 cm(-1) and 1,675 to 1,671 cm(-1), respectively in PCA feed urethane primed lung cancerous tissues DNA in comparison to urethane primed lung cancerous tissues DNA. The present study suggests that PCA components have synergistic anti-cancerous and cytokine based immunomodulatory role and DNA conformation restoring effects. However, more research is required to show the effects of each component separately and in combination for effective therapeutic use to cure and prevent lung cancer including other cancers.

  1. A novel biomimetic analysis system for quantitative characterisation of sclerosing foams used for the treatment of varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Dario; Ankrett, Dyan N; O'Byrne, Vincent; Willis, Sean; Wright, David D I; Lewis, Andrew L; Hill, Martyn; Zhang, Xunli

    2013-06-01

    A novel analysis system for the quantification of sclerosing foam properties under clinically relevant conditions was developed with the purpose of establishing a robust methodology for comparative characterisation of different foam formulations and production strategies. The developed biomimetic-inspired model comprised of 4 or 10 mm inner diameter polytetrafluoroethylene tubing, filled with a blood substitute and fixed to a platform with an adjustable inclination angle. Sclerosing foams were produced by mixing polidocanol with either atmospheric air or 100 % CO₂, using a double-syringe system method. Individual foams were injected into the tube, while videos were captured simultaneously. Videos were then transferred to an in-house computational foam analysis system (CFAS) which performed a sequence of semi-automated operations, allowing quantitative characterisation of sclerosing foam dynamic behaviour. Using CFAS, degradation rates of different foams were measured and the effect of gas composition, liquid sclerosant concentration and time delay between foam production and injection were evaluated.

  2. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B.R. Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  3. Degradation kinetics of poly(ether-urethane) Estane[reg] induced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannoux, A.; Esnouf, S.; Begue, J.; Amekraz, B.; Moulin, C.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation effects on a segmented aromatic poly(ether-urethane) induced by electron beam irradiation under oxygen atmosphere were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in order to determine the degradation mechanisms. Thin films have been irradiated under a dose rate of 1 MGy/h with absorbed doses varying from 25 to 1000 kGy under O 2 . FTIR spectra have shown the formation of hydroperoxides, carboxylic acids, primary amines, alcohols, esters and formates. Moreover, the decrease of urethane and ether absorbances revealed the degradation of both soft and hard segments. Spin-trapping technique was used to monitor the evolution of short-lived peroxy and alkyl radicals at room temperature. Finally, a mechanism of degradation for electron irradiated polyurethane is proposed

  4. PSt-b-PU-b-PSt copolymers using tetraphenylethane-urethane macroinitiator through SARA ATRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Chmielarz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The course of supplemental activator and reducing agent (SARA atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP has been presented in the presence of Cu0. The novelty of this work is that SARA ATRP has been used for the first time to synthesize polystyrene-b-polyurethane-b-polystyrene copolymers by using tetraphenylethane-urethane macroinitiator as transitional products reacting with styrene in the presence of CuIIBr2/TPMA catalyst complex. The influence of copper surface area on the polymerization was examined. It was confirmed that in all cases, both the molecular weight of resulting copolymer increases linearly with increasing conversion as well as the value of ln([M]0/[M] as a function of polymerization time increases linearly. A successful formation of the urethane-styrene copolymers was confirmed by NMR spectral studies.

  5. Thio-urethane oligomers improve the properties of light-cured resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Consani, Rafael L; Martim, Gedalias C; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2015-05-01

    Thio-urethanes were synthesized by combining 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (aliphatic) with pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (aromatic) with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. Oligomers were added at 10-30 phr to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, BUT). 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Commercial cement (Relyx Veneer, 3M-ESPE) was also evaluated with 10-20 phr of aromatic oligomer. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion (DC) and rate of polymerization (Rpmax). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS, %) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Results were analyzed with ANOVA/Tukey's test (α=5%). In general terms, for BUT cements, conversion and mechanical properties in flexure increased for selected groups with the addition of thio-urethane oligomers. The aromatic versions resulted in greater FS/FM than aliphatic. Fracture toughness increased by two-fold in the experimental groups (from 1.17 ± 0.36 MPam(1/2) to around 3.23 ± 0.22 MPam(1/2)). Rpmax decreased with the addition of thio-urethanes, though the vitrification point was not statistically different from the control. VS and PS decreased with both oligomers. For the commercial cement, 20 phr of oligomer increased DC, vitrification, reduced Rpmax and also significantly increased KIC, and reduced PS and FM. Thio-urethane oligomers were shown to favorably modify conventional dimethacrylate networks. Significant reductions in polymerization stress were achieved at the same time conversion and fracture toughness increased. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunosuppressive effects of Pteridium aquilinum enhance susceptibility to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniceiro, Beatriz D; Latorre, Andreia O; Fukumasu, Heidge; Sanches, Daniel S; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Górniak, Silvana L

    2015-01-01

    Pteridium aquilinum (bracken fern), one of the most important toxic plants in the world, contains the toxic norsequiterpene ptaquiloside that induces cancers in humans and farm animals. Previous studies in the laboratory demonstrated immunotoxic effects produced by ptaquiloside, which are characterized by suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity (i.e. cytotoxicity and interferon [IFN]-γ production). However, it is unknown whether these immunosuppressive effects could contribute to carcinogenesis in situ in general because of the important function of NK cells in innate killing of tumor cells. This study assessed the impact of P. aquilinum-induced immunosuppression on urethane-induced lung cancer in C57BL/6 mice. Adult mice were treated with an extract of P. aquilinum (30 g/kg/day) by gavage once daily for 14 days, followed by gavage (5 days/week) during an 11-week period that was accompanied by treatment with urethane (1 g/kg) via once-weekly intraperitoneal injection; 20 weeks after the end of the treatment period, all lungs were evaluated. The results indicated there was a significant increase in lung nodule number as well as in multiplicity of lesions in mice treated with both P. aquilinum and urethane (PU group) compared to values in mice treated only with the urethane (U group). In addition, histologic evaluation revealed a 76% increase in the rate of lung adenomas and a 41% increase in rate of bronchiolization of alveoli in the mice from the PU group compared to levels seen in mice within the U group. Taken together, the results here show for the first time that immunosuppressive effects of P. aquilinum could increase the risk of cancer formation in exposed hosts.

  7. The role of nanocrystalline cellulose on the microstructure of foamed castor-oil polyurethane nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Andrés Ignacio; Amalvy, Javier Ignacio; Fortunati, Elena; Kenny, José María; Chiacchiarelli, Leonel Matías

    2015-12-10

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (CNC), obtained by sulphuric acid hydrolysis, was used to synthesize polyurethane foams (PUFs) based on a functionalized castor oil polyol and a Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI). Formulations with varying isocyanate index (FI) and NCO number were prepared. At 0.5 wt.%, SEM's of the fractured surface underlined that the CNC acted both as a nucleation agent and as a particulate surfactant with cell geometries and apparent density changing selectively. The chemical structure of the PUF (FTIR) changed after the incorporation of CNC by a relative change of the amount of urea, urethane and isocyanurate groups. A low NCO number and isocyanate index contributed to the migration of the CNC to the Hard Segment (HS), acting as reinforcement and improving substantially the compressive mechanical properties (Ec and σc improvements of 63 and 50%, respectively). For a high NCO number or isocyanate index, the CNC migrated to the Soft Segment (SS), without causing a reinforcement effect. The migration of the CNC was also detected with DSC, TGA and DMA, furtherly supporting the hypothesis that a low NCO number and index contributed both to the formation of a microstructure with a higher content of urethane groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Foam rheology at large deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géminard, J.-C.; Pastenes, J. C.; Melo, F.

    2018-04-01

    Large deformations are prone to cause irreversible changes in materials structure, generally leading to either material hardening or softening. Aqueous foam is a metastable disordered structure of densely packed gas bubbles. We report on the mechanical response of a foam layer subjected to quasistatic periodic shear at large amplitude. We observe that, upon increasing shear, the shear stress follows a universal curve that is nearly exponential and tends to an asymptotic stress value interpreted as the critical yield stress at which the foam structure is completely remodeled. Relevant trends of the foam mechanical response to cycling are mathematically reproduced through a simple law accounting for the amount of plastic deformation upon increasing stress. This view provides a natural interpretation to stress hardening in foams, demonstrating that plastic effects are present in this material even for minute deformation.

  9. Spectroscopic, semiempirical studies and antibacterial activity of new urethane derivatives of natural polyether antibiotic - Monensin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huczyński, Adam; Stefańska, Joanna; Piśmienny, Mieszko; Brzezinski, Bogumil

    2013-02-01

    A series of new Monensin A dimers linked by diurethane moiety were synthesised and their molecular structures were studied using ESI-MS, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR and PM5 methods. The results showed that the compounds form a pseudo-cyclic structure stabilized by three intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the sodium cation was coordinated by five oxygen atoms of polyether skeleton of Monensin moiety. The NMR and FT-IR data of complexes of Monensin urethane sodium salts demonstrated that within the pseudo-cyclic structure the carbonyl oxygen atom of the urethane group did not coordinate the sodium cation. Monensin urethanes were tested in vitro for the activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi as well as against a series of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). The most active compound against MRSA and MSSA was 1,4-phenylene diurethane of Monensin with MIC 10.4-41.4 μmol/L).

  10. Laser Irradiated Foam Targets: Absorption and Radiative Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Martina; Luigi Andreoli, Pier; Cipriani, Mattia; Consoli, Fabrizio; Cristofari, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Riccardo; di Giorgio, Giorgio; Giulietti, Danilo; Ingenito, Francesco; Gus'kov, Sergey Yu.; Rupasov, Alexander A.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental campaign to characterize the laser radiation absorption of foam targets and the subsequent emission of radiation from the produced plasma was carried out in the ABC facility of the ENEA Research Center in Frascati (Rome). Different targets have been used: plastic in solid or foam state and aluminum targets. The activated different diagnostics allowed to evaluate the plasma temperature, the density distribution, the fast particle spectrum and the yield of the X-Ray radiation emitted by the plasma for the different targets. These results confirm the foam homogenization action on laser-plasma interaction, mainly attributable to the volume absorption of the laser radiation propagating in such structured materials. These results were compared with simulation absorption models of the laser propagating into a foam target.

  11. Mechanical properties and impact behavior of a microcellular structural foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Avalle

    Full Text Available Structural foams are a relatively new class of materials with peculiar characteristics that make them very attractive in some energy absorption applications. They are currently used for packaging to protect goods from damage during transportation in the case of accidental impacts. Structural foams, in fact, have sufficient mechanical strength even with reduced weight: the balance between the two antagonist requirements demonstrates that these materials are profitable. Structural foams are generally made of microcellular materials, obtained by polymers where voids at the microscopic level are created. Although the processing technologies and some of the material properties, including mechanical, are well known, very little is established for what concerns dynamic impact properties, for the design of energy absorbing components made of microcellular foams. The paper reports a number of experimental results, in different loading conditions and loading speed, which will be a basis for the structural modeling.

  12. Hyperbolic prisms and foams in Hele-Shaw cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br [Soft Matter Laboratory, Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Tufaile, A.P.B. [Soft Matter Laboratory, Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-03

    The propagation of light in foams creates patterns which are generated due to the reflection and refraction of light. One of these patterns is observed by the formation of multiple mirror images inside liquid bridges in a layer of bubbles in a Hele-Shaw cell. We are presenting the existence of these patterns in foams and their relation with hyperbolic geometry and Sierpinski gaskets using the Poincare disk model. The images obtained from the experiment in foams are compared to the case of hyperbolic optical elements. -- Highlights: → The chaotic scattering of light in foams generating deltoid patterns is based on hyperbolic geometry. → The deltoid patterns are obtained through the Plateau borders in a Hele-Shaw cell. → The Plateau borders act like hyperbolic prism. → Some effects of the refraction and reflection of the light rays were studied using a hyperbolic prism.

  13. Application of epoxy resin to a solid-foam pelvic model: creating a dry-erase pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Michael J; Brubacher, Jacob W; Vrahas, Mark S

    2014-11-01

    The value of preoperative planning and templating has been well-established in fracture surgery. We have found that using 3-dimensional (3-D) models in preoperative planning aids in the understanding of anatomy, fracture-reduction techniques, and fixation methods, particularly in pelvic and acetabular fractures. To facilitate the correction of errors and reuse for future cases, we coat pelvic models with dry-erase epoxy resin. Fracture lines and planned implants are drawn onto the models with dry-erase markers. The creation of 3-D planning tools is useful in understanding the anatomy of pelvic and acetabular fractures.

  14. An approach for characterising cellular polymeric foam structures using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Youming; Das, Raj; Battley, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Global properties of foams depend on foam base materials and microstructures. Characterisation of foam microstructures is important for developing numerical foam models. In this study, the microstructures of four polymeric structural foams were imaged using a micro-CT scanner. Image processing and analysis methods were proposed to quantify the relative density, cell wall thickness and cell size of these foams from the captured CT images. Overall, the cells in these foams are fairly isotropic, and cell walls are rather straight. The measured average relative densities are in good agreement with the actual values. Relative density, cell size and cell wall thickness in these foams are found to vary along the thickness of foam panel direction. Cell walls in two of these foams are found to be filled with secondary pores. In addition, it is found that the average cell wall thickness measured from 2D images is around 1.4 times of that measured from 3D images, and the average cell size measured from 3D images is 1.16 times of that measured from 2D images. The distributions of cell wall thickness and cell size measured from 2D images exhibit lager dispersion in comparison to those measured from 3D images.

  15. Influence of material non-linearity on the thermo-mechanical response of polymer foam cored sandwich structures - FE modelling and preliminary experiemntal results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleti, Hara Naga Krishna Teja; Thomsen, Ole Thybo; Fruehmann, Richard.K

    In this paper, the polymer foam cored sandwich structures with fibre reinforced composite face sheets will be analyzed using the commercial FE code ABAQUS/Standard® incorporating the material and geometrical non-linearity. Large deformations are allowed which attributes geometric non linearity...

  16. The Construction of Spin Foam Vertex Amplitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Bianchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin foam vertex amplitudes are the key ingredient of spin foam models for quantum gravity. These fall into the realm of discretized path integral, and can be seen as generalized lattice gauge theories. They can be seen as an attempt at a 4-dimensional generalization of the Ponzano-Regge model for 3d quantum gravity. We motivate and review the construction of the vertex amplitudes of recent spin foam models, giving two different and complementary perspectives of this construction. The first proceeds by extracting geometric configurations from a topological theory of the BF type, and can be seen to be in the tradition of the work of Barrett, Crane, Freidel and Krasnov. The second keeps closer contact to the structure of Loop Quantum Gravity and tries to identify an appropriate set of constraints to define a Lorentz-invariant interaction of its quanta of space. This approach is in the tradition of the work of Smolin, Markopoulous, Engle, Pereira, Rovelli and Livine.

  17. Preparation and characterization of starch-based loose-fill packaging foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qi

    Regular and waxy corn starches were blended in various ratios with biodegradable polymers including polylactic acid (PLA), Eastar Bio Copolyester 14766 (EBC) and Mater-Bi ZF03U (MBI) and extruded with a C. W. Brabender laboratory twin screw extruder using a 3-mm die nozzle at 150°C and 150 rev/min. Physical characteristics including radial expansion, unit density and bulk density and water solubility index, water absorption characteristics, mechanical properties including compressibility, Young's modulus, spring index, bulk compressibility and bulk spring index and abrasion resistance were investigated as affected by the ingredient formulations, i.e. type of polymers, type of starches, polymer to starch ratio and starch moisture content. A completely randomized factorial blocking experimental design was used. Fifty-four treatments resulted. Each treatment was replicated three times. SAS statistical software package was used to analyze the data. Foams made of waxy starch had better radial expansion, lower unit density and bulk density than did foams made of regular starch. Regular starch foams had significantly lower water solubility index than did the waxy starch foams. PLA-starch foams had the lowest compressibility and Young's modulus. MBI-starch foams were the most rigid. All foams had excellent spring indices and bulk spring indices which were comparable to the spring index of commercial expanded polystyrene foam. Correlations were established between the foam mechanical properties and the physical characteristics. Foam compressibility and Young's modulus decreased as increases in radial expansion and decreases in unit and bulk densities. Their relationships were modeled with power law equations. No correlation was observed between spring index and bulk spring index and foam physical characteristics. MBI-starch foams had the highest equilibrium moisture content. EBC-starch and PLA-starch foams had similar water absorption characteristics. No significant

  18. Low-temperature oxidative degradation of PBX 9501 and its components determined via molecular weight analysis of the poly [ester urethane] binder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Joel D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The results of following the oxidative degradation of a plastic-bonded explosive (PBX 9501) are reported. Into over 1100 sealed containers were placed samples of PBX 9501 and combinations of its components and aged at relatively low temperatures to induce oxidative degradation of the samples. One of the components of the explosive is a poly(ester urethane) polymer and the oxidative degradation of the samples were following by measuring the molecular weight change of the polymer by gel permeation chromatography (coupled with both differential refractive index and multiangle laser light scattering detectors). Multiple temperatures between 40 and 64 {sup o}C were used to accelerate the aging of the samples. Interesting induction period behavior, along with both molecular weight increasing (crosslinking) and decreasing (chain scissioning) processes, were found at these relatively mild conditions. The molecular weight growth rates were fit to a random crosslinking model for all the combinations of components. The fit rate coefficients show Arrhenius behavior and activation energies and frequency factors were obtained. The kinetics of molecular weight growth shows a compensatory effect between the Arrhenius prefactors and activation energies, suggesting a common degradation process between PBX 9501 and the various combinations of its constituents. An oxidative chemical mechanism of the polymer is postulated, consistent with previous experimental results, that involves a competition between urethane radical crosslinking and carbonyl formation.

  19. Injectable foams for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Edna M; Page, Jonathan M; Harmata, Andrew J; Guelcher, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    The design of injectable biomaterials has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Many injectable biomaterials, such as hydrogels and calcium phosphate cements (CPCs), have nanoscale pores that limit the rate of cellular migration and proliferation. While introduction of macroporosity has been suggested to increase cellular infiltration and tissue healing, many conventional methods for generating macropores often require harsh processing conditions that preclude their use in injectable foams. In recent years, processes such as porogen leaching, gas foaming, and emulsion-templating have been adapted to generate macroporosity in injectable CPCs, hydrogels, and hydrophobic polymers. While some of the more mature injectable foam technologies have been evaluated in clinical trials, there are challenges remaining to be addressed, such as the biocompatibility and ultimate fate of the sacrificial phase used to generate pores within the foam after it sets in situ. Furthermore, while implantable scaffolds can be washed extensively to remove undesirable impurities, all of the components required to synthesize injectable foams must be injected into the defect. Thus, every compound in the foam must be biocompatible and noncytotoxic at the concentrations utilized. As future research addresses these critical challenges, injectable macroporous foams are anticipated to have an increasingly significant impact on improving patient outcomes for a number of clinical procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparative study on germ cell mutation induced by urethane (ethyl carbamate) gas and X-rays in drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Taisei; Kurokawa, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Although its mutagenicity has not been confirmed in mouse germ cells, urethane (ethyl carbamate) gas induces a significant increase of X-linked recessive lethal mutations in the germ cells of Drosophila melanogaster. The mutation frequency increased as the exposure time was changed from 3.5 to 5.5 h. Mutations were also induced by X-rays (20 to 40 Gy) and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) (0.06 to 0.10%). However, no significant increase of chromosomal changes (partial loss of the Y chromosome, total loss of X or Y, and translocations) was produced by urethane, although these were readily induced by X-rays. There were large and significant increases in chromosomal changes caused by X-rays (20 Gy) compared to urethane (5.5 h) or MNU (0.06%). In contrast, there were no substantial differences among these three treatments as regards recessive lethal mutations. Urethane-induced DNA lesions detected as recessive lethals appear to be intragenic mutations. Complementation analysis with 15 reference single-site loci (cistrons) in the zeste-white region of the X chromosome revealed that 29 of 723 urethane-induced recessive lethals were located in the zeste-white region and all were restricted to a single locus. However, among 28 of 890 X-ray-induced lethals, 2 were non-complementary to 2 or 3 adjacent loci, indicating deletions encompassing 2 or 3 loci. In addition, 3 of these lethal chromosomes included mutations outside the zeste-white region. Another difference between urethane and X-rays was in the distribution of mutation sites. Urethane-induced mutations were strikingly non-random with two hot spots at zw-1 and zw-2, whereas the distribution of X-ray-induced mutations was more nearly random. (author)

  1. A linear peristaltic MRF/foam actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, J. J.; Jenkins, C. H.; Korde, U. A.

    2007-04-01

    , peristaltic pumps in industry are common for a variety of material handling applications, particularly involving the movement of sterile fluids (for example, blood). The peristaltic pump is usually circular in configuration, relying on external rollers to move fluid within a tube. Some linear configuration pumps have been proposed and developed, however they are complicated than their circular counterparts. In the remaining part of the present work, we discuss the development of a linear peristaltic actuator based upon the deformation of MRF/foam. The actuator consists of an open-cell polymer foam substrate infused with MRF. To one side of the foam substrate resides a translating magnet, such that a magnetic field can be propagated down its length. The linear peristaltic action is generated as the transversely propagating field shapes the MRF/foam substrate in a corresponding way. Experimental results are discussed, an outline of on-going theoretical modeling is presented, and conclusions are provided.

  2. Production of Polystyrene Open-celled Microcellular Foam in Batch Process by Super Critical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Enayati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Open-celled foams are capable to allow the passage of fluids through their structure, because of interconnections between the open cells or bubbles and therefore these structures can be used as a membrane and filter. In thiswork, we have studied the production of polystyrene open-celled microcellular foam by using CO2 as blowing agent. To achieve such structures, it is necessary to control the stages of growth in such a way that the cells would connect to each other through the pores without any coalescence. The required processing condition to achieve open-celled structures is predictable by a model theory of opened-cell. This model suggests that at least a 130 bar saturation pressure and foaming time between 9 and 58 s are required for this system. The temperature range has been selected for to be both higher than polymer glass transition temperature and facilitating the foaming process. Experimental results in the batch foaming process has verified the model quite well. The SEM and mercury porousimetry tests show the presence of pores between the cells with open-celled structure. Experimental results show that by increasing the saturation pressure and the foaming temperature, there is a drop in the time required for open-celled structure formation. A 130 bar saturation pressure, 150o C foaming temperature and 60 s foaming time, suggest the attainment of open-celled microcellular foam based on polystyrene/CO2 system in the batch process.

