WorldWideScience

Sample records for model turbulent dynamics

  1. Modelling the dynamics of turbulent floods

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Z; Li, Z; Li, Zhenquan

    1999-01-01

    Consider the dynamics of turbulent flow in rivers, estuaries and floods. Based on the widely used k-epsilon model for turbulence, we use the techniques of centre manifold theory to derive dynamical models for the evolution of the water depth and of vertically averaged flow velocity and turbulent parameters. This new model for the shallow water dynamics of turbulent flow: resolves the vertical structure of the flow and the turbulence; includes interaction between turbulence and long waves; and gives a rational alternative to classical models for turbulent environmental flows.

  2. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, G G

    2015-05-13

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature.

  3. Diffusive dynamics and stochastic models of turbulent axisymmetric wakes

    CERN Document Server

    Rigas, G; Brackston, R D; Morrison, J F

    2015-01-01

    A modelling methodology to reproduce the experimental measurements of a turbulent flow under the presence of symmetry is presented. The flow is a three-dimensional wake generated by an axisymmetric body. We show that the dynamics of the turbulent wake- flow can be assimilated by a nonlinear two-dimensional Langevin equation, the deterministic part of which accounts for the broken symmetries which occur at the laminar and transitional regimes at low Reynolds numbers and the stochastic part of which accounts for the turbulent fluctuations. Comparison between theoretical and experimental results allows the extraction of the model parameters.

  4. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Physics Department, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Physics Department, China Central Normal University, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  5. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    CERN Document Server

    Gasenzer, Thomas; Pawlowski, Jan M; Sexty, Dénes

    2013-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appear in the gauge field which are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signalled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these r...

  6. Modeling the stochastic dynamics of moving turbulent spots over a slender cone at Mach 5 during laminar-turbulent transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Brian; Field, Rich; Grigoriu, Mircea; Jamison, Ryan; Mesh, Mikhail; Casper, Katya; Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-11-01

    During reentry, a hypersonic vehicle undergoes a period in which the flow about the vehicle transitions from laminar to turbulent flow. During this transitional phase, the flow is characterized by intermittent formations of localized turbulent behavior. These localized regions of turbulence are born at the onset of transition and grow as they move to the aft end of the flight vehicle. Throughout laminar-turbulent transition, the moving turbulent spots cause pressure fluctuations on the outer surface of the vehicle, which leads to the random vibration of the structure and its internal components. In light of this, it is of great interest to study the dynamical response of a flight vehicle undergoing transitional flow so that aircraft can be better designed to prevent structural failure. In this talk, we present a statistical model that calculates the birth, evolution, and pressure field of turbulent spots over a generic slender cone structure. We then illustrate that the model appropriately quantifies intermittency behavior and pressure loading by comparing the intermittency and root-mean-square pressure fluctuations produced by the model with theory and experiment. Finally, we present results pertaining to the structural response of a housing panel on the slender cone. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulations of turbulent flows with lattice Boltzmann dynamics and dynamical system sub-grid models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, two sub-grid scale (SGS) models are introduced into the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), i.e., the dynamics SGS model and the dynamical system SGS model, and applied to numerically solving three-dimensional high Re turbulent cavity flows. Results are compared with those obtained from the Smagorinsky model and direct numerical simulation for the same cases. It is shown that the method with LBM dynamics SGS model has advantages of fast computation speed, suitable to simulate high Re turbulent flows. In addition, it can capture detailed fine structures of turbulent flow fields. The method with LBM dynamical system SGS model dose not contain any adjustable parameters, and can be used in simulations of various complicated turbulent flows to obtain correct information of sub-grid flow field, such as the backscatter of energy transportation between large and small scales. A new average method of eliminating the inherent unphysical oscillation of LBM is also given in the paper.

  8. A Cell Dynamical System Model for Simulation of Continuum Dynamics of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric flows exhibit long-range spatiotemporal correlations manifested as the fractal geometry to the global cloud cover pattern concomitant with inverse power-law form for power spectra of temporal fluctuations of all scales ranging from turbulence (millimeters-seconds) to climate (thousands of kilometers-years). Long-range spatiotemporal correlations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and are identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. Standard models for turbulent fluid flows in meteorological theory cannot explain satisfactorily the observed multifractal (space-time) structures in atmospheric flows. Numerical models for simulation and prediction of atmospheric flows are subject to deterministic chaos and give unrealistic solutions. Deterministic chaos is a direct consequence of round-off error growth in iterative computations. Round-off error of finite precision computations doubles on an average at each step of iterative computations. Round-off error will propagate to the main...

  9. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  10. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Sahoo, Ganapati; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  11. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    In this report a new turbulence model is presented.In contrast to the bulk of modern work, the model is a classical continuum model with a relatively simple constitutive equation. The constitutive equation is, as usual in continuum mechanics, entirely empirical. It has the usual Newton or Stokes...... term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence....... The model is in a virgin state, but a number of numerical tests have been carried out with good results. It is published to encourage other researchers to study the model in order to find its merits and possible limitations....

  12. A Dynamical model of the atmospheric turbulence from the unstable stratification to the stable stratification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShidaLIU; ZuguangZheng; 等

    1996-01-01

    We analyse the behavior of the nonlinear dynamical systems which are the truncated-spectrum model of the atmospheric turbulence equation.It shows that the chaos can appear in the Lorenz equation obtained by simple equations for the unstable stratification(Ri0),And the chaos can also appear in Burgers-Chao equations for the stable stratification(Ri>0,Ra<0),The atmospheric turbulence is intermittent in the stable stratified atmosphere.

  13. Turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2014-01-01

    turbulence models. In the present work, the flow in a dynamic scale model of a uniflowscavenged cylinder is investigated experimentally. The model has a transparent cylinder and a moving piston driven by a linear motor. The flow is investigated using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV...

  14. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, R.-E.

    2013-07-15

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capability of the dynamics wake meandering model to a level where it is sufficiently mature to be applied in industrial applications and for an augmentation of the IEC-standard for wind turbine wake modelling. Based on a comparison of capabilities of the dynamic wake meandering model to the requirement of the wind industry, four areas were identified as high prioritizations for further research: 1. the turbulence distribution in a single wake. 2. multiple wake deficits and build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines. 3. the effect of the atmospheric boundary layer on wake turbulence and wake deficit evolution. 4. atmospheric stability effects on wake deficit evolution and meandering. The conducted research is to a large extent based on detailed wake investigations and reference data generated through computational fluid dynamics simulations, where the wind turbine rotor has been represented by an actuator line model. As a consequence, part of the research also targets the performance of the actuator line model when generating wind turbine wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Highlights of the conducted research: 1. A description is given for using the dynamic wake meandering model as a standalone flow-solver for the velocity and turbulence distribution, and power production in a wind farm. The performance of the standalone implementation is validated against field data, higher-order computational fluid dynamics models, as well as the most common engineering wake models in the wind industry. 2. The EllipSys3D actuator line model, including the synthetic methods used to model atmospheric boundary layer shear and turbulence, is verified for modelling the evolution of wind

  15. Dynamic Subgrid Scale Modeling of Turbulent Flows using Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    CERN Document Server

    Premnath, Kannan N; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the incorporation of dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models in the lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows. The use of a dynamic procedure, which involves sampling or test-filtering of super-grid turbulence dynamics and subsequent use of scale-invariance for two levels, circumvents the need for empiricism in determining the magnitude of the model coefficient of the SGS models. We employ the multiple relaxation times (MRT) formulation of LBM with a forcing term for simulation of the grid-filtered dynamics of large-eddies. The dynamic procedure is illustrated for use with the common Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity SGS model. We also discuss proper sampling techniques or test-filters that facilitate implementation of dynamic models in the LBM. For accommodating variable resolutions, we employ locally refined grids in this framework. As examples, we consider the canonical fully developed turbulent channel flow at two different shear Reynolds numbers $Re_{...

  16. Structural ensemble dynamics based closure model for wall-bounded turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Su She; Ning Hu; You Wu

    2009-01-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flow involves the development of multi-scale turbulent eddies, as well as a sharply varying boundary layer. Its theoretical descriptions are yet phenomenological. We present here a new framework called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), which aims at using systematically all relevant statistical properties of turbulent structures for a quantitative description of ensemble means. A new set of closure equations based on the SED approach for a turbulent channel flow is presented. SED order functions are defined, and numerically determined from data of direct numerical simulations (DNS). Computational results show that the new closure model reproduces accurately the solution of the original Navier-Stokes simulation, including the mean velocity profile, the kinetic energy of the stream-wise velocity component, and every term in the energy budget equation. It is suggested that the SED-based studies of turbulent structure builds a bridge between the studies of physical mechanisms of turbulence and the development of accurate model equations for engineering predictions.

  17. A phenomenological model for the dynamic response of wind turbines to turbulent wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauh, Alexander; Peinke, Joachim [Institut fur Physik, Universitat Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    To predict the average power output of a wind turbine, a response model is proposed which takes into account: (1) the delayed response to the longitudinal wind speed fluctuations; (2) a response function of the turbine with arbitrary frequency dependence; and (3) wind fields of arbitrary turbulence intensity. In the limit of low turbulence intensity, the dynamical ansatz as proposed in 1992 by Rosen and Sheinman is reproduced. It is shown, how the response function of the turbine can be obtained from simulation experiments of a specific wind turbine. For two idealized situations the dynamic effect of fluctuating wind is estimated at turbulence intensities 0{<=}I{sub u}{<=}0.5. At the special mean wind speed V=8m/s, the turbine response function is determined from simulation data published by Sheinman and Rosen in 1992 and 1994.

  18. A stability condition for turbulence model: From EMMS model to EMMS-based turbulence model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Limin; Li, Jinghai

    2013-01-01

    The closure problem of turbulence is still a challenging issue in turbulence modeling. In this work, a stability condition is used to close turbulence. Specifically, we regard single-phase flow as a mixture of turbulent and non-turbulent fluids, separating the structure of turbulence. Subsequently, according to the picture of the turbulent eddy cascade, the energy contained in turbulent flow is decomposed into different parts and then quantified. A turbulence stability condition, similar to the principle of the energy-minimization multi-scale (EMMS) model for gas-solid systems, is formulated to close the dynamic constraint equations of turbulence, allowing the heterogeneous structural parameters of turbulence to be optimized. We call this model the `EMMS-based turbulence model', and use it to construct the corresponding turbulent viscosity coefficient. To validate the EMMS-based turbulence model, it is used to simulate two classical benchmark problems, lid-driven cavity flow and turbulent flow with forced con...

  19. Lattice Boltzmann model for collisionless electrostatic drift wave turbulence obeying Charney-Hasegawa-Mima dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Held, M

    2015-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) approach to the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model for adiabatic drift wave turbulence in magnetised plasmas, is implemented. The CHM-LBM model contains a barotropic equation of state for the potential, a force term including a cross-product analogous to the Coriolis force in quasigeostrophic models, and a density gradient source term. Expansion of the resulting lattice Boltzmann model equations leads to cold-ion fluid continuity and momentum equations, which resemble CHM dynamics under drift ordering. The resulting numerical solutions of standard test cases (monopole propagation, stable drift modes and decaying turbulence) are compared to results obtained by a conventional finite difference scheme that directly discretizes the CHM equation. The LB scheme resembles characteristic CHM dynamics apart from an additional shear in the density gradient direction. The occuring shear reduces with the drift ratio and is ascribed to the compressible limit of the underlying LBM.

  20. Stochastic Subspace Modelling of Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Pedersen, B. J.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2009-01-01

    Turbulence of the incoming wind field is of paramount importance to the dynamic response of civil engineering structures. Hence reliable stochastic models of the turbulence should be available from which time series can be generated for dynamic response and structural safety analysis. In the paper...

  1. Dynamical modeling of sub-grid scales in 2D turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Jean-Philippe; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Nazarenko, Sergey

    2000-08-01

    We develop a new numerical method which treats resolved and sub-grid scales as two different fluid components evolving according to their own dynamical equations. These two fluids are nonlinearly interacting and can be transformed one into another when their scale becomes comparable to the grid size. Equations describing the two-fluid dynamics were rigorously derived from Euler equations [B. Dubrulle, S. Nazarenko, Physica D 110 (1997) 123-138] and they do not involve any adjustable parameters. The main assumption of such a derivation is that the large-scale vortices are so strong that they advect the sub-grid scales as a passive scalar, and the interactions of small scales with small and intermediate scales can be neglected. As a test for our numerical method, we performed numerical simulations of 2D turbulence with a spectral gap, and we found a good agreement with analytical results obtained for this case by Nazarenko and Laval [Non-local 2D turbulence and passive scalars in Batchelor’s regime, J. Fluid Mech., in press]. We used the two-fluid method to study three typical problems in 2D dynamics of incompressible fluids: decaying turbulence, vortex merger and forced turbulence. The two-fluid simulations performed on at 128 2 and 256 2 resolution were compared with pseudo-spectral simulations using hyperviscosity performed at the same and at much higher resolution. This comparison shows that performance of the two-fluid method is much better than one of the pseudo-spectral method at the same resolution and comparable computational cost. The most significant improvement is observed in modeling of the small-scale component, so that effective inertial interval increases by about two decades compared to the high-resolution pseudo-spectral method. Using the two-fluid method, we demonstrated that the k-3 tail always exists for the energy spectrum, although its amplitude is slowly decreasing in decaying turbulence.

  2. Turbulence modelling; Modelisation de la turbulence isotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, D. [Electricite de France (EDF), Direction des Etudes et Recherches, 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-12-31

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-{epsilon} two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the `standard` (R{sub ij}-{epsilon}) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called `feasible`. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author). 37 refs.

  3. Dynamics of turbulent western-boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow-water model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuetevi, C. Q. C.; Wirth, A.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western-boundary currents (WBCs) crossing the Equator are considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced-gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s-1 and greater, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical Munk-layer solution. When the viscosity is reduced, the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in the form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer, VSL) and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the VSL, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity; the second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. Characteristic scales of the dynamics and dissipation are determined. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse-resolution numerical models is proposed.

  4. Dynamic Stall Prediction of a Pitching Airfoil using an Adjusted Two-Equation URANS Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Bangga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity in the analysis of dynamic stall becomes increasingly important due to its impact on many streamlined structures such as helicopter and wind turbine rotor blades. The present paper provides Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD predictions of a pitching NACA 0012 airfoil at reduced frequency of 0.1 and at small Reynolds number value of 1.35e5. The simulations were carried out by adjusting the k − ε URANS turbulence model in order to damp the turbulence production in the near wall region. The damping factor was introduced as a function of wall distance in the buffer zone region. Parametric studies on the involving variables were conducted and the effect on the prediction capability was shown. The results were compared with available experimental data and CFD simulations using some selected two-equation turbulence models. An improvement of the lift coefficient prediction was shown even though the results still roughly mimic the experimental data. The flow development under the dynamic stall onset was investigated with regards to the effect of the leading and trailing edge vortices. Furthermore, the characteristics of the flow at several chords length downstream the airfoil were evaluated.

  5. Dynamics of turbulent western boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Q. C. Akuetevi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western boundary currents crossing the equator is considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s−1 and more, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical Munk-layer solution. When the viscosity is reduced, the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the viscous sub-layer, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity. The second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. Characteristic scales of the dynamics and dissipation are determined. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse resolution numerical models is proposed.

  6. Implementation of a Mixing Length Turbulence Formulation Into the Dynamic Wake Meandering Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this paper focuses on improving the description of wake evolution due to turbulent mixing in the dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model. From wake investigations performed with high-fidelity actuator line simulations carried out in ELLIPSYS3D, it is seen that the current DWM...... description, where the eddy viscosity is assumed to be constant in each cross-section of the wake, is insufficient. Instead, a two-dimensional eddy viscosity formulation is proposed to model the shear layer generated turbulence in the wake, based on the classical mixing length model. The performance...... from 3 to 12 diameters behind the rotor, is reduced by 27% by using the new eddy viscosity formulation. ©2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers...

  7. Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    and complexity of thermochemistry . Accordingly a practical viewpoint is required to meet near-term work required for use in advanced CFD codes...teachers the opportunity to learn/explore/ teach turbulence issues. While such a product could be an invaluable eductaional tool (university), it also

  8. Dynamics of turbulent western boundary currents at low latitude in a shallow water model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Q. C. Akuetevi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of low latitude turbulent western boundary currents, subject to two different types of idealized wind forcing, Monsoon Wind and Trade Wind, is considered using numerical results from integrations of a reduced gravity shallow-water model. For viscosity values of 1000 m2 s−1 and above, the boundary layer dynamics compares well to the analytical solutions of the Munk-layer and the inertial-layer, derived from quasigeostrophic theory. Modifications due to variations in the layer thickness (vortex stretching are only important close to the boundary. When the viscosity is reduced the boundary layer becomes turbulent and coherent structures in form of anticyclonic eddies, bursts (violent detachments of the viscous sub-layer and dipoles appear. Three distinct boundary layers emerge, the viscous sub-layer, the advective boundary layer and the extended boundary layer. The first is characterized by a dominant vorticity balance between the viscous transport and the advective transport of vorticity. The second by a balance between the advection of planetary vorticity and the advective transport of relative vorticity. The extended boundary layer is the area to which turbulent motion from the boundary extends. The scaling of the three boundary layer thicknesses with viscosity is evaluated. A pragmatic approach to determine the eddy viscosity diagnostically for coarse resolution numerical models is proposed.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  10. A Lagrangian model of Copepod dynamics: clustering by escape jumps in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ardeshiri, Hamidreza; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Toschi, Federico; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are small crustaceans that have the ability to swim by quick powerful jumps. Such an aptness is used to escape from high shear regions, which may be caused either by flow per- turbations, produced by a large predator (i.e. fish larvae), or by the inherent highly turbulent dynamics of the ocean. Through a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigate the impact of jumping behaviour on the small-scale patchiness of copepods in a turbulent environment. Recorded velocity tracks of copepods displaying escape response jumps in still water are here used to define and tune a Lagrangian Copepod (LC) model. The model is further employed to simulate the behaviour of thousands of copepods in a fully developed hydrodynamic turbulent flow obtained by direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. First, we show that the LC velocity statistics is in qualitative agreement with available experimental observations of copepods in tur- bulence. Second, we quantify the clustering of LC...

  11. Low-order dynamical system model of a fully developed turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2017-06-01

    A reduced order model of a turbulent channel flow is composed from a direct numerical simulation database hosted at the Johns Hopkins University. Snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to identify the Hilbert space from which the reduced order model is obtained, as the POD basis is defined to capture the optimal energy content by mode. The reduced order model is defined by coupling the evolution of the dynamic POD mode coefficients through their respective time derivative with a least-squares polynomial fit of terms up to third order. Parameters coupling the dynamics of the POD basis are defined in analog to those produced in the classical Galerkin projection. The resulting low-order dynamical system is tested for a range of basis modes demonstrating that the non-linear mode interactions do not lead to a monotonic decrease in error propagation. A basis of five POD modes accounts for 50% of the integrated turbulence kinetic energy but captures only the largest features of the turbulence in the channel flow and is not able to reflect the anticipated flow dynamics. Using five modes, the low-order model is unable to accurately reproduce Reynolds stresses, and the root-mean-square error of the predicted stresses is as great as 30%. Increasing the basis to 28 modes accounts for 90% of the kinetic energy and adds intermediate scales to the dynamical system. The difference between the time derivatives of the random coefficients associated with individual modes and their least-squares fit is amplified in the numerical integration leading to unstable long-time solutions. Periodic recalibration of the dynamical system is undertaken by limiting the integration time to the range of the sampled data and offering the dynamical system new initial conditions. Renewed initial conditions are found by pushing the mode coefficients in the end of the integration time toward a known point along the original trajectories identified through a least-squares projection. Under

  12. Shell Models of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Plunian, Franck; Frick, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accu...

  13. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-08-26

    This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports.

  14. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  15. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    This thesis addresses stochastic modelling of turbulence with applications to wind energy in mind. The primary tool is ambit processes, a recently developed class of computationally tractable stochastic processes based on integration with respect to Lévy bases. The subject of ambit processes...... stochastic turbulence model based on ambit processes is proposed. It is shown how a prescribed isotropic covariance structure can be reproduced. Non-Gaussian turbulence models are obtained through non-Gaussian Lévy bases or through volatility modulation of Lévy bases. As opposed to spectral models operating...... is dissipated into heat due to the internal friction caused by viscosity. An existing stochastic model, also expressed in terms of ambit processes, is extended and shown to give a universal and parsimonious description of the turbulent energy dissipation. The volatility modulation, referred to above, has...

  16. A novel dynamic coherent eddy model and its application to LES of a turbulent jet with free surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We has developed a novel dynamic coherent eddy model,in which the coherent structure-Q criterion introduced by Hunt et al(1988)-is taken into account in the subgrid-scale turbulent viscosity based on the eddy viscosity model.One proposed method is to combine the resolved-scale velocity-gradient tensor in the classical Smagorinsky model with Q criterion weighted.A kind of dynamic procedure which was averaged in a general process at temporal direction based on the autocorrelations of the characteristic resolved scales of turbulence was taken for the coefficient of subgrid model.The model is implemented in the σ-coordinate and the filtered Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the operator splitting method.The validation was explored to 2-D turbulent slot jet both in ambient environment and in regular waves.The prediction of the present model was compared with the experiment data,including the averaged velocity profiles,the velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds stress.The model performance is shown to be satisfactory.

  17. A fast Eulerian multiphase flow model for volcanic ash plumes: turbulence, heat transfer and particle non-equilibrium dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminara, Matteo; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Carlo Berselli, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a compressible multiphase flow model to simulate the three-dimensional dynamics of turbulent volcanic ash plumes. The model describes the eruptive mixture as a polydisperse fluid, composed of different types of gases and particles, treated as interpenetrating Eulerian phases. Solid phases represent the discrete ash classes into which the total granulometric spectrum is discretized, and can differ by size and density. The model is designed to quickly and accurately resolve important physical phenomena in the dynamics of volcanic ash plumes. In particular, it can simulate turbulent mixing (driving atmospheric entrainment and controlling the heat transfer), thermal expansion (controlling the plume buoyancy), the interaction between solid particles and volcanic gas (including kinetic non-equilibrium effects) and the effects of compressibility (over-pressured eruptions and infrasonic measurements). The model is based on the turbulent dispersed multiphase flow theory for dilute flows (volume concentration <0.001, implying that averaged inter-particle distance is larger than 10 diameters) where particle collisions are neglected. Moreover, in order to speed up the code without losing accuracy, we make the hypothesis of fine particles (Stokes number <0.2 , i.e., volcanic ash particles finer then a millimeter), so that we are able to consider non-equilibrium effects only at the first order. We adopt LES formalism (which is preferable in transient regimes) for compressible flows to model the non-linear coupling between turbulent scales and the effect of sub-grid turbulence on the large-scale dynamics. A three-dimensional numerical code has been developed basing on the OpenFOAM computational framework, a CFD open source parallel software package. Numerical benchmarks demonstrate that the model is able to capture important non-equilibrium phenomena in gas-particle mixtures, such as particle clustering and ejection from large-eddy turbulent structures, as well

  18. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  19. Otto Laporte Lecture: Fluid Dynamics Prize Talk: Simple Models for Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    2009-11-01

    We focus on the modeling of two turbulent flows: dispersion from a line source in grid turbulence; and, a lifted non-premixed turbulent jet flame. Stochastic Lagrangian models and PDF methods are described, and are shown to model these flows satisfactorily. For the line source, a Lagrangian approach is taken, with the Langevin equation modeling the velocity following a fluid particle, and with a simple relaxation model for the particle temperature. Comparison with experimental data shows that the resulting model describes accurately the dispersion from single and multiple line sources. These simple stochastic Lagrangian models are then applied to the much more challenging case of a lifted non-premixed jet flame. The stochastic Lagrangian models form the basis for a particle/mesh numerical method for solving a modeled transport equation for the Eulerian joint probability density function (PDF) of velocity and composition. The PDF calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, and exhibit the observed extreme sensitivity of the flame to the temperature of the co-flow. The PDF model calculations presented clearly demonstrate that simple models can be very useful, even though aspects of their behavior may be inaccurate or incomplete. The shortcomings of the Langevin equation are examined, and more advanced models (designed to overcome some of these shortcomings) are described. These include models for fluid-particle acceleration, including the effects of intermittency; models accounting for mean shear, which are correct in the rapid- distortion limit; and models designed for use in conjunction with large-eddy simulations (LES).

  20. A low-dimensional model predicting geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Kunlun; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We test the ability of a general low-dimensional model for turbulence to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures, such as convection rolls. The model consists of stochastic ordinary differential equations, which are derived as a function of boundary geometry from the Navier-Stokes equations (Brown and Ahlers 2008). We test the model using Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection experiments in a cubic container. The model predicts a new mode in which the alignment of a convection roll switches between diagonals. We observe this mode with a measured switching rate within 30% of the prediction.

  1. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  2. Modeling Of Z-Pinch Dynamics With Taking Into Account The Generation Of Turbulent/Chaotic Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikhrev, V. V.; Baronova, E. O.

    2006-01-01

    Pinch dynamics is described, which takes into account generation of turbulent magnetic fields. Turbulent/chaotic magnetic fields (TMF) appear due to MHD and kinetic instabilities. It is shown, that TMF arises near the moment of maximal compression and essentially affects plasma dynamics at the expansion stage.

  3. Qualitative dynamics of wavepackets in turbulent jets

    CERN Document Server

    Semeraro, Onofrio; Pastur, Luc; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    It has long been established that turbulent jets comprise large-scale coherent structures, now more commonly referred to as "wavepackets". These structures exhibit a remarkable spatio-temporal organisation, despite turbulence. In this work we analyse, from a qualitative point of view, the temporal dynamics of axisymmetric wavepackets educed, experimentally, from subsonic iso-thermal jets. We use the data presented by, where time-series of the wavepackets are extracted at different streamwise locations. A thorough analysis is performed, statistical tools are used for estimating the embedding and correlation dimensions characterising the dynamical system. System identification is used for computing nonlinear surrogate models. Finally, control-oriented linear models are computed. The goal of the contribution is to assess the extent to which non-linear models are necessary, or appropriate, for description of the temporal wave-packet dynamics and to provide a complementary perspective to the current modelling.

  4. Dynamics of turbulent falling films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Naraigh, Lennon; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of laminar falling films have received considerable attention over the past several decades. In contrast, turbulent falling films have been the subject of far fewer studies. We seek to redress this balance by studying the stability of falling films which have already undergone a transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow regime. We derive a uniform-film base-state for this flow by assuming the averaged turbulent velocity field to be steady and fully-developed, and by employing a modified version of mixing-length theory. The latter features an interpolation function for the eddy viscosity, and van Driest-type functions for turbulence-damping near the wall and interface regions. The predicted base-state streamwise velocity component is in good agreement with experimental data. A linear stability analysis of this base-state is then carried out by solving a modified version of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Our results suggest that the unstable mode is a long-wave one. This provides motivation for the derivation of long-wave equations for the nonlinear evolution of the film.

  5. Structure and mechanism in a second-order statistical state dynamics model of self-sustaining turbulence in plane Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the self-sustaining process (SSP) that maintains turbulence in wall-bounded shear flow. The study uses Couette flow and is based on a statistical state dynamics (SSD) model closed at second order with state variables the streamwise mean (first cumulant) and the covariance of perturbations (second cumulant). The SSD is closed by either neglecting or stochastically parameterizing the perturbation--perturbation nonlinearity in the perturbation covariance equation. This class of quasi-linear SSD models, which are referred to as RNL models, are a second order SSD systems that includes the stochastic structural stability theory (S3T or equivalently RNL$_\\infty$) model which is used in this study. Comparisons of turbulence maintained in DNS and RNL simulations have demonstrated that RNL systems self-sustain turbulence with a mean flow and perturbation structure consistent with DNS. The current results isolate the dynamical components sustaining turbulence in the S3T system concentrati...

  6. Modelling coupled turbulence - dissolved oxygen dynamics near the sediment-water interface under wind waves and sea swell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Mathieu; Guizien, Katell

    2010-03-01

    A one-dimensional vertical unsteady numerical model for diffusion-consumption of dissolved oxygen (DO) above and below the sediment-water interface was developed to investigate DO profile dynamics under wind waves and sea swell (high-frequency oscillatory flows with periods ranging from 2 to 30s). We tested a new approach to modelling DO profiles that coupled an oscillatory turbulent bottom boundary layer model with a Michaelis-Menten based consumption model. The flow regime controls both the mean value and the fluctuations of the oxygen mass transfer efficiency during a wave cycle, as expressed by the non-dimensional Sherwood number defined with the maximum shear velocity (Sh). The Sherwood number was found to be non-dependent on the sediment biogeochemical activity (mu). In the laminar regime, both cycle-averaged and variance of the Sherwood number are very low (Sh wave cycle fluctuations that increase with the wave Reynolds number (VAR(Sh) up to 30%). Our computations show that DO mass transfer efficiency under high-frequency oscillatory flows in the turbulent regime are water-side controlled by: (a) the diffusion time across the diffusive boundary layer and (b) diffusive boundary layer dynamics during a wave cycle. As a result of these two processes, when the wave period decreases, the Sh minimum increases and the Sh maximum decreases. Sh values vary little, ranging from 0.17 to 0.23. For periods up to 30s, oxygen penetration depth into the sediment did not show any intra-wave fluctuations. Values for the laminar regime are small (turbulent regime, the oxygen penetration depth reaches values up to five times larger than those in the laminar regime, becoming asymptotic as the maximum shear velocity increases.

  7. Electron MHD: dynamics and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron MHD (EMHD). We argue there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact non-linear solutions; (ii) co-linear whistlers do not interact (including counter-propagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector, $k_1=k_2$, do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero-mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfven turbulence cannot be transferred to the E...

  8. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  9. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: dynamics and turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k(1)=k(2) do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade [proportionality]k(-2). The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  10. A consistent turbulence formulation for the dynamic wake meandering model in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; Veldkamp, Dick; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob

    This thesis describes the further development and validation of the dynamic meandering wake model for simulating the flow field and power production of wind farms operating in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The overall objective of the conducted research is to improve the modelling capabil...... intensity. This power drop is comparable to measurements from the North Hoyle and OWEZ wind farms....

  11. Numerical modeling of turbulent swirling flow in a multi-inlet vortex nanoprecipitation reactor using dynamic DDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James C.; Liu, Zhenping; Fox, Rodney O.; Passalacqua, Alberto; Olsen, Michael G.

    2015-11-01

    The multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR) has been developed to provide a platform for rapid mixing in the application of flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) for manufacturing functional nanoparticles. Unfortunately, commonly used RANS methods are unable to accurately model this complex swirling flow. Large eddy simulations have also been problematic, as expensive fine grids to accurately model the flow are required. These dilemmas led to the strategy of applying a Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) method to the vortex reactor. In the current work, the turbulent swirling flow inside a scaled-up MIVR has been investigated by using a dynamic DDES model. In the DDES model, the eddy viscosity has a form similar to the Smagorinsky sub-grid viscosity in LES and allows the implementation of a dynamic procedure to determine its coefficient. The complex recirculating back flow near the reactor center has been successfully captured by using this dynamic DDES model. Moreover, the simulation results are found to agree with experimental data for mean velocity and Reynolds stresses.

  12. A self-sustaining process model of inertial layer dynamics in high Reynolds number turbulent wall flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chini, G. P.; Montemuro, B.; White, C. M.; Klewicki, J.

    2017-03-01

    Field observations and laboratory experiments suggest that at high Reynolds numbers Re the outer region of turbulent boundary layers self-organizes into quasi-uniform momentum zones (UMZs) separated by internal shear layers termed `vortical fissures' (VFs). Motivated by this emergent structure, a conceptual model is proposed with dynamical components that collectively have the potential to generate a self-sustaining interaction between a single VF and adjacent UMZs. A large-Re asymptotic analysis of the governing incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is performed to derive reduced equation sets for the streamwise-averaged and streamwise-fluctuating flow within the VF and UMZs. The simplified equations reveal the dominant physics within-and isolate possible coupling mechanisms among-these different regions of the flow.

  13. Turbulence modelling of thermal plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the ideas for modelling turbulent thermal plasma flows, reviewing the challenges, efforts, and state-of-the-art simulations. Demonstrative simulations are also performed to present the importance of numerical methods as well as physical models to express turbulent features. A large eddy simulation has been applied to turbulent thermal plasma flows to treat time-dependent and 3D motions of multi-scale eddies. Sub-grid scale models to be used should be able to express not only turbulent but also laminar states because both states co-exist in and around thermal plasmas which have large variations of density as well as transport properties under low Mach-number conditions. Suitable solution algorithms and differencing schemes must be chosen and combined appropriately to capture multi-scale eddies and steep gradients of temperature and chemical species, which are turbulent features of thermal plasma flows with locally variable Reynolds and Mach numbers. Several simulations using different methods under different conditions show commonly that high-temperature plasma regions exhibit less turbulent structures, with only large eddies, whereas low-temperature regions tend to be more turbulent, with numerous small eddies. These numerical results agree with both theoretical insight and photographs that show the characteristics of eddies. Results also show that a turbulence transition of a thermal plasma jet through a generation-breakup process of eddies in a torch is dominated by fluid dynamic instability after ejection rather than non-uniform or unsteady phenomena.

  14. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Nonlinear Anisotropic Dynamical Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Heusen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate test-particle diffusion in dynamical turbulence based on a numerical approach presented before. For the turbulence we employ the nonlinear anisotropic dynamical turbulence model which takes into account wave propagation effects as well as damping effects. We compute numerically diffusion coefficients of energetic particles along and across the mean magnetic field. We focus on turbulence and particle parameters which should be relevant for the solar system and compare our findings with different interplanetary observations. We vary different parameters such as the dissipation range spectral index, the ratio of the turbulence bendover scales, and the magnetic field strength in order to explore the relevance of the different parameters. We show that the bendover scales as well as the magnetic field ratio have a strong influence on diffusion coefficients whereas the influence of the dissipation range spectral index is weak. The best agreement with solar wind observations can be found for equal bend...

  15. Space-Time Correlations and Dynamic Coupling in Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guowei; Jin, Guodong; Yang, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Space-time correlation is a staple method for investigating the dynamic coupling of spatial and temporal scales of motion in turbulent flows. In this article, we review the space-time correlation models in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, which include the random sweeping and local straining models for isotropic and homogeneous turbulence, Taylor's frozen-flow model and the elliptic approximation model for turbulent shear flows, and the linear-wave propagation model and swept-wave model for compressible turbulence. We then focus on how space-time correlations are used to develop time-accurate turbulence models for the large-eddy simulation of turbulence-generated noise and particle-laden turbulence. We briefly discuss their applications to two-point closures for Kolmogorov's universal scaling of energy spectra and to the reconstruction of space-time energy spectra from a subset of spatial and temporal signals in experimental measurements. Finally, we summarize the current understanding of space-time correlations and conclude with future issues for the field.

  16. Phase-locked stereoscopic PIV measurements of the turbulent swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Meyer, Knud Erik; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    turbulence models. In the present work, the flow in a dynamic scale model of a uniflow-scavenged cylinder is investigated experimentally. The model has a transparent cylinder and a movable piston driven by a linear motor. The flow is investigated using phase-locked stereoscopic particle image velocimetry......It is desirable to use computational fluid dynamics for the optimization of in-cylinder processes in large two-stroke low-speed uniflowscavenged marine diesel engines. However, the complex nature of the turbulent swirling in-cylinder flow necessitates experimental data for validation of the used...... (PIV) and time resolved laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Radial profiles of the phase-averaged mean velocities are computed from the velocity fields recorded with PIV and the validity of the obtained profiles is demonstrated by comparison with reference LDA measurements. Radial profiles are measured...

  17. Introduction to turbulent dynamical systems in complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Majda, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a research expository article on the applied mathematics of turbulent dynamical systems through the paradigm of modern applied mathematics. It involves the blending of rigorous mathematical theory, qualitative and quantitative modeling, and novel numerical procedures driven by the goal of understanding physical phenomena which are of central importance to the field. The contents cover general framework, concrete examples, and instructive qualitative models. Accessible open problems are mentioned throughout. Topics covered include: · Geophysical flows with rotation, topography, deterministic and random forcing · New statistical energy principles for general turbulent dynamical systems, with applications · Linear statistical response theory combined with information theory to cope with model errors · Reduced low order models · Recent mathematical strategies for online data assimilation of turbulent dynamical systems as well as rigorous results for finite ensemble Kalman filters The volume wi...

  18. Bending dynamics of semi-flexible macromolecules in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Aamir; Vincenzi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of semi-flexible macromolecules in laminar as well as in homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows by means of analytically solvable stochastic models and direct numerical simulations. The statistics of the bending angle is qualitatively different in laminar and turbulent flows and exhibits a strong dependence on the topology of the velocity field. In particular, in two-dimensional turbulence, particles are either found in a fully extended or in a fully folded configuration; in three dimensions, the predominant configuration is the fully extended one.

  19. The universality of dynamic multiscaling in homogeneous, isotropic Navier-Stokes and passive-scalar turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Pandit, Rahul [Centre for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Departement Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, BP4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)], E-mail: ssray@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: dhruba.mitra@gmail.com, E-mail: rahul@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2008-03-15

    We systematize the study of dynamic multiscaling of time-dependent structure functions in different models of passive-scalar and fluid turbulence. We show that, by suitably normalizing these structure functions, we can eliminate their dependence on the origin of time at which we start our measurements and that these normalized structure functions yield the same linear bridge relations that relate the dynamic-multiscaling and equal-time exponents for statistically steady turbulence. We show analytically, for both the Kraichnan model of passive-scalar turbulence and its shell model analogue, and numerically, for the Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada (GOY) shell model of fluid turbulence and a shell model for passive-scalar turbulence, that these exponents and bridge relations are the same for statistically steady and decaying turbulence. Thus, we provide strong evidence for dynamic universality, i.e. dynamic-multiscaling exponents do not depend on whether the turbulence decays or is statistically steady.

  20. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, E.A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The {open_quotes}vortex strings{close_quotes} scale l{sub s} {approximately} LRe{sup -3/10} (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES).

  1. Turbulence Model Evaluation Study for a Secondary Flow and a Flow Pulsation in the Sub-Channels of an 18-Finned Rod Bundle by Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Cheol; Kim, Heon Il

    2008-09-15

    Since the heat flux of the rod type fuel used in the HANARO, a research reactor being operated in the KAERI, is substantially higher than the heat flux of power reactors, the HANARO fuel has 8 longitudinal fins for enhancing the heat release from the fuel rod surface. This unique shape of a nuclear fuel led us to study the flows and thermal hydraulic characteristics of it. Especially because the flows through the narrow channels built up by these finned rod fuels would be different from the flow characteristics in the coolant channels formed by bare rod fuels, some experimental studies to investigate the flow behaviors and structures in a finned rod bundle were done by other researchers. But because of the very complex geometries of the flow channels in the finned rod bundle only allowed us to obtain limited information about the flow characteristics, a numerical study by a computational fluid dynamics technique has been adopted to elucidate more about such a complicated flow in a finned rod bundle. In this study, for the development of an adequate computational model to simulate such a complex geometry, a mesh sensitivity study and the effects of various turbulence models were examined. The CFD analysis results were compared with the experimental results. Some of them have a good agreement with the experimental results. All linear eddy viscosity turbulence models could hardly predict the secondary flows near the fuel surfaces and in the sub-channel, but the RSM (Reynolds Stress Model) revealed very different results from the eddy viscosity turbulence models. In the transient analysis all turbulence model predicted flow pulsation at the center of a subchannel as well as at the gap between rods in spite of large P/D. The flow pulsation showed different results with turbulence models and the location in the sub-channels.

  2. The chaotic dynamics of a turbulent wake

    CERN Document Server

    Varon, Eliott; Edwige, Stephie; Gilotte, Philippe; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a 3D bi-stable turbulent wake downstream a square-back Ahmed body are experimentally studied in a wind-tunnel through high-frequency wall pressure probes mapping the rear of the model and a horizontal 2D velocity field. The barycenters of the pressure distribution over the rear part of the model and the intensity recirculation are found highly correlated. Focusing on the pressure, its barycenter trajectory exhibits the same characteristics as a Lorenz dynamical system, with two well defined attractors and a 2D Poincar\\'e section displaying a well-defined "butterfly-like" shape. The signal is firstly transformed and analyzed as a telegraph signal showing that its dynamics corresponds to a quasi-random telegraph signal. Then the largest Lyapunov exponent is estimated, leading to a positive value characteristic of strange attractors and chaotic systems. Finally, analyzing the autocorrelation function of the time-series, we compute the correlation dimension, slightly larger than two, very similar ...

  3. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  4. Turbulence Models of Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张直明; 王小静; 孙美丽

    2003-01-01

    The main theoretical turbulence models for application to hydrodynamic lubrication problems were briefly reviewed, and the course of their development and their fundamentals were explained. Predictions by these models on flow fields in turbulent Couette flows and shear-induced countercurrent flows were compared to existing measurements, and Zhang & Zhang' s combined k-ε model was shown to have surpassingly satisfactory results. The method of application of this combined k-ε model to high speed journal bearings and annular seals was summarized, and the predicted results were shown to be satisfactory by comparisons with existing experiments of journal bearings and annular seals.

  5. Modeling the turbulent kinetic energy equation for compressible, homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Reynolds, William C.; Zeman, Otto

    1990-01-01

    The turbulent kinetic energy transport equation, which is the basis of turbulence models, is investigated for homogeneous, compressible turbulence using direct numerical simulations performed at CTR. It is shown that the partition between dilatational and solenoidal modes is very sensitive to initial conditions for isotropic decaying turbulence but not for sheared flows. The importance of the dilatational dissipation and of the pressure-dilatation term is evidenced from simulations and a transport equation is proposed to evaluate the pressure-dilatation term evolution. This transport equation seems to work well for sheared flows but does not account for initial condition sensitivity in isotropic decay. An improved model is proposed.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k-ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  7. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  9. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  10. Outer scales of temperature turbulence and dynamic turbulence from the data of acoustic sounding of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Krasnenko, N. P.; Kapegesheva, O. F.

    2014-11-01

    The outer scale of turbulence plays an important role in the theory of atmospheric turbulence. It specifies the lowfrequency boundary of the inertial subrange of fluctuation spectra of the atmospheric meteorological parameters, is used to construct models of the atmospheric turbulence and to estimate the excess turbulent attenuation of waves in the atmosphere. Outer scales of the wind velocity, temperature, humidity, and ozone concentration were previously determined, in particular, from direct airborne measurements of the spectral power density of these parameters, and their dependences on the altitude above the underlying surface, its properties, and type of the atmospheric stratification were demonstrated. For optical radiation propagating in the surface layer, the outer scale of temperature turbulence was determined from measurements of the variance of phase fluctuations of optical waves propagating along the near-ground paths. Unlike the optical waves, the acoustic wave propagation in the atmospheric boundary layer is influenced simultaneously by the temperature fluctuations caused by thermal convection and by the velocity fluctuations (dynamic turbulence caused by the wind shear). Their relative contributions depend on the ratio of the outer scales of the dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence. In the present work, a method of simultaneous acoustic sounding of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is suggested, and combined influence of these parameters on the acoustic wave propagation is estimated. Temporal dynamics of vertical profiles of the outer scales of dynamic turbulence and temperature turbulence is analyzed. The efficiency of the suggested method is confirmed by the results of comparison with the data of laser sensing of these parameters and their theoretical estimates, which demonstrate their good agreement.

  11. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical

  12. Dynamic Stochastic Superresolution of sparsely observed turbulent systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branicki, M., E-mail: branicki@cims.nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Majda, A.J. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Real-time capture of the relevant features of the unresolved turbulent dynamics of complex natural systems from sparse noisy observations and imperfect models is a notoriously difficult problem. The resulting lack of observational resolution and statistical accuracy in estimating the important turbulent processes, which intermittently send significant energy to the large-scale fluctuations, hinders efficient parameterization and real-time prediction using discretized PDE models. This issue is particularly subtle and important when dealing with turbulent geophysical systems with an vast range of interacting spatio-temporal scales and rough energy spectra near the mesh scale of numerical models. Here, we introduce and study a suite of general Dynamic Stochastic Superresolution (DSS) algorithms and show that, by appropriately filtering sparse regular observations with the help of cheap stochastic exactly solvable models, one can derive stochastically ‘superresolved’ velocity fields and gain insight into the important characteristics of the unresolved dynamics, including the detection of the so-called black swans. The DSS algorithms operate in Fourier domain and exploit the fact that the coarse observation network aliases high-wavenumber information into the resolved waveband. It is shown that these cheap algorithms are robust and have significant skill on a test bed of turbulent solutions from realistic nonlinear turbulent spatially extended systems in the presence of a significant model error. In particular, the DSS algorithms are capable of successfully capturing time-localized extreme events in the unresolved modes, and they provide good and robust skill for recovery of the unresolved processes in terms of pattern correlation. Moreover, we show that DSS improves the skill for recovering the primary modes associated with the sparse observation mesh which is equally important in applications. The skill of the various DSS algorithms depends on the energy spectrum

  13. Modelling of the decay of isotropic turbulence by the LES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdibekov, U S; Zhakebaev, D B, E-mail: uali1@mail.ru, E-mail: daurjaz@mail.ru [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

    2011-12-22

    This work deals with the modelling of degeneration of isotropic turbulence. To simulate the turbulent process the filtered three-dimensional nonstationary Navier-Stokes equation is used. The basic equation is closed with the dynamic model. The problem is solved numerically, and the equation of motion is solved by a modified method of fractional steps using compact schemes, the equation for pressure is solved by the Fourier method with a combination of matrix factorization. In the process of simulation changes of the kinetic energy of turbulence in the time, micro scale of turbulence and changes of inlongitudinal-transverse correlation functions are obtained, longitudinal and transverse one-dimensional spectra are defined.

  14. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E {times} B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics.

  15. Turbulence dynamics in unsteady atmospheric flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady pressure-gradient forcing in geophysical flows challenges the quasi-steady state assumption, and can strongly impact the mean wind and higher-order turbulence statistics. Under such conditions, it is essential to understand when turbulence is in quasi-equilibrium, and what are the implications of unsteadiness on flow characteristics. The present study focuses on the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) where pressure gradient, Coriolis, buoyancy, and friction forces interact. We perform a suite of LES with variable pressure-gradient. The results indicate that the dynamics are mainly controlled by the relative magnitudes of three time scales: Tinertial, Tturbulence, and Tforcing. It is shown that when Tf Tt , the turbulence is no longer in a quasi-equilibrium state due to highly complex mean-turbulence interactions; consequently, the log-law and turbulence closures are no longer valid in these conditions. However, for longer and, surprisingly, for shorter forcing times, quasi-equilibrium is maintained. Varying the pressure gradient in the presence of surface buoyancy fluxes primarily influences the buoyant destruction in the stable ABLs, while under unstable conditions it mainly influences the transport terms. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University.

  16. Mathematical and numerical foundations of turbulence models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chacón Rebollo, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    With applications to climate, technology, and industry, the modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent flows are rich with history and modern relevance. The complexity of the problems that arise in the study of turbulence requires tools from various scientific disciplines, including mathematics, physics, engineering, and computer science. Authored by two experts in the area with a long history of collaboration, this monograph provides a current, detailed look at several turbulence models from both the theoretical and numerical perspectives. The k-epsilon, large-eddy simulation, and other models are rigorously derived and their performance is analyzed using benchmark simulations for real-world turbulent flows. Mathematical and Numerical Foundations of Turbulence Models and Applications is an ideal reference for students in applied mathematics and engineering, as well as researchers in mathematical and numerical fluid dynamics. It is also a valuable resource for advanced graduate students in fluid dynamics,...

  17. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulent separated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This study discusses about numerical investigation of the turbulent flow (Re ... systems, while the 90° diffuser or sudden expansion is normally found in piping junctions or weld ribs . ... According to the widely used two-equation k−ε model, t.

