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  1. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  2. Interfacial Fluid Mechanics A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaev, Vladimir S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial Fluid Mechanics: A Mathematical Modeling Approach provides an introduction to mathematical models of viscous flow used in rapidly developing fields of microfluidics and microscale heat transfer. The basic physical effects are first introduced in the context of simple configurations and their relative importance in typical microscale applications is discussed. Then,several configurations of importance to microfluidics, most notably thin films/droplets on substrates and confined bubbles, are discussed in detail.  Topics from current research on electrokinetic phenomena, liquid flow near structured solid surfaces, evaporation/condensation, and surfactant phenomena are discussed in the later chapters. This book also:  Discusses mathematical models in the context of actual applications such as electrowetting Includes unique material on fluid flow near structured surfaces and phase change phenomena Shows readers how to solve modeling problems related to microscale multiphase flows Interfacial Fluid Me...

  3. Modeling interfacial liquid layers on environmental ices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Kuo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interfacial layers on ice significantly influence air-ice chemical interactions. In solute-containing aqueous systems, a liquid brine may form upon freezing due to the exclusion of impurities from the ice crystal lattice coupled with freezing point depression in the concentrated brine. The brine may be segregated to the air-ice interface where it creates a surface layer, in micropockets, or at grain boundaries or triple junctions.

    We present a model for brines and their associated liquid layers in environmental ice systems that is valid over a wide range of temperatures and solute concentrations. The model is derived from fundamental equlibrium thermodynamics and takes into account nonideal solution behavior in the brine, partitioning of the solute into the ice matrix, and equilibration between the brine and the gas phase for volatile solutes. We find that these phenomena are important to consider when modeling brines in environmental ices, especially at low temperatures. We demonstrate its application for environmentally important volatile and nonvolatile solutes including NaCl, HCl, and HNO3. The model is compared to existing models and experimental data from literature where available. We also identify environmentally relevant regimes where brine is not predicted to exist, but the QLL may significantly impact air-ice chemical interactions. This model can be used to improve the representation of air-ice chemical interactions in polar atmospheric chemistry models.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Mesoscale and Interfacial Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsev, Nikolai Dimitrov

    With rapidly emerging technologies that feature interfaces modified at the nanoscale, traditional macroscopic models are pushed to their limits to explain phenomena where molecular processes can play a key role. Often, such problems appear to defy explanation when treated with coarse-grained continuum models alone, yet remain prohibitively expensive from a molecular simulation perspective. A prominent example is surface nanobubbles: nanoscopic gaseous domains typically found on hydrophobic surfaces that have puzzled researchers for over two decades due to their unusually long lifetimes. We show how an entirely macroscopic, non-equilibrium model explains many of their anomalous properties, including their stability and abnormally small gas-side contact angles. From this purely transport perspective, we investigate how factors such as temperature and saturation affect nanobubbles, providing numerous experimentally testable predictions. However, recent work also emphasizes the relevance of molecular-scale phenomena that cannot be described in terms of bulk phases or pristine interfaces. This is true for nanobubbles as well, whose nanoscale heights may require molecular detail to capture the relevant physics, in particular near the bubble three-phase contact line. Therefore, there is a clear need for general ways to link molecular granularity and behavior with large-scale continuum models in the treatment of many interfacial problems. In light of this, we have developed a general set of simulation strategies that couple mesoscale particle-based continuum models to molecular regions simulated through conventional molecular dynamics (MD). In addition, we derived a transport model for binary mixtures that opens the possibility for a wide range of applications in biological and drug delivery problems, and is readily reconciled with our hybrid MD-continuum techniques. Approaches that couple multiple length scales for fluid mixtures are largely absent in the literature, and

  5. Modeling interfacial dynamics using nonequilibrium thermodynamics frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years several nonequilibrium thermodynamic frameworks have been developed capable of describing the dynamics of multiphase systems with complex microstructured interfaces. In this paper we present an overview of these frameworks. We will discuss interfacial dynamics in the context of the

  6. Interfacial Thermal Transport via One-Dimensional Atomic Junction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Xiong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern information technology, as integration density increases rapidly and the dimension of materials reduces to nanoscale, interfacial thermal transport (ITT has attracted widespread attention of scientists. This review introduces the latest theoretical development in ITT through one-dimensional (1D atomic junction model to address the thermal transport across an interface. With full consideration of the atomic structures in interfaces, people can apply the 1D atomic junction model to investigate many properties of ITT, such as interfacial (Kapitza resistance, nonlinear interface, interfacial rectification, and phonon interference, and so on. For the ballistic ITT, both the scattering boundary method (SBM and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF method can be applied, which are exact since atomic details of actual interfaces are considered. For interfacial coupling case, explicit analytical expression of transmission coefficient can be obtained and it is found that the thermal conductance maximizes at certain interfacial coupling (harmonic mean of the spring constants of the two leads and the transmission coefficient is not a monotonic decreasing function of phonon frequency. With nonlinear interaction—phonon–phonon interaction or electron–phonon interaction at interface, the NEGF method provides an efficient way to study the ITT. It is found that at weak linear interfacial coupling, the nonlinearity can improve the ITT, but it depresses the ITT in the case of strong-linear coupling. In addition, the nonlinear interfacial coupling can induce thermal rectification effect. For interfacial materials case which can be simulated by a two-junction atomic chain, phonons show interference effect, and an optimized thermal coupler can be obtained by tuning its spring constant and atomic mass.

  7. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann Modeling of Interfacial Dynamics in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M. L.; Coon, E. T.; Kang, Q.; Carey, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Traditional continuum scale multiphase flow models rely heavily on average properties and constitutive relationships that do not always accurately represent the underlying physics affecting flow and transport at the pore scale. These models are typically based on heuristic extensions of Darcy's law, rather than formally upscaling conservation principles that account for the microscale physics. As a result, constitutive relationships, such as capillary pressure and relative permeability, are highly simplified. It has been recognized that continuum scale multiphase flow models must include gradients of saturation and specific fluid-fluid interfacial area, in addition to the Darcy pressure gradient, as driving forces for the flow of multiple fluids in porous media. In this work, we investigate interfacial dynamics in porous media using a multicomponent lattice-Boltzmann simulator. We present simulations of drainage and imbibition in 2D and 3D heterogeneous porous media. We validate the simulations by comparing specific interfacial area estimates with those obtained from experiments. In addition, we present estimates of continuum scale interfacial velocity and the production/destruction of specific interfacial area.

  9. Ordering kinetics in model systems with inhibited interfacial adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willart, J.-F.; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Naudts, J.

    1992-01-01

    . The results are related to experimental work on ordering processes in orientational glasses. It is suggested that the experimental observation of very slow ordering kinetics in, e.g., glassy crystals of cyanoadamantane may be a consequence of low-temperature activated processes which ultimately lead......The ordering kinetics in two-dimensional Ising-like spin moels with inhibited interfacial adsorption are studied by computer-simulation calculations. The inhibited interfacial adsorption is modeled by a particular interfacial adsorption condition on the structure of the domain wall between......, of the algebraic growth law, R(t)∼Atn, whereas the growth exponent, n, remains close to the value n=1/2 predicted by the classical Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn growth law for systems with nonconserved order parameter. At very low temperatures there is, however, an effective crossover to a much slower algebraic growth...

  10. Bulk dynamics for interfacial growth models

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Cristobal; Garrido, Pedro L.; Santos, Francisco de los

    2000-01-01

    We study the influence of the bulk dynamics of a growing cluster of particles on the properties of its interface. First, we define a general bulk growth model by means of a continuum Master equation for the evolution of the bulk density field. This general model just considers an arbitrary addition of particles (though it can be easily generalized to consider subtraction) with no other physical restriction. The corresponding Langevin equation for this bulk density field is derived where the i...

  11. Interfacial and Wall Transport Models for SPACE-CAP Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Choo, Yeon Joon; Han, Tae Young; Hwang, Su Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Tech., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Ha, Sang Jun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The development project for the domestic design code was launched to be used for the safety and performance analysis of pressurized light water reactors. And CAP (Containment Analysis Package) code has been also developed for the containment safety and performance analysis side by side with SPACE. The CAP code treats three fields (gas, continuous liquid, and dispersed drop) for the assessment of containment specific phenomena, and is featured by its multidimensional assessment capabilities. Thermal hydraulics solver was already developed and now under testing of its stability and soundness. As a next step, interfacial and wall transport models was setup. In order to develop the best model and correlation package for the CAP code, various models currently used in major containment analysis codes, which are GOTHIC, CONTAIN2.0, and CONTEMPT-LT, have been reviewed. The origins of the selected models used in these codes have also been examined to find out if the models have not conflict with a proprietary right. In addition, a literature survey of the recent studies has been performed in order to incorporate the better models for the CAP code. The models and correlations of SPACE were also reviewed. CAP models and correlations are composed of interfacial heat/mass, and momentum transport models, and wall heat/mass, and momentum transport models. This paper discusses on those transport models in the CAP code.

  12. A Summary of Interfacial Heat Transfer Models and Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sung Won; Cho, Hyung Kyu; Lee, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Chul; Jung, Young Jong; Kim, K. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    A long term project has been launched in October 2006 to develop a plant safety analysis code. 5 organizations are joining together for the harmonious coworking to build up the code. In this project, KAERI takes the charge of the building up the physical models and correlations about the transport phenomena. The momentum and energy transfer terms as well as the mass are surveyed from the RELAP5/MOD3, RELAP5-3D, CATHARE, and TRAC-M does. Also the recent papers are surveyed. Among these resources, most of the CATHARE models are based on their own experiment and test results. Thus, the CATHARE models are only used as the comparison purposes. In this paper, a summary of the models and the correlations about the interfacial heat transfer are represented. These surveyed models and correlations will be tested numerically and one correlation is selected finally.