  3. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  4. Foaming and emulsifying properties of pectin isolated from different plant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yancheva Nikoleta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The foaming and emulsifying properties of pectins obtained from waste rose petals, citrus pressings, grapefruit peels and celery were studied. It was found that the highest foaming capacity showed pectin derived from celery. The effect of pectin concentration on the foaming capacity of pectin solutions was investigated. For all the investigated pectins increasing the concentration led to increase of the foaming capacity. Emulsifying activity and emulsion stability of model emulsion systems (50 % oil phase with 0.6 % pectic solutions were determined. The highest emulsifying activity and stability showed pectin isolated by dilute acid extraction from waste rose petals.

  5. Electrospun poly(ester-Urethane- and poly(ester-Urethane-Urea fleeces as promising tissue engineering scaffolds for adipose-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Gugerell

    Full Text Available An irreversible loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue in patients after tumor removal or deep dermal burns makes soft tissue engineering one of the most important challenges in biomedical research. The ideal scaffold for adipose tissue engineering has yet not been identified though biodegradable polymers gained an increasing interest during the last years. In the present study we synthesized two novel biodegradable polymers, poly(ε-caprolactone-co-urethane-co-urea (PEUU and poly[(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone-co-(L-lysine ethyl ester diisocyanate-block-oligo(ethylene glycol-urethane] (PEU, containing different types of hydrolytically cleavable bondings. Solutions of the polymers at appropriate concentrations were used to fabricate fleeces by electrospinning. Ultrastructure, tensile properties, and degradation of the produced fleeces were evaluated. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs were seeded on fleeces and morphology, viability, proliferation and differentiation were assessed. The biomaterials show fine micro- and nanostructures composed of fibers with diameters of about 0.5 to 1.3 µm. PEUU fleeces were more elastic, which might be favourable in soft tissue engineering, and degraded significantly slower compared to PEU. ASCs were able to adhere, proliferate and differentiate on both scaffolds. Morphology of the cells was slightly better on PEUU than on PEU showing a more physiological appearance. ASCs differentiated into the adipogenic lineage. Gene analysis of differentiated ASCs showed typical expression of adipogenetic markers such as PPARgamma and FABP4. Based on these results, PEUU and PEU meshes show a promising potential as scaffold materials in adipose tissue engineering.

  6. Ultrasound estimation and FE analysis of elastic modulus of Kelvin foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nohyu; Yang, Seung Yong

    2016-01-01

    The elastic modulus of a 3D-printed Kelvin foam plate is investigated by measuring the acoustic wave velocity of 1 MHz ultrasound. An isotropic tetrakaidecahedron foam with 3 mm unit cell is designed and printed layer upon layer to fabricate a Kelvin foam plate of 14 mm thickness with a 3D CAD/printer using ABS plastic. The Kelvin foam plate is completely filled with paraffin wax for impedance matching, so that the acoustic wave may propagate through the porous foam plate. The acoustic wave velocity of the foam plate is measured using the time-of-flight (TOF) method and is used to calculate the elastic modulus of the Kelvin foam plate based on acousto-elasticity. Finite element method (FEM) and micromechanics is applied to the Kelvin foam plate to calculate the theoretical elastic modulus using a non-isotropic tetrakaidecahedron model. The predicted elastic modulus of the Kelvin foam plate from FEM and micromechanics model is similar, which is only 3-4% of the bulk material. The experimental value of the elastic modulus from the ultrasonic method is approximately twice as that of the numerical and theoretical methods because of the flexural deformation of the cell edges neglected in the ultrasonic method

  7. Ultrasound estimation and FE analysis of elastic modulus of Kelvin foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nohyu; Yang, Seung Yong [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The elastic modulus of a 3D-printed Kelvin foam plate is investigated by measuring the acoustic wave velocity of 1 MHz ultrasound. An isotropic tetrakaidecahedron foam with 3 mm unit cell is designed and printed layer upon layer to fabricate a Kelvin foam plate of 14 mm thickness with a 3D CAD/printer using ABS plastic. The Kelvin foam plate is completely filled with paraffin wax for impedance matching, so that the acoustic wave may propagate through the porous foam plate. The acoustic wave velocity of the foam plate is measured using the time-of-flight (TOF) method and is used to calculate the elastic modulus of the Kelvin foam plate based on acousto-elasticity. Finite element method (FEM) and micromechanics is applied to the Kelvin foam plate to calculate the theoretical elastic modulus using a non-isotropic tetrakaidecahedron model. The predicted elastic modulus of the Kelvin foam plate from FEM and micromechanics model is similar, which is only 3-4% of the bulk material. The experimental value of the elastic modulus from the ultrasonic method is approximately twice as that of the numerical and theoretical methods because of the flexural deformation of the cell edges neglected in the ultrasonic method.

  8. Swarm intelligence application for optimization of CO2 diffusivity in polystyrene-b-polybutadiene-b-polystyrene (SEBS) foaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharudin, Rahida Wati; Ajib, Norshawalina Muhamad; Yusoff, Marina; Ahmad, Mohd Aizad

    2017-12-01

    Thermoplastic elastomer SEBS foams were prepared by using carbon dioxide (CO2) as a blowing agent and the process is classified as physical foaming method. During the foaming process, the diffusivity of CO2 need to be controlled since it is one of the parameter that will affect the final cellular structure of the foam. Conventionally, the rate of CO2 diffusion was measured experimentally by using a highly sensitive device called magnetic suspension balance (MSB). Besides, this expensive MSB machine is not easily available and measurement of CO2 diffusivity is quite complicated as well as time consuming process. Thus, to overcome these limitations, a computational method was introduced. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a part of Swarm Intelligence system which acts as a beneficial optimization tool where it can solve most of nonlinear complications. PSO model was developed for predicting the optimum foaming temperature and CO2 diffusion rate in SEBS foam. Results obtained by PSO model are compared with experimental results for CO2 diffusivity at various foaming temperature. It is shown that predicted optimum foaming temperature at 154.6 °C was not represented the best temperature for foaming as the cellular structure of SEBS foamed at corresponding temperature consisted pores with unstable dimension and the structure was not visibly perceived due to foam shrinkage. The predictions were not agreed well with experimental result when single parameter of CO2 diffusivity is considered in PSO model because it is not the only factor that affected the controllability of foam shrinkage. The modification on the PSO model by considering CO2 solubility and rigidity of SEBS as additional parameters needs to be done for obtaining the optimum temperature for SEBS foaming. Hence stable SEBS foam could be prepared.

  9. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  10. Amorphous microcellular polytetrafluoroethylene foam film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chongzheng

    1991-11-01

    We report herein the preparation of novel low-density ultramicrocellular fluorocarbon foams and their application. These fluorocarbon foams are of interest for the biochemistry arena in numerous applications including foodstuff, pharmacy, wine making, beer brewery, fermentation medical laboratory, and other processing factories. All of those require good quality processing programs in which, after eliminating bacterium and virus, compressed air is needed. Ordinarily, compressed air contains bacterium and virus, its size is 0.01 - 2 micrometers fluorocarbon foam films. Having average porous diameter 0.04 - 0.1 micrometers , these are stable to high temperature (280 degree(s)C) and chemical environments, and generally have good engineering and mechanical properties (e.g., low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus, and good dimensional stability). Our new process for preparing low density fluorocarbon foams provides materials with unique properties. As such, they offer the possibility for being superior to earlier materials for a number of the filter applications mentioned.

  11. Oil-foam interactions in a micromodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, N.S.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-11-01

    This report presents results of a pore-level visualization study of foam stability in the presence of oil. Many laboratory investigations have been carried out in the absence of oil, but comparatively few have been carried out in the presence of oil. For a field application, where the residual oil saturation may vary from as low as 0 to as high as 40% depending on the recovery method applied, any effect of the oil on foam stability becomes a crucial matter. Sandstone patterns were used in this study. The micromodels used are two-dimensional replicas of the flow path of Berea sandstone etched on to a silicon wafer to a prescribed depth, adapting fabrication techniques from the computer chip industry. After flooding the models up to connate water and residual oil saturations, surfactant flood followed by gas injection to generate foam was done. Visual observations were made using a high resolution microscope and pictures were recorded on videotape before being processed as they appear in this report.

  12. Forming and Bending of Metal Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebosky, Paul; Tyszka, Daniel; Niebur, Glen; Schmid, Steven

    2004-06-01

    This study examines the formability of a porous tantalum foam, known as trabecular metal (TM). Used as a bone ingrowth surface on orthopedic implants, TM is desirable due to its combination of high strength, low relative density, and excellent osteoconductive properties. This research aims to develop bend and stretch forming as a cost-effective alternative to net machining and EDM for manufacturing thin parts made of TM. Experimentally, bending about a single axis using a wiping die was studied by observing cracking and measuring springback. It was found that die radius and clearance strongly affect the springback properties of TM, while punch speed, embossings, die radius and clearance all influence cracking. Depending on the various combinations of die radius and clearance, springback factor ranged from .70-.91. To examine the affect of the foam microstructure, bending also was examined numerically using a horizontal hexagonal mesh. As the hexagonal cells were elongated along the sheet length, elastic springback decreased. This can be explained by the earlier onset of plastic hinging occurring at the vertices of the cells. While the numerical results matched the experimental results for the case of zero clearance, differences at higher clearances arose due to an imprecise characterization of the post-yield properties of tantalum. By changing the material properties of the struts, the models can be modified for use with other open-cell metallic foams.

  13. Foam shell project: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 μm thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D 2 or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE

  14. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevremović, Milutin; Milošević, Bratislav; Lazarević, Nataša

    2010-01-01

    This article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of a metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems, which are used for the painting of military equipment. During the evaluation of the efficiency of decontamination, the impact of contaminants on the coating was not examined but the amount of contaminants residual after decontamination was, and was determined by activity measurements of the surface. The samples for testing were painted aluminum plates contaminated by liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60Co, 133Ba, 152Eu and 241Am (A=12297.91 Bq/ml). Decontamination of contaminated samples was performed with 0.5% detergent solution on the basis of synthetic surfactants. The activity measurements of samples were conducted using gamma spectroscopy system with a high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of relative efficiency of 50% at 60Co (1.33 MeV). The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. A comparison of the results is presented in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the efficiency of decontamination. The samples with an alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin were superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. The difference in the efficiency of decontamination for the examined coatings increases almost linearly in relation to the retention time of the contaminants in the coating.

  15. Targeted deletion of Nrf2 reduces urethane-induced lung tumor development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K Bauer

    Full Text Available Nrf2 is a key transcription factor that regulates cellular redox and defense responses. However, permanent Nrf2 activation in human lung carcinomas promotes pulmonary malignancy and chemoresistance. We tested the hypothesis that Nrf2 has cell survival properties and lack of Nrf2 suppresses chemically-induced pulmonary neoplasia by treating Nrf2(+/+ and Nrf2(-/- mice with urethane. Airway inflammation and injury were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage analyses and histopathology, and lung tumors were analyzed by gross and histologic analysis. We used transcriptomics to assess Nrf2-dependent changes in pulmonary gene transcripts at multiple stages of neoplasia. Lung hyperpermeability, cell death and apoptosis, and inflammatory cell infiltration were significantly higher in Nrf2(-/- mice compared to Nrf2(+/+ mice 9 and 11 wk after urethane. Significantly fewer lung adenomas were found in Nrf2(-/- mice than in Nrf2(+/+ mice at 12 and 22 wk. Nrf2 modulated expression of genes involved cell-cell signaling, glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress response, and immune responses during early stage neoplasia. In lung tumors, Nrf2-altered genes had roles in transcriptional regulation of cell cycle and proliferation, carcinogenesis, organismal injury and abnormalities, xenobiotic metabolism, and cell-cell signaling genes. Collectively, Nrf2 deficiency decreased susceptibility to urethane-induced lung tumorigenesis in mice. Cell survival properties of Nrf2 were supported, at least in part, by reduced early death of initiated cells and heightened advantage for tumor cell expansion in Nrf2(+/+ mice relative to Nrf2(-/- mice. Our results were consistent with the concept that Nrf2 over-activation is an adaptive response of cancer conferring resistance to anti-cancer drugs and promoting malignancy.

  16. Ameliorative effects of gallic acid, quercetin and limonene on urethane-induced genotoxicity and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Isha; Abraham, Suresh K

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of our present work was to ascertain the efficacy of Drosophila melanogaster model for assessing antigenotoxic and antioxidant effects of dietary phytochemicals gallic acid (GA), quercetin (QC) and limonene (Lim) against urethane (URE), a genotoxic environmental carcinogen. Oregon-K (ORK) adult male flies were fed GA, QC and Lim in combination with URE (20 mM) in 10% sucrose for 72 h. Third instar larvae were fed instant medium containing the above phytochemicals and URE for 24 h. Sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test and assays for estimating glutathione content (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation (MDA content) were performed. Adult feeding experiments demonstrated that co-treatment of flies with URE and the test phytochemicals has significantly decreased the frequencies of SLRL mutations in all the germ cell stages when compared to that with URE alone. Larval feeding experiments also showed a similar pattern. The above results correlate well with antioxidative potentials of the test agents where we observed the elevated enzymatic levels with a significant reduction in MDA level in Drosophila larvae. The results further suggest that the dietary phytochemicals have an antioxidant and antimutagenic property which can be assessed using D. melanogaster.

  17. ASPECTS OF THE MECHNANICAL BEHAVIOR OF STITCHED T300 MAT/URETHANE 420 IMR COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, S.

    2002-11-25

    This report presents experimental and analytical results concerning the behavior of crossply and quasi-isotropic laminates manufactured of stitch-bonded T300 urethane 420 IMR polymeric composites. Based on extensive creep and recovery data at various levels of stress and temperature, as well as on strain-to-failure information, it was possible to arrive at empirical expressions relating deformation to the previous input as well as to input duration. These expressions were incorporated within the formalisms of viscoelasticity and laminate theory to illuminate some basic underlying mechanistic aspects of the material at hand, thereby enabling the prediction of anticipated response under more complex stress and temperature inputs.

  18. Effects of Excess Cu Addition on Photochromic Properties of AgCl-Urethane Resin Composite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Miyazaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AgCl-resin photochromic composite films were prepared using AgNO3, HCl-EtOH, CuCl2 ethanol solutions, and a urethane resin as starting materials. The AgCl particle size in the composite films, which was confirmed via TEM observations, was 23–43 nm. The AgCl composite films showed photochromic properties: coloring induced by UV-vis irradiation and bleaching induced by cessation of UV-vis irradiation. The coloring and bleaching speed of the composite film increases with increasing CuCl2 mixing ratio.

  19. Scaling up the Fabrication of Mechanically-Robust Carbon Nanofiber Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Curtin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify and address the main challenges associated with fabricating large samples of carbon foams composed of interwoven networks of carbon nanofibers. Solutions to two difficulties related with the process of fabricating carbon foams, maximum foam size and catalyst cost, were developed. First, a simple physical method was invented to scale-up the constrained formation of fibrous nanostructures process (CoFFiN to fabricate relatively large foams. Specifically, a gas deflector system capable of maintaining conditions supportive of carbon nanofiber foam growth throughout a relatively large mold was developed. ANSYS CFX models were used to simulate the gas flow paths with and without deflectors; the data generated proved to be a very useful tool for the deflector design. Second, a simple method for selectively leaching the Pd catalyst material trapped in the foam during growth was successfully tested. Multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and mechanical testing, were employed to characterize the foams generated in this study. All results confirmed that the larger foam samples preserve the basic characteristics: their interwoven nanofiber microstructure forms a low-density tridimensional solid with viscoelastic behavior. Fiber growth mechanisms are also discussed. Larger samples of mechanically-robust carbon nanofiber foams will enable the use of these materials as strain sensors, shock absorbers, selective absorbents for environmental remediation and electrodes for energy storage devices, among other applications.

  20. Cooling capacity of high porosity open-cell metal foams as passive cryogenic radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Tisha; Ghosh, Indranil

    2017-06-01

    This work presents an innovative avenue for employment of high porosity open-cell metal foams as extended heat transfer surfaces in passive cryogenic radiators. Metal foams are known for being light in weight and possess high surface area density. In contrast to a solid surface, porosity of metal foams makes it feasible for penetration of radiation thereby resulting in higher radiatively interactive surface area. Two 20 PPI metal foams made of copper and aluminum with 94.9% and 90.3% porosity respectively have been chosen for this study. A laboratory-scale test rig measures the radiative cooling capacity of metal foams in vacuum (10-6 mbar) subjected to liquid nitrogen environment. Heat load to the foam has been provided by means of convective fluid loop. Simultaneously, a theoretical model based on radiation-conduction fin analysis has been developed to predict the foam cooling capacity at a specified temperature. The required radiation heat transfer coefficient has been obtained from a previous experiment wherein the foam samples are freely suspended in similar conditions but with no heat load. Lastly, performance of the foams under study has been expressed in terms of a commonly used performance parameter (surface area/cooling capacity) for passive cryogenic radiators.

  1. pH stability and comparative evaluation of ranaspumin-2 foam for application in biochemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Ebersbacher, Charles F; Quan, Fu-Shi; Montemagno, Carlo D

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous channels of foam represent a simplified, natural bioreactor on the micro-/nano-scale. Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility and potential application of foams in replicating cellular process in vitro, but no research has been performed to establish a basis for designing stable and biocompatible foam formulations. Our research has been directed specifically to the evaluation of ranaspumin-2 (RSN-2), a frog foam nest protein. The strong surfactant activity of RSN-2 enabled us to produce foams using low protein concentration (1 mg ml −1 ) over a wide pH range (pH ≥ 3). Importantly, the RSN-2 formulation exhibited the best foam stability at a near neutral pH condition, which shows a potential for application to various biosynthesis applications. Model cellular systems such as liposomes and inactivated A/PR/8/34 influenza virus maintained their physicochemical stability and full hemagglutination activity, indicating biocompatibility of RSN-2 with both cellular membranes and proteins both in bulk solution and in foam. Moreover, the addition of RSN-2 did not exert any deteriorative effects on bacterial cell growth kinetics. In contrast, Tween 20, Triton X-100, and BSA did not show satisfactory performance in terms of foamability, foam stability, physicochemcial stability, and biochemical stability. Although our study has been limited to representative formulations composed of only surfactant molecules, a number of unique advantages make RSN-2 a promising candidate for in vitro foam biosynthesis. (paper)

  2. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  3. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Rossen

    2005-03-16

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research is to lay the groundwork for more-applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  4. Thermal Transport in High-Strength Polymethacrylimide (PMI) Foam Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Zheng, X. H.; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W.; Yang, S. Y.; Hu, A. J.; Wang, L. L.; Li, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal transport in high-strength polymethacrylimide (PMI) foam insulations is described, with special emphasis on the density and temperature effects on the thermal transport performance. Measurements of the effective thermal conductivity are performed by a freestanding sensor-based 3ω method. A linear relationship between the density and the effective thermal conductivity is observed. Based on the analysis of the foam insulation morphological structures and the corresponding geometrical cell model, the quantitative contribution of the solid conductivity and the gas conductivity as well as the radiative conductivity to the total effective thermal conductivity as a function of the density and temperature is calculated. The agreement between the curves of the results from the developed model and experimental data indicate the model can be used for PMI foam insulating performance optimization.

  5. Applicability of Solid Solution Heat Treatments to Aluminum Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rodríguez-Pérez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Present research work evaluates the influence of both density and size on the treatability of Aluminum-based (6000 series foam-parts subjected to a typical solid solution heat treatment (water quenching. The results are compared with those obtained for the bulk alloy, evaluating the fulfilment of cooling requirements. Density of the foams was modeled by tomography analysis and the thermal properties calculated, based on validated density-scaled models. With this basis, cooling velocity maps during water quenching were predicted by finite element modeling (FEM in which boundary conditions were obtained by solving the inverse heat conduction problem. Simulations under such conditions have been validated experimentally. Obtained results address incomplete matrix hardening for foam-parts bigger than 70 mm in diameter with a density below 650 kg/m3. An excellent agreement has been found in between the predicted cooling maps and final measured microhardness profiles.

  6. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength).

  7. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  8. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO 2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  9. Solid cellulose nanofiber based foams - Towards facile design of sustained drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svagan, Anna J; Benjamins, Jan-Willem; Al-Ansari, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    -chemical properties that, when combined with surfactants, can be used to create very stable air bubbles and dry foams. Utilizing this inherent property, it is possible to modify the release kinetics of the model drug riboflavin in a facile way. Wet foams were prepared using cationic CNF and a pharmaceutically...

  10. Liquid versus foam sclerotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel-Desnos, C; Allaert, F-A

    2009-12-01

    A systematic review to compare efficacy and safety of foam (F) sclerotherapy versus liquid (L) sclerotherapy for primary varicose veins of the lower limbs. Systematic searches of electronic databases were conducted in April 2009 to identify relevant published studies. Database searches were augmented with abstracts from conference proceedings and electronic and hand searching of journals not consistently indexed in the major databases. For treatment of saphenous veins, six trials (four randomized controlled trials) were considered. Despite containing much less sclerosing agent, F was markedly more effective compared with L, the difference being put at between 20% and 50%. Four studies were included in a meta-analysis showing efficacy of F at 76.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 71-82) versus L at 39.5% (95% CI 33-46), chi(2) = 60.9740; P reticular veins and telangiectases, only two comparative trials were found and do not at present provide any conclusive evidence to support the superiority of efficacy of one form over the other. Statistically, the side-effects reported in all the available comparative trials do not differ between F and L forms, even if visual disturbances seem to be more common with F. In the treatment of varices of the lower limbs, F shows much greater efficacy compared to L. Concerning the side effects, no statistical significant differences were found between L and F.