  19. Helicity Transfer in Turbulent Models

    CERN Document Server

    Biferale, L; Toschi, F

    1998-01-01

    Helicity transfer in a shell model of turbulence is investigated. We show that a Reynolds-independent helicity flux is present in the model when the large scale forcing breaks inversion symmetry. The equivalent in Shell Models of the ``2/15 law'', obtained from helicity conservation in Navier-Stokes eqs., is derived and tested. The odd part of helicity flux statistic is found to be dominated by a few very intense events. In a particular model, we calculate analytically leading and sub-leading contribution to the scaling of triple velocity correlation.

  20. Relating statistics to dynamics in axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Godeferd, Fabien S

    2012-01-01

    The structure and the dynamics of homogeneous turbulence are modified by the presence of body forces such that the Coriolis or the buoyancy forces, which may render a wide range of turbulence scales anisotropic. The corresponding statistical characterization of such effects is done in physical space using structure functions, as well as in spectral space with spectra of two-point correlations, providing two complementary viewpoints. In this framework, second-order and third-order structure functions are put in parallel with spectra of two-point second- and third-order velocity correlation functions, using passage relations. Such relations apply in the isotropic case, or for isotropically averaged statistics, which, however, do not reflect the actual more complex structure of anisotropic turbulence submitted to rotation or stratification. This complexity is demonstrated in this paper by orientation-dependent energy and energy transfer spectra produced in both cases by means of a two-point statistical model for...

  1. Ability of a low-dimensional model to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kunlun; Ji, Dandan; Brown, Eric

    2016-02-01

    We test the ability of a general low-dimensional model for turbulence to predict geometry-dependent dynamics of large-scale coherent structures, such as convection rolls. The model consists of stochastic ordinary differential equations, which are derived as a function of boundary geometry from the Navier-Stokes equations [Brown and Ahlers, Phys. Fluids 20, 075101 (2008); Phys. Fluids 20, 105105 (2008)]. We test the model using Rayleigh-Bénard convection experiments in a cubic container. The model predicts a mode in which the alignment of a convection roll stochastically crosses a potential barrier to switch between diagonals. We observe this mode with a measured switching rate within 30% of the prediction.

  2. Qualitative dynamics of wave packets in turbulent jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, Onofrio; Lusseyran, François; Pastur, Luc; Jordan, Peter

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the temporal dynamics associated with axisymmetric coherent structures in a turbulent jet. It has long been established that turbulent jets comprise large-scale coherent structures, now more commonly referred to as "wave packets" [Jordan and Colonius, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 45, 173 (2013), 10.1146/annurev-fluid-011212-140756]. These structures exhibit a marked spatiotemporal organization, despite turbulence, and we aim to characterize their temporal dynamics by means of nonlinear statistical tools. The analysis is based on data presented Breakey et al., in Proceedings of the 19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, AIAA Paper 2013-2083 (AIAA, Reston, VA, 2013), where time series of the wave-packet signatures are extracted at different streamwise locations. The experiment runs at Ma=0.6 and Re=5.7 ×105 . A thorough analysis is performed. Statistical tools are used to estimate the embedding and correlation dimensions that characterize the dynamical system. Input-output transfer functions are designed as control-oriented models; and for this special case, consistent with other recent studies, we find that linear models can reproduce much of the convective input-ouput behavior. Finally, we show how surrogate models can partially reproduce the nonlinear dynamics.

  3. Two-equation modeling of turbulent rotating flows

    OpenAIRE

    Cazalbou, Jean-Bernard; Chassaing, Patrick; Dufour, Guillaume; CARBONNEAU, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The possibility to take into account the effects of the Coriolis acceleration on turbulence is examined in the framework of two-equation eddy-viscosity models. General results on the physical consistency of such turbulence models are derived from a dynamical-system approach to situations of time-evolving homogeneous turbulence in a rotating frame. Application of this analysis to a (k,epsilon) model fitted with an existing Coriolis correction [J. H. G. Howard, S. V. Patankar, and R. M. Bordynu...

  4. Instantaneous aerosol dynamics in a turbulent flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate aerosol particles evolution dynamics in a turbulent mixing layer is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation for the flow field and the direct quadrature method of moments for the aerosol evolution. Most par-ticles are nucleated in a thin layer region corresponding to a specific narrow temperature range near the cool stream side. However, particles undergo high growth rate on the hot stream side due to condensation. Coagulation decreases the total particle number density at a rate which is highly correlated to the in-stantaneous number density.

  5. Environmental forecasting and turbulence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    This review describes the fundamental assumptions and current methodologies of the two main kinds of environmental forecast; the first is valid for a limited period of time into the future and over a limited space-time ‘target’, and is largely determined by the initial and preceding state of the environment, such as the weather or pollution levels, up to the time when the forecast is issued and by its state at the edges of the region being considered; the second kind provides statistical information over long periods of time and/or over large space-time targets, so that they only depend on the statistical averages of the initial and ‘edge’ conditions. Environmental forecasts depend on the various ways that models are constructed. These range from those based on the ‘reductionist’ methodology (i.e., the combination of separate, scientifically based, models for the relevant processes) to those based on statistical methodologies, using a mixture of data and scientifically based empirical modeling. These are, as a rule, focused on specific quantities required for the forecast. The persistence and predictability of events associated with environmental and turbulent flows and the reasons for variation in the accuracy of their forecasts (of the first and second kinds) are now better understood and better modeled. This has partly resulted from using analogous results of disordered chaotic systems, and using the techniques of calculating ensembles of realizations, ideally involving several different models, so as to incorporate in the probabilistic forecasts a wider range of possible events. The rationale for such an approach needs to be developed. However, other insights have resulted from the recognition of the ordered, though randomly occurring, nature of the persistent motions in these flows, whose scales range from those of synoptic weather patterns (whether storms or ‘blocked’ anticyclones) to small scale vortices. These eigen states can be predicted

  6. Two improvements to the dynamic wake meandering model: including the effects of atmospheric shear on wake turbulence and incorporating turbulence build-up in a row of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Rolf-Erik; de Mare, Martin Tobias; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    the model to simulate the build-up of turbulence over a row of turbines in a physically consistent manner. The performance of the modified model is validated against actuator line (AL) model results and field data from the Lillgrund offshore wind farm. Qualitatively, the modified DWM model is in fair......%, respectively, by including the proposed corrections for a row of eight turbines. Furthermore, it is found that the root-mean-square difference between the AL model and the modified DWM model in terms of wind speed and turbulence intensity does not increase over a row of turbines compared with the root...

  7. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  8. An integrated, multi-sensing approach to describe the dynamic relations between turbulence, fluid-forces, and reconfiguration of a submerged plant model in steady flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves; Aberle, Jochen; Dijkstra, Jasper; Myrhaug, Dag

    2016-04-01

    -force. Point measurements of turbulence were realized by two ADVs which were located upstream and downstream of the surrogate. Detailed motions of the surrogate were recorded by two cameras above and next to the flume. Image processing allowed for the characterization of the mean deformation and the different modes of horizontal and vertical 'vibration' of the surrogate. The experimental results were compared to numerical simulations obtained from an updated version of the Dynveg code developed by Deltares. The results showed a clear correlation between the cylinder's movements and the (drag) force fluctuations. Due to the swaying motion of the surrogate, the turbulence spectrum is significantly affected when the flow passes the plant model. The succession of several motion modes are observed as the velocity increases, affecting the dominant frequencies in the drag force spectrum and the overall drag. These preliminary results emphasise the importance of the dynamics of the plant flow interactions, and provide an example of the use of new methodologies to provide deeper insights into the physics of complex flows.

  9. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  10. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  11. Estimation of Wind Turbulence Using Spectral Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The production and loading of wind farms are significantly influenced by the turbulence of the flowing wind field. Estimation of turbulence allows us to optimize the performance of the wind farm. Turbulence estimation is; however, highly challenging due to the chaotic behavior of the wind....... In this paper, a method is presented for estimation of the turbulence. The spectral model of the wind is used in order to provide the estimations. The suggested estimation approach is applied to a case study in which the objective is to estimate wind turbulence at desired points using the measurements of wind...... speed outside the wind field. The results show that the method is able to provide estimations which explain more than 50% of the wind turbulence from the distance of about 300 meters....

  12. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  13. Turbulence, superrotation, and general circulation models of the atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izakov, M. N.

    2016-09-01

    The data obtained in space-borne measurements and the findings of turbulence theory show that turbulence, of both small and large scales, has a decisive influence on the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere of Venus. The small-scale turbulence generates anomalous convection, while large-scale turbulence induces the return spectral flux of energy that is the main element of the superrotation mechanism in the atmosphere. Ways for improving the general circulation model of the atmosphere of Venus are proposed.

  14. Modelling and prediction of non-stationary optical turbulence behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelman, Niek; Osborn, James

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong need to model the temporal fluctuations in turbulence parameters, for instance for scheduling, simulation and prediction purposes. This paper aims at modelling the dynamic behaviour of the turbulence coherence length r0, utilising measurement data from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument installed at the Isaac Newton Telescope at La Palma. Based on an estimate of the power spectral density function, a low order stochastic model to capture the temporal variability of r0 is proposed. The impact of this type of stochastic model on the prediction of the coherence length behaviour is shown.

  15. Helicity statistics in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and turbulence models

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Ganapati; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of helicity in direct numerical simulations of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and in a class of turbulence shell models. We consider correlation functions based on combinations of vorticity and velocity increments that are not invariant under mirror symmetry. We also study the scaling properties of high-order structure functions based on the moments of the velocity increments projected on a subset of modes with either positive or negative helicity (chirality). We show that mirror symmetry is recovered at small-scales, i.e. chiral terms are always subleading and they are well captured by a dimensional argument plus a small anomalous correction. We confirm these findings with numerical study of helical shell models at high Reynolds numbers.

  16. Helicity statistics in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Ganapati; De Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca

    2017-02-01

    We study the statistical properties of helicity in direct numerical simulations of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and in a class of turbulence shell models. We consider correlation functions based on combinations of vorticity and velocity increments that are not invariant under mirror symmetry. We also study the scaling properties of high-order structure functions based on the moments of the velocity increments projected on a subset of modes with either positive or negative helicity (chirality). We show that mirror symmetry is recovered at small scales, i.e., chiral terms are subleading and they are well captured by a dimensional argument plus anomalous corrections. These findings are also supported by a high Reynolds numbers study of helical shell models with the same chiral symmetry of Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Spectral large-eddy simulations and vortex dynamics in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lesieur, M

    1999-01-01

    We present a point of view of large-eddy simulations (LES) in Fourier space, where the eddy coefficients are expressed thanks to a two- point spectral closure of isotropic turbulence, the EDQNM theory. Returning to real space, this leads to models of the structure- function family (plain, selective or filtered). These models are applied with success to predict the statistical distributions and coherent-vortex dynamics for a wide variety of turbulent flows. In three-dimensional decaying isotropic turbulence, we confirm the existence of a k/sup 4/ infrared backscatter in the kinetic-energy spectrum, and predict a new k/sup 2/ law for the pressure spectrum in this range. In the mixing layer (temporal or spatial), we show how to manipulate the topology of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices, from quasi two- dimensionality to helical pairing. The latter vortex organization is found in a backward-facing step just behind the step, and yields big staggered Lambda -vortices which are carried away downstream. In a developed turb...

  18. On Lean Turbulent Combustion Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin LEVENTIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a lean methane-air flame with different chemical reaction mechanisms, for laminar and turbulent combustion, approached as one and bi-dimensional problem. The numerical results obtained with Cantera and Ansys Fluent software are compared with experimental data obtained at CORIA Institute, France. First, for laminar combustion, the burn temperature is very well approximated for all chemical mechanisms, however major differences appear in the evaluation of the flame front thickness. Next, the analysis of turbulence-combustion interaction shows that the numerical predictions are suficiently accurate for small and moderate turbulence intensity.

  19. PARAMETER ESTIMATION OF ENGINEERING TURBULENCE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱炜祺; 蔡金狮

    2001-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is introduced and used to determine the parameters in the standard k-ε two equation turbulence model (SKE). It can be found from the estimation results that although the parameter estimation method is an effective method to determine model parameters, it is difficult to obtain a set of parameters for SKE to suit all kinds of separated flow and a modification of the turbulence model structure should be considered. So, a new nonlinear k-ε two-equation model (NNKE) is put forward in this paper and the corresponding parameter estimation technique is applied to determine the model parameters. By implementing the NNKE to solve some engineering turbulent flows, it is shown that NNKE is more accurate and versatile than SKE. Thus, the success of NNKE implies that the parameter estimation technique may have a bright prospect in engineering turbulence model research.

  20. Sources and dynamics of turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, R. D.; Trier, S. B.; Lane, T. P.; Doyle, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    Turbulence is a well-known hazard to aviation that is responsible for numerous injuries each year, with occasional fatalities, and is the underlying cause of many people's fear of air travel. Not only are turbulence encounters a safety issue, they also result in millions of dollars of operational costs to airlines, leading to increased costs passed on to the consumer. For these reasons, pilots, dispatchers, and air traffic controllers attempt to avoid turbulence wherever possible. Accurate forecasting of aviation-scale turbulence has been hampered in part by a lack of understanding of the underlying dynamical processes. However, more precise observations of turbulence encounters together with recent research into turbulence generation processes is helping to elucidate the detailed dynamical processes involved and is laying the foundation for improved turbulence forecasting and avoidance. In this paper we briefly review some of the more important recent observational, theoretical, and modeling results related to turbulence at cruise altitudes for commercial aircraft (i.e., the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere), and their implications for aviation turbulence forecasting.

  1. Hierarchic Models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Kaivarainen, A

    2000-01-01

    New models of Turbulence, Superfluidity and Superconductivity, based on new Hierarchic theory, general for liquids and solids (physics/0102086), have been proposed. CONTENTS: 1 Turbulence. General description; 2 Mesoscopic mechanism of turbulence; 3 Superfluidity. General description; 4 Mesoscopic scenario of fluidity; 5 Superfluidity as a hierarchic self-organization process; 6 Superfluidity in 3He; 7 Superconductivity: General properties of metals and semiconductors; Plasma oscillations; Cyclotron resonance; Electroconductivity; 8. Microscopic theory of superconductivity (BCS); 9. Mesoscopic scenario of superconductivity: Interpretation of experimental data in the framework of mesoscopic model of superconductivity.

  2. Three dimensional dynamic mode decomposition of premixed turbulent jet flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenga, Temistocle; Macart, Jonathan; Mueller, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of turbulent combustion DNS data largely focuses on statistical analyses. However, turbulent combustion is highly unsteady and dynamic. In this work, Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) will be explored as a tool for dynamic analysis of turbulent combustion DNS data, specifically a series of low Mach number spatially-evolving turbulent planar premixed hydrogen/air jet flames. DMD decomposes data into coherent modes with corresponding growth rates and oscillatory frequencies. The method identifies structures unbiased by energy so is particularly well suited to exploring dynamic processes at scales smaller than the largest, energy-containing scales of the flow and that may not be co-located in space and time. The focus of this work will be on both the physical insights that can potentially be derived from DMD modes and the computational issues associated with applying DMD to large three-dimensional DNS datasets.

  3. Dust dynamics in 2D gravito-turbulent disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Stone, James M; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of solid bodies in protoplanetary disks are subject to the properties of any underlying gas turbulence. Turbulence driven by disk self-gravity shows features distinct from those driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the dynamics of solids in gravito-turbulent disks with two-dimensional (in the disk plane), hybrid (particle and gas) simulations. Gravito-turbulent disks can exhibit stronger gravitational stirring than MRI-active disks, resulting in greater radial diffusion and larger eccentricities and relative speeds for large particles (those with dimensionless stopping times $t_{stop} \\Omega > 1$, where $\\Omega$ is the orbital frequency). The agglomeration of large particles into planetesimals by pairwise collisions is therefore disfavored in gravito-turbulent disks. However, the relative speeds of intermediate-size particles $t_{stop} \\Omega \\sim 1$ are significantly reduced as such particles are collected by gas drag and gas gravity into coherent filament-like structures ...

  4. A minimal model of self-sustaining turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Farrell, Brian F. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Ioannou, Petros J. [Department of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    In this work, we examine the turbulence maintained in a Restricted Nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. This model is a computationally efficient approximation of the second order statistical state dynamics obtained by partitioning the flow into a streamwise averaged mean flow and perturbations about that mean, a closure referred to herein as the RNL{sub ∞} model. The RNL model investigated here employs a single member of the infinite ensemble that comprises the covariance of the RNL{sub ∞} dynamics. The RNL system has previously been shown to support self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow and structural features that are consistent with direct numerical simulations (DNS). Regardless of the number of streamwise Fourier components used in the simulation, the RNL system’s self-sustaining turbulent state is supported by a small number of streamwise varying modes. Remarkably, further truncation of the RNL system’s support to as few as one streamwise varying mode can suffice to sustain the turbulent state. The close correspondence between RNL simulations and DNS that has been previously demonstrated along with the results presented here suggest that the fundamental mechanisms underlying wall-turbulence can be analyzed using these highly simplified RNL systems.

  5. Modelling turbulence in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Wieslaw

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is complex behaviour that is ubiquitous both in laboratory and astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Notwithstanding the progress in simulation of turbulence in various continuous media, its mechanism is still not sufficiently clear. Therefore, following the basic idea of Kolmogorov, some phenomenological models of scaling behaviour have been proposed, including fractal and multifractal modelling, that can reveal the intermittent character of turbulence. Based on wealth of data provided by deep spacecraft missions including Voyager 1 and 2, these models show that the turbulence in the entire heliosphere is intermittent and multifractal. Moreover, the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is modulated by the phases of the solar cycles, also beyond the heliospheric termination shock, i. e. in the heliosheath. However, in the very local interstellar medium beyond the heliopause turbulence becomes rather weak and less intermittent, as shown by recent measurements from Voyager 1. This suggests that the heliosphere is immersed in a relatively quiet environment. Hence these studies of turbulence, especially at the heliospheric boundaries, demonstrate that the outer heliosphere provides an interesting possibility to look into turbulence in various media.

  6. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  7. Dynamical-systems approach to localised turbulence in pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Paul; Avila, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent-laminar patterns are ubiquitous near transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Despite recent progress in describing their dynamics in analogy to nonequilibrium phase transitions, there is no theory explaining their emergence. Dynamical-system approaches suggest that invariant solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations, such as traveling waves and relative periodic orbits in pipe flow, act as building blocks of the disordered dynamics. While recent studies have shown how transient chaos arises from such solutions, the ensuing dynamics lacks the strong fluctuations in size, shape and speed of the turbulent spots observed in experiments. We here show that chaotic spots with distinct dynamical and kinematic properties merge in phase space and give rise to the enhanced spatiotemporal patterns observed in pipe flow. This paves the way for a dynamical-system foundation to the phenomenogloy of turbulent-laminar patterns in wall-bounded extended shear flows.

  8. Dynamics of dissolved polymer chains in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shi; Collins, Lance R.

    2007-10-01

    Polymers are remarkable molecules that have relaxation times that can span 15 orders of magnitude. The very longest of the relaxation times for high molecular weight polymers are sufficiently long to overlap with fluid mechanical times scales; under those circumstances, polymers can influence the flow. A well-known example that is still not fully understood is polymer drag reduction. It has been known since Toms (1949 Proc. 1st Int. Congress on Rheology 2 135-41) that parts per million (mass basis) concentrations of polymers can reduce the drag on a solid surface by as much as 80%. Understanding the mechanism of drag reduction requires an understanding of the dynamics of the dissolved polymer chain in response to local fluctuations in the turbulent flow field. We investigate this by using Brownian dynamics simulations of bead-spring models of polymers immersed in a turbulent solvent that is separately computed using direct numerical simulations. We observe that polymer chains with parameters that are effective for drag reduction generally remain stretched for long periods of time and only occasionally relax. The relatively restricted configuration space they sample makes it reasonable to represent their behavior with simpler dumbbell models. We also study the spatial structure of the polymer stresses using a Lagrangian strategy. The results explain the need for relatively high spatial resolution for numerical simulations of polymer flows.

  9. Analysis Regarding the Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Aircraft Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela STROE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will analyze the Gust Load Alleviation (GLA systems which can be used to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulences generated by wind gusts on vertical acceleration of aircraft. Their purpose is to reduce airframe loads and to improve passenger comfort. The dynamic model of the aircraft is more realistic than a rigid-body model, since it includes the structural flexibility; due to its complexity, such model can make feedback control design for gust load alleviation more challenging. The gust is generated with the Dryden power spectral density model. This kind of model lends itself well to frequency-domain performance specifications in the form of the weighting functions. Two classical analytical representations for the power spectral density (PSD function of atmospheric turbulence as given by Von Kármán and Dryden, were used. The analysis is performed for a set of specified values for flight velocity and altitude (as test cases, with different gust signals that must be generated with the required intensity, scale lengths and PSD functions.

  10. Regularization of turbulence - a comprehensive modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Turbulence readily arises in numerous flows in nature and technology. The large number of degrees of freedom of turbulence poses serious challenges to numerical approaches aimed at simulating and controlling such flows. While the Navier-Stokes equations are commonly accepted to precisely describe fluid turbulence, alternative coarsened descriptions need to be developed to cope with the wide range of length and time scales. These coarsened descriptions are known as large-eddy simulations in which one aims to capture only the primary features of a flow, at considerably reduced computational effort. Such coarsening introduces a closure problem that requires additional phenomenological modeling. A systematic approach to the closure problem, know as regularization modeling, will be reviewed. Its application to multiphase turbulent will be illustrated in which a basic regularization principle is enforced to physically consistently approximate momentum and scalar transport. Examples of Leray and LANS-alpha regularization are discussed in some detail, as are compatible numerical strategies. We illustrate regularization modeling to turbulence under the influence of rotation and buoyancy and investigate the accuracy with which particle-laden flow can be represented. A discussion of the numerical and modeling errors incurred will be given on the basis of homogeneous isotropic turbulence.

  11. On the dynamics of turbulent transport near marginal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, P.H. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Hahm, T.S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1995-03-01

    A general methodology for describing the dynamics of transport near marginal stability is formulated. Marginal stability is a special case of the more general phenomenon of self-organized criticality. Simple, one field models of the dynamics of tokamak plasma self-organized criticality have been constructed, and include relevant features such as sheared mean flow and transport bifurcations. In such models, slow mode (i.e. large scale, low frequency transport events) correlation times determine the behavior of transport dynamics near marginal stability. To illustrate this, impulse response scaling exponents (z) and turbulent diffusivities (D) have been calculated for the minimal (Burgers) and sheared flow models. For the minimal model, z = 1 (indicating ballastic propagation) and D {approximately}(S{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}, where S{sub 0}{sup 2} is the noise strength. With an identically structured noise spectrum and flow with shearing rate exceeding the ambient decorrelation rate for the largest scale transport events, diffusion is recovered with z = 2 and D {approximately} (S{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 3/5}. This indicates a qualitative change in the dynamics, as well as a reduction in losses. These results are consistent with recent findings from {rho} scaling scans. Several tokamak transport experiments are suggested.

  12. Role of magnetic shear in dynamics of large-scale structures in electron temperature gradient turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiquan; Kishimoto, Y.; Miyato, N.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate how the magnetic shear governs the dynamics of large-scale structures, such as zonal flows and streamers, in electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence. Based on the well-known 2D Hasegawa-Mima turbulence modeling, which is the inviscid version of fluid (or gyrofluid) ETG turbulence [1], we derive a general dispersion relation of secondary fluctuations through modulation instability analysis. The results show that the formation of different large-scale structures including zonal flow, streamer and so-called generalized Kelvin-Helmholtz (GKH) mode in ETG turbulence depends on the spectral anisotropy of turbulent fluctuation. In a slab geometry, the magnetic shear closely relates to the ETG mode structures so that it may determine the pattern selection in the quasi-steady ETG turbulence. 3D gyrofluid slab ETG simulations show that turbulent ETG fluctuation energy condenses to the zonal flows in the weak shear plasmas and to the streamer component for the high shears. 2D ETG simulations with rather high resolution not only exhibits the global spectral distribution of zonal flows, but also further confirm a mechanism: enhanced zonal flow in weak shear ETG turbulence is limited by exciting a KH mode [1]. Furthermore, in toroidal ETG simulations, streamer structures are observed at around good curvature region along the flux tube in the quasisteady state in some medium shear regime. Related streamer dynamics are also investigated. [1] Jiquan Li and Y. Kishimoto, Phys. Plasmas 11, 1493(2004)

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Molten Steel Flow Patterns and Particle-Wall Interactions Inside a Slide-Gate Nozzle by a Hybrid Turbulent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-10-01

    Melt flow patterns and turbulence inside a slide-gate throttled submerged entry nozzle (SEN) were studied using Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) model, which is a combination of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The DES switching criterion between RANS and LES was investigated to closely reproduce the flow structures of low and high turbulence regions similar to RANS and LES simulations, respectively. The melt flow patterns inside the nozzle were determined by k- ɛ (a RANS model), LES, and DES turbulent models, and convergence studies were performed to ensure reliability of the results. Results showed that the DES model has significant advantages over the standard k- ɛ model in transient simulations and in regions containing flow separation from the nozzle surface. Moreover, due to applying a hybrid approach, DES uses a RANS model at wall boundaries which resolves the extremely fine mesh requirement of LES simulations, and therefore it is computationally more efficient. Investigation of particle distribution inside the nozzle and particle adhesion to the nozzle wall also reveals that the DES model simulations predict more particle-wall interactions compared to LES model.

  14. Aerodynamic Noise Prediction Using stochastic Turbulence Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Ahmadzadegan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amongst many approaches to determine the sound propagated from turbulent flows, hybrid methods, in which the turbulent noise source field is computed or modeled separately from the far field calculation, are frequently used. For basic estimation of sound propagation, less computationally intensive methods can be developed using stochastic models of the turbulent fluctuations (turbulent noise source field. A simple and easy to use stochastic model for generating turbulent velocity fluctuations called continuous filter white noise (CFWN model was used. This method based on the use of classical Langevian-equation to model the details of fluctuating field superimposed on averaged computed quantities. The resulting sound field due to the generated unsteady flow field was evaluated using Lighthill's acoustic analogy. Volume integral method used for evaluating the acoustic analogy. This formulation presents an advantage, as it confers the possibility to determine separately the contribution of the different integral terms and also integration regions to the radiated acoustic pressure. Our results validated by comparing the directivity and the overall sound pressure level (OSPL magnitudes with the available experimental results. Numerical results showed reasonable agreement with the experiments, both in maximum directivity and magnitude of the OSPL. This method presents a very suitable tool for the noise calculation of different engineering problems in early stages of the design process where rough estimates using cheaper methods are needed for different geometries.

  15. Steady states in Leith's model of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenev, V. N.; Griffin, A.; Medvedev, S. B.; Nazarenko, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a comprehensive study and full classification of the stationary solutions in Leith’s model of turbulence with a generalised viscosity. Three typical types of boundary value problems are considered: Problems 1 and 2 with a finite positive value of the spectrum at the left (right) and zero at the right (left) boundaries of a wave number range, and Problem 3 with finite positive values of the spectrum at both boundaries. Settings of these problems and analysis of existence of their solutions are based on a phase-space analysis of orbits of the underlying dynamical system. One of the two fixed points of the underlying dynamical system is found to correspond to a ‘sharp front’ where the energy flux and the spectrum vanish at the same wave number. The other fixed point corresponds to the only exact power-law solution—the so-called dissipative scaling solution. The roles of the Kolmogorov, dissipative and thermodynamic scaling, as well as of sharp front solutions, are discussed.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands imbedded in small-scale turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraglia, M; Agullo, O; Benkadda, S; Garbet, X; Beyer, P; Sen, A

    2009-10-02

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic tearing islands imbedded in a pressure gradient driven turbulence is investigated numerically in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. The study reveals regimes where the linear and nonlinear phases of the tearing instability are controlled by the properties of the pressure gradient. In these regimes, the interplay between the pressure and the magnetic flux determines the dynamics of the saturated state. A secondary instability can occur and strongly modify the magnetic island dynamics by triggering a poloidal rotation. It is shown that the complex nonlinear interaction between the islands and turbulence is nonlocal and involves small scales.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics of Magnetic Islands Imbedded in Small-Scale Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Muraglia, Magali; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Garbet, Xavier; Beyer, P; Sen, Abhijit; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.145001

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of magnetic tearing islands imbedded in a pressure gradient driven turbulence is investigated numerically in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. The study reveals regimes where the linear and nonlinear phases of the tearing instability are controlled by the properties of the pressure gradient. In these regimes, the interplay between the pressure and the magnetic flux determines the dynamics of the saturated state. A secondary instability can occur and strongly modify the magnetic island dynamics by triggering a poloidal rotation. It is shown that the complex nonlinear interaction between the islands and turbulence is nonlocal and involves small scales.

  18. An Oriented-Eddy Collision Model for Turbulence Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    kinetic energy, K, and dissipation rate, E). There is also a hypothesized algebraic constitutive equation relating these two scalar quantities and the...elliptic relaxation ( Durbin ) have even expanded the predictive scope of these models. Nevertheless, it is well understood at this time, even by CFD users...Publisher, 1993 P.A. Durbin , Near-wall turbulence closure modeling without ’damping functions’, Theoret. Comput. Fluid Dynamics 3, 1-13, 1991. W. C

  19. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Bingöl, Ferhat;

    , are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed......We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however......, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...

  20. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 4 Turbulence, Gas Adsorption and Release, Diesel Fuel Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    The present Volume 4 of the successful monograh package “Multiphase Flow Dynamics”is devoted to selected Chapters of the multiphase fluid dynamics that are important for practical applications but did not find place in the previous volumes. The state of the art of the turbulence modeling in multiphase flows is presented. As introduction, some basics of the single phase boundary layer theory including some important scales and flow oscillation characteristics in pipes and rod bundles are presented. Then the scales characterizing the dispersed flow systems are presented. The description of the turbulence is provided at different level of complexity: simple algebraic models for eddy viscosity, simple algebraic models based on the Boussinesq hypothesis, modification of the boundary layer share due to modification of the bulk turbulence, modification of the boundary layer share due to nucleate boiling. The role of the following forces on the mathematical description of turbulent flows is discussed: the lift fo...

  1. A k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence closure model of an isothermal dry granular dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Chung

    2016-07-01

    The turbulent flow characteristics of an isothermal dry granular dense matter with incompressible grains are investigated by the proposed first-order k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence closure model. Reynolds-filter process is applied to obtain the balance equations of the mean fields with two kinematic equations describing the time evolutions of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are used to derive the equilibrium closure relations satisfying turbulence realizability conditions, with the dynamic responses postulated by a quasi-linear theory. The established closure model is applied to analyses of a gravity-driven stationary flow down an inclined moving plane. While the mean velocity decreases monotonically from its value on the moving plane toward the free surface, the mean porosity increases exponentially; the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation evolve, respectively, from their minimum and maximum values on the plane toward their maximum and minimum values on the free surface. The evaluated mean velocity and porosity correspond to the experimental outcomes, while the turbulent dissipation distribution demonstrates a similarity to that of Newtonian fluids in turbulent shear flows. When compared to the zero-order model, the turbulent eddy evolution tends to enhance the transfer of the turbulent kinetic energy and plane shearing across the flow layer, resulting in more intensive turbulent fluctuation in the upper part of the flow. Solid boundary as energy source and sink of the turbulent kinetic energy becomes more apparent in the established first-order model.

  2. Lagrangian frequency spectrum as a diagnostic for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Angela; Müller, Wolf-Christian; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2010-12-01

    For the phenomenological description of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence competing models exist, e.g., Boldyrev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 115002 (2006)] and Gogoberidze [Phys. Plasmas 14, 022304 (2007)], which predict the same Eulerian inertial-range scaling of the turbulent energy spectrum although they employ fundamentally different basic interaction mechanisms. A relation is found that links the Lagrangian frequency spectrum with the autocorrelation time scale of the turbulent fluctuations τ(ac) and the associated cascade time scale τ(cas). Thus, the Lagrangian energy spectrum can serve to identify weak (τ(ac) ≪ τ(cas)) and strong (τ(ac) ∼ τ(cas)) interaction mechanisms providing insight into the turbulent energy cascade. The new approach is illustrated by results from direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional incompressible MHD turbulence.

  3. Numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Zhenghua

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical models have been developed to address several important aspects of numerical modeling of turbulent combustion and flame spread. The developed models include a pyrolysis model for charring and non-charring solid materials, a fast narrow band radiation property evaluation model (FASTNB) and a turbulence model for buoyant flow and flame. In the pyrolysis model, a completely new algorithm has been proposed, where a moving dual mesh concept was developed and implemented. With this new concept, it provides proper spatial resolution for both temperature and density and automatically considers the regression of the surface of the non-charring solid material during its pyrolysis. It is simple, very efficient and applicable to both charring and non-charring materials. FASTNB speeds up significantly the evaluation of narrow band spectral radiation properties and thus provides a potential of applying narrow band model in numerical simulations of practical turbulent combustion. The turbulence model was developed to improve the consideration of buoyancy effect on turbulence and turbulent transport. It was found to be simple, promising and numerically stable. It has been tested against both plane and axisymmetric thermal plumes and an axisymmetric buoyant diffusion flame. When compared with the widely used standard buoyancy-modified {kappa} - {epsilon} model, it gives significant improvement on numerical results. These developed models have been fully incorporated into CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code and coupled with other CFD sub-models, including the DT (Discrete Transfer) radiation model, EDC (Eddy Dissipation Concept) combustion model, flamelet combustion model, various soot models and transpired wall function. Comprehensive numerical simulations have been carried out to study soot formation and oxidation in turbulent buoyant diffusion flames, flame heat transfer and flame spread in fires. The gas temperature and velocity, soot volume fraction, wall

  4. A simple model for turbulence intermittencies

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbert, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Whether turbulence intermittencies shall be described by a log-Poisson, a log-stable pdf or other distributions is still debated nowadays. In this paper, a bridge between polymer physics, self-avoiding walk and random vortex stretching is established which may help in getting a new insight on this topics. Actually a very simple relationship between stability index of the stable law and the well known Flory exponent stemming from polymer physics is established. Moreover the scaling of turbulence intermittencies with Reynolds number is also obtained and the overall picture is very close to Tennekes' simple model for the fine scale structure of turbulence [Phys. Fluids, 11, 3 (1968)] : vortex tubes of Kolmogorov length width are bend by bigger vortices of Taylor length scale. This thus results in both a simple and sound model with no fitting parameter needed.

  5. Numerical study of two equation turbulence models for subchannel thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazififard, Mohammad; Suha, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The need for more accurate computational methods for the analysis of nuclear reactor systems has generated rising interests for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and growing range of applications of commercial CFD software. This study presents results of the sensitivity analysis using the two equation turbulence models for several grid configurations. The Turbulence Enhanced Mixing Analysis (TEMA) result contributes further to turbulent convective heat transfer mechanisms in a subchannel of a square array rod bundle.

  6. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Bingoel, F. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture a stochastic model of the downstream wake meandering is formulated. In addition to the kinematic formulation of the dynamics of the 'meandering frame of reference', models characterizing the mean wake deficit as well as the added wake turbulence, described in the meandering frame of reference, are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed and trailed vorticity, has been approached by analytical as well as by numerical studies. The dynamic wake meandering philosophy has been verified by comparing model predictions with extensive full-scale measurements. These comparisons have demonstrated good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as

  7. Alpha models and boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. From this equation we obtain a theoretical prediction of the skin-friction coefficient in a wide range of Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, and deduce the maximal value of the skin-friction coefficient in the turbulent boundary layer. The two-parameter family of solutions to the equation matches experimental data in the transitional boundary layers with different free stream turbulence intensity. A one-parameter sub-family of solutions, obtained using our skin-friction coefficient law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  8. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B. F.; Gayme, D. F.; Ioannou, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or `band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.

  9. TWO MODIFICATORY K-ε TURBULENCE MODELS FOR TURBULENT SWIRLING FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ze; Liu Wei-ming

    2003-01-01

    Since the standard K-ε model used to predict the strongly swirling flow leads to a large deviation from experimental results, it is necessary to introduce modification to the standard K-ε model. Based on the algebraic Reynolds stress model and Bradshaw's turbulent length scale modification conception, we present two modified K-ε models. To investigate the behaviour of the modified turbulence models, they are used to predict two representative turbulent swirling flows. The computational results, after compared with the experimental data, show that the modified K-ε models substantially improve the prediction of the standard K-ε model for the turbulent swirling flows.

  10. Blending Modified Gaussian Closure and Non-Gaussian Reduced Subspace Methods for Turbulent Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sapsis, Themistoklis Panagiotis; Majda, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent dynamical systems are characterized by persistent instabilities which are balanced by nonlinear dynamics that continuously transfer energy to the stable modes. To model this complex statistical equilibrium in the context of uncertainty quantification all dynamical components (unstable modes, nonlinear energy transfers, and stable modes) are equally crucial. Thus, order-reduction methods present important limitations. On the other hand uncertainty quantification methods based on the ...

  11. Nonlinear turbulence models for predicting strong curvature effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jing-lei; MA Hui-yang; HUANG Yu-ning

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of the characteristics of turbulent flows with strong streamline curvature, such as flows in turbomachines, curved channel flows, flows around airfoils and buildings, is of great importance in engineering applicatious and poses a very practical challenge for turbulence modeling. In this paper, we analyze qualitatively the curvature effects on the structure of turbulence and conduct numerical simulations of a turbulent U- duct flow with a number of turbulence models in order to assess their overall performance. The models evaluated in this work are some typical linear eddy viscosity turbulence models, nonlinear eddy viscosity turbulence models (NLEVM) (quadratic and cubic), a quadratic explicit algebraic stress model (EASM) and a Reynolds stress model (RSM) developed based on the second-moment closure. Our numerical results show that a cubic NLEVM that performs considerably well in other benchmark turbulent flows, such as the Craft, Launder and Suga model and the Huang and Ma model, is able to capture the major features of the highly curved turbulent U-duct flow, including the damping of turbulence near the convex wall, the enhancement of turbulence near the concave wall, and the subsequent turbulent flow separation. The predictions of the cubic models are quite close to that of the RSM, in relatively good agreement with the experimental data, which suggests that these inodels may be employed to simulate the turbulent curved flows in engineering applications.

  12. Ensemble Kalman filters for dynamical systems with unresolved turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grooms, Ian, E-mail: grooms@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Lee, Yoonsang [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Majda, Andrew J. [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Prototype Climate Modelling, NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-09-15

    Ensemble Kalman filters are developed for turbulent dynamical systems where the forecast model does not resolve all the active scales of motion. Coarse-resolution models are intended to predict the large-scale part of the true dynamics, but observations invariably include contributions from both the resolved large scales and the unresolved small scales. The error due to the contribution of unresolved scales to the observations, called ‘representation’ or ‘representativeness’ error, is often included as part of the observation error, in addition to the raw measurement error, when estimating the large-scale part of the system. It is here shown how stochastic superparameterization (a multiscale method for subgridscale parameterization) can be used to provide estimates of the statistics of the unresolved scales. In addition, a new framework is developed wherein small-scale statistics can be used to estimate both the resolved and unresolved components of the solution. The one-dimensional test problem from dispersive wave turbulence used here is computationally tractable yet is particularly difficult for filtering because of the non-Gaussian extreme event statistics and substantial small scale turbulence: a shallow energy spectrum proportional to k{sup −5/6} (where k is the wavenumber) results in two-thirds of the climatological variance being carried by the unresolved small scales. Because the unresolved scales contain so much energy, filters that ignore the representation error fail utterly to provide meaningful estimates of the system state. Inclusion of a time-independent climatological estimate of the representation error in a standard framework leads to inaccurate estimates of the large-scale part of the signal; accurate estimates of the large scales are only achieved by using stochastic superparameterization to provide evolving, large-scale dependent predictions of the small-scale statistics. Again, because the unresolved scales contain so much energy

  13. Restricted Euler dynamics along trajectories of small inertial particles in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-04-01

    The fate of small particles in turbulent flows depends strongly on the surrounding fluid's velocity gradient properties such as rotation and strain-rates. For non-inertial (fluid) particles, the Restricted Euler model provides a simple, low-dimensional dynamical system representation of Lagrangian evolution of velocity gradients in fluid turbulence, at least for short times. Here we derive a new restricted Euler dynamical system for the velocity gradient evolution of inertial particles such as solid particles in a gas or droplets and bubbles in turbulent liquid flows. The model is derived in the limit of small (sub Kolmogorov scale) particles and low Stokes number. The system exhibits interesting fixed points, stability and invariant properties. Comparisons with data from Direct Numerical Simulations show that the model predicts realistic trends such as the tendency of increased straining over rotation along heavy particle trajectories and, for light particles such as bubbles, the tendency of reduced self-stretching of strain-rate.

  14. Restricted Euler dynamics along trajectories of small inertial particles in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Perry L

    2016-01-01

    The fate of small particles in turbulent flows depends strongly on the surrounding fluid's velocity gradient properties such as rotation and strain-rates. For non-inertial (fluid) particles, the Restricted Euler model provides a simple, low-dimensional dynamical system representation of Lagrangian evolution of velocity gradients in fluid turbulence, at least for short times. Here we derive a new restricted Euler dynamical system for the velocity gradient evolution of inertial particles such as solid particles in a gas or droplets and bubbles in turbulent liquid flows. The model is derived in the limit of small (sub Kolmogorov scale) particles and low Stokes number. The system exhibits interesting fixed points, stability and invariant properties. Comparisons with data from Direct Numerical Simulations show that the model predicts realistic trends such as the tendency of increased straining over rotation along heavy particle trajectories and, for light particles such as bubbles, the tendency of reduced self-str...

  15. The Use of DNS in Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nagi N.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The use of Direct numerical simulations (DNS) data in developing and testing turbulence models is reviewed. The data is used to test turbulence models at all levels: algebraic, one-equation, two-equation and full Reynolds stress models were tested. Particular examples on the development of models for the dissipation rate equation are presented. Homogeneous flows are used to test new scaling arguments for the various terms in the dissipation rate equation. The channel flow data is used to develop modifications to the equation model that take into account near-wall effects. DNS of compressible flows under mean compression are used in testing new compressible modifications to the two-equation models.

  16. Dynamic responses of a wind turbine drivetrain under turbulent wind and voltage disturbance conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwu Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy is known as one of the most efficient clean renewable energy sources and has attracted extensive research interests in both academic and industry fields. In this study, the effects of turbulent wind and voltage disturbance on a wind turbine drivetrain are analyzed, and a wind turbine drivetrain dynamic model combined with the electric model of a doubly fed induction generator is established. The proposed model is able to account for the dynamic interaction between turbulent wind, voltage disturbance, and mechanical system. Also, the effects of time-varying meshing stiffness, transmission error, and bearing stiffness are included in the mechanical part of the coupled dynamic model. From the resultant model, system modes are computed. In addition, by considering the actual control strategies in the simulation process, the effects of turbulent wind and voltage disturbance on the geared rotor system are analyzed. The computational results show that the turbulent wind and voltage disturbance can cause adverse effects on the wind turbine drivetrain, especially the gearbox. A series of parametric studies are also performed to understand the influences of generator and gearbox parameters on the drivetrain system dynamics. Finally, the appropriate generator parameters having a positive effect on the gearbox in alleviating the extreme loads and the modeling approach for investigating the transient performance of generator are discussed.

  17. Statistical state dynamics-based analysis of the physical mechanisms sustaining and regulating turbulence in Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a study of the self-sustaining process in wall turbulence. The study is based on a second order statistical state dynamics model of Couette flow in which the state variables are the streamwise mean flow (first cumulant) and perturbation covariance (second cumulant). This statistical state dynamics model is closed by either setting the third cumulant to zero or by replacing it with a stochastic parametrization. Statistical state dynamics models with this form are referred to as S3T models. S3T models have been shown to self-sustain turbulence with a mean flow and second order perturbation structure similar to that obtained by direct numerical simulation of the equations of motion. The use of a statistical state dynamics model to study the physical mechanisms underlying turbulence has important advantages over the traditional approach of studying the dynamics of individual realizations of turbulence. One advantage is that the analytical structure of S3T statistical state dynamics models isolates the interaction between the mean flow and the perturbation components of the turbulence. Isolation of the interaction between these components reveals how this interaction underlies both the maintenance of the turbulence variance by transfer of energy from the externally driven flow to the perturbation components as well as the enforcement of the observed statistical mean turbulent state by feedback regulation between the mean and perturbation fields. Another advantage of studying turbulence using statistical state dynamics models of S3T form is that the analytical structure of S3T turbulence can be completely characterized. For example, the perturbation component of turbulence in the S3T system is demonstrably maintained by a parametric perturbation growth mechanism in which fluctuation of the mean flow maintains the perturbation field which in turn maintains the mean flow fluctuations in a synergistic interaction. Furthermore, the equilibrium

  18. Multiscale Turbulence Models Based on Convected Fluid Microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2012-01-01

    The Euler-Poincar\\'e approach to complex fluids is used to derive multiscale equations for computationally modelling Euler flows as a basis for modelling turbulence. The model is based on a \\emph{kinematic sweeping ansatz} (KSA) which assumes that the mean fluid flow serves as a Lagrangian frame of motion for the fluctuation dynamics. Thus, we regard the motion of a fluid parcel on the computationally resolvable length scales as a moving Lagrange coordinate for the fluctuating (zero-mean) motion of fluid parcels at the unresolved scales. Even in the simplest 2-scale version on which we concentrate here, the contributions of the fluctuating motion under the KSA to the mean motion yields a system of equations that extends known results and appears to be suitable for modelling nonlinear backscatter (energy transfer from smaller to larger scales) in turbulence using multiscale methods.

  19. Magnetic reversals in a modified shell model for magnetohydrodynamics turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Giuseppina; Carbone, Vincenzo

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the paper is the study of dynamo action using a simple nonlinear model in the framework of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The nonlinear behavior of the system is described by using a shell model for velocity field and magnetic field fluctuations, modified for the magnetic field at the largest scale by a term describing a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Turbulent fluctuations generate a dynamical situation where the large-scale magnetic field jumps between two states which represent the opposite polarities of the magnetic field. Despite its simplicity, the model has the capability to describe a long time series of reversals from which we infer results about the statistics of persistence times and scaling laws of cancellations between opposite polarities for different magnetic diffusivity coefficients. These properties of the model are compared with real paleomagnetic data, thus revealing the origin of long-range correlations in the process.

  20. On the dynamics of homogeneous turbulence near a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Oscar; Riley, James J.

    2011-11-01

    It is becoming increasing clear that stably-stratified flows can support a stratified turbulence k - 5 / 3 inertial range, different from Kolmogorov's. Stratification inhibits vertical motions, but the large-scale quasi-horizontal motions produce strong vertical shearing and small-scale instabilities. The result is a k - 5 / 3 horizontal spectrum for the horizontal velocities at scales larger than the Ozmidov scale, the largest scale that can overturn. For smaller scales, the classical Kolmogorov k - 5 / 3 applies. Inspired by data taken near the water surface in a tidal river, we here explore to what extent the dynamics of the nonlinear spectral energy transfer of near-surface turbulence with no mean shear (i.e., horizontally isotropic turbulence bounded by free-slip and no-slip surfaces) is analogous to stably stratified turbulence. To that end, we perform DNS of decaying isotropic turbulence with Reλ ~ 100 , but bounded by a non-slip surface and a free slip surface. The behavior of the flow near the free-slip surface is similar to stratified turbulence, with a tentative k - 5 / 3 range, but the same is not true for the no-slip surface at the present Reynolds numbers. This research was supported by ARO and NSF. Chickadel et al. (2011) to appear in IEEE Geosci. Remote Sens. Lett.

  1. The dynamics of small inertial particles in weakly stratified turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aartrijk, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    We present an overview of a numerical study on the small-scale dynamics and the large-scale dispersion of small inertial particles in stably stratified turbulence. Three types of particles are examined: fluid particles, light inertial particles (with particle-to-fluid density ratio 1Ͽp/Ͽf25) and

  2. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  3. A Full Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell Study of Turbulent Dynamics and Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Juno, J.; Hakim, A.