  13. Interfacial shear modeling in two-phase annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Edwards, D.P.

    1996-07-01

    A new interfacial shear stress model called the law of the interface model, based on the law of the wall approach in turbulent flows, has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, adiabatic, two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model in conjunction with other models available in the literature that are required for the closure of the continuity and momentum equations. These results have been compared with droplet velocity data (using laser Doppler velocimetry and hot film anemometry), void fraction data (using gamma densitometry) and pressure drop data obtained in a R-134A refrigerant test facility. Droplet velocity results match the experimental data well, however, the prediction of the void fraction is less accurate. The poor prediction of void fraction, especially for the low void fraction cases, appears to be due to the lack of a good mechanistic model for entrainment

  14. Physical Basis for Interfacial Traction-Separation Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neville R. Moody

    2002-01-01

    Many weapon components contain interfaces between dissimilar materials where cracks can initiate and cause failure. In recent years many researchers in the fracture community have adopted a cohesive zone model for simulating crack propagation (based upon traction-separation relations) Sandia is implementing this model in its ASCI codes. There is, however, one important obstacle to using a cohesive zone modeling approach. At the present time traction-separation relations are chosen in an ad hoc manner. The goal of the present work is to determine a physical basis for Traction-Separation (T-U) relations. This report presents results of a program aimed at determining the dependence of such relations on adhesive and bulk properties. The work focused on epoxy/solid interfaces, although the approach is applicable to a broad range of materials. Asymmetric double cantilevered beam and free surface film nanoindentation fracture toughness tests were used to generate a unique set of data spanning length scales, applied mode mixities, and yield (plastic) zone constraint. The crucial roles of crack tip plastic zone size and interfacial adhesion were defined by varying epoxy layer thickness and using coupling agents or special self-assembled monolayers in preparing the samples. The nature of the yield zone was probed in collaborative experiments run at the Advanced Photon Source. This work provides an understanding of the major phenomena governing polymer/solid interfacial fracture and identifies the essential features that must be incorporated in a T-U based cohesive zone failure model. We believe that models using physically based T-U relations provide a more accurate and widely applicable description of interface cracking than models using ad hoc relations. Furthermore, these T-U relations provide an essential tool for using models to tailor interface properties to meet design needs

  15. Assessment of interfacial heat transfer models under subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Guilherme B.; Braz Filho, Francisco A., E-mail: gbribeiro@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avançados (DCTA/IEAv), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The present study concerns a detailed analysis of subcooled flow boiling characteristics under high pressure systems using a two-fluid Eulerian approach provided by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver. For this purpose, a vertical heated pipe made of stainless steel with an internal diameter of 15.4 mm was considered as the modeled domain. An uniform heat flux of 570 kW/m2 and saturation pressure of 4.5 MPa were applied to the channel wall, whereas water mass flux of 900 kg/m2s was considered for all simulation cases. The model was validated against a set of experimental data and results have indicated a promising use of CFD technique for the estimation of wall temperature, the liquid bulk temperature and the location of the departure of nucleate boiling. Different sub-models of interfacial heat transfer coefficient were applied and compared, allowing a better prediction of void fraction along the heated channel. (author)

  16. A Novel Model of Dielectric Constant of Two-Phase Composites with Interfacial Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingzhong

    Considering the interface effect between two phases in composite, we present a novel model of dielectric constant of two-phase composites with interfacial shells. Starting from Maxwell theory and average polarization theory, the formula of calculating the effective dielectric constant of two-phase random composites with interfacial shells is presented. The theoretical results on effective dielectric constant of alkyd resin paint/Barium titanate random composites with interfacial shells are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Modelling CO2-Brine Interfacial Tension using Density Gradient Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Ruslan, Mohd Fuad Anwari Che

    2018-03-01

    Knowledge regarding carbon dioxide (CO2)-brine interfacial tension (IFT) is important for petroleum industry and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies. In petroleum industry, CO2-brine IFT is especially importance for CO2 – based enhanced oil recovery strategy as it affects phase behavior and fluid transport in porous media. CCS which involves storing CO2 in geological storage sites also requires understanding regarding CO2-brine IFT as this parameter affects CO2 quantity that could be securely stored in the storage site. Several methods have been used to compute CO2-brine interfacial tension. One of the methods employed is by using Density Gradient Theory (DGT) approach. In DGT model, IFT is computed based on the component density distribution across the interface. However, current model is only applicable for modelling low to medium ionic strength solution. This limitation is due to the model only considers the increase of IFT due to the changes of bulk phases properties and does not account for ion distribution at interface. In this study, a new modelling strategy to compute CO2-brine IFT based on DGT was proposed. In the proposed model, ion distribution across interface was accounted for by separating the interface to two sections. The saddle point of tangent plane distance where ( ) was defined as the boundary separating the two sections of the interface. Electrolyte is assumed to be present only in the second section which is connected to the bulk liquid phase side. Numerical simulations were performed using the proposed approach for single and mixed salt solutions for three salts (NaCl, KCl, and CaCl2), for temperature (298 K to 443 K), pressure (2 MPa to 70 MPa), and ionic strength (0.085 mol·kg-1 to 15 mol·kg-1). The simulation result shows that the tuned model was able to predict with good accuracy CO2-brine IFT for all studied cases. Comparison with current DGT model showed that the proposed approach yields better match with the experiment data

  18. Cold welding of organic light emitting diode: Interfacial and contact models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Asare

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an analytical and computational study of the contacts and interfacial fracture associated with the cold welding of Organic Light Emitting diodes (OLEDs. The effects of impurities (within the possible interfaces are explored for contacts and interfacial fracture between layers that are relevant to model OLEDs. The models are used to study the effects of adhesion, pressure, thin film layer thickness and dust particle modulus (between the contacting surfaces on contact profiles around impurities between cold-welded thin films. The lift-off stage of thin films (during cold welding is then modeled as an interfacial fracture process. A combination of adhesion and interfacial fracture theories is used to provide new insights for the design of improved contact and interfacial separation during cold welding. The implications of the results are discussed for the design and fabrication of cold welded OLED structures.

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann modeling of experimental fluid displacement patterns, interfacial area and capillary trapped CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M. L.; Kang, Q.; Tarimala, S.; Abdel-Fattah, A.; Backhaus, S.; Carey, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Successful sequestration of CO2 into deep saline aquifers presents an enormous challenge that requires fundamental understanding of reactive-multiphase flow and transport across many temporal and spatial scales. Of critical importance is accurately predicting the efficiency of CO2 trapping mechanisms. At the pore scale (e.g., microns to millimeters) the interfacial area between CO2 and brine, as well as CO2 and the solid phase, directly influences the amount of CO2 trapped due to capillary forces, dissolution and mineral precipitation. In this work, we model immiscible displacement micromodel experiments using the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method. We focus on quantifying interfacial area as a function of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios typically encountered in CO2 sequestration operations. We show that the LB model adequately predicts the steady-state experimental flow patterns and interfacial area measurements. Based on the steady-state agreement, we use the LB model to investigate interfacial dynamics (e.g., fluid-fluid interfacial velocity and the rate of production of fluid-fluid interfacial area). In addition, we quantify the amount of interfacial area and the interfacial dynamics associated with the capillary trapped nonwetting phase. This is expected to be important for predicting the amount of nonwetting phase subsequently trapped due to dissolution and mineral precipitation.

  20. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  1. Phase field modelling of precipitate morphologies in systems with tetragonal interfacial free energy anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Arijit; Gururajan, M P

    2017-01-01

    A wide variety of morphologies arise due to the tetragonal anisotropy in interfacial free energy. In this paper, we report on a family of Extended Cahn-Hilliard (ECH) models for incorporating tetragonal anisotropy in interfacial free energy. We list the non-zero and independent parameters that are introduced in our model and list the constraints on them. For appropriate choice of these parameters, our model can produce a many of the morphologies seen in tetragonal systems such as di-pyramids,...

  2. Coupled Interfacial Tension and Phase Behavior Model Based on Micellar Curvatures

    KAUST Repository

    Torrealba, V. A.

    2017-11-08

    This article introduces a consistent and robust model that predicts interfacial tensions for all microemulsion Winsor types and overall compositions. The model incorporates film bending arguments and Huh\\'s equation and is coupled to phase behavior so that simultaneous tuning of both interfacial tension (IFT) and phase behavior is possible. The oil-water interfacial tension and characteristic length are shown to be related to each other through the hydrophilic-lipophilic deviation (HLD). The phase behavior is tied to the micelle curvatures, without the need for using the net average curvature (NAC). The interfacial tension model is related to solubilization ratios in order to introduce a coupled interfacial tension-phase behavior model for all phase environments. The approach predicts two- and three-phase interfacial tensions and phase behavior (i.e., tie lines and tie triangles) for changes in composition and HLD input parameters, such as temperature, pressure, surfactant structure, and oil equivalent alkane carbon number. Comparisons to experimental data show excellent fits and predictive capability.

  3. Development of an interfacial model for forming of a metal-composite material system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Compston, Paul; Mosse, Luke

    2013-12-01

    This work presents a finite element model for the stamp forming simulation of Fiber-Metal laminate system consisting of glass fiber reinforced composite material layer sandwiched between two aluminium layers. A novel interfacial model was developed to analyze the role of the interface between the metal and composite layers. A one way coupled thermo mechanical model was used to study the effect of pre heating the material system to improve the formability. Comparison between the simulation and experiments were carried out for forming of rectangular cups. The results indicate that the interfacial model is effective in predicting the forming behavior of this advanced light weight material system.