  11. Foam-mat drying technology: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Z; Jideani, V A

    2017-08-13

    This article reviews various aspects of foam-mat drying such as foam-mat drying processing technique, main additives used for foam-mat drying, foam-mat drying of liquid and solid foods, quality characteristics of foam-mat dried foods, and economic and technical benefits for employing foam-mat drying. Foam-mat drying process is an alternative method that allows the removal of water from liquid materials and pureed materials. In this drying process, a liquid material is converted into foam that is stable by being whipped after adding an edible foaming agent. The stable foam is then spread out in sheet or mat and dried by using hot air (40-90°C) at atmospheric pressure. Methyl cellulose (0.25-2%), egg white (3-20%), maltodextrin (0.5-05%), and gum Arabic (2-9%) are the commonly utilized additives for the foam-mat drying process at the given range, either combined together for their effectiveness or individual effect. The foam-mat drying process is suitable for heat sensitive, viscous, and sticky products that cannot be dried using other forms of drying methods such as spray drying because of the state of product. More interest has developed for foam-mat drying because of the simplicity, cost effectiveness, high speed drying, and improved product quality it provides.

  12. Stability analysis of uniform equilibrium foam states for EOR processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashoori, E.; Marchesin, D.; Rossen, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The use of foam for mobility control is a promising mean to improve sweep efficiency in EOR. Experimental studies discovered that foam exhibits three different states (weak foam, intermediate foam, and strong foam). The intermediate-foam state is found to be unstable in the lab whereas the weak- and

  13. External Tank (ET) Foam Thermal/Structural Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David F.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chang, Li C.; Malroy, Eric T.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    An independent study was performed to assess the pre-launch thermally induced stresses in the Space Shuttle External Tank Bipod closeout and Ice/Frost ramps (IFRs). Finite element models with various levels of detail were built that included the three types of foam (BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL 1034) and the underlying structure and bracketry. Temperature profiles generated by the thermal analyses were input to the structural models to calculate the stress levels. An area of high stress in the Bipod closeout was found along the aluminum tank wall near the phenolic insulator and along the phenolic insulator itself. This area of high stress might be prone to cracking and possible delamination. There is a small region of slightly increased stress in the NCFI 24-124 foam near its joint with the Bipod closeout BX-265 foam. The calculated stresses in the NCFI 24-124 acreage foam are highest at the NCFI 24-124/PDL 1034/tank wall interface under the LO2 and LH2 IFRs. The highest calculated stresses in the LH2 NCFI 24-124 foam are higher than in similar locations in the LO2 IFR. This finding is consistent with the dissection results of IFRs on ET-120.

  14. The mechanism of foaming and thermal conductivity of glasses foamed with MnO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    bubbles and subsequent growth. We discuss evolution of pore morphology in terms of pore number density, pore size and closed porosity. The thermal conductivity of the foam glasses is linearly dependent on density. The heat transfer mechanism is revealed by comparing the experimental data with structural...... data and analytical models.We show that the effect of pore size, presence of crystal inclusions and degree of closed porosity do not affect the overall thermal conductivity....

  15. Mechanism of adhesion of electroless-deposited silver on poly(ether urethane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.E.; Norton, P.R.; Griffiths, K.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial growth on medical implants and devices is a common source of infection. There is a great deal of interest in the surface modification of polymeric materials to decrease infection rates without altering properties that affect their function. One possibility is to coat the material with an antibacterial agent such as silver. This paper explores the feasibility of depositing adherent silver films onto biomedical poly(ether urethanes) by an electroless plating process. The surface chemistry of the deposition process and the effect of a plasma treatment on the metal/polymer adhesion have been explored. The silver films produced on an unmodified poly(ether urethane) surface consist predominantly of micron-sized clusters that form in solution and are poorly adhered to the surface. However, some small adherent clusters are also deposited on the polymer surface and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the metal/polymer interface shows evidence of chemical interaction between silver and surface carbonyl groups. An air plasma treatment of the polymer to increase the number of carbonyl containing groups at the surface has been shown to significantly improve the metal/polymer adhesion and to decrease the porosity of the silver films. This paper illustrates the importance of chemical bonding in the electroless metallization of polymers

  16. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Griffiths, S.K.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1982-09-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some loss-of-coolant nuclear reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, several open tube tests and over one hundred closed vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion with and without foam have been conducted. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen (the stoichiometric limit is 29.6% hydrogen) where the peak overpressure is reduced by two and one-half. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increased by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  17. Influence of the glass particle size on the foaming process and physical characteristics of foam glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. The effect of the glass particle size on the foaming process, the apparent density and the pore morphology is revealed. The results show that the foaming is mainly caused......–3 mm due to a faster coalescence process. However, by quenching the sample from the foaming to the annealing temperature the pore size is reduced by a factor of 5–10. The foams with an apparent density of porous. The foams exhibit a thermal conductivity as lowas 38.1m...

  18. Effect of gas type on foam film permeability and its implications for foam flow in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Muruganathan, R M; Rossen, W R; Krastev, R

    2011-10-14

    The aim of this paper is to provide a perspective on the effect of gas type on the permeability of foam films stabilized by different types of surfactant and to present a critical overview of the tracer gas experiments, which is the common approach to determine the trapped fraction of foam in porous media. In these experiments some part of the gas is replaced by a "tracer gas" during the steady-state stage of the experiments and trapped fraction of foam is determined by fitting the effluent data to a capacitance mass-transfer model. We present the experimental results on the measurement of the gas permeability of foam films stabilized with five surfactants (non-ionic, anionic and cationic) and different salt concentrations. The salt concentrations assure formation of either common black (CBF) or Newton black films (NBF). The experiments are performed with different single gasses. The permeability of the CBF is in general higher than that of the NBF. This behavior is explained by the higher density of the surfactant molecules in the NBF compared to that of CBF. It is also observed that the permeability coefficient, K(cm/s), of CBF and NBF for non-ionic and cationic surfactants are similar and K is insensitive to film thickness. Compared to anionic surfactants, the films made by the non-ionic surfactant have much lower permeability while the films made by the cationic surfactant have larger permeability. This conclusion is valid for all gasses. For all types of surfactant the gas permeability of foam film is largely dependent on the dissolution of gas in the surfactant solution and increases with increasing gas solubility in the bulk liquid. The measured values of K are consistent with rapid diffusion of tracer gasses through trapped gas adjacent to flowing gas in porous media, and difficulties in interpreting the results of tracer-foam experiments with conventional capacitance models. The implications of the results for foam flow in porous media and factors leading

  19. The role of colloidal particles in the stability of decontamination foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guignot, S.

    2008-12-01

    Illustrating an effort in the design of more controllable foams, therefore better adapted to decontamination, this research aims at highlighting the reciprocal interaction mechanisms between foam and a population of hydrophilic of hydrophobic particles. This study aims at identifying the particle system model for these both cases, hydrophilic and hydrophobic. Then, in the case of partially hydrophobic particles, the author tries to identify the viscoelastic properties of a water-air interface bearing the particles, and then to characterize the corresponding foams. In the case of hydrophilic particles, he investigated the influence of confinement on flow properties of suspensions, using a stack of spherical balls as a foam model. The obtained results are compared to those obtained in a free drainage configuration which is more representative of the use of a decontamination foam

  20. Numerical investigation on aluminum foam application in a tubular heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonomo, Bernardo; di Pasqua, Anna; Ercole, Davide; Manca, Oronzio; Nardini, Sergio

    2018-02-01

    A numerical study has been conducted to examine the thermal and fluiddynamic behaviors of a tubular heat exchanger in aluminum foam. A plate in metal foam with a single array of five circular tubes is the geometrical domain under examination. Darcy-Forchheimer flow model and the thermal non-equilibrium energy model are used to execute two-dimensional simulations on metal foam heat exchanger. The foam is characterized by porosity and (number) pores per inch respectively equal to 0.935 and 20. Different air flow rates are imposed to the entrance of the heat exchanger with an assigned surface tube temperature. The results are provided in terms of local heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number evaluated on the external surface of the tubes. Furthermore, local air temperature and velocity profiles in the smaller cross section, between two consecutive tubes are given. Finally, the Energy Performance Ratio (EPR) is evaluated in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the metal foam.

  1. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  2. Viscous Control of the Foam Glass Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup

    for several types of glasses, and carried out the foam processes at different viscosities by using CaCO3 as foaming agent to find a common optimum viscosity for all the tested glasses. We also measured the particle size distribution of the recycled cullet, and quantified the degree of foam expansion through...

  3. Bicontinuous nanoporous polymers by carbon dioxide foaming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, B.; Münüklü, P.; van der Vegt, N.F.A.; Wessling, Matthias; Sijbesma, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the physical foaming process of glassy poly(ether imide) and poly(ether sulfone) using carbon dioxide and report temperature-concentration diagrams ("foam diagrams") marking out the foaming envelope in which dense CO2-saturated films expand and microvoids are introduced. Two types of

  4. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  5. Microstructure and properties of poly(urethane-siloxane)s based on hyperbranched polyester of the fourth pseudo generation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pergal, M. V.; Džunuzović, J. V.; Poreba, Rafal; Ostojić, S.; Radulović, A.; Špírková, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 4 (2013), s. 743-756 ISSN 0300-9440 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/0195 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly(urethane-siloxane) films * hyperbranched polyester * polysiloxane Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.302, year: 2013

  6. The inhibition of tissue respiration and alcoholic fermentation at different catabolic levels by ethyl carbamate (urethan) and arsenite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, E.; Gruber, M.; Leijnse, B.; Huisman, T.H.J.

    1950-01-01

    1. A hypothesis is given concerning the action of urethan and arsenite on malignant growth. Two assumptionsares made:- (a) the enzyme system responsible for energy production in malignant tumours is working at maximal rate, contrary to the corresponding enzyme system in normal tissues. (b) a

  7. Studies of the thermal and mechanical properties of poly(urethane-siloxane)s cross-linked by hyperbranched polyesters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Džunuzović, J. V.; Pergal, M. V.; Poreba, Rafal; Ostojić, S.; Lazić, N.; Špírková, Milena; Jovanović, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 33 (2012), s. 10824-10832 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/0195 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : poly urethane * mechanical properties * thermal properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.206, year: 2012

  8. Exterior foam drainage and flow regime switch in the foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anazadehsayed, Abdolhamid; Rezaee, Nastaran; Naser, Jamal

    2018-02-01

    The three-dimensional flow in exterior microscale foams including the Plateau borders and nodes are investigated by solving Navier-stoke and continuity equations. First, we show the effect of the interfacial mobility and film thickness on the dimensionless mean velocity of the exterior foams. The velocity of the exterior node-PB is similar to the velocity of single exterior Plateau border. Next, we calculated the pressure difference of each element separately and obtained their hydraulic resistances. We found out that the hydraulic resistance of the exterior Plateau border is always larger than the hydraulic resistance of the exterior node, resulting in a consistent channel-dominated regime. However, For the interior foams, there is a value of interfacial mobility where the node's resistance overcomes the channel's resistance, resulting in a switch from the channel-dominated regime to a node-dominated regime. This switching point is dependent on the relative length of the channels. Hence, we obtained an approximation of the interfacial mobility switching points versus the relative length of channels. Moreover, in a form of approximation master curve, we showed the dependence of mean velocities of foams and channels' hydraulic resistances to a dimensionless combined parameter of Λ -1 that contains interfacial mobility and film thickness together. For both the exterior and interior nodes, the velocity and hydraulic resistance are almost constant for various Boussinesq numbers since interfacial mobility has a marginal effect on node's flow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of foam on the stability characteristics of immiscible flow in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, J. M.; Farajzadeh, R.; Rossen, W. R.; Jansen, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate field-scale simulations of foam enhanced oil recovery are challenging, due to the sharp transition between gas and foam. Hence, unpredictable numerical and physical behavior is often observed, casting doubt on the validity of the simulation results. In this paper, a thorough stability analysis of the foam model is presented to validate the simulation results. We study the effect of a strongly non-monotonous total mobility function arising from foam models on the stability characteristics of the flow. To this end, we apply the linear stability analysis to nearly discontinuous relative permeability functions and compare the results with those of highly accurate numerical simulations. In addition, we present a qualitative analysis of the effect of different reservoir and fluid properties on the foam fingering behavior. In particular, we consider the effect of heterogeneity of the reservoir, injection rates, and foam quality. Relative permeability functions play an important role in the onset of fingering behavior of the injected fluid. Hence, we can deduce that stability properties are highly dependent on the non-linearity of the foam transition. The foam-water interface is governed by a very small total mobility ratio, implying a stable front. The transition between gas and foam, however, exhibits a huge total mobility ratio, leading to instabilities in the form of viscous fingering. This implies that there is an unstable pattern behind the front. We deduce that instabilities are able to grow behind the front but are later absorbed by the expanding wave. Moreover, the stability analysis, validated by numerical simulations, provides valuable insights about the important scales and wavelengths of the foam model. In this way, we remove the ambiguity regarding the effect of grid resolution on the convergence of the solutions. This insight forms an essential step toward the design of a suitable computational solver that captures all the appropriate scales, while

  10. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part II: Functionally graded foam liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, L.; Forero Rueda, M.A.; Gilchrist, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    The energy absorbing liner of safety helmets was optimised using finite element modelling. In this present paper, a functionally graded foam (FGF) liner was modelled, while keeping the average liner density the same as in a corresponding reference single uniform density liner model. Use of a functionally graded foam liner would eliminate issues regarding delamination and crack propagation between interfaces of different density layers which could arise in liners with discrete density variations. As in our companion Part I paper [Forero Rueda MA, Cui L, Gilchrist MD. Optimisation of energy absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part I: Layered foam liner. Mater Des [submitted for publication

  11. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  12. Method of making a cyanate ester foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

    2014-08-05

    A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

  13. Stretching and folding mechanism in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, Alberto [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Pedrosa Biscaia Tufaile, Adriana [Escola de Artes, Ciencias e Humanidades, Soft Matter Laboratory, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 03828-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-10-13

    We have described the stretching and folding of foams in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing air and a surfactant solution, from a sequence of upside-down flips. Besides the fractal dimension of the foam, we have observed the logistic growth for the soap film length. The stretching and folding mechanism is present during the foam formation, and this mechanism is observed even after the foam has reached its respective maximum fractal dimension. Observing the motion of bubbles inside the foam, large bubbles present power spectrum associated with random walk motion in both directions, while the small bubbles are scattered like balls in a Galton board.

  14. Graphene nanoplatelets-reinforced polyetherimide foams prepared by water vapor-induced phase separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Abbasi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work considers the preparation of medium-density polyetherimide foams reinforced with variable amounts of graphene nanoplatelets (1–10 wt% by means of water vapor-induced phase separation (WVIPS and their characterization . A homogeneous closed-cell structure with cell sizes around 10 µm was obtained, with foams exhibiting zero crystallinity according to X-ray diffraction (XRD. Thermogravimetric analysis under nitrogen showed a two-step thermal decomposition behaviour for both unfilled and graphene-reinforced foams, with foams containing graphene presenting thermal stability improvements, related to a physical barrier effect promoted by the nanoplatelets. Thermo-mechanical analysis indicated that the specific storage modulus of the nanocomposite foams significantly increased owing to the high stiffness of graphene and finer cellular morphology of the foams. Although foamed nanocomposites displayed no further sign of graphene nanoplatelets exfoliation, the electrical conductivity of these foams was significant even for low graphene contents, with a tunnel-like model fitting well to the evolution of the electrical conductivity with the amount of graphene.

  15. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Gangmin; Shi, Ting; Shao, Zhihong; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu; Ren, Jie; Lin, Chao; Wang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T 1 -contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  16. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  17. Foaming Glass Using High Pressure Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    Foam glass is a high added value product which contributes to waste recycling and energy efficiency through heat insulation. The foaming can be initiated by a chemical or physical process. Chemical foaming with aid of a foaming agent is the dominant industrial process. Physical foaming has two...... variations. One way is by saturation of glass melts with gas. The other involves sintering of powdered glass under a high gas pressure resulting in glass pellets with high pressure bubbles entrapped. Reheating the glass pellets above the glass transition temperature under ambient pressure allows the bubbles...... to expand. After heat-treatment foam glass can be obtained with porosities of 80–90 %. In this study we conduct physical foaming of cathode ray tube (CRT) panel glass by sintering under high pressure (5-25 MPa) using helium, nitrogen, or argon at 640 °C (~108 Pa s). Reheating a sample in a heating...

  18. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles Doped DVB Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yu; Luo Xuan; Fan Yongheng; Zhang Qingjun; Ren Hongbo; Xiao Lei

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams was researched, which can be used as ICF target materials. By high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) method, gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams were prepared, with gold nanoparticles dissolved in inner phase. The results show that the content of Au in the gold nanoparticles doped DVB foam is 3. 19%, the axial direction density of the foam is uniform which indicates none evident settlement of gold nanoparticles. SEM tests show that the gold doped DVB polymer foams have open-celled structure and very uniform aperture, and the average pore size is about 1 μm, which is much smaller than that of pure DVB foams. EDX test shows that Au disperses uniformly in the foams. (authors)

  19. Open-celled polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foam has a density of 8.3 pounds per cubic foot and a compressive strength of 295 to 325 psi. It is useful as a porous spacer in layered insulation and as an insulation material in vacuum tight systems.

  20. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  1. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  2. Influence of foaming agents on solid thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared from CRT panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Martin Bonderup; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal transport mechanism of foam glass is still lacking. The contribution of solid- and gas conduction to the total thermal conductivity remains to be reported. In many foam glasses, the solid phase consist of a mix of an amorphous and a crystalline part where foaming...... containing glass and crystalline foaming agents and amorphous samples where the foaming agents are completely dissolved in the glass structure, respectively. Results show that the samples prepared by sintering have a higher thermal conductivity than the samples prepared by melt-quenching. The thermal...... conductivities of the sintered and the melt-quenched samples represent an upper and lower limit of the solid phase thermal conductivity of foam glasses prepared with these foaming agents. The content of foaming agents dissolved in the glass structure has a major impact on the solid thermal conductivity of foam...

  3. Porous Polyurethane Foam for Use as a Particle Collection Substrate in a Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition Sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mines, Levi W D; Park, Jae Hong; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Anthony, T Renée; Grassian, Vicki H; Peters, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Porous polyurethane foam was evaluated to replace the eight nylon meshes used as a substrate to collect nanoparticles in the Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition (NRD) sampler. Cylindrical (25-mm diameter by 40-mm deep) foam with 110 pores per inch was housed in a 25-mm-diameter conductive polypropylene cassette cowl compatible with the NRD sampler. Pristine foam and nylon meshes were evaluated for metals content via elemental analysis. The size-selective collection efficiency of the foam was evaluated using salt (NaCl) and metal fume aerosols in independent tests. Collection efficiencies were compared to the nanoparticulate matter (NPM) criterion and a semi-empirical model for foam. Changes in collection efficiency and pressure drop of the foam and nylon meshes were measured after loading with metal fume particles as measures of substrate performance. Substantially less titanium was found in the foam (0.173 μg sampler -1 ) compared to the nylon mesh (125 μg sampler -1 ), improving the detection capabilities of the NRD sampler for titanium dioxide particles. The foam collection efficiency was similar to that of the nylon meshes and the NPM criterion (R 2 = 0.98, for NaCl), although the semi-empirical model underestimated the experimental efficiency (R 2 = 0.38). The pressure drop across the foam was 8% that of the nylon meshes when pristine and changed minimally with metal fume loading (~ 19 mg). In contrast, the pores of the nylon meshes clogged after loading with ~ 1 mg metal fume. These results indicate that foam is a suitable substrate to collect metal (except for cadmium) nanoparticles in the NRD sampler.

  4. Hydrocortisone release from tablets based on bioresorbable poly(ether-ester-urethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Manuel Orozco-Castellanos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bioresorbable linear poly(ether-ester-urethanes with different hydrophilic characteristics were synthesized from triblock copolymers of poly(ε-caprolactone-poly(ethylene oxide-poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL-PEO as macrodiols, and L-lysine diisocyanate (LDI or hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDI were used as the required diisocyanates. Macrodiols were obtained by ring-opening polymerization (ROP of ε-caprolactone (CL. Polyurethanes were synthesized by the reaction of the triblock copolymers with LDI or HDI in solution using stannous 2-ethylhexanoate as catalyst. Polyurethane tablets were fabricated and investigated as prospective drug delivery systems. The effect of the PEO content on the polymers' performance as drug carriers was evaluated. It was found that water provoked more swelling and erosion of polymers with higher contents of PEO. The hydrocortisone release profiles were analyzed using the Ritger-Peppas approximation. An anomalous release behaviour (values of n higher than 0.5 was found for most of the analyzed samples.

  5. Aqueous Tape Casting of Alumina using an Emulsion of Urethane Polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaishi, T; Inada, H; Sato, M; Sano, S; Kawakami, S

    2011-01-01

    From the viewpoint of solving environmental problems, changeover from organic solvent-based system to water-based system in tape casting process has been required. The effects of organic additives on the rheological properties of water-based alumina slurries were investigated. The aqueous slurries were prepared from low-soda alumina powder, deionized water, ammonium salt of polycarboxylic acid type dispersant, emulsion type urethane polymer binder and defoamer. By means of the zeta potential measurement, the optimum content of added dispersant was estimated. Furthermore, precipitation test, viscosity measurement and so on were performed. From these measurements, it was decided that optimum amounts of dispersant and binder were 0.8 mass% and 12 mass%, respectively. Well-dispersed and high solid content slurry gave good quality green sheets, and high density sintered bodies were obtained.

  6. Evaluation of the microstructure of waterborne poly(urethane-urea)s nanocomposites with hydrophilic clay (NWPUU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Gisele dos S.; Delpech, Marcia C.; Reis, Rodrigo A. dos; Pereira, Alexandre Z.I; Coelho, Aline B.