    2016-12-01

    The development of a detailed understanding of turbulence in magnetized plasmas has been a long standing goal of the broader scientific community, both as a fundamental physics process and because of its applicability to a wide variety of phenomena. Turbulence in a magnetized plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for transforming energy at large injection scales into small-scale motions, which are ultimately dissipated as heat in systems such as the solar corona and wind. At large scales, the turbulence is well described by fluid models of the plasma; however, understanding the processes responsible for heating a weakly collisional plasma such as the solar wind requires a kinetic description. We present the first fully kinetic Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell study of turbulence using the Gkeyll simulation code. We focus on the pristine distribution function dynamics that are possible with the Eulerian approach. We also present the signatures and form of dissipation as diagnosed via field-particle correlation functions.

  4. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    , that can accurately and efficiently simulate wind turbine wakes. The linear k-ε eddy viscosity model (EVM) is a popular turbulence model in RANS; however, it underpredicts the velocity wake deficit and cannot predict the anisotropic Reynolds-stresses in the wake. In the current work, nonlinear eddy...... viscosity models (NLEVM) are applied to wind turbine wakes. NLEVMs can model anisotropic turbulence through a nonlinear stress-strain relation, and they can improve the velocity deficit by the use of a variable eddy viscosity coefficient, that delays the wake recovery. Unfortunately, all tested NLEVMs show...... numerically unstable behavior for fine grids, which inhibits a grid dependency study for numerical verification. Therefore, a simpler EVM is proposed, labeled as the k-ε - fp EVM, that has a linear stress-strain relation, but still has a variable eddy viscosity coefficient. The k-ε - fp EVM is numerically...

  5. Turbulent Flow and Sand Dune Dynamics: Identifying Controls on Aeolian Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. M.; Wiggs, G.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment transport models are founded on cubic power relationships between the transport rate and time averaged flow parameters. These models have achieved limited success and recent aeolian and fluvial research has focused on the modelling and measurement of sediment transport by temporally varying flow conditions. Studies have recognised turbulence as a driving force in sediment transport and have highlighted the importance of coherent flow structures in sediment transport systems. However, the exact mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, research in the fluvial environment has identified the significance of turbulent structures for bedform morphology and spacing. However, equivalent research in the aeolian domain is absent. This paper reports the findings of research carried out to characterise the importance of turbulent flow parameters in aeolian sediment transport and determine how turbulent energy and turbulent structures change in response to dune morphology. The relative importance of mean and turbulent wind parameters on aeolian sediment flux was examined in the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Measurements of wind velocity (using sonic anemometers) and sand transport (using grain impact sensors) at a sampling frequency of 10 Hz were made across a flat surface and along transects on a 9 m high barchan dune. Mean wind parameters and mass sand flux were measured using cup anemometers and wedge-shaped sand traps respectively. Vertical profile data from the sonic anemometers were used to compute turbulence and turbulent stress (Reynolds stress; instantaneous horizontal and vertical fluctuations; coherent flow structures) and their relationship with respect to sand transport and evolving dune morphology. On the flat surface time-averaged parameters generally fail to characterise sand transport dynamics, particularly as the averaging interval is reduced. However, horizontal wind speed correlates well with sand transport even with short averaging times. Quadrant

  6. A stochastic differential equation framework for the timewise dynamics of turbulent velocities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    We discuss a stochastic differential equation as a modeling framework for the timewise dynamics of turbulent velocities. The equation is capable of capturing basic stylized facts of the statistics of temporal velocity increments. In particular, we focus on the evolution of the probability density...

  7. Angular dynamics of a small particle in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Candelier, F; Mehlig, B

    2016-01-01

    We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching, and can be substantial in turbulence where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.

  8. Dynamics of finite size neutrally buoyant particles in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhimer, M; Jean, A; Praud, O; Bazile, R; Marchal, M; Couteau, G, E-mail: elhimer@imft.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles suspended in a turbulent flow is investigated experimentally, with particles having diameters larger than the Kolmogorov length scale. To that purpose, a turbulence generator have been constructed and the resulting flow characterized. The fluid was then seeded with polystyrene particles of diameter about 1 mm and their velocity measured separately and simultaneously with the surrounding fluid. Comparison of the velocities statistics between the two phases shows no appreciable discrepancy. However, simultaneous velocity measurement shows that particles may move in different direction from the underlying flow.

  9. Initial Conditions and Modeling for Shock Driven Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    We focus on the simulation of shock-driven material mixing driven by flow instabilities and initial conditions. Beyond complex multi-scale resolution of shocks and variable density turbulence, me must address the equally difficult problem of predicting flow transition promoted by energy deposited at the material interfacial layer during the shock interface interactions. Transition involves unsteady large-scale coherent-structure dynamics which can be captured by LES, but not by URANS based on equilibrium turbulence assumptions and single-point-closure modeling. Such URANS is frequently preferred on the engineering end of computation capabilities for full-scale configurations - and with reduced 1D/2D dimensionality being also a common aspect. With suitable initialization around each transition - e.g., reshock, URANS can be used to simulate the subsequent near-equilibrium weakly turbulent flow. We demonstrate 3D state-of-the-art URANS performance in one such flow regime. We simulate the CEA planar shock-tube experiments by Poggi et al. (1998) with an ILES strategy. Laboratory turbulence and mixing data are used to benchmark ILES. In turn, the ILES generated data is used to initialize and as reference to assess state-of-the-art 3D URANS. We find that by prescribing physics-based 3D initial conditions and allowing for 3D flow convection with just enough resolution, the additionally computed dissipation in 3D URANS effectively blends with the modeled dissipation to yield significantly improved statistical predictions.

  10. ON THE EDDY VISCOSITY MODEL OF PERIODIC TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新军; 罗纪生; 周恒

    2003-01-01

    Physical argument shows that eddy viscosity is essentially different from molecular viscosity. By direct numerical simulation, it was shown that for periodic turbulent flows, there is phase difference between Reynolds stress and rate of strain. This finding posed great challenge to turbulence modeling, because most turbulence modeling, which use the idea of eddy viscosity, do not take this effect into account.

  11. Subgrid-scale heat flux modeling for large eddy simulation of turbulent mixed convection

    OpenAIRE

    Morar, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, new subgrid-scale (SGS) heat flux model for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixed convection is developed. The new model explicitly includes the buoyancy production term. It is based on the algebraic equations and dynamic procedure is applied to calculate model coefficients. An experiment on turbulent mixed convection to water in a vertical duct is used for validation of the model.

  12. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    A new spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence is proposed. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  13. 4-wave dynamics in kinetic wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-01-01

    A general Hamiltonian wave system with quartic resonances is considered, in the standard kinetic limit of a continuum of weakly interacting dispersive waves with random phases. The evolution equation for the multimode characteristic function $Z$ is obtained within an "interaction representation" and a perturbation expansion in the small nonlinearity parameter. A frequency renormalization is performed to remove linear terms that do not appear in the 3-wave case. Feynman-Wyld diagrams are used to average over phases, leading to a first order differential evolution equation for $Z$. A hierarchy of equations, analogous to the Boltzmann hierarchy for low density gases is derived, which preserves in time the property of random phases and amplitudes. This amounts to a general formalism for both the $N$-mode and the 1-mode PDF equations for 4-wave turbulent systems, suitable for numerical simulations and for investigating intermittency.

  14. A marketing mix model for a complex and turbulent environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Mason

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper is based on the proposition that the choice of marketing tactics is determined, or at least significantly influenced, by the nature of the company’s external environment. It aims to illustrate the type of marketing mix tactics that are suggested for a complex and turbulent environment when marketing and the environment are viewed through a chaos and complexity theory lens. Design/Methodology/Approach: Since chaos and complexity theories are proposed as a good means of understanding the dynamics of complex and turbulent markets, a comprehensive review and analysis of literature on the marketing mix and marketing tactics from a chaos and complexity viewpoint was conducted. From this literature review, a marketing mix model was conceptualised.Findings: A marketing mix model considered appropriate for success in complex and turbulent environments was developed. In such environments, the literature suggests destabilising marketing activities are more effective, whereas stabilising type activities are more effective in simple, stable environments. Therefore the model proposes predominantly destabilising type tactics as appropriate for a complex and turbulent environment such as is currently being experienced in South Africa. Implications: This paper is of benefit to marketers by emphasising a new way to consider the future marketing activities of their companies. How this model can assist marketers and suggestions for research to develop and apply this model are provided. It is hoped that the model suggested will form the basis of empirical research to test its applicability in the turbulent South African environment. Originality/Value: Since businesses and markets are complex adaptive systems, using complexity theory to understand how to cope in complex, turbulent environments is necessary, but has not been widely researched. In fact, most chaos and complexity theory work in marketing has concentrated on marketing strategy, with

  15. Two-Equation Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Garg

    1998-01-01

    reason for the discrepancy on the pressure surface could be the presence of unsteady effects due to stator-rotor interaction in the experiments which are not modeled in the present computations. Prediction using the two-equation model is in general poorer than that using the zero-equation model, while the former requires at least 40% more computational resources.

  16. Exploitation of homogeneous isotropic turbulence models for optimization of turbulence remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Nijhuis, A.C.P.; Krasnov, O.K.; Unal, C.M.H.; Russchenberg, H.W.J.; Yarovoy, A.

    2015-01-01

    Homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT) models are compared, with respect to optimization of turbulence remote sensing. HIT models have different applications such as load calculation for wind turbines (Mann, 1998) or droplet track modelling (Pinsky and Khain, 2006). Details of vortices seem of less

  17. IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Mamaev, Ivan S; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A; IUTAM BOOKSERIES : Volume 6

    2008-01-01

    This work brings together previously unpublished notes contributed by participants of the IUTAM Symposium on Hamiltonian Dynamics, Vortex Structures, Turbulence (Moscow, 25-30 August 2006). The study of vortex motion is of great interest to fluid and gas dynamics: since all real flows are vortical in nature, applications of the vortex theory are extremely diverse, many of them (e.g. aircraft dynamics, atmospheric and ocean phenomena) being especially important. The last few decades have shown that serious possibilities for progress in the research of real turbulent vortex motions are essentially related to the combined use of mathematical methods, computer simulation and laboratory experiments. These approaches have led to a series of interesting results which allow us to study these processes from new perspectives. Based on this principle, the papers collected in this proceedings volume present new results on theoretical and applied aspects of the processes of formation and evolution of various flows, wave a...

  18. Modelling [CI] emission from turbulent molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, Simon C O; Micic, Milica; Molina, Faviola

    2014-01-01

    We use detailed numerical simulations of the coupled chemical, thermal and dynamical evolution of the gas in a turbulent molecular cloud to study the usefulness of the [CI] 609 micron and 370 micron fine structure emission lines as tracers of cloud structure. Emission from these lines is observed throughout molecular clouds, and yet the question of what we can learn from them about the physics of the clouds remains largely unexplored. We show that the fact that [CI] emission is widespread within molecular clouds is a simple consequence of the fact that the clouds are dominated by turbulent motions. Turbulence creates large density inhomogeneities, allowing radiation to penetrate deeply into the clouds. As a result, [CI] emitting gas is found throughout the cloud, rather than being concentrated at the edges. We examine how well we can use [CI] emission to trace the structure of the cloud, and show that the integrated intensity of the 609 micron line traces column density accurately over a wide range of visual ...

  19. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating turbulent cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analogue (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  20. One-dimensional hydrodynamic model generating a turbulent cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sakajo, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    As a minimal mathematical model generating cascade analogous to that of the Navier-Stokes turbulence in the inertial range, we propose a one-dimensional partial-differential-equation model that conserves the integral of the squared vorticity analog (enstrophy) in the inviscid case. With a large-scale random forcing and small viscosity, we find numerically that the model exhibits the enstrophy cascade, the broad energy spectrum with a sizable correction to the dimensional-analysis prediction, peculiar intermittency, and self-similarity in the dynamical system structure.

  1. Numerical Verification of the Weak Turbulent Model for Swell Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, A O; Resio, D; Zakharov, V E

    2007-01-01

    We performed numerical simulation of an ensemble of nonlinearly interacting free gravity waves (swell) by two different methods: solution of primordial dynamical equations describing potential flow of the ideal fluid with a free surface and, solution of the kinetic Hasselmann equation, describing the wave ensemble in the framework of the theory of weak turbulence. Comparison of the results demonstrates applicability of the weak turbulent approach. In both cases we observed effects predicted by this theory: frequency downshift, angular spreading and formation of Zakharov-Filonenko spectrum $I_{\\omega} \\sim \\omega^{-4}$. One of the results of our article consists in the fact that physical processes in finite size laboratory wave tanks and in the ocean are quite different, and the results of such laboratory experiments can be applied to modeling of the ocean phenomena with extra care. We also present the estimate on the minimum size of the laboratory installation, allowing to model open ocean surface wave dynami...

  2. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  3. The improvement of turbulence modeling for the aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The engineering computation of turbulent flows is mainly based on turbulence modeling,however,accurate aerothermal computation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is still a not well-solved problem. Aerothermal computation for turbulent boundary layers on a supersonic or hypersonic blunt cone with small bluntness is done firstly by using both direct numerical simulation and BL model,and seven different cases are investigated. Then the results obtained by the two methods are compared,and the reason causing the differences is found to be the incorrect assumption in the turbulence modeling that the ratio between eddy heat conductivity and eddy viscosity is constant throughout the whole boundary layer. Based on certain theoretical arguments,a method of modifying the expression of eddy heat conductivity in the region surrounding the peak location of the turbulent kinetic energy is proposed,which is verified to be effective,at least for the seven cases investigated.

  4. Evaluation of Turbulence Models in Gas Dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Several earlier model validation studies for predicting gas dispersion scenarios have been conducted for the three RANS two-equation eddy viscosity turbulence models, the standard k-ε (SKE), Re- Normalisation group k-ε (RNG) and Realizable k-ε (Realizable). However, these studies have mainly validated one or two of the models, and have mostly used one simulation case as a basis for determining which model is the best suited for predicting such scenarios. In addition, the studies have shown co...

  5. Modeling Rotating Turbulent Flows with the Body Force Potential Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Perot, Blair

    2000-11-01

    Like a Reynolds Stress Transport equation model, the turbulent potential model has an explicit Coriolis acceleration term that appears in the model that accounts for rotation effects. In this work the additional secondary effects that system rotation has on the dissipation rate, return-to-isotropy, and fast pressure strain terms are also included in the model. The resulting model is tested in the context of rotating isotropic turbulence, rotating homogeneous shear flow, rotating channel flow, and swirling pipe flow. Many of the model changes are applicable to Reynolds stress transport equation models. All model modifications are frame indifferent.

  6. Dynamic Model of Mesoscale Eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovikov, Mikhail S.

    2003-04-01

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies which are analogs of well known synoptic eddies (cyclones and anticyclones), are studied on the basis of the turbulence model originated by Dubovikov (Dubovikov, M.S., "Dynamical model of turbulent eddies", Int. J. Mod. Phys.B7, 4631-4645 (1993).) and further developed by Canuto and Dubovikov (Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: I. General formalism", Phys. Fluids8, 571-586 (1996a) (CD96a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: II. Sheardriven flows", Phys. Fluids8, 587-598 (1996b) (CD96b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S., Cheng, Y. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: III. Numerical results", Phys. Fluids8, 599-613 (1996c)(CD96c); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: IV. Buoyancy-driven flows", Phys. Fluids9, 2118-2131 (1997a) (CD97a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: V. The effect of rotation", Phys. Fluids9, 2132-2140 (1997b) (CD97b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Wielaard, D.J., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VI. Two dimensional turbulence", Phys. Fluids9, 2141-2147 (1997c) (CD97c); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Physical regimes and dimensional structure of rotating turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 666-669 (1997d) (CD97d); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "Turbulent convection in a spectral model", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 662-665 (1997e) (CD97e); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A new approach to turbulence", Int. J. Mod. Phys.12, 3121-3152 (1997f) (CD97f); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Two scaling regimes for rotating Raleigh-Benard convection", Phys. Rev. Letters78, 281-284, (1998) (CD98); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VII. The five invariants for shear driven flows", Phys. Fluids11, 659-664 (1999a) (CD99a); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Yu, G., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VIII. IR and UV

  7. Modelling wind turbine wakes using the turbulent entrainment hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Simple models for turbine wakes have been used extensively in the wind energy community, both as independent tools, as well as to complement more refined and computationally-intensive techniques. Jensen (1983; see also Katić et al. 1986) developed a model assuming that the wake radius grows linearly with distance x, approximating the velocity deficit with a top-hat profile. While this model has been widely implemented in the wind energy community, recently Bastankhah & Porté-Agel (2014) showed that it does not conserve momentum. They proposed a momentum-conserving theory, which assumed a Gaussian velocity deficit and retained the linear-spreading assumption, significantly improving agreement with experiments and LES. While the linear spreading assumption facilitates conceptual modeling, it requires empirical estimates of the spreading rate, and does not readily enable generalizations to other turbine designs. Furthermore, field measurements show sub-linear wake growth with x in the far-wake, consistently with results from fundamental turbulence studies. We develop a model by relying on a simple and general turbulence parameterization, namely the entrainment hypothesis, which has been used extensively in other areas of geophysical fluid dynamics. Without assuming similarity, we derive an analytical solution for a circular turbine wake, which predicts a far-wake radius increasing with x 1 / 3, and is consistent with field measurements and fundamental turbulence studies. Finally, we discuss developments accounting for effects of stratification, as well as generalizations to other turbine designs.

  8. ALGEBRAIC TURBULENCE MODEL WITH MEMORY FOR COMPUTATION OF 3-D TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS WITH VALIDATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Additional equations were found based on experiments for an algebraic turbulence model to improve the prediction of the behavior of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers by taking account of the effects of pressure gradient and the historical variation of eddy viscosity, so the model is with memory. Numerical calculation by solving boundary layer equations was carried out for the five pressure driven three dimensional turbulent boundary layers developed on flat plates, swept-wing, and prolate spheroid in symmetrical plane. Comparing the computational results with the experimental data, it is obvious that the prediction will be more accurate if the proposed closure equations are used, especially for the turbulent shear stresses.

  9. An Improved Model for the Turbulent PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; Canuto, V. M.; Howard, A. M.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Second order turbulence models of the Mellor and Yamada type have been widely used to simulate the PBL. It is however known that these models have several deficiencies. For example, they all predict a critical Richardson number which is about four times smaller than the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) data, they are unable to match the surface data, and they predict a boundary layer height lower than expected. In the present model, we show that these difficulties are all overcome by a single new physical input: the use of the most complete expression for both the pressure-velocity and the pressure-temperature correlations presently available. Each of the new terms represents a physical process that, was not accounted for by previous models. The new model is presented in three different levels according to Mellor and Yamada's terminology, with new, ready-to-use expressions for the turbulent, moments. We show that the new model reproduces several experimental and LES data better than previous models. As far as the PBL is concerned, we show that the model reproduces both the Kansas data as analyzed by Businger et al. in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for smaller Richardson numbers, as well as the LES and laboratory data up to Richardson numbers of order unity. We also show that the model yields a higher PBL height than the previous models.

  10. A numerical study of the alpha model for two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A G

    2004-01-01

    We explore some consequences of the ``alpha model,'' also called the ``Lagrangian-averaged'' model, for two-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. This model is an extension of the smoothing procedure in fluid dynamics which filters velocity fields locally while leaving their associated vorticities unsmoothed, and has proved useful for high Reynolds number turbulence computations. We consider several known effects (selective decay, dynamic alignment, inverse cascades, and the probability distribution functions of fluctuating turbulent quantities) in magnetofluid turbulence and compare the results of numerical solutions of the primitive MHD equations with their alpha-model counterparts' performance for the same flows, in regimes where available resolution is adequate to explore both. The hope is to justify the use of the alpha model in regimes that lie outside currently available resolution, as will be the case in particular in three-dimensional geometry or for magnetic Prandtl number...

  11. MHD Turbulent Mixing Layers: Equilibrium Cooling Models

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A; Cho, J; Lazarian, A; Leitner, S N

    2006-01-01

    We present models of turbulent mixing at the boundaries between hot (T~10^{6-7} K) and warm material (T~10^4 K) in the interstellar medium, using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical code, with radiative cooling. The source of turbulence in our simulations is a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, produced by shear between the two media. We found, that because the growth rate of the large scale modes in the instability is rather slow, it takes a significant amount of time (~1 Myr) for turbulence to produce effective mixing. We find that the total column densities of the highly ionized species (C IV, N V, and O VI) per interface (assuming ionization equilibrium) are similar to previous steady-state non-equilibrium ionization models, but grow slowly from log N ~10^{11} to a few 10^{12} cm^{-2} as the interface evolves. However, the column density ratios can differ significantly from previous estimates, with an order of magnitude variation in N(C IV)/N(O VI) as the mixing develops.

  12. Representing Turbulence Model Uncertainty with Stochastic PDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Validation of and uncertainty quantification for extrapolative predictions of RANS turbulence models are necessary to ensure that the models are not used outside of their domain of applicability and to properly inform decisions based on such predictions. In previous work, we have developed and calibrated statistical models for these purposes, but it has been found that incorporating all the knowledge of a domain expert--e.g., realizability, spatial smoothness, and known scalings--in such models is difficult. Here, we explore the use of stochastic PDEs for this purpose. The goal of this formulation is to pose the uncertainty model in a setting where it is easier for physical modelers to express what is known. To explore the approach, multiple stochastic models describing the error in the Reynolds stress are coupled with multiple deterministic turbulence models to make uncertain predictions of channel flow. These predictions are compared with DNS data to assess their credibility. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  13. Achieving Fast Reconnection in Resistive MHD Models via Turbulent Means

    CERN Document Server

    Lapenta, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Astrophysical fluids are generally turbulent and this preexisting turbulence must be taken into account for the models of magnetic reconnection which are attepmted to be applied to astrophysical, solar or heliospheric environments. In addition, reconnection itself induces turbulence which provides an important feedback on the reconnection process. In this paper we discuss both theoretical model and numerical evidence that magnetic reconnection gets fast in the approximation of resistive MHD. We consider the relation between the Lazarian & Vishniac turbulent reconnection theory and Lapenta's numerical experiments testifying of the spontaneous onset of turbulent reconnection in systems which are initially laminar.

  14. Analysis of pressure perturbation sources on a generic space launcher after-body in supersonic flow using zonal turbulence modeling and dynamic mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schmid, Peter; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A sparsity promoting dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) combined with a classical data-based statistical analysis is applied to the turbulent wake of a generic axisymmetric configuration of an Ariane 5-like launcher at Ma∞ = 6.0 computed via a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large-eddy simulation (RANS/LES) method. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the wake flow dynamics of the generic launcher by clarification and visualization of initially unknown pressure perturbation sources on its after-body in coherent flow patterns. The investigated wake topology is characterized by a subsonic cavity region around the cylindrical nozzle extension which is formed due to the displacement effect of the afterexpanding jet plume emanating from the rocket nozzle (Mae = 2.52, pe/p∞ = 100) and the shear layer shedding from the main body. The cavity region contains two toroidal counter-rotating large-scale vortices which extensively interact with the turbulent shear layer, jet plume, and rocket walls, leading to the shear layer instability process to be amplified. The induced velocity fluctuations in the wake and the ultimately resulting pressure perturbations on the after-body feature three global characteristic frequency ranges, depending on the streamwise position inside the cavity. The most dominant peaks are detected at SrD r3 = 0.85 ± 0.075 near the nozzle exit, while the lower frequency peaks, in the range of SrD r2 = 0.55 ± 0.05 and SrD r1 = 0.25 ± 0.05, are found to be dominant closer to the rocket's base. A sparse promoting DMD algorithm is applied to the time-resolved velocity field to clarify the origin of the detected peaks. This analysis extracts three low-frequency spatial modes at SrD = 0.27, 0.56, and 0.85. From the three-dimensional shape of the DMD modes and the reconstructed modulation of the mean flow in time, it is deduced that the detected most dominant peaks of SrD r3 ≈ 0.85 are caused by the radial flapping motion of

  15. Dynamics of ion temperature gradient turbulence and transport with a static magnetic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier; Holland, Christopher; James, Spencer D.; Brennan, Dylan P.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interaction mechanisms between large-scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and small-scale drift-wave microturbulence is essential for predicting and optimizing the performance of magnetic confinement based fusion energy experiments. We report progress on understanding these interactions using both analytic theory and numerical simulations performed with the BOUT++ [Dudson et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 180, 1467 (2009)] framework. This work focuses upon the dynamics of the ion temperature gradient instability in the presence of a background static magnetic island, using a weakly electromagnetic two-dimensional five-field fluid model. It is found that the island width must exceed a threshold size (comparable with the turbulent correlation length in the no-island limit) to significantly impact the turbulence dynamics, with the primary impact being an increase in turbulent fluctuation and heat flux amplitudes. The turbulent radial ion energy flux is shown to localize near the X-point, but does so asymmetrically in the poloidal dimension. An effective turbulent resistivity which acts upon the island outer layer is also calculated and shown to always be significantly (10×-100×) greater than the collisional resistivity used in the simulations.

  16. A kinetic model of plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Greco, A.; Califano, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Veltri, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) model is presented and recent results about the link between kinetic effects and turbulence are reviewed. Using five-dimensional (2D in space and 3D in the velocity space) simulations of plasma turbulence, it is found that kinetic effects (or non-fluid effects) manifest through the deformation of the proton velocity distribution function (DF), with patterns of non-Maxwellian features being concentrated near regions of strong magnetic gradients. The direction of the proper temperature anisotropy, calculated in the main reference frame of the distribution itself, has a finite probability of being along or across the ambient magnetic field, in general agreement with the classical definition of anisotropy T ⊥/T ∥ (where subscripts refer to the magnetic field direction). Adopting the latter conventional definition, by varying the global plasma beta (β) and fluctuation level, simulations explore distinct regions of the space given by T ⊥/T ∥ and β∥, recovering solar wind observations. Moreover, as in the solar wind, HVM simulations suggest that proton anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. The role of alpha particles is reviewed using multi-ion kinetic simulations, revealing a similarity between proton and helium non-Maxwellian effects. The techniques presented here are applied to 1D spacecraft-like analysis, establishing a link between non-fluid phenomena and solar wind magnetic discontinuities. Finally, the dimensionality of turbulence is investigated, for the first time, via 6D HVM simulations (3D in both spaces). These preliminary results provide support for several previously reported studies based on 2.5D simulations, confirming several basic conclusions. This connection between kinetic features and turbulence open a new path on the study of processes such as heating, particle acceleration, and temperature

  17. Turbulent convection model in the overshooting region: II. Theoretical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S Q

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent convection models are thought to be good tools to deal with the convective overshooting in the stellar interior. However, they are too complex to be applied in calculations of stellar structure and evolution. In order to understand the physical processes of the convective overshooting and to simplify the application of turbulent convection models, a semi-analytic solution is necessary. We obtain the approximate solution and asymptotic solution of the turbulent convection model in the overshooting region, and find some important properties of the convective overshooting: I. The overshooting region can be partitioned into three parts: a thin region just outside the convective boundary with high efficiency of turbulent heat transfer, a power law dissipation region of turbulent kinetic energy in the middle, and a thermal dissipation area with rapidly decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. The decaying indices of the turbulent correlations $k$, $\\bar{u_{r}'T'}$, and $\\bar{T'T'}$ are only determined by the ...

  18. Model of non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Kurien, Susan; Clark, Timothy T.

    2017-02-01

    We compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al. in Theor Comp Fluid Dyn 8:1-35, 1996) with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al. in Phys Rev E 77:016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We propose two possible causes for the discrepancies. The first is the local approximation to the pressure-transport and the second is the a priori spherical averaging used to reduce the dimensionality of the solution space of the model, from wavevector to wavenumber space. DNS data are then used to gauge the relative importance of both possible deficiencies in the model.

  19. Axisymmetric Vortex Simulations with Various Turbulence Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Howard Fiedler

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CFD code FLUENTTM has been applied to a vortex within an updraft above a frictional lower boundary. The sensitivity of vortex intensity and structure to the choice of turbulent model is explored. A high Reynolds number of 108 is employed to make the investigation relevant to the atmospheric vortex known as a tornado. The simulations are axisymmetric and are integrated forward in time to equilibrium.  In a variety of turbulence models tested, the Reynolds Stress Model allows for the greatest intensification of the vortex, with the azimuthal wind speed near the surface being 2.4 times the speed of the updraft, consistent with the destructive nature of tornadoes.  The Standard k-e Model, which is simpler than the Reynolds Stress Model but still more detailed than what is commonly available in numerical weather prediction models, produces an azimuthal wind speed near the surface of at most 0.6 times the updraft speed.        

  20. Searching for turbulence models by artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamahara, Masataka; Hattori, Yuji

    2017-05-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) is tested as a tool for finding a new subgrid model of the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress in large-eddy simulation. An ANN is used to establish a functional relation between the grid-scale flow field and the SGS stress without any assumption of the form of function. Data required for training and test of the ANN are provided by direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow. It is shown that an ANN can establish a model similar to the gradient model. The correlation coefficients between the real SGS stress and the output of the ANN are comparable to or larger than similarity models, but smaller than a two-parameter dynamic mixed model. Large-eddy simulations using the trained ANN are also performed. Although ANN models show no advantage over the Smagorinsky model, the results confirm that the ANN is a promising tool for establishing a new subgrid model with further improvement.

  1. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall-turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F; Ioannou, Petros J

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews results demonstrating the benefits of studying wall-bounded shear flows using dynamics for the evolution of the statistical state of the turbulent system. The statistical state dynamics (SSD) approach used in this work employs a second order closure which isolates the interaction between the streamwise mean and the equivalent of the perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean together with nonlinear interactions between the mean and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems in which an ensemble of a finite number of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow provide tractable approximations to the equivalently infinite ensemble RNL system. The infinite ensemble system,...

  2. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C. [Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Sung, C.H. [David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  3. Intermittency in MHD turbulence and coronal nanoflares modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Veltri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution numerical simulations, solar wind data analysis, and measurements at the edges of laboratory plasma devices have allowed for a huge progress in our understanding of MHD turbulence. The high resolution of solar wind measurements has allowed to characterize the intermittency observed at small scales. We are now able to set up a consistent and convincing view of the main properties of MHD turbulence, which in turn constitutes an extremely efficient tool in understanding the behaviour of turbulent plasmas, like those in solar corona, where in situ observations are not available. Using this knowledge a model to describe injection, due to foot-point motions, storage and dissipation of MHD turbulence in coronal loops, is built where we assume strong longitudinal magnetic field, low beta and high aspect ratio, which allows us to use the set of reduced MHD equations (RMHD. The model is based on a shell technique in the wave vector space orthogonal to the strong magnetic field, while the dependence on the longitudinal coordinate is preserved. Numerical simulations show that injected energy is efficiently stored in the loop where a significant level of magnetic and velocity fluctuations is obtained. Nonlinear interactions give rise to an energy cascade towards smaller scales where energy is dissipated in an intermittent fashion. Due to the strong longitudinal magnetic field, dissipative structures propagate along the loop, with the typical speed of the Alfvén waves. The statistical analysis on the intermittent dissipative events compares well with all observed properties of nanoflare emission statistics. Moreover the recent observations of non thermal velocity measurements during flare occurrence are well described by the numerical results of the simulation model. All these results naturally emerge from the model dynamical evolution without any need of an ad-hoc hypothesis.

  4. Nonaxisymmetric anisotropy of solar wind turbulence as a direct test for models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A J; Gogoberidze, G; Chapman, S C

    2012-02-24

    Single point spacecraft observations of the turbulent solar wind flow exhibit a characteristic nonaxisymmetric anisotropy that depends sensitively on the perpendicular power spectral exponent. We use this nonaxisymmetric anisotropy as a function of wave vector direction to test models of MHD turbulence. Using Ulysses magnetic field observations in the fast, quiet polar solar wind we find that the Goldreich-Sridhar model of MHD turbulence is not consistent with the observed anisotropy, whereas the observations are well reproduced by the "slab+2D" model. The Goldreich-Sridhar model alone cannot account for the observations unless an additional component is also present.

  5. Toward Better Modeling of Supercritical Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, Laurent; Okongo'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    study was done as part of an effort to develop computational models representing turbulent mixing under thermodynamic supercritical (here, high pressure) conditions. The question was whether the large-eddy simulation (LES) approach, developed previously for atmospheric-pressure compressible-perfect-gas and incompressible flows, can be extended to real-gas non-ideal (including supercritical) fluid mixtures. [In LES, the governing equations are approximated such that the flow field is spatially filtered and subgrid-scale (SGS) phenomena are represented by models.] The study included analyses of results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of several such mixing layers based on the Navier-Stokes, total-energy, and conservation- of-chemical-species governing equations. Comparison of LES and DNS results revealed the need to augment the atmospheric- pressure LES equations with additional SGS momentum and energy terms. These new terms are the direct result of high-density-gradient-magnitude regions found in the DNS and observed experimentally under fully turbulent flow conditions. A model has been derived for the new term in the momentum equation and was found to perform well at small filter size but to deteriorate with increasing filter size. Several alternative models were derived for the new SGS term in the energy equation that would need further investigations to determine if they are too computationally intensive in LES.

  6. Comparison of different turbulence models in predicting the temperature separation in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, T.; Bandyopdhyay, S.S. [Cryogenic Engineering Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sinhamahapatra, K.P. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2010-06-15

    An axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used to compare the influence of different Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based turbulence models in predicting the temperature separation in a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube. The standard {kappa}-{epsilon}, RNG {kappa}-{epsilon}, standard {kappa}-{omega} and SST {kappa}-{omega} turbulence models are used in this study. The performance curves (hot and cold outlet temperatures versus hot outlet mass fraction) obtained by using these turbulence models are compared with the experimental results. The objective is to select an appropriate turbulence model for the simulation of the flow phenomena in a vortex tube with optimum computational expense. The performance analysis shows that among all the turbulence models investigated in this study, temperature separation predicted by the standard {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model is closer to the experimental results. (author)

  7. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Valentini, F; Stabile, S; Pezzi, O; Servidio, S; De Marco, R; Marcucci, F; Bruno, R; Lavraud, B; De Keyser, J; Consolini, G; Brienza, D; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Retinò, A; Vaivads, A; Salatti, M; Veltri, P

    2016-01-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas w...

  8. Dynamical Topological Symmetry Breaking as the Origin of Turbulence, Non-Markovianity, and Self-Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Ovchinnikov, Igor V

    2012-01-01

    Here it is shown that the most general Parisi-Sourlas-Wu stochastic quantization procedure applied to any stochastic differential equation (SDE) leads to a Witten-type topological field theory - a model with a global topological Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin supersymmetry (Q-symmetry). Q-symmetry can be dynamically broken only by (anti-)instantons - ultimately nonlinear sudden tunneling processes of (creation)annihilation of solitons, e.g., avalanches in self-organized criticality (SOC) or (creation)annihilation of vortices in turbulent water. The phases with unbroken Q-symmetry are essentially markovian and can be understood solely in terms of the conventional Fokker-Plank evolution of the probability density. For these phases, Ito interpretation of SDEs and/or Martin-Siggia-Rose approximation of the stochastic quantization are applicable. SOC, turbulence, glasses, quenches etc. constitute the "generalized turbulence" category of stochastic phases with broken Q-symmetry. In this category, (anti-)instantons conde...

  9. Some issues on modeling atmospheric turbulence experienced by helicopter rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Mark; Gaonkar, G. H.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence velocities seen by nonrotating aircraft components and rotating blades can be substantially different. The differences are due to the spatial motion of the rotor blades, which move fore and aft through the gust waves. Body-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the actual atmospheric turbulence experienced by a point fixed on a nonrotating aircraft component such as the aircraft's center of gravity or the rotor hub, while blade-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the atmospheric turbulence experienced by an element of the rotating rotor blade. An example is presented, which, though overly simplified, shows important differences between blade- and body-fixed rotorcraft atmospheric turbulence models. All of the information necessary to develop the dynamic equations describing the atmospheric turbulence velocity field experienced by an aircraft is contained in the atmospheric turbulence velocity correlation matrix. It is for this reason that a generalized formulation of the correlation matrix describing atmospheric turbulence that a rotating blade encounters is developed. From this correlation matrix, earlier treated cases restricted to a rotor flying straight and level directly into the mean wind can be recovered as special cases.

  10. A κ-ε Turbulence Model Considering Compressibility in Three-Dimensional Transonic Turbulent Flow Calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the standark κ-ε turbulence model,a new compressible κ-ε model considering the pressure expansion influence due to the compressibility of fluid is developed and aplied to the simulation of 3D transonic turbulent flows in a nozzle and a cascade.The Reynolds averaged N-S equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates are solved with implementation of the new model,the high resolution TVD scheme is used to discretize the convective terms.The numerical results show that the compressible κ-ε odel behaves well in the simulation of transonic internal turbulent flows.

  11. Kolmogorov Behavior of Near-Wall Turbulence and Its Application in Turbulence Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1992-01-01

    The near-wall behavior of turbulence is re-examined in a way different from that proposed by Hanjalic and Launder and followers. It is shown that at a certain distance from the wall, all energetic large eddies will reduce to Kolmogorov eddies (the smallest eddies in turbulence). All the important wall parameters, such as friction velocity, viscous length scale, and mean strain rate at the wall, are characterized by Kolmogorov microscales. According to this Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence, the turbulence quantities, such as turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate, etc. at the location where the large eddies become Kolmogorov eddies, can be estimated by using both direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and asymptotic analysis of near-wall turbulence. This information will provide useful boundary conditions for the turbulent transport equations. As an example, the concept is incorporated in the standard k-epsilon model which is then applied to channel and boundary flows. Using appropriate boundary conditions (based on Kolmogorov behavior of near-wall turbulence), there is no need for any wall-modification to the k-epsilon equations (including model constants). Results compare very well with the DNS and experimental data.

  12. Anisotropy and Dissipation of Turbulence and Their Effects on Solar Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on a dynamic model for turbulent convection, we investigate the effects of dissipation and anisotropy of the turbulence on the convective energy transport. We introduce two time scales to describe the dissipation of the turbulence,and approximate the anisotropy of the turbulence by Rotta's proposal of "return to isotropy". The improved turbulence model results in an equation to determine the temperature gradient in the convection zone, which is of similar form as that of the MLT. We apply the improved MLT to solar models, and find that the increases of the anisotropy and decreases of the dissipation of the turbulence reduce the value of the convection parameter α, because these processes enhance the convective energy transfer rate. Compared with the observed solar p-mode frequencies, it is plausible that the dissipation of the turbulence in the solar convection zone should be fairly strong, while the degree of anisotropy of the turbulence plays a less significant role on the structure of the solar convection zone.

  13. Estimation of Wind Turbulence Using Spectral Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The production and loading of wind farms are significantly influenced by the turbulence of the flowing wind field. Estimation of turbulence allows us to optimize the performance of the wind farm. Turbulence estimation is; however, highly challenging due to the chaotic behavior of the wind. In thi...

  14. Comparison of two turbulent models in simulating evaporating liquid film in a wiped molecular distillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Aishuang; XU Songlin

    2005-01-01

    Velocity field of evaporating liquid film in a wiped molecular distillator was simulated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and two turbulent models treating near-wall flow were compared. Differences between wiped and other molecular distillations were introduced to explain why turbulent model should be used in this simulation. Three assumptions were made in order to simplify simulating processes. In rotating coordinate system, fixed other settings, the above two turbulent models were used, and the volume of fluid (VOF) multiphase model was also applied to tracking the liquid-gas surface. Both of the simulating results are basically identical with real situation and were compared in several aspects. It was concluded that both of the turbulent models are suitable in this simulation.

  15. Parallel Lagrangian models for turbulent transport and chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, Gilia Cornelia

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis we give an overview of recent stochastic Lagrangian models and present a new particle model for turbulent dispersion and chemical reactions. Our purpose is to investigate and assess the feasibility of the Lagrangian approach for modelling the turbulent dispersion and chemistry

  16. Statistical models for spatial patterns of inertial particles in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, K

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of particles suspended in turbulent flows is of fundamental importance for a wide range of questions in astrophysics, cloud physics, oceanography, and in technology. Laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations have demonstrated that heavy particles respond in intricate ways to turbulent fluctuations of the carrying fluid: independent particles may cluster together and form spatial patterns even though the fluid is incompressible, and the relative speeds of nearby particles may fluctuate strongly. Both phenomena depend sensitively on the parameters of the system, affect collision rates and outcomes, and thus the long-term fate of the system. This is a hard problem to describe theoretically: the turbulence determines the particle paths, but at the same time the turbulent fluctuations encountered by a particle depend sensitively upon its path through the medium. In recent years it has become clear that important aspects of the particle dynamics in turbulence can be understood in terms of...

  17. Dynamic evolution of coherent vortex dipole in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhong; Zeng, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The analytical expression for the cross-spectral density function of Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams with coherent vortex dipole (CVD) propagating through atmospheric turbulence is derived, which enables us to study the evolution process of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence, where the influences of the beams parameters and atmospheric turbulence parameters on the ratio of critical off-axis distance to the waist width are stressed. It shows that the evolution process of the CVD depends on the off-axis distance. The larger the off-axis distance is, the more the number of CVD is. When the off-axis distance is zero, the position of coherent vortices with positive and negative topological charge of CVD propagating through atmospheric turbulence is always symmetry. When the off-axis distance is big enough, compared with the situation at source plane, the orientation of the positive coherent vortex of inherent CVD and negative coherent vortex of that rotates 180° in the far field. The larger the structure constant and the waist width are, as well as the smaller the spatial correlation length and the inner scale are, the smaller the ratio ac/w0 is. Besides, the ratio ac/w0 will no longer change when the spatial correlation length or the inner scale increases to a certain value, whereas the outer scale has no effect on the ratio.

  18. Self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear model of plane Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 21218 (United States); Lieu, Binh K.; Jovanović, Mihailo R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 55455 (United States); Farrell, Brian F. [School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 (United States); Ioannou, Petros J. [Department of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens, 15784 (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    This paper demonstrates the maintenance of self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. The RNL system is derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations and permits higher resolution studies of the dynamical system associated with the stochastic structural stability theory (S3T) model, which is a second order approximation of the statistical state dynamics of the flow. The RNL model shares the dynamical restrictions of the S3T model but can be easily implemented by reducing a DNS code so that it retains only the RNL dynamics. Comparisons of turbulence arising from DNS and RNL simulations demonstrate that the RNL system supports self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow as well as structural and dynamical features that are consistent with DNS. These results demonstrate that the simplified RNL system captures fundamental aspects of fully developed turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows and motivate use of the RNL/S3T framework for further study of wall-turbulence.

  19. Energy transfers and spectral eddy viscosity in large-eddy simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence: Comparison of dynamic Smagorinsky and multiscale models over a range of discretizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, T.J.R.; Wells, G.N.; Wray, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Energy transfers within large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) grids are studied. The spectral eddy viscosity for conventional dynamic Smagorinsky and variational multiscale LES methods are compared with DNS results. Both models underestimate the DNS results for a very coa

  20. Testing turbulent closure models with convection simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Snellman, J E; Mantere, M J; Rheinhardt, M; Dintrans, B

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To compare simple analytical closure models of turbulent Boussinesq convection for stellar applications with direct three-dimensional simulations both in homogeneous and inhomogeneous (bounded) setups. Methods: We use simple analytical closure models to compute the fluxes of angular momentum and heat as a function of rotation rate measured by the Taylor number. We also investigate cases with varying angles between the angular velocity and gravity vectors, corresponding to locating the computational domain at different latitudes ranging from the pole to the equator of the star. We perform three-dimensional numerical simulations in the same parameter regimes for comparison. The free parameters appearing in the closure models are calibrated by two fit methods using simulation data. Unique determination of the closure parameters is possible only in the non-rotating case and when the system is placed at the pole. In the other cases the fit procedures yield somewhat differing results. The quality of the closu...

  1. Algebraic Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The results of a series of Perfectly Stirred Reactor (PSR) and Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) simulations are compared to each other over a wide range of operating conditions. It is found that the PaSR results can be simulated by a PSR solution with just an adjusted chemical reaction rate. A simple expression has been developed that gives the required change in reaction rate for a PSR solution to simulate the PaSR results. This expression is the basis of a simple turbulence-chemistry interaction model. The interaction model that has been developed is intended for use with simple one-step global reaction mechanisms and for steady-state flow simulations. Due to the simplicity of the model there is very little additional computational cost in adding it to existing CFD codes.

  2. Influence of vortex dynamics and atmospheric turbulence on the early evolution of a contrail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Paugam

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes three-dimensional numerical simulations of the evolution of an aircraft contrail during the first 30 min following the emission of exhausts. The wake is modeled as a vortex pair descending in a stratified atmosphere where turbulent fluctuations are sustained in the late dissipation regime. The focus of the study is laid on the interactions between vortex dynamics, atmospheric turbulence and contrail microphysics, and their role in determining the growth and the distribution of ice crystals. The atmospheric turbulence is synthesized using a methodology developed to force anisotropic turbulent fluctuations. The results show the feasibility of three-dimensional simulations of the early development of a contrail in supersaturated conditions before its transition into a contrail-cirrus. %(when radiative heating and sedimentation are no more negligible. It is shown that in case of strongly supersaturated and shear-free atmosphere the optical depth is maintained as the contrail spreads by turbulent diffusion in the late dissipation regime.

  3. Towards CFD modeling of turbulent pipeline material transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahirpour, Amir; Herzog, Nicoleta; Egbers, Cristoph

    2013-04-01

    Safe and financially efficient pipeline transportation of carbon dioxide is a critical issue in the developing field of the CCS Technology. In this part of the process, carbon dioxide is transported via pipes with diameter of 1.5 m and entry pressure of 150 bar, with Reynolds number of 107 and viscosity of 8×10(-5) Pa.s as dense fluid [1]. Presence of large and small scale structures in the pipeline, high Reynolds numbers at which CO2 should be transferred, and 3 dimensional turbulence caused by local geometrical modifications, increase the importance of simulation of turbulent material transport through the individual components of the CO2 chain process. In this study, incompressible turbulent channel flow and pipe flow have been modeled using OpenFoam, an open source CFD software. In the first step, simulation of a turbulent channel flow has been considered using LES for shear Reynolds number of 395. A simple geometry has been chosen with cyclic fluid inlet and outlet boundary conditions to simulate a fully developed flow. The mesh is gradually refined towards the wall to provide values close enough to the wall for the wall coordinate (y+). Grid resolution study has been conducted for One-Equation model. The accuracy of the results is analyzed with respect to the grid smoothness in order to reach an optimized resolution for carrying out the next simulations. Furthermore, three LES models, One-Equation, Smagorinsky and Dynamic Smagorinsky are applied for the grid resolution of (60 × 100 × 80) in (x, y, z) directions. The results are then validated with reference to the DNS carried out by Moser et al.[2] for the similar geometry using logarithmic velocity profile (U+) and Reynolds stress tensor components. In the second step the similar flow is modeled using Reynolds averaged method. Several RANS models, like K-epsilon and Launder-Reece-Rodi are applied and validated against DNS and LES results in a similar fashion. In the most recent step, it has been intended

  4. Numerical modelling of a turbulent bluff-body flow with Reynolds stress turbulent models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guoxiu; Dirk ROEKAERTS

    2005-01-01

    Numerical modelling of a turbulent bluff-body flow has been performed using differential Reynolds stress models (DRSMs). To clarify the applicability of the existing DRSMs in this complex flow, several typical DRSMs, including LRR-IP model, JM model, SSG model, as well as a modified LRR-IP model, have been validated and evaluated. The performance difference between various DRSMs is quite significant. Most of the above mentioned DRSMs cannot provide overall satisfactory predictions for this challenging test case. Motivated by the deficiency of the existing approaches, a new modification of LRR-IP model has been proposed. A very significant improvement of the prediction of flow field is obtained.