  4. Modeling the Effects of Interfacial Characteristics on Gas Permeation Behavior of Nanotube-Mixed Matrix Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehrazi, Ehsan; Sharif, Alireza; Omidkhah, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Mohammad

    2017-10-25

    Theoretical approaches that accurately predict the gas permeation behavior of nanotube-containing mixed matrix membranes (nanotube-MMMs) are scarce. This is mainly due to ignoring the effects of nanotube/matrix interfacial characteristics in the existing theories. In this paper, based on the analogy of thermal conduction in polymer composites containing nanotubes, we develop a model to describe gas permeation through nanotube-MMMs. Two new parameters, "interfacial thickness" (a int ) and "interfacial permeation resistance" (R int ), are introduced to account for the role of nanotube/matrix interfacial interactions in the proposed model. The obtained values of a int , independent of the nature of the permeate gas, increased by increasing both the nanotubes aspect ratio and polymer-nanotube interfacial strength. An excellent correlation between the values of a int and polymer-nanotube interaction parameters, χ, helped to accurately reproduce the existing experimental data from the literature without the need to resort to any adjustable parameter. The data includes 10 sets of CO 2 /CH 4 permeation, 12 sets of CO 2 /N 2 permeation, 3 sets of CO 2 /O 2 permeation, and 2 sets of CO 2 /H 2 permeation through different nanotube-MMMs. Moreover, the average absolute relative errors between the experimental data and the predicted values of the proposed model are very small (less than 5%) in comparison with those of the existing models in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where such a systematic comparison between model predictions and such extensive experimental data is presented. Finally, the new way of assessing gas permeation data presented in the current work would be a simple alternative to complex approaches that are usually utilized to estimate interfacial thickness in polymer composites.

  5. A mode III moving interfacial crack based on strip magneto-electric polarization saturation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xiaodong; Zhong, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with a mode III Yoffe-type interfacial crack propagating subsonically under the moving strip magneto-electric saturation model. Nonlinear effects are characterized by different magnetic and electric saturation strips around the crack tip. Employing the extended Stroh method, we obtain generalized moving interfacial dislocation densities analytically under impermeable magneto-electric crack boundary conditions. The generalized intensity factor and local energy release rate with nonlinear effects are derived as fracture parameters for the moving magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) interfacial crack. Numerical results are presented to show the characteristics of fracture dominant parameters with respect to the loading as well as the propagation velocity. In addition, a dimensionless parameter defined by the ratio of the volume fraction of the composite constituents is proposed to evaluate the influences of the MEE bimaterial properties. This research will give us ideas on material selection for optimizing the fracture toughness of MEE composites. (paper)

  6. Comparison for the interfacial and wall friction models in thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Park, Jee Won; Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, See Dal

    2007-07-01

    The average equations employed in the current thermal hydraulic analysis codes need to be closed with the appropriate models and correlations to specify the interphase phenomena along with fluid/structure interactions. This includes both thermal and mechanical interactions. Among the closure laws, an interfacial and wall frictions, which are included in the momentum equations, not only affect pressure drops along the fluid flow, but also have great effects for the numerical stability of the codes. In this study, the interfacial and wall frictions are reviewed for the commonly applied thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes, i.e. RELAP5-3D, MARS-3D, TRAC-M, and CATHARE

  7. Modeling of Pressure Dependence of Interfacial Tension Behaviors of Supercritical CO2 + Crude Oil Systems Using a Basic Parachor Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayanand, S.

    2017-01-01

    Parachor based expressions (basic and mechanistic) are often used to model the experimentally observed pressure dependence of interfacial tension behaviors of complex supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO 2 ) and crude oil mixtures at elevated temperatures. However, such modeling requires various input data (e.g. compositions and densities of the equilibrium liquid and vapor phases, and molecular weights and diffusion coefficients for various components present in the system). In the absence of measured data, often phase behavior packages are used for obtaining these input data for performing calculations. Very few researchers have used experimentally measured input data for performing parachor based modeling of the experimental interfacial tension behaviors of sc-CO 2 and crude oil systems that are of particular interest to CO 2 injection in porous media based enhanced oil recovery operations. This study presents the results of parachor based modeling performed to predict pressure dependence of interfacial tension behaviors of a complex sc-CO 2 and crude oil system for which experimentally measured data is available in public domain. Though parachor model based on calculated interfacial tension behaviors shows significant deviation from the measured behaviors in high interfacial tension region, difference between the calculated and the experimental behaviors appears to vanish in low interfacial tension region. These observations suggest that basic parachor expression based calculated interfacial tension behaviors in low interfacial tension region follow the experimental interfacial tension behaviors more closely. An analysis of published studies (basic and mechanistic parachor expressions based on modeling of pressure dependence of interfacial tension behaviors of both standard and complex sc-CO 2 and crude oil systems) and the results of this study reinforce the need of better description of gas-oil interactions for robust modeling of pressure dependence of

  8. Development of two-group interfacial area transport equation for confined flow-2. Model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Kim, Seungjin; Ishii, Mamoru; Beus, Stephen G.

    2003-01-01

    The bubble interaction mechanisms have been analytically modeled in the first paper of this series to provide mechanistic constitutive relations for the two-group interfacial area transport equation (IATE), which was proposed to dynamically solve the interfacial area concentration in the two-fluid model. This paper presents the evaluation approach and results of the two-group IATE based on available experimental data obtained in confined flow, namely, 11 data sets in or near bubbly flow and 13 sets in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow. The two-group IATE is evaluated in steady state, one-dimensional form. Also, since the experiments were performed under adiabatic, air-water two-phase flow conditions, the phase change effect is omitted in the evaluation. To account for the inter-group bubble transport, the void fraction transport equation for Group-2 bubbles is also used to predict the void fraction for Group-2 bubbles. Agreement between the data and the model predictions is reasonably good and the average relative difference for the total interfacial area concentration between the 24 data sets and predictions is within 7%. The model evaluation demonstrates the capability of the two-group IATE focused on the current confined flow to predict the interfacial area concentration over a wide range of flow regimes. (author)

  9. Interfacial tension and wettability in water-carbon dioxide systems: Experiments and self-consistent field modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, S.; Hassenklover, E.; Kleijn, J.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling results on water–CO2 interfacial tension (IFT) together with wettability studies of water on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces immersed in CO2. CO2–water interfacial tension (IFT) measurements showed that the IFT decreased with increasing

  10. A Linear Gradient Theory Model for Calculating Interfacial Tensions of Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, You-Xiang; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    containing supercritical methane, argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide gases at high pressure. With this model it is unnecessary to solve the time-consuming density profile equations of the gradient theory model. The model has been tested on a number of mixtures at low and high pressures. The results show...... with proper scaling behavior at the critical point is at least required.Key words: linear gradient theory; interfacial tension; equation of state; influence parameter; density profile.......In this research work, we assumed that the densities of each component in a mixture are linearly distributed across the interface between the coexisting vapor and liquid phases, and we developed a linear gradient theory model for computing interfacial tensions of mixtures, especially mixtures...

  11. Interfacial rheology of model particles at liquid interfaces and its relation to (bicontinuous) Pickering emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J. H. J.; Vermant, J.

    2018-01-01

    Interface-dominated materials are commonly encountered in both science and technology, and typical examples include foams and emulsions. Conventionally stabilised by surfactants, emulsions can also be stabilised by micron-sized particles. These so-called Pickering–Ramsden (PR) emulsions have received substantial interest, as they are model arrested systems, rather ubiquitous in industry and promising templates for advanced materials. The mechanical properties of the particle-laden liquid–liquid interface, probed via interfacial rheology, have been shown to play an important role in the formation and stability of PR emulsions. However, the morphological processes which control the formation of emulsions and foams in mixing devices, such as deformation, break-up, and coalescence, are complex and diverse, making it difficult to identify the precise role of the interfacial rheological properties. Interestingly, the role of interfacial rheology in the stability of bicontinuous PR emulsions (bijels) has been virtually unexplored, even though the phase separation process which leads to the formation of these systems is relatively simple and the interfacial deformation processes can be better conceptualised. Hence, the aims of this topical review are twofold. First, we review the existing literature on the interfacial rheology of particle-laden liquid interfaces in rheometrical flows, focussing mainly on model latex suspensions consisting of polystyrene particles carrying sulfate groups, which have been most extensively studied to date. The goal of this part of the review is to identify the generic features of the rheology of such systems. Secondly, we will discuss the relevance of these results to the formation and stability of PR emulsions and bijels.