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne poly(urethane-urea)s (WPUU) and respective nanocomposites based on hydrophilic clay (NWPUU) generally show segregation between hard and soft domains, in a greater or lesser extent, which directly influences the stability of the dispersion and affect the final properties of the material. Simple characterization techniques, such as infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X ray diffraction (XRD), employed in this study, can generate information about the microstructure and phase miscibility, using small amounts of material. The evaluation of the results obtained from the techniques showed that increments in rigid domains content and in the amount of internal emulsifier, as well as the presence of clay, decreased the size of the crystallites (crystallinity of the soft segments). (author)'

  7. A new fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic groups for use in dental adhesive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buruiana, Tinca, E-mail: tbur@icmpp.ro [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Melinte, Violeta [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Aldea, Horia [Gr. T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Dentistry, 16 University Str., 700115 Iasi (Romania); Pelin, Irina M.; Buruiana, Emil C. [Polyaddition and Photochemistry Department, Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania)

    2016-05-01

    A urethane macromer containing hexafluoroisopropylidene, poly(ethylene oxide) and carboxylic moieties (UF-DMA) was synthesized and used in proportions varying between 15 and 35 wt.% (F1–F3) in dental adhesive formulations besides BisGMA, triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The FTIR and {sup 1}H ({sup 13}C) NMR spectra confirmed the chemical structure of the UF-DMA. The experimental adhesives were characterized with regard to the degree of conversion, water sorption/solubility, contact angle, diffusion coefficient, Vickers hardness, and morphology of the crosslinked networks and compared with the specimens containing 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HAP) or calcium phosphate (CaP). The conversion degree (after 180 s of irradiation with visible light) ranged from 59.5% (F1) to 74.8% (F3), whereas the water sorption was between 23.15 μg mm{sup −3} (F1) and 40.52 μg mm{sup −3} (F3). Upon the addition of HAP or CaP this parameter attained values of 37.82–49.14 μg mm{sup −3} (F1–F3-HAP) and 34.58–45.56 μg mm{sup −3}, respectively. Also, the formation of resin tags through the infiltration of a dental composition (F3) was visualized by SEM analysis. The results suggest that UF-DMA taken as co-monomer in dental adhesives of acrylic type may provide improved properties in the moist environment of the mouth. - Highlights: • Fluorinated urethane dimethacrylate with carboxylic units (UF-DMA) was proposed as co-monomer in dental adhesives. • UF-DMA exhibits good photoreactivity in mixture with commercial dental monomers. • Water sorption/solubility and diffusion coefficient depend on the amount of UF-DMA. • The infiltration of adhesive mixture into the dentin tubules was evidenced by SEM.

  8. Grafting of phosphorylcholine functional groups on polycarbonate urethane surface for resisting platelet adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Bin [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Feng, Yakai, E-mail: yakaifeng@hotmail.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, Jian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Miao; Shi, Changcan; Khan, Musammir [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Guo, Jintang [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Weijin Road 92, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Weijin Road 92, 300072 Tianjin (China)

    2013-07-01

    In order to improve the resistance of platelet adhesion on material surface, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) was grafted onto polycarbonate urethane (PCU) surface via Michael reaction to create biomimetic structure. After introducing primary amine groups via coupling tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TAEA) onto the polymer surface, the double bond of MPC reacted with the amino group to obtain MPC modified PCU. The modified surface was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results verified that MPC was grafted onto PCU surface by Michael reaction method. The MPC grafted PCU surface had a low water contact angle and a high water uptake. This means that the hydrophilic PC functional groups improved the surface hydrophilicity significantly. In addition, surface morphology of MPC grafted PCU film was imaged by atomic force microscope (AFM). The results showed that the grafted surface was rougher than the blank PCU surface. In addition, platelet adhesion study was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. The PCU films after treated with platelet-rich plasma demonstrated that much fewer platelets adhered to the MPC-grafted PCU surface than to the blank PCU surface. The antithrombogenicity of the MPC-grafted PCU surface was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The result suggested that the MPC modified PCU may have potential application as biomaterials in blood-contacting and some subcutaneously implanted devices. - Highlights: • MPC was successfully grafted onto polycarbonate urethane surface via Michael reaction. • High concentration of PC functional groups on the surface via TAEA molecule • Biomimetic surface modification • The modified surface showed high hydrophilicity and anti-platelet adhesion.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of polycaprolactone urethane hollow fiber membranes as small diameter vascular grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Pagán, Ángel E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Stahl, Alexander M. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Ramseier, Michelle L. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Behn, Anthony W. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Yang, Yunzhi, E-mail: ypyang@stanford.edu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The design of bioresorbable synthetic small diameter (< 6 mm) vascular grafts (SDVGs) capable of sustaining long-term patency and endothelialization is a daunting challenge in vascular tissue engineering. Here, we synthesized a family of biocompatible and biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) urethane macromers to fabricate hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) as SDVG candidates, and characterized their mechanical properties, degradability, hemocompatibility, and endothelial development. The HFMs had smooth surfaces and porous internal structures. Their tensile stiffness ranged from 0.09 to 0.11 N/mm and their maximum tensile force from 0.86 to 1.03 N, with minimum failure strains of approximately 130%. Permeability varied from 1 to 14 × 10{sup −6} cm/s, burst pressures from 1158 to 1468 mm Hg, and compliance from 0.52 to 1.48%/100 mm Hg. The suture retention forces ranged from 0.55 to 0.81 N. HFMs had slow degradation profiles, with 15 to 30% degradation after 8 weeks. Human endothelial cells proliferated well on the HFMs, creating stable cell layer coverage. Hemocompatibility studies demonstrated low hemolysis (< 2%), platelet activation, and protein adsorption. There were no significant differences in the hemocompatibility of HFMs in the absence and presence of endothelial layers. These encouraging results suggest great promise of our newly developed materials and biodegradable elastomeric HFMs as SDVG candidates. - Highlights: • Polyester urethane hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) were fabricated and evaluated. • HFM properties varied according to composition. • HFM inner and outer surfaces were successfully seeded with cells. • HFMs showed excellent hemocompatibility in vitro. • HFM has the potential to be used for small diameter vascular grafts.

  10. Hyperspectral chemical imaging reveals spatially varied degradation of polycarbonate urethane (PCU) biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ronan M; Lawless, Bernard M; Burton, Hanna E; Espino, Daniel M; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Gowen, Aoife A

    2018-04-04

    Hyperspectral chemical imaging (HCI) is an emerging technique which combines spectroscopy with imaging. Unlike traditional point spectroscopy, which is used in the majority of polymer biomaterial degradation studies, HCI enables the acquisition of spatially localised spectra across the surface of a material in an objective manner. Here, we demonstrate that attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infra-red (ATR-FTIR) HCI reveals spatial variation in the degradation of implantable polycarbonate urethane (PCU) biomaterials. It is also shown that HCI can detect possible defects in biomaterial formulation or specimen production; these spatially resolved images reveal regional or scattered spatial heterogeneity. Further, we demonstrate a map sampling method, which can be used in time-sensitive scenarios, allowing for the investigation of degradation across a larger component or component area. Unlike imaging, mapping does not produce a contiguous image, yet grants an insight into the spatial heterogeneity of the biomaterial across a larger area. These novel applications of HCI demonstrate its ability to assist in the detection of defective manufacturing components and lead to a deeper understanding of how a biomaterial's chemical structure changes due to implantation. Statement of Signifance The human body is an aggressive environment for implantable devices and their biomaterial components. Polycarbonate urethane (PCU) biomaterials in particular were investigated in this study. Traditionally one or a few points on the PCU surface are analysed using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. However the selection of acquisition points is susceptible to operator bias and critical information can be lost. This study utilises hyperspectral chemical imaging (HCI) to demonstrate that the degradation of a biomaterial varies spatially. Further, HCI revealed spatial variations of biomaterials that were not subjected to oxidative degradation leading to the possibility of HCI being used in the

  11. Study on Incineration/ Pyrolysis/ Gasification Characteristics of Urethane/ Styrofoam Generated from Home Appliances Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung-Jin; Jung, Hae-Young; Lee, Jang-Su; Lee, Ki-Bae; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Ki-Heon

    2010-01-01

    According to the report of the Korean Association of Electronics Environment (KAEE), 1.44 million units of refrigerators, 1.15 million units of washing machines, 886 thousand units of televisions, and 327 thousand units of air conditioners were discarded in 2006. From such wastes more than 90 wt.% of valuable materials are recovered. Polyurethane/ styrofoam, used to reduce noise and thermally insulating agent in such electric appliances is hard to recycle and handle by any treatment processes. Urethane/ Styrofoam waste recycling consists of 3 parts material recycling, mechanical recycling and energy recycling. The material recycling involves shredding polyurethane for using as raw materials preparing various appliances. This is not easy however, active attempts are being made. The chemical recycling using thermal depolymerization is reduction from polyurethane to raw material polymer. The energy recycling is incineration of polyurethane for cogeneration, RDF (refuse dericed fuel) etc. Most of Urethane/ Styrofoam waste in Korea is sent to cement kilns as auxiliary fuel or is disposed off at landfill sites. Considering the limited landfill capacity and environmental problems associated to land filling, alternative treatment methods such as incineration, pyrolysis and gasification are evaluated for polyurethane/styrofoam disposal. In this study, we considered recovery and recycling of polyurethane/ styrofoam using 3 thermal treatment process (incineration, pyrolysis and gasification). The evaluation of 3 experimental conditions will suggest the energy recovery possibility and the hazard analysis of generated gas and residues. In addition, heating value of oil generated by pyrolysis will also be assessed. Results on possibility of energy recovery by analyzing syngas composition, heating value and carbon conversion efficiency during gasification experiment will also be presented. (author)

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials with Poly(urea-urethane) Shells Containing Cellulose Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Youngman; Martinez, Carlos; Youngblood, Jeffrey P

    2017-09-20

    The main objective of this study is to develop microencapsulation technology for thermal energy storage incorporating a phase change material (PCM) in a composite wall shell, which can be used to create a stable environment and allow the PCM to undergo phase change without any outside influence. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was conducted by grafting poly(lactic acid) oligomers and oleic acid to improve the dispersion of nanoparticles in a polymeric shell. A microencapsulated phase change material (methyl laurate) with poly(urea-urethane) (PU) composite shells containing the hydrophobized cellulose nanocrystals (hCNCs) was fabricated using an in situ emulsion interfacial polymerization process. The encapsulation process of the PCMs with subsequent interfacial hCNC-PU to form composite microcapsules as well as their morphology, composition, thermal properties, and release rates was examined in this study. Oil soluble Sudan II dye solution in methyl laurate was used as a model hydrophobic fill, representing other latent fills with low partition coefficients, and their encapsulation efficiency as well as dye release rates were measured spectroscopically in a water medium. The influence of polyol content in the PU polymer matrix of microcapsules was investigated. An increase in polyol contents leads to an increase in the mean size of microcapsules but a decrease in the gel content (degree of cross-linking density) and permeability of their shell structure. The encapsulated PCMs for thermal energy storage demonstrated here exhibited promising performance for possible use in building or paving materials in terms of released heat, desired phase transformation temperature, chemical and physical stability, and concrete durability during placement.

  13. Performance analysis of a membrane humidifier containing porous metal foam as flow distributor in a PEM fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Baharlou Houreh, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three metal foam configurations for the membrane humidifier are introduced. • The performances of the humidifiers containing metal foam are investigated. • A 3D CFD model is developed to compare the introduced humidifiers with one another. • Using metal foam at dry side has no positive effect on the humidifier performance. - Abstract: Using metal foam as flow distributor in membrane humidifier for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system has some unique characteristics like more water transfer, low manufacturing complexity and low cost compared to the conventional flow channel plate. Metal foam can be applied at wet side or dry side or both sides of a humidifier. The three-dimensional CFD models are developed to investigate the performance of the above mentioned meanwhile compare them with the conventional humidifier. This model consists of a set of coupled equations including conservations of mass, momentum, species and energy for all regions of the humidifier. The results indicate that with the metal foam installed at wet side and both sides, water recovery ratio and dew point at dry side outlet are more than that of the conventional humidifier, indicating a better humidifier performance; while using metal foam at dry side has no positive effect on humidifier performance. At dry side mass flow rates higher than 10 mgr/s pressure drop in humidifier containing metal foam at wet side is lower than that of the conventional humidifier. As the mass flow rate increases from 9 to 15 mgr/s humidifier containing metal foam at wet side has better performance, while at mass flow rates lower than 9 mgr/s, the humidifier containing metal foam at both sides has better performance. At dry side inlet temperatures lower than 303 K, humidifier containing metal foam at wet side has better performance and at temperatures higher than 303 K, humidifier containing metal foam at both sides has better performance

  14. Report on achievements in fiscal 1998. Development of foaming eco-material using magazine waste papers. (The first fiscal year); 1998 nendo zasshi koshi wo mochiita happo seikei eko material no kaihatsu seika hokokusho (dai 1 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Such foaming materials as styro-foam, urethane and polyethylene greatly increase load on the environment when discarded, and are a problem as harmful rubbish. On the other hand, magazine waste papers have limitation as regenerated paper because their pulp fibers are cut off and deteriorated during use and regeneration. They are left unused without a prospect of re-use even if recovered. Under such a background, the present research and development is intended to develop magazine waste papers as a reusable cushioning material, commercialize the cushioning material as a low environment load type material, and promote reutilization of magazine waste papers. Specifically, development is performed on a manufacturing technology and a manufacturing equipment for a cushioning material having excellent biodegradation performance manufactured by mixing magazine waste papers with gelatin as a binder, and further by foaming and forming. The research and development items include: (1) development of a manufacturing technology for a foaming eco-material using magazine waste papers, (2) development of manufacturing equipment for the foaming eco-material, and (3) the market research thereon. This paper reports the achievements in the research and development of each item in fiscal 1998. (NEDO)

  15. Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Response of Injection-Molded Cenosphere/HDPE Syntactic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath Kumar, B. R.; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    High strain rate compressive properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix syntactic foams containing cenosphere filler are investigated. Thermoplastic matrix syntactic foams have not been studied extensively for high strain rate deformation response despite interest in them for lightweight underwater vehicle structures and consumer products. Quasi-static compression tests are conducted at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1 and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. Further, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized for characterizing syntactic foams for high strain rate compression. The compressive strength of syntactic foams is higher than that of HDPE resin at the same strain rate. Yield strength shows an increasing trend with strain rate. The average yield strength values at high strain rates are almost twice the values obtained at 10-4 s-1 for HDPE resin and syntactic foams. Theoretical models are used to estimate the effectiveness of cenospheres in reinforcing syntactic foams.

  16. Acoustic properties of aluminium foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, L. E.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses normal incidence sound absorption by aluminium foam manufactured with powder metallurgy technology. Aluminium foams with different surface morphologies were obtained by varying the type of precursor and adding filler materials during the foaming process. The sound absorption coefficients found for these aluminium foams were compared to the coefficient for commercial foams marketed under the name ALPORAS. The effect of foam thickness on the absorption coefficient was studied for each sample prepared. The combination of good acoustic and mechanical properties makes aluminium foams particularly attractive products. The study included an analysis of the effect of 2-, 5- and 10-cm air gaps on the sound absorption coefficient. The results showed that such gaps, which are routinely used in construction to reduce the reverberation period in indoor premises, raised the low frequency absorption coefficient significantly. This increase was found to depend on aluminium foam density and thickness and the depth of the air gap. In this same line, we have investigated the absorption coefficient of the aluminium foams combined with a mineral fiber panel.Se presenta un estudio del coeficiente de absorción acústica a incidencia normal de espumas de aluminio fabricadas mediante la técnica pulvimetalúrgica. Se fabricaron espumas de aluminio de distinta morfología superficial variando el tipo de precursor y usando materiales de relleno durante el proceso de espumación. Se muestra un estudio comparativo del coeficiente de absorción acústica de las espumas de aluminio fabricadas y las espumas comerciales conocidas como ALPORAS. Para cada muestra fabricada se estudió la influencia del espesor sobre el valor del coeficiente de absorción.El atractivo de las espumas de aluminio radica en que en ellas se combinan interesantes propiedades acústicas y mecánicas. Se analizó el efecto de una cámara de aire de 2, 5 y 10 cm de anchura sobre el

  17. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be at...

  18. Foam relaxation in fractures and narrow channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Perazzo, Antonio; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-11-01

    Various applications, from foam manufacturing to hydraulic fracturing with foams, involve pressure-driven flow of foams in narrow channels. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of this problem accounting for the compressible nature of the foam. In particular, in our experiments the foam is initially compressed in one channel and then upon flow into a second channel the compressed foam relaxes as it moves. A plug flow is observed in the tube and the pressure at the entrance of the tube is higher than the exit. We measure the volume collected at the exit of the tube, V, as a function of injection flow rate, tube length and diameter. Two scaling behaviors for V as a function of time are observed depending on whether foam compression is important or not. Our work may relate to foam fracturing, which saves water usage in hydraulic fracturing, more efficient enhanced oil recovery via foam injection, and various materials manufacturing processes involving pressure-driven flow foams.

  19. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  20. Covering sources of toxic vapors with foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aue, W. P.; Guidetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    In a case of chemical terrorism, first responders might well be confronted with a liquid source of toxic vapor which keeps spreading out its hazardous contents. With foam as an efficient and simple means, such a source could be covered up in seconds and the spread of vapors mitigated drastically. Once covered, the source could then wait for a longer time to be removed carefully and professionally by a decontamination team. In order to find foams useful for covering up toxic vapor sources, a large set of measurements has been performed in order to answer the following questions: - Which foams could be used for this purpose? - How thick should the foam cover be? - For how long would such a foam cover be effective? - Could the practical application of foam cause a spread of the toxic chemical? The toxic vapors sources included GB, GD and HD. Among the foams were 10 fire fighter foams (e.g. AFFF, protein) and the aqueous decontamination foam CASCAD. Small scale experiments showed that CASCAD is best suited for covering a toxic source; a 10 cm layer of it covers and decontaminates GB. The large scale experiments confirmed that any fire fighter foam is a suitable cover for a longer or shorter period.(author)

  1. Making continuous bubble type polyethylene foam incombustible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Kanako; Hatada, Motoyoshi; Yoshizawa, Iwao; Komai, Kuniaki; Kohara, Choji.

    1989-01-01

    Since continuous bubble type plastic foam has excellent compression characteristics and sound absorption characteristics, it has been widely used as cushion material, sealing material, sound insulating material and so on. However, the most part of plastic foam is taken by air, therefore at the time of fires, it becomes a very dangerous material. At present, the material used mostly as the seat cushions for airliners, railroad coaches, automobiles and others is polyurethane foam, but since it contains C-N couples in its molecules, it is feared to generate cyanic gas according to the condition of combustion. As the plastic foam that does not generate harmful gas at the time of fires, there is continuous bubble type polyethylene which is excellent in its weathering property and chemical resistance. A reactive, phosphorus-containing oligomer has large molecular weight and two or more double couplings in a molecule, therefore, it does not enter the inside of polyethylene, and polymerizes and crosslinks on the surfaces of bubble walls in the foam, accordingly it is expected that the apparent graft polymerization is carried out, and it is very effective for making polyethylene foam incombustible. The method of making graft foam, the properties of graft foam and so on are reported. When the graft polymerization of this oligomer to continuous bubble type polyethylene foam was tried, highly incombustible polyethylene foam was obtained. (K.I.)

  2. Behaviour of Metal Foam Sandwich Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhudery, Hayder; Virdi, Kuldeep

    2011-01-01

    Sandwich panels as used in structures comprise of a foam core enclosed by thin high strength steel faces. This paper discusses currently design formulae of local buckling behaviour of such panels using the finite element method. Multiple wave finite element models were adopted to investigate...... and examine the adequacy of currently used approach for the design of sandwich panels. The paper presents brief details of the finite element model used including geometry, load pattern and boundary conditions. The selected model gives good agreement with experimental results from Pokharel and Mahendran (2003......). The study shows that currently available design formulae are conservative for stocky sandwich plate elements while being over-conservative for high slenderness. A unified design formula of local buckling behaviour applicable to the full range of slenderness is developed....

  3. Hydraulic jumps in the liquid foam microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufaste, Christophe; Cohen, Alexandre; Fraysse, Nathalie; Rajchenbach, Jean; Bouret, Yann; Argentina, Mederic

    2017-11-01

    Plateau borders (PBs) are the liquid microchannels found at the intersection between three bubbles in liquid foams. They form an interconnected network that plays a major role in foam drainage and stability properties. Each channel has an unbounded geometry but is not subject to the Rayleigh-Plateau instability. This stability is accounted for by an effective negative surface tension (Géminard et al., 2004). We show that their relaxation dynamics can trigger inertial flows characterized by strongly nonlinear features. An experimental setup was designed to study the response of a PB to a liquid perturbation. Extra liquid is injected into the PB by drop coalescence. Depending on the parameters, either a viscous flow or an inertial one is observed. For the latter, the relaxation takes the form of a hydraulic jump, which propagates at a velocity around 0.1-1 m/s. Solitons are also observed for another type of perturbation. The PB dynamics is modeled and its equation presents an analogy with the differential equation of mechanical nonlinear oscillators.

  4. 2-vertex Lorentzian spin foam amplitudes for dipole transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Giorgio; Speziale, Simone; Stagno, Gabriele V.

    2018-04-01

    We compute transition amplitudes between two spin networks with dipole graphs, using the Lorentzian EPRL model with up to two (non-simplicial) vertices. We find power-law decreasing amplitudes in the large spin limit, decreasing faster as the complexity of the foam increases. There are no oscillations nor asymptotic Regge actions at the order considered, nonetheless the amplitudes still induce non-trivial correlations. Spin correlations between the two dipoles appear only when one internal face is present in the foam. We compute them within a mini-superspace description, finding positive correlations, decreasing in value with the Immirzi parameter. The paper also provides an explicit guide to computing Lorentzian amplitudes using the factorisation property of SL(2,C) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients in terms of SU(2) ones. We discuss some of the difficulties of non-simplicial foams, and provide a specific criterion to partially limit the proliferation of diagrams. We systematically compare the results with the simplified EPRLs model, much faster to evaluate, to learn evidence on when it provides reliable approximations of the full amplitudes. Finally, we comment on implications of our results for the physics of non-simplicial spin foams and their resummation.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization and Biocompatibility of Biodegradable Elastomeric Poly(ether-ester urethane)s Based on Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) and Poly(ethylene glycol) via Melting Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zibiao; Yang, Xiaodi; Wu, Linping

    2009-01-01

    contact angle measurements revealed that surface hydrophilicity of the PUs was enhanced by incorporating the PEG segment into PHBHHx polymer backbone. The mechanical properties assessment of the PUs recorded an improved and adjustable ductility and toughness than pure PHBHHx while preserving the tensile......Poly(ether-ester urethane)s (PUs) multiblock co-polymers were synthesized from telechelic hydroxylated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) via a melting polymerization (MP) process using 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as a non-toxic coupling...... transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The PU produced via the MP method showed a higher molecular weight than those resulting from the solvent polymerization (SP) reported previously. Thermal properties showed enhanced thermal stability with semi-crystalline morphology via incorporation of PEG...