  5. Fusion plasma turbulence described by modified sandpile dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Ciraolo, Guido; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Norscini, Claudia; Sarazin, Yanick; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Garbet, Xavier; Grandgirard, Virginie; Strugarek, Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Transport in fusion plasmas is investigated with modified sandpile models. Based on results from more complete simulations, the sandpile model is modified in steps. Models with a constant source are obtained by coupling two sandpiles. Decoupling the mean field from the bursts allows one to develop a reduced model which captures some of the key features of flux-driven simulations. In the latter sandpile model, turbulent transport is mediated by the burst field while the mean-field gradient governs the transfer to the bursts. This allows one to investigate spreading, namely turbulent transport into stable regions, and transport barriers, regions where the transfer from the mean field to turbulence is reduced. Both cases are found to exhibit intermittent behaviors when the system undergoes spontaneous transitions between different transport regimes. Finally, one couples to the sandpile algorithm a species evolution algorithm that assigns a quality factor to each site. The latter appears to self-generate corrugations, or micro-barriers. These are found to naturally cluster radially in structures that are large enough to impact confinement. The mechanisms introduced to alleviate the clustering, destabilization of the corrugation by overloading and by secondary instabilities at critical radial extents, are shown to generate long-range relaxation events in space and in time with quasiperiodic reorganization of the corrugation pattern.

  6. Searching for turbulence models by artificial neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Gamahara, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) is tested as a tool for finding a new subgrid model of the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress in large-eddy simulation. ANN is used to establish a functional relation between the grid-scale (GS) flow field and the SGS stress without any assumption of the form of function. Data required for training and test of ANN are provided by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent channel flow. It is shown that ANN can establish a model similar to the gradient model. The correlation coefficients between the real SGS stress and the output of ANN are comparable to or larger than similarity models, but smaller than a two-parameter dynamic mixed model.

  7. New Approaches in Modeling Multiphase Flows and Dispersion in Turbulence, Fractal Methods and Synthetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolleau, FCGA; Redondo, J-M

    2012-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the main contributions from the first five workshops held by Ercoftac Special Interest Group on Synthetic Turbulence Models (SIG42. It is intended as an illustration of the sig's activities and of the latest developments in the field. This volume investigates the use of Kinematic Simulation (KS) and other synthetic turbulence models for the particular application to environmental flows. This volume offers the best syntheses on the research status in KS, which is widely used in various domains, including Lagrangian aspects in turbulence mixing/stirring, partic

  8. Dynamics of particle--turbulence interaction at the dissipative scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; JM Burgerscentrum Collaboration; COST Action, Particles in Turbulence Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present results of a novel phosphorescent tagging technique that is particularly suited to study particle-laden flows. Using phosphorescent droplets we probe the dynamics of particle-turbulence interaction at the dissipative length scales. We create a cloud of droplets within a chamber capable of generating homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with zero-mean flow. The droplets have Stokes number St ~ 1 , and the flow is intensely turbulent, with Reynolds number Reλ ~ 500 . Using a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser, we can tag a variety of volumes, such as thin slabs or thin, pencil-like cylinders. The droplets in these volumes glow during a few Kolmogorov times. By tracking the fate of pencil-shaped clouds using a fast (5 kHz) camera, we come to the surprising conclusion that they disperse faster than fluid elements, with a spreading rate reaching a maximum at St ~ 2 . Sheets of tagged droplets display preferential concentration at work; we discuss statistical quantities that can capture these events. This project is funded by Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM).

  9. Simulations and Transport Models for Imbalanced Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chung-Sang; Dennis, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a series of three-dimensional simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence based on reduced MHD equations. Alfven waves are launched from both ends of a long tube along the background uniform magnetic field so that turbulence develops due to collision between counter propagating Alfven waves in the interior region. Waves are launched randomly with specified correlation time Tc such that the length of the tube, L, is greater than (but of the same order of) VA *Tc such that turbulence can fill most of the tube. While waves at both ends are launched with equal power, turbulence generated is imbalanced in general, with normalized cross-helicity gets close to -1 at one end and 1 at the other end. This simulation setup allows easier comparison of turbulence properties with one-dimensional turbulence transport models, which have been applied rather successfully in modeling solar wind turbulence. However, direct comparison of such models with full simulations of solar wind turbulence is difficult due to much higher level of complexity involved. We will present our latest simulations at different resolutions with decreasing dissipation (resistivity and viscosity) levels and compare with model outputs from turbulence transport models. This work is supported by a NASA Grant NNX15AU61G.

  10. Dynamic Multiscaling in Two-dimensional Fluid Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Perlekar, Prasad; Pandit, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We obtain, by extensive direct numerical simulations, time-dependent and equal-time structure functions for the vorticity, in both quasi-Lagrangian and Eulerian frames, for the direct-cascade regime in two-dimensional fluid turbulence with air-drag-induced friction. We show that different ways of extracting time scales from these time-dependent structure functions lead to different dynamic-multiscaling exponents, which are related to equal-time multiscaling exponents by different classes of bridge relations; for a representative value of the friction we verify that, given our error bars, these bridge relations hold.

  11. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  12. The Quasilinear Premise for the Modeling of Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G; TenBarge, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    The quasilinear premise is a hypothesis for the modeling of plasma turbulence in which the turbulent fluctuations are represented by a superposition of randomly-phased linear wave modes, and energy is transferred among these wave modes via nonlinear interactions. We define specifically what constitutes the quasilinear premise, and present a range of theoretical arguments in support of the relevance of linear wave properties even in a strongly turbulent plasma. We review evidence both in support of and in conflict with the quasilinear premise from numerical simulations and measurements of plasma turbulence in the solar wind. Although the question of the validity of the quasilinear premise remains to be settled, we suggest that the evidence largely supports the value of the quasilinear premise in modeling plasma turbulence and that its usefulness may also be judged by the insights gained from such an approach, with the ultimate goal to develop the capability to predict the evolution of any turbulent plasma syst...

  13. On specification of initial conditions in turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollin, Bertrand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that initial conditions have a significant influence on the evolution of a flow towards turbulence. This important finding offers a unique opportunity for turbulence control, but also raises the question of how to properly specify initial conditions in turbulence models. We study this problem in the context of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an interfacial fluid instability that leads to turbulence and turbulent mixing. It occurs when a light fluid is accelerated in to a heavy fluid because of misalignment between density and pressure gradients. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a key role in a wide variety of natural and man-made flows ranging from supernovae to the implosion phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Our approach consists of providing the turbulence models with a predicted profile of its key variables at the appropriate time in accordance to the initial conditions of the problem.

  14. Magnetic turbulence and particle dynamics in the Earth’s magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zimbardo

    Full Text Available The influence of magnetic turbulence in the near-Earth magnetotail on ion motion is investigated by numerical simulation. The magnetotail current sheet is modelled as a magnetic field reversal with a normal magnetic field com-ponent Bn , plus a three-dimensional spectrum of magnetic fluctuations dB which represents the observed magnetic turbulence. The dawn-dusk electric field Ey is also considered. A test particle simulation is performed using different values of Bn and of the fluctuation level dB/B0. We show that when the magnetic fluctuations are taken into account, the particle dynamics is deeply affected, giving rise to an increase in the cross tail transport, ion heating, and current sheet thickness. For strong enough turbulence, the current splits in two layers, in agreement with recent Cluster observations.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics – Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence – Electromagnetics (numerical methods

  15. Towards a general turbulent combustion model for spark ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naji, H.; Said, R.; Borghi, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The prediction of combustion within spark ignition engines needs to take into account the interaction of turbulent fluctuations. Previous attempts at this used a model in which the chemical processes were supposed infinitely fast and the combustion was controlled by turbulent mixing only. This paper describes their progress in extending such models in two directions.

  16. Analysis of a turbulent buoyant confined jet modeled using realizable k-ε model

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-06-13

    Through this paper, analyses of components of the unheated/heated turbulent confined jet are introduced and some models to describe them are developed. Turbulence realizable k-ε model is used to model the turbulence of this problem. Numerical simulations of 2D axisymmetric vertical hot water confined jet into a cylindrical tank have been done. Solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while velocity, pressure, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank are analyzed. For seeking verification, an experiment was conducted for measuring of the temperature of the same system, and comparison between the measured and simulated temperature shows a good agreement. Using the simulated results, some models are developed to describe axial velocity, centerline velocity, radial velocity, dynamic pressure, mass flux, momentum flux and buoyancy flux for both unheated (non-buoyant) and heated (buoyant) jet. Finally, the dynamics of the heated jet in terms of the plume function which is a universal quantity and the source parameter are studied and therefore the maximum velocity can be predicted theoretically. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  17. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is put on understanding of effects on turbulent characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  18. Turbulence theories and modelling of fluids and plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira; Yokio, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 87, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    Theoretical and heuristic modelling methods are reviewed for studying turbulence phenomena of fluids and plasmas. Emphasis is placed on understanding of effects on turbulence characteristics due to inhomogeneities of field and plasma parameters. The similarity and dissimilarity between the methods for fluids and plasmas are sought in order to shed light on the properties that are shared or not by fluid and plasma turbulence. (author)

  19. Modelling wind flow and vehicle-induced turbulence in urban streets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzo, Efisio; Cai, Xiaoming; Vardoulakis, Sotiris

    Mechanically generated wind flow and turbulence in urban street canyons are the results of combined processes of atmospheric wind and vehicular traffic, both of which contribute to the transport and dilution of pollutants emitted by vehicles at street level. A good understanding of these processes is thus essential for predicting the spatial distribution of pollutants, and especially for deriving useful parameterisations to be included in urban air-quality models. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling methodology for the simulation of the flow and turbulence induced by wind and vehicle motion within an idealised street canyon is presented. Initially, a CFD methodology for analysing the contribution of vehicle's movement to the production of flow and turbulence near street level is introduced. The effects of vehicle's motion are characterised in terms of mean wind flow and turbulence. The results obtained from this analysis are then used for the modelling of the combined effects of wind and vehicular traffic in the street canyon. The CFD methodology is tested by comparing the model results against wind tunnel data of mean velocity and turbulence. Evaluation of the results shows the capability of the methodology to reproduce measured flow field and turbulence patterns. This methodology can be used to gain insights into the mechanically driven turbulence for the dispersion of pollutants within urban streets.

  20. A study of surface semi-geostrophic turbulence: freely decaying dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ragone, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In this study we give a characterization of semi-geostrophic turbulence by performing freely decaying simulations of the semi-geostrophic equations for the case of constant uniform potential vorticity, a set of equations known as surface semi-geostrophic approximation. The equations are formulated as conservation laws for potential temperature and potential vorticity, with a nonlinear Monge-Amp\\'{e}re type inversion equation for the streamfunction, expressed in a transformed coordinate system that follows the geostrophic flow. We perform model studies of turbulent surface semi-geostrophic flows in a doubly-periodic domain in the horizontal limited in the vertical by two rigid lids, allowing for variations of potential temperature at one of the boundaries, and we compare them with the corresponding surface quasi-geostrophic case. Results show that, while surface quasi-geostrophic dynamics is dominated by a symmetric population of cyclones-anticyclones, surface semi-geostrophic dynamics features a prominent rol...

  1. RECENT PROGRESS IN NONLINEAR EDDY-VISCOSITY TURBULENCE MODELING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符松; 郭阳; 钱炜祺; 王辰

    2003-01-01

    This article presents recent progresses in turbulence modeling in the Unit for Turbulence Simulation in the Department of Engineering Mechanics at Tsinghua University. The main contents include: compact Non-Linear Eddy-Viscosity Model (NLEVM) based on the second-moment closure, near-wall low-Re non-linear eddy-viscosity model and curvature sensitive turbulence model.The models have been validated in a wide range of complex flow test cases and the calculated results show that the present models exhibited overall good performance.

  2. Spectral Characteristics of Atmospheric Turbulence Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuojunXINShida; LIUShikouLIU; 等

    1996-01-01

    In this paper,KdV-Burgers equation can be regarded as the normal equation of atmospheric turbulence in the stable boundary layer.On the basis of the travelling wave analytic solution of KdV-Burgers equation,the turbulent spectrum is obtained.We observe that the behavior of the spectra is consistent with actual turbulent spectra of stable atmospheric boundary layer.

  3. Turbulence transport equations for variable-density turbulence and their relationship to two-field models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besnard, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) CEA Centre d' Etudes de Limeil, 94 - Villeneuve-Saint-Georges (France)); Harlow, F.H.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Zemach, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-06-01

    This study gives an updated account of our current ability to describe multimaterial compressible turbulent flows by means of a one-point transport model. Evolution equations are developed for a number of second-order correlations of turbulent data, and approximations of the gradient type are applied to additional correlations to close the system of equations. The principal fields of interest are the one- point Reynolds tensor for variable-density flow, the turbulent energy dissipation rate, and correlations for density-velocity and density- density fluctuations. This single-field description of turbulent flows is compared in some detail to two-field flow equations for nonturbulent, highly dispersed flow with separate variables for each field. This comparison suggests means for improved modeling of some correlations not subjected to evolution equations.

  4. A model for gyrotactic pattern formation of motile micro-organisms in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, K; Jonsson, P R; Mehlig, B

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show that the dynamics of motile organisms subject to gravitational torques in turbulence gives rise to patchiness. Spherical motile organisms gather in down-welling regions of the turbulent flow. We determine how shape affects preferential sampling and small-scale spatial clustering (determining local encounter rates) by analysing a statistical model in two and three spatial dimensions. By recursively refining approximations for the paths the organisms take through the flow we determine analytically how preferential sampling and small-scale clustering in the model depend upon the dimensionless parameters of the problem. We show that singularities ("caustics") occur in the dynamics and discuss how these singularities affect spatial patterns.

  5. Machine learning control taming nonlinear dynamics and turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Duriez, Thomas; Noack, Bernd R

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book on a generally applicable control strategy for turbulence and other complex nonlinear systems. The approach of the book employs powerful methods of machine learning for optimal nonlinear control laws. This machine learning control (MLC) is motivated and detailed in Chapters 1 and 2. In Chapter 3, methods of linear control theory are reviewed. In Chapter 4, MLC is shown to reproduce known optimal control laws for linear dynamics (LQR, LQG). In Chapter 5, MLC detects and exploits a strongly nonlinear actuation mechanism of a low-dimensional dynamical system when linear control methods are shown to fail. Experimental control demonstrations from a laminar shear-layer to turbulent boundary-layers are reviewed in Chapter 6, followed by general good practices for experiments in Chapter 7. The book concludes with an outlook on the vast future applications of MLC in Chapter 8. Matlab codes are provided for easy reproducibility of the presented results. The book includes interviews with leading r...

  6. Numerical Studies of Quantum Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Yui, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    We review numerical studies of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence is currently one of the most important problems in low temperature physics and is actively studied for superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. A key aspect of quantum turbulence is the dynamics of condensates and quantized vortices. The dynamics of quantized vortices in superfluid helium are described by the vortex filament model, while the dynamics of condensates are described by the Gross-Pitaevskii model. Both of these models are nonlinear, and the quantum turbulent states of interest are far from equilibrium. Hence, numerical studies have been indispensable for studying quantum turbulence. In fact, numerical studies have contributed to revealing the various problems of quantum turbulence. This article reviews the recent developments in numerical studies of quantum turbulence. We start with the motivation and the basics of quantum turbulence and invite readers to the frontier of this research. Though there are many important topics in the quantum turbulence of superfluid helium, this article focuses on inhomogeneous quantum turbulence in a channel, which has been motivated by recent visualization experiments. Atomic Bose-Einstein condensates are a modern issue in quantum turbulence, and this article reviews a variety of topics in the quantum turbulence of condensates, e.g., two-dimensional quantum turbulence, weak wave turbulence, turbulence in a spinor condensate, some of which have not been addressed in superfluid helium and paves the novel way for quantum turbulence researches. Finally, we discuss open problems.

  7. Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z. Lin; R.E. Waltz

    2007-01-01

    @@ Turbulent transport driven by plasma pressure gradients [Tangl978] is one of the most important scientific challenges in burning plasma experiments since the balance between turbulent transport and the self-heating by the fusion products (a-particles) determines the performance of a fusion reactor like ITER.

  8. Enstrophy inertial range dynamics in generalized two-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwayama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    We show that the transition to a k-1 spectrum in the enstrophy inertial range of generalized two-dimensional turbulence can be derived analytically using the eddy damped quasinormal Markovianized (EDQNM) closure. The governing equation for the generalized two-dimensional fluid system includes a nonlinear term with a real parameter α . This parameter controls the relationship between the stream function and generalized vorticity and the nonlocality of the dynamics. An asymptotic analysis accounting for the overwhelming dominance of nonlocal triads allows the k-1 spectrum to be derived based upon a scaling analysis. We thereby provide a detailed analytical explanation for the scaling transition that occurs in the enstrophy inertial range at α =2 in terms of the spectral dynamics of the EDQNM closure, which extends and enhances the usual phenomenological explanations.

  9. Turbulence elasticity—A new mechanism for transport barrier dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Z. B., E-mail: guozhipku@gmail.com [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Kosuga, Y. [IAS and RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Gürcan, Ö. D. [LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau Cedex 91128 (France)

    2014-09-15

    We present a new, unified model of transport barrier formation in “elastic” drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. A new physical quantity—the delay time (i.e., the mixing time for the DW turbulence)—is demonstrated to parameterize each stage of the transport barrier formation. Quantitative predictions for the onset of limit-cycle-oscillation (LCO) among DW and ZF intensities (also denoted as I-mode) and I-mode to high-confinement mode (H-mode) transition are also given. The LCO occurs when the ZF shearing rate (|〈v〉{sub ZF}{sup ′}|) enters the regime Δω{sub k}<|〈V〉{sub ZF}{sup ′}|<τ{sub cr}{sup −1}, where Δω{sub k} is the local turbulence decorrelation rate and τ{sub cr} is the threshold delay time. In the basic predator-prey feedback system, τ{sub cr} is also derived. The I-H transition occurs when |〈V〉{sub E×B}{sup ′}|>τ{sub cr}{sup −1}, where the mean E × B shear flow driven by ion pressure “locks” the DW-ZF system to the H-mode by reducing the delay time below the threshold value.

  10. Joint-constraint model for large-eddy simulation of helical turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli; Shi, Yipeng; Chen, Shiyi

    2014-04-01

    A three-term mixed subgrid-scale (SGS) stress model is proposed for large-eddy simulation (LES) of helical turbulence. The new model includes a Smagorinsky-Lilly term, a velocity gradient term, and a symmetric vorticity gradient term. The model coefficients are determined by minimizing the mean square error between the realistic and modeled Leonard stresses under a joint constraint of kinetic energy and helicity fluxes. The model formulated as such is referred to as joint-constraint dynamic three-term model (JCD3TM). First, the new model is evaluated a priori using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of homogeneous isotropic turbulence with helical forcing. It is shown that the SGS dissipation fractions from all three terms in JCD3TM have the properties of length-scale invariance in inertial subrange. JCD3TM can predict the SGS stresses, energy flux, and helicity flux more accurately than the dynamic Smagorinsky model (DSM) and dynamic mixed helical model (DMHM) in both pointwise and statistical senses. Then, the performance of JCD3TM is tested a posteriori in LESs of both forced and freely decaying helical isotropic turbulence. It is found that JCD3TM possesses certain features of superiority over the other two models in predicting the energy spectrum, helicity spectrum, high-order statistics, etc. It is also noteworthy that JCD3TM is capable of simulating the evolutions of both energy and helicity spectra more precisely than other models in decaying helical turbulence. We claim that the present SGS model can capture the main helical features of turbulent motions and may serve as a useful tool for LES of helical turbulent flows.

  11. SIMULATION OF NOx FORMATION IN TURBULENT SWIRLING COMBUSTION USING A USM TURBULENCE-CHEMISTRY MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周力行; 乔丽; 张健

    2003-01-01

    A unified second-order moment (USM) turbulence-chemistry model for simulating NOx formation in turbulent combustion is proposed.All of correlations,including the correlation of the reaction-rate coefficient fluctuation with the concentration fluctuation,are closed by the transport equations in the same form.This model discards the approximation of series expansion of the exponential function or the approximation of using the product of several 1-D PDF's instead of a joint PDF.It is much simpler than other refined models,such as the PDF transport equation model and the conditional moment closure model.The proposed model is used to simulate methane-air swirling turbulent combustion and NOx formation.The prediction results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Gas Properties and Implications for Galactic Star Formation in Numerical Models of the Turbulent, Multiphase ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, H

    2008-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of galactic disks resolving scales from ~1 to several hundred pc, we investigate dynamical properties of the multiphase ISM with turbulence driven by star formation feedback. We focus on HII region effects by applying intense heating in dense, self-gravitating regions. Our models are two-dimensional radial-vertical slices through the disk, and include sheared background rotation, vertical stratification, heating and cooling to yield temperatures T~10-10^4K, and thermal conduction. We separately vary the gas surface density Sigma, the stellar volume density rho_*, and the local angular rotation rate Omega to explore environmental dependencies, and analyze the steady-state properties of each model. Among other statistics, we evaluate turbulent amplitudes, virial ratios, Toomre Q parameters including turbulence, and the mass fractions at different densities. We find that the dense gas (n>100 cm^-3) has turbulence levels similar to observed GMCs and virial ratios ~1-2. The Toomre Q par...

  13. Regularization of turbulence - a comprehensive modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence readily arises in numerous flows in nature and technology. The large number of degrees of freedom of turbulence poses serious challenges to numerical approaches aimed at simulating and controlling such flows. While the Navier-Stokes equations are commonly accepted to precisely describe fl

  14. Turbulent Combustion Modeling Advances, New Trends and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Echekki, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent combustion sits at the interface of two important nonlinear, multiscale phenomena: chemistry and turbulence. Its study is extremely timely in view of the need to develop new combustion technologies in order to address challenges associated with climate change, energy source uncertainty, and air pollution. Despite the fact that modeling of turbulent combustion is a subject that has been researched for a number of years, its complexity implies that key issues are still eluding, and a theoretical description that is accurate enough to make turbulent combustion models rigorous and quantitative for industrial use is still lacking. In this book, prominent experts review most of the available approaches in modeling turbulent combustion, with particular focus on the exploding increase in computational resources that has allowed the simulation of increasingly detailed phenomena. The relevant algorithms are presented, the theoretical methods are explained, and various application examples are given. The book ...

  15. Restricted Euler dynamics along trajectories of small inertial particles in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The fate of small particles in turbulent flows depends strongly on the surrounding fluid's velocity gradient properties such as rotation and strain-rates. For non-inertial (fluid) particles, the Restricted Euler model provides a simple, low-dimensional dynamical system representation of Lagrangian evolution of velocity gradients in fluid turbulence, at least for short times. Here we derive a new restricted Euler dynamical system for the velocity gradient evolution of inertial particles such as solid particles in a gas or droplets and bubbles in turbulent liquid flows. The model is derived in the limit of small (sub Kolmogorov scale) particles and low Stokes number. The system exhibits interesting fixed points, stability and invariant properties. Comparisons with data from Direct Numerical Simulations show that the model predicts realistic trends such as the tendency of increased straining over rotation along heavy particle trajectories and, for light particles such as bubbles, the tendency of severely reduced self-stretching of strain-rate. Supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1232825 and by a Grant from The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  16. Plume dynamics in quasi-2D turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizon, C.; Werne, J.; Predtechensky, A. A.; Julien, K.; McCormick, W. D.; Swift, J. B.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1997-03-01

    We have studied turbulent convection in a vertical thin (Hele-Shaw) cell at very high Rayleigh numbers (up to 7x10(4) times the value for convective onset) through experiment, simulation, and analysis. Experimentally, convection is driven by an imposed concentration gradient in an isothermal cell. Model equations treat the fields in two dimensions, with the reduced dimension exerting its influence through a linear wall friction. Linear stability analysis of these equations demonstrates that as the thickness of the cell tends to zero, the critical Rayleigh number and wave number for convective onset do not depend on the velocity conditions at the top and bottom boundaries (i.e., no-slip or stress-free). At finite cell thickness delta, however, solutions with different boundary conditions behave differently. We simulate the model equations numerically for both types of boundary conditions. Time sequences of the full concentration fields from experiment and simulation display a large number of solutal plumes that are born in thin concentration boundary layers, merge to form vertical channels, and sometimes split at their tips via a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Power spectra of the concentration field reveal scaling regions with slopes that depend on the Rayleigh number. We examine the scaling of nondimensional heat flux (the Nusselt number, Nu) and rms vertical velocity (the Peclet number, Pe) with the Rayleigh number (Ra(*)) for the simulations. Both no-slip and stress-free solutions exhibit the scaling NuRa(*) approximately Pe(2) that we develop from simple arguments involving dynamics in the interior, away from cell boundaries. In addition, for stress-free solutions a second relation, Nu approximately nPe, is dictated by stagnation-point flows occurring at the horizontal boundaries; n is the number of plumes per unit length. No-slip solutions exhibit no such organization of the boundary flow and the results appear to agree with Priestley's prediction of Nu

  17. Multiscaling in superfluid turbulence: A shell-model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vishwanath; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-10-01

    We examine the multiscaling behavior of the normal- and superfluid-velocity structure functions in three-dimensional superfluid turbulence by using a shell model for the three-dimensional (3D) Hall-Vinen-Bekharevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) equations. Our 3D-HVBK shell model is based on the Gledzer-Okhitani-Yamada shell model. We examine the dependence of the multiscaling exponents on the normal-fluid fraction and the mutual-friction coefficients. Our extensive study of the 3D-HVBK shell model shows that the multiscaling behavior of the velocity structure functions in superfluid turbulence is more complicated than it is in fluid turbulence.

  18. Progress in wall turbulence 2 understanding and modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Javier; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    This is the proceedings of the ERCOFTAC Workshop on Progress in Wall Turbulence: Understanding and Modelling, that was held in Lille, France from June 18 to 20, 2014. The workshop brought together world specialists of near wall turbulence and stimulated exchanges between them around up-to-date theories, experiments, simulations and numerical models. This book contains a coherent collection of recent results on near wall turbulence including theory, new experiments, DNS, and modeling with RANS, LES.The fact that both physical understanding and modeling by different approaches are addressed by the best specialists in a single workshop is original.

  19. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  20. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind Including Pickup Protons and Turbulence Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2012-01-01

    To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons.We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 deg - .90 deg and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

  1. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Brasseur, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent

    2016-01-04

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  2. 2D fluid simulations of interchange turbulence with ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens; Xu, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a first principle global two-dimensional fluid model. The HESEL (Hot Edge SOL Electrostatic) model is a 2D numerical fluid code, based on interchange dynamics and includes besides electron also the ion pressure dynamic. In the limit of cold ions the model almost reduces...

  3. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  4. Turbulence modeling in three-dimensional stenosed arterial bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, J; Bressloff, N W

    2007-02-01

    Under normal healthy conditions, blood flow in the carotid artery bifurcation is laminar. However, in the presence of a stenosis, the flow can become turbulent at the higher Reynolds numbers during systole. There is growing consensus that the transitional k-omega model is the best suited Reynolds averaged turbulence model for such flows. Further confirmation of this opinion is presented here by a comparison with the RNG k-epsilon model for the flow through a straight, nonbifurcating tube. Unlike similar validation studies elsewhere, no assumptions are made about the inlet profile since the full length of the experimental tube is simulated. Additionally, variations in the inflow turbulence quantities are shown to have no noticeable affect on downstream turbulence intensity, turbulent viscosity, or velocity in the k-epsilon model, whereas the velocity profiles in the transitional k-omega model show some differences due to large variations in the downstream turbulence quantities. Following this validation study, the transitional k-omega model is applied in a three-dimensional parametrically defined computer model of the carotid artery bifurcation in which the sinus bulb is manipulated to produce mild, moderate, and severe stenosis. The parametric geometry definition facilitates a powerful means for investigating the effect of local shape variation while keeping the global shape fixed. While turbulence levels are generally low in all cases considered, the mild stenosis model produces higher levels of turbulent viscosity and this is linked to relatively high values of turbulent kinetic energy and low values of the specific dissipation rate. The severe stenosis model displays stronger recirculation in the flow field with higher values of vorticity, helicity, and negative wall shear stress. The mild and moderate stenosis configurations produce similar lower levels of vorticity and helicity.

  5. Reduced-Basis Determination of Planetary Boundary-Layer Flow Statistics for a Novel Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skitka, Joseph; Marston, Brad; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty in climate modeling and weather forecasting can largely be attributed to the omission or inaccurate representation of oceanic and atmospheric subgrid processes. Existing subgrid turbulence models are built on assumptions of isotropy, homogeneity, and the locality of correlations. Direct statistical simulation (DSS) using expansion in equal-time cumulants is a novel approach to subgrid modeling that does not make these assumptions. In prior work, a second-order closure, CE2, was shown to capture important vertical turbulent transports in Langmuir turbulence and Rayleigh-Bénard convection, but to run efficiently, this approach to turbulence modeling requires a drastic reduction in dimensionality. The present work addresses how accurately these systems can be represented with a truncated principal orthogonal decomposition (POD). The representation of turbulent transports by truncated POD bases are studied by static projection of fully resolved statistics and dynamical evolution of a reduced model. Results indicate the projected truncated turbulent statistics in these flows are less sensitive to flow details, like mixed-layer depth, than the truncated basis itself. The question of whether POD is an optimal truncation technique for these purposes is considered. NSF DMR 1306806, NSF GCE 1350795, The Institute at Brown for Environment and Society Graduate Student Fellowship.

  6. Review and assessment of turbulence models for hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Christopher J.; Blottner, Frederick G.

    2006-10-01

    Accurate aerodynamic prediction is critical for the design and optimization of hypersonic vehicles. Turbulence modeling remains a major source of uncertainty in the computational prediction of aerodynamic forces and heating for these systems. The first goal of this article is to update the previous comprehensive review of hypersonic shock/turbulent boundary-layer interaction experiments published in 1991 by Settles and Dodson (Hypersonic shock/boundary-layer interaction database. NASA CR 177577, 1991). In their review, Settles and Dodson developed a methodology for assessing experiments appropriate for turbulence model validation and critically surveyed the existing hypersonic experiments. We limit the scope of our current effort by considering only two-dimensional (2D)/axisymmetric flows in the hypersonic flow regime where calorically perfect gas models are appropriate. We extend the prior database of recommended hypersonic experiments (on four 2D and two 3D shock-interaction geometries) by adding three new geometries. The first two geometries, the flat plate/cylinder and the sharp cone, are canonical, zero-pressure gradient flows which are amenable to theory-based correlations, and these correlations are discussed in detail. The third geometry added is the 2D shock impinging on a turbulent flat plate boundary layer. The current 2D hypersonic database for shock-interaction flows thus consists of nine experiments on five different geometries. The second goal of this study is to review and assess the validation usage of various turbulence models on the existing experimental database. Here we limit the scope to one- and two-equation turbulence models where integration to the wall is used (i.e., we omit studies involving wall functions). A methodology for validating turbulence models is given, followed by an extensive evaluation of the turbulence models on the current hypersonic experimental database. A total of 18 one- and two-equation turbulence models are reviewed

  7. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  8. Measurements of turbulent premixed flame dynamics using cinema stereoscopic PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F. [University of Michigan, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ceccio, Steven L. [University of Michigan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-06-15

    A new experimental method is described that provides high-speed movies of turbulent premixed flame wrinkling dynamics and the associated vorticity fields. This method employs cinema stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and has been applied to a turbulent slot Bunsen flame. Three-component velocity fields were measured with high temporal and spatial resolutions of 0.9 ms and 140{mu}m, respectively. The flame-front location was determined using a new multi-step method based on particle image gradients, which is described. Comparisons are made between flame fronts found with this method and simultaneous CH-PLIF images. These show that the flame contour determined corresponds well to the true location of maximum gas density gradient. Time histories of typical eddy-flame interactions are reported and several important phenomena identified. Outwardly rotating eddy pairs wrinkle the flame and are attenuated at they pass through the flamelet. Significant flame-generated vorticity is produced downstream of the wrinkled tip. Similar wrinkles are caused by larger groups of outwardly rotating eddies. Inwardly rotating pairs cause significant convex wrinkles that grow as the flame propagates. These wrinkles encounter other eddies that alter their behavior. The effects of the hydrodynamic and diffusive instabilities are observed and found to be significant contributors to the formation and propagation of wrinkles. (orig.)

  9. Using Dynamically Coupled Turbine/Wind Simulations to Investigate the Influence of Atmospheric Turbulence in Turbine Wake Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, E.; Linn, R.; Bossert, J. A.; Kelley, N. D.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient atmospheric turbulence interacts with spinning turbines, which modify the intensity and spectra of the turbulence. This turbine-influenced turbulent wind field creates the environment surrounding downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus controlling the amount of wind energy available for harvesting as well as the nature of aerodynamic loads on the blades which cause wear-and-tear of the wind turbines. The conditions to which downstream turbines are exposed, their productivity, and potentially their lifespan is a function of their position within the turbulent wake of upstream turbines. In order to increase our efficiency of energy capture in wind farms and optimize turbine arrangements for both off-shore and terrestrial settings where the wind conditions can be very different, it is essential to understand the influences that various environmental conditions have on the turbulence within wind farms. It is important to find ways of studying the evolution of turbulence as it interacts with turbines and as it advects downstream. It is also important to connect properties of the turbulence with the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of the loads that are applied to turbine blades. Unfortunately, full-scale wind turbine experiments are costly and it is extremely difficult to analyze the dynamic evolution of the full three-dimensional flow field upwind and downwind of wind turbines for a broad set of operating conditions. Numerical simulation tools can be used to perform preliminary investigation of turbine wake flow fields, thus guiding and helping interpret measurement schemes for the limited number of experiments that will be performed. By using numerical models to study the influence of different ambient conditions for different turbine spacing it is possible to develop a better understanding of how terrestrial experiments might relate to off-shore conditions where experiments are more difficult. A numerical technique, WindBlade, has been developed for

  10. A streamwise constant model of turbulence in plane Couette flow

    OpenAIRE

    Gayme, D. F.; McKeon, B. J.; Papachristodoulou, A.; Bamieh, B; Doyle, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Streamwise and quasi-streamwise elongated structures have been shown to play a significant role in turbulent shear flows. We model the mean behaviour of fully turbulent plane Couette flow using a streamwise constant projection of the Navier–Stokes equations. This results in a two-dimensional three-velocity-component (2D/3C) model. We first use a steady-state version of the model to demonstrate that its nonlinear coupling provides the mathematical mechanism that shapes the turbulent velocity p...

  11. A lattice Boltzmann study of non-hydrodynamic effects in shell models of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzi, R.; Biferale, L.; Sbragaglia, M.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.

    2004-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann scheme simulating the dynamics of shell models of turbulence is developed. The influence of high-order kinetic modes (ghosts) on the dissipative properties of turbulence dynamics is studied. It is analytically found that when ghost fields relax on the same timescale as the hydrodynamic ones, their major effect is a net enhancement of the fluid viscosity. The bare fluid viscosity is recovered by letting ghost fields evolve on a much longer timescale. Analytical results are borne out by high-resolution numerical simulations. These simulations indicate that the hydrodynamic manifold is very robust towards large fluctuations of non-hydrodynamic fields.

  12. Performance of turbulence models for transonic flows in a diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangwei; Wu, Jianuo; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-09-01

    Eight turbulence models frequently used in aerodynamics have been employed in the detailed numerical investigations for transonic flows in the Sajben diffuser, to assess the predictive capabilities of the turbulence models for shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI) in internal flows. The eight turbulence models include: the Spalart-Allmaras model, the standard k - 𝜀 model, the RNG k - 𝜀 model, the realizable k - 𝜀 model, the standard k - ω model, the SST k - ω model, the v2¯ - f model and the Reynolds stress model. The performance of the different turbulence models adopted has been systematically assessed by comparing the numerical results with the available experimental data. The comparisons show that the predictive performance becomes worse as the shock wave becomes stronger. The v2¯ - f model and the SST k - ω model perform much better than other models, and the SST k - ω model predicts a little better than the v2¯ - f model for pressure on walls and velocity profile, whereas the v2¯ - f model predicts a little better than the SST k - ω model for separation location, reattachment location and separation length for strong shock case.

  13. Turbulent Spot Pressure Fluctuation Wave Packet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Wave packet analysis provides a connection between linear small disturbance theory and subsequent nonlinear turbulent spot flow behavior. The traditional association between linear stability analysis and nonlinear wave form is developed via the method of stationary phase whereby asymptotic (simplified) mean flow solutions are used to estimate dispersion behavior and stationary phase approximation are used to invert the associated Fourier transform. The resulting process typically requires nonlinear algebraic equations inversions that can be best performed numerically, which partially mitigates the value of the approximation as compared to a more complete, e.g. DNS or linear/nonlinear adjoint methods. To obtain a simpler, closed-form analytical result, the complete packet solution is modeled via approximate amplitude (linear convected kinematic wave initial value problem) and local sinusoidal (wave equation) expressions. Significantly, the initial value for the kinematic wave transport expression follows from a separable variable coefficient approximation to the linearized pressure fluctuation Poisson expression. The resulting amplitude solution, while approximate in nature, nonetheless, appears to mimic many of the global features, e.g. transitional flow intermittency and pressure fluctuation magnitude behavior. A low wave number wave packet models also recover meaningful auto-correlation and low frequency spectral behaviors.

  14. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  15. Structure and mechanism of turbulence under dynamical restriction in plane Poiseuille flow

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F; Jiménez, Javier; Constantinou, Navid C; Lozano-Duran, Adrián; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The perspective of statistical state dynamics (SSD) has been applied to the study of mechanisms underlying turbulence in various physical systems. An example application of SSD is that of the second order closure, referred to as stochastic structural stability theory (S3T), which has provided insight into the dynamics of wall turbulence and the emergence and maintenance of the roll/streak structure. This closure eliminates nonlinear interactions among the perturbations restricting nonlinearity to that of the mean equation and interaction between the mean and perturbations. Simulations at modest $Re$ reveal that the essential features of wall-turbulence dynamics are retained with the dynamics restricted in this manner. Here this restriction of the dynamics is used to obtain a closely related dynamical system, referred to as the restricted non-linear (RNL) system, which is used to study the structure and dynamics of turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow at moderately high $Re$. Remarkably, the RNL system spontane...

  16. On the Vortex Dynamics in Fractal Fourier Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Lanotte, Alessandra S; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Incompressible, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations on a reduced set of Fourier modes, belonging to a fractal set of dimension $D$. By tuning the fractal dimension parameter, we study the dynamical effects of Fourier decimation on the vortex stretching mechanism and on the statistics of the velocity and the velocity gradient tensor. In particular, we show that as we move from $D=3$ to $D \\sim 2.8$, the statistics gradually turns into a purely Gaussian one. This result suggests that even a mild fractal mode reduction strongly depletes the stretching properties of the non-linear term of the Navier-Stokes equations and suppresses anomalous fluctuations.

  17. An analogy between optical turbulence and activator-inhibitor dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of laser beams through madia with cubic nonlinear polarization is part of a wide range of practical applications. The processes that are involved are at the limit of extreme (cuasi-singular) concentration of intensity and the transversal modulational instability, the saturation and defocusing effect of the plasma generated through avalanche and multi-photon (MPI) ionization are competing leading to a complicated pattern of intensity in the transversal plane. This regime has been named \\textquotedblleft optical turbulence\\textquotedblright and it has been studied in experiments and numerical simulations. Led by the similarity of the portraits we have investigated the possibility that the mechanism that underlies the creation of the complex pattern of the intensity field is the manifestation of the dynamics \\textit{activator-inhibitor}. In a previous work we have considered a unique connection, the \\textit{complex Landau-Ginzburg equation}, a common ground for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation ...

  18. 2D fluid simulations of interchange turbulence with ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens; Xu, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a first principle global two-dimensional fluid model. The HESEL (Hot Edge SOL Electrostatic) model is a 2D numerical fluid code, based on interchange dynamics and includes besides electron also the ion pressure dynamic. In the limit of cold ions the model almost reduces......B vorticity as well as the ion diamagnetic vorticity. The 2D domain includes both open and closed field lines and is located on the out-board midplane of a tokamak. On open field field lines the parallel dynamics are parametrized as sink terms depending on the dynamic quantities; density, electron and ion...

  19. Prediction of gasoline yield in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC riser using k-epsilon turbulence and 4-lump kinetic models: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC is an essential process for the conversion of gas oil to gasoline. This study is an effort to model the phenomenon numerically using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, heavy density catalyst and 4-lump kinetic model. Geometry, boundary conditions and dimensions of industrial riser for catalytic cracking unit are conferred for 2D simulation using commercial CFD code FLUENT 6.3. Continuity, momentum, energy and species transport equations, applicable to two phase solid and gas flow, are used to simulate the physical phenomenon as efficient as possible. This study implements and predicts the use of the granular Eulerian multiphase model with species transport. Time accurate transient problem is solved with the prediction of mass fraction profiles of gas oil, gasoline, light gas and coke. The output curves demonstrate the breaking of heavy hydrocarbon in the presence of catalyst. An approach proposed in this study shows good agreement with the experimental and numerical data available in the literature.

  20. Second order closure modeling of turbulent buoyant wall plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gang; Lai, Ming-Chia; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1992-01-01

    Non-intrusive measurements of scalar and momentum transport in turbulent wall plumes, using a combined technique of laser Doppler anemometry and laser-induced fluorescence, has shown some interesting features not present in the free jet or plumes. First, buoyancy-generation of turbulence is shown to be important throughout the flow field. Combined with low-Reynolds-number turbulence and near-wall effect, this may raise the anisotropic turbulence structure beyond the prediction of eddy-viscosity models. Second, the transverse scalar fluxes do not correspond only to the mean scalar gradients, as would be expected from gradient-diffusion modeling. Third, higher-order velocity-scalar correlations which describe turbulent transport phenomena could not be predicted using simple turbulence models. A second-order closure simulation of turbulent adiabatic wall plumes, taking into account the recent progress in scalar transport, near-wall effect and buoyancy, is reported in the current study to compare with the non-intrusive measurements. In spite of the small velocity scale of the wall plumes, the results showed that low-Reynolds-number correction is not critically important to predict the adiabatic cases tested and cannot be applied beyond the maximum velocity location. The mean and turbulent velocity profiles are very closely predicted by the second-order closure models. but the scalar field is less satisfactory, with the scalar fluctuation level underpredicted. Strong intermittency of the low-Reynolds-number flow field is suspected of these discrepancies. The trends in second- and third-order velocity-scalar correlations, which describe turbulent transport phenomena, are also predicted in general, with the cross-streamwise correlations better than the streamwise one. Buoyancy terms modeling the pressure-correlation are shown to improve the prediction slightly. The effects of equilibrium time-scale ratio and boundary condition are also discussed.

  1. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low-frequency bur......In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...... to the mean component of the flow. Bursting can also result from the quasi-linear modification of the linear instability drive which is the mean pressure gradient. For each bursting process the relevant zero-dimensional model equations are given. These are finally coupled in a minimal model of convection...

  2. Turbulence Model Discovery with Data-Driven Learning and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ryan; Hamlington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Data-driven techniques have emerged as a useful tool for model development in applications where first-principles approaches are intractable. In this talk, data-driven multi-task learning techniques are used to discover flow-specific optimal turbulence closure models. We use the recently introduced autonomic closure technique to pose an online supervised learning problem created by test filtering turbulent flows in the self-similar inertial range. The autonomic closure is modified to solve the learning problem for all stress components simultaneously with multi-task learning techniques. The closure is further augmented with a feature extraction step that learns a set of orthogonal modes that are optimal at predicting the turbulent stresses. We demonstrate that these modes can be severely truncated to enable drastic reductions in computational costs without compromising the model accuracy. Furthermore, we discuss the potential universality of the extracted features and implications for reduced order modeling of other turbulent flows.

  3. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  4. Bubble dynamics and bubble-induced turbulence of a single-bubble chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyoung; Park, Hyungmin

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the bubble dynamics and liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles injected from a single nozzle have been experimentally investigated. Using a high-speed two-phase particle image velociemtry, measurements on the bubbles and liquid-phase velocity field are conducted in a transparent tank filled with water, while varying the bubble release frequency from 0.1 to 35 Hz. The tested bubble size ranges between 2.0-3.2 mm, and the corresponding bubble Reynolds number is 590-1100, indicating that it belongs to the regime of path instability. As the release frequency increases, it is found that the global shape of bubble dispersion can be classified into two regimes: from asymmetric (regular) to axisymmetric (irregular). In particular, at higher frequency, the wake vortices of leading bubbles cause an irregular behaviour of the following bubble. For the liquid phase, it is found that a specific trend on the bubble-induced turbulence appears in a strong relation to the above bubble dynamics. Considering this, we try to provide a theoretical model to estimate the liquid-phase turbulence induced by a chain of bubbles. Supported by a Grant funded by Samsung Electronics, Korea.

  5. Evolution of a turbulent pycnocline within the framework of a modified model of turbulent closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soustova, Irina; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Ezhova, Ekaterina; Rybushkina, Galina; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    The formation and evolution of a turbulent pycnocline generated by internal wave breaking were investigated within the framework of a modified model of turbulent closure. Numerical computation based on closed Reynolds equations using closure hypotheses obtained in the framework of the kinetic approach showed a strong dependence of vertical distributions corresponding to hydrodynamic parameters on the anisotropy of turbulence and speed of pycnocline motion. Strongly anisotropic motion is characterized by the presence of stepwise variations in the vertical profiles of buoyancy frequency, turbulence scale, and kinetic and potential energy as compared to the known analytical solution obtained earlier without allowance for a non-steady-state term in the kinetic energy balance equation. In the case of a weaker anisotropy, no sharp changes are observed in spatial and energy characteristics of turbulence and the qualitative shape of their profiles in the pycnolcline region coincides with the known analytical dependences. The obtained result is important for development of numerical climatic models of the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation of Basic Research (13-05-00865, 14-05-91767, 15-45-02580).

  6. Variable Density Effects in Stochastic Lagrangian Models for Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    PDF methods have proven useful in modelling turbulent combustion, primarily because convection and complex reactions can be treated without the need...modelled transport equation fir the joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and composition (species mass fractions and enthalpy ). The advantages of...PDF methods in dealing with chemical reaction and convection are preserved irrespective of density variation. Since the density variation in a typical

  7. Elastic turbulence in a shell model of polymer solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar

    2016-01-01

    We show that, at low inertia and large elasticity, shell models of viscoelastic fluids develop a chaotic behaviour with properties similar to those of elastic turbulence. The low dimensionality of shell models allows us to explore a wide range both in polymer concentration and in Weissenberg number. Our results demonstrate that the physical mechanisms at the origin of elastic turbulence do not rely on the boundary conditions or on the geometry of the mean flow.