  12. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  13. New modeling and experimental approaches for characterization of two-phase flow interfacial structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Sun, Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents new experimental and modeling approaches in characterizing interfacial structures in gas-liquid two-phase flow. For the experiments, two objective approaches are developed to identify flow regimes and to obtain local interfacial structure data. First, a global measurement technique using a non-intrusive ring-type impedance void-meter and a self-organizing neural network is presented to identify the one-dimensional'' flow regimes. In the application of this measurement technique, two methods are discussed, namely, one based on the probability density function of the impedance probe measurement (PDF input method) and the other based on the sorted impedance signals, which is essentially the cumulative probability distribution function of the impedance signals (instantaneous direct signal input method). In the latter method, the identification can be made close to instantaneously since the required signals can be acquired over a very short time period. In addition, a double-sensor conductivity probe can also be used to obtain ''local'' flow regimes by using the instantaneous direct signal input method with the bubble chord length information. Furthermore, a newly designed conductivity probe with multiple double-sensor heads is proposed to obtain ''two-dimensional'' flow regimes across the flow channel. Secondly, a state-of-the-art four-sensor conductivity probe technique has been developed to obtain detailed local interfacial structure information. The four-sensor conductivity probe accommodates the double-sensor probe capability and can be applied in a wide range of flow regimes spanning from bubbly to churn-turbulent flows. The signal processing scheme is developed such that it categorizes the acquired parameters into two groups based on bubble cord length information. Furthermore, for the modeling of the interfacial structure characterization, the interfacial area transport equation proposed earlier has been studied to provide a dynamic and

  14. X-ray studies of interfacial strontium-extractant complexes in a model solvent extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wei; Mihaylov, Miroslav; Amoanu, Daniel; Lin, Binhua; Meron, Mati; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Soderholm, L; Schlossman, Mark L

    2014-10-30

    The interfacial behavior of a model solvent extraction liquid-liquid system, consisting of solutions of dihexadecyl phosphate (DHDP) in dodecane and SrCl2 in water, was studied to determine the structure of the interfacial ion-extractant complex and its variation with pH. Previous experiments on a similar extraction system with ErCl3 demonstrated that the kinetics of the extraction process could be greatly retarded by cooling through an adsorption transition, thus providing a method to immobilize ion-extractant complexes at the interface and further characterize them with X-ray interface-sensitive techniques. Here, we use this same method to study the SrCl2 system. X-ray reflectivity and fluorescence near total reflection measured the molecular-scale interfacial structure above and below the adsorption transition for a range of pH. Below the transition, DHDP molecules form a homogeneous monolayer at the interface with Sr(2+) coverage increasing from zero to saturation (one Sr(2+) per two DHDP) within a narrow range of pH. Experimental values of Sr(2+) interfacial density determined from fluorescence measurements are larger than those from reflectivity measurements. Although both techniques probe Sr(2+) bound to DHDP, only the fluorescence provides adequate sensitivity to Sr(2+) in the diffuse double layer. A Stern equation determines the Sr(2+) binding constant from the reflectivity measurements and the additional Sr(2+) measured in the diffuse double layer is accounted for by Gouy-Chapman theory. Above the transition temperature, a dilute concentration of DHDP-Sr complexes resides at the interface, even for temperatures far above the transition. A comparison is made of the structure of the interfacial ion-extractant complex for this divalent metal ion to recent results on trivalent Er(3+) metal ions, which provides insight into the role of metal ion charge on the structure of interfacial ion-extractant complexes, as well as implications for extraction of these two

  15. Computational modeling for fluid flow and interfacial transport

    CERN Document Server

    Shyy, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Practical applications and examples highlight this treatment of computational modeling for handling complex flowfields. A reference for researchers and graduate students of many different backgrounds, it also functions as a text for learning essential computation elements.Drawing upon his own research, the author addresses both macroscopic and microscopic features. He begins his three-part treatment with a survey of the basic concepts of finite difference schemes for solving parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. The second part concerns issues related to computati

  16. Current induced torques and interfacial spin-orbit coupling: Semiclassical modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Haney, Paul M.

    2013-05-07

    In bilayer nanowires consisting of a ferromagnetic layer and a nonmagnetic layer with strong spin-orbit coupling, currents create torques on the magnetization beyond those found in simple ferromagnetic nanowires. The resulting magnetic dynamics appear to require torques that can be separated into two terms, dampinglike and fieldlike. The dampinglike torque is typically derived from models describing the bulk spin Hall effect and the spin transfer torque, and the fieldlike torque is typically derived from a Rashba model describing interfacial spin-orbit coupling. We derive a model based on the Boltzmann equation that unifies these approaches. We also consider an approximation to the Boltzmann equation, the drift-diffusion model, that qualitatively reproduces the behavior, but quantitatively differs in some regimes. We show that the Boltzmann equation with physically reasonable parameters can match the torques for any particular sample, but in some cases, it fails to describe the experimentally observed thickness dependencies.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Tumor Distant Interactions Supports a Systemic Control of Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sebastien; Lamont, Clare; Barbolosi, Dominique; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-09-15

    Interactions between different tumors within the same organism have major clinical implications, especially in the context of surgery and metastatic disease. Three main explanatory theories (competition, angiogenesis inhibition, and proliferation inhibition) have been proposed, but precise determinants of the phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we formalized these theories into mathematical models and performed biological experiments to test them with empirical data. In syngeneic mice bearing two simultaneously implanted tumors, growth of only one of the tumors was significantly suppressed (61% size reduction at day 15, P < 0.05). The competition model had to be rejected, whereas the angiogenesis inhibition and proliferation inhibition models were able to describe the data. Additional models including a theory based on distant cytotoxic log-kill effects were unable to fit the data. The proliferation inhibition model was identifiable and minimal (four parameters), and its descriptive power was validated against the data, including consistency in predictions of single tumor growth when no secondary tumor was present. This theory may also shed new light on single cancer growth insofar as it offers a biologically translatable picture of how local and global action may combine to control local tumor growth and, in particular, the role of tumor-tumor inhibition. This model offers a depiction of concomitant resistance that provides an improved theoretical basis for tumor growth control and may also find utility in therapeutic planning to avoid postsurgery metastatic acceleration. Cancer Res; 77(18); 5183-93. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics: A consistent model for interfacial multiphase fluid flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimi, Abdelkader; Rezoug, Mehdi; Khelladi, Sofiane; Nogueira, Xesús; Deligant, Michael; Ramírez, Luis

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a consistent Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model to deal with interfacial multiphase fluid flows simulation is proposed. A modification to the Continuum Stress Surface formulation (CSS) [1] to enhance the stability near the fluid interface is developed in the framework of the SPH method. A non-conservative first-order consistency operator is used to compute the divergence of stress surface tensor. This formulation benefits of all the advantages of the one proposed by Adami et al. [2] and, in addition, it can be applied to more than two phases fluid flow simulations. Moreover, the generalized wall boundary conditions [3] are modified in order to be well adapted to multiphase fluid flows with different density and viscosity. In order to allow the application of this technique to wall-bounded multiphase flows, a modification of generalized wall boundary conditions is presented here for using the SPH method. In this work we also present a particle redistribution strategy as an extension of the damping technique presented in [3] to smooth the initial transient phase of gravitational multiphase fluid flow simulations. Several computational tests are investigated to show the accuracy, convergence and applicability of the proposed SPH interfacial multiphase model.

  19. Insights into the relationships among capillary pressure, saturation, interfacial area and relative permeability using pore-network modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joekar-Niasar, V.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Leijnse, A.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight in relationships among capillary pressure, interfacial area, saturation, and relative permeability in two-phase flow in porous media, we have developed two types of pore-network models. The first one, called tube model, has only one element type, namely pore throats. The second one

  20. Insights into the Relationships Among Capillary Pressure, Saturation, Interfacial Area and Relative Permeability Using Pore-Network Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joekar-Niasar, V.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Leijnse, A.

    To gain insight in relationships among capillary pressure, interfacial area, saturation, and relative permeability in two-phase flow in porous media, we have developed two types of pore-network models. The first one, called tube model, has only one element type, namely pore throats. The second one

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of Interfacial Tension on Saturation and Relative Permeability Model Predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael

    2011-05-18

    Interfacial tension (IFT) measurements of Dodecane/brine systems at different concentrations and Dodecane/deionized water subject to different Dodecane purification cycles were taken over extended durations at room temperature and pressure to investigate the impact of aging. When a fresh droplet was formed, a sharp drop in IFT was observed assumed to be a result of intrinsic impurity adsorption at the interface. The subsequent measurements exhibited a prolonged equilibration period consistent with diffusion from the bulk phase to the interface. Our results indicate that minute amounts of impurities present in experimental chemical fluids "used as received" have a drastic impact on the properties of the interface. Initial and equilibrium IFT are shown to be dramatically different, therefore it is important to be cautious of utilizing IFT values in numerical models. The study demonstrates the impact these variations in IFT have on relative permeability relationships by adopting a simple pore network model simulation.

  2. Interfacial rheology of fluid/fluid systems. Study of model hydrocarbon-water-surfactant systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Zanobini, Alessandra; Santini, Eva; Ravera, Francesca; Pandolfini, Piero; Noskov, Boris A.; Miller, Reinhard; Makievski, Alexander V.; Loglio, Giuseppe; Liggieri, Libero; Kr?gel, J?rgen; Ferrari, Michele; Del Gaudio, Lucilla

    2006-01-01

    Crude-oil technology specifically involves the application of interfacial rheological properties. Actually, static and dynamic interfacial physical quantities encompass several processes of interest for oil industry (such as enhanced oil recovery, emulsion formation, emulsion-stability control and breaking, oil de-watering, emulsion/sludge separation in waste water treatment, et cetera). Three points are worth to be taken into consideration. A) The role of interfacial viscoelasticity of dropl...