  6. Study of a flowing aqueous decontamination foam drainage mechanisms and hydrodynamic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boissonnet, G.

    1998-01-01

    For the decontamination of nuclear facilities, the use of foams has a great potentiality. This work deals with the study of a flowing aqueous foam regarding two aspects: the structure and the drainage on one hand, the hydrodynamic behaviour on the other hand. The foam has been studied from a photograph of a plexiglass column wall, in which the foam flows vertically. Image processing and analysis have been used to measure the foam structure parameters and demonstrate that the smaller the average diameter of the bubbles is, the more stable the foam is. The competition between the gravity and the interfacial forces has been showed by two types of fluid flow in the inter-bubble channels: one where the gravity is preponderant, the other where the two forces exist. Two drainage models based on the Darcy law and the Weaire model have been elaborated. From an hydrodynamic behaviour point of view, the sliding of a shear core in the liquid film on wall, has been demonstrated. A Ostwald De Weale type behaviour appears concerning the whole flow; a Herschel Bulkley type behaviour of the foam core appears when the shearing and the sliding are dissociated. The sliding speed is 5 to 95% of the global speed according to the experiment conditions. A method to forecast the pressure losses, based on the Moody diagram has been established. (A.L.B.)

  7. Uncertainty Analysis of Decomposing Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Romero, Vicente J.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are necessary to determine where to allocate resources for improved predictions in support of our nation's nuclear safety mission. Yet, sensitivity/uncertainty analyses are not commonly performed on complex combustion models because the calculations are time consuming, CPU intensive, nontrivial exercises that can lead to deceptive results. To illustrate these ideas, a variety of sensitivity/uncertainty analyses were used to determine the uncertainty associated with thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam exposed to high radiative flux boundary conditions. The polyurethane used in this study is a rigid closed-cell foam used as an encapsulant. Related polyurethane binders such as Estane are used in many energetic materials of interest to the JANNAF community. The complex, finite element foam decomposition model used in this study has 25 input parameters that include chemistry, polymer structure, and thermophysical properties. The response variable was selected as the steady-state decomposition front velocity calculated as the derivative of the decomposition front location versus time. An analytical mean value sensitivity/uncertainty (MV) analysis was used to determine the standard deviation by taking numerical derivatives of the response variable with respect to each of the 25 input parameters. Since the response variable is also a derivative, the standard deviation was essentially determined from a second derivative that was extremely sensitive to numerical noise. To minimize the numerical noise, 50-micrometer element dimensions and approximately 1-msec time steps were required to obtain stable uncertainty results. As an alternative method to determine the uncertainty and sensitivity in the decomposition front velocity, surrogate response surfaces were generated for use with a constrained Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) technique. Two surrogate response surfaces were investigated: 1) a linear surrogate response surface (LIN) and 2

  8. Fabrication of Aluminum Foams with Small Pore Size by Melt Foaming Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Shi, Tong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Ningzhen

    2017-04-01

    This article introduces an improvement to the fabrication of aluminum foams with small pore size by melt foaming method. Before added to the melt, the foaming agent (titanium hydride) was pretreated in two steps. It firstly went through the traditional pre-oxidation treatment, which delayed the decomposition of titanium hydride and made sure the dispersion stage was controllable. Then such pre-oxidized titanium hydride powder was mixed with copper powder in a planetary ball mill. This treatment can not only increase the number of foaming agent particles and make them easier to disperse in the melt, which helps to increase the number of pores, but also reduce the amount of hydrogen released in the foaming stage. Therefore, the pore size could be decreased. Using such a ball-milled foaming agent in melt foaming method, aluminum foams with small pore size (average size of 1.6 mm) were successfully fabricated.

  9. Crosslinked polyethylene foams, via eb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, E.C.L.; Lugao, A. B.; Andrade e Silva, L. G.

    1998-01-01

    Polyethylene foams, produced by radio-induced crosslinking, show a smooth and homogeneous surface, when compared to chemical crosslinking method using peroxide as crosslinking agent. This process fosters excellent adhesive and printability properties. Besides that, closed cells, intrinsic to these foams, imparts optimum mechanical, shocks and insulation resistance, indicating these foams to some markets segments as: automotive and transport; buoyancy, flotation and marine; building and insulation; packaging; domestic sports and leisure goods. We were in search of an ideal foam, by adding 5 to 15% of blowing agent in LDPE. A series of preliminary trials defined 203 degree sign C as the right blowing agent decomposition temperature. At a 22.7 kGys/dose ratio, the lowest dose for providing an efficient foam was 30 kGy, for a formulation comprising 10% of azodicarbonamide in LDPE, within a 10 minutes foaming time

  10. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  11. Application and future of solid foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenu, Yves

    2014-10-01

    To conclude this series of chapters on solid foam materials, a review of industrial current applications and of mid-term market perspectives centred on manmade foams is given, making reference to natural cellular materials. Although the polymeric foam industrial development overwhelms the rest and finds applications on many market segments, more attention will be paid to the emerging market of inorganic-especially metallic-foams (and cellular materials) and their applications, present or upcoming. It is shown that the final applications of solid foams are primarily linked to transport and the present-day development of the different classes of solid foams is contrasted between functional applications and structural applications. xml:lang="fr"

  12. ALUHAB — The Superior Aluminium Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcsan, N.; Beke, S.; Makk, P.; Soki, P.; Számel, Gy; Degischer, H. P.; Mokso, R.

    A new metal foaming technology has been developed to produce aluminum foams with controlled cell sizes, a wide range of alloy compositions, and attractive mechanical properties. ALUHAB aluminium foams are manufactured from a special foamable aluminium alloy containing ultrafine particles (80-3000 nm). The technology uses high temperature ultrasonication to homogeneously disperse the particles and thus create a stable, foamable aluminum melt. Oscillating gas injector (loud-nozzle) technology permits the injection of optimally sized bubbles into the melt that are independent of the injector orifice diameter. Using this direct gas injection method, bubble size is regulated by the frequency and the power of the ultrasound, producing uniform bubble sizes in the sub-millimeter range. The technology results in extremely stable metal foams which can be cast into complex forms and re-melted without loss of foam integrity. Processing methods and properties of the ALUHAB foams will be discussed.

  13. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  14. FoAM Kernow Activity Report 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Amber; Griffiths, David

    2016-01-01

    This review shows selected projects from the FoAM Kernow studio in 2016. FoAM is a network of transdisciplinary labs at the intersection of art, science, nature and everyday life. FoAM’s members are generalists - people who work across disparate fields in an entangled, speculative culture. Research and creative projects at FoAM combine elements of futurecrafting, citizen science, prototyping, experience design and process facilitation to re-imagine possible futures, and artistic experime...

  15. FoAM Kernow Activity Report 2017

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Amber; Weatherill, Aidan; Griffiths, David

    2017-01-01

    This review shows selected projects from the FoAM Kernow studio in 2017. FoAM is a network of transdisciplinary labs at the intersection of art, science, nature and everyday life. FoAM’s members are generalists - people who work across disparate fields in an entangled, speculative culture. Research and creative projects at FoAM combine elements of futurecrafting, citizen science, prototyping, experience design and process facilitation to re-imagine possible futures.

  16. Halogen-free flame retardant polyolefin foams

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo Realinho, Vera Cristina de; Antunes, Marcelo de Sousa Pais; Santana Pérez, Orlando Onofre; Velasco Perero, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the preparation and characterizacion of an improved fire-resistant ethylene-acrylate foamed material containing calcium carbonate and a silicon elastomer. This grade, usually employed on the cable industry sector, was modified two differents synergistic FR systems : silica/zinc borate (S/ZB) and montmorillonite/graphite nanoplatelets(N). The different formulations were prepared by melt-blending and the foams by a compression-molding foaming process using Azodicarbo...

  17. NATURAL FIBER REINFORCED POLYURETHANE RIGID FOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Seydibeyoglu, M.Ozgur; Demiroğlu, Sibel; Erdoğan, Fatma; Akın, Ecem; Ayvalık, Aynur; Karavana, Hüseyin Ata

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to prepare polyurethane foam reinforced with local Turkish natural resources. In this work, olive kernel and nutshell fibers were used for reinforcing the polyurethane foam. In order to characterize reinforced polyurethane samples, mechanical, chemical, thermal, and morphological methods were used. Mechanical properties of polyurethane foam were measured by compression test. With compression test, it was observed that compressive strength of polyurethane f...

  18. Understanding and Predicting Foam in Anaerobic Digester

    OpenAIRE

    I. R. Kanu; T. J. Aspray; A. J. Adeloye

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the ambiguity and complexity surrounding anaerobic digester foaming, efforts have been made by various researchers to understand the process of anaerobic digester foaming so as to proffer a solution that can be universally applied rather than site specific. All attempts ranging from experimental analysis to comparative review of other process has not fully explained the conditions and process of foaming in anaerobic digester. Studying the current available ...

  19. Organic pollutant loading and biodegradability of firefighting foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Zhong; Bao, Zhi-ming; Hu, Cheng; Li-Shuai, Jing; Chen, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Firefighting foam has been widely used as the high-performance extinguishing agent in extinguishing the liquid poor fire. It was concerned for its environmental impacts due to its massive usage. In this study, the organic loading level and the biodegradability of 18 firefighting foams commonly used in China were evaluated and compared. The COD and TOC of firefighting foam concentrates are extremely high. Furthermore, those of foam solutions are also much higher than regular wastewater. The COD/TOC ratio of synthetic foams are higher than protein foams. The 28-day biodegradation rates of 18 firefighting foams are all over 60%, indicating that they are all ready biodegradable. Protein foams (P, FP and FFFP) have the higher organic loading and lower 28-day biodegradation rates compared to the synthetic foams (Class A foam, AFFF and S). The short and long-term impact of protein foams on the environment are larger than synthetic foams.

  20. Starch/fiber/poly(lactic acid) foam and compressed foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composites of starch, fiber, and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were made using a foam substrate formed by dehydrating starch or starch/fiber gels. PLA was infiltrated into the dry foam to provide better moisture resistance. Foam composites were compressed into plastics using force ranging from 4-76MPa. Te...

  1. Thermal performance enhancement of erythritol/carbon foam composites via surface modification of carbon foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junfeng; Lu, Wu; Luo, Zhengping; Zeng, Yibing

    2017-03-01

    The thermal performance of the erythritol/carbon foam composites, including thermal diffusivity, thermal capacity, thermal conductivity and latent heat, were investigated via surface modification of carbon foam using hydrogen peroxide as oxider. It was found that the surface modification enhanced the wetting ability of carbon foam surface to the liquid erythritol of the carbon foam surface and promoted the increase of erythritol content in the erythritol/carbon foam composites. The dense interfaces were formed between erythritol and carbon foam, which is due to that the formation of oxygen functional groups C=O and C-OH on the carbon surface increased the surface polarity and reduced the interface resistance of carbon foam surface to the liquid erythritol. The latent heat of the erythritol/carbon foam composites increased from 202.0 to 217.2 J/g through surface modification of carbon foam. The thermal conductivity of the erythritol/carbon foam composite before and after surface modification further increased from 40.35 to 51.05 W/(m·K). The supercooling degree of erythritol also had a large decrease from 97 to 54 °C. Additionally, the simple and effective surface modification method of carbon foam provided an extendable way to enhance the thermal performances of the composites composed of carbon foams and PCMs.

  2. AC induction field heating of graphite foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, James W.; Rios, Orlando; Kisner, Roger

    2017-08-22

    A magneto-energy apparatus includes an electromagnetic field source for generating a time-varying electromagnetic field. A graphite foam conductor is disposed within the electromagnetic field. The graphite foam when exposed to the time-varying electromagnetic field conducts an induced electric current, the electric current heating the graphite foam. An energy conversion device utilizes heat energy from the heated graphite foam to perform a heat energy consuming function. A device for heating a fluid and a method of converting energy are also disclosed.

  3. Molecular Design of Novel Poly(urethane-urea) Hybrids as Helmet Pads for Ballistic and Blast Trauma Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    including as potential protection against projectile impacts and blast loading impacts. In general, both PU and PUU consist of long-chain polyols ...the hard segments of PU and PUU, respectively. During the polymerization of PUU, the urethane linkage is formed from the diisocyanate- polyol reaction...between the soft and hard segments gives rise to a wide range of useful physical and mechanical properties (2). The type and molecular weight of polyols

  4. State-of-the-Art Review on the Characteristics of Surfactants and Foam from Foam Concrete Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sritam Swapnadarshi; Gandhi, Indu Siva Ranjani; Khwairakpam, Selija

    2018-02-01

    Foam concrete finds application in many areas, generally as a function of its relatively lightweight and its beneficial properties in terms of reduction in dead load on structure, excellent thermal insulation and contribution to energy conservation. For production of foam concrete with desired properties, stable and good quality foam is the key requirement. It is to be noted that the selection of surfactant and foam production parameters play a vital role in the properties of foam which in turn affects the properties of foam concrete. However, the literature available on the influence of characteristics of foaming agent and foam on the properties of foam concrete are rather limited. Hence, a more systematic research is needed in this direction. The focus of this work is to provide a review on characteristics of surfactant (foaming agent) and foam for use in foam concrete production.

  5. Foam-Driven Fractures of an Elastic Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Smiddy, Sam; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental study of foam-driven fractures in an elastic matrix. When a pressurized foam is constantly injected into a gelatin matrix with a constant flow rate, the foam generates a disc-like fracture which is commonly observed in liquid-driven fractures. Compare to liquid-driven fractures, foam-driven fractures grow faster with time. We investigate how the rheological behaviour of foams affects the fracture characteristics by varying the air volume fraction of the foam, the types and concentration of surfactants in the foam. Foam-fracturing reduces the environmental costs of hydraulic fracturing, which inspires this laboratory study.

  6. rhoCentralRfFoam: An OpenFOAM solver for high speed chemically active flows - Simulation of planar detonations -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Marcantoni, L. F.; Tamagno, J.; Elaskar, S.

    2017-10-01

    A new solver developed within the framework of OpenFOAM 2.3.0, called rhoCentralRfFoam which can be interpreted like an evolution of rhoCentralFoam, is presented. Its use, performing numerical simulations on initiation and propagation of planar detonation waves in combustible mixtures H2-Air and H2-O2-Ar, is described. Unsteady one dimensional (1D) Euler equations coupled with sources to take into account chemical activity, are numerically solved using the Kurganov, Noelle and Petrova second order scheme in a domain discretized with finite volumes. The computational code can work with any number of species and its corresponding reactions, but here it was tested with 13 chemically active species (one species inert), and 33 elementary reactions. A gaseous igniter which acts like a shock-tube driver, and powerful enough to generate a strong shock capable of triggering exothermic chemical reactions in fuel mixtures, is used to start planar detonations. The following main aspects of planar detonations are here, treated: induction time of combustible mixtures cited above and required mesh resolutions; convergence of overdriven detonations to Chapman-Jouguet states; detonation structure (ZND model); and the use of reflected shocks to determine induction times experimentally. The rhoCentralRfFoam code was verified comparing numerical results and it was validated, through analytical results and experimental data.

  7. Microstructural characterization of in situ MXCT images of high density foams under large strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gleiman, Seth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Trevor G [UCSB; Milstein, Fredrick [UCSB

    2009-01-01

    we describe our computer aided image analysis methodologies and present examples of their application to the MXCT images of foams. Operations of the computer program include noise removal (smoothing), thresholding [7], edge detection [8], distance transformation [9, 10], pore detection via a Hough transformation [11], and skeletonization [12]. Strut parameters, such as the strut cross-sectional area and strut arrangement, are calculated from a skeleton-based model of the MXCT images. The Hough transform is a feature detection method used primarily in image analysis applications. We use this transform to detect and calculate pore parameters, such as pore arrangement and pore size distribution. The experiments and calculations are performed in order to develop data for the formulation of theory that links foam mechanical behavior specifically to the microstructure of high relative-density foams, not just simply to the relative-density of the foam.

  8. The flow of a foam in a two-dimensional porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géraud, Baudouin; Jones, Siân. A.; Cantat, Isabelle; Dollet, Benjamin; Méheust, Yves

    2016-02-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for enhanced oil recovery and aquifer remediation, and more recently, for remediation of the vadose zone, in which case foams carry chemical amendments. Foams are better injection fluids than aqueous solutions due to their low sensitivity to gravity and because they are less sensitive to permeability heterogeneities, thus allowing a more uniform sweep. The latter aspect results from their peculiar rheology, whose understanding motivates the present study. We investigate foam flow through a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a horizontal transparent Hele-Shaw cell. The local foam structure is recorded in situ, which provides a measure of the spatial distribution of bubble velocities and sizes at regular time intervals. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology including preferential flow paths and local flow nonstationarity (intermittency) despite the imposed permanent global flow rate. Moreover, the medium selects the bubble size distribution through lamella division-triggered bubble fragmentation. Varying the mean bubble size of the injected foam, its water content, and mean velocity, we characterize those processes systematically. In particular, we measure the spatial evolution of the distribution of bubble areas, and infer the efficiency of bubble fragmentation depending on the various control parameters. We furthermore show that the distributions of bubble sizes and velocities are correlated. This study sheds new light on the local rheology of foams in porous media and opens the way toward quantitative characterization of the relationship between medium geometry and foam flow properties. It also suggests that large-scale models of foam flows in the subsurface should account for the correlation between bubble sizes and velocities.

  9. CO2 Induced Foaming Behavior of Polystyrene near the Glass Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Al-Enezi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effect of high-pressure carbon dioxide on the foaming process in polystyrene near the glass transition temperature and the foaming was studied using cylindrical high-pressure view cell with two optical windows. This technique has potential applications in the shape foaming of polymers at lower temperatures, dye impregnation, and the foaming of polystyrene. Three sets of experiments were carried out at operating temperatures of 50, 70, and 100°C, each over a range of pressures from 24 to 120 bar. Foaming was not observed when the polymer was initially at conditions below Tg but was observed above Tg. The nucleation appeared to occur randomly leading to subsequent bubble growth from these sites, with maximum radius of 0.02–0.83 mm. Three models were applied on the foaming experimental data. Variable diffusivity and viscosity model (Model C was applied to assess the experimental data with the WLF equation. The model shows very good agreement by using realistic parameter values. The expansion occurs by diffusion of a dissolved gas from the supersaturated polymer envelope into the bubble.

  10. PUFoam : A novel open-source CFD solver for the simulation of polyurethane foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, M.; Droghetti, H.; Marchisio, D. L.

    2017-08-01

    In this work a transient three-dimensional mathematical model is formulated and validated for the simulation of polyurethane (PU) foams. The model is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is coupled with a population balance equation (PBE) to describe the evolution of the gas bubbles/cells within the PU foam. The front face of the expanding foam is monitored on the basis of the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method using a compressible solver available in OpenFOAM version 3.0.1. The solver is additionally supplemented to include the PBE, solved with the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), the polymerization kinetics, an adequate rheological model and a simple model for the foam thermal conductivity. The new solver is labelled as PUFoam and is, for the first time in this work, validated for 12 different mixing-cup experiments. Comparison of the time evolution of the predicted and experimentally measured density and temperature of the PU foam shows the potentials and limitations of the approach.

  11. Attenuation of fluorocarbons released from foam insulation in landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Dote, Yukata; Fredenslund, Anders Michael

    2007-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) have been used as blowing agents (BAs) for foam insulation in home appliances and building materials, which after the end of their useful life are disposed of in landfills. The objective of this project...... was to evaluate the potential for degradation of BAs in landfills, and to develop a landfill model, which could simulate the fate of BAs in landfills. The investigation was performed by use of anaerobic microcosm studies using different types of organic waste and anaerobic digested sludge as inoculum. The BAs...... in any of the experiments within a run time of up to 200 days. The obtained degradation rate coefficients were used as input for an extended version of an existing landfill fate model incorporating a time dependent BA release from co-disposed foam insulation waste. Predictions with the model indicate...

  12. Auditory cortical and hippocampal-system mismatch responses to duration deviants in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Ruusuvirta

    Full Text Available Any change in the invariant aspects of the auditory environment is of potential importance. The human brain preattentively or automatically detects such changes. The mismatch negativity (MMN of event-related potentials (ERPs reflects this initial stage of auditory change detection. The origin of MMN is held to be cortical. The hippocampus is associated with a later generated P3a of ERPs reflecting involuntarily attention switches towards auditory changes that are high in magnitude. The evidence for this cortico-hippocampal dichotomy is scarce, however. To shed further light on this issue, auditory cortical and hippocampal-system (CA1, dentate gyrus, subiculum local-field potentials were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats. A rare tone in duration (deviant was interspersed with a repeated tone (standard. Two standard-to-standard (SSI and standard-to-deviant (SDI intervals (200 ms vs. 500 ms were applied in different combinations to vary the observability of responses resembling MMN (mismatch responses. Mismatch responses were observed at 51.5-89 ms with the 500-ms SSI coupled with the 200-ms SDI but not with the three remaining combinations. Most importantly, the responses appeared in both the auditory-cortical and hippocampal locations. The findings suggest that the hippocampus may play a role in (cortical manifestation of MMN.

  13. Microencapsulation of maltogenic α-amylase in poly(urethane-urea) shell: inverse emulsion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciulyte, Sandra; Kochane, Tatjana; Budriene, Saulute

    2015-01-01

    The novel poly(urethane-urea) microcapsules (PUUMC) were obtained by the interfacial polyaddition reaction between the oil-soluble hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and the water soluble poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in a water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The PVA was used instead of diols. Maltogenase L (maltogenic α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (E. C. 3.2.1.133) (MG) was encapsulated in the PUUMC during or after formation of capsules. The PUUMC were thoroughly characterised by chemical analytical methods, FT-IR, SEM, thermal analysis, surface area, pore volume and size analysis. Furthermore, by carefully analysing the influencing factors including: catalyst and surfactants and their concentrations, the initial molar ratio of PVA and HMDI, stirring rate and ratio of dispersed phase to external phase, the optimum synthesis conditions were found out. A controlled release of MG could be observed in many cases. Delayed-release capsules were obtained when initial concentration of HMDI was increased. These capsules have potential application in biotechnology for saccharification of starch.