  8. Macro-scale turbulence modelling for flows in porous media; Modelisation a l'echelle macroscopique d'un ecoulement turbulent au sein d'un milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinson, F

    2006-03-15

    - This work deals with the macroscopic modeling of turbulence in porous media. It concerns heat exchangers, nuclear reactors as well as urban flows, etc. The objective of this study is to describe in an homogenized way, by the mean of a spatial average operator, turbulent flows in a solid matrix. In addition to this first operator, the use of a statistical average operator permits to handle the pseudo-aleatory character of turbulence. The successive application of both operators allows us to derive the balance equations of the kind of flows under study. Two major issues are then highlighted, the modeling of dispersion induced by the solid matrix and the turbulence modeling at a macroscopic scale (Reynolds tensor and turbulent dispersion). To this aim, we lean on the local modeling of turbulence and more precisely on the k - {epsilon} RANS models. The methodology of dispersion study, derived thanks to the volume averaging theory, is extended to turbulent flows. Its application includes the simulation, at a microscopic scale, of turbulent flows within a representative elementary volume of the porous media. Applied to channel flows, this analysis shows that even within the turbulent regime, dispersion remains one of the dominating phenomena within the macro-scale modeling framework. A two-scale analysis of the flow allows us to understand the dominating role of the drag force in the kinetic energy transfers between scales. Transfers between the mean part and the turbulent part of the flow are formally derived. This description significantly improves our understanding of the issue of macroscopic modeling of turbulence and leads us to define the sub-filter production and the wake dissipation. A f - <{epsilon}>f - <{epsilon}{sub w}>f model is derived. It is based on three balance equations for the turbulent kinetic energy, the viscous dissipation and the wake dissipation. Furthermore, a dynamical predictor for the friction coefficient is proposed. This model is then

  9. New developments in geostrophic turbulence and its implications for climate modeling and weather predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribbia, Joseph

    2012-10-01

    One of the many areas in geophysical fluid dynamics that impacts how we model dissipation in the climate system is the theory of two-dimensional and quasi geostrophic turbulence and its impact on atmospheric flow. Upscale energy and and down scale enstrophy cascades have been observed in the atmosphere along with the -3 power law predicted in two-dimensional turbulence theory put forward by Batchelor and Kraichnan in the late 1960s. A consequence of this observational finding is the fact that, unlike three-dimensional turbulence in which the eddy turnover time decreases with eddy length scale, in two dimensional and quasi-geostrophic turbulence the eddy turnover time is constant independent of eddy length scale in the enstrophy cascading range. A further consequence of this is that the Rossby number is constant through the enstrophy cascade. This implies that instabilities which depend on ageostrophic processes are restricted because the scaling laws which imply balanced, quasi-geostrophic dynamics are valid at all length scales. Recent results show, however, even given that all of the above statements are true and maintained in the dynamics, there is a mechanism through which quasi-geostrophic turbulence becomes inconsistent and develops the seeds of its own destruction at small scales.

  10. Efficiency of a statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    In developing its theory for turbulent dispersion transport, the Litchford and Jeng (1991) statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion took a generalized approach in which the perturbing influence of each turbulent eddy on consequent interactions was transported through all subsequent eddies. Nevertheless, examinations of this transport relation shows it to be able to decay rapidly: this implies that additional computational efficiency may be obtained via truncation of unneccessary transport terms. Attention is here given to the criterion for truncation, as well as to expected efficiency gains.

  11. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale structures in a turbulent wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varon, Eliott; Eulalie, Yoann; Edwige, Stephie; Gilotte, Philippe; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of a three-dimensional (3D) bimodal turbulent wake downstream of a square-back Ahmed body are experimentally studied in a wind tunnel through high-frequency wall-pressure probes mapping the rear of the model and a horizontal two-dimensional (2D) velocity field. The barycenters of the pressure distribution over the rear part of the model and the intensity recirculation are found highly correlated. Both described the most energetic large-scale structures dynamics, confirming the relation between the large-scale recirculation bubble and its wall-pressure footprint. Focusing on the pressure, its barycenter trajectory has a stochastic behavior but its low-frequency dynamics exhibit the same characteristics as a weak strange chaotic attractor system, with two well-defined attractors. The low-frequency dynamics associated to the large-scale structures are then analyzed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is first estimated, leading to a low positive value characteristic of strange attractors and weak chaotic systems. Afterwards, analyzing the autocorrelation function of the timeseries, we compute the correlation dimension, larger than two. The signal is finally transformed and analyzed as a telegraph signal, showing that its dynamics correspond to a quasirandom telegraph signal. This is the first demonstration that the low-frequency dynamics of a turbulent 3D wake are not a purely stochastic process but rather a weak chaotic process exhibiting strange attractors. From the flow control point of view, it also opens the path to more simple closed-loop flow-control strategies aiming at the stabilization of the wake and the control of the dynamics of the wake barycenter.

  12. Modelling and simulation of turbulence and heat transfer in wall-bounded flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovac, M.

    2006-01-01

    At present it is widely accepted that there is no universal turbulence model, i.e. no turbulence model can give acceptably good predictions for all turbulent flows that are found in nature or engineering. Every turbulence model is based on certain assumptions, and hence it is aimed at certain type o

  13. Model of strong stationary vortex turbulence in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Aburjania

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the macroscopic consequences of nonlinear solitary vortex structures in magnetized space plasmas by developing theoretical model of plasma turbulence. Strongly localized vortex patterns contain trapped particles and, propagating in a medium, excite substantial density fluctuations and thus, intensify the energy, heat and mass transport processes, i.e., such vortices can form strong vortex turbulence. Turbulence is represented as an ensemble of strongly localized (and therefore weakly interacting vortices. Vortices with various amplitudes are randomly distributed in space (due to collisions. For their description, a statistical approach is applied. It is supposed that a stationary turbulent state is formed by balancing competing effects: spontaneous development of vortices due to nonlinear twisting of the perturbations' fronts, cascading of perturbations into short scales (direct spectral cascade and collisional or collisionless damping of the perturbations in the short-wave domain. In the inertial range, direct spectral cascade occurs through merging structures via collisions. It is shown that in the magneto-active plasmas, strong turbulence is generally anisotropic Turbulent modes mainly develop in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetic field. It is found that it is the compressibility of the local medium which primarily determines the character of the turbulent spectra: the strong vortex turbulence forms a power spectrum in wave number space. For example, a new spectrum of turbulent fluctuations in k−8/3 is derived which agrees with available experimental data. Within the framework of the developed model particle diffusion processes are also investigated. It is found that the interaction of structures with each other and particles causes anomalous diffusion in the medium. The effective coefficient of diffusion has a square root dependence on the stationary level of noise.

  14. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  15. Computational investigation of the effects of turbulence, inertia, and gravity on particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Peter John

    In this work, we examine the motion of particles which are subjected to varying levels of turbulence, inertia, and gravity, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulence. These investigations are performed through direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Eulerian fluid velocity field combined with Lagrangian particle tracking. The primary motivation of these investigations is to better understand and model the dynamics and growth of water droplets in warm, cumulus clouds. In the first part of this work, we discuss the code we developed for these simulations, Highly Parallel Particle-laden flow Solver for Turbulence Research (HiPPSTR). HiPPSTR uses efficient parallelization strategies, time-integration techniques, and interpolation methods to enable massively parallel simulations of three-dimensional, particle-laden turbulence. In the second, third, and fourth sections of this work, we analyze simulations of particle-laden flows which are representative of those at the edges and cores of clouds. In the second section, we consider the mixing of droplets near interfaces with varying turbulence intensities and gravitational orientations, to provide insight into the dynamics near cloud edges. The simulations are parameterized to match wind-tunnel experiments of particle mixing which were conducted at Cornell, and the DNS and experimental results are compared and contrasted. Mixing is suppressed when turbulence intensities differ across the interface, and in all cases, the particle concentrations are subject to large fluctuations. In the third and fourth sections, we use HiPPSTR to analyze droplet motion in isotropic turbulence, which we take to be representative of adiabatic cloud cores. The third section examines the Reynolds-number scaling of single-particle and particle-pair statistics without gravity, while the fourth section shows results when gravity is included. While weakly inertial particles preferentially sample certain regions of the flow, gravity reduces

  16. Comparative analysis of turbulence models for flow simulation around a vertical axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Saha, U.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Guwahati (India)

    2012-07-01

    An unsteady computational investigation of the static torque characteristics of a drag based vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) has been carried out using the finite volume based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package Fluent 6.3. A comparative study among the various turbulence models was conducted in order to predict the flow over the turbine at static condition and the results are validated with the available experimental results. CFD simulations were carried out at different turbine angular positions between 0 deg.-360 deg. in steps of 15 deg.. Results have shown that due to high static pressure on the returning blade of the turbine, the net static torque is negative at angular positions of 105 deg.-150 deg.. The realizable k-{epsilon} turbulent model has shown a better simulation capability over the other turbulent models for the analysis of static torque characteristics of the drag based VAWT. (Author)

  17. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Guangyuan, E-mail: gysungrad@gmail.com; Lignell, David O., E-mail: davidlignell@byu.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Hewson, John C., E-mail: jchewso@sandia.gov [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Gin, Craig R., E-mail: cgin@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  18. Turbulent Boundary Layers - Experiments, Theory and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    DEVELOPMENT (ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD ) AGARD Conference Proceedings No.271 TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS - EXPERIMENTS, THEORY AND...photographs of Figures 21 and 22. In this case, the photographs are taken with a single flash strobe and thus yield the instantaneous positions of the

  19. Aerosol dynamics within and above forest in relation to turbulent transport and dry deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Zhou, Putian;

    2016-01-01

    of 10 days in May 2013 to a pine forest site in southern Finland. The period was characterized by frequent new particle formation events and simultaneous intensive aerosol transformation. The aim of the study was to analyze and quantify the role of aerosol and ABL dynamics in the vertical transport...... of aerosols. It was of particular interest to what extent the fluxes above the canopy deviate from the particle dry deposition on the canopy foliage due to the above-mentioned processes. The model simulations revealed that the particle concentration change due to aerosol dynamics frequently exceeded...... the effect of particle deposition by even an order of magnitude or more. The impact was, however, strongly dependent on particle size and time. In spite of the fact that the timescale of turbulent transfer inside the canopy is much smaller than the timescales of aerosol dynamics and dry deposition, leading...

  20. Study and modeling of finite rate chemistry effects in turbulent non-premixed flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervisch, Luc

    1993-01-01

    The development of numerical models that reflect some of the most important features of turbulent reacting flows requires information about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between turbulent and chemical processes is so strong that it is extremely difficult to isolate the role played by one individual physical phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (hereafter DNS) allows us to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interaction in some restricted but completely defined situations. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting regimes: the fast chemistry case, where the turbulent flame can be pictured as a random distribution of local chemical equilibrium problems; and the slow chemistry case, where the chemistry integrates in time the turbulent fluctuations. The Damkoehler number, ratio of a mechanical time scale to chemical time scale, is used to distinguish between these regimes. Today most of the industrial computer codes are able to perform predictions in the hypothesis of local equilibrium chemistry using a presumed shape for the probability density function (pdt) of the conserved scalar. However, the finite rate chemistry situation is of great interest because industrial burners usually generate regimes in which, at some points, the flame is undergoing local extinction or at least non-equilibrium situations. Moreover, this variety of situations strongly influences the production of pollutants. To quantify finite rate chemistry effect, the interaction between a non-premixed flame and a free decaying turbulence is studied using DNS. The attention is focused on the dynamic of extinction, and an attempt is made to quantify the effect of the reaction on the small scale mixing process. The unequal diffusivity effect is also addressed. Finally, a simple turbulent combustion model based on the DNS observations and tractable in real flow configurations is proposed.

  1. Doppler ultrasound in vitro modeling of turbulence in carotid vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Meghan L.; Poepping, Tamie L.; Rankin, Richard N.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2004-04-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous to many systems in nature, except the human vasculature. Development of turbulence in the human vasculature is an indication of abnormalities and disease. A severely stenosed vessel is one such example. In vitro modeling of common vascular diseases, such as a stenosis, is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fluid dynamics for a characteristic geometry. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) is the only available non-invasive technique for in vivo applications. Using Doppler velocity-derived data, turbulence intensity (TI) can be calculated. We investigate a realistic 70% stenosed bifurcation model in pulsatile flow and the performance of this model for turbulent flow. Blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) was pumped through the model using a flow simulator, which generated pulsatile flow with a mean flow rate of 6 ml/s. Twenty-five cycles of gated DUS data were acquired within regions of laminar and turbulent flow. The data was digitized at 44.1 kHz and analyzed at 79 time-points/cardiac cycle with a 1024-point FFT, producing a 1.33 cm/s velocity resolution. We found BMF to exhibit DUS characteristics similar to blood. We demonstrated the capabilities to generate velocities comparable to that found in the human carotid artery and calculated TI in the case of repetitive pulsatile flow.

  2. Collisional-radiative modelling for the spectroscopic diagnostic of turbulent plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosato, J.; Lefevre, T.; Escarguel, A.; Capes, H.; Catoire, F.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R. [PIIM, Universite de Provence, CNRS, Marseille (France); Rosmej, F.B. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)] [LULI, Palaiseau (France); Kadomtsev, M.B.; Levashova, M.G.; Lisitsa, V.S. [NFI, Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bonhomme, G. [IJL, Universite de Nancy, CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2011-07-01

    Spectroscopy is a diagnostic method widely used in plasma physics research, e.g. in laboratory experiments, in fusion devices or in astrophysics. Information on the plasma parameters (electron density, temperature etc.) can be obtained from the analysis of both line shapes and intensities through the use of suitable models. The aim of the present paper is to assess the role of turbulent fluctuations on line intensity ratios in the case of weakly radiating plasmas. This involves the use of collisional-radiative modelling. In the present work we address the radiation due to atomic lines in turbulent helium plasmas at low density/temperature. The statistical formalism previously used in line shape modelling is adapted in this way, and the atomic populations are calculated with a collisional-radiative code. Different regimes, according to the turbulence correlation time, have been considered. In the static case, which corresponds to low-frequency fluctuations, it has been shown that the turbulence can lead to an increase of the line intensities. An application to helium in realistic experimental conditions has revealed that line ratios are sensitive to the fluctuations, which offers a track to a diagnostic. In the dynamic case, the use of a reduced model in the case of an ideal two-level atom has revealed the possibility for a significant dependence of the atomic populations on the turbulence frequency

  3. Is there universal predator-prey dynamics at the laminar-turbulent phase transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hong-Yan; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of pipe flow shows that transitional turbulence is dominated by two collective modes: a longitudinal mode for small-scale turbulent fluctuations whose anisotropy induces an emergent large-scale azimuthal mode (so-called zonal flow) that inhibits anisotropic Reynolds stress. This activation-inhibition interaction leads to stochastic predator-prey-like dynamics, from which it follows that the transition to turbulence belongs to the directed percolation universality class. Here we show how predator-prey dynamics arises by deriving phenomenologically an effective field theory of the transition from a coarse-graining of the Reynolds equation. The rigorous mapping between the conserved currents in Rayleigh-Benard convection (RBC), Taylor-Couette and pipe flows suggests that the zonal flow-turbulence scenario might occur in these systems, consistent with observations of zonal flows in two-dimensional RBC, and bursts of transitional turbulence in Couette flow that follow the critical scalings of directed percolation.

  4. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward

    2016-11-01

    What happens to turbulent motions below the Kolmogorov length scale? In order to explore this question, a 300 million molecule Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation is presented for the minimal Couette channel in which turbulence can be sustained. The regeneration cycle and turbulent statistics show excellent agreement to continuum based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) at Re=400. As MD requires only Newton's laws and a form of inter-molecular potential, it captures a much greater range of phenomena without requiring the assumptions of Newton's law of viscosity, thermodynamic equilibrium, fluid isotropy or the limitation of grid resolution. The fundamental nature of MD means it is uniquely placed to explore the nature of turbulent transport. A number of unique insights from MD are presented, including energy budgets, sub-grid turbulent energy spectra, probability density functions, Lagrangian statistics and fluid wall interactions. EPSRC Post Doctoral Prize Fellowship.

  5. Turbulent Flow Characteristics and Dynamics Response of a Vertical-Axis Spiral Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a vertical-axis spiral wind rotor is proposed and implemented in the interest of adapting it to air flows from all directions and improving the rotor’s performance. A comparative study is performed between the proposed rotor and conventional Savonius rotor. Turbulent flow features near the rotor blades are simulated with Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The torque coefficient of the proposed rotor is satisfactory in terms of its magnitude and variation through the rotational cycle. Along the height of the rotor, distinct spatial turbulent flow patterns vary with the upstream air velocity. Subsequent experiments involving a disk generator gives an in-depth understanding of the dynamic response of the proposed rotor under different operation conditions. The optimal tip-speed ratio of the spiral rotor is 0.4–0.5, as is shown in both simulation and experiment. Under normal and relative-motion flow conditions, and within the range of upstream air velocity from 1 to 12 m/s, the output voltage of the generator was monitored and statistically analyzed. It was found that normal air velocity fluctuations lead to a non-synchronous correspondence between upstream air velocity and output voltage. In contrast, the spiral rotor’s performance when operating from the back of a moving truck was significantly different to its performance under the natural conditions.

  6. Transport dynamics of self-consistent, near-marginal drift-wave turbulence. I. Investigation of the ability of external flows to tune the non-diffusive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, D.; Newman, D. E.; Sánchez, R.

    2017-07-01

    The reduction of turbulent transport across sheared flow regions has been known for a long time in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. However, details of the dynamics are still unclear, in particular, in what refers to the changes caused by the flow on the nature of radial transport itself. In Paper II, we have shown in a simplified model of drift wave turbulence that, when the background profile is allowed to evolve self-consistently with fluctuations, a variety of transport regimes ranging from superdiffusive to subdiffusive open up depending on the properties of the underlying turbulence [D. Ogata et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052307 (2017)]. In this paper, we show that externally applied sheared flows can, under the proper conditions, cause the transport dynamics to be diffusive or subdiffusive.

  7. Modelling of turbulent impurity transport in fusion edge plasmas using measured and calculated ionization cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Kendl, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent transport of trace impurities impurities in the edge and scrape-off-layer of tokamak fusion plasmas is modelled by three dimensional electromagnetic gyrofluid computations including evolution of plasma profile gradients. The source function of impurity ions is dynamically computed from pre-determined measured and calculated electron impact ionization cross section data. The simulations describe the generation and further passive turbulent E-cross-B advection of the impurities by intermittent fluctuations and coherent filamentary structures (blobs) across the scrape-off-layer.

  8. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  9. A model of rotationally-sampled wind turbulence for predicting fatigue loads in wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Empirical equations are presented with which to model rotationally-sampled (R-S) turbulence for input to structural-dynamic computer codes and the calculation of wind turbine fatigue loads. These equations are derived from R-S turbulence data which were measured at the vertical-plane array in Clayton, New Mexico. For validation, the equations are applied to the calculation of cyclic flapwise blade loads for the NASA/DOE Mod-2 2.5-MW experimental HAWT's (horizontal-axis wind turbines), and the results compared to measured cyclic loads. Good correlation is achieved, indicating that the R-S turbulence model developed in this study contains the characteristics of the wind which produce many of the fatigue loads sustained by wind turbines. Empirical factors are included which permit the prediction of load levels at specified percentiles of occurrence, which is required for the generation of fatigue load spectra and the prediction of the fatigue lifetime of structures.

  10. The Dynamical Generation of Current Sheets in Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, Gregory G

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence profoundly affects particle transport and plasma heating in many astrophysical plasma environments, from galaxy clusters to the solar corona and solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere. Both fluid and kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence ubiquitously generate coherent structures, in the form of current sheets, at small scales, and the locations of these current sheets appear to be associated with enhanced rates of dissipation of the turbulent energy. Therefore, illuminating the origin and nature of these current sheets is critical to identifying the dominant physical mechanisms of dissipation, a primary aim at the forefront of plasma turbulence research. Here we present evidence from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations that strong nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfven waves, or strong Alfven wave collisions, are a natural mechanism for the generation of current sheets in plasma turbulence. Furthermore, we conceptually explain this current sheet development in terms of the nonlinear...

  11. Extending the restricted nonlinear model for wall-turbulence to high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretheim, Joel; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice

    2016-11-01

    The restricted nonlinear (RNL) model for wall-turbulence is motivated by the long-observed streamwise-coherent structures that play an important role in these flows. The RNL equations, derived by restricting the convective term in the Navier-Stokes equations, provide a computationally efficient approach due to fewer degrees of freedom in the underlying dynamics. Recent simulations of the RNL system have been conducted for turbulent channel flows at low Reynolds numbers (Re), yielding insights into the dynamical mechanisms and statistics of wall-turbulence. Despite the computational advantages of the RNL system, simulations at high Re remain out-of-reach. We present a new Large Eddy Simulation (LES) framework for the RNL system, enabling its use in engineering applications at high Re such as turbulent flows through wind farms. Initial results demonstrate that, as observed at moderate Re, restricting the range of streamwise varying structures present in the simulation (i.e., limiting the band of x Fourier components or kx modes) significantly affects the accuracy of the statistics. Our results show that only a few well-chosen kx modes lead to RNL turbulence with accurate statistics, including the mean profile and the well-known inner and outer peaks in energy spectra. This work is supported by NSF (WindInspire OISE-1243482).

  12. Model Polyelectrolytes in Turbulent Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Brian; Hoagland, David A.

    1997-03-01

    Isolated polymer chains in strong flow are deformed significantly from their equilibrium conformations, imparting a pronounced change in the local velocity field. Turbulent drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions is an important example. The onset of drag reduction appears dependent on a characteristic shear stress at the wall τw for a given polymer. (Virk, P.S. AIChE Journal 21 1975) Length and time scales formed from τw and solvent kinematic viscosity provide different scalings of the onset with chain length. It is likely that length polydispersity could be responsible for the disparity among the previously reported results concerning the correct onset condition. We have employed preparative gel electrophoresis to produce samples of very low polydispersity to determine the onset scaling of drag reduction in turbulent couette flow. The same technique provides information about chain scission in turburlence, yielding an indirect indication of chain conformation.

  13. Quantification of Modelling Uncertainties in Turbulent Flow Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edeling, W.N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to make predictive simulations with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, i.e. simulations with a systematic treatment of model and data uncertainties and their propagation through a computational model to produce predictions of quantities of interest w

  14. Simulating tidal turbines with mesh optimisation and RANS turbulence models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abolghasemi, A.; Piggott, M.D.; Spinneken, J.; Vire, A.; Cotter, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    A versatile numerical model for the simulation of flow past horizontal axis tidal turbines has been developed. Currently most large-scale marine models employed to study marine energy use the shallow water equations and therefore can fail to account for important turbulent physics. The model present

  15. Quantification of Modelling Uncertainties in Turbulent Flow Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edeling, W.N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to make predictive simulations with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, i.e. simulations with a systematic treatment of model and data uncertainties and their propagation through a computational model to produce predictions of quantities of interest

  16. An improved turbulence model for rotating shear flows*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yasutaka; Hattori, Hirofumi

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we construct a turbulence model based on a low-Reynolds-number non-linear k e model for turbulent flows in a rotating channel. Two-equation models, in particular the non-linear k e model, are very effective for solving various flow problems encountered in technological applications. In channel flows with rotation, however, the explicit effects of rotation only appear in the Reynolds stress components. The exact equations for k and e do not have any explicit terms concerned with the rotation effects. Moreover, the Coriolis force vanishes in the momentum equation for a fully developed channel flow with spanwise rotation. Consequently, in order to predict rotating channel flows, after proper revision the Reynolds stress equation model or the non-linear eddy viscosity model should be used. In this study, we improve the non-linear k e model so as to predict rotating channel flows. In the modelling, the wall-limiting behaviour of turbulence is also considered. First, we evaluated the non-linear k e model using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) database for a fully developed rotating turbulent channel flow. Next, we assessed the non-linear k e model at various rotation numbers. Finally, on the basis of these assessments, we reconstruct the non-linear k e model to calculate rotating shear flows, and the proposed model is tested on various rotation number channel flows. The agreement with DNS and experiment data is quite satisfactory.

  17. Instantons in a Lagrangian model of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorio, Leonardo S; Pereira, Rodrigo M; Chevillard, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The role of instantons is investigated in the Lagrangian model for the velocity gradient evolution known as the Recent Fluid Deformation approximation. After recasting the model into the path-integral formalism, the probability distribution function is computed along with the most probable path in the weak noise limit through the saddle-point approximation. Evaluation of the instanton solution is implemented numerically by means of the iteratively Chernykh-Stepanov method. In the case of the longitudinal velocity gradient statistics, due to symmetry reasons, the number of degrees of freedom can be reduced to one, allowing the pdf to be evaluated analytically as well, thereby enabling a prediction of the scaling of the moments as a function of Reynolds number. It is also shown that the instanton solution lies on the Vieillefosse line concerning the RQ-plane. We illustrate how instantons can be unveiled in the stochastic dynamics performing a conditional statistics.

  18. Optical Turbulence Characterization by WRF model above Ali, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongshuai; Yao, Yongqiang; Liu, Liyong; Qian, Xuan; Yin, Jia

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence modeling and forecast for astronomy is a relatively recent discipline, but has played important roles in site survey, optimization of large telescope observing tables, and in the applications of adaptive optics technique. The numerical approach, by using of meteorological parameters and parameterization of optical turbulence, can provide all the optical turbulence parameters related, such as C2n profile, coherent length, wavefront coherent time, seeing, isoplanatic angle, and so on. This is particularly interesting for searching new sites without the long and expensive site testing campaigns with instruments. Earlier site survey results by the site survey team of National Astronomical Observatories of China imply that the south-west Tibet, Ali, is one of the world best IR and sub-mm site. For searching the best site in Ali area, numerical approach by Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model had been used to evaluate the climatology of the optical turbulence. The WRF model is configured over a domain 200km×200km with 1km horizontal resolution and 65 vertical levels from ground to the model top(10millibars) in 2010. The initial and boundary conditions for the model are provided by the 1° × 1° Global Final Analysis data from NCEP. The distribution and seasonal variation of optical turbulence parameters over this area are presented.

  19. Mathematical and Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. Vedovoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is devoted to the development and implementation of a computational framework to perform numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent flows over complex geometries. The algorithm under consideration is based on a classical predictor-corrector time integration scheme that employs a projection method for the momentum equations. The domain decomposition strategy is adopted for distributed computing, displaying very satisfactory levels of speed-up and efficiency. The Immersed Boundary Methodology is used to characterize the presence of a complex geometry. Such method demands two separate grids: An Eulerian, where the transport equations are solved with a Finite Volume, second order discretization and a Lagrangian domain, represented by a non-structured shell grid representing the immersed geometry. The in-house code developed was fully verified by the Method of Manufactured Solu- tions, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian domains. The capabilities of the resulting computational framework are illustrated on four distinct cases: a turbulent jet, the Poiseuille flow, as a matter of validation of the implemented Immersed Boundary methodology, the flow over a sphere covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, and finally, with the intention of demonstrating the applicability of Large Eddy Simulations - LES - in an industrial problem, the turbulent flow inside an industrial fan.

  20. Multiscale modeling of turbulent channel flow over porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogaraj, Sudhakar; Lacis, Ugis; Bagheri, Shervin

    2016-11-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulent flow through a channel coated with a porous material. The Navier-stokes equations governing the fluid domain and the Darcy equations of the porous medium are coupled using an iterative partitioned scheme. At the interface between the two media, boundary conditions derived using a multiscale homogenization approach are enforced. The main feature of this approach is that the anisotropic micro-structural pore features are directly taken into consideration to derive the constitutive coefficients of the porous media as well as of the interface. The focus of the present work is to study the influence of micro-structure pore geometry on the dynamics of turbulent flows. Detailed turbulence statistics and instantaneous flow field are presented. For comparison, flow through impermeable channel flows are included. Supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Grant agreement No 708281.

  1. Near-wall variable-Prandtl-number turbulence model for compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon (sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  2. A near-wall four-equation turbulence model for compressible boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T. P.; So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.

    1992-01-01

    A near-wall four-equation turbulence model is developed for the calculation of high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers. The four equations used are the k-epsilon equations and the theta(exp 2)-epsilon(sub theta) equations. These equations are used to define the turbulent diffusivities for momentum and heat fluxes, thus allowing the assumption of dynamic similarity between momentum and heat transport to be relaxed. The Favre-averaged equations of motion are solved in conjunction with the four transport equations. Calculations are compared with measurements and with another model's predictions where the assumption of the constant turbulent Prandtl number is invoked. Compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers with both adiabatic and constant temperature wall boundary conditions are considered. Results for the range of low Mach numbers and temperature ratios investigated are essentially the same as those obtained using an identical near-wall k-epsilon model. In general, the numerical predictions are in very good agreement with measurements and there are significant improvements in the predictions of mean flow properties at high Mach numbers.

  3. High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a Lagrangian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J Pietarila; Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2011-07-01

    With the help of a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence tested previously, we explore high Reynolds number regimes up to equivalent resolutions of 6000(3) grid points in the absence of forcing and with no imposed uniform magnetic field. For the given initial condition chosen here, with equal kinetic and magnetic energy, the flow ends up being dominated by the magnetic field, and the dynamics leads to an isotropic Iroshnikov-Kraichnan energy spectrum. However, the locally anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations perpendicular to the local mean field follow a Kolmogorov law. We find that the ratio of the eddy turnover time to the Alfvén time increases with wave number, contrary to the so-called critical balance hypothesis. Residual energy and helicity spectra are also considered; the role played by the conservation of magnetic helicity is studied, and scaling laws are found for the magnetic helicity and residual helicity spectra. We put these results in the context of the dynamics of a globally isotropic MHD flow that is locally anisotropic because of the influence of the strong large-scale magnetic field, leading to a partial equilibration between kinetic and magnetic modes for the energy and the helicity.

  4. Turbulence radiation interaction modeling in hydrocarbon pool fire simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURNS,SHAWN P.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of turbulent fluctuations in temperature and species concentration in thermal radiation transport modeling for combustion applications is well accepted by the radiation transport and combustion communities. A number of experimental and theoretical studies over the last twenty years have shown that fluctuations in the temperature and species concentrations may increase the effective emittance of a turbulent flame by as much as 50% to 300% over the value that would be expected from the mean temperatures and concentrations. With the possibility of such a large effect on the principal mode of heat transfer from a fire, it is extremely important for fire modeling efforts that turbulence radiation interaction be well characterized and possible modeling approaches understood. Toward this end, this report seeks to accomplish three goals. First, the principal turbulence radiation interaction closure terms are defined. Second, an order of magnitude analysis is performed to understand the relative importance of the various closure terms. Finally, the state of the art in turbulence radiation interaction closure modeling is reviewed. Hydrocarbon pool fire applications are of particular interest in this report and this is the perspective from which this review proceeds. Experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that, for this type of heavily sooting flame, the turbulent radiation interaction effect is dominated by the nonlinear dependence of the Planck function on the temperature. Additional effects due to the correlation between turbulent fluctuations in the absorptivity and temperature may be small relative to the Planck function effect for heavily sooting flames. This observation is drawn from a number of experimental and theoretical discussions. Nevertheless, additional analysis and data is needed to validate this observation for heavily sooting buoyancy dominated plumes.

  5. Bed slope effects on turbulent wave boundary layers: 1. Model validation and quantification of rough-turbulent results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, combined with a two-equation k-omega turbulence closure, is used to study converging-diverging effects from a sloping bed on turbulent (oscillatory) wave boundary layers. Bed shear stresses from the numerical model...

  6. Differential kinetic dynamics and heating of ions in the turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Stabile, S.; Pezzi, O.; Servidio, S.; De Marco, R.; Marcucci, F.; Bruno, R.; Lavraud, B.; De Keyser, J.; Consolini, G.; Brienza, D.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Retinò, A.; Vaivads, A.; Salatti, M.; Veltri, P.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind plasma is a fully ionized and turbulent gas ejected by the outer layers of the solar corona at very high speed, mainly composed by protons and electrons, with a small percentage of helium nuclei and a significantly lower abundance of heavier ions. Since particle collisions are practically negligible, the solar wind is typically not in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. Such a complex system must be described through self-consistent and fully nonlinear models, taking into account its multi-species composition and turbulence. We use a kinetic hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell numerical code to reproduce the turbulent energy cascade down to ion kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the uncontaminated solar wind plasma, with the aim of exploring the differential kinetic dynamics of the dominant ion species, namely protons and alpha particles. We show that the response of different species to the fluctuating electromagnetic fields is different. In particular, a significant differential heating of alphas with respect to protons is observed. Interestingly, the preferential heating process occurs in spatial regions nearby the peaks of ion vorticity and where strong deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium are recovered. Moreover, by feeding a simulator of a top-hat ion spectrometer with the output of the kinetic simulations, we show that measurements by such spectrometer planned on board the Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR mission), a candidate for the next M4 space mission of the European Space Agency, can provide detailed three-dimensional ion velocity distributions, highlighting important non-Maxwellian features. These results support the idea that future space missions will allow a deeper understanding of the physics of the interplanetary medium.

  7. Effects of Freestream Turbulence in a Model Wind Turbine Wake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Jin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The flow structure in the wake of a model wind turbine is explored under negligible and high turbulence in the freestream region of a wind tunnel at R e ∼ 7 × 10 4 . Attention is placed on the evolution of the integral scale and the contribution of the large-scale motions from the background flow. Hotwire anemometry was used to obtain the streamwise velocity at various streamwise and spanwise locations. The pre-multiplied spectral difference of the velocity fluctuations between the two cases shows a significant energy contribution from the background turbulence on scales larger than the rotor diameter. The integral scale along the rotor axis is found to grow linearly with distance, independent of the incoming turbulence levels. This scale appears to reach that of the incoming flow in the high turbulence case at x / d ∼ 35–40. The energy contribution from the turbine to the large-scale flow structures in the low turbulence case increases monotonically with distance. Its growth rate is reduced past x / d ∼ 6–7. There, motions larger than the rotor contribute ∼ 50 % of the total energy, suggesting that the population of large-scale motions is more intense in the intermediate field. In contrast, the wake in the high incoming turbulence is quickly populated with large-scale motions and plateau at x / d ∼ 3 .

  8. A Model for the Saturation of the Turbulent Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e. on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e. the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present the first scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover timescale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales...

  9. Refined subgrid-scale model for large-eddy simulation of helical turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli

    2013-01-01

    A refined two-term helical subgrid-scale (SGS) stress model with respect to that suggested by Li et al. [Phys. Rev. E 74, 026310 (2006)] is designed for large-eddy simulation (LES) of helical turbulence. The model coefficients in the new model are verified a priori to be scale invariant in inertial range, which proves that our model is local in scale. A dynamic method based on minimizing the residual resolved energy and helicity dissipations is suggested to simultaneously evaluate the coefficients of the mixed SGS model as the simulation progresses. In addition, an SGS helicity dissipation (or helicity flux) constraint condition is proposed to optimize the mixed two-term model. Both techniques are first tested and validated in the LES of forced isotropic helical turbulence. The statistical results are analyzed and compared with those obtained from the dynamic Smagorinsky model, the traditional dynamic mixed model, and the direct numerical simulation. It is found that the introduction of this dynamic procedure can help overcome the drawback of the traditional dynamic method which can not capture the negative helicity fluxes and SGS dissipations. The probability density functions of the energy flux and the conditioned helicity flux and SGS stress demonstrate that the helicity flux constrained dynamic SGS model can effectively predict the real SGS helical effects on the resolved scales, such as backscatters of energy and helicity, accurate helicity dissipation rate, and so on. The present models are also applied to the simulation of freely decaying isotropic turbulence with no apparent improvement observed in comparison with the traditional SGS models. The underlying reasons for these issues are addressed in detail.

  10. Rossby and Drift Wave Turbulence and Zonal Flows: the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, Colm; Quinn, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and also drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form survive in more realistic and complicated models, and as such form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence -zonostrophy and the invariant cascades are shown to be characterised...

  11. On the performance of a generic length scale turbulence model within an adaptive finite element ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jon; Piggott, M. D.; Ham, David A.; Popova, E. E.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Research into the use of unstructured mesh methods for ocean modelling has been growing steadily in the last few years. One advantage of using unstructured meshes is that one can concentrate resolution where it is needed. In addition, dynamic adaptive mesh optimisation (DAMO) strategies allow resolution to be concentrated when this is required. Despite the advantage that DAMO gives in terms of improving the spatial resolution where and when required, small-scale turbulence in the oceans still requires parameterisation. A two-equation, generic length scale (GLS) turbulence model (one equation for turbulent kinetic energy and another for a generic turbulence length-scale quantity) adds this parameterisation and can be used in conjunction with adaptive mesh techniques. In this paper, an implementation of the GLS turbulence parameterisation is detailed in a non-hydrostatic, finite-element, unstructured mesh ocean model, Fluidity-ICOM. The implementation is validated by comparing to both a laboratory-scale experiment and real-world observations, on both fixed and adaptive meshes. The model performs well, matching laboratory and observed data, with resolution being adjusted as necessary by DAMO. Flexibility in the prognostic fields used to construct the error metric used in DAMO is required to ensure best performance. Moreover, the adaptive mesh models perform as well as fixed mesh models in terms of root mean square error to observation or theoretical mixed layer depths, but uses fewer elements and hence has a reduced computational cost.

  12. MODELLING AND COMPUTATION OF UNSTEADY TURBULENT CAVITATION FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying; LU Chuan-jing; WU Lei

    2006-01-01

    Unsteady turbulent cavitation flows in a Venturi-type section and around a NACA0012 hydrofoil were simulated by two-dimensional computations of viscous compressible turbulent flow model.The Venturi-type section flow proved numerical precision and reliability of the physical model and the code, and further the cavitation around NACA0012 foil was investigated.These flows were calculated with a code of SIMPLE-type finite volume scheme, associated with a barotropic vapor/liquid state law which strongly links density and pressure variation.To simulate turbulent flows, modified RNG k- ε model was used.Numerical results obtained in the Venturi-type flow simulated periodic shedding of sheet cavity and was compared with experiment data, and the results of the NACA0012 foil show quasi-periodic vortex cavitation phenomenon.Results obtained concerning cavity shape and unsteady behavior, void ratio, and velocity field were found in good agreement with experiment ones.

  13. Conditional moment closure modeling of a lifted turbulent flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yong; QIU Rong; ZHOU Wei; FAN Weicheng

    2005-01-01

    Results obtained using conditional moment closure (CMC) approach to modeling a lifted turbulent hydrogen flame are presented. Predictions are based on k-ε-g turbulent closure, a 23-step chemical mechanism and a radially averaged CMC model. The objectives are to find out how radially averaged CMC can represent a lifted flame and which mechanism of flame stabilization can be described by this modeling method. As a first stage of the study of multi-dimensional CMC for large eddy simulation (LES) of the lifted turbulent flames, the effect of turbulence upon combustion is included, the high-order compact finite- difference scheme (Padé) is used and previously developed characteristic-wave-based boundary conditions for multi- component perfect gas mixtures are here extended to their conditional forms but the heat release due to combustion is not part of the turbulent calculations. Attention is focused to the lift-off region of the flame which is commonly considered as a cold flow. Comparison with published experimental data and the computational results shows that the lift-off height can be accurately determined, and Favre averaged radial profiles of temperature and species mole fractions are also reasonably well predicted. Some of the current flame stabilization mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Turbulence Modelling of A Lock-Release Oil Slick

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The motion of a lock-release oil slick as an immiscible two-fluid gravity current is numerically studied by a finite difference algorithm based on the volume of fluid (VOF) method for the basic formulation and a rigid cover approximation for the open free surface. Detailed numerical simulation with careful model validation reveals the existence of turbulence and the adaptability of the renormalization group (RNG) k-ε model for the Reynolds-stress closure in the case of the oil slick. The time evolution and spatial distribution of the mean velocity, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulent viscosity are characterized. The mechanism for the transition from an initial gravity-inertial phase to a second gravity-viscous phase is shown to be the relaminarization effect of the initially highly turbulent slick. Compared well with known theoretical analyses and experimental observations, the turbulence modeling results in self-similar spreading laws in terms of the fact that the oil slick passes through the initial gravity-inertial phase with the front speed decreasing as t-1/3 (where t is the time measured from lock release) and the second gravity-viscous phase with the front speed decreasing as t-5/8.

  15. Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris G. Panaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there.

  16. A study on the dependency between turbulent models and mesh configurations of CFD codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Jungjin; Heo, Yujin; Jerng, Dong-Wook [CAU, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper focuses on the analysis of the behavior of hydrogen mixing and hydrogen stratification, using the GOTHIC code and the CFD code. Specifically, we examined the mesh sensitivity and how the turbulence model affects hydrogen stratification or hydrogen mixing, depending on the mesh configuration. In this work, sensitivity analyses for the meshes and the turbulence models were conducted for missing and stratification phenomena. During severe accidents in a nuclear power plants, the generation of hydrogen may occur and this will complicate the atmospheric condition of the containment by causing stratification of air, steam, and hydrogen. This could significantly impact containment integrity analyses, as hydrogen could be accumulated in local region. From this need arises the importance of research about stratification of gases in the containment. Two computation fluid dynamics code, i.e. GOTHIC and STAR-CCM+ were adopted and the computational results were benchmarked against the experimental data from PANDA facility. The main findings observed through the present work can be summarized as follows: 1) In the case of the GOTHIC code, it was observed that the aspect ratio of the mesh was found more important than the mesh size. Also, if the number of the mesh is over 3,000, the effects of the turbulence models were marginal. 2) For STAR-CCM+, the tendency is quite different from the GOTHIC code. That is, the effects of the turbulence models were small for fewer number of the mesh, however, as the number of mesh increases, the effects of the turbulence models becomes significant. Another observation is that away from the injection orifice, the role of the turbulence models tended to be important due to the nature of mixing process and inducted jet stream.

  17. A Lower Bound on Adiabatic Heating of Compressed Turbulence for Simulation and Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-04-01

    The energy in turbulent flow can be amplified by compression, when the compression occurs on a timescale shorter than the turbulent dissipation time. This mechanism may play a part in sustaining turbulence in various astrophysical systems, including molecular clouds. The amount of turbulent amplification depends on the net effect of the compressive forcing and turbulent dissipation. By giving an argument for a bound on this dissipation, we give a lower bound for the scaling of the turbulent velocity with the compression ratio in compressed turbulence. That is, turbulence undergoing compression will be enhanced at least as much as the bound given here, subject to a set of caveats that will be outlined. Used as a validation check, this lower bound suggests that some models of compressing astrophysical turbulence are too dissipative. The technique used highlights the relationship between compressed turbulence and decaying turbulence.

  18. A lower bound on adiabatic heating of compressed turbulence for simulation and model validation

    CERN Document Server

    Davidovits, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The energy in turbulent flow can be amplified by compression, when the compression occurs on a timescale shorter than the turbulent dissipation time. This mechanism may play a part in sustaining turbulence in various astrophysical systems, including molecular clouds. The amount of turbulent amplification depends on the net effect of the compressive forcing and turbulent dissipation. By giving an argument for a bound on this dissipation, we give a lower bound for the scaling of the turbulent velocity with compression ratio in compressed turbulence. That is, turbulence undergoing compression will be enhanced at least as much as the bound given here, subject to a set of caveats that will be outlined. Used as a validation check, this lower bound suggests that some simulations and models of compressing astrophysical turbulence are too dissipative. The technique used highlights the relationship between compressed turbulence and decaying turbulence.

  19. Development of a Complete Model of Turbulence Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    model have been those of Bush and Fendell (Ref 14 - for the mixing-length model) and Wilcox and Traci. In neither case were effects of pressure gradient...Second Edition (1976). - - - ---. ~A 14. Bush, .B. and Fendell , F.E., "Asymptotic Analysis of Turbulent Channel and Boundary-Layer Flow," JFM, Vol 56

  20. Second Order Model for Strongly Sheared Compressible Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzougui hamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a model designed to describe a strongly sheared compressible homogeneous turbulent flows. Such flows are far from equilibrium and are well represented by the A3 and A4 cases of the DNS of Sarkar. Speziale and Xu developed a relaxation model in incompressible turbulence able to take into account significant departures from equilibrium. In a previous paper, Radhia et al. proposed a relaxation model similar to that of Speziale and Xu .This model is based on an algebraic representation of the Reynolds stress tensor, much simpler than that of Speziale and Xu and it gave a good result for rapid axisymetric contraction. In this work, we propose to extend the Radhia et al’s. model to compressible homogenous turbulence. This model is based on the pressure-strain model of Launder et al., where we incorporate turbulent Mach number in order to take into account compressibility effects. To assess this model, two numerical simulations were performed which are similar to the cases A3 and A4 of the DNS of Sarkar.

  1. A new turbulence-based model for sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Wiggs, Giles; Bailey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. While many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. However, turbulence has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study we present a new transport model (the 'turbulence model') that accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) and vertical (w) components of wind flow. The turbulence model is fitted to wind velocity and sediment transport data from a field experiment undertaken in Namibia's Skeleton Coast National Park, and its performance at three temporal resolutions (10 Hz, 1 Hz, 1 min) is compared to two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003). The validity of the three models is analysed under a variety of saltation conditions, using a 2-hour (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset from the Skeleton Coast and a 5-hour (1 min measurement resolution) dataset from the southwestern Kalahari Desert. The turbulence model is shown to outperform the Radok and Dong models when predicting total saltation count over the three experimental periods. For all temporal resolutions presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the turbulence model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.34%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The strong performance of the turbulence model can be attributed to a lag in mass flux response built into its formulation, which can be adapted depending on the temporal resolution of investigation. This accounts for the inherent lag within the physical

  2. Using Dynamically Coupled Turbine/Wind Simulations to Investigate the Influence of Atmospheric Turbulence in Turbine Wake Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, R.; Koo, E.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B.; Lundquist, J. K.; Canfield, J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to increase our efficiency of energy capture in wind farms, optimize turbine arrangements, and adapt wind-turbine technology to optimal performance in common atmospheric conditions such as low level jets (LLJ), it is critical to understand the dynamic interactions between turbulence and multiple wind turbines. Ambient atmospheric turbulence interacts with spinning turbines producing the critical mechanism for the recovery of the wind field behind a wind turbine. This turbine-influenced turbulent wind field creates the environment surrounding downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus controlling the amount of wind energy available for harvesting as well as the nature of the wear and tear that downwind turbines endure. The strength of the turbulent structures and their length-scales evolve downstream. Thus, the conditions to which downstream turbines are exposed, their productivity, and potentially their lifespan is a function of their position within the turbulent wake of upstream turbines. A numerical technique, WindBlade, has been developed for characterizing the interaction of spinning wind turbines and unsteady/heterogeneous atmospheric boundary layers at length scales ranging from blade-chord-scale (meters) to turbine-array-scale (multiple kilometers). This implementation of this technique combines an R&D100 winning numerical tool, HIGRAD/FIRETEC, a fully-compressible atmospheric hydrodynamics model with novel techniques to capture forces exchanged between the atmosphere and turbine as it rotates. The blade-induced forces on the wind field over the along the span of spinning turbine blades interacts with any oncoming atmospheric turbulence or shear, thus producing turbine wakes which are functions of turbine blade geometry and pitch, rotation speed, topographic and vegetation influences, and of course ambient wind speed, direction, shear, and turbulence. TurbSim, which creates vertical planes of three-dimensional turbulent wind fields based on empirical

  3. Coupled Dynamics of Turbulent Water Flow and Non-Spherical Particles Through Novel Measurement Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, M.; Meyer, C.; Bellani, G.; Variano, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for simultaneously measuring both the fluid and particle phases in a dense particle-laden flow or slurry. There is no limit to the technique's ability to resolve very high particle number density. With this, we measure the motion of particles in high-Reynolds number turbulent water flow. The particles we consider include spheres, ellipsoids, and completely irregular geometries. The particles range from near neutrally buoyant to a specific gravity of 2. We measure the particles' translation and rotation, while simultaneously measuring the turbulent flow surrounding them. With this information, we can determine: the effect of particles on turbulent flow (e.g. enhanced dissipation); the effect of turbulent flow on particle (e.g. eddy diffusivity and modified settling velocity); and the dynamics at the particle interfaces which explain theses effects. In this presentation, we explain the method; present results on the rotational diffusion of particles; and present results on how particles affect the ambient turbulent flow.

  4. Applications of weakly compressible model to turbulent flow problem towards adaptive turbulence simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takuya; Yokomine, Takehiko; Shimizu, Akihiko

    2002-11-01

    We have been engaged in the development of multi-scale adaptive simulation technique for incompressible turbulent flow. This is designed as that important scale components in the flow field are detected automatically by lifting wavelet and solved selectively. In conventional incompressible scheme, it is very common to solve Poisson equation of pressure to meet the divergence free constraints of incompressible flow. It may be not impossible to solve the Poisson eq. in the adaptive way, but this is very troublesome because it requires generation of control volume at each time step. We gave an eye on weakly compressible model proposed by Bao(2001). This model was derived from zero Mach limit asymptotic analysis of compressible Navier-Stokes eq. and does not need to solve the Poisson eq. at all. But it is relatively new and it requires demonstration study before the combination with the adaptation by wavelet. In present study, 2-D and 3-D Backstep flow were selected as test problems and applicability to turbulent flow is verified in detail. Besides, combination of adaptation by wavelet with weakly compressible model towards the adaptive turbulence simulation is discussed.