  3. Impact of Interfacial Characteristics on Foam Structure: Study on Model Fluids and at Pilot Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezdour Samir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Foams represent an important area of research because of their relevance to many industrial processes. In continuous foaming operations, foaming ability depends on the process parameters and the characteristics of the raw materials used for foamed products. The effects of fluid viscosity and equilibrium surface tension on foam structure have been studied extensively. Furthermore, as surface active agents diffuse to the interface, they can modify other interface properties through their adsorption, such as interfacial rheology and surface tension kinetics. In order to better understand how these two interfacial properties influence foam structuring, we formulated model foaming solutions with different interface viscoelasticity levels and adsorption rates, but all with the same equilibrium surface tension and viscosity. The solutions were made up of a surface active agent and glucose syrup, so as to maintain a Newtonian behaviour. Five surface active agents were used: Whey Protein Isolate (WPI, sodium caseinate, saponin, cetyl phosphate and Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS, at concentrations ranging from 0.1% to 1%. Their molecular characteristics, and their interaction with the glucose syrup, made it possible to obtain a range of interface viscoelasticities and surface tension kinetics for these model solutions. The solutions were whipped in a continuously-operating industrial foaming device in order to control process parameters such as shearing and overrun, and to ensure that the experiment was representative of industrial production. The structure of the foams thus obtained foams was then determined by characterising bubble size using image analysis. For all the model solutions, both the viscoelastic moduli and apparent diffusion coefficient were linked to foam structure. The results showed that both high interface viscoelasticity and rapid diffusion kinetics induced a foam structure containing small bubbles. Both effects, as well as the impact of

  4. Modelling of AlAs/GaAs interfacial structures using high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Paul D; Finnie, Michael; Craven, Alan J

    2012-07-01

    High angle annular dark field (HAADF) image simulations were performed on a series of AlAs/GaAs interfacial models using the frozen-phonon multislice method. Three general types of models were considered-perfect, vicinal/sawtooth and diffusion. These were chosen to demonstrate how HAADF image measurements are influenced by different interfacial structures in the technologically important III-V semiconductor system. For each model, interfacial sharpness was calculated as a function of depth and compared to aberration-corrected HAADF experiments of two types of AlAs/GaAs interfaces. The results show that the sharpness measured from HAADF imaging changes in a complicated manner with thickness for complex interfacial structures. For vicinal structures, it was revealed that the type of material that the probe projects through first of all has a significant effect on the measured sharpness. An increase in the vicinal angle was also shown to generate a wider interface in the random step model. The Moison diffusion model produced an increase in the interface width with depth which closely matched the experimental results of the AlAs-on-GaAs interface. In contrast, the interface width decreased as a function of depth in the linear diffusion model. Only in the case of the perfect model was it possible to ascertain the underlying structure directly from HAADF image analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of stability enhancing minimum interfacial pressure force model for MARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Ho Gon; Kim, Kyung Doo; Ha, Kwi Seok

    2001-04-01

    For thermal-hydraulic modeling of two-phase flow systems, two-fluid model, which assumes that the pressures of liquid, vapor and interface are identical, a so-called single-pressure model, is commonly used in codes for nuclear reactor safety analyses. Typical two-phase model with single pressure assumption possesses complex characteristics that result in system being ill-posed. As a result, typical single pressure model may cause the unbounded growth of instabilities. In order to overcome the ill-posedness of single-pressure two-fluid model, a hyperbolic equation system has been developed by introducing an interfacial pressure force into single pressure two-fluid model. The potential impact of the present model on the stability of finite difference solution has been examined by Von-Neumann stability analysis. The obvious improvement in numerical stability has been found when a semi-implicit time advancement scheme is used. Numerical experiments using the pilot code were also performed for the conceptual problems. It was found that the result was consistent with numerical stability test. The new model was implemented to MARS using Two-step approach. Through the conceptual stability test problems and benchmark problems, the applicability of the new model was verified

  6. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido, J. M. [Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Universidad de Concepción, POB 160-C Concepción (Chile); Algaba, J.; Blas, F. J., E-mail: felipe@uhu.es [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Míguez, J. M. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et Leurs Reservoirs, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, CNRS, TOTAL–UMR 5150, Avenue de l’Université, B.P. 1155, Pau F-64013 (France); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, E36310 Vigo (Spain); Mendiboure, B. [Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes et Leurs Reservoirs, Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, CNRS, TOTAL–UMR 5150, Avenue de l’Université, B.P. 1155, Pau F-64013 (France); Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I. [Laboratorio de Simulación Molecular y Química Computacional, CIQSO-Centro de Investigación en Química Sostenible and Departamento de Geología, Universidad de Huelva, 21007 Huelva (Spain); Piñeiro, M. M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, E36310 Vigo (Spain)

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  7. Dividing phases in two-phase flow and modeling of interfacial drag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M. [VTT Energy (Finland)

    1997-07-01

    Different models intended to describe one-dimensional two-phase flow are considered in this paper. The following models are introduced: conventional six-equation model, conventional model equipped with terms taking into account nonuniform transverse velocity distribution of the phases, several virtual mass models and a model in which the momentum equations have been derived by using the principles of Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The dynamics of the models have been tested by comparing their characteristic velocities to each other and against experimental data. The results show that the SFAV-model makes a hyperbolic system and predicts the propagation velocities of disturbances with the same order of accuracy as the best tested virtual mass models. Furthermore, the momentum interaction terms for the SFAV-model are considered. These consist of the wall friction terms and the interfacial friction term. The authors model wall friction with two independent terms describing the effect of each fluid on the wall separately. In the steady state, a relationship between the slip velocity and friction coefficients can be derived. Hence, the friction coefficients for the SFAV-model can be calculated from existing correlations, viz. from a drift-flux correlation and a wall friction correlation. The friction model was tested by searching steady-state distributions in a partial BWR fuel channel and comparing the relaxed values with the drift-flux correlation, which agreed very well with each other. In addition, response of the flow to a sine-wave disturbance in the water inlet flux was calculated as function of frequency. The results of the models differed from each other already with frequency of order 5 Hz, while the time constant for the relaxation, obtained from steady-state distribution calculation, would have implied significant differences appear not until with frequency of order 50 Hz.

  8. Dividing phases in two-phase flow and modeling of interfacial drag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumo, T.; Rajamaeki, M.

    1997-01-01

    Different models intended to describe one-dimensional two-phase flow are considered in this paper. The following models are introduced: conventional six-equation model, conventional model equipped with terms taking into account nonuniform transverse velocity distribution of the phases, several virtual mass models and a model in which the momentum equations have been derived by using the principles of Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The dynamics of the models have been tested by comparing their characteristic velocities to each other and against experimental data. The results show that the SFAV-model makes a hyperbolic system and predicts the propagation velocities of disturbances with the same order of accuracy as the best tested virtual mass models. Furthermore, the momentum interaction terms for the SFAV-model are considered. These consist of the wall friction terms and the interfacial friction term. The authors model wall friction with two independent terms describing the effect of each fluid on the wall separately. In the steady state, a relationship between the slip velocity and friction coefficients can be derived. Hence, the friction coefficients for the SFAV-model can be calculated from existing correlations, viz. from a drift-flux correlation and a wall friction correlation. The friction model was tested by searching steady-state distributions in a partial BWR fuel channel and comparing the relaxed values with the drift-flux correlation, which agreed very well with each other. In addition, response of the flow to a sine-wave disturbance in the water inlet flux was calculated as function of frequency. The results of the models differed from each other already with frequency of order 5 Hz, while the time constant for the relaxation, obtained from steady-state distribution calculation, would have implied significant differences appear not until with frequency of order 50 Hz

  9. Network model investigation of interfacial area, capillary pressure and saturation relationships in granular porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joekar-Niasar, V.; Prodanović, M.; Wildenschild, D.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a new approach for generating pore throat cross sections of various shapes based on distributions of shape factors and radii of inscribed circles. These distributions are obtained from analysis of grains packing. General formulas for calculating geometrical properties and entry capillary pressure for given shape factor and inscribed circle radius are developed. These relationships are employed in a pore network, which has a number of special features. In particular, it is highly flexible in terms of location of pore bodies, variable coordination number, as well as variable cross-sectional shapes. The pore network model is employed for simulating the equilibrium distribution of two fluids in a granular porous medium, under both drainage and imbibition conditions. The pore network model is verified by comparing simulation results with experimental data of quasi-static drainage and imbibition experiments in a glass bead medium. The pore-level topology and geometrical description of pore bodies and pore throats, essential for building the network, are rigorously extracted from experimental data using image analysis (3DMA-Rock software). Calculated capillary pressure-saturation (Pc - Sw) and specific interfacial area-saturation (anw - Sw) curves show very good agreement with measured ones, for both drainage and imbibition. We show that the shape factor can significantly influence the form of macroscopic Pc - Sw and anw - Sw curves, if the length and volumes associated to the pore throats are considerable. Furthermore, using continuous generation of shape factor distribution, the model can be validated against the grain size distribution. After validating the model against experiments, in addition to primary and main curves, we simulate many scanning curves to generate Pc - Sw - anw surfaces for drainage and imbibition, separately. Results show that these two surfaces lie very close to each other, and the average normalized difference is small, in the

  10. Development and validation of bubble breakup and coalescence constitutive models for the one-group interfacial area transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellacani, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    A local mechanistic model for bubble coalescence and breakup for the one-group interfacial area transport equation has been developed, in agreement and within the limits of the current understanding, based on an exhaustive survey of the theory and of the state of the art models for bubble dynamics simulation. The new model has been tested using the commercial 3D CFD code ANSYS CFX. Upward adiabatic turbulent air-water bubbly flow has been simulated and the results have been compared with the data obtained in the experimental facility PUMA. The range of the experimental data available spans between 0.5 to 2 m/s liquid velocity and 5 to 15 % volume fraction. For the implementation of the models, both the monodispersed and the interfacial area transport equation approaches have been used. The first one to perform a detailed analysis of the forces and models to reproduce the dynamic of the dispersed phase adequately and to be used in the next phases of the work. Also two different bubble induced turbulence models have been tested to consider the effect of the presence of the gas phase on the turbulence of the liquid phase. The interfacial area transport equation has been successfully implemented into the CFD code and the state of the art breakup and coalescence models have been used for simulation. The limitations of the actual theory have been shown and a new bubble interactions model has been developed. The simulations showed that a considerable improvement is achieved if compared to the state of the art closure models. Limits in the implementation derive from the actual understanding and formulation of the bubbly dynamics. A strong dependency on the interfacial non-drag force models and coefficients have been shown. More experimental and theory work needs to be done in this field to increase the prediction capability of the simulation tools regarding the distribution of the phases along the pipe radius.