  14. Synthesis of polyester urethane urea and fabrication of elastomeric nanofibrous scaffolds for myocardial regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamadi, Elham Sadat; Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh [Department of Textile engineering, Isfahan university of technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Morshed, Mohammad, E-mail: morshed@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Textile engineering, Isfahan university of technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Morteza [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan university of technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nanotechmpp@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, 2 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, 2 Engineering Drive 3, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of bioactive scaffolds is one of the most promising strategies to reconstruct the infarcted myocardium. In this study, we synthesized polyester urethane urea (PEUU), further blended it with gelatin and fabricated PEUU/G nanofibrous scaffolds. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction were used for the characterization of the synthesized PEUU and properties of nanofibrous scaffolds were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ATR-FTIR, contact angle measurement, biodegradation test, tensile strength analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). In vitro biocompatibility studies were performed using cardiomyocytes. DMA analysis showed that the scaffolds could be reshaped with cyclic deformations and might remain stable in the frequencies of the physiological activity of the heart. On the whole, our study suggests that aligned PEUU/G 70:30 nanofibrous scaffolds meet the required specifications for cardiac tissue engineering and could be used as a promising construct for myocardial regeneration. - Highlights: • PEUU was synthesized to fabricate elastomeric scaffolds for myocardial regeneration. • FTIR, DSC and XRD analysis showed that polymer synthesis was well. • PEUU/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds could be reshaped with cyclic deformations of the heart. • Gelatin in structure of PEUU nanofibers improved proliferation of cardiomyocytes. • Aligned PEUU/gelatin 70:30 nanofibrous scaffold support the alignment of cardiomyocytes.

  15. In vitro degradation and in vivo biocompatibility study of a new linear poly(urethane urea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Basse; Aulin, Cecilia; Bowden, Tim; Eriksson, Niklas; Mathisen, Torbjörn; Bjursten, Lars-Magnus; Hilborn, Jöns

    2008-07-01

    Segmented poly(urethane urea)s (PUUs) with hard segments derived only from methyl 2,6-diisocyantohexanoate (LDI) without the use of a chain extender have previously been described. These materials, which contain hard segments with multiple urea linkages, show exceptionally high strain capability (1600-4700%). In the study reported here, the rate and effect of hydrolysis of these materials were determined for gamma-sterilized and nonsterilized samples. Materials investigated contained PCL, PTMC, P(TMC-co-CL), P(CL-co-DLLA), or P(TMC-co-DLLA) as soft segments and, as well as their mechanical properties, changes in mass, inherent viscosity (I.V.), and thermal properties were studied over 20 weeks. Results showed that the degradation rate was dependant on the soft segment structure, with a higher rate of degradation for the polyester-dominating PUUs exhibiting a substantial loss in I.V. A tendency of reduction of tensile strength and strain hardening was seen for all samples. Also, loss in elongation at break was detected, for PUU-P(CL-DLLA) it went from 1600% to 830% in 10 weeks. Gamma radiation caused an initial loss in I.V. and induced more rapid hydrolysis compared with nonsterilized samples, except for PUU-PTMC. A cytotoxicity test using human fibroblasts demonstrated that the material supports cell viability. In addition, an in vivo biocompatibility study showed a typical foreign body reaction after 1 and 6 weeks. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Modification of Polyamide-Urethane (PAUt Thin Film Composite Membrane for Improving the Reverse Osmosis Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fen Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the poly (amide-urethane (PAUt membranes were successfully fabricated by interfacial polymerization of m-phenylenediamine (MPD and 5-choroformyloxyisophaloyl chloride (CFIC on the polysulfone substrates. Two modification methods based on layer-by-layer assembly were applied to modify the PAUt membrane surface to achieve antifouling property: 1. Chitosan (CS was directly self-assembled on the PAUt membrane (i.e., PAUt-CS; and 2. polydimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride (PDDA, polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, and CS were successively self-assembled on the membrane surface (i.e., PAUt-PDDA/PSS/CS. The resultant membranes were symmetrically characterized by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM and Contact Angle Meter (CAM, respectively. The results indicated that the modified membranes had much smoother and more hydrophilic surfaces as compared to the nascent PAUt membrane. Meanwhile, the modified membranes exhibited better reverse osmosis performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. After the modified membranes were fouled by lake water, the PAUt-PDDA/PSS/CS membrane presented the best antifouling performance among the three types of membranes. Combining the reverse osmosis performance with the anti-fouling property obviously, the PAUt-PDDA/PSS/CS membrane behaved as a promising candidate to be used in real applications.

  17. Synthesis and activity of novel glutathione analogues containing an urethane backbone linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciatore, I; Caccuri, A M; Di Stefano, A; Luisi, G; Nalli, M; Pinnen, F; Ricci, G; Sozio, P

    2003-09-01

    The new GSH analogues H-Glo(-Ser-Gly-OH)-OH (5), its O-benzyl derivative 4, and H-Glo(-Asp-Gly-OH)-OH (9), characterized by the replacement of central cysteine with either serine or aspartic acid, and containing an urethanic fragment as isosteric substitution of the scissile gamma-glutamylic junction, have been synthesized and characterized. Their ability to inhibit human GST P1-1 (hGST P1-1) in comparison with H-Glu(-Ser-Gly-OH)-OH and H-Glu(-Asp-Gly-OH)-OH, which are potent competitive inhibitors of rat GST 3-3 and 4-4, has been evaluated. In order to further investigate the effect of the isosteric substitution on the binding abilities of the new GSH analogues 4, 5 and 9, the previously reported cysteinyl-containing analogue H-Glo(-Cys-Gly-OH)-OH has been also evaluated as a co-substrate for hGSTP1-1.

  18. Hippocampal long-term potentiation is enhanced in urethane-anesthetized RGS2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, R Matthew; Chidiac, Peter; Leung, L Stan

    2009-08-01

    RGS2 is a member of the regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) family and has been implicated in cellular mechanisms associated with neuronal plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP) of RGS2 knockout and wild-type mice was examined at the Schaffer collaterals to CA1 pathway in urethane-anesthetized mice in vivo to examine RGS2's possible role in the regulation of potentiation. As compared to wild-type mice, RGS2 knockouts demonstrated much stronger LTP of the extracellular population spikes at the somatic and dendritic layers in CA1 region and more pronounced LTP of the population excitatory postsynaptic current sink. Under baseline conditions, RGS2 knockouts showed lower paired-pulse facilitation of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials and associated current sinks in vivo as compared with wild-type mice. The data show for the first time that RGS2 deficient mice in vivo differ from wild-type mice in both short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity suggesting that RGS2 serves as a negative regulator of long-term synaptic plasticity. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaolong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Wang, Gangmin [Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shi, Ting [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shao, Zhihong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ren, Jie [Institute of Nano and Biopolymeric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Lin, Chao, E-mail: chaolin@tongji.edu.cn [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Peijun, E-mail: tjpjwang@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T{sub 1}-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  20. Loop quantum cosmology and spin foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Campiglia, Miguel; Henderson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is used to provide concrete evidence in support of the general paradigm underlying spin foam models (SFMs). Specifically, it is shown that: (i) the physical inner product in the timeless framework equals the transition amplitude in the deparameterized theory; (ii) this quantity admits a vertex expansion a la SFMs in which the M-th term refers just to M volume transitions, without any reference to the time at which the transition takes place; (iii) the exact physical inner product is obtained by summing over just the discrete geometries; no 'continuum limit' is involved; and, (iv) the vertex expansion can be interpreted as a perturbative expansion in the spirit of group field theory. This sum over histories reformulation of LQC also addresses certain other issues which are briefly summarized.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of Ti–Ta–Nb–Mn foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, C., E-mail: claudio.aguilar@usm.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Materiales, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Guerra, C. [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Materiales, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Lascano, S. [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Guzman, D. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidad de Atacama, Av. Copayapu 485, Copiapó (Chile); Rojas, P.A. [Escuela de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Los Carrera, 01567 Quilpué (Chile); Thirumurugan, M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica y Materiales, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Bejar, L.; Medina, A. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented increase in human life expectancy have produced profound changes in the prevailing patterns of disease, like the observed increased in degenerative disc diseases, which cause degradation of the bones. Ti–Nb–Ta alloys are promising materials to replace the damaged bone due to their excellent mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. In general metallic foams are widely used for medical application due to their lower elastic moduli compare to bulk materials. In this work we studied the synthesis of 34Nb–29Ta–xMn (x: 2, 4 and 6 wt.% Mn) alloy foams (50% v/v) using ammonium hydrogen carbonate as a space holder. Alloys were produced through mechanical alloying in a planetary mill for 50 h. Green compacts were obtained by applying 430 MPa pressure. To remove the space holder from the matrix the green compacts were heated to 180 °C for 1.5 h and after sintered at 1300 °C for 3 h. Foams were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning, transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The elastic modulus of the foam was measured as ~ 30 GPa, and the values are almost equal to the values predicted using various theoretical models. - Highlights: • Metallic foams of Ti–34Nb–29Ta–xMn (x: 2, 4 and 6 wt.% Mn) alloys were synthetized. • The macro and micro pore produced have sizes smaller than 600 and 20 μm, respectively. • The macro and micro pores shows good characteristics to cell adhesion and bone ingrowth. • Elastic properties were comparable to that exhibited by cortical bone.

  2. Detailed investigation of the microbial community in foaming activated sludge reveals novel foam formers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, T.

    2015-01-01

    Foaming of activated sludge (AS) causes adverse impacts on wastewater treatment operation and hygiene. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities of foam, foaming AS and non-foaming AS in a sewage treatment plant via deep-sequencing of the taxonomic marker genes 16S rRNA and mycobacterial rpoB and a metagenomic approach. In addition to Actinobacteria, many genera (e.g., Clostridium XI, Arcobacter, Flavobacterium) were more abundant in the foam than in the AS. On the other hand, deep-sequencing of rpoB did not detect any obligate pathogenic mycobacteria in the foam. We found that unknown factors other than the abundance of Gordonia sp. could determine the foaming process, because abundance of the same species was stable before and after a foaming event over six months. More interestingly, although the dominant Gordonia foam former was the closest with G. amarae, it was identified as an undescribed Gordonia species by referring to the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB and, most convincingly, the reconstructed draft genome from metagenomic reads. Our results, based on metagenomics and deep sequencing, reveal that foams are derived from diverse taxa, which expands previous understanding and provides new insight into the underlying complications of the foaming phenomenon in AS. PMID:25560234

  3. Analysis of Influence of Foaming Mixture Components on Structure and Properties of Foam Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandashova, N. S.; Goltsman, B. M.; Yatsenko, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    It is recommended to use high-quality thermal insulation materials to increase the energy efficiency of buildings. One of the best thermal insulation materials is foam glass - durable, porous material that is resistant to almost any effect of substance. Glass foaming is a complex process depending on the foaming mode and the initial mixture composition. This paper discusses the influence of all components of the mixture - glass powder, foaming agent, enveloping material and water - on the foam glass structure. It was determined that glass powder is the basis of the future material. A foaming agent forms a gas phase in the process of thermal decomposition. This aforementioned gas foams the viscous glass mass. The unreacted residue thus changes a colour of the material. The enveloping agent slows the foaming agent decomposition preventing its premature burning out and, in addition, helps to accelerate the sintering of glass particles. The introduction of water reduces the viscosity of the foaming mixture making it evenly distributed and also promotes the formation of water gas that additionally foams the glass mass. The optimal composition for producing the foam glass with the density of 150 kg/m3 is defined according to the results of the research.

  4. Industrial waste utilization for foam concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Gokul; Anand, K. B.

    2018-02-01

    Foam concrete is an emerging and useful construction material - basically a cement based slurry with at least 10% of mix volume as foam. The mix usually containing cement, filler (usually sand) and foam, have fresh densities ranging from 400kg/m3 to 1600kg/m3. One of the main drawbacks of foam concrete is the large consumption of fine sand as filler material. Usage of different solid industrial wastes as fillers in foam concrete can reduce the usage of fine river sand significantly and make the work economic and eco-friendly. This paper aims to investigate to what extent industrial wastes such as bottom ash and quarry dust can be utilized for making foam concrete. Foam generated using protein based agent was used for preparing and optimizing (fresh state properties). Investigation to find the influence of design density and air-void characteristics on the foam concrete strength shows higher strength for bottom ash mixes due to finer air void distribution. Setting characteristics of various mix compositions are also studied and adoption of Class C flyash as filler demonstrated capability of faster setting.

  5. Expanded polylactide bead foaming - A new technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofar, M.; Ameli, A.; Park, C. B.

    2015-05-01

    Bead foaming technology with double crystal melting peak structure has been recognized as a promising method to produce low-density foams with complex geometries. During the molding stage of the bead foams, the double peak structure generates a strong bead-to-bead sintering and maintains the overall foam structure. During recent years, polylactide (PLA) bead foaming has been of the great interest of researchers due to its origin from renewable resources and biodegradability. However, due to the PLA's low melt strength and slow crystallization kinetics, the attempts have been limited to the manufacturing methods used for expanded polystyrene. In this study, for the first time, we developed microcellular PLA bead foams with double crystal melting peak structure. Microcellular PLA bead foams were produced with expansion ratios and average cell sizes ranging from 3 to 30-times and 350 nm to 15 µm, respectively. The generated high melting temperature crystals during the saturation significantly affected the expansion ratio and cell density of the PLA bead foams by enhancing the PLA's poor melt strength and promoting heterogeneous cell nucleation around the crystals.

  6. Injectivity errors in simulation of foam EOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeftink, T.N.; Latooij, C.A.; Rossen, W.R.

    2014-01-01

    Injectivity is a key factor in the economics of foam enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. Poor injectivity of low-mobility foam slows the production of oil and allows more time for gravity segregation of injected gas. The conventional Peaceman equation (1978), when applied in a large grid block,

  7. Measuring Rind Thickness on Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C.; Miller, J.; Brown, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nondestructive test determines rind thickness of polyurethane foam. Surface harness of foam measured by Shore durometer method: hardness on Shore D scale correlates well with rind thickness. Shore D hardness of 20, for example, indicates rind thickness of 0.04 inch (1 millimeter). New hardness test makes it easy to determine rind thickness of sample nondestructively and to adjust fabrication variables accordingly.

  8. Foam is a decon waste minimization tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.D.; McGlynn, J.F.; Rankin, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    The use of foam in decontamination operations offers significant reductions in waste generation. Initial use has confirmed its effectiveness. Issues being resolved at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compatibility of foam generating solutions with decontamination solutions, waste disposal, and operational safety

  9. Application of Auxetic Foam in Sports Helmets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Foster

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This investigation explored the viability of using open cell polyurethane auxetic foams to augment the conformable layer in a sports helmet and improve its linear impact acceleration attenuation. Foam types were compared by examining the impact severity on an instrumented anthropomorphic headform within a helmet consisting of three layers: a rigid shell, a stiff closed cell foam, and an open cell foam as a conformable layer. Auxetic and conventional foams were interchanged to act as the helmet’s conformable component. Attenuation of linear acceleration was examined by dropping the combined helmet and headform on the front and the side. The helmet with auxetic foam reduced peak linear accelerations (p < 0.05 relative to its conventional counterpart at the highest impact energy in both orientations. Gadd Severity Index reduced by 11% for frontal impacts (38.9 J and 44% for side impacts (24.3 J. The conformable layer within a helmet can influence the overall impact attenuating properties. The helmet fitted with auxetic foam can attenuate impact severity more than when fitted with conventional foam, and warrants further investigation for its potential to reduce the risk of traumatic brain injuries in sport specific impacts.

  10. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  11. Low-density carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.M.; Buckley, S.R.; Giles, C.L. Jr.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Letts, S.A.; Overturf, G.E. III; Price, C.W.; Cook, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report documents research and development on resorcinol- formaldehyde-based foam materials conducted between 1986 and June 1990, when the effort was discontinued. The foams discussed are resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) foam, carbonized RF (CRF) foam, and two composite foams, a polystyrene/RF (PS/RF) foam and its carbonized derivative (CPR). The RF foams are synthesized by the polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in a slightly basic solution. Their structure and density depend strongly on the concentration of the sodium carbonate catalyst. The have an interconnected bead structure similar to that of silica aerogels; bead sizes range from 30 to 130 Angstrom, and cell sizes are less than 0.1 μm. We have achieved densities of 16 to 200 mg/cm 3 . The RF foams can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a vitreous carbon foam (CRF), which has a similar microstructure but much higher mechanical strength. The PS/RF foams are obtained by filling the 2- to 3-μm cells of PS foam (a low-density hydrocarbon foam we have developed) with RF. The resultant foams have the outstanding handling and machinability of the PS foam matrix and the small cell size of RF. Pyrolyzing PS/RF foams causes depolymerization and loss of the PS; the resulting CPR foams have a structure similar to the PS foams in which CRF both replicates and fills the PS cells

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of foaming process with chain extended recycled PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimental study of a thermoplastic polymer foaming process is presented. Industrial scraps of PET were used for the production of foamed sheets. The process was performed by making use of a chemical blowing agent (CBA in the extrusion process. Due to the low intrinsic viscosity of the recycled PET, a chain extender was also used in order to increase the molecular weight of the polymer matrix. Pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA and Hydrocerol CT 534 were chosen as chain extender and CBA, respectively. The reactive extrusion and foaming were performed in a two step process. Rheological characterization was carried out on PET samples previously treated with PMDA, as well as the morphological study was performed to define the cellular structure of the foams produced. Moreover, in order to predict the morphology of the foam, a non isothermal model was developed by taking into account both mass transfer phenomenon and viscous forces effect. Model results were compared with experimental data obtained analyzing the foamed samples. The model was validated in relation to working conditions, chemical blowing agent percentage and initial rheological properties of recycled polymer. A pretty good agreement between experimental and calculated data was achieved.

  13. Milestone 5 test report. Task 5, subtask 5.2: Tile to foam strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes work that has been performed to date on the strength of a cryotank insulation system using Rohacell foam and TUFI-coated AETB-12 ceramic tiles directly bonded to a simulated graphite-epoxy tank wall. Testing utilized a custom specimen design which consists of a long tensile specimen with eccentric loading to induce curvature similar to the curvature expected due to 'pillowing' of the tank when pressurized. A finite element model was constructed to predict the specific element strains in the test article, and to assist with design of the test specimen to meet the specific goals of curvature and laminate strain. The results indicate that the heat treated 3.25-pcf density Rohacell foam does not provide sufficient strength for the induced stresses due to curvature and stress concentration at the RTV bondline to the TUFI tile. The test was repeated using higher density non-heat treated Rohacell foam (6.9 pcf) without foam failure. The finite element model was shown to predict specimen behavior, and validation of the model was successful. It is pertinent to mention that the analyses described herein accurately predicted the failure of the heat treated foams and based on this analysis method it is expected that the untreated 3.25 pcf Rohacell foam will be successful.

  14. Oxidation behaviour of metallic glass foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, B.R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 434 Dougherty Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States)], E-mail: bbarnard@utk.edu; Liaw, P.K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 434 Dougherty Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); Demetriou, M.D.; Johnson, W.L. [Department of Materials Science, Keck Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the effects of porosity on the oxidation behaviour of bulk-metallic glasses were investigated. Porous Pd- and Fe-based bulk-metallic glass (BMG) foams and Metglas ribbons were studied. Oxidizing experiments were conducted at 70 deg. C, and around 80 deg. C below glass-transition temperatures, (T{sub g}s). Scanning-electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) studies revealed little evidence of oxidation at 70 deg. C. Specimens exhibited greater oxidation at T{sub g} - 80 deg. C. Oxides were copper-based for Pd-based foams, Fe-, Cr-, and Mo-based for Fe-based foams, and Co-based with borosilicates likely for the Metglas. Pd-based foams demonstrated the best oxidation resistance, followed by Metglas ribbons, followed by Fe-based foams.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Properties of Foam Concrete for Industrial Floors in Testing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Jozef; Drusa, Marian; Scherfel, Walter; Sedlar, Bronislav

    2017-12-01

    Foam concrete (FC), as a mixture of cement, water, additives and technical foam, is well known for more than 30 years. It is building material with good mechanical properties, low thermal conductivity, simple and even high technological treatment. Foam concrete contains closed void pores, what allows achieving low bulk density and spare of raw materials. Thanks to its properties, it is usable as a replacement of conventional subbase layers of the industrial floors, the transport areas or as a part of the foundation structures of the buildings. Paper presents the preparation of the testing field (physical model) which was created for experimental investigation of the foam concrete subbase layer of the industrial floor in a real scale.

  16. In vitro analysis of polyurethane foam as a topical hemostatic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekema, Ferdinand I; van Oeveren, Wim; Zuidema, Johan; Visscher, Susan H; Bos, Rudolf R M

    2011-04-01

    Topical hemostatic agents can be used to treat problematic bleedings in patients who undergo surgery. Widely used are the collagen- and gelatin-based hemostats. This study aimed to develop a fully synthetic, biodegradable hemostatic agent to avoid exposure to animal antigens. In this in vitro study the suitability of different newly developed polyurethane-based foams as a hemostatic agent has been evaluated and compared to commonly used agents. An experimental in vitro test model was used in which human blood flowed through the test material. Different modified polyurethane foams were compared to collagen and gelatin. The best coagulation was achieved with collagen. The results of the polyurethane foam improved significantly by increasing the amount of polyethylene glycol. Therefore, the increase of the PEG concentration seems a promising approach. Additional in vivo studies will have to be implemented to assess the application of polyurethane foam as a topical hemostatic agent.