  5. Modelling turbulent stellar convection zones: sub-grid scales effects

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A; Brun, A S; Charbonneau, P; Mathis, S; Smolarkiewicz, P K

    2016-01-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modelled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We deriv...

  6. Subgrid Modeling of AGN-Driven Turbulence in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2008-01-01

    Hot, underdense bubbles powered by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are likely to play a key role in halting catastrophic cooling in the centers of cool-core galaxy clusters. We present three-dimensional simulations that capture the evolution of such bubbles, using an adaptive-mesh hydrodynamic code, FLASH3, to which we have added a subgrid model of turbulence and mixing. While pure-hydro simulations indicate that AGN bubbles are disrupted into resolution-dependent pockets of underdense gas, proper modeling of subgrid turbulence indicates that this a poor approximation to a turbulent cascade that continues far beyond the resolution limit. Instead, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities act to effectively mix the heated region with its surroundings, while at the same time preserving it as a coherent structure, consistent with observations. Thus bubbles are transformed into hot clouds of mixed material as they move outwards in the hydrostatic intracluster medium (ICM), much as large airbursts lead to a distinctive ``mushroo...

  7. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier–Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number’. PMID:28167585

  8. A Nonlinear k-ε Turbulence Model Applicable to High Pressure Gradient and Large Curvature Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyao Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the RANS turbulence models solve the Reynolds stress by linear hypothesis with isotropic model. They can not capture all kinds of vortexes in the turbomachineries. In this paper, an improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is proposed, which is modified from the RNG k-ε turbulence model and Wilcox's k-ω turbulence model. The Reynolds stresses are solved by nonlinear methods. The nonlinear k-ε turbulence model can calculate the near wall region without the use of wall functions. The improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is used to simulate the flow field in a curved rectangular duct. The results based on the improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model agree well with the experimental results. The calculation results prove that the nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is available for high pressure gradient flows and large curvature flows, and it can be used to capture complex vortexes in a turbomachinery.

  9. Assessment of turbulence models for pulsatile flow inside a heart pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azawy, Mohammed G; Turan, A; Revell, A

    2016-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is applied to study the unsteady flow inside a pulsatile pump left ventricular assist device, in order to assess the sensitivity to a range of commonly used turbulence models. Levels of strain and wall shear stress are directly relevant to the evaluation of risk from haemolysis and thrombosis, and thus understanding the sensitivity to these turbulence models is important in the assessment of uncertainty in CFD predictions. The study focuses on a positive displacement or pulsatile pump, and the CFD model includes valves and moving pusher plate. An unstructured dynamic layering method was employed to capture this cyclic motion, and valves were simulated in their fully open position to mimic the natural scenario, with in/outflow triggered at control planes away from the valves. Six turbulence models have been used, comprising three relevant to the low Reynolds number nature of this flow and three more intended to investigate different transport effects. In the first group, we consider the shear stress transport (SST) [Formula: see text] model in both its standard and transition-sensitive forms, and the 'laminar' model in which no turbulence model is used. In the second group, we compare the one equation Spalart-Almaras model, the standard two equation [Formula: see text] and the full Reynolds stress model (RSM). Following evaluation of spatial and temporal resolution requirements, results are compared with available experimental data. The model was operated at a systolic duration of 40% of the pumping cycle and a pumping rate of 86 BPM (beats per minute). Contrary to reasonable preconception, the 'transition' model, calibrated to incorporate additional physical modelling specifically for these flow conditions, was not noticeably superior to the standard form of the model. Indeed, observations of turbulent viscosity ratio reveal that the transition model initiates a premature increase of turbulence in this flow, when compared with

  10. A dual-scale turbulence model for gas-liquid bubbly flows☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Guan; Zhaoqi Li; Lijun Wang⁎; Xi Li; Youwei Cheng

    2015-01-01

    A dual-scale turbulence model is applied to simulate cocurrent upward gas–liquid bubbly flows and validated with available experimental data. In the model, liquid phase turbulence is split into shear-induced and bubble-induced turbulence. Single-phase standard k-εmodel is used to compute shear-induced turbulence and another transport equation is added to model bubble-induced turbulence. In the latter transport equation, energy loss due to interface drag is the production term, and the characteristic length of bubble-induced turbulence, simply the bubble diameter in this work, is introduced to model the dissipation term. The simulated results agree well with experimental data of the test cases and it is demonstrated that the proposed dual-scale turbulence model outperforms other models. Analysis of the predicted turbulence shows that the main part of turbulent kinetic en-ergy is the bubble-induced one while the shear-induced turbulent viscosity predominates within turbulent vis-cosity, especially at the pipe center. The underlying reason is the apparently different scales for the two kinds of turbulence production mechanisms:the shear-induced turbulence is on the scale of the whole pipe while the bubble-induced turbulence is on the scale of bubble diameter. Therefore, the model reflects the multi-scale phe-nomenon involved in gas–liquid bubbly flows.

  11. Global MHD Modelling of the ISM - From large towards small scale turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A; Avillez, Miguel A. de; Breitschwerdt, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Dealing numerically with the turbulent nature and non-linearity of the physical processes involved in the ISM requires the use of sophisticated numerical schemes coupled to HD and MHD mathematical models. SNe are the main drivers of the interstellar turbulence by transferring kinetic energy into the system. This energy is dissipated by shocks (which is more efficient) and by molecular viscosity. We carried out adaptive mesh refinement simulations (with a finest resolution of 0.625 pc) of the turbulent ISM embedded in a magnetic field with mean field components of 2 and 3 $\\mu$G. The time scale of our run was 400 Myr, sufficiently long to avoid memory effects of the initial setup, and to allow for a global dynamical equilibrium to be reached in case of a constant energy input rate. It is found that the longitudinal and transverse turbulent length scales have a time averaged (over a period of 50 Myr) ratio of 0.52-0.6, almost similar to the one expected for isotropic homogeneous turbulence. The mean characteris...

  12. Limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Howes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The limitations of Hall MHD as a model for turbulence in weakly collisional plasmas are explored using quantitative comparisons to Vlasov-Maxwell kinetic theory over a wide range of parameter space. The validity of Hall MHD in the cold ion limit is shown, but spurious undamped wave modes exist in Hall MHD when the ion temperature is finite. It is argued that turbulence in the dissipation range of the solar wind must be one, or a mixture, of three electromagnetic wave modes: the parallel whistler, oblique whistler, or kinetic Alfvén waves. These modes are generally well described by Hall MHD. Determining the applicability of linear kinetic damping rates in turbulent plasmas requires a suite of fluid and kinetic nonlinear numerical simulations. Contrasting fluid and kinetic simulations will also shed light on whether the presence of spurious wave modes alters the nonlinear couplings inherent in turbulence and will illuminate the turbulent dynamics and energy transfer in the regime of the characteristic ion kinetic scales.

  13. Constructive modelling of structural turbulence: computational experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belotserkovskii, O M; Oparin, A M; Troshkin, O V [Institute for Computer Aided Design, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vtoraya Brestskaya st., 19/18, Moscow, 123056 (Russian Federation); Chechetkin, V M [Keldysh Institute for Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miusskaya sq., 4, Moscow, 125047 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: o.bel@icad.org.ru, E-mail: a.oparin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: troshkin@icad.org.ru, E-mail: chech@gin@keldysh.ru

    2008-12-15

    Constructively, the analysis of the phenomenon of turbulence must and can be performed through direct numerical simulations of mechanics supposed to be inherent to secondary flows. This one reveals itself through such instances as large vortices, structural instabilities, vortex cascades and principal modes discussed in this paper. Like fragments of a puzzle, they speak of a motion ordered with its own nuts and bolts, however chaotic it appears at first sight. This opens an opportunity for a multi-oriented approach of which a prime ideology seems to be a rational combination of grid, spectral and statistical methods. An attempt is made to bring together the above instances and produce an alternative point of view on the phenomenon in question when based on the main laws of conservation.

  14. Large scale dynamics in flux driven gyrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Allfrey, S.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Strugarek, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2010-05-01

    The turbulent transport governed by the toroidal ion temperature gradient driven instability is analysed with the full-f global gyrokinetic code GYSELA (Grandgirard et al 2007 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49 B173) when the system is driven by a prescribed heat source. Weak, yet finite, collisionality governs a neoclassical ion heat flux that can compete with the turbulent driven transport. In turn, the ratio of turbulent to neoclassical transport increases with the source magnitude, resulting in the degradation of confinement with additional power. The turbulent flux exhibits avalanche-like events, characterized by intermittent outbursts which propagate ballistically roughly at the diamagnetic velocity. Locally, the temperature gradient can drop well below the linear stability threshold. Large outbursts are found to correlate with streamer-like structures of the convection cells albeit their Fourier spectrum departs significantly from that of the most unstable linear modes. Last, the poloidal rotation of turbulent eddies is essentially governed by the radial electric field at moderate density gradient.

  15. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  16. Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-16

    Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows FA9550-11-1-0203 Dr. Charles E. Tinney, Aerospace Engineering and Engineering...Low-Dimensional Dynamical Characteristics of Shock Wave /Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Conical Flows Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-11-1-0203...driven by transonic resonance (Zaman et al, 2002). What is common about many of these planar nozzle studies is that there is just one single

  17. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Rincon, F.; Cossu, C.; Lesur, G.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Longaretti, P.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo mechanisminvolving magnetorotational instability (MRI). This dynamo may notably contribute to explaining the time-variability of various accreting systems, as high-resolution simulations of MRI dynamo turbulence exhibit statistical self-organization into large-scale cyclic dynamics. However, understanding the physics underlying these statistical states and assessing their exact astrophysical relevance is theoretically challenging. The study of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has highlighted the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming impossibility of a dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl number (Pm), a common regime in disks. Arguably though, these simple laminar structures may not be fully representative of the complex, statistically self-organized states expected in astrophysical regimes. Here, we aim at closing this seeming discrepancy by reporting the numerical discovery of exactly periodic, yet semi-statistical "chimeral MRI dynamo states" which are the organized outcome of a succession of MRI-unstable, non-axisymmetric dynamical stages of different forms and amplitudes. Interestingly, these states, while reminiscent of the statistical complexity of turbulent simulations, involve the same physical principles as simpler laminar cycles, and their analysis further confirms the theory that subcritical turbulent magnetic diffusion impedes the sustainment of an MRI dynamo at low Pm. Overall, chimera dynamo cycles therefore offer an unprecedented dual physical and statistical perspective on dynamos in rotating shear flows, which may prove useful in devising more accurate, yet intuitive mean-field models of time-dependent turbulent disk dynamos. Movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Stochastic linearization of turbulent dynamics of dispersive waves in equilibrium and non-equilibrium state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shixiao W.; Lu, Haihao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing dispersive wave turbulence in the long time dynamics is central to understanding of many natural phenomena, e.g., in atmosphere ocean dynamics, nonlinear optics, and plasma physics. Using the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam nonlinear system as a prototypical example, we show that in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium steady state the turbulent state even in the strongly nonlinear regime possesses an effective linear stochastic structure in renormalized normal variables. In this framework, we can well characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics, which are dominated by long-wavelength renormalized waves. We further demonstrate that the energy flux is nearly saturated by the long-wavelength renormalized waves in non-equilibrium steady state. The scenario of such effective linear stochastic dynamics can be extended to study turbulent states in other nonlinear wave systems.

  19. The role of turbulence-flow interactions in L- to H-mode transition dynamics: recent progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent experimental and simulation work has substantially advanced the understanding of L-mode plasma edge turbulence and plasma flows and their mutual interaction across the L-H transition. Flow acceleration and E   ×   B shear flow amplification via the turbulent Reynolds stress have been directly observed in multiple devices, using multi-tip probe arrays, Doppler backscattering, beam emission spectroscopy, and gas puff imaging diagnostics. L-H transitions characterized by limit-cycle oscillations (LCO) allow probing of the trigger dynamics and the synergy of turbulence-driven and pressure-gradient-driven flows with high spatio-temporal resolution. L-mode turbulent structures exhibit characteristic changes in topology (tilting) and temporal and radial correlation preceding the L-H transition. Long-range toroidal flow correlations increase preceding edge-transport-barrier formation. The energy transfer from the turbulence spectrum to large-scale axisymmetric flows has been quantified in L-LCO and fast L-H transitions in several devices. After formation of a transient barrier, the increasing ion pressure gradient (via the E   ×   B flow shear associated with diamagnetic flow) sustains fluctuation suppression and secures the transition to H-mode. Heuristic models of the L-H trigger dynamics have progressed from 0D predator-prey models to 1D extended models, including neoclassical ion flow-damping and pressure-gradient evolution. Initial results from 2D and 3D reduced fluid models have been obtained for high-collisionality regimes.

  20. Control of spiral waves and turbulent states in a cardiac model by travelling-wave perturbations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏业; 谢平; 尹华伟

    2003-01-01

    We propose a travelling-wave perturbation method to control the spatiotemporal dynamics in a cardiac model.It is numerically demonstrated that the method can successfully suppress the wave instability(alternans in action potential duration) in the one-dimensional case and convert spiral waves and turbulent states to the normal travelling wave states in the two-dimensional case.An experimental scheme is suggested which may provide a new design for a cardiac defibrillator.

  1. Dynamics of Ion Temperature Gradient Turbulence and Transport with a Static Magnetic Island

    CERN Document Server

    Izacard, Olivier; James, Spencer D; Brennan, Dylan P

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the interaction mechanism between large-scale magnetohydrodynamics instabilities and small-scale drift-wave microturbulence is essential for predicting and optimizing the performance of magnetic confinement based fusion energy experiments. We report progress on understanding these interactions using both analytic theory and numerical simulation, with BOUT++ [B. Dudson et al., Comput. Phys. Comm. 180, 1467 (2009)] used to evolve simple five-field fluid models in a sheared slab geometry. This work focuses upon understanding the dynamics of the ion temperature gradient instability in the presence of a background static magnetic island in a weakly electromagnetic two-dimensional five-field model as key parameters such as ion temperature gradient, magnetic gradients and static magnetic island size are varied. The simulation results are then used to calculate the effective turbulent transport coefficient (i.e. resistivity) that is compared against classical coefficient. As part of this work, t...

  2. On the dynamical mechanism of cross-over from chaotic to turbulent states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Ananthkrishna

    2005-03-01

    The Portevin–Le Chatelier effect is one of the few examples of organization of defects. Here the spatio-temporal dynamics emerges from the cooperative behavior of the constituent defects, namely dislocations and point defects. Recent dynamical approach to the study of experimental time series reports an intriguing cross-over phenomenon from a low dimensional chaotic to an infinite dimensional scale invariant power-law regime of stress drops in experiments on CuAl single crystals and AlMg polycrystals, as a function of strain rate. We show that an extension of a dynamical model due to Ananthakrishna and coworkers for the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect reproduces this cross-over. At low and medium strain rates, the model shows chaos with the structure of the attractor resembling the reconstructed experimental attractor. At high strain rates, the model exhibits a power-law statistics for the magnitudes and durations of the stress drops as in experiments. Concomitantly, the largest Lyapunov exponent is zero. In this regime, there is a finite density of null exponents which itself follows a power law. This feature is similar to the Lyapunov spectrum of a shell model for turbulence. The marginal nature of this state is visualized through slow manifold approach.

  3. Modelling of Turbulent Nonpremixed CH4/H2 Flame Using Second-Moment Turbulence Closure Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国岫

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent nonpremixed CH4/H2 flame has been simulated using several typical differential secondmoment turbulence closure (SMTC) models. To clarify the applicability of the various models, the LRR-IP model,JM model, SSG model as well as two modified LRR-IP models were tested. Some of above-mentioned SMTC models cannot provide the overall satisfactory predictions of this challenging case. It is confirmed again that the standard LRR-IP model considerably overpredict the centerline velocity decay rate, and therefore performs not well. Also it is interesting to observe that the JM model does not perform well in this challenging test case, although it has already been proved successful in other cases. The SSG model produces quite satisfactory prediction and performs equally well or better than the two modified LRR-IP models in the reacting case. It can be concluded that the modified LRR-IP models as well as the SSG model are superior to the other SMTC models in the turbulent nonpremixed CH4/H2 flame.

  4. Intrinsic Axial Flows in CSDX and Dynamical Symmetry Breaking in ITG Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacong; Diamond, P. H.; Hong, R.; Thakur, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma rotation can enhance confinement when combined with weak magnetic shear. Also, external rotation drive in future fusion devices (e.g. ITER) will be weak. Together, these two considerations drive us to study intrinsic rotations with weak magnetic shear. In particular, a global transition is triggered in CSDX when magnetic field B exceeds a critical strength threshold. At the transition an ion feature emerges in the core turbulence. Recent studies show that a dynamical symmetry breaking mechanism in drift wave turbulence can drive intrinsic axial flows in CSDX, as well as enhance intrinsic rotations in tokamaks. Here, we focus on what happens when ion features emerge in CSDX, and how ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence drives intrinsic rotations with weak magnetic shear. The effect of dynamical symmetry breaking in ITG turbulence depends on the stability regime. In a marginally stable regime, dynamical symmetry breaking results in an augmented turbulence viscosity (chi-phi). However, when ITG is far from the stability boundary, a negative increment in turbulent viscosity is induced. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award No. DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  5. Modeling H2 formation in the turbulent ISM: Solenoidal versus compressive turbulent forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Milosavljevic, Milica; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S

    2011-01-01

    We present results from high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the turbulent interstellar medium that study the influence of the nature of the turbulence on the formation of molecular hydrogen. We have examined both solenoidal (divergence-free) and compressive (curl-free) turbulent driving, and show that compressive driving leads to faster H2 formation, owing to the higher peak densities produced in the gas. The difference in the H2 formation rate can be as much as an order of magnitude at early times, but declines at later times as the highest density regions become fully molecular and stop contributing to the total H2 formation rate. We have also used our results to test a simple prescription suggested by Gnedin et al. (2009) for modeling the influence of unresolved density fluctuations on the H2 formation rate in large-scale simulations of the ISM. We find that this approach works well when the H2 fraction is small, but breaks down once the highest density gas becomes fully molecular.

  6. Analysis of drop deformation dynamics in turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie Nachtigall; Daniel Zedel; Matthias Kraume

    2016-01-01

    Drop breakage and coalescence influence the particle formation in liquid–liquid dispersions. In order to reduce the influencing factors of the whole dispersion process, single drops where coalescence processes can be neglected were analyzed in this work. Drops passing the turbulent vicinity of a single stirrer blade were investi-gated by high-speed imaging. In order to gain a statistical y relevant amount of drops passing the area of interest and corresponding breakage events, at least 1600 droplets were considered for each parameter set of this work. A specially developed fully automatic image analysis based on Matlab® was used for the evaluation of the resulting high amount of image data. This al owed the elimination of the time-consuming manual analysis and further-more, al owed the objective evaluation of the drops' behavior. Different deformation parameters were consid-ered in order to describe the drop deformation dynamics properly. Regarding the ratio of both main particle axes (θaxes), which was therefore approximated through an el ipse, al owed the determination of very small de-viations from the spherical shape. The perimeter of the particle (θperi) was used for the description of highly de-formed shapes. In this work the results of a higher viscosity paraffin oil (ηd=127 mPa·s) and a low viscosity solvent (petroleum,ηd=1.7 mPa·s) are presented with and without the addition of SDS to the continuous water phase. All results show that the experimental y determined oscil ation but also deformation times underlie a wide spreading. Drop deformations significantly increased not only with increasing droplet viscosity, but also with decreasing interfacial tension. Highly deformed particles of one droplet species were more likely to break than more or less spherical particles. As droplet fragmentation results from a variety of different macro-scale de-formed particles, it is not assumed that a critical deformation value must be reached for the

  7. Stochastic modelling of primitive equation and quasi-geostrophic subgrid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Jorgen; Kitsios, Vassili; Dix, Martin; Osbrough, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    A general method for stochastic and deterministic modelling of subgrid scale turbulence is presented and applied to primitive equation and quasi-geostrophic models of atmospheric and oceanic flows. Dynamical and thermodynamical subgrid-scale parameterisations of eddy drain, net dissipation and stochastic backscatter are calculated for a multi-level primitive equation atmospheric general circulation model. The parameterisations have only moderate variability with height and a cusp behaviour with peaks near the largest retained wavenumber. They are compared with corresponding results for quasi-geostrophic models of the atmosphere and ocean for which the parameterisations are shown to satisfy scaling laws. Large-eddy simulations (LES) with the subgrid terms very closely reproduce the results of higher resolution direct numerical simulations. The method is shown to produce parameterisations and LES with similar skill for three-dimensional turbulence in boundary layer channel flow.

  8. Front structure and dynamics in dense colonies of motile bacteria: Role of active turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Rayan; Perlekar, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    We study the spreading of a bacterial colony undergoing turbulent like collective motion. We present two minimalistic models to investigate the interplay between population growth and coherent structures arising from turbulence. Using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the proposed models we find that turbulence has two prominent effects on the spatial growth of the colony: (a) the front speed is enhanced, and (b) the front gets crumpled. Both these effects, which we highlight by using statistical tools, are markedly different in our two models. We also show that the crumpled front structure and the passive scalar fronts in random flows are related in certain regimes.

  9. New DNS and modeling results for turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Arne; El Khoury, George; Grundestam, Olof; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Linne Flow Centre Team

    2013-11-01

    The near-wall region of turbulent pipe and channel flows (as well as zero-pressure gradient boundary layers) have been shown to exhibit a very high degree of similarity in terms of all statistical moments and many other features, while even the mean velocity profile in the two cases exhibits significant differences between in the outer region. The wake part of the profile, i.e. the deviation from the log-law, in the outer region is of substantially larger amplitude in pipe flow as compared to channel flow (although weaker than in boundary layer flow). This intriguing feature has been well known but has no simple explanation. Model predictions typically give identical results for the two flows. We have analyzed a new set of DNS for pipe and channel flows (el Khoury et al. 2013, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion) for friction Reynolds numbers up to 1000 and made comparing calculations with differential Reynolds stress models (DRSM). We have strong indications that the key factor behind the difference in mean velocity in the outer region can be coupled to differences in the turbulent diffusion in this region. This is also supported by DRSM results, where interesting differences are seen depending on the sophistication of modeling the turbulent diffusion coefficient.

  10. The study of PDF turbulence models in combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1991-01-01

    In combustion computations, it is known that the predictions of chemical reaction rates are poor if conventional turbulence models are used. The probability density function (pdf) method seems to be the only alternative that uses local instantaneous values of the temperature, density, etc., in predicting chemical reaction rates, and thus is the only viable approach for more accurate turbulent combustion calculations. The fact that the pdf equation has a very large dimensionality renders finite difference schemes extremely demanding on computer memories and thus impractical. A logical alternative is the Monte Carlo scheme. Since CFD has a certain maturity as well as acceptance, it seems that the use of a combined CFD and Monte Carlo scheme is more beneficial. Therefore, a scheme is chosen that uses a conventional CFD flow solver in calculating the flow field properties such as velocity, pressure, etc., while the chemical reaction part is solved using a Monte Carlo scheme. The discharge of a heated turbulent plane jet into quiescent air was studied. Experimental data for this problem shows that when the temperature difference between the jet and the surrounding air is small, buoyancy effect can be neglected and the temperature can be treated as a passive scalar. The fact that jet flows have a self-similar solution lends convenience in the modeling study. Futhermore, the existence of experimental data for turbulent shear stress and temperature variance make the case ideal for the testing of pdf models wherein these values can be directly evaluated.

  11. On the modeling of wave-enhanced turbulence nearshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Saeed; Thomson, Jim; Özkan-Haller, Tuba; Umlauf, Lars; Zippel, Seth

    2016-07-01

    A high resolution k-ω two-equation turbulence closure model, including surface wave forcing was employed to fully resolve turbulence dissipation rate profiles close to the ocean surface. Model results were compared with observations from Surface Wave Instrument Floats with Tracking (SWIFTs) in the nearshore region at New River Inlet, North Carolina USA, in June 2012. A sensitivity analysis for different physical parameters and wave and turbulence formulations was performed. The flux of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) prescribed by wave dissipation from a numerical wave model was compared with the conventional prescription using the wind friction velocity. A surface roughness length of 0.6 times the significant wave height was proposed, and the flux of TKE was applied at a distance below the mean sea surface that is half of this roughness length. The wave enhanced layer had a total depth that is almost three times the significant wave height. In this layer the non-dimensionalized Terray scaling with power of - 1.8 (instead of - 2) was applicable.

  12. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  13. Dynamics and structure analysis of coherent turbulent structures at the boundary of toroidally confined plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchert, Golo

    2013-12-13

    The safe and reliable satisfaction of the world's increasing energy demand at affordable costs is one of the major challenges of our century. Nuclear fusion power plants following the magnetic confinement approach may play an essential role in solving this issue. The energy loss of the fusion plasma due to plasma turbulence reduces the efficiency and poses a threat to the first wall of a fusion reactor. Close to the wall, in the scrape-off layer, this transport is dominated by blobs or filaments: Localized structures of increased pressure, which transport energy and particles towards the wall by propagating radially outwards. Their contribution to the transport depends on their size, propagation velocity and generation rate. An analytical model for the evolution of blobs predicts their velocity and size, but not the generation rate. Experiments indicate that edge turbulence in the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (the boundary between the confined plasma and the scrape-off layer) is involved in the blob generation process and should influence the generation rate. The present thesis aims at answering two main questions: How well do the blob properties predicted from the simple model compare to experimental observations in more complex magnetic field configurations of actual fusion experiments and does the edge turbulence influence the blob properties during the generation process. A fast camera was used to measure blob properties in two devices, TJ-K and ASDEX Upgrade. In TJ-K, blob sizes and velocities were determined together with the generation rate. An overall agreement with the predictions from the simple model is found. For the first time a clear influence of the edge dynamics on the analyzed blob properties is demonstrated. These measurements include the first systematic comparison of the structure-size scaling inside and outside of the last closed flux surface. Furthermore, measurements with a multi-probe array are used to reconstruct the blob

  14. Development of a recursion RNG-based turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George; Thangam, S.

    1993-01-01

    Reynolds stress closure models based on the recursion renormalization group theory are developed for the prediction of turbulent separated flows. The proposed model uses a finite wavenumber truncation scheme to account for the spectral distribution of energy. In particular, the model incorporates effects of both local and nonlocal interactions. The nonlocal interactions are shown to yield a contribution identical to that from the epsilon-renormalization group (RNG), while the local interactions introduce higher order dispersive effects. A formal analysis of the model is presented and its ability to accurately predict separated flows is analyzed from a combined theoretical and computational stand point. Turbulent flow past a backward facing step is chosen as a test case and the results obtained based on detailed computations demonstrate that the proposed recursion -RNG model with finite cut-off wavenumber can yield very good predictions for the backstep problem.

  15. Refined Turbulence Modeling for Swirl Velocity in Turbomachinery Seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhyo Kim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized new form of the rotation-sensitive source term coefficient previously proposed by Bardina and colleagues as an extension of the standard k-ε turbulence model was developed. The proposal made by Bardina and colleagues focused on rotating flows without significant turbulence generation, and the result was a negative-valued constant coefficient. The new functional form developed here for the coefficient has global as well as local dependence. The new model predictions of laser Doppler anemometry measurements of swirling flows in labyrinth seals were compared with the swirl distribution measurements and with the standard k-ε model (i.e., no rotation source term predictions. It was found that for the labyrinth seal cases for which detailed measurements are available, the standard k-ε model gives unsatisfactory predictions, whereas the new model gives significantly improved predictions.

  16. A compressible near-wall turbulence model for boundary layer calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R. M. C.; Zhang, H. S.; Lai, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A compressible near-wall two-equation model is derived by relaxing the assumption of dynamical field similarity between compressible and incompressible flows. This requires justifications for extending the incompressible models to compressible flows and the formulation of the turbulent kinetic energy equation in a form similar to its incompressible counterpart. As a result, the compressible dissipation function has to be split into a solenoidal part, which is not sensitive to changes of compressibility indicators, and a dilational part, which is directly affected by these changes. This approach isolates terms with explicit dependence on compressibility so that they can be modeled accordingly. An equation that governs the transport of the solenoidal dissipation rate with additional terms that are explicitly dependent on the compressibility effects is derived similarly. A model with an explicit dependence on the turbulent Mach number is proposed for the dilational dissipation rate. Thus formulated, all near-wall incompressible flow models could be expressed in terms of the solenoidal dissipation rate and straight-forwardly extended to compressible flows. Therefore, the incompressible equations are recovered correctly in the limit of constant density. The two-equation model and the assumption of constant turbulent Prandtl number are used to calculate compressible boundary layers on a flat plate with different wall thermal boundary conditions and free-stream Mach numbers. The calculated results, including the near-wall distributions of turbulence statistics and their limiting behavior, are in good agreement with measurements. In particular, the near-wall asymptotic properties are found to be consistent with incompressible behavior; thus suggesting that turbulent flows in the viscous sublayer are not much affected by compressibility effects.

  17. Investigation of Efficient Turbulence Model for Two-Dimensional Nozzle Designed for Supersonic Cruise Using STAR-CCM+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Mummidisetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigation of various turbulence models has been carried out for predicting the efficient turbulence model for a two-dimensional nozzle designed for a supersonic cruise nozzle. Initially, a computational domain was created for a two-dimensional nozzle for a supersonic cruise, then, with an appropriate mesh size, various turbulence models has been used for simulations. The main objective of the present work is to determine the efficient turbulence model for nozzle designs. As till date, commercial software’s are implementing many advanced technique, the test of turbulence model is very much needed for today’s research. The results obtained from the computational approach were compared with experimental approach which was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.8 to 1.2 by NASA Langley Research Centre, Virginia. These supersonic cruise nozzles have a wide range of applications in designing Fighter jets and supersonic cruise aircraft's. The present work was conducted by using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software, STAR-CCM+. Initially, Nozzle at a free stream Mach number 0.9 was designed and all the initial and boundary conditions were calculated. From the results obtained in the present investigation, we can conclude that there was an excellent correlation between the experimental and computational data for K-Epsilon turbulence model.

  18. Interfacial instability of turbulent two-phase stratified flow: Multi-equation turbulent modelling with rapid distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Náraigh, L Ó; Matar, O; Zaki, T

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the linear stability of a flat interface that separates a liquid layer from a fully-developed turbulent gas flow. In this context, linear-stability analysis involves the study of the dynamics of a small-amplitude wave on the interface, and we develop a model that describes wave-induced perturbation turbulent stresses (PTS). We demonstrate the effect of the PTS on the stability properties of the system in two cases: for a laminar thin film, and for deep-water waves. In the first case, we find that the PTS have little effect on the growth rate of the waves, although they do affect the structure of the perturbation velocities. In the second case, the PTS enhance the maximum growth rate, although the overall shape of the dispersion curve is unchanged. Again, the PTS modify the structure of the velocity field, especially at longer wavelengths. Finally, we demonstrate a kind of parameter tuning that enables the production of the thin-film (slow) waves in a deep-water setting.

  19. Coarse-graining two-dimensional turbulence via dynamical optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Turkington, Bruce; Thalabard, Simon

    2015-01-01

    A model reduction technique based on an optimization principle is employed to coarse-grain inviscid, incompressible fluid dynamics in two dimensions. In this reduction the spectrally-truncated vorticity equation defines the microdynamics, while the macroscopic state space consists of quasi-equilibrium trial probability densities on the microscopic phase space, which are parameterized by the means and variances of the low modes of the vorticity. A macroscopic path therefore represents a coarse-grained approximation to the evolution of a nonequilibrium ensemble of microscopic solutions. Closure in terms of the vector of resolved variables, namely, the means and variances of the low modes, is achieved by minimizing over all feasible paths the time integral of their mean-squared residual with respect to the Liouville equation. The equations governing the optimal path are deduced from Hamilton-Jacobi theory. The coarse-grained dynamics derived by this optimization technique contains a scale-dependent eddy viscosit...

  20. Exact coherent states and connections to turbulent dynamics in minimal channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Several new families of nonlinear three-dimensional travelling wave solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation, also known as exact coherent states, are computed for Newtonian plane Poiseuille flow. The symmetries and streak/vortex structures are reported and their possible connections to critical layer dynamics examined. While some of the solutions clearly display fluctuations that are localized around the critical layer (the surface on which the streamwise velocity matches the wave speed of the solution), for others this connection is not as clear. Dynamical trajectories along unstable directions of the solutions are computed. Over certain ranges of Reynolds number, two solution families are shown to lie on the basin boundary between laminar and turbulent flow. Direct comparison of nonlinear travelling wave solutions to turbulent flow in the same channel is presented. The state-space dynamics of the turbulent flow are organized around one of the newly-identified travelling wave families, and in particular the ...

  1. Improving Prediction Skill of Imperfect Turbulent Models Through Statistical Response and Information Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Qi, Di

    2016-02-01

    Turbulent dynamical systems with a large phase space and a high degree of instabilities are ubiquitous in climate science and engineering applications. Statistical uncertainty quantification (UQ) to the response to the change in forcing or uncertain initial data in such complex turbulent systems requires the use of imperfect models due to the lack of both physical understanding and the overwhelming computational demands of Monte Carlo simulation with a large-dimensional phase space. Thus, the systematic development of reduced low-order imperfect statistical models for UQ in turbulent dynamical systems is a grand challenge. This paper applies a recent mathematical strategy for calibrating imperfect models in a training phase and accurately predicting the response by combining information theory and linear statistical response theory in a systematic fashion. A systematic hierarchy of simple statistical imperfect closure schemes for UQ for these problems is designed and tested which are built through new local and global statistical energy conservation principles combined with statistical equilibrium fidelity. The forty mode Lorenz 96 (L-96) model which mimics forced baroclinic turbulence is utilized as a test bed for the calibration and predicting phases for the hierarchy of computationally cheap imperfect closure models both in the full phase space and in a reduced three-dimensional subspace containing the most energetic modes. In all of phase spaces, the nonlinear response of the true model is captured accurately for the mean and variance by the systematic closure model, while alternative methods based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem alone are much less accurate. For reduced-order model for UQ in the three-dimensional subspace for L-96, the systematic low-order imperfect closure models coupled with the training strategy provide the highest predictive skill over other existing methods for general forced response yet have simple design principles based on a

  2. Forecasting turbulent modes with nonparametric diffusion models: Learning from noisy data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Tyrus; Harlim, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we apply a recently developed nonparametric modeling approach, the "diffusion forecast", to predict the time-evolution of Fourier modes of turbulent dynamical systems. While the diffusion forecasting method assumes the availability of a noise-free training data set observing the full state space of the dynamics, in real applications we often have only partial observations which are corrupted by noise. To alleviate these practical issues, following the theory of embedology, the diffusion model is built using the delay-embedding coordinates of the data. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most stable component of the dynamics and reduces the influence of independent additive observation noise. The resulting diffusion forecast model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and when the observation noise vanishes. As in any standard forecasting problem, the forecasting skill depends crucially on the accuracy of the initial conditions. We introduce a novel Bayesian method for filtering the discrete-time noisy observations which works with the diffusion forecast to determine the forecast initial densities. Numerically, we compare this nonparametric approach with standard stochastic parametric models on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. We show that when the only available data is the low-dimensional set of noisy modes that are being modeled, the diffusion forecast is indeed competitive to the perfect model.

  3. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  4. Magnetic moment nonconservation in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalena, S; Greco, A; Rappazzo, A F; Mace, R L; Matthaeus, W H

    2012-07-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the adiabatic theory do not apply in the presence of sharp field gradients or in the presence of well-developed magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. For this reason, in such conditions the magnetic moment μ is no longer expected to be constant. This can influence particle acceleration and have considerable implications in many astrophysical problems. Starting with the resonant interaction between ions and a single parallel propagating electromagnetic wave, we derive expressions for the magnetic moment trapping width Δμ (defined as the half peak-to-peak difference in the particle magnetic moments) and the bounce frequency ω(b). We perform test-particle simulations to investigate magnetic moment behavior when resonance overlapping occurs and during the interaction of a ring-beam particle distribution with a broadband slab spectrum. We find that the changes of magnetic moment and changes of pitch angle are related when the level of magnetic fluctuations is low, δB/B(0) = (10(-3),10(-2)), where B(0) is the constant and uniform background magnetic field. Stochasticity arises for intermediate fluctuation values and its effect on pitch angle is the isotropization of the distribution function f(α). This is a transient regime during which magnetic moment distribution f(μ) exhibits a characteristic one-sided long tail and starts to be influenced by the onset of spatial parallel diffusion, i.e., the variance grows linearly in time as in normal diffusion. With strong fluctuations f(α) becomes completely isotropic, spatial diffusion sets in, and the f(μ) behavior is closely related to the sampling of the varying magnetic field associated with that spatial diffusion.

  5. Military Children's Difficulty With Reintegration After Deployment: A Relational Turbulence Model Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Leanne K; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Ebata, Aaron T; McGlaughlin, Patricia C

    2017-02-16

    This study drew on the relational turbulence model to investigate how the interpersonal dynamics of military couples predict parents' reports of the reintegration difficulty of military children upon homecoming after deployment. Longitudinal data were collected from 118 military couples once per month for 3 consecutive months after reunion. Military couples reported on their depressive symptoms, characteristics of their romantic relationship, and the reintegration difficulty of their oldest child. Results of dyadic growth curve models indicated that the mean levels of parents' depressive symptoms (H1), relationship uncertainty (H2), and interference from a partner (H3) were positively associated with parents' reports of military children's reintegration difficulty. These findings suggest that the relational turbulence model has utility for illuminating the reintegration difficulty of military children during the postdeployment transition. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Lagrangian filtered density function for LES-based stochastic modelling of turbulent dispersed flows

    CERN Document Server

    Innocenti, A; Chibbaro, S

    2016-01-01

    The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach based on Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is one of the most promising and viable numerical tools to study turbulent dispersed flows when the computational cost of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) becomes too expensive. The applicability of this approach is however limited if the effects of the Sub-Grid Scales (SGS) of the flow on particle dynamics are neglected. In this paper, we propose to take these effects into account by means of a Lagrangian stochastic SGS model for the equations of particle motion. The model extends to particle-laden flows the velocity-filtered density function method originally developed for reactive flows. The underlying filtered density function is simulated through a Lagrangian Monte Carlo procedure that solves for a set of Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs) along individual particle trajectories. The resulting model is tested for the reference case of turbulent channel flow, using a hybrid algorithm in which the fluid velocity field is provided b...

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR THE STEPPED SPILLWAY OVERFLOW WITH TURBULENCE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Stepped spillways have increasingly become a very important measure for flood discharge and energy dissipation. Therefore, the velocity, pressure and other characteristics of the flow on the stepped spillway should be known clearly. But so far the study for the stepped spillway overflow is only based on the model test. In this paper, the stepped spillway overflow was simulated by the Reynolds stress turbulence model. The simulation results were analyzed and compared with measured data, which shows they are satisfactory.

  8. Turbulence in the highly restricted dynamics of a closure at second order: comparison with DNS

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, Navid C; Nikolaidis, Marios-Andreas; Farrell, Brian F; Ioannou, Petros J; Jiménez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    S3T (Stochastic Structural Stability Theory) employs a closure at second order to obtain the dynamics of the statistical mean turbulent state. When S3T is implemented as a coupled set of equations for the streamwise mean and perturbation states, nonlinearity in the dynamics is restricted to interaction between the mean and perturbations. The S3T statistical mean state dynamics can be approximately implemented by similarly restricting the dynamics used in a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the full Navier-Stokes equations (referred to as the NS system). Although this restricted nonlinear system (referred to as the RNL system) is greatly simplified in its dynamics in comparison to the associated NS, it nevertheless self-sustains a turbulent state in wall-bounded shear flow with structures and dynamics comparable to that in observed turbulence. Moreover, RNL turbulence can be analyzed effectively using theoretical methods developed to study the closely related S3T system. In order to better understand RNL tu...

  9. A Streamwise Constant Model of Turbulence in Plane Couette Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gayme, D F; Papachristodoulou, A; Bamieh, B; Doyle, J C

    2010-01-01

    There is a consensus that turbulent flow is characterized by coherent structures. In particular, streamwise and quasi-streamwise elongated structures have been observed in both numerical simulations and experiments. Using this idea the mean behavior of fully turbulent plane Couette flow is modeled using a streamwise constant projection of the Navier Stokes equations. This assumption results in a two dimensional, three velocity component (2D/3C) model. We first use a steady state version of this 2D/3C model to demonstrate that the nonlinear coupling in the equations provides the mathematical mechanisms associated with the shape of the turbulent velocity profile. In simulating the full model we borrow some ideas from robust control and represent uncertainty as well as modeling errors using small amplitude noise forcing. Simulations of the 2D/3C model under small amplitude Gaussian forcing of the cross stream components is compared to DNS data. The results indicate that a streamwise constant projection of the Na...

  10. Large eddy simulation on unstructured meshes using Lagrangian subgrid-scale model for complex turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Steven; Sahni, Onkar; RPI Team

    2015-11-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) provide high fidelity in which the large-scale turbulent structures are resolved while their interactions with the subgrid scales are modeled. In a Smagorinsky-based LES approach, the unresolved stresses are modeled using an eddy viscosity which in-turn involves a model parameter that is unknown a priori and varies in space and time for complex problems. Therefore, dynamic procedures are employed to determine this parameter where averaging is applied to make the procedure robust. When applicable, spatial averaging is applied across homogeneous directions. However, for complex flows the Lagrangian subgrid-scale model employing averaging over pathlines becomes attractive. In contrast to the dynamic Smagorinsky model, variational multiscale (VMS) models have also been developed for LES. In this study, we investigate dynamic mixed models for LES based on the combinations of the Lagrangian subgrid-scale model and the residual-based VMS (RBVMS) approach to study complex, inhomogeneous turbulent flows on unstructured meshes. Applications range from flow through a channel to flow over an airfoil at a moderate angle of attack. Experimental and DNS data are used to make comparisons.

  11. Turbulence in edge and core transport barriers: new experimental results and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuzawa, T.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, recent progressive studies on experimental analysis and theoretical models for turbulence phenomena around the transport barriers in high-performance magnetic confined fusion plasma are reviewed. The linkage of radial electric fields and turbulence, the importance of radial electric field curvature, and observations of spatiotemporal turbulence structures are described with related theoretical models.

  12. Modelling of pressure-strain correlation in compressible turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siyuan Huang; Song Fu

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies carried out in the early 1990s conjectured that the main compressible effects could be associated with the dilatational effects of velocity fluctuation.Later,it was shown that the main compressibility effect came from the reduced pressure-strain term due to reduced pressure fluctuations.Although better understanding of the compressible turbulence is generally achieved with the increased DNS and experimental research effort,there are still some discrepancies among these recent findings.Analysis of the DNS and experimental data suggests that some of the discrepancies are apparent if the compressible effect is related to the turbulent Mach number,Mt.From the comparison of two classes of compressible flow,homogenous shear flow and inhomogeneous shear flow(mixing layer),we found that the effect of compressibility on both classes of shear flow can be characterized in three categories corresponding to three regions of turbulent Mach numbers:the low-Mt,the moderate-Mt and high-Mt regions.In these three regions the effect of compressibility on the growth rate of the turbulent mixing layer thickness is rather different.A simple approach to the reduced pressure-strain effect may not necessarily reduce the mixing-layer growth rate,and may even cause an increase in the growth rate.The present work develops a new second-moment model for the compressible turbulence through the introduction of some blending functions of Mt to account for the compressibility effects on the flow.The model has been successfully applied to the compressible mixing layers.

  13. Relevant Criteria for Testing the Quality of Turbulence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten; Jørgensen, Hans E.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    turbines when seeking wind characteristics that correspond to one blade and the entire rotor, respectively. For heights exceeding 50-60m the gust factor increases with wind speed. For heights larger the 60-80m, present assumptions on the value of the gust factor are significantly conservative, both for 3......Seeking relevant criteria for testing the quality of turbulence models, the scale of turbulence and the gust factor have been estimated from data and compared with predictions from first-order models of these two quantities. It is found that the mean of the measured length scales is approx. 10......% smaller than the IEC model, for wind turbine hub height levels. The mean is only marginally dependent on trends in time series. It is also found that the coefficient of variation of the measured length scales is about 50%. 3sec and 10sec pre-averaging of wind speed data are relevant for MW-size wind...

  14. Detonability of white dwarf plasma: turbulence models at low densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, D.; Plewa, T.

    2017-06-01

    We study the conditions required to produce self-sustained detonations in turbulent, carbon-oxygen degenerate plasma at low densities. We perform a series of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of turbulence driven with various degrees of compressibility. The average conditions in the simulations are representative of models of merging binary white dwarfs. We find that material with very short ignition times is abundant in case turbulence is driven compressively. This material forms contiguous structures that persist over many ignition times, and that we identify as prospective detonation kernels. Detailed analysis of prospective kernels reveals that these objects are centrally condensed and their shape is characterized by low curvature, supportive of self-sustained detonations. The key characteristic of the newly proposed detonation mechanism is thus high degree of compressibility of turbulent drive. The simulated detonation kernels have sizes notably smaller than the spatial resolution of any white dwarf merger simulation performed to date. The resolution required to resolve kernels is 0.1 km. Our results indicate a high probability of detonations in such well-resolved simulations of carbon-oxygen white dwarf mergers. These simulations will likely produce detonations in systems of lower total mass, thus broadening the population of white dwarf binaries capable of producing Type Ia supernovae. Consequently, we expect a downward revision of the lower limit of the total merger mass that is capable of producing a prompt detonation. We review application of the new detonation mechanism to various explosion scenarios of single, Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs.

  15. Stochastic Modeling of Turbulence-Driven Systems: Application to Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, P.; Waechter, M.; Peinke, J.

    2010-11-01

    The recent increase in the exploitation of the wind energy resource stresses the need for fundamental research in fluid dynamics. The complex wind inflows that drive wind turbines affect their availability in terms of electric power production, as well as in operation lifetime. Short-scale turbulent effects in the wind such as intermittency, as well as large-scale atmospheric non-stationarity lead to ever-changing power signals fed into the electric grid. This calls for a theoretical classification of wind energy phenomena into complex, turbulence-driven systems. Our raising dependence on wind energy requires a better understanding of these phenomena, as well as reliable models. A stochastic model is proposed as an alternative to standard wind energy models that often neglect turbulent effects or CFD models that cannot decribe large wind turbines yet. This model is based on the stochastic equation of Langevin that can simulate these complex systems after their proper characterization. This stochastic model can be applied separately on both atmospheric wind speed signals as well as wind turbine power production signals, after the wind turbine was characterized properly. The signals generated display the proper statistics and represent fast and flexible models for wind energy applications such as monitoring, availability prediction or grid integration. A future analysis of fatigue loads is also under development.

  16. Mixing Model Performance in Non-Premixed Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.; Ren, Zhuyin

    2002-11-01

    In order to shed light on their qualitative and quantitative performance, three different turbulent mixing models are studied in application to non-premixed turbulent combustion. In previous works, PDF model calculations with detailed kinetics have been shown to agree well with experimental data for non-premixed piloted jet flames. The calculations from two different groups using different descriptions of the chemistry and turbulent mixing are capable of producing the correct levels of local extinction and reignition. The success of these calculations raises several questions, since it is not clear that the mixing models used contain an adequate description of the processes involved. To address these questions, three mixing models (IEM, modified Curl and EMST) are applied to a partially-stirred reactor burning hydrogen in air. The parameters varied are the residence time and the mixing time scale. For small relative values of the mixing time scale (approaching the perfectly-stirred limit) the models yield the same extinction behavior. But for larger values, the behavior is distictly different, with EMST being must resistant to extinction.