  11. Two-phase interfacial area and flow regime modeling in FLOWTRAN-TF code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.G. III; Lee, S.Y.; Flach, G.P.; Hamm, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a new two-component, two-phase thermal-hydraulics code to capture the detailed assembly behavior associated with loss-of-coolant accident analyses in multichannel assemblies of the SRS reactors. The local interfacial area of the two-phase mixture is computed by summing the interfacial areas contributed by each of three flow regimes. For smooth flow regime transitions, the code uses an interpolation technique in terms of component void fraction for each basic flow regime

  12. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  13. Multiple Size Group Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in the Mold: An Analysis of Turbulence and Interfacial Force Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa

    2015-04-01

    An inhomogeneous Multiple Size Group (MUSIG) model based on the Eulerian-Eulerian approach has been developed to describe the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold. A laboratory scale mold has been simulated using four different turbulence closure models (modified k - ɛ, RNG k - ɛ, k - ω, and SST) with the purpose of critically comparing their predictions of bubble Sauter mean diameter distribution with previous experimental data. Furthermore, the influences of all the interfacial momentum transfer terms including drag force, lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force are investigated. The breakup and coalescence effects of the bubbles are modeled according to the bubble breakup by the impact of turbulent eddies while for bubble coalescence by the random collisions driven by turbulence and wake entrainment. It has been found that the modified k - ɛ model shows better agreement than other models in predicting the bubble Sauter mean diameter profiles. Further, simulations have also been performed to understand the sensitivity of different interfacial forces. The appropriate drag force coefficient, lift force coefficient, virtual mass force coefficient, and turbulent dispersion force coefficient are chosen in accordance with measurements of water model experiments. However, the wall lubrication force does not have much effect on the current polydispersed bubbly flow system. Finally, the MUSIG model is then used to estimate the argon bubble diameter in the molten steel of the mold. The argon bubble Sauter mean diameter generated in molten steel is predicted to be larger than air bubbles in water for the similar conditions.

  14. Probing the role of interfacial waters in protein-DNA recognition using a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shen; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    When proteins bind to their DNA target sites, ordered water molecules are often present at the protein-DNA interface bridging protein and DNA through hydrogen bonds. What is the role of these ordered interfacial waters? Are they important determinants of the specificity of DNA sequence recognition, or do they act in binding in a primarily non-specific manner, by improving packing of the interface, shielding unfavorable electrostatic interactions, and solvating unsatisfied polar groups that are inaccessible to bulk solvent? When modeling details of structure and binding preferences, can fully implicit solvent models be fruitfully applied to protein-DNA interfaces, or must the individualistic properties of these interfacial waters be accounted for? To address these questions, we have developed a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model that specifically accounts for the locations and orientations of small numbers of DNA-bound water molecules while treating the majority of the solvent implicitly. Comparing the performance of this model to its fully implicit counterpart, we find that explicit treatment of interfacial waters results in a modest but significant improvement in protein sidechain placement and DNA sequence recovery. Base-by-base comparison of the performance of the two models highlights DNA sequence positions whose recognition may be dependent on interfacial water. Our study offers large-scale statistical evidence for the role of ordered water for protein DNA recognition, together with detailed examination of several well-characterized systems. In addition, our approach provides a template for modeling explicit water molecules at interfaces that should be extensible to other systems. PMID:23444044

  15. A novel BLK-induced tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, David Leander; Berthelsen, Jens; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    -hematological malignancies including breast, kidney, and lung cancers, suggesting that BLK could be a new potential target for therapy. Here, we studied the oncogenic potential of human BLK. We found that engrafted Ba/F3 cells stably expressing constitutive active human BLK formed tumors in mice, whereas neither Ba/F3 cells...... expressing wild type BLK nor non-transfected Ba/F3 cells did. Inhibition of BLK with the clinical grade and broadly reacting SRC family kinase inhibitor dasatinib inhibited growth of BLK-induced tumors. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that human BLK is a true proto-oncogene capable of inducing...... tumors, and we demonstrate a novel BLK activity-dependent tumor model suitable for studies of BLK-driven lymphomagenesis and screening of novel BLK inhibitors in vivo....

  16. Model of vascular desmoplastic multispecies tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin F; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2017-10-07

    We present a three-dimensional nonlinear tumor growth model composed of heterogeneous cell types in a multicomponent-multispecies system, including viable, dead, healthy host, and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) tissue species. The model includes the capability for abnormal ECM dynamics noted in tumor development, as exemplified by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, including dense desmoplasia typically characterized by a significant increase of interstitial connective tissue. An elastic energy is implemented to provide elasticity to the connective tissue. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) are modeled as key contributors to this ECM remodeling. The tumor growth is driven by growth factors released by these stromal cells as well as by oxygen and glucose provided by blood vasculature which along with lymphatics are stimulated to proliferate in and around the tumor based on pro-angiogenic factors released by hypoxic tissue regions. Cellular metabolic processes are simulated, including respiration and glycolysis with lactate fermentation. The bicarbonate buffering system is included for cellular pH regulation. This model system may be of use to simulate the complex interactions between tumor and stromal cells as well as the associated ECM and vascular remodeling that typically characterize malignant cancers notorious for poor therapeutic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  18. Water-in-model oil emulsions studied by small-angle neutron scattering: interfacial film thickness and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verruto, Vincent J; Kilpatrick, Peter K

    2008-11-18

    The ever-increasing worldwide demand for energy has led to the upgrading of heavy crude oil and asphaltene-rich feedstocks becoming viable refining options for the petroleum industry. Traditional problems associated with these feedstocks, particularly stable water-in-petroleum emulsions, are drawing increasing attention. Despite considerable research on the interfacial assembly of asphaltenes, resins, and naphthenic acids, much about the resulting interfacial films is not well understood. Here, we describe the use of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate interfacial film properties from model emulsion systems. Modeling the SANS data with both a polydisperse core/shell form factor as well as a thin sheet approximation, we have deduced the film thickness and the asphaltenic composition within the stabilizing interfacial films of water-in-model oil emulsions prepared in toluene, decalin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. Film thicknesses were found to be 100-110 A with little deviation among the three solvents. By contrast, asphaltene composition in the film varied significantly, with decalin leading to the most asphaltene-rich films (30% by volume of the film), while emulsions made in toluene and methylnaphthalene resulted in lower asphaltenic contents (12-15%). Through centrifugation and dilatational rheology, we found that trends of decreasing water resolution (i.e., increasing emulsion stability) and increasing long-time dilatational elasticity corresponded with increasing asphaltene composition in the film. In addition to the asphaltenic composition of the films, here we also deduce the film solvent and water content. Our analyses indicate that 1:1 (O/W) emulsions prepared with 3% (w/w) asphaltenes in toluene and 1 wt % NaCl aqueous solutions at pH 7 and pH 10 resulted in 80-90 A thick films, interfacial areas around 2600-3100 cm (2)/mL, and films that were roughly 25% (v/v) asphaltenic, 60-70% toluene, and 8-12% water. The increased asphaltene and water film

  19. Modeling tumor invasion and metastasis in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne O. Miles

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of major signaling pathways between humans and flies has made Drosophila a useful model organism for cancer research. Our understanding of the mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation and development has been considerably advanced by studies in Drosophila. Several recent high profile studies have examined the processes constraining the metastatic growth of tumor cells in fruit fly models. Cell invasion can be studied in the context of an in vivo setting in flies, enabling the genetic requirements of the microenvironment of tumor cells undergoing metastasis to be analyzed. This Perspective discusses the strengths and limitations of Drosophila models of cancer invasion and the unique tools that have enabled these studies. It also highlights several recent reports that together make a strong case for Drosophila as a system with the potential for both testing novel concepts in tumor progression and cell invasion, and for uncovering players in metastasis.

  20. Modeling interfacial slag layer phenomena in the shell/mold gap in continuous casting of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ya

    A new lubrication and friction model of slag in the interfacial gap was combined into an existing 1-D heat transfer model, CON1D. Analytical transient models of liquid slag flow and solid slag stress have been coupled with a finite-difference model of heat transfer in the mold, gap and steel shell to predict transient shear stress, friction, slip and fracture of the slag layers. Experimental work was conducted to measure the properties of slag powder, including the friction coefficient at elevated temperatures and viscosity near solidification temperature. Tests with wide cooling rates range were conducted to construct CCT curves and to predict critical cooling rates of two slags with different crystallization tendencies. Slag composition and microstructure were analyzed by XRD and SEM. The CON1D model predicts shell thickness, temperature distributions in the mold and shell, slag layers thickness, heat flux profiles down the mold, cooling water temperature rise, ideal taper of the mold walls, and other related phenomena. Plants measurements from operating casters were collected to calibrate the model. The model was then applied to study the effect of casting speed and powder viscosity properties on slag layer behavior. The study finds that liquid slag lubrication would produce negligible stresses. Lower mold slag consumption rate leads to higher solid friction and results in solid slag layer fracture and movement if it falls below a critical value. Mold friction and fracture are governed by lubrication consumption rate. The high measured friction force in operating casters could be due to three sources: an intermittent moving solid slag layer, excessive mold taper or mold misalignment. The model was also applied to interpret the crystallization behavior of slag. A mechanism for the formation of this crystalline layer was proposed that combined the effects of a shift in the viscosity curve, a decrease in the liquid slag conductivity due to partial crystallization

  1. Solid-liquid interfacial free energy of ice Ih, ice Ic, and ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water via the capillary wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Michael; Vorselaars, Bart; Allen, Michael P; Quigley, David

    2017-02-21

    We apply the capillary wave method, based on measurements of fluctuations in a ribbon-like interfacial geometry, to determine the solid-liquid interfacial free energy for both polytypes of ice I and the recently proposed ice 0 within a mono-atomic model of water. We discuss various choices for the molecular order parameter, which distinguishes solid from liquid, and demonstrate the influence of this choice on the interfacial stiffness. We quantify the influence of discretisation error when sampling the interfacial profile and the limits on accuracy imposed by the assumption of quasi one-dimensional geometry. The interfacial free energies of the two ice I polytypes are indistinguishable to within achievable statistical error and the small ambiguity which arises from the choice of order parameter. In the case of ice 0, we find that the large surface unit cell for low index interfaces constrains the width of the interfacial ribbon such that the accuracy of results is reduced. Nevertheless, we establish that the interfacial free energy of ice 0 at its melting temperature is similar to that of ice I under the same conditions. The rationality of a core-shell model for the nucleation of ice I within ice 0 is questioned within the context of our results.