  17. Effect of Irradiation on the Mixture of Egg White Proteins Responsible for Foaming Property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian De Liu; Rong Xiu Han; Dong-Il Jin; Soo-Kee Lee; Cheo-Run Jo

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation of egg white increased foaming ability significantly. To investigate the protein modification by irradiation responsible for the increase of foaming ability, 3 major egg white proteins were purchased and mixed (7.7 g/L ovalbumin, 1.8 g/L ovotransferrin, 0.5 g/L lysozyme) as a model system and irradiated at 0, 2.5, and 5 kGy. The different protein expressions were evaluated using 2-D electrophoresis and it was found that ovotransferrin was cleaved by irradiation and molecular weight and isoelectric point were changed. In addition, many uncharacterized proteins were found and it indicated that irradiation modified proteins randomly but mainly fragmentation was observed. Therefore, it can be concluded that protein fragmentation of 3 major egg white proteins responsible for foaming ability may be the main reason for the improvement of foaming ability

  18. Semiclassical regime of Regge calculus and spin foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Satz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Recent attempts to recover the graviton propagator from spin foam models involve the use of a boundary quantum state peaked on a classical geometry. The question arises whether beyond the case of a single simplex this suffices for peaking the interior geometry in a semiclassical configuration. In this paper we explore this issue in the context of quantum Regge calculus with a general triangulation. Via a stationary phase approximation, we show that the boundary state succeeds in peaking the interior in the appropriate configuration, and that boundary correlations can be computed order by order in an asymptotic expansion. Further, we show that if we replace at each simplex the exponential of the Regge action by its cosine-as expected from the semiclassical limit of spin foam models-then the contribution from the sign-reversed terms is suppressed in the semiclassical regime and the results match those of conventional Regge calculus

  19. FOAM CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT BY BASALT FIBRES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate that the foam concrete performance can be improved by dispersed reinforcement, including methods that involve basalt fibres. They address the results of the foam concrete modeling technology and assess the importance of technology-related parameters. Reinforcement efficiency criteria are also provided in the article. Dispersed reinforcement improves the plasticity of the concrete mix and reduces the settlement crack formation rate. Conventional reinforcement that involves metal laths and rods demonstrates its limited application in the production of concrete used for thermal insulation and structural purposes. Dispersed reinforcement is preferable. This technology contemplates the infusion of fibres into porous mixes. Metal, polymeric, basalt and glass fibres are used as reinforcing components. It has been identified that products reinforced by polypropylene fibres demonstrate substantial abradability and deformability rates even under the influence of minor tensile stresses due to the low adhesion strength of polypropylene in the cement matrix. The objective of the research was to develop the type of polypropylene of D500 grade that would demonstrate the operating properties similar to those of Hebel and Ytong polypropylenes. Dispersed reinforcement was performed by the basalt fibre. This project contemplates an autoclave-free technology to optimize the consumption of electricity. Dispersed reinforcement is aimed at the reduction of the block settlement in the course of hardening at early stages of their operation, the improvement of their strength and other operating properties. Reduction in the humidity rate of the mix is based on the plasticizing properties of fibres, as well as the application of the dry mineralization method. Selection of optimal parameters of the process-related technology was performed with the help of G-BAT-2011 Software, developed at Moscow State University of Civil Engineering. The authors also

  20. Generation of sclerosant foams by mechanical methods increases the foam temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lulu; Wong, Kaichung; Connor, David; Fakhim, Babak; Behnia, Masud; Parsi, Kurosh

    2017-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of agitation on foam temperature. Methods Sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol were used. Prior to foam generation, the sclerosant and all constituent equipment were cooled to 4-25℃ and compared with cooling the sclerosant only. Foam was generated using a modified Tessari method. During foam agitation, the temperature change was measured using a thermocouple for 120 s. Results Pre-cooling all the constituent equipment resulted in a cooler foam in comparison with only cooling the sclerosant. A starting temperature of 4℃ produced average foam temperatures of 12.5 and 13.2℃ for sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol, respectively. It was also found that only cooling the liquid sclerosant provided minimal cooling to the final foam temperature, with the temperature 20 and 20.5℃ for sodium tetradecyl sulphate and polidocanol, respectively. Conclusion The foam generation process has a noticeable impact on final foam temperature and needs to be taken into consideration when creating foam.

  1. Foam pad of appropriate thickness can improve diagnostic value of foam posturography in detecting postural instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Leng, Yangming; Zhou, Renhong; Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Dongdong; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Su-Lin; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2017-11-21

    The present study investigated the effect of foam thickness on postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) during foam posturography. Static and foam posturography were performed in 33 patients (UVH group) and 30 healthy subjects (control group) with eyes open (EO) and closed (EC) on firm surface and on 1-5 foam pad(s). Sway velocity (SV) of center of pressure, standing time before falling (STBF) and falls reaction were recorded and analyzed. (1) SVs had an increasing tendency in both groups as the foam pads were added under EO and EC conditions. (2) STBFs, only in UVH group with EC, decreased with foam thickness increasing. (3) Significant differences in SV were found between the control and UVH group with EO (except for standing on firm surface, on 1 and 2 foam pad(s)) and with EC (all surface conditions). (4) Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the SV could better reflect the difference in postural stability between the two groups while standing on the 4 foam pads with EC. Our study showed that diagnostic value of foam posturography in detecting postural instability might be enhanced by using foam pad of right thickness.

  2. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and Oriented Strand Board Roof Sheathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Smegal, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Unvented roof strategies with open cell and closed cell spray polyurethane foam insulation sprayed to the underside of roof sheathing have been used since the mid-1990's to provide durable and efficient building enclosures. However, there have been isolated moisture related incidents reported anecdotally that raise potential concerns about the overall hygrothermal performance of these systems. This project involved hygrothermal modeling of a range of rainwater leakage and field evaluations of in-service residential roofs using spray foam insulation. All of the roof assemblies modeled exhibited drying capacity to handle minor rainwater leakage. All field evaluation locations of in-service residential roofs had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. Explorations of eleven in-service roof systems were completed. The exploration involved taking a sample of spray foam from the underside of the roof sheathing, exposing the sheathing, then taking a moisture content reading. All locations had moisture contents well within the safe range for wood-based sheathing. One full-roof failure was reviewed, as an industry partner was involved with replacing structurally failed roof sheathing. In this case the manufacturer's investigation report concluded that the spray foam was installed on wet OSB based on the observation that the spray foam did not adhere well to the substrate and the pore structure of the closed cell spray foam at the ccSPF/OSB interface was indicative of a wet substrate.

  3. Compliant Buckled Foam Actuators and Application in Patient-Specific Direct Cardiac Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C; Futran, Chaim C; Lee, Jeanne; O'Brien, Kevin W; Amiri Moghadam, Amir A; Mosadegh, Bobak; Silberstein, Meredith N; Min, James K; Shepherd, Robert F

    2018-02-01

    We introduce the use of buckled foam for soft pneumatic actuators. A moderate amount of residual compressive strain within elastomer foam increases the applied force ∼1.4 × or stroke ∼2 × compared with actuators without residual strain. The origin of these improved characteristics is explained analytically. These actuators are applied in a direct cardiac compression (DCC) device design, a type of implanted mechanical circulatory support that avoids direct blood contact, mitigating risks of clot formation and stroke. This article describes a first step toward a pneumatically powered, patient-specific DCC design by employing elastomer foam as the mechanism for cardiac compression. To form the device, a mold of a patient's heart was obtained by 3D printing a digitized X-ray computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scan into a solid model. From this model, a soft, robotic foam DCC device was molded. The DCC device is compliant and uses compressed air to inflate foam chambers that in turn apply compression to the exterior of a heart. The device is demonstrated on a porcine heart and is capable of assisting heart pumping at physiologically relevant durations (∼200 ms for systole and ∼400 ms for diastole) and stroke volumes (∼70 mL). Although further development is necessary to produce a fully implantable device, the material and processing insights presented here are essential to the implementation of a foam-based, patient-specific DCC design.

  4. Shrinkage / stress reduction and mechanical properties improvement in restorative composites formulated with thio-urethane oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Atais; Yih, Jonathan A; Platta, Jacqueline; Knight, Joseph; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2018-02-01

    Thio-urethane oligomers (TUs) have been shown to favorably modify methacrylate networks to reduce stress and significantly increase fracture toughness. Since those are very desirable features in dental applications, the objective of this work was to characterize restorative composites formulated with the addition of TUs. TUs were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP) - with isocyanates - 1,6-Hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic) or dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-Diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. 20wt% TU were added to BisGMA-TEGDMA (70-30%). To this organic matrix, 70wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion and rate of polymerization (Rp max ). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM) and toughness (T), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (K IC ). Polymerization stress (PS) was measured on the Bioman. Volumetric shrinkage (VS) was measured with the bonded disk technique. Glass transition temperature (Tg) and heterogeneity of network were obtained with dynamic mechanical analysis. The addition of TUs led to an increase in mechanical properties (except for Tg and FS). Fracture toughness ranged from 1.6-1.94MPam 1/2 for TU-modified groups, an increase of 33-61% in relation to the control (1.21 ± 0.1MPam 1/2 ). Toughness showed a two-fold increase in relation to the control: from 0.91MPa to values ranging from 1.70-1.95MPa. Flexural modulus was statistically higher for the TU-modified groups. The Tg, as expected, decreased for all TU groups due to the greater flexibility imparted to the network (which also explains the increase in toughness and fracture toughness). Narrower tan-delta peaks suggest more homogeneous

  5. Foaming in Electric Arc Furnace—Part II: Foaming Visualization and Comparison with Plant Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chychko, Andrei; Teng, Lidong; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2012-10-01

    The kinetics of slag foaming by limestone particles was studied at 1773 K (1500 °C) with the aid of an X-ray imaging system. Two models were implemented to describe the decrease in foam height with the time on the basis of the lowering of the average temperature and CaO shell formation during decomposition reaction. The energy impact of carbonate additions was studied on an industrial scale in a 100-ton electric arc furnace (EAF). It was found that, in the case of the addition of carbonates after the scrap is completely molten, the heat effects for limestone and dolomite (2255 and 2264 kJ/kg, respectively) were only 70 pct from theoretical values. Comparing these values with similar additions during the scrap melting stage shows that the energy requirements in the case of carbonate additions to steel bath are much smaller. It was found from the trial heats with dolomite addition to the steel bath that the partial substitution of lime by raw dolomite can be made without an increase in energy consumption.

  6. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  7. One-pot synthesis of (R)-1-(pyridin-4-yl)ethyl acetate using tandem catalyst prepared by co-immobilization of palladium and lipase on mesoporous foam: Optimization and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magadum, Deepali B; Yadav, Ganapati D

    2017-12-01

    The synthesis of (R)-1-(pyridin-4-yl)ethyl acetate was achieved over tandem palladium-lipase catalyst with 100% selectivity using 4-acetyl pyridine as a reactant. The 2% w/w palladium and lipase catalyst was successfully co-immobilized in the microenvironment of the mesocellular foam and characterized by various techniques. The palladium metal from catalyst hydrogenated 4-acetyl pyridine to form 1-(pyridin-4-yl)ethanol. The generated intermediate product then underwent kinetic resolution over lipase and selectively gave (R)-1-(pyridin-4- yl)ethyl acetate. The catalytic conditions were then studied for optimal performance of both steps. The reaction conditions were optimized to 50 °C and toluene as a solvent. Both chemical and enzymatic kinetic models of the reaction were developed for a given set of reaction conditions and kinetic parameters were predicted. At optimal conditions, the obtained selectivity of intermediate (1-(pyridin-4-yl)ethanol) was 51.38%. The final product yield of ((R)-1-(pyridin-4-yl)ethyl acetate) was 48.62%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Characterization of urethane-dimethacrylate derivatives as alternative monomers for the restorative composite matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszczewska-Rybarek, Izabela M

    2014-12-01

    The aim was accomplished by a comparative analysis of the physicochemical properties of urethane-dimethacrylate (UDMA) monomers and their homopolymers with regard to the properties of basic dimethacrylates used presently in dentistry. The homologous series of UDMA were obtained from four oligoethylene glycols monomethacrylates (HEMA, DEGMMA, TEGMMA and TTEGMMA) and six diisocyanates (HMDI, TMDI, IPDI, CHMDI, TDI and MDI). Photopolymerization was light-initiated with the camphorquinone/tertiary amine system. Monomers were tested for viscosity and density. Flexural strength, flexural modulus, hardness, water sorption and polymerization shrinkage of the polymers were studied. The glass transition temperature and the degree of conversion were also discussed. HEMA/IPDI appeared to be the most promising alternative monomer. The monomer exhibited a lower viscosity and achieved higher degree of conversion, the polymer had lower water sorption as well as higher modulus, glass temperature and hardness than Bis-GMA. The polymer of DEGMMA/CHMDI exhibited lower polymerization shrinkage, lower water sorption and higher hardness, however it exhibited lower modulus when compared to HEMA/TMDI. The remaining monomers obtained from HEMA were solids. Monomers with longer TEGMMA and TTEGMMA units polymerized to rubbery networks with high water sorption. The viscosity of all studied UDMA monomers was too high to be used as reactive diluents. The systematic, comparative analysis of the homologous UDMA monomers and corresponding homopolymers along with their physico-mechanical properties are essential for optimizing the design process of new components desirable in dental formulations. Some of the studied UDMA monomers may be simple and effective alternative dimethacrylate comonomers. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical Characterization of Lightweight Foamed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kozłowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Foamed concrete shows excellent physical characteristics such as low self weight, relatively high strength and superb thermal and acoustic insulation properties. It allows for minimal consumption of aggregate, and by replacement of a part of cement by fly ash, it contributes to the waste utilization principles. For many years, the application of foamed concrete has been limited to backfill of retaining walls, insulation of foundations and roof tiles sound insulation. However, during the last few years, foamed concrete has become a promising material for structural purposes. A series of tests was carried out to examine mechanical properties of foamed concrete mixes without fly ash and with fly ash content. In addition, the influence of 25 cycles of freezing and thawing on the compressive strength was investigated. The apparent density of hardened foamed concrete is strongly correlated with the foam content in the mix. An increase of the density of foamed concrete results in a decrease of flexural strength. For the same densities, the compressive strength obtained for mixes containing fly ash is approximately 20% lower in comparison to the specimens without fly ash. Specimens subjected to 25 freeze-thaw cycles show approximately 15% lower compressive strengths compared to the untreated specimens.

  10. DRY MIX FOR OBTAINING FOAM CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composition of a dry mix has been developed for production of non-autoclaved foam concrete with natural curing. The mix has been created on the basis of Portland cement, UFAPORE foaming agent, mineral additives (RSAM sulfoaluminate additive, MK-85 micro-silica and basalt fiber, plasticizing and accelerating “Citrate-T” additive and   redispersible Vinnapas-8034 H powder. It has been established that foam concrete with  density of 400–800 kg/m3, durability of 1,1–3,4 MPa, low water absorption (40–50 %, without shrinkable cracks has been formed while adding water of Water/Solid = 0.4–0.6 in the dry mix,  subsequent mechanical swelling and curing of foam mass.Introduction of the accelerating and plasticizing “Citrate-T” additive into composition of the dry mix leads to an increase of rheological properties in expanded foam mass and  time reduction of its drying and curing. An investigation on microstructure of foam-concrete chipping surface carried out with the help of a scanning electron microscope has shown that the introduction of  basalt fiber and redispersible Vinnapas-8034 H powder into the composition of the dry mix promotes formation of more finely-divided crystalline hydrates. Such approach makes it possible to change purposefully morphology of crystalline hydrates and gives the possibility to operate foam concrete structurization process.

  11. Ultra-stable self-foaming oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Bernard P; Marinopoulos, Ioannis

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the foaming of a range of fats in the absence of added foaming agent/emulsifier. By controlling the temperature on warming from the solid or cooling from the melt, crystals of high melting triglycerides form in a continuous phase of low melting triglycerides. Such crystal dispersions in oil can be aerated to produce whipped oils of high foamability and extremely high stability. The foams do not exhibit drainage and bubbles neither coarsen nor coalesce as they become coated with solid crystals. The majority of the findings relate to coconut oil but the same phenomenon occurs in shea butter, cocoa butter and palm kernel stearin. For each fat, there exists an optimum temperature for foaming at which the solid fat content reaches up to around 30%. We demonstrate that the oil foams are temperature-responsive and foam collapse can be controllably triggered by warming the foam to around the melting point of the crystals. Our hypothesis is given credence in the case of the pure system of tristearin crystals in liquid tricaprylin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Drainage and Stratification Kinetics of Foam Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2014-03-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Foam lifetime, drainage kinetics and stability are strongly influenced by surfactant type (ionic vs non-ionic), and added proteins, particles or polymers modify typical responses. The rate at which fluid drains out from a foam film, i.e. drainage kinetics, is determined in the last stages primarily by molecular interactions and capillarity. Interestingly, for certain low molecular weight surfactants, colloids and polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures, a layered ordering of molecules, micelles or particles inside the foam films leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification. Though stratification is observed in many confined systems including foam films containing particles or polyelectrolytes, films containing globular proteins seem not to show this behavior. Using a Scheludko-type cell, we experimentally study the drainage and stratification kinetics of horizontal foam films formed by protein-surfactant mixtures, and carefully determine how the presence of proteins influences the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of foam films.

  13. Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances through the consumption of fish from lakes affected by aqueous film-forming foam emissions - A combined epidemiological and exposure modeling approach. The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Solrunn; Vestergren, Robin; Herzke, Dorte; Melhus, Marita; Evenset, Anita; Hanssen, Linda; Brustad, Magritt; Sandanger, Torkjel M

    2016-09-01

    Releases of aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) from airport firefighting activities have been identified as important local point sources of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in nearby waterways. PFASs can be taken up by fish, and in turn by the humans that consume them. Despite the global extent of AFFF emissions, few studies exist on related impacts on humans. We aimed to investigate the associations between the consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations in humans using a combination of statistical tools, empirical data, and toxicokinetic modeling. Participants of the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study were the basis for this study sample, which comprised 74 persons. Fifty-nine participants who reported consuming fish from AFFF-affected waters and 15 nonconsumers completed a questionnaire and gave serum samples. Participants were classified based on their consumption of trout and char: high (n=16), moderate (n=16), low (n=27), and nonconsumers (n=15); and serum samples were tested for the presence of 15 PFASs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) was found in all participants, with the highest concentrations detected in the high consumption group (geometric means, 28ng/mL) compared to the low consumption group and nonconsumers (10 and 11ng/mL, respectively). In an analysis of variance contrast model, a significant, positive increasing trend was seen for fish consumption and PFOS, perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Toxicokinetic modeling allowed us to predict the median increases in serum concentrations of PFOS, PFHxS, and PFNA among high consumers within a factor of 2.2. The combination of statistical evaluation and toxicokinetic modeling clearly demonstrated a positive relationship between consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations. Further studies on dietary exposure to other PFASs present in AFFF and its consequences on human health are warranted. Copyright

  14. Influence of Rubber Powders on Foaming Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Foamed Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Yue

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene/rubber powders composites with different kinds of rubber powders were foamed by injection molding machine equipped with volume-adjustable cavity. The effect of dispersity of rubber powders and crystallization behavior of composites on the foaming behavior and mechanical properties was investigated. The results show that the addition of rubber powders can improve the cell structure of foamed PP with fine and uniform cell distribution. And cell density and size of PP/PP-MAH/NBR foams are 7.64×106cell/cm3 and 29.78μm respectively, which are the best among these foams. Combining cell structures with mechanical properties, notch impact strength of PP/PP-MAH/CNBR composites increases approximately by 2.2 times while tensile strength is reduced just by 26% compared with those of the pure PP. This indicates that PP/PP-MAH/CNBR composites are ideal foamed materials.

  15. Rigid Polyurethane Foam Reinforced Coconut Coir Fiber Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Azham Azmi

    2012-01-01

    This research work studied the properties of composite foam panels. Coconut coir fibers were used as reinforcement in polyurethane (PU) foam in order to increase the properties of foam. This composite foam panels were fabricated by using polyurethane molded method. The polyurethane foam panels reinforced from 5 to 20wt% coconut coir were produced to investigate the physical and mechanical test via density test and three point bending test respectively. It was found that the density test resul...

  16. Structural Foams of Biobased Isosorbide-Containing Copolycarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Zepnik, Stefan; Sander, Daniel; Kabasci, Stephan; Hopmann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Isosorbide-containing copolycarbonate (Bio-PC) is a partly biobased alternative to conventional bisphenol A (BPA) based polycarbonate (PC). Conventional PC is widely used in polymer processing technologies including thermoplastic foaming such as foam injection molding. At present, no detailed data is available concerning the foam injection molding behavior and foam properties of Bio-PC. This contribution provides first results on injection-molded foams based on isosorbide-containing PC. The s...

  17. Study of Thermal Properties of Cast Metal- Ceramic Composite Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gawdzińska K.; Chybowski L.; Przetakiewicz W.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to its properties, metallic foams can be used as insulation material. Thermal properties of cast metal-ceramic composite foams have applications in transport vehicles and can act as fire resistant and acoustic insulators of bulkheads. This paper presents basic thermal properties of cast and foamed aluminum, the values of thermal conductivity coefficient of selected gases used in foaming composites and thermal capabilities of composite foams (AlSi11/SiC). A certificate of non-combustibil...

  18. Intra-molecular electron communication, spectroscopic and conformational stability of the newly developed urethane modified polyetheramide coatings: Computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Adebayo A; Akintayo, Cecilia O; Akintayo, Emmanuel T; Conradie, Jeanet

    2017-11-01

    There have been constant research efforts towards the development of new and thermally stable resins, containing properties to outdoor usage, such as high quality of adhesion, as well as resistance to water and acid, amongst others. In this computational study, the spectroscopic properties were calculated, also the intramolecular electronic communication, susceptibility, as well as conformational changes in two monomers of potential resins, namely Albiziabenth oil polyetheramide (ABOPEtA) and urethanated Albiziabenth oil polyetheramide (UABOPEtA), as well as their precursor, namely hydroxylethyl albiziabenth oil amide (HEABOA). Many of these computed properties clearly show that the urethane linkage group in UABOPEtA acts as a strong electron withdrawing group, consequently causing the rest of the molecule to be more nucleophilic. This leads to an increase in the stability of UABOPEtA, as compared the rest of the molecules, as evidenced by an increase in the intramolecular energy of interaction, as well as negative values of the polarizability exaltation index (Γ). Further UABOPEtA is also associated with higher non-linear optical properties, in terms of the hyperpolarizabilities (β) and increased aromaticity, than for molecules ABOPEtA and HEABOA. The conformational folding of molecule UABOPEtA is characterized by larger values of the bisphenol-A linkage bond angle C⋯C⋯C, contrary to the angle observed in molecule ABOPEtA. This is a direct effect of hiding the urethane unit in the cleft of the folded UABOPEtA, which clearly leads to an increase in the hydrophobicity of UABOPEtA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Extraction kinetics of uranium (VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Chen, Dong-Hwang; Huang, Shius-Dong; Huang, Ching-Tsven; Shieh, Mu-Chang.