  17. RANS turbulence model form uncertainty quantification for wind engineering flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorle, Catherine; Zeoli, Stephanie; Bricteux, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations with linear eddy-viscosity turbulence models are commonly used for modeling wind engineering flows, but the use of the results for critical design decisions is hindered by the limited capability of the models to correctly predict bluff body flows. A turbulence model form uncertainty quantification (UQ) method to define confidence intervals for the results could remove this limitation, and promising results were obtained in a previous study of the flow in downtown Oklahoma City. The objective of the present study is to further investigate the validity of these results by considering the simplified test case of the flow around a wall-mounted cube. DNS data is used to determine: 1. whether the marker, which identifies regions that deviate from parallel shear flow, is a good indicator for the regions where the turbulence model fails, and 2. which Reynolds stress perturbations, in terms of the tensor magnitude and the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the normalized anisotropy tensor, can capture the uncertainty in the flow field. A comparison of confidence intervals obtained with the UQ method and the DNS solution indicates that the uncertainty in the velocity field can be captured correctly in a large portion of the flow field.

  18. Sonic eddy model of the turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, Robert; Dintilhac, Paul; Williams, Owen

    2016-11-01

    A model of the compressible turbulent boundary layer is proposed. It is based on the notion that turbulent transport by an eddy requires that information of nonsteady events propagates across the diameter of that eddy during one rotation period. The finite acoustic signaling speed then controls the turbulent fluxes. As a consequence, the fluxes are limited by the largest eddies that satisfies this requirement. Therefore "sonic eddies" with a rotational Mach number of about unity would determine the skin friction, which is predicted to vary inversely with Mach number. This sonic eddy model contrasts with conventional models that are based on the energy equation and variations in the density. The effect of density variations is known to be weak in free shear flows, and the sonic eddy model assumes the same for the boundary layer. In general, Mach number plays two simultaneous roles in compressible flow, one related to signaling and the other related to the energy equation. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and DNS results from the literature.

  19. Characterizing the Severe Turbulence Environments Associated With Commercial Aviation Accidents: A Real-Time Turbulence Model (RTTM) Designed for the Operational Prediction of Hazardous Aviation Turbulence Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Lux, Kevin M.; Cetola, Jeffrey D.; Huffman, Allan W.; Riordan, Allen J.; Slusser, Sarah W.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Charney, Joseph J.; Waight, Kenneth T.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time prediction of environments predisposed to producing moderate-severe aviation turbulence is studied. We describe the numerical model and its postprocessing system designed for said prediction of environments predisposed to severe aviation turbulence as well as presenting numerous examples of its utility. The numerical model is MASS version 5.13, which is integrated over three different grid matrices in real time on a university work station in support of NASA Langley Research Center s B-757 turbulence research flight missions. The postprocessing system includes several turbulence-related products, including four turbulence forecasting indices, winds, streamlines, turbulence kinetic energy, and Richardson numbers. Additionally, there are convective products including precipitation, cloud height, cloud mass fluxes, lifted index, and K-index. Furthermore, soundings, sounding parameters, and Froude number plots are also provided. The horizontal cross-section plot products are provided from 16 000 to 46 000 ft in 2000-ft intervals. Products are available every 3 hours at the 60- and 30-km grid interval and every 1.5 hours at the 15-km grid interval. The model is initialized from the NWS ETA analyses and integrated two times a day.

  20. Calculation of Vertical Mixing in Plane TUrbulent Buoyant Jets on the Basis of the Algebraic Model of Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.G.Martynenko; V.N.Korovkin

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic model of turbulence,involving buyancy forces,is used for calculating velocity and temperature fields in plane turbulent vertical jets in a non-homogeneous stagnant medium,A new approach to the solution of the governing system of partial differential differental equations (Continuity ,Conservation of momentum,heat (buoyancy),turbulent kinetic energy,dissipation rate and mean quadratic temperature fluctuation)is suggested which is based on the intrduction of mathematical variables.Comparison is made between the results of the present calculations with experimental and numerical data of ther authors.

  1. Turbulent Chemical Interaction Models in NCC: Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Andrew T.; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a scalar PDF hydrogen-air combustion model in predicting a complex reacting flow is evaluated. In addition the results are compared to those obtained by running the same case with the so-called laminar chemistry model and also a new model based on the concept of mapping partially stirred reactor data onto perfectly stirred reactor data. The results show that the scalar PDF model produces significantly different results from the other two models, and at a significantly higher computational cost.

  2. Star formation and turbulent dissipation in models of disk galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Avila-Reese, V; Vázquez-Semadeni, E

    2003-01-01

    The kinetic energy dissipation rate in the turbulent ISM of disk galaxies is a key ingredient in galaxy evolution models since it determines the effectiveness of large-scale star formation (SF) feedback. Using magneto-hydro-dynamic simulations, we find that the ISM dissipates efficiently the turbulent kinetic energy injected by sources of stellar nature. Thus, the SF process may be self-regulated by an energy balance only at the level of the disk ISM. The use of the self-regulation SF mechanism in galaxy evolutionary models, where disks form inside growing Cold Dark Matter halos, allows to predict the SF history of disk galaxies, including the Milky Way and the solar neighborhood, as well as the contribution of the whole population of disk galaxies to the cosmic SF history. The results are encouraging.

  3. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...... in the process as well as modeling dependences between attributes....

  4. A stochastic model of cascades in 2D turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    The dual cascade of energy and enstrophy in 2D turbulence cannot easily be understood in terms of an analog to the Richardson-Kolmogorov scenario describing the energy cascade in 3D turbulence. The coherent up- and downscale fluxes points to non-locality of interactions in spectral space, and thus the specific spatial structure of the flow could be important. Shell models, which lack spacial structure and have only local interactions in spectral space, indeed fail in reproducing the correct scaling for the inverse cascade of energy. In order to exclude the possibility that non-locality of interactions in spectral space is crucial for the dual cascade, we introduce a stochastic spectral model of the cascades which is local in spectral space and which shows the correct scaling for both the direct enstrophy - and the inverse energy cascade.

  5. Modelling and analysis of turbulent datasets using ARMA processes

    CERN Document Server

    Faranda, Davide; Dubrulle, Bérèngere; Daviaud, François; Saint-Michel, Brice; Herbert, Éric; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel way to extract information from turbulent datasets by applying an ARMA statistical analysis. Such analysis goes well beyond the analysis of the mean flow and of the fluctuations and links the behavior of the recorded time series to a discrete version of a stochastic differential equation which is able to describe the correlation structure in the dataset. We introduce a new intermittency parameter $\\Upsilon$ that measures the difference between the resulting analysis and the Obukhov model of turbulence, the simplest stochastic model reproducing both Richardson law and the Kolmogorov spectrum. We test the method on datasets measured in a von K\\'arm\\'an swirling flow experiment. We found that the ARMA analysis is well correlated with spatial structures of the flow, and can discriminate between two different flows with comparable mean velocities, obtained by changing the forcing. Moreover, we show that the intermittency parameter is highest in regions where shear layer vortices are present, t...

  6. Effect of velocity ratio on coherent-structure dynamics in turbulent free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Narasimha, Roddam

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of the vortex-gas model to the large scale dynamics of temporally evolving turbulent free shear layers has been established by extensive simulations (Phys. Rev. E 89, 013009 (2014)). The effects of velocity ratio (r =U2 /U1) on shear layer dynamics are revealed by spatially evolving vortex-gas shear-layer simulations using a computational model based on Basu et al. (Appl. Math. Modelling 19, (1995)), but with a crucial improvement that ensures conservation of global circulation. The simulations show that the initial conditions and downstream boundaries can significantly affect the flow over substantial part of the domain, but the equilibrium spread rate is a universal function of r, and is within the experimental scatter. The spread in the r = 0 limit is higher than Galilean-transformed temporal value. The present 2D simulations at r = 0 show continuous growth of structures, while merger-dominated evolution is observed for r = 0 . 23 (and higher). These two mechanisms were observed across the same two values of r in the experiments of D'Ovidio & Coats (J. Fluid Mech. 737, 2013), but the continuous growth was instead attributed to mixing-transition and 3D. The 2D mechanisms responsible for the observed continuous growth of structures are analyzed in detail. Supported in part by RN/Intel/4288 and RN/DRDO/4124.

  7. Assessment of the modulated gradient model in decaying isotropic turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A recently introduced nonlinear model undergoes evaluations based on two isotropic turbulent cases:a University of Wiscosion-Madison case at a moderate Reynolds number and a Johns Hopkins University case at a high Reynolds number.The model uses an estimation of the subgrid-scale(SGS) kinetic energy to model the magnitude of the SGS stress tensor,and uses the normalized velocity gradient tensor to model the structure of the SGS stress tensor.Testing is performed for the first case through a comparison betwee...

  8. Modeling quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with variable energy flux

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2014-01-01

    In quasi-static MHD, experiments and numerical simulations reveal that the energy spectrum is steeper than Kolmogorov's $k^{-5/3}$ spectrum. To explain this observation, we construct turbulence models based on variable energy flux, which is caused by the Joule dissipation. In the first model, which is applicable to small interaction parameters, the energy spectrum is a power law, but with a spectral exponent steeper than -5/3. In the other limit of large interaction parameters, the second model predicts an exponential energy spectrum and flux. The model predictions are in good agreement with the numerical results.

  9. Review of Four Turbulence Models using Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Lars Peter Kølgaard; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Pedersen, Jakob Martin;

    2003-01-01

    for changing from the k-w model to the k-e model throughout the boundary layer does not work when simulating the flow in the Annex 20 test case. We analyze the topologies of the numerical flow fields and show that they agree with experiments as precisely as can be expected from a 2D simulation....

  10. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  11. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight, a

  12. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aerospace Vehicles: Fractional Order Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An improved model for simulating atmospheric disturbances is disclosed. A scale Kolmogorov spectral may be scaled to convert the Kolmogorov spectral into a finite energy von Karman spectral and a fractional order pole-zero transfer function (TF) may be derived from the von Karman spectral. Fractional order atmospheric turbulence may be approximated with an integer order pole-zero TF fit, and the approximation may be stored in memory.

  13. Coarse-graining two-dimensional turbulence via dynamical optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkington, Bruce; Chen, Qian-Yong; Thalabard, Simon

    2016-10-01

    A model reduction technique based on an optimization principle is employed to coarse-grain inviscid, incompressible fluid dynamics in two dimensions. In this reduction the spectrally-truncated vorticity equation defines the microdynamics, while the macroscopic state space consists of quasi-equilibrium trial probability densities on the microscopic phase space, which are parameterized by the means and variances of the low modes of the vorticity. A macroscopic path therefore represents a coarse-grained approximation to the evolution of a nonequilibrium ensemble of microscopic solutions. Closure in terms of the vector of resolved variables, namely, the means and variances of the low modes, is achieved by minimizing over all feasible paths the time integral of their mean-squared residual with respect to the Liouville equation. The equations governing the optimal path are deduced from Hamilton-Jacobi theory. The coarse-grained dynamics derived by this optimization technique contains a scale-dependent eddy viscosity, modified nonlinear interactions between the low mode means, and a nonlinear coupling between the mean and variance of each low mode. The predictive skill of this optimal closure is validated quantitatively by comparing it against direct numerical simulations. These tests show that good agreement is achieved without adjusting any closure parameters.

  14. Investigation of Francis Turbine Part Load Instabilities using Flow Simulations with a Hybrid RANS-LES Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krappel, Timo; Ruprecht, Albert; Riedelbauch, Stefan; Jester-Zuerker, Roland; Jung, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The operation of Francis turbines in part load condition causes high pressure fluctuations and dynamic loads in the turbine as well as high flow losses in the draft tube. Owing to the co-rotating velocity distribution at the runner blade trailing edge a low pressure zone arises in the hub region finally leading to a rotating vortex rope in the draft tube. A better understanding and a more accurate prediction of this phenomenon can help in the design process of a Francis turbine. The goal of this study is to reach a quantitatively better numerical prediction of the flow at part load and to evaluate the necessary numerical depth with respect to effort and benefit. As standard practice, simulation results are obtained for the steady state approach with SST turbulence modelling. Those results are contrasted with transient simulations applying a SST as well as a SAS (Scale Adaptive Simulation) turbulence model. The structure of the SAS model is such, that it is able to resolve the turbulent flow behaviour in more detail. The investigations contain a comparison of the flow losses in different turbine components. A detailed flow evaluation is done in the cone and the diffuser of the draft tube. The different numerical approaches show a different representation of the vortex rope phenomenon indicating differences in pressure pulsations at different geometric positions in the entire turbine. Finally, the turbulent flow structures in the draft tube are illustrated with several evaluation methods, such as turbulent eddy viscosity, velocity invariant and turbulent kinetic energy spectra.

  15. Development of a One-Equation Transition/Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDWARDS,JACK R.; ROY,CHRISTOPHER J.; BLOTTNER,FREDERICK G.; HASSAN,HASSAN A.

    2000-09-26

    This paper reports on the development of a unified one-equation model for the prediction of transitional and turbulent flows. An eddy viscosity - transport equation for non-turbulent fluctuation growth based on that proposed by Warren and Hassan (Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 35, No. 5) is combined with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model for turbulent fluctuation growth. Blending of the two equations is accomplished through a multidimensional intermittence function based on the work of Dhawan and Narasimha (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 3, No. 4). The model predicts both the onset and extent of transition. Low-speed test cases include transitional flow over a flat plate, a single element airfoil, and a multi-element airfoil in landing configuration. High-speed test cases include transitional Mach 3.5 flow over a 5{degree} cone and Mach 6 flow over a flared-cone configuration. Results are compared with experimental data, and the spatial accuracy of selected predictions is analyzed.

  16. Realtime capable first principle based modelling of tokamak turbulent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, Jonathan; Breton, Sarah; Felici, Federico; Imbeaux, Frederic; Redondo, Juan; Aniel, Thierry; Artaud, Jean-Francois; Baiocchi, Benedetta; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Camenen, Yann; Garcia, Jeronimo

    2015-11-01

    Transport in the tokamak core is dominated by turbulence driven by plasma microinstabilities. When calculating turbulent fluxes, maintaining both a first-principle-based model and computational tractability is a strong constraint. We present a pathway to circumvent this constraint by emulating quasilinear gyrokinetic transport code output through a nonlinear regression using multilayer perceptron neural networks. This recovers the original code output, while accelerating the computing time by five orders of magnitude, allowing realtime applications. A proof-of-principle is presented based on the QuaLiKiz quasilinear transport model, using a training set of five input dimensions, relevant for ITG turbulence. The model is implemented in the RAPTOR real-time capable tokamak simulator, and simulates a 300s ITER discharge in 10s. Progress in generalizing the emulation to include 12 input dimensions is presented. This opens up new possibilities for interpretation of present-day experiments, scenario preparation and open-loop optimization, realtime controller design, realtime discharge supervision, and closed-loop trajectory optimization.

  17. The analysis of large-scale turbulence characteristics in the Indonesian seas derived from a regional model based on the Princeton Ocean Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O'Driscoll

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis is presented of the distribution of deep ocean turbulence characteristics on the horizontal scale of order 100 km in the vicinity of the Lifamatola Sill, from the Southern Maluku Sea (north of the sill to the Seram Sea (south of the sill. The turbulence characteristics were calculated with a regional model of the Indonesian seas circulation based on the Princeton Ocean Model (POM, incorporating the Mellor-Yamada turbulence closure scheme. The analysis has been carried out for the entire Indonesian seas region, including areas around important topographic features, such as the Lifamatola Sill, the North Sangihe Ridge, the Dewakang Sill and the North and South Halmahera Sea Sills. To illustrate results of application of the Mellor-Yamada closure scheme we have focused on the description of features of turbulence characteristics across the Lifamatola Sill because dynamically this region is very important and some estimates of mixing coefficients in this area are available. As is well known, the POM model output provides both dynamical (depth-integrated and 3-D velocities, temperature, salinity, and sea-surface-height and turbulence characteristics (kinetic energy and master scale of turbulence, mixing coefficients of momentum, temperature and salinity, etc.. As a rule, the analysis of POM modeling results has been restricted to the study of corresponding dynamical characteristics, however the study of turbulence characteristics is essential to understanding the dynamics of the ocean circulation as well. Due to the absence of direct measurements of turbulence characteristics in the analyzed area, we argued the validity of the simulated characteristics in the light of their compatibility with some general principles. Thus, along these lines, vertical profiles of across-the-sill velocities, twice the kinetic energy of turbulence, turbulence length scale, the separate terms in the equation of kinetic energy of turbulence, the Richardson

  18. An improved dynamic subgrid-scale model and its application to large eddy simulation of stratified channel flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Fengquan(仲峰泉); LIU; Nansheng(刘难生); LU; Xiyun(陆夕云); ZHUANG; Lixian(庄礼贤)

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper, a new dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model of turbulent stress and heat flux for stratified shear flow is proposed. Based on our calculated results of stratified channel flow, the dynamic subgrid-scale model developed in this paper is shown to be effective for large eddy simulation (LES) of stratified turbulent shear flows. The new SGS model is then applied to the LES of the stratified turbulent channel flow to investigate the coupled shear and buoyancy effects on the behavior of turbulent statistics, turbulent heat transfer and flow structures at different Richardson numbers.

  19. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs.

  20. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-07-14

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.

  1. Burgers turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bec, Jeremie [Laboratoire Cassiopee UMR6202, CNRS, OCA, BP4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: jeremie.bec@obs-nice.fr; Khanin, Konstantin [Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3G3 (Canada)]. E-mail: khanin@math.toronto.edu

    2007-08-15

    The last decades witnessed a renewal of interest in the Burgers equation. Much activities focused on extensions of the original one-dimensional pressureless model introduced in the thirties by the Dutch scientist J.M. Burgers, and more precisely on the problem of Burgers turbulence, that is the study of the solutions to the one- or multi-dimensional Burgers equation with random initial conditions or random forcing. Such work was frequently motivated by new emerging applications of Burgers model to statistical physics, cosmology, and fluid dynamics. Also Burgers turbulence appeared as one of the simplest instances of a nonlinear system out of equilibrium. The study of random Lagrangian systems, of stochastic partial differential equations and their invariant measures, the theory of dynamical systems, the applications of field theory to the understanding of dissipative anomalies and of multiscaling in hydrodynamic turbulence have benefited significantly from progress in Burgers turbulence. The aim of this review is to give a unified view of selected work stemming from these rather diverse disciplines.

  2. Dynamics of homogeneous shear turbulence: A key role of the nonlinear transverse cascade in the bypass concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatsashvili, G.; Khujadze, G.; Chagelishvili, G.; Dong, S.; Jiménez, J.; Foysi, H.

    2016-08-01

    To understand the mechanism of the self-sustenance of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable (constant) shear flows, we performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear turbulence for different aspect ratios of the flow domain with subsequent analysis of the dynamical processes in spectral or Fourier space. There are no exponentially growing modes in such flows and the turbulence is energetically supported only by the linear growth of Fourier harmonics of perturbations due to the shear flow non-normality. This non-normality-induced growth, also known as nonmodal growth, is anisotropic in spectral space, which, in turn, leads to anisotropy of nonlinear processes in this space. As a result, a transverse (angular) redistribution of harmonics in Fourier space is the main nonlinear process in these flows, rather than direct or inverse cascades. We refer to this type of nonlinear redistribution as the nonlinear transverse cascade. It is demonstrated that the turbulence is sustained by a subtle interplay between the linear nonmodal growth and the nonlinear transverse cascade. This course of events reliably exemplifies a well-known bypass scenario of subcritical turbulence in spectrally stable shear flows. These two basic processes mainly operate at large length scales, comparable to the domain size. Therefore, this central, small wave number area of Fourier space is crucial in the self-sustenance; we defined its size and labeled it as the vital area of turbulence. Outside the vital area, the nonmodal growth and the transverse cascade are of secondary importance: Fourier harmonics are transferred to dissipative scales by the nonlinear direct cascade. Although the cascades and the self-sustaining process of turbulence are qualitatively the same at different aspect ratios, the number of harmonics actively participating in this process (i.e., the harmonics whose energies grow more than 10% of the maximum spectral energy at least once during evolution) varies

  3. Influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based FSO system with use of realistic link model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Yu, Zhongyuan; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2016-04-01

    We study the influence of atmospheric turbulence on OAM-based free-space optical (FSO) communication by using the Pump turbulence spectrum model which accurately characterizes the realistic FSO link. A comprehensive comparison is made between the Pump and Kolmogorov spectrum models with respect to the turbulence impact. The calculated results show that obtained turbulence-induced crosstalk is lower, which means that a higher channel capacity is projected when the realistic Pump spectrum is used instead of the Kolmogorov spectrum. We believe that our results prove that performance of practical OAM-based FSO is better than one predicted by using the original Kolmogorov turbulence model.

  4. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames-Body Stabilized Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON V. Sankaran a. REPORT...and temporal scales is called direct numerical simulation ( DNS ). In a DNS there is no need for a turbulence or turbulent combustion model [3]. All...therefore computationally very expensive. DNS also requires small time steps that adds additional expense. As a result of this required fine resolution

  5. A computational fluid dynamics model for designing heat exchangers based on natural convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkse, M.H.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Walle, van der T.; Speetjens, S.L.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model was created for the design of a natural convection shell-and-tube heat exchanger with baffles. The flow regime proved to be turbulent and this was modelled using the k¿¿ turbulence model. The features of the complex geometry were simplified considerably resulting

  6. Physical modelling of interactions between interfaces and turbulence; Modelisation physique des interactions entre interfaces et turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toutant, A

    2006-12-15

    The complex interactions between interfaces and turbulence strongly impact the flow properties. Unfortunately, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) have to entail a number of degrees of freedom proportional to the third power of the Reynolds number to correctly describe the flow behaviour. This extremely hard constraint makes it impossible to use DNS for industrial applications. Our strategy consists in using and improving DNS method in order to develop the Interfaces and Sub-grid Scales concept. ISS is a two-phase equivalent to the single-phase Large Eddy Simulation (LES) concept. The challenge of ISS is to integrate the two-way coupling phenomenon into sub-grid models. Applying a space filter, we have exhibited correlations or sub-grid terms that require closures. We have shown that, in two-phase flows, the presence of a discontinuity leads to specific sub-grid terms. Comparing the maximum of the norm of the sub-grid terms with the maximum of the norm of the advection tensor, we have found that sub-grid terms related to interfacial forces and viscous effect are negligible. Consequently, in the momentum balance, only the sub-grid terms related to inertia have to be closed. Thanks to a priori tests performed on several DNS data, we demonstrate that the scale similarity hypothesis, reinterpreted near discontinuity, provides sub-grid models that take into account the two-way coupling phenomenon. These models correspond to the first step of our work. Indeed, in this step, interfaces are smooth and, interactions between interfaces and turbulence occur in a transition zone where each physical variable varies sharply but continuously. The next challenge has been to determine the jump conditions across the sharp equivalent interface corresponding to the sub-grid models of the transition zone. We have used the matched asymptotic expansion method to obtain the jump conditions. The first tests on the velocity of the sharp equivalent interface are very promising (author)

  7. Three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model with eddy viscosity and turbulent resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 672, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We have developed a three-fluid, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that incorporates turbulence transport, eddy viscosity, turbulent resistivity, and turbulent heating. The solar wind plasma is described as a system of co-moving solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Numerical steady-state solutions of Reynolds-averaged solar wind equations coupled with turbulence transport equations for turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length are obtained by the time relaxation method in the corotating with the Sun frame of reference in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU (but still inside the termination shock). The model equations include the effects of electron heat conduction, Coulomb collisions, photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with the solar wind protons, turbulence energy generation by pickup protons, and turbulent heating of solar wind protons and electrons. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition and turbulence phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. In addition to using separate energy equations for the solar wind protons and electrons, a significant improvement over our previous work is that the turbulence model now uses an eddy viscosity approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor and the mean turbulent electric field. The approximation allows the turbulence model to account for driving of turbulence by large-scale velocity gradients. Using either a dipole approximation for the solar magnetic field or synoptic solar magnetograms from the Wilcox Solar Observatory for assigning boundary conditions at the coronal base, we apply the model to study the global structure of the solar wind and its three-dimensional properties, including embedded turbulence, heating, and acceleration throughout the heliosphere. The model results are

  8. Nonlinear Dynamic Model Explains The Solar Dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuman, Maria

    Nonlinear mathematical model in torus representation describes the solar dynamic. Its graphic presentation shows that without perturbing force the orbits of the planets would be circles; only perturbing force could elongate the circular orbits into ellipses. Since the Hubble telescope found that the planetary orbits of other stars in the Milky Way are also ellipses, powerful perturbing force must be present in our galaxy. Such perturbing force is the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy with its heavy Black Hole and leftover stars, which we see orbiting around the center of our galaxy. Since observations of NASA's SDO found that magnetic fields rule the solar activity, we can expect when the planets align and their magnetic moments sum up, the already perturbed stars to reverse their magnetic parity (represented graphically as periodic looping through the hole of the torus). We predict that planets aligned on both sides of the Sun, when their magnetic moments sum-up, would induce more flares in the turbulent equatorial zone, which would bulge. When planets align only on one side of the Sun, the strong magnetic gradient of their asymmetric pull would flip the magnetic poles of the Sun. The Sun would elongate pole-to-pole, emit some energy through the poles, and the solar activity would cease. Similar reshaping and emission was observed in stars called magnetars and experimentally observed in super-liquid fast-spinning Helium nanodroplets. We are certain that NASA's SDO will confirm our predictions.

  9. A Non-Fickian Mixing Model for Stratified Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Berselli et al., 2011) and in ocean models ( Marques and Özgökmen, 2012). Our approach in Özgökmen et al. (2012) is perhaps the first truly multi-scale...Transport in Star Eddies: Star eddies have been observed from MODIS SST images in both the summer 2011 and winter 2012 LatMix cruises. I have...published, refereed]. Marques , G.M. and T.M. Özgökmen: On modeling the turbulent exchange in buoyancy-driven fronts. Ocean Modelling [submitted

  10. Energy transfers in shell models for magnetohydrodynamics turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Verma, Mahendra K

    2009-06-01

    A systematic procedure to derive shell models for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is proposed. It takes into account the conservation of ideal quadratic invariants such as the total energy, the cross helicity, and the magnetic helicity, as well as the conservation of the magnetic energy by the advection term in the induction equation. This approach also leads to simple expressions for the energy exchanges as well as to unambiguous definitions for the energy fluxes. When applied to the existing shell models with nonlinear interactions limited to the nearest-neighbor shells, this procedure reproduces well-known models but suggests a reinterpretation of the energy fluxes.

  11. Validating modelling assumptions of alpha particles in electrostatic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkie, George; Highcock, Edmund; Dorland, William

    2014-01-01

    To rigorously model fast ions in fusion plasmas, a non-Maxwellian equilibrium distribution must be used. In the work, the response of high-energy alpha particles to electrostatic turbulence has been analyzed for several different tokamak parameters. Our results are consistent with known scalings and experimental evidence that alpha particles are generally well-confined: on the order of several seconds. It is also confirmed that the effect of alphas on the turbulence is negligible at realistically low concentrations, consistent with linear theory. It is demonstrated that the usual practice of using a high-temperature Maxwellian gives incorrect estimates for the radial alpha particle flux, and a method of correcting it is provided. Furthermore, we see that the timescales associated with collisions and transport compete at moderate energies, calling into question the assumption that alpha particles remain confined to a flux surface that is used in the derivation of the slowing-down distribution.

  12. Weak versus strong wave turbulence in the MMT model

    CERN Document Server

    Chibbaro, Sergio; Onorato, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Within the spirit of fluid turbulence, we consider the one-dimensional Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak (MMT) model that describes the interactions of nonlinear dispersive waves. We perform a detailed numerical study of the direct energy cascade in the defocusing regime. In particular, we consider a configuration with large-scale forcing and small scale dissipation, and we introduce three non- dimensional parameters: the ratio between nonlinearity and dispersion, {\\epsilon}, and the analogues of the Reynolds number, Re, i.e. the ratio between the nonlinear and dissipative time-scales, both at large and small scales. Our numerical experiments show that (i) in the limit of small {\\epsilon} the spectral slope observed in the statistical steady regime corresponds to the one predicted by the Weak Wave Turbulence (WWT) theory. (ii) As the nonlinearity is increased, the WWT theory breaks down and deviations from its predictions are observed. (iii) It is shown that such departures from the WWT theoretical predictions are accom...

  13. Modeling turbulent stellar convection zones: Sub-grid scales effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, A.; Beaudoin, P.; Brun, A. S.; Charbonneau, P.; Mathis, S.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    The impressive development of global numerical simulations of turbulent stellar interiors unveiled a variety of possible differential rotation (solar or anti-solar), meridional circulation (single or multi-cellular), and dynamo states (stable large scale toroidal field or periodically reversing magnetic fields). Various numerical schemes, based on the so-called anelastic set of equations, were used to obtain these results. It appears today mandatory to assess their robustness with respect to the details of the numerics, and in particular to the treatment of turbulent sub-grid scales. We report on an ongoing comparison between two global models, the ASH and EULAG codes. In EULAG the sub-grid scales are treated implicitly by the numerical scheme, while in ASH their effect is generally modeled by using enhanced dissipation coefficients. We characterize the sub-grid scales effect in a turbulent convection simulation with EULAG. We assess their effect at each resolved scale with a detailed energy budget. We derive equivalent eddy-diffusion coefficients and use the derived diffusivities in twin ASH numerical simulations. We find a good agreement between the large-scale flows developing in the two codes in the hydrodynamic regime, which encourages further investigation in the magnetohydrodynamic regime for various dynamo solutions.

  14. Airship dynamics modeling: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen; Nahon, Meyer; Sharf, Inna

    2011-04-01

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities adapted to these lighter-than-air vehicles. However, the modeling techniques for airship dynamics have lagged behind and are less systematic than those for fixed-wing aircraft. A state-of-the-art literature review is presented on airship dynamics modeling, aiming to provide a comprehensive description of the main problems in this area and a useful source of references for researchers and engineers interested in modern airship applications. The references are categorized according to the major topics in this area: aerodynamics, flight dynamics, incorporation of structural flexibility, incorporation of atmospheric turbulence, and effects of ballonets. Relevant analytical, numerical, and semi-empirical techniques are discussed, with a particular focus on how the main differences between lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air aircraft have been addressed in the modeling. Directions are suggested for future research on each of these topics.

  15. Self-Energy Closure for Inhomogeneous Turbulent Flows and Subgrid Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgen S. Frederiksen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new statistical dynamical closure theory for general inhomogeneous turbulent flows and subgrid modeling is presented. This Self-Energy (SE closure represents all eddy interactions through nonlinear dissipation or forcing ‘self-energy’ terms in the mean-field, covariance and response function equations. This makes the renormalization of the bare dissipation and forcing, and the subgrid modeling problem, transparent. The SE closure generalizes the quasi-diagonal direct interaction closure to allow for more complex interactions. The SE closure is applicable to flows in different geometries, is exact near maximum entropy states corresponding to canonical equilibrium, and provides a framework for deriving simpler realizable closures.

  16. Global models of turbulence in protoplanetary disks I. A cylindrical potential on a Cartesian grid and transport of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Lyra, W; Klahr, H; Piskunov, N

    2007-01-01

    We present global 3D MHD simulations of disks of gas and solids, aiming at developing models that can be used to study various scenarios of planet formation and planet-disk interaction in turbulent accretion disks. A second goal is to show that Cartesian codes are comparable to cylindrical and spherical ones in handling the magnetohydrodynamics of the disk simulations, as the disk-in-a-box models presented here develop and sustain MHD turbulence. We investigate the dependence of the magnetorotational instability on disk scale height, finding evidence that the turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability grows with thermal pressure. The turbulent stresses depend on the thermal pressure obeying a power law of 0.24+/-0.03, compatible with the value of 0.25 found in shearing box calculations. The ratio of stresses decreased with increasing temperature. We also study the dynamics of boulders in the hydromagnetic turbulence. The vertical turbulent diffusion of the embedded boulders is comparable to the...

  17. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    CERN Document Server

    Seshasayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow - the flow between counter-translating parallel plates - displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for the spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by the approach are discussed.

  18. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshasayanan, K [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, CNRS UMR 8550, École Normale Supérieure, F-75005 Paris (France); Manneville, P, E-mail: paul.manneville@polytechnique.edu [Laboratoire d’Hydrodynamique, CNRS UMR7646, École Polytechnique, F-91128, Palaiseau (France)

    2015-06-15

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow–the flow between counter-translating parallel plates–displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier–Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond the lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at the cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by this approach are discussed. (paper)

  19. Hydrodynamic Modeling of the Interaction of Winds within a Collapsing Turbulent Gas Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Arreaga-García

    2015-01-01

    a velocity according to a turbulent spectrum built in a Fourier space of 643 grid elements. The level of turbulence and the temperature of the cloud are both adjusted so that a gravitational collapse of the cloud is initially induced. All the winds are activated in a very early stage of evolution of the cloud. We consider only two kinds of winds, namely, one with spherical symmetry and the second one of a bipolar collimated jet. In order to assess the dynamical change in the cloud due to interactions with the winds, we show isovelocity and isodensity plots for all our simulations. We also report on the accretion centers detected at the last simulation time available for each model.

  20. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier-Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted.

  1. Staircase temperature profiles and plasma transport self-organisation in a minimum kinetic model of turbulence based on the trapped ion mode instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Drouot, T.; Estève, D.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Norscini, C.; Passeron, C.

    2014-11-01

    A minimum model of plasma turbulence in a kinetic framework is presented. It is based on trapped ion turbulence, gyro and bounce averaged, and implemented in the versatile and efficient code TERESA. Zonal flow - streamer interplay are readily shown to be key players that govern the confinement properties of the model. The parameter space of the model is explored with brute force numerics. A generic result is either a streamer dominated pattern with large transport, or a staircase temperature profile with very marked corrugations and quenched transport. A case with off-axis heating is found to exhibit quasiperiodic relaxation events relevant to investigate dynamical turbulence self-organisation.

  2. A new class of finite element variational multiscale turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sondak, David; Oberai, Assad A; Pawlowski, Roger P; Cyr, Eric C; Smith, Tom M

    2014-01-01

    New large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence models for incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) derived from the variational multiscale (VMS) formulation for finite element simulations are introduced. The new models include the variational multiscale formulation, a residual-based eddy viscosity model, and a mixed model that combines both of these component models. Each model contains terms that are proportional to the residual of the incompressible MHD equations and is therefore numerically consistent. Moreover, each model is also dynamic, in that its effect vanishes when this residual is small. The new models are tested on the decaying MHD Taylor Green vortex at low and high Reynolds numbers. The evaluation of the models is based on comparisons with available data from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the time evolution of energies as well as energy spectra at various discrete times. A numerical study, on a sequence of meshes, is presented that demonstrates that the large eddy simulation approaches the ...

  3. A flamelet model for turbulent diffusion combustion in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE; ChunHian

    2010-01-01

    In order to develop a turbulent diffusion combustion model for supersonic flow, the physical argument of the extension of the flamelet model to supersonic flow was presented, and the flow field of a hydrogen/air diffusion combustion generated by axisymmetric supersonic jets was numerically simulated by employing the flamelet model. Using the experimental data, value of the model coefficient of scalar dissipation in the flamelet model was revised specifically for supersonic flow. The computational results of the modified flamelet model were compared with the experimental results, and it was indicated that the precision of the modified flamelet model was satisfying. Based on the numerical results and flamelet theory, the influence mechanisms of turbulence fluctuation on the average state equation and chemical reaction rate were studied for the first time. It was found that the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature has little effect on the averaged gas state equation; the temperature fluctuation decreases the product of H2O, but its effect is small; the fluctuation of species mass fractions increases the product of H2O in the region close to oxidizer while decreases the product of H2O in other regions; the fluctuation correlation of species mass fractions and temperature largely decreases the product of H2O.

  4. A scale-aware subgrid model for quasi-geostrophic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Scott D.; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Pearson, Brodie

    2017-02-01

    This paper introduces two methods for dynamically prescribing eddy-induced diffusivity, advection, and viscosity appropriate for primitive equation models with resolutions permitting the forward potential enstrophy cascade of quasi-geostrophic dynamics, such as operational ocean models and high-resolution climate models with O>(25>) km horizontal resolution and finer. Where quasi-geostrophic dynamics fail (e.g., the equator, boundary layers, and deep convection), the method reverts to scalings based on a matched two-dimensional enstrophy cascade. A principle advantage is that these subgrid models are scale-aware, meaning that the model is suitable over a range of grid resolutions: from mesoscale grids that just permit baroclinic instabilities to grids below the submesoscale where ageostrophic effects dominate. Two approaches are presented here using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques adapted for three-dimensional rotating, stratified turbulence. The simpler approach has one nondimensional parameter, Λ, which has an optimal value near 1. The second approach dynamically optimizes Λ during simulation using a test filter. The new methods are tested in an idealized scenario by varying the grid resolution, and their use improves the spectra of potential enstrophy and energy in comparison to extant schemes. The new methods keep the gridscale Reynolds and Péclet numbers near 1 throughout the domain, which confers robust numerical stability and minimal spurious diapycnal mixing. Although there are no explicit parameters in the dynamic approach, there is strong sensitivity to the choice of test filter. Designing test filters for heterogeneous ocean turbulence adds cost and uncertainty, and we find the dynamic method does not noticeably improve over setting Λ = 1.

  5. Role of helicities for the dynamics of turbulent magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Wollf-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity are conducted with pseudospectral, three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of forced and decaying incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The high-resolution simulations which allow for the necessary scale-separation show that the observed self-similar scaling behavior of magnetic helicity and related quantities can only be understood by taking the full nonlinear interplay of velocity and magnetic fluctuations into account. With the help of the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation a probably universal relation between kinetic and magnetic helicities is derived that closely resembles the extended definition of the prominent dynamo pseudoscalar $\\alpha$. This unexpected similarity suggests an additional nonlinear quenching mechanism of the current-helicity contribution to $\\alpha$.

  6. Laminar-turbulent transition on the flying wing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenko, A. M.; Zanin, B. Yu.; Katasonov, M. M.

    2016-10-01

    Results of an experimental study of a subsonic flow past aircraft model having "flying wing" form and belonging to the category of small-unmanned aerial vehicles are reported. Quantitative data about the structure of the flow near the model surface were obtained by hot-wire measurements. It was shown, that with the wing sweep angle 34 °the laminar-turbulent transition scenario is identical to the one on a straight wing. The transition occurs through the development of a package of unstable oscillations in the boundary layer separation.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification and Validation for RANS Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Todd; Moser, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Uncertainty quantification and validation procedures for RANS turbulence models are developed and applied. The procedures used here rely on a Bayesian view of probability. In particular, the uncertainty quantification methodology requires stochastic model development, model calibration, and model comparison, all of which are pursued using tools from Bayesian statistics. Model validation is also pursued in a probabilistic framework. The ideas and processes are demonstrated on a channel flow example. Specifically, a set of RANS models--including Baldwin-Lomax, Spalart-Allmaras, k- ɛ, k- ω, and v2- f--and uncertainty representations are analyzed using DNS data for fully-developed channel flow. Predictions of various quantities of interest and the validity (or invalidity) of the various models for making those predictions will be examined. This work is supported by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security Administration] under Award Number [DE-FC52-08NA28615].

  8. Near-wall modelling of compressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Ronald M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Work was carried out to formulate near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature-variance and its dissipation rate. With these equations properly modeled, a foundation is laid for their extension together with the heat-flux equations to compressible flows. This extension is carried out in a manner similar to that used to extend the incompressible near-wall Reynolds-stress models to compressible flows. The methodology used to accomplish the extension of the near-wall Reynolds-stress models is examined and the actual extension of the models for the Reynolds-stress equations and the near-wall dissipation-rate equation to compressible flows is given. Then the formulation of the near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature variance and its dissipation rate is discussed. Finally, a sample calculation of a flat plate compressible turbulent boundary-layer flow with adiabatic wall boundary condition and a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 using a two-equation near-wall closure is presented. The results show that the near-wall two-equation closure formulated for compressible flows is quite valid and the calculated properties are in good agreement with measurements. Furthermore, the near-wall behavior of the turbulence statistics and structure parameters is consistent with that found in incompressible flows.

  9. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    CERN Document Server

    Stoll, Moritz H R

    2016-01-01

    Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, as it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing simulations have shown that $\\alpha$-values a few times $10^{-4}$ can be generated. The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of dust particles. Here, we address in particular the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles in order to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. We perform 3D numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. We confirm that under realistic conditions the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc s...

  10. Translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, Varghese; van der Poel, Erwin P; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of the translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in isotropic turbulence. We introduce an efficient method to simultaneously determine the position and (absolute) orientation of a spherical body from visual observation. The method employs a minimization algorithm to obtain the orientation from the 2D projection of a specific pattern drawn onto the surface of the sphere. This has the advantages that it does not require a database of reference images, is easily scalable using parallel processing, and enables accurate absolute orientation reference. Analysis of the sphere's translational dynamics reveals clear differences between the streamwise and transverse directions. The translational auto-correlations and PDFs provide evidence for periodicity in the particle's dynamics even under turbulent conditions. The angular autocorrelations show weak periodicity. The angular accelerations exhibit wide tails, however without a directional dependence.

  11. Submicron particle dynamics for different surfaces under quiescent and turbulent conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Karn; Ghosh, Kunal; Tripathi, S. N.; Thangamani, I.; Goyal, P.; Dutta, Anu; Verma, V.

    2017-03-01

    Experiments were conducted using CsI aerosols in a small scale test chamber to simulate behaviour of aerosols in the containment of a nuclear reactor. The primary focus of the study was on submicron particles (14.3 nm-697.8 nm) due to their hazardous effect on human health. Different wall surfaces, viz., plexiglass, concrete and sandpaper were chosen to study the effect of surface roughness on dry deposition velocity under both quiescent and turbulent conditions. An analytical approach to calculate dry deposition velocity of submicron particles for rough surfaces has been proposed with an improvement in the existing parameterization for shift in the velocity boundary layer. The predicted deposition velocity with the improved parameterization was found to have better agreement with published measured data of Lai and Nazaroff (2005) compared to the existing parameterizations (Wood, 1981; Zhao and Wu, 2006b). There was a significant reduction in root mean square error (RMSE) between predicted, using the improved parameterization and measured deposition velocity (upto 100%) compared to earlier ones. The new analytical deposition approach was coupled with volume conserving semi-implicit coagulation model. This aerosol dynamic model was evaluated against explicit particle size distribution for the first time for rough surfaces. Normalized RMSE between simulated and measured particle size distribution varied in the range of 2%-20% at different instances. The model seems to closely predict submicron particle behaviour in indoor environment.

  12. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  13. On the coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent molecular mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givi, Peyman; Kosaly, George

    1987-01-01

    The general coalescence-dispersion (C/D) closure provides phenomenological modeling of turbulent molecular mixing. The models of Curl and Dopazo and O'Brien appear as two limiting C/D models that bracket the range of results one can obtain by various models. This finding is used to investigate the sensitivtiy of the results to the choice of the model. Inert scalar mixing is found to be less model-sensitive than mixing accompanied by chemical reaction. Infinitely fast chemistry approximation is used to relate the C/D approach to Toor's earlier results. Pure mixing and infinite rate chemistry calculations are compared to study further a recent result of Hsieh and O'Brien who found that higher concentration moments are not sensitive to chemistry.

  14. PDF modelling and particle-turbulence interaction of turbulent spray flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent spray flames can be found in many applications, such as Diesel engines, rocket engines and power plants. The many practical applications are a motivation to investigate the physical phenomena occurring in turbulent spray flames in detail in order to be able to understand, predict and

  15. PDF modelling and particle-turbulence interaction of turbulent spray flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Turbulent spray flames can be found in many applications, such as Diesel engines, rocket engines and power plants. The many practical applications are a motivation to investigate the physical phenomena occurring in turbulent spray flames in detail in order to be able to understand, predict and optim

  16. Chaotic and regular instantons in helical shell models of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    De Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Shell models of turbulence have a finite-time blowup, i.e. the enstrophy diverges while the single shell velocities stay finite, in the inviscid limit. The signature of this blowup is represented by self-similar instantonic structures traveling coherently through the inertial range. These solutions might influence the energy transfer and the anomalous scaling properties empirically observed for the forced and viscous models. In this paper we present a study of the instantonic solutions for a class of shell-models of turbulence based on the exact decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations in helical eigenstates. We found that depending on the helical structure of the shell interactions instantons are chaotic or regular. Some instantonic solutions tend to recover mirror symmetry for scales small enough. All models that have anomalous scaling develop regular non-chaotic instantons. Vice-versa, models that have mean field non-anomalous scaling in the stationary regime are those that have chaotic instantons. Fin...

  17. Investigating Coherent Structures in the Standard Turbulence Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliassen, Lene; Andersen, Søren

    2016-09-01

    The wind turbine design standards recommend two different methods to generate turbulent wind for design load analysis, the Kaimal spectra combined with an exponential coherence function and the Mann turbulence model. The two turbulence models can give very different estimates of fatigue life, especially for offshore floating wind turbines. In this study the spatial distributions of the two turbulence models are investigated using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, which is used to characterize large coherent structures. The main focus has been on the structures that contain the most energy, which are the lowest POD modes. The Mann turbulence model generates coherent structures that stretches in the horizontal direction for the longitudinal component, while the structures found in the Kaimal model are more random in their shape. These differences in the coherent structures at lower frequencies for the two turbulence models can be the reason for differences in fatigue life estimates for wind turbines.

  18. A theoretical model of turbulent fiber suspension and its application to the channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A theoretical model of turbulent fiber suspension is developed by deriving the equations of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes,turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence dissipation rate with the additional term of fibers.In order to close the above equations,the equation of probability distribution function for mean fiber orientation is also derived.The theoretical model is applied to the turbulent channel flow and the corresponding equations are solved numerically.The numerical results are verified by comparisons with the experimental ones.The effects of Reynolds number,fiber concentration and fiber aspect-ratio on the velocity profile,turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate are analyzed.Based on the numerical data,the expression for the velocity profile in the turbulent fiber suspension channel flow,which includes the effect of Reynolds number,fiber concentration and aspect-ratio,is proposed.

  19. Study of staircase formation in Hasegawa-Wakatani turbulence, using a multi-field, K - ɛ based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashourvan, Arash; Diamond, P. H.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-11-01

    Staircase formation is a generic form of secondary pattern formation instability in out-of-equilibrium, turbulent systems. Inhomogeneous mixing of potential vorticity across its background gradient can result in highly structured staircases in the PV profile, by weakening the background PV in some regions and sharpening it in others. We study the staircase formation in the density profile of a Hasegawa-Wakatani system, in which turbulence can be driven by both the density gradient and the flow shear. Total potential enstrophy of this system is explicitly conserved, up to the enstrophy production and dissipation terms. We use a 3-field model, which evolves the mean density profile, the mean vorticity profile, and the turbulent potential enstrophy. Both analytical and numerical techniques are used to study the equilibrium solutions and their stability, as well as the dynamics of this model. Supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER54738.

  20. An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers (BBLs) is proposed using eddy viscosity of a quadratic form. The common definition of friction velocity based on maximum bottom shear stress is found unsatisfactory for BBLs under rotating flows, and a possible extension based on turbulent kinetic energy balance is proposed. The model solutions show that the flow may slip at the top of the boundary layer due to capping by the water surface or stratification, reducing the bottom shear stress, and that the Earth's rotation induces current and bottom shear stress components perpendicular to the interior flow with a phase lag (or lead). Comparisons with field and numerical experiments indicate that the model predicts the essential characteristics of the velocity profiles, although the agreement is rather qualitative due to assumptions of quadratic eddy viscosity with time-independent friction velocity and a well-mixed boundary layer. On the other hand, the predicted linear friction coefficients, phase lead, and veering angle at the bottom agreed with available data with an error of 3%-10%, 5°-10°, and 5°-10°, respectively. As an application of the model, the friction coefficients are used to calculate e-folding decay distances of progressive internal waves with a semidiurnal frequency.