  2. Spherical Cancer Models in Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Bastien Weiswald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type.

  3. Spherical cancer models in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Bellet, Dominique; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type. Copyright © 2014 Neoplasia Press, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Datamining approaches for modeling tumor control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqa, Issam El; Deasy, Joseph O; Mu, Yi; Huang, Ellen; Hope, Andrew J; Lindsay, Patricia E; Apte, Aditya; Alaly, James; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2010-11-01

    Tumor control probability (TCP) to radiotherapy is determined by complex interactions between tumor biology, tumor microenvironment, radiation dosimetry, and patient-related variables. The complexity of these heterogeneous variable interactions constitutes a challenge for building predictive models for routine clinical practice. We describe a datamining framework that can unravel the higher order relationships among dosimetric dose-volume prognostic variables, interrogate various radiobiological processes, and generalize to unseen data before when applied prospectively. Several datamining approaches are discussed that include dose-volume metrics, equivalent uniform dose, mechanistic Poisson model, and model building methods using statistical regression and machine learning techniques. Institutional datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are used to demonstrate these methods. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate Spearman rank correlations (rs). Over-fitting was controlled via resampling methods. Using a dataset of 56 patients with primary NCSLC tumors and 23 candidate variables, we estimated GTV volume and V75 to be the best model parameters for predicting TCP using statistical resampling and a logistic model. Using these variables, the support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance for TCP prediction with an rs=0.68 on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression (rs=0.4), Poisson-based TCP (rs=0.33), and cell kill equivalent uniform dose model (rs=0.17). The prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing datamining approaches, which are able to unravel important non-linear complex interactions among model variables and have the capacity to predict on unseen data for prospective clinical applications.

  5. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  6. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  7. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating ...

  8. Modeling measurement error in tumor characterization studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoram Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Etiologic studies of cancer increasingly use molecular features such as gene expression, DNA methylation and sequence mutation to subclassify the cancer type. In large population-based studies, the tumor tissues available for study are archival specimens that provide variable amounts of amplifiable DNA for molecular analysis. As molecular features measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy, we propose a novel approach to improve statistical efficiency when comparing groups of samples. We illustrate the phenomenon using the MethyLight technology, applying our proposed analysis to compare MLH1 DNA methylation levels in males and females studied in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. Results We introduce two methods for computing empirical weights to model heteroscedasticity that is caused by sampling variable quantities of DNA for molecular analysis. In a simulation study, we show that using these weights in a linear regression model is more powerful for identifying differentially methylated loci than standard regression analysis. The increase in power depends on the underlying relationship between variation in outcome measure and input DNA quantity in the study samples. Conclusions Tumor characteristics measured from small amounts of tumor DNA are inherently noisy. We propose a statistical analysis that accounts for the measurement error due to sampling variation of the molecular feature and show how it can improve the power to detect differential characteristics between patient groups.

  9. Force field and a surface model database for silica to simulate interfacial properties in atomic resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Emami, FS; Puddu, V; Berry, RJ; Varshney, V; Patwardhan, SV; Perry, CC; Heinz, H

    2014-01-01

    Silica nanostructures find applications in drug delivery, catalysis, and composites, however, understanding of the surface chemistry, aqueous interfaces, and biomolecule recognition remain difficult using current imaging techniques and spectroscopy. A silica force field is introduced that resolves numerous shortcomings of prior silica force fields over the last thirty years and reduces uncertainties in computed interfacial properties relative to experiment from several 100% to less than 5%. I...

  10. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated generative method for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method is based on the type of generative model often used for segmenting healthy brain tissues, where tissues are modeled by Gaussian mixture models combined...... with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training images, without...

  11. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  12. FEM Modeling of In-Plane Stress Distribution in Thick Brittle Coatings/Films on Ductile Substrates Subjected to Tensile Stress to Determine Interfacial Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishi Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The ceramic-metal interface is present in various material structures and devices that are vulnerable to failures, like cracking, which are typically due to their incompatible properties, e.g., thermal expansion mismatch. In failure of these multilayer systems, interfacial shear strength is a good measure of the robustness of interfaces, especially for planar films. There is a widely-used shear lag model and method by Agrawal and Raj to analyse and measure the interfacial shear strength of thin brittle film on ductile substrates. The use of this classical model for a type of polymer derived ceramic coatings (thickness ~18 μm on steel substrate leads to high values of interfacial shear strength. Here, we present finite element simulations for such a coating system when it is subjected to in-plane tension. Results show that the in-plane stresses in the coating are non-uniform, i.e., varying across the thickness of the film. Therefore, they do not meet one of the basic assumptions of the classical model: uniform in-plane stress. Furthermore, effects of three significant parameters, film thickness, crack spacing, and Young’s modulus, on the in-plane stress distribution have also been investigated. ‘Thickness-averaged In-plane Stress’ (TIS, a new failure criterion, is proposed for estimating the interfacial shear strength, which leads to a more realistic estimation of the tensile strength and interfacial shear strength of thick brittle films/coatings on ductile substrates.

  13. Influence of pH on Oil-Water Interfacial Tension and Mass Transfer for Asphaltenes Model Oils. Comparison with Crude Oil Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutin Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Asphaltenes are shown to be amphoteric, containing acidic and basic species that can ionize at low and high pH respectively when they come in contact with water. We have used a mass transfer model in order to determine the partition coefficients of asphaltenes between oil and water. We have compared the influence of type of asphaltenes on interfacial tension and on mass transfer between oil and water and analysed the influence of an added surfactant. We have also compared the behavior of asphaltenes dissolved in model solvents with that of diluted heavy crude oils. Although asphaltenes qualitatively reproduce the behavior of crude oil components at the oil-water interface, differences were observed, either in interfacial tensions at low pH, or in partition coefficients at high pH. These differences are due to other molecules present in crude oil, which are either more interfacially active or more soluble in water.

  14. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  15. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The dose-rate in internal emitter therapy is low and time-dependent as compared to external beam radiotherapy. Once the total absorbed dose delivered to a target tissue is calculated, however, most dosimetric analyses of radiopharmaceuticals are considered complete. To translate absorbed dose estimates obtained for internal emitter therapy to biologic effect, the growth characteristics, repair capacity, and radiosensitivity of the tumor must be considered. Tumor growth may be represented by the Gompertz equation in which tumor cells increase at an exponential growth rate that is itself decreasing at an exponential rate; as the tumor increases in size, the growth rate diminishes. The empirical Gompertz expression for tumor growth may be derived from a mechanistic model in which growth is represented by a balance between tumor-cell birth and loss. The birth rate is assumed to be fixed, while the cell loss rate is time-dependent and increases with tumor size. The birth rate of the tumors may be related to their potential doubling time. Multiple biopsies of individual tumors have demonstrated a heterogeneity in the potential doubling time of tumors. By extending the mechanistic model described above to allow for sub-populations of tumor cells with different birth rates, the effect of kinetic heterogeneity within a tumor may be examined. Model simulations demonstrate that the cell kinetic parameters of a tumor are predicted to change over time and measurements obtained using a biopsy are unlikely to reflect the kinetics of the tumor throughout its growth history. A decrease in overall tumor mass, in which each sub-population is reduced in proportion to its cell number, i.e., the log-kill assumption, leads to re-growth of a tumor that has a greater proliferation rate. Therapy that is linked to the potential doubling time or to the effective proliferation rate of the tumor may lead to re-growth of a tumor that is kinetically unchanged. The simplest model of

  16. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport

  17. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  18. Solid, liquid, and interfacial properties of TiAl alloys: parameterization of a new modified embedded atom method model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shoutian; Ramachandran, Bala Ramu; Wick, Collin D

    2018-02-21

    New interatomic potentials for pure Ti and Al, and binary TiAl were developed utilizing the second nearest neighbour modified embedded-atom method (MEAM) formalism. The potentials were parameterized to reproduce multiple properties spanning bulk solids, solid surfaces, solid/liquid phase changes, and liquid interfacial properties. This was carried out using a newly developed optimization procedure that combined the simple minimization of a fitness function with a genetic algorithm to efficiently span the parameter space. The resulting MEAM potentials gave good agreement with experimental and DFT solid and liquid properties, and reproduced the melting points for Ti, Al, and TiAl. However, the surface tensions from the model consistently underestimated experimental values. Liquid TiAl's surface was found to be mostly covered with Al atoms, showing that Al has a significant propensity for the liquid/air interface.

  19. Therapeutic Implications from Sensitivity Analysis of Tumor Angiogenesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Enderling, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic cancer treatments induce tumor starvation and regression by targeting the tumor vasculature that delivers oxygen and nutrients. Mathematical models prove valuable tools to study the proof-of-concept, efficacy and underlying mechanisms of such treatment approaches. The effects of parameter value uncertainties for two models of tumor development under angiogenic signaling and anti-angiogenic treatment are studied. Data fitting is performed to compare predictions of both models and to obtain nominal parameter values for sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the success of different cancer treatments depends on tumor size and tumor intrinsic parameters. In particular, we show that tumors with ample vascular support can be successfully targeted with conventional cytotoxic treatments. On the other hand, tumors with curtailed vascular support are not limited by their growth rate and therefore interruption of neovascularization emerges as the most promising treatment target. PMID:25785600

  20. Structure, viscoelasticity, and interfacial dynamics of a model polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Robert J.; Gillard, Timothy M.; Irwin, Matthew T.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S. (UMM)

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied the equilibrium structure and dynamics of a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) composed of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHE), poly(ethylene) (PE), and a volumetrically symmetric PCHE–PE diblock copolymer, using dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The BμE was investigated over an 80 °C temperature range, revealing a structural evolution and a rheological response not previously recognized in such systems. As the temperature is reduced below the point associated with the lamellar-disorder transition at compositions adjacent to the microemulsion channel, the interfacial area per chain of the BμE approaches that of the neat (undiluted) lamellar diblock copolymer. With increasing temperature, the diblock-rich interface swells through homopolymer infiltration. Time–temperature-superposed linear dynamic data obtained as a function of frequency show that the viscoelastic response of the BμE is strikingly similar to that of the fluctuating pure diblock copolymer in the disordered state, which we associate with membrane undulations and the breaking and reforming of interfaces. This work provides new insights into the structure and dynamics that characterize thermodynamically stable BμEs in the limits of relatively weak and strong segregation.

  1. The role of interfacial tension in colloid retention and remobilization during two-phase flow in a polydimethylsiloxane micro-model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Quilan; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2017-01-01

    The work presented here consisted of steady-state and transient two-phase flow experiments on the role of interfacial tension in colloid transport. Experiments were performed in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-model containing a network of pores with a mean pore size of 30 µm. The flow network

  2. Dynamical analysis of fractional order model of immunogenic tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we examine the fractional order model of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to a growing tumor cell population. We investigate the long-term behavior of tumor growth and explore the conditions of tumor elimination analytically. We establish the conditions for the tumor-free equilibrium and tumor-infection equilibrium to be asymptotically stable and provide the expression of the basic reproduction number. Existence of physical significant tumor-infection equilibrium points is investigated analytically. We show that tumor growth rate, source rate of immune cells, and death rate of immune cells play vital role in tumor dynamics and system undergoes saddle-node and transcritical bifurcation based on these parameters. Furthermore, the effect of cancer treatment is discussed by varying the values of relevant parameters. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the analytical results.

  3. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational modeling of brain tumors: discrete, continuum or hybrid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    In spite of all efforts, patients diagnosed with highly malignant brain tumors (gliomas), continue to face a grim prognosis. Achieving significant therapeutic advances will also require a more detailed quantitative understanding of the dynamic interactions among tumor cells, and between these cells and their biological microenvironment. Data-driven computational brain tumor models have the potential to provide experimental tumor biologists with such quantitative and cost-efficient tools to generate and test hypotheses on tumor progression, and to infer fundamental operating principles governing bidirectional signal propagation in multicellular cancer systems. This review highlights the modeling objectives of and challenges with developing such in silico brain tumor models by outlining two distinct computational approaches: discrete and continuum, each with representative examples. Future directions of this integrative computational neuro-oncology field, such as hybrid multiscale multiresolution modeling are discussed.

  5. Hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics and finite-difference diffusion model: simulation of reactive polymer coupling and interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2013-10-21

    A novel hybrid approach combining dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and finite difference (FD) solution of partial differential equations is proposed to simulate complex reaction-diffusion phenomena in heterogeneous systems. DPD is used for the detailed molecular modeling of mass transfer, chemical reactions, and phase separation near the liquid∕liquid interface, while FD approach is applied to describe the large-scale diffusion of reactants outside the reaction zone. A smooth, self-consistent procedure of matching the solute concentration is performed in the buffer region between the DPD and FD domains. The new model is tested on a simple model system admitting an analytical solution for the diffusion controlled regime and then applied to simulate practically important heterogeneous processes of (i) reactive coupling between immiscible end-functionalized polymers and (ii) interfacial polymerization of two monomers dissolved in immiscible solvents. The results obtained due to extending the space and time scales accessible to modeling provide new insights into the kinetics and mechanism of those processes and demonstrate high robustness and accuracy of the novel technique.

  6. A tumor cord model for Doxorubicin delivery and dose optimization in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eikenberry Steffen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Doxorubicin is a common anticancer agent used in the treatment of a number of neoplasms, with the lifetime dose limited due to the potential for cardiotoxocity. This has motivated efforts to develop optimal dosage regimes that maximize anti-tumor activity while minimizing cardiac toxicity, which is correlated with peak plasma concentration. Doxorubicin is characterized by poor penetration from tumoral vessels into the tumor mass, due to the highly irregular tumor vasculature. I model the delivery of a soluble drug from the vasculature to a solid tumor using a tumor cord model and examine the penetration of doxorubicin under different dosage regimes and tumor microenvironments. Methods A coupled ODE-PDE model is employed where drug is transported from the vasculature into a tumor cord domain according to the principle of solute transport. Within the tumor cord, extracellular drug diffuses and saturable pharmacokinetics govern uptake and efflux by cancer cells. Cancer cell death is also determined as a function of peak intracellular drug concentration. Results The model predicts that transport to the tumor cord from the vasculature is dominated by diffusive transport of free drug during the initial plasma drug distribution phase. I characterize the effect of all parameters describing the tumor microenvironment on drug delivery, and large intercapillary distance is predicted to be a major barrier to drug delivery. Comparing continuous drug infusion with bolus injection shows that the optimum infusion time depends upon the drug dose, with bolus injection best for low-dose therapy but short infusions better for high doses. Simulations of multiple treatments suggest that additional treatments have similar efficacy in terms of cell mortality, but drug penetration is limited. Moreover, fractionating a single large dose into several smaller doses slightly improves anti-tumor efficacy. Conclusion Drug infusion time has a significant

  7. An interfacial shear term evaluation study for adiabatic dispersed air–water two-phase flow with the two-fluid model using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, S.L., E-mail: sharma55@purdue.edu [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Schlegel, J.P. [Department of Mining and Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Buchanan, J.R.; Hogan, K.J. [Bettis Laboratory, Naval Nuclear Laboratory, West Mifflin, PA (United States); Guilbert, P.W. [ANSYS UK Ltd, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Closure form of the interfacial shear term in three-dimensional form is investigated. • Assessment against adiabatic upward bubbly air–water flow data using CFD. • Effect of addition of the interfacial shear term on the phase distribution. - Abstract: In commercially available Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as ANSYS CFX and Fluent, the interfacial shear term is missing in the field momentum equations. The derivation of the two-fluid model (Ishii and Hibiki, 2011) indicates the presence of this term as a momentum source in the right hand side of the field momentum equation. The inclusion of this term is considered important for proper modeling of the interfacial momentum coupling between phases. For separated flows, such as annular flow, the importance of the shear term is understood in the one-dimensional (1-D) form as the major mechanism by which the wall shear is transferred to the gas phase (Ishii and Mishima, 1984). For gas dispersed two-phase flow CFD simulations, it is important to assess the significance of this term in the prediction of phase distributions. In the first part of this work, the closure of this term in three-dimensional (3-D) form in a CFD code is investigated. For dispersed gas–liquid flow, such as bubbly or churn-turbulent flow, bubbles are dispersed in the shear layer of the continuous phase. The continuous phase shear stress is mainly due to the presence of the wall and the modeling of turbulence through the Boussinesq hypothesis. In a 3-D simulation, the continuous phase shear stress can be calculated from the continuous fluid velocity gradient, so that the interfacial shear term can be closed using the local values of the volume fraction and the total stress of liquid phase. This form also assures that the term acts as an action-reaction force for multiple phases. In the second part of this work, the effect of this term on the volume fraction distribution is investigated. For testing the model two

  8. Modelling Nanoparticle Diffusion into Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podduturi, Vishwa Priya; Derosa, Pedro

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major, potentially deadly diseases and has been for years. Non-specific delivery of the drug can damage healthy tissue seriously affecting in many cases the patient's living condition. Nanoparticles are being used for a targeted drug delivery thereby reducing the dose. In addition, metallic nanoparticles are being used in thermal treatment of cancer cells where nanoparticles help concentrate heat in the tumor and away from living tissue. We proposed a model that combines random walk with diffusion principles. The particle drift velocity is taken from the Hagen-Poiseuille equation and the velocity profile of the particle at the pores in the capillary wall is obtained using the Coventorware software. Pressure gradient and concentration gradient through the capillary wall are considered. Simulations are performed in Matlab using the Monte Carlo technique. Number of particles leaving the blood vessel through a pore is obtained as a function of blood pressure, the osmotic pressure, temperature, particle concentration, blood vessel radius, and pore size, and the relative effect of each of the parameters is discussed.

  9. Modeling and testing treated tumor growth using cubic smoothing splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Maiying; Yan, Jun

    2011-07-01

    Human tumor xenograft models are often used in preclinical study to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a certain compound or a combination of certain compounds. In a typical human tumor xenograft model, human carcinoma cells are implanted to subjects such as severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Treatment with test compounds is initiated after tumor nodule has appeared, and continued for a certain time period. Tumor volumes are measured over the duration of the experiment. It is well known that untreated tumor growth may follow certain patterns, which can be described by certain mathematical models. However, the growth patterns of the treated tumors with multiple treatment episodes are quite complex, and the usage of parametric models is limited. We propose using cubic smoothing splines to describe tumor growth for each treatment group and for each subject, respectively