    1993-01-01

    The extraction kinetics of uranium(VI) from aqueous nitrate solution with polyether-based polyurethane foam was investigated in a batch reactor with automatic squeezing. The extraction curves of uranium(VI) concentration in solution vs. extraction time exhibited a rather rapid exponential decay within the first few minutes, followed by a slower exponential decay during the remaining period. This phenomenon can be attributed to the presence of two-phase structure, hard segment domains and soft segment matrix in the polyurethane foam. A two-stage rate model expressed by a superposition of two exponential curves was proposed, according to which the experimental data were fitted by an optimization method. The extraction rate of uranium (VI) was also found to increase with increasing temperature, nitrate concentration, and hydration of the cation of nitrate salt. (author)

  20. Combustion and radiation modeling of laminar premixed flames using OpenFOAM: A numerical investigation of radiative heat transfer in the RADIADE project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haider, Sajjad; Pang, Kar Mun; Ivarsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    flow and combusting flow cases. The results show that without including radiation modelling, the predicted flame temperature is higher than the measured values. P1 radiation Model is used with sub-models for absorption and emission coefficients. The model using constant values for the absorption...

  1. A Method to Produce Foam Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    or a compound which yields pure carbon as the foaming agent is oxidized by a sufficient amount of an efficient oxidizing agent essentially added to the glass-carbon powder mixture, where the oxidizing agent supplies oxygen in the relevant temperature range, to release CO/CO2 gas mixture in the softened glass......The present invention relates to a production process of foam glass from a mixture of glass cullet or slag or fly ash with a foaming agent and an oxidizing agent and heating to below 1100 C under low oxygen atmosphere. The invention relates more particularly to a process wherein pure carbon...

  2. Behaviour of aluminum foam under fire conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account fire-protection requirements it is advantageous for aluminum foam, after melting at a temperature considerably exceeding the melting point, to have a structure of discontinuous suspension of solid inclusions to liquid metal instead of liquid consistency. Continuity of the suspension depends on the solid phase content. The boundary value of the phase determined by J. Śleziona, above which the suspension becomes discontinuous, is provided by the formula (1. Figure 1 presents the relationship graphically. Boundary values of the vs content resulting from the above relationship is too low, taking into account the data obtained from the technology of suspension composites [4]. Therefore, based on the structure assumed for the suspension shown in Figure 2 these authors proposed another way of determining the contents, the value of which is determined by the relationship (3 [5].For purposes of the experimental study presented in the paper two foams have been molten: a commercially available one, made by aluminum foaming with titanium hydride, and a foam manufactured in the Marine Materials Plant of the Maritime University of Szczecin by blowing the AlSi7 +20% SiC composite with argon. Macrophotographs of foam cross-sections are shown in Figure 3. The foams have been molten in the atmosphere of air at a temperature of 750ºC. The products of melting are presented in Figure 4. It appears that molten aluminum foam may have no liquid consistency, being unable to flow, which is a desired property from the point of view of fire-protection. The above feature of the molten foam results from the fact that it may be a discontinuous suspension of solid particles in a liquid metal. The suspended particles may be solid particles of the composite that served for making the foam or oxide membranes formed on extended metal surface of the bubbles included in the foam. The desired foam ability to form a discontinuous suspension after melting may be

  3. Foam process for application of decontamination agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.M.; Miller, J.R.; Frazier, R.S.; Walter, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents the results and observations of a study performed by the authors to parametrically evaluate the performance characteristics of a foam process for application of decontamination agents. The initial tests were established to assess foam quality. Subsequent tests determined the ability of the foam as a carrier of chemical systems, and established system operating parameters. The technique was then applied in an actual decontamination task to verify effectiveness of these established parameters and to determine decontamination reduction factors. 4 figures, 5 tables

  4. Flow of an aqueous foam through a two-dimensional porous medium: a pore scale investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meheust, Y.; Jones, S. A.; Dollet, B.; Cox, S.; Cantat, I.

    2012-12-01

    Flowing foams are used in many engineering and technical applications. A well-known application is oil recovery. Another one is the remediation of polluted soil: the foam is injected into the ground in order to mobilize chemical species present in the medium. Apart from potential interesting physico-chemical and biochemical properties, foams have peculiar flow properties that might be of benefit to the application. We address here this physical aspect of the topic. As a precursor to the study of foam flow through a complex porous material, we first study the behavior of an aqueous two-dimensional foam flowing through a medium consisting of two parallel channels with different widths, at fixed medium porosity, that is, at fixed total combined width of the two channels. The flow velocity, and hence flux, in each channel is measured by analyzing images of the flowing foam. It is then compared to a theoretical model, the basic assumption of which is that the pressure drop along a channel is identical for both channels. This pressure drop both consists of (i) a dynamic pressure drop, which is controlled by bubble-wall friction and depends on the foam velocity in the channel, and (ii) a capillary pressure drop over the bubble films that emerge at the channel outlet, the latter pressure drop being controlled by the radius of curvature of the bubble film. Based on this assumption, the dependence of the ratio of the foam velocities in the two channels is inferred as a function of the channel width ratio. It compares well to the measurements and shows that the flow behavior is highly dependent on the foam structure within the narrowest of the two channels, especially when a "bamboo" structure is obtained. Consequently, the flux in a channel is found to have a more complicated relation to the channel width than expected for the flow of a standard Newtonian fluid in the same geometry. We provide a comparison to this reference configuration. We then study the flow of the same

  5. A case for closed-loop recycling of post-consumer PET for automotive foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedell, Matthew; Brown, Matthew; Kiziltas, Alper; Mielewski, Deborah; Mukerjee, Shakti; Tabor, Rick

    2018-01-01

    Striving to utilize sustainable material sources, polyester polyols made via glycolysis and esterification of recycled polyethylene terephthalate (rPET) scrap were used to synthesize flexible polyurethane (PU) foams typically found in automotive interior applications. The objective of this endeavor was to ascertain if a closed-loop model could be established with the discarded PET feedstock. In five separate formulations, up to 50% of the total polyol content (traditionally derived from petroleum-based feedstock) was replaced with the afore-mentioned sustainable recycled polyols. These foams underwent mechanical, thermal, morphological, and physical characterization testing to determine feasibility for use in an automotive interior. Young's modulus, tensile stress at maximum load, tear resistance, and compression modulus all increased by combined averages of 121%, 67%, 32%, and 150% over the control petroleum-based formulation, respectively, in foams possessing 50% rPET polyol content. Thermal stability also increased with sustainable polyol content; thermogravimetric analysis showed that 50% mass loss temperature increased by an average of 20 °C in foams containing 30% recycled polyol. Properties of density and SAG factor remained within 5% of the control petroleum-based reference foams. After comparing these findings to traditional polyols, a compelling argument can be made for the use of post-consumer automotive and industrial feedstocks in developing high-performing interior automotive PU foams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research on Gas-liquid Flow Rate Optimization in Foam Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B. K.; Sun, D. G.; Jia, Z. G.; Huang, Z. Q.

    2010-03-01

    With the advantages of less gas consumption, higher carrying rocks ability, lower leakage and higher penetration rate, foam drilling is widely used today in petroleum industry. In the process of foam underbalanced drilling, the mixture of gas, liquid and cuttings flows upwards through the annular, so it is a typical gas-liquid-solid multi-phase flow. In order to protect the reservoir and avoid borehole wall collapsing during foam drilling, it is crucial to ensure that the bottom hole pressure is lower than the formation pressure and higher than the formation collapse pressure, and in the mean time, foam drilling fluid in the whole wellbore should be in the best foam quality stage in order to have sufficient capacity to carry cuttings. In this paper, main relations between bottom hole pressure and gas-liquid injecting rate are analyzed with the underbalanced multiphase flow models. And in order to obtain precise flow pattern and flow pressure, the whole well bore is spatial meshed and iterative method is used. So, a convenient safety window expressed by gas-liquid injecting rate is obtained instead of that by bottom hole pressure. Finally, a foam drilling example from a block in Yemen is presented; the drilling results show that this method is reliable and practical.

  7. Microtomography-based CFD analysis of transport in open-cell aluminum metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranut, Paola; Nobile, Enrico; Mancini, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the need for developing more effective heat exchange technologies and innovative materials, capable of increasing performances while keeping power consumption, size and cost at reasonable levels, is well recognized. Under this perspective, metal foams have a great potential for enhancing the thermal efficiency of heat transfer devices, while allowing for the use of smaller and lighter equipments. However, for practical applications, it is necessary to compromise between the augmented heat transfer rate and the increased pressure drop induced by the tortuous flow passages. For design purposes, the estimation of the flow permeability and the thermal conductivity of the foam is fundamental, but far from simple. From this perspective, besides classical transport models and correlations, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at the pore scale, although challenging, is becoming a promising approach, especially if coupled with a realistic description of the foam structure. For precisely recovering the microstructure of the foams, a 3D X-ray computed microtomography (μ-CT) can be adopted. In this work, the results of μ-CT-based CFD simulations performed on different open-cell aluminum foams samples, for laminar flow regime, will be discussed. The results demonstrate that open-cell aluminum foams are effective means for enhancing heat transfer.

  8. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams: from everyday observations to liquid transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Alban; Boulogne, Francois; Cappello, Jean; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    When a liquid-filled container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to slosh, i.e. oscillate. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rim of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily, which suggests that the presence of foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath in a Hele-Shaw cell. We generate a monodisperse 2D liquid foam and track its motion. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is characterized: 2 to 3 layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. For more than 5 layers of bubbles, the original vertical motion of the foam becomes mainly horizontal. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient. This study motivated by everyday observations has promising applications in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquid in cargoes.

  9. Vibration transmissibility and damping behaviour for auxetic and conventional foams under linear and nonlinear regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Matteo; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the vibration transmissibility behaviour in conventional and auxetic (negative Poisson’s ratio) foams under low and high amplitude vibrations. Auxetic foam pads were manufactured from conventional open cell PU-PE based blocks using an alternative manufacturing process to the one currently used in the mainstream literature. The dynamic behaviour of both conventional and auxetic porous materials was assessed within the frequency bandwidth 5-500 Hz using a base excitation technique with a calibrated seismic mass. The foam pads were subjected to white noise broadband excitation at low dynamic strain, followed by a sine sweep around the resonance of the foam-mass system. The experimental data have been used to perform an inverse identification of the nonlinear dependence of the foam permeability versus the amplitude and frequency of excitation using a single-degree-of-freedom poroelastic vibration model. The auxetic foam shows higher dynamic stiffness and enhanced viscous dissipation characteristics, in particular when subjected to nonlinear vibration loading.

  10. Rheological and mechanical properties and interfacial stress development of composite cements modified with thio-urethane oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Pfeifer, Carmem S

    2016-08-01

    Thio-urethane oligomers have been shown to reduce stress and increase toughness in highly filled composite materials. This study evaluated the influence of thio-urethane backbone structure on rheological and mechanical properties of resin cements modified with a fixed concentration of the oligomers. Thio-urethane oligomers (TU) were synthesized by combining thiols - pentaerythritol tetra-3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP) or trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate (TMP) - with isocyanates - 1,6-hexanediol-diissocyante (HDDI) (aliphatic) or 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene (BDI) (aromatic) or dicyclohexylmethane 4,4'-diisocyanate (HMDI) (cyclic), at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol, leaving pendant thiols. 20wt% TU were added to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2). 60wt% silanated inorganic fillers were added. Near-IR was used to follow methacrylate conversion and rate of polymerization ( [Formula: see text] ). Mechanical properties were evaluated in three-point bending (ISO 4049) for flexural strength/modulus (FS/FM, and toughness), and notched specimens (ASTM Standard E399-90) for fracture toughness (KIC). PS was measured on the Bioman. Viscosity (V) and gel-points (defined as the crossover between storage and loss shear moduli (G'/G″)) were obtained with rheometry. Glass transition temperature (Tg), cross-link density and homogeneity of the network were obtained with dynamic mechanical analysis. Film-thickness was evaluated according to ISO 4049. DC and mechanical properties increased and [Formula: see text] and PS decreased with the addition of TUs. Gelation (G'/G″) was delayed and DC at G'/G″ increased in TU groups. Tg and cross-link density dropped in TU groups, while oligomers let to more homogenous networks. An increase in V was observed, with no effect on film-thickness. Significant reductions in PS were achieved at the same time conversion and mechanical properties increased. The addition of thio-urethane oligomers proved successful in improving several key properties

  11. [Experimental Study of PMI Foam Composite Properties in Terahertz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li-yun; Cui, Hong-liang; Shi, Chang-cheng; Han, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Zi-yin; Li, Wei; Ma, Yu-ting; Zheng, Yan; Zhang, Song-nian

    2015-12-01

    Polymethacrylimide (PMI) foam composite has many excellent properties. Currently, PMI is heat-resistant foam, with the highest strength and stiffness. It is suitable as a high-performance sandwich structure core material. It can replace the honeycomb structure. It is widely used in aerospace, aviation, military, marine, automotive and high-speed trains, etc. But as new sandwich materials, PMI performance testing in the THz band is not yet visible. Based on the Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy technique, we conducted the transmission and reflection experiments, got the time domain waveforms and power density spectrum. And then we analyzed and compared the signals. The MATALB and Origin 8. 0 was used to calculate and obtain the transmittance (transfer function), absorptivity Coefficient, reflectance and the refractive index of the different thickness Degussa PMI (Model: Rohacell WF71), which were based on the application of the time-domain and frequency-domain analysis methods. We used the data to compared with the THz refractive index and absorption spectra of a domestic PMI, Baoding Meiwo Technology Development Co. , Ltd. (Model: SP1D80-P-30). The result shows that the impact of humidity on the measurement results is obvious. The refractive index of PMI is about 1. 05. The attenuation of power spectrum is due to the signal of the test platform is weak, the sample is thick and the internal scattering of PMI foam microstructure. This conclusion provides a theoretical basis for the THz band applications in the composite PMI. It also made a good groundwork for THz NDT (Non-Destructive Testing, NDT) technology in terms of PMI foam composites.

  12. Validation of Heat Transfer Thermal Decomposition and Container Pressurization of Polyurethane Foam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Sarah Nicole; Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E.; Suo-Anttila, Jill M.; Erickson, Kenneth L

    2014-09-01

    Polymer foam encapsulants provide mechanical, electrical, and thermal isolation in engineered systems. In fire environments, gas pressure from thermal decomposition of polymers can cause mechanical failure of sealed systems. In this work, a detailed uncertainty quantification study of PMDI-based polyurethane foam is presented to assess the validity of the computational model. Both experimental measurement uncertainty and model prediction uncertainty are examined and compared. Both the mean value method and Latin hypercube sampling approach are used to propagate the uncertainty through the model. In addition to comparing computational and experimental results, the importance of each input parameter on the simulation result is also investigated. These results show that further development in the physics model of the foam and appropriate associated material testing are necessary to improve model accuracy.

  13. Investigation of the spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function of sea foam layer by the Monte Carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L X; Wang, F Q; Wang, C A; Wang, C C; Tan, J Y

    2015-11-20

    Spectral properties of sea foam greatly affect ocean color remote sensing and aerosol optical thickness retrieval from satellite observation. This paper presents a combined Mie theory and Monte Carlo method to investigate visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance and bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of sea foam layers. A three-layer model of the sea foam is developed in which each layer is composed of large air bubbles coated with pure water. A pseudo-continuous model and Mie theory for coated spheres is used to determine the effective radiative properties of sea foam. The one-dimensional Cox-Munk surface roughness model is used to calculate the slope density functions of the wind-blown ocean surface. A Monte Carlo method is used to solve the radiative transfer equation. Effects of foam layer thickness, bubble size, wind speed, solar zenith angle, and wavelength on the spectral reflectance and BRDF are investigated. Comparisons between previous theoretical results and experimental data demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed method. Sea foam can significantly increase the spectral reflectance and BRDF of the sea surface. The absorption coefficient of seawater near the surface is not the only parameter that influences the spectral reflectance. Meanwhile, the effects of bubble size, foam layer thickness, and solar zenith angle also cannot be obviously neglected.

  14. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  15. Flame Retardants Used in Flexible Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partnership project on flame retardants in furniture seeks to update the health and environmental profiles of flame-retardant chemicals that meet fire safety standards for upholstered consumer products with polyurethane foam

  16. Biodegradative Activities of Selected Environmental Fungi on a Polyester Polyurethane Varnish and Polyether Polyurethane Foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barragán, Joyce; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Vargas-Suárez, Martín; González-Hernández, Ricardo; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; Loza-Tavera, Herminia

    2016-09-01

    Polyurethane (PU) is widely used in many aspects of modern life because of its versatility and resistance. However, PU waste disposal generates large problems, since it is slowly degraded, there are limited recycling processes, and its destruction may generate toxic compounds. In this work, we isolated fungal strains able to grow in mineral medium with a polyester PU (PS-PU; Impranil DLN) or a polyether PU (PE-PU; Poly Lack) varnish as the only carbon source. Of the eight best Impranil-degrading strains, the six best degraders belonged to the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex, including the species C. pseudocladosporioides, C. tenuissimum, C. asperulatum, and C. montecillanum, and the two others were identified as Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum The best Impranil degrader, C. pseudocladosporioides strain T1.PL.1, degraded up to 87% after 14 days of incubation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis of Impranil degradation by this strain showed a loss of carbonyl groups (1,729 cm(-1)) and N-H bonds (1,540 and 1,261 cm(-1)), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis showed a decrease in ester compounds and increase in alcohols and hexane diisocyanate, indicating the hydrolysis of ester and urethane bonds. Extracellular esterase and low urease, but not protease activities were detected at 7 and 14 days of culture in Impranil. The best eight Impranil-degrading fungi were also able to degrade solid foams of the highly recalcitrant PE-PU type to different extents, with the highest levels generating up to 65% of dry-weight losses not previously reported. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of fungus-treated foams showed melted and thinner cell wall structures than the non-fungus-treated ones, demonstrating fungal biodegradative action on PE-PU. Polyurethane waste disposal has become a serious problem. In this work, fungal strains able to efficiently degrade different types of polyurethanes are reported, and

  17. Involvement of EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a and associated molecules in pathogenesis of urethane induced mouse lung tumors: Potential targets for cancer control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Manuraj; Sahay, Satya; Tiwari, Prakash [Carcinogenesis Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow –226001 (India); Upadhyay, Daya S. [Laboratory Animals Services, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Sitapur Road, Lucknow (India); Sultana, Sarwat [Dept. Medical Elementology and Toxicology, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard Nagar, New Delhi (India); Gupta, Krishna P., E-mail: krishnag522@yahoo.co.in [Carcinogenesis Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow –226001 (India)

    2014-10-15

    In the present study, we showed the correlation of EZH2, SUV39H1 or G9a expression and histone modifications with the urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis in the presence or absence of antitumor agent, inositol hexaphosphate (IP6). Tumorigenesis and the molecular events involved therein were studied at 1, 4, 12 or 36 weeks after the exposure. There were no tumors at 1 or 4 weeks but tumors started appearing at 12 weeks and grew further till 36 weeks after urethane exposure. Among the molecular events, upregulation of EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions appeared to be time dependent, but G9a expression was altered significantly only at later stages of 12 or 36 weeks. Alteration in miR-138 expression supports the upregulation of its target, EZH2. H3K9me2, H3K27me3 or H4K20me3 was found to be altered at 12 or 36 weeks. However, ChIP analysis of p16 and MLH1 promoters showed their binding with H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 which was maximum at 36 weeks. Thus, histone modification and their interactions with gene promoter resulted in the reduced expression of p16 and MLH1. IP6 prevented the incidence and the size of urethane induced lung tumors. IP6 also prevented the urethane induced alterations in EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a expressions and histone modifications. Our results suggest that the alterations in the histone modification pathways involving EZH2 and SUV39H1 expressions are among the early events in urethane induced mouse lung tumorigenesis and could be exploited for cancer control. - Highlights: • Urethane induces mouse lung tumor in a time dependent manner. • EZH2, SUV39H1, G9a induced by urethane and progress with time • Downregulation of miRNA-138 supports the EZH2 upregulation. • Methylation of histones showed a consequence of upregulated EZH2, SUV39H1 and G9a. • IP6 inhibits urethane induced changes and prevents tumor development.

  18. RANS Simulations using OpenFOAM Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the potential to perform large scale CFD simulations without incurring the significant licence fees concomitant with using commercial software ...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED RANS Simulations using OpenFOAM Software D.A. Jones1, M. Chapuis3, M. Liefvendahl3, D. Norrison1, and R. Widjaja2...Agency - FOI, SE 147 25 Tumba, Stockholm, Sweden DST-Group-TR-3204 ABSTRACT The use of the OpenFOAM software suite for the performance of Reynolds

  19. Measurement of radiant properties of ceramic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoornstra, J.; Turecky, M.; Maatman, D.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental facility is described for the measurement of the normal spectral and total emissivity and transmissivity of semi-transparent materials in the temperature range of 600 C to 1200 C. The set-up was used for the measurement of radiation properties of highly porous ceramic foam which is used in low NO x radiant burners. Emissivity and transmissivity data were measured and are presented for coated and uncoated ceramic foam of different thicknesses. (orig.)

  20. Unusual properties of foams at low pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, M A; Vaz, M Fátima

    2003-10-01

    In addition to a high coarsening rate, foams at low pressures may show special properties. These include a bulk modulus going to zero, a Poisson's ratio approaching zero, and a zero binding energy, implying foam separation into individual bubbles at a critical pressure. We provide examples of calculations made for particular two-dimensional clusters with an ideal gas, which illustrate these features. We also discuss the difficulties in performing experiments at the low pressures at which the unusual properties show up.