  1. Spectral Model of Non-Stationary, Inhomogeneous Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bragg, Andrew D; Clark, Timothy T

    2015-01-01

    We compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al., Theor. Comp. Fluid. Dyn., vol. 8, pp 1-35, 1996) with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al., Phys. Rev. E, vol. 77, 016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long-times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We present arguments, supported by the DNS data, that a significant cause of the discrepancies is the local approximation to the intrinsically non-local pressure-transport in physical...

  2. Energy Dissipation in the Smagorinsky Model of Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Layton, William

    2016-01-01

    The Smagorinsky model, unmodified, is often reported to severely overdiffuse flows. Previous estimates of the energy dissipation rate of the Smagorinsky model for shear flows reflect a blow up of model energy dissipation as Re increases. This blow up is consistent with the numerical evidence and leads to the question: Is the over dissipation due to the influence of the turbulent viscosity in boundary layers alone or is its action on small scales generated by the nonlinearity through the cascade also a contributor? This report develops model dissipation estimates for body force driven flow under periodic boundary conditions (and thus only with nonlinearity generated small scales). It is proven that the model's time averaged energy dissipation rate satisfies the same upper bound as for the NSE plus one additional term that vanishes uniformly in the Reynolds number as the Smagorinsky length scale decreases. Since this estimate is consistent with that observed for the NSE, it establishes that, without boundary la...

  3. Environmental Turbulence, Enterprises Strategic Responses and the Formation & Evolution of Dynamic Capabilities:Theoretic Model and Propositions%环境变动、企业战略反应与动态能力的形成演化:理论模型与命题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾萍; 宋铁波

    2013-01-01

      当前企业动态能力形成演化的研究更多地关注了影响动态能力形成的直接因素,而缺乏对环境变动影响下企业内在战略反应与动态能力形成演化路径的研究。基于资源基础理论与演化理论视角,对相关文献进行分析与综合,在此基础上构建了一个环境变动、企业战略反应以及动态能力形成演化的理论模型,并提炼出相关命题,从而为动态能力理论的发展以及企业战略管理实践提供了新的洞见。%  Current research on the formation and evolution of dynamic capabilities pays great attention to the direct factors that affect the formation of dynamic capabilities , but there is little research on enterprises strategic responses and the formation and evolvement of dynamic capabilities under the influence of environmental turbulence .Based on the Resource-Based Theory and the Evolution Theory , this article analyzes relevant literature comprehensively , and establishes a theoretical model of environmental turbulence , enterprises strategic responses and the formation and evolvement of dynamic capabilities , and then draws some relevant propositions .The conclusion of this article provides new insights on the development of dynamic capabilities theory and the practice of enterprises manage -ment.

  4. Dynamically dominant exact coherent structures in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krygier, Michael; Grigoriev, Roman

    2016-11-01

    Unstable Exact Coherent Structures (ECS), which are solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation, provide a connection between turbulence and dynamical systems and offer a method for exploiting the low dimensionality of weakly turbulent flows. We investigate ECS in an intermittent Taylor-Couette flow (TCF) found in a small-aspect-ratio geometry with counter-rotating cylinders (η = 0 . 5 , Γ = 1 , Rei = - 1200 , Reo = 1200). The presence of end-caps breaks the axial translational symmetry of TCF, but continuous rotational symmetry remains, which suggest that typical ECS should be the relative versions of equilibria and time-periodic orbits. Indeed, previous studies (Meseguer et al., 2009 and Deguchi, Meseguer & Mellibovsky, 2014) found several unstable traveling wave solutions (relative equilibria). We have shown that the dynamically dominant ECS for weakly turbulent TCF in the small-aspect-ratio geometry are relative periodic orbits (not relative equilibria), as evidenced by the frequent visits of their neighborhoods by the turbulent flow. This work is supported by a Grant from the Army Research Office (Contract # W911NF-15-1-0471).

  5. Turbulent structure and dynamics of swirled, strongly pulsed jet diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    2013-11-02

    The structure and dynamics of swirled, strongly pulsed, turbulent jet diffusion flames were examined experimentally in a co-flow swirl combustor. The dynamics of the large-scale flame structures, including variations in flame dimensions, the degree of turbulent flame puff interaction, and the turbulent flame puff celerity were determined from high-speed imaging of the luminous flame. All of the tests presented here were conducted with a fixed fuel injection velocity at a Reynolds number of 5000. The flame dimensions were generally found to be more impacted by swirl for the cases of longer injection time and faster co-flow flow rate. Flames with swirl exhibited a flame length up to 34% shorter compared to nonswirled flames. Both the turbulent flame puff separation and the flame puff celerity generally decreased when swirl was imposed. The decreased flame length, flame puff separation, and flame puff celerity are consistent with a greater momentum exchange between the flame and the surrounding co-flow, resulting from an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. Three scaling relations were developed to account for the impact of the injection time, the volumetric fuel-to-air flow rate ratio, and the jet-on fraction on the visible flame length. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

  6. A fast algorithm for a three-dimensional synthetic model of intermittent turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Malara, Francesco; Nigro, Giuseppina; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic turbulence models are a useful tool that provide realistic representations of turbulence, necessary to test theoretical results, to serve as background fields in some numerical simulations, and to test analysis tools. Models of 1D and 3D synthetic turbulence previously developed still required large computational resources. A new wavelet-based model of synthetic turbulence, able to produce a field with tunable spectral law, intermittency and anisotropy, is presented here. The rapid algorithm introduced, based on the classic $p$-model of intermittent turbulence, allows to reach a broad spectral range using a modest computational effort. The model has been tested against the standard diagnostics for intermittent turbulence, i.e. the spectral analysis, the scale-dependent statistics of the field increments, and the multifractal analysis, all showing an excellent response.

  7. Near-surface snow particle dynamics from particle tracking velocimetry and turbulence measurements during alpine blowing snow storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksamit, Nikolas O.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2016-12-01

    Many blowing snow conceptual and predictive models have been based on simplified two-phase flow dynamics derived from time-averaged observations of bulk flow conditions in blowing snow storms. Measurements from the first outdoor application of particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) of near-surface blowing snow yield new information on mechanisms for blowing snow initiation, entrainment, and rebound, whilst also confirming some findings from wind tunnel observations. Blowing snow particle movement is influenced by complex surface flow dynamics, including saltation development from creep that has not previously been measured for snow. Comparisons with 3-D atmospheric turbulence measurements show that blowing snow particle motion immediately above the snow surface responds strongly to high-frequency turbulent motions. Momentum exchange from wind to the dense near-surface particle-laden flow appears significant and makes an important contribution to blowing snow mass flux and saltation initiation dynamics. The more complete and accurate description of near-surface snow particle motions observable using PTV may prove useful for improving blowing snow model realism and accuracy.

  8. Fix-point Multiplier Distributions in Discrete Turbulent Cascade Models

    CERN Document Server

    Jouault, B; Lipa, P

    1998-01-01

    One-point time-series measurements limit the observation of three-dimensional fully developed turbulence to one dimension. For one-dimensional models, like multiplicative branching processes, this implies that the energy flux from large to small scales is not conserved locally. This then renders the random weights used in the cascade curdling to be different from the multipliers obtained from a backward averaging procedure. The resulting multiplier distributions become solutions of a fix-point problem. With a further restoration of homogeneity, all observed correlations between multipliers in the energy dissipation field can be understood in terms of simple scale-invariant multiplicative branching processes.

  9. Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence Effect on Terrestrial FSO Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric turbulence results in many effects causing fluctuation in the received optical power. Terrestrial laser beam communication is affected above all by scintillations. The paper deals with modeling the influence of scintillation on link performance, using the modified Rytov theory. The probability of correct signal detection in direct detection system in dependence on many parameters such as link distance, power link margin, refractive-index structure parameter, etc. is discussed and different approaches to the evaluation of scintillation effect are compared. The simulations are performed for a horizontal-path propagation of the Gaussian-beam wave.

  10. Turbulence Modeling for the Simulation of Transition in Wall Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Our research involves study of the behavior of k-epsilon turbulence models for simulation of bypass-level transition over flat surfaces and turbine blades. One facet of the research has been to assess the performance of a multitude of k-epsilon models in what we call "natural transition", i.e. no modifications to the k-e models. The study has been to ascertain what features in the dynamics of the model affect the start and end of the transition. Some of the findings are in keeping with those reported by others (e.g. ERCOFTAC). A second facet of the research has been to develop and benchmark a new multi-time scale k-epsilon model (MTS) for use in simulating bypass-level transition. This model has certain features of the published MTS models by Hanjalic, Launder, and Schiestel, and by Kim and his coworkers. The major new feature of our MTS model is that it can be used to compute wall shear flows as a low-turbulence Reynolds number type of model, i.e. there is no required partition with patching a one-equation k model in the near-wall region to a two-equation k-epsilon model in the outer part of the flow. Our MTS model has been studied extensively to understand its dynamics in predicting the onset of transition and the end-stage of the transition. Results to date indicate that it far superior to the standard unmodified k-epsilon models. The effects of protracted pressure gradients on the model behavior are currently being investigated.

  11. Models for Dynamic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    be applied to formulate, analyse and solve these dynamic problems and how in the case of the fuel cell problem the model consists of coupledmeso and micro scale models. It is shown how data flows are handled between the models and how the solution is obtained within the modelling environment....

  12. Chaotic dynamics of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action in a turbulent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrelis, F; Fauve, S [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, CNRS UMR 8550, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: petrelis@lps.ens.fr

    2008-12-10

    We present models related to the results of a recent experiment (the 'VKS experiment') showing the generation of a magnetic field by a fully turbulent flow of liquid sodium. We first discuss the geometry of the mean magnetic field when the two coaxial impellers driving the flow counter-rotate at the same frequency. We then show how we expect this geometry to be modified when the impellers rotate at different frequencies. We also show that, in the latter case, dynamical regimes of the magnetic field can be easily understood from the interaction of modes with dipolar (respectively quadrupolar) symmetry. In particular, this interaction generates magnetic field reversals that have been observed in the experiment and display a hierarchy of timescales similar to the Earth's magnetic field: the duration of the steady phases is widely distributed, but is always much longer than the time needed to switch polarity. In addition to reversals, several other large scale features of the generated magnetic field are obtained when varying the governing parameters of the flow. These results are also understood in the framework of the same model.

  13. Assessment of three turbulence model performances in predicting water jet flow plunging into a liquid pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidouni Kendil Faiza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the current study is to numerically investigate, through computational fluid dynamics modeling, a water jet injected vertically downward through a straight circular pipe into a water bath. The study also aims to obtain a better understanding of jet behavior, air entrainment and the dispersion of bubbles in the developing flow region. For these purposes, three dimensional air and water flows were modeled using the volume of fluid technique. The equations in question were formulated using the density and viscosity of a 'gas-liquid mixture', described in terms of the phase volume fraction. Three turbulence models with a high Reynolds number have been considered i. e. the standard k-e model, realizable k-e model, and Reynolds stress model. The predicted flow patterns for the realizable k-e model match well with experimental measurements found in available literature. Nevertheless, some discrepancies regarding velocity relaxation and turbulent momentum distribution in the pool are still observed for both the standard k-e and the Reynolds stress model.

  14. Color of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zare, Armin; Georgiou, Tryphon T

    2016-01-01

    Second-order statistics of turbulent flows can be obtained either experimentally or via direct numerical simulations. Statistics reflect fundamentals of flow physics and can be used to develop low-complexity turbulence models. Due to experimental or numerical limitations it is often the case that only partial flow statistics can be reliably known, i.e., only certain correlations between a limited number of flow field components are available. Thus, it is of interest to complete the statistical signature of the flow field in a way that is consistent with the known dynamics. This is an inverse problem and our approach utilizes stochastically-forced linearization around turbulent mean velocity profile. In general, white-in-time stochastic forcing is not sufficient to explain turbulent flow statistics. In contrast, colored-in-time forcing of the linearized equations allows for exact matching of available correlations. To accomplish this, we develop dynamical models that generate the required stochastic excitation...

  15. PROSPECTS OF DESIGNING FLEXIBLE BUSINESS MODEL IN TURBULENT TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia DUTU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the current global context to capture the characteristics of the new type of volatile and turbulent business environment in which companies must operate nowdays and to bring some propositions in order to guide managers in designing or redesigning business models to achieve flexibility. The central message of this paper, that is a point of view one, is that, nowdays but also in the future, business models that are based on strategic, organizational and operational flexibility and on reaction speed will be those who will provide the greatest capacity to respond to change. Even if the international theory provides a multiple perspective analysis of business model concept, still how it can be achieved such flexibility remains an open issue in the academic debate, but also in the practice of companies. Thus, the paper contains some propositions in order to guide managers in the process of designing or redesigning the business model.

  16. Model-based design of transverse wall oscillations for turbulent drag reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Moarref, Rashad

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, both experiments and simulations have demonstrated that transverse wall oscillations with properly selected amplitude and frequency can reduce turbulent drag by as much as 40%. In this paper, we develop a model-based approach for designing oscillations that suppress turbulence in a channel flow. We utilize eddy-viscosity-enhanced linearization of the turbulent flow with control in conjunction with turbulence modeling to determine skin-friction drag in a simulation-free manner. The Boussinesq eddy viscosity hypothesis is used to quantify the effect of fluctuations on the mean velocity in the flow subject to control. In contrast to the traditional approach that relies on numerical simulations, we determine the turbulent viscosity from the second order statistics of the linearized model driven by white-in-time stochastic forcing. The spatial power spectrum of the forcing is selected to ensure that the linearized model for the uncontrolled flow reproduces the turbulent energy spectrum. ...

  17. A dynamic subgrid-scale model for the large eddy simulation of stratified flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宁宇; 陆夕云; 庄礼贤

    2000-01-01

    A new dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model, including subgrid turbulent stress and heat flux models for stratified shear flow is proposed by using Yoshizawa’ s eddy viscosity model as a base model. Based on our calculated results, the dynamic subgrid-scale model developed here is effective for the large eddy simulation (LES) of stratified turbulent channel flows. The new SGS model is then applied to the large eddy simulation of stratified turbulent channel flow under gravity to investigate the coupled shear and buoyancy effects on the near-wall turbulent statistics and the turbulent heat transfer at different Richardson numbers. The critical Richardson number predicted by the present calculation is in good agreement with the value of theoretical analysis.

  18. A dynamic subgrid-scale model for the large eddy simulation of stratified flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model, including subgrid turbulent stress and heat flux models for stratified shear flow is proposed by using Yoshizawa's eddy viscosity model as a base model. Based on our calculated results, the dynamic subgrid-scale model developed here is effective for the large eddy simulation (LES) of stratified turbulent channel flows. The new SGS model is then applied to the large eddy simulation of stratified turbulent channel flow under gravity to investigate the coupled shear and buoyancy effects on the near-wall turbulent statistics and the turbulent heat transfer at different Richardson numbers. The critical Richardson number predicted by the present calculation is in good agreement with the value of theoretical analysis.

  19. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-10-01

    Context. Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, since it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing numerical simulations have shown that α-values a few times 10-4 can be generated. Aims: The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of embedded dust particles. Here, we address, in particular, the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of embedded particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. Results: We confirm that, under realistic conditions, the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc shows turbulence within 10 to 60 au. The mean radial motion of the gas is such that it is directed inward near the midplane and outward in the surface layers. We find that large particles drift inward with the expected speed, while small particles can experience phases of outward drift. Additionally, the particles show bunching behaviour with overdensities reaching five times the average value, which is strongest for dimensionless stopping times around unity. Conclusions: Particles in a VSI-turbulent discs are concentrated in large-scale turbulent eddies and show low relative speeds that allow for growing collisions. The reached overdensities will also enable the onset of streaming instabilities, further enhancing particle growth. The outward drift for small particles at higher disk elevations enable the transport of processed high temperature material in the solar system to greater distances.

  20. Forcing-dependent dynamics and emergence of helicity in rotating turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    The effects of large scale mechanical forcing on the dynamics of rotating turbulent flows are studied by means of numerical simulations, varying systematically the nature of the mechanical force in time. We demonstrate that the statistically stationary solutions of these flows depend on the nature of the forcing mechanism. Rapidly enough rotating flows with a forcing that has a persistent direction relatively to the axis of rotation bifurcate from a non-helical state to a helical state despite the fact that the forcing is non-helical. We find that the nature of the mechanical force in time and the emergence of helicity have direct implications on the cascade dynamics of these flows, determining the anisotropy in the flow, the energy condensation at large scales and the power-law energy spectra that are consistent with previous findings and phenomenologies under strong and weak-wave turbulent conditions.

  1. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, E R

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of planar Couette flow is presented for the minimal channel in which turbulence structures can be sustained. Evolution over a single breakdown and regeneration cycle is compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Qualitative similar structures are observed and turbulent statistics show excellent quantitative agreement. The molecular scale law of the wall is presented in which stick-slip molecular wall-fluid interactions replace the no-slip conditions. The impact of grid resolution is explored and the observed structures are seen to be dependant on averaging time and length scales. The kinetic energy spectra show a range of scales are present in the molecular system and that spectral content is dependent on the grid resolution employed. The subgrid velocity of the molecules is compared to spatial averaged velocity using joint probability density functions. Molecular trajectories, diffusions and Lagrangian statistics are presented. The importance of sub-grid ...

  2. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  3. Dissipation in unsteady turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that unsteady turbulent flows, before reaching a dynamic equilibrium state, display a universal behaviour. We show that the observed universal non-equilibrium scaling can be explained using a non-equilibrium correction of Kolmogorov's energy spectrum. Given the universality of the experimental and numerical observations, the ideas presented here lay the foundation for the modeling of a wide class of unsteady turbulent flows.

  4. Modeling of turbulent supersonic H2-air combustion with an improved joint beta PDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Hassan, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    Attempts at modeling recent experiments of Cheng et al. indicated that discrepancies between theory and experiment can be a result of the form of assumed probability density function (PDF) and/or the turbulence model employed. Improvements in both the form of the assumed PDF and the turbulence model are presented. The results are again used to compare with measurements. Initial comparisons are encouraging.

  5. Youngs-Type Material Strength Model in the Besnard-Harlow-Rauenzahn Turbulence Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denissen, Nicholas Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Plohr, Bradley J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Youngs [AWE Report Number 96/96, 1992] has augmented a two-phase turbulence model to account for material strength. Here we adapt the model of Youngs to the turbulence model for the mixture developed by Besnard, Harlow, and Rauenzahn [LANL Report LA-10911, 1987].

  6. CALCULATION OF THERMAL AND SALINE TURBULENT FLOW BY k-ε MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhen-hong; Shen Yong-ming; Zheng Yong-hong; Liu Cai-guang

    2003-01-01

    Based on the N-S equation, taking the character of thermal and saline stratified flow into account, and considering the effects of buoyancy on turbulence, the k-ε model of thermal and saline stratified flow is established.Density stratified flow with both the vertical temperature gradient and the vertical salinity gradient is simulated numerically, in which turbulent terms are calculated by the k-ε turbulent model.The distributions of velocity, temperature and salinity are given in this paper.The feature of stratification and turbulence is described correctly by the model.The computational results agree well with the experimental data.

  7. Turbulent coherent-structure dynamics in a natural surface storage zone: Mechanisms of mass and momentum transport in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escauriaza, Cristian; Sandoval, Jorge; Mignot, Emmanuel; Mao, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows developed in surface storage zones (SSZ) in rivers control many physical and biogeochemical processes of contaminants in the water. These regions are characterized by low velocities and long residence times, which favor particle deposition, nutrient uptake, and flow interactions with reactive sediments. The dynamics of the flow in SSZ is driven by a shear layer that induces multiple vortical structures with a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. In this work we study the flow in a lateral SSZ of the Lluta River, a high-altitude Andean stream (4,000 masl), with a Re=45,800. We describe the large-scale turbulent coherent structures using field measurements and 3D numerical simulations. We measure the bed topography, instantaneous 3D velocities at selected points, the mean 2D free-surface velocity field, and arsenic concentration in the sediment. Numerical simulations of the flow are also performed using a DES turbulence model. We focus on the mass and momentum transport processes, analyzing the statistics of mass exchange and residence times in the SSZ. With this information we provide new insights on the flow and transport processes between the main channel and the recirculating region in natural conditions. Supported by Fondecyt 1130940.

  8. Scaling law and fractality concepts in models of turbulent diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakunin, O G [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , Nuclear Fusion Institute, Kurchatova Sq., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); FOM Instituut voor Plasmafysica ' Rijnhuizen' , Associate Euroatom-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2003-10-01

    A large variety of plasma instabilities lead to the development of different types of plasma turbulences. This paper discusses the Dreizin-Dykhne model of random flows, the Kadomtsev-Pogutse approach to describe 'braided' magnetic field and transport estimates in systems with convective cells. The important role of correlation effects and anisotropy is shown. The variety of forms require not only special description methods, but also an analysis of the general mechanisms for different turbulence types. One such mechanism is the percolation transport. Its description is based on the idea of long-range correlations, taken from the theory of phase transitions and the percolation theory. This approach is based on fractality ideas. This paper discusses several different models of the percolation transport. The similar characters of used approaches are pointed out. The detailed analysis of the more important results obtained in this domain is presented in this paper. The aim of this paper is to make these results clear and not only for theoreticians.

  9. Unsteady Flame Embedding (UFE) Subgrid Model for Turbulent Premixed Combustion Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    El-Asrag, Hossam

    2010-01-04

    We present a formulation for an unsteady subgrid model for premixed combustion in the flamelet regime. Since chemistry occurs at the unresolvable scales, it is necessary to introduce a subgrid model that accounts for the multi-scale nature of the problem using the information available on the resolved scales. Most of the current models are based on the laminar flamelet concept, and often neglect the unsteady effects. The proposed model\\'s primary objective is to encompass many of the flame/turbulence interactions unsteady features and history effects. In addition it provides a dynamic and accurate approach for computing the subgrid flame propagation velocity. The unsteady flame embedding approach (UFE) treats the flame as an ensemble of locally one-dimensional flames. A set of elemental one dimensional flames is used to describe the turbulent flame structure at the subgrid level. The stretched flame calculations are performed on the stagnation line of a strained flame using the unsteady filtered strain rate computed from the resolved- grid. The flame iso-surface is tracked using an accurate high-order level set formulation to propagate the flame interface at the coarse resolution with minimum numerical diffusion. In this paper the solver and the model components are introduced and used to investigate two unsteady flames with different Lewis numbers in the thin reaction zone regime. The results show that the UFE model captures the unsteady flame-turbulence interactions and the flame propagation speed reasonably well. Higher propagation speed is observed for the lower than unity Lewis number flame because of the impact of differential diffusion.

  10. A dynamical equation for the distribution of a scalar advected by turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venaille, Antoine; Sommeria, Joel

    2007-02-01

    A phenomenological model for the dissipation of scalar fluctuations due to the straining by the fluid motion is proposed in this Brief Communication. An explicit equation is obtained for the time evolution of the probability distribution function of a coarse-grained scalar concentration. The model relies on a self-convolution process. We first present this model in the Batchelor regime and then extend empirically our result to the turbulent case. This approach is finally compared with other models.

  11. Binary tree models of high-Reynolds-number turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, Erik; Dormy, Emmanuel; Frick, Peter

    1997-08-01

    We consider hierarchical models for turbulence, that are simple generalizations of the standard Gledzer-Ohkitani-Yamada shell models (E. B. Gledzer, Dokl, Akad. Nauk SSSR 209, 5 (1973) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 18, 216 (1973)]; M. Yamada and K. Ohkitani, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 4210 (1987)). The density of degrees of freedom is constant in wave-number space. Looking only at this behavior and at the quadratic invariants in the inviscid unforced limit, the models can be thought of as systems living naturally in one spatial dimension, but being qualitatively similar to hydrodynamics in two (2D) and three dimensions. We investigated cascade phenomena and intermittency in the different cases. We observed and studied a forward cascade of enstrophy in the 2D case.

  12. A dynamic subgrid-scale modeling framework for large eddy simulation using approximate deconvolution

    CERN Document Server

    Maulik, Romit

    2016-01-01

    We put forth a dynamic modeling framework for sub-grid parametrization of large eddy simulation of turbulent flows based upon the use of the approximate deconvolution procedure to compute the Smagorinsky constant self-adaptively from the resolved flow quantities. Our numerical assessments for solving the Burgers turbulence problem shows that the proposed approach could be used as a viable tool to address the turbulence closure problem due to its flexibility.

  13. Interchange turbulence model for the edge plasma in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufferand, H.; Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Fedorczak, N.; Gunn, J.; Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Colin, C.; Galassi, D.; Leybros, R.; Serre, E. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, M2P2, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    Cross-field transport in edge tokamak plasmas is known to be dominated by turbulent transport. A dedicated effort has been made to simulate this turbulent transport from first principle models but the numerical cost to run these simulations on the ITER scale remains prohibitive. Edge plasma transport study relies mostly nowadays on so-called transport codes where the turbulent transport is taken into account using effective ad-hoc diffusion coefficients. In this contribution, we propose to introduce a transport equation for the turbulence intensity in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE to describe the interchange turbulence properties. Going beyond the empirical diffusive model, this system automatically generates profiles for the turbulent transport and hence reduces the number of degrees of freedom for edge plasma transport codes. We draw inspiration from the k-epsilon model widely used in the neutral fluid community. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Dynamic term structure models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Meldrum, Andrew

    This paper studies whether dynamic term structure models for US nominal bond yields should enforce the zero lower bound by a quadratic policy rate or a shadow rate specification. We address the question by estimating quadratic term structure models (QTSMs) and shadow rate models with at most four...

  15. Intermittency, chaos and singular fluctuations in the mixed Obukhov-Novikov shell model of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Dombre, T; Dombre, Thierry; Gilson, Jean Louis

    1995-01-01

    The multiscaling properties of the mixed Obukhov-Novikov shell model of turbulence are investigated numerically and compared with those of the complex GOY model, mostly studied in the recent years. Two types of generic singular fluctuations are identified~: first, self-similar solutions propagating from large to small scales and building up intermittency, second, complex time singularities inhibiting the cascade and promoting chaos. A simple and robust method is proposed to track these objects. It is shown that the scaling exponent of self-similar solutions selected by the dynamics is compatible with large order statistics whenever it departs enough from the Kolmogorov value. Complex time singularities on the other hand get trapped on the last shells, when the proportion of Novikov interactions exceeds a critical value which is argued to mark the boundary between chaotic and regular dynamics in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  16. DYNAMICS OF TURBULENT CONVECTION AND CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOT IN A MODERATE-MASS STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kosovichev, A. G., E-mail: irina.n.kitiashvili@nasa.gov [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We present results of realistic three-dimensional (3D) radiative hydrodynamic simulations of the outer layers of a moderate-mass star (1.47 M {sub ⊙}), including the full convection zone, the overshoot region, and the top layers of the radiative zone. The simulation results show that the surface granulation has a broad range of scales, from 2 to 12 Mm, and that large granules are organized in well-defined clusters, consisting of several granules. Comparison of the mean structure profiles from 3D simulations with the corresponding one-dimensional (1D) standard stellar model shows an increase of the stellar radius by ∼800 km, as well as significant changes in the thermodynamic structure and turbulent properties of the ionization zones. Convective downdrafts in the intergranular lanes between granulation clusters reach speeds of more than 20 km s{sup −1}, penetrate through the whole convection zone, hit the radiative zone, and form an 8 Mm thick overshoot layer. Contrary to semi-empirical overshooting models, our results show that the 3D dynamic overshoot region consists of two layers: a nearly adiabatic extension of the convection zone and a deeper layer of enhanced subadiabatic stratification. This layer is formed because of heating caused by the braking of the overshooting convective plumes. This effect has to be taken into account in stellar modeling and the interpretation of asteroseismology data. In particular, we demonstrate that the deviations of the mean structure of the 3D model from the 1D standard model of the same mass and composition are qualitatively similar to the deviations for the Sun found by helioseismology.

  17. Study on Turbulent Modeling in Gas Entrainment Evaluation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kei; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Nakamine, Yoshiaki; Imai, Yasutomo

    Suppression of gas entrainment (GE) phenomena caused by free surface vortices are very important to establish an economically superior design of the sodium-cooled fast reactor in Japan (JSFR). However, due to the non-linearity and/or locality of the GE phenomena, it is not easy to evaluate the occurrences of the GE phenomena accurately. In other words, the onset condition of the GE phenomena in the JSFR is not predicted easily based on scaled-model and/or partial-model experiments. Therefore, the authors are developing a CFD-based evaluation method in which the non-linearity and locality of the GE phenomena can be considered. In the evaluation method, macroscopic vortex parameters, e.g. circulation, are determined by three-dimensional CFD and then, GE-related parameters, e.g. gas core (GC) length, are calculated by using the Burgers vortex model. This procedure is efficient to evaluate the GE phenomena in the JSFR. However, it is well known that the Burgers vortex model tends to overestimate the GC length due to the lack of considerations on some physical mechanisms. Therefore, in this study, the authors develop a turbulent vortex model to evaluate the GE phenomena more accurately. Then, the improved GE evaluation method with the turbulent viscosity model is validated by analyzing the GC lengths observed in a simple experiment. The evaluation results show that the GC lengths analyzed by the improved method are shorter in comparison to the original method, and give better agreement with the experimental data.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MULTIFIELD MODEL OF CHURN-TURBULENT GAS/LIQUID FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski; Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    The accuracy of numerical predictions for gas/liquid two-phase flows using Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) methods strongly depends on the formulation of models governing the interaction between the continuous liquid field and bubbles of different sizes. The purpose of this paper is to develop, test and validate a multifield model of adiabatic gas/liquid flows at intermediate gas concentrations (e.g., churn-turbulent flow regime), in which multiple-size bubbles are divided into a specified number of groups, each representing a prescribed range of sizes. The proposed modeling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for each bubble field. The overall model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. The results of NPHASE-CMFD simulations have been validated against the experimental data from the TOPFLOW test facility. Also, a parametric analysis on the effect of various modeling assumptions has been performed.

  19. Evolution and dynamics of shear-layer structures in near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Arne V.; Alfredsson, P. H.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Near-wall flow structures in turbulent shear flows are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the study of their space-time evolution and connection to turbulence production. The results are obtained from investigation of a database generated from direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow at a Reynolds number of 180 based on half-channel width and friction velocity. New light is shed on problems associated with conditional sampling techniques, together with methods to improve these techniques, for use both in physical and numerical experiments. The results clearly indicate that earlier conceptual models of the processes associated with near-wall turbulence production, based on flow visualization and probe measurements need to be modified. For instance, the development of asymmetry in the spanwise direction seems to be an important element in the evolution of near-wall structures in general, and for shear layers in particular. The inhibition of spanwise motion of the near-wall streaky pattern may be the primary reason for the ability of small longitudinal riblets to reduce turbulent skin friction below the value for a flat surface.

  20. Information Theory Analysis of Cascading Process in a Synthetic Model of Fluid Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Materassi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of transfer entropy has proven to be helpful in detecting which is the verse of dynamical driving in the interaction of two processes, X and Y . In this paper, we present a different normalization for the transfer entropy, which is capable of better detecting the information transfer direction. This new normalized transfer entropy is applied to the detection of the verse of energy flux transfer in a synthetic model of fluid turbulence, namely the Gledzer–Ohkitana–Yamada shell model. Indeed, this is a fully well-known model able to model the fully developed turbulence in the Fourier space, which is characterized by an energy cascade towards the small scales (large wavenumbers k, so that the application of the information-theory analysis to its outcome tests the reliability of the analysis tool rather than exploring the model physics. As a result, the presence of a direct cascade along the scales in the shell model and the locality of the interactions in the space of wavenumbers come out as expected, indicating the validity of this data analysis tool. In this context, the use of a normalized version of transfer entropy, able to account for the difference of the intrinsic randomness of the interacting processes, appears to perform better, being able to discriminate the wrong conclusions to which the “traditional” transfer entropy would drive.

  1. Dynamics of Turbulent Convection and Convective Overshoot in a Moderate Mass Star

    CERN Document Server

    Kitiashvili, Irina N; Mansour, Nagi N; Wray, Alan A

    2015-01-01

    Continued progress in observational stellar astrophysics requires a deep understanding of the underlying convection dynamics. We present results of realistic 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations of the outer layers of a moderate mass star (1.47 Msun), including the full convection zone, the overshoot region, and the top layers of the radiative zone. The simulation results show that the surface granulation has a broad range of scales, from 2 to 12 Mm, and that large granules are organized in well-defined clusters, consisting of several granules. Comparison of the mean structure profiles from 3D simulations with the corresponding 1D standard stellar model shows an increase of the stellar radius by ~800 km, as well as significant changes in the thermodynamic structure and turbulent properties of the ionization zones. Convective downdrafts in the intergranular lanes between granulation clusters reach speeds of more than 20 km/s, penetrate through the whole convection zone, hit the radiative zone, and form a 8 Mm...

  2. Low Reynolds number turbulence modeling of blood flow in arterial stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalichi, F; Deng, X; De Champlain, A; Douville, Y; King, M; Guidoin, R

    1998-01-01

    Moderate and severe arterial stenoses can produce highly disturbed flow regions with transitional and or turbulent flow characteristics. Neither laminar flow modeling nor standard two-equation models such as the kappa-epsilon turbulence ones are suitable for this kind of blood flow. In order to analyze the transitional or turbulent flow distal to an arterial stenosis, authors of this study have used the Wilcox low-Re turbulence model. Flow simulations were carried out on stenoses with 50, 75 and 86% reductions in cross-sectional area over a range of physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers. The results obtained with this low-Re turbulence model were compared with experimental measurements and with the results obtained by the standard kappa-epsilon model in terms of velocity profile, vortex length, wall shear stress, wall static pressure, and turbulence intensity. The comparisons show that results predicted by the low-Re model are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This model accurately predicts the critical Reynolds number at which blood flow becomes transitional or turbulent distal an arterial stenosis. Most interestingly, over the Re range of laminar flow, the vortex length calculated with the low-Re model also closely matches the vortex length predicted by laminar flow modeling. In conclusion, the study strongly suggests that the proposed model is suitable for blood flow studies in certain areas of the arterial tree where both laminar and transitional/turbulent flows coexist.

  3. Melting dynamics of large ice balls in a turbulent swirling flow

    CERN Document Server

    Machicoane, N; Volk, R

    2013-01-01

    We study the melting dynamics of large ice balls in a turbulent von Karman flow at very high Reynolds number. Using an optical shadowgraphy setup, we record the time evolution of particle sizes. We study the heat transfer as a function of the particle scale Reynolds number for three cases: fixed ice balls melting in a region of strong turbulence with zero mean flow, fixed ice balls melting under the action of a strong mean flow with lower fluctuations, and ice balls freely advected in the whole flow. For the fixed particles cases, heat transfer is observed to be much stronger than in laminar flows, the Nusselt number behaving as a power law of the Reynolds number of exponent 0.8. For freely advected ice balls, the turbulent transfer is further enhanced and the Nusselt number is proportional to the Reynolds number. The surface heat flux is then independent of the particles size, leading to an ultimate regime of heat transfer reached when the thermal boundary layer is fully turbulent.

  4. Single-phase and modified turbulence models for simulation of unsteady cavitating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basuki, W.; Schnerr, G.H.; Yuan, W. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this research is to provide a physical complete and numerical efficient simulation method to predict developed cavitation in hydrodynamic turbomachinery as well as in micro fluid dynamic applications, e.g. in high pressure injection nozzles of combustion engines. Cavitating two-phase flows are always very unstable, highly unsteady, 3-D and turbulent. To understand cavitation dynamics and its interaction with viscous effects like boundary layers and separation, we introduce the single-phase turbulence k - {omega} model of Wilcox without modifications with respect to dispersed structures of bubbly liquids, which overestimates viscous effects in the transitional regime between the vapor and liquid phase and tends to suppress typical cavitation instabilities. Consequently our further approach consists of modifications of the single-phase Wilcox model to account for the strong nonlinear variation of the turbulent viscosity {mu}{sub t}, depending on the local void fraction {alpha}. The key issue of all numerical methods for simulation of cavitating flows is the treatment of the sudden density change of the fluid, in cold water up to 40.000:1, embedded in a global incompressible liquid flow. Here the two-phase fluid is modeled as dispersed mixture of an incompressible liquid and tiny vapor bubbles which grow or collapse, accordingly to the local static pressure and their convective transport. Therefore, the standard VOF method for capturing distinct interfaces without phase transition, e.g. free surface flow or single bubbles, is extended to include phase transition of dispersed mixtures. For simulation of bubble dynamics we apply the Rayleigh equation, which is completed by an energy balance to account for thermal effects, if hot water or if technical fluids others than water, e.g. refrigerants, with high vapor densities are considered. By using our CFD tool CAVKA we present examples of cavitating flow around hydrofoils and through single hole injection

  5. A heuristic model for MRI turbulent stresses in Hall MHD

    CERN Document Server

    Lingam, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the Shakura-Sunyaev $\\alpha$ viscosity prescription has been highly successful in characterizing myriad astrophysical environments, it has proven to be partly inadequate in modelling turbulent stresses driven by the MRI. Hence, we adopt the approach employed by \\citet{GIO03}, but in the context of Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), to study MRI turbulence. We utilize the exact evolution equations for the stresses, and the non-linear terms are closed through the invocation of dimensional analysis and physical considerations. We demonstrate that the inclusion of the Hall term leads to non-trivial results, including the modification of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, as well as the (asymptotic) non-equipartition between the kinetic and magnetic energies; the latter issue is also addressed via the analysis of non-linear waves. The asymptotic ratio of the kinetic and magnetic energies is shown to be \\emph{independent} of the choice of initial conditions, but it is governed by the \\emph{Hall parameter}. W...

  6. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure boundary layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J DEY; P PHANI KUMAR

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the turbulent dissipation rate in a boundary layer is a very involved process.Experimental determination of either the dissipation rate or the Taylor microscale, even in isotropic turbulence,which may occur in a portion of the turbulent boundary layer, is known to be a difficult task. For constant pressure boundary layers, a model for the turbulent dissipation rate is proposed here in terms of the local mean flow quantities. Comparable agreement between the estimated Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov length scale with other data in the logarithmic region suggests usefulness of this model in obtaining these quantitiesexperimentally

  7. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  8. An entrainment model for the turbulent jet in a coflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjalbert, Nicolas; Galley, David; Pierrot, Laurent

    2009-09-01

    The entrainment hypothesis was introduced by G.I. Taylor to describe one-dimensionally the development of turbulent jets issuing into a stagnant or coflowing environment. It relates the mass flow rate of surrounding fluid entrained into the jet to the characteristic velocity difference between the jet and the coflow. A model based on this hypothesis along with axial velocity assumed to follow a realistic Gaussian distribution is presented. It possesses an implicit analytical solution, and its results are compared and shown to be fully equivalent to previously published models that are rather based on a spreading hypothesis. All of them are found to be in agreement with experimental results, on a wide range of downstream positions and for various coflow intensities. To cite this article: N. Enjalbert et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  9. Modeling and measuring neighborhood scale flow, turbulence, and temperature within Chicago heat island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conry, Patrick; Sharma, Ashish; Leo, Laura; Fernando, H. J. S.; Potosnak, Mark; Hellmann, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    The modeling of urban heat island (UHI) requires a multi-scale approach as it involves numerous physical phenomena spanning a range of scales. We have performed a comprehensive study of Chicago's UHI via coupling of mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and micro-scale ENVI-met models. The application of the latter model to a Lincoln Park neighborhood and a parallel observational campaign will be the primary focus of this presentation. ENVI-met employs a computational fluid dynamics model to represent heterogeneity of urban areas, providing fine resolution output of UHI dynamics. In the field campaign, two stations located on rooftops of DePaul University buildings were each equipped with a sonic anemometer and vertical array of thermocouples, allowing investigations of spatial variability of flow, turbulent fluxes, and temperature profiles in an urban roughness sublayer. One of these was located above a rooftop garden and the other above a conventional rooftop. Downscaled output from the WRF model or a set of observational data served as initial and boundary conditions for the ENVI-met model. The model's predicative capabilities were assessed through comparison with another set of observational data, and dynamical causes for the model's poor behavior were identified. Funded by NSF Grant No. 0934592 and ND-ECI.

  10. Estimation of Several Turbulent Fluctuation Quantities Using an Approximate Pulsatile Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent fluctuation behavior is approximately modeled using a pulsatile flow model analogy.. This model follows as an extension to the turbulent laminar sublayer model developed by Sternberg (1962) to be valid for a fully turbulent flow domain. Here unsteady turbulent behavior is modeled via a sinusoidal pulsatile approach. While the individual modes of the turbulent flow fluctuation behavior are rather crudely modeled, approximate temporal integration yields plausible estimates for Root Mean Square (RMS) velocity fluctuations. RMS pressure fluctuations and spectra are of particular interest and are estimated via the pressure Poisson expression. Both RMS and Power Spectral Density (PSD), i.e. spectra are developed. Comparison with available measurements suggests reasonable agreement. An additional fluctuating quantity, i.e. RMS wall shear fluctuation is also estimated, yielding reasonable agreement with measurement.

  11. Fractal Potential Flows as an Exact Model for Fully Developed Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Vass, József

    2013-01-01

    Fully Developed Turbulence (FDT) occurs at the infinite extreme of the Reynolds spectrum. It is a theoretical phenomenon which can only be approximated experimentally or computationally, and thus its precise properties are only hypothetical, though widely accepted. It is considered to be a chaotic yet steady flow field, with self-similar fractalline features. A number of approximate models exist, often exploiting this self-similarity. We hereby present the exact mathematical model of Fractal Potential Flows, and link it philosophically to the phenomenon of FDT, building on its experimental characteristics. The model hinges on the recursive iteration of a fluid dynamical transfer operator. We show the existence of its unique attractor in an appropriate function space - called the invariant flow - which will serve as our model for the FDT flow field. Its sink singularities are shown to form an IFS fractal, resolving Mandelbrot's Conjecture. Meanwhile we present an isometric isomorphism between flows and probabi...

  12. Comparison between 2D turbulence model ESEL and experimental data from AUG and COMPASS tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ondac, Peter; Horacek, Jan; Seidl, Jakub;

    2015-01-01

    In this article we have used the 2D fluid turbulence numerical model, ESEL, to simulate turbulent transport in edge tokamak plasma. Basic plasma parameters from the ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS tokamaks are used as input for the model, and the output is compared with experimental observations obtained...

  13. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  14. A nonlinear kp-εp particle two-scale turbulence model and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuoxiong Zeng; Zhuozhi Zeng; Yihua Xu

    2007-01-01

    A particle nonlinear two-scale Kp-εp turbulence model is proposed for simulating the anisotropic turbulent two-phase flow. The particle kinetic energy equation for two-scale fluctuation, particle energy transfer rate equation for large-scale fluctuation, and particle turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation for small-scale fluctuation are deri-ved and closed. This model is used to simulate gas-particle flows in a sudden-expansion chamber. The simulation is com-pared with the experiment and with those obtained by using another two kinds of tow-phase turbulence model, such as the single-scale k-ε two-phase turbulence model and the particle two-scale second-order moment (USM) two-phase turbulence model. It is shown that the present model gives simulation in much better agreement with the experiment than the single-scale k-ε two-phase turbulence model does and is almost as good as the particle two-scale USM turbu-lence model.

  15. A mathematical model of turbulence in flows with uniform stationary velocity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain cases of turbulence as a postinstability state of a fluid in motion modeled by the introduction of multivalued velocity fields are examined. The turbulence is regarded as occurring in the form of random pulsations which grow until the external energy input in the average flow is balanced by the dissipated energy of pulsations by means of turbulent friction. Closed form analytic solutions are shown to be possible when the considered velocity fields, the pulsation velocity and the fluid velocity, are decoupled.

  16. Observational and Numerical Methods for Quantifying and Modeling of Turbulence in a Stratified Reservoir

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sebnem Elci; Huseyin Burak Ekmekçi

    2016-01-01

    .... A 3D numerical model is used to investigate the water column hydrodynamics for the duration of measurements and the performance of various turbulence models used in the CFD model are investigated via...

  17. On turbulent, erratic and other dynamical properties of Zadeh's extensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman-Flores, H., E-mail: hroman@uta.cl [Instituto de Alta Investigacion, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Chalco-Cano, Y., E-mail: ychalco@uta.cl [Instituto de Alta Investigacion, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Silva, G.N., E-mail: gsilva@ibilce.unesp.br [Departamento de Ciencia da Computacao e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Sao Jose do Rio Preto-SP (Brazil); Kupka, Jiri, E-mail: Jiri.Kupka@osu.cz [Institute for Research and Applications of Fuzzy Modeling, University of Ostrava, 30, dubna 22, 701 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We study the relations between the dynamics of (X, f) and their set (fuzzy)-extensions. > We prove that if (X, f) is turbulent then their set (fuzzy)-extensions are turbulent. > We prove that if (X, f) is erratic then their set (fuzzy)-extensions are erratic. > We provide examples showing that the reverse implications are not necessarily true. - Abstract: Let (X, d) be a compact metric space and f : X {yields} X a continuous function. Consider the hyperspace (K(X),H) of all nonempty compact subsets of X endowed with the Hausdorff metric induced by d, and let (F(X),d{sub {infinity})} be the metric space of all nonempty compact fuzzy set on X equipped with the supremum metric d{sub {infinity}} which is calculated as the supremum of the Hausdorff distances of the corresponding level sets. If f-bar is the natural extension of f to (K(X),H) and f-hat is the Zadeh's extension of f to (F(X),d{sub {infinity})}, then the aim of this paper is to study the dynamics of f-bar and f-hat when f is turbulent (erratic, respectively).

  18. Dynamics and flow-coupling in two-layer turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi-Chao

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the dynamics and flow-coupling of convective turbulent flows in a cylindrical Rayleigh-Benard convection cell with two immiscible fluids, water and fluorinert FC-77 electronic liquid (FC77). It is found that one large-scale circulation (LSC) roll exists in each of the fluid layers, and that their circulation planes have two preferred azimuthal orientations separated by $\\sim\\pi$. A surprising finding of the study is that cessations/reversals of the LSC in FC77 of the two-layer system occur much more frequently than they do in single-layer turbulent RBC, and that a cessation is most likely to result in a flow reversal of the LSC, which is in sharp contrast with the uniform distribution of the orientational angular change of the LSC before and after cessations in single-layer turbulent RBC. This implies that the dynamics governing cessations and reversals in the two systems are very different. Two coupling modes, thermal coupling (flow directions of the two LSCs are o...

  19. Discrete dynamical models

    CERN Document Server

    Salinelli, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the analysis of discrete dynamical systems. The content is presented by an unitary approach that blends the perspective of mathematical modeling together with the ones of several discipline as Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Systems Theory and Probability. After a preliminary discussion of several models, the main tools for the study of linear and non-linear scalar dynamical systems are presented, paying particular attention to the stability analysis. Linear difference equations are studied in detail and an elementary introduction of Z and Discrete Fourier Transform is presented. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of bifurcations and chaotic dynamics. One-step vector-valued dynamical systems are the subject of three chapters, where the reader can find the applications to positive systems, Markov chains, networks and search engines. The book is addressed mainly to students in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economic...

  20. Investigating Coherent Structures in the Standard Turbulence Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliassen, Lene; Andersen, Søren Juhl

    2016-01-01

    The wind turbine design standards recommend two different methods to generate turbulent wind for design load analysis, the Kaimal spectra combined with an exponential coherence function and the Mann turbulence model. The two turbulence models can give very different estimates of fatigue life......, especially for offshore floating wind turbines. In this study the spatial distributions of the two turbulence models are investigated using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, which is used to characterize large coherent structures. The main focus has been on the structures that contain the most energy, which...... are the lowest POD modes. The Mann turbulence model generates coherent structures that stretches in the horizontal direction for the longitudinal component, while the structures found in the Kaimal model are more random in their shape. These differences in the coherent structures at lower frequencies for the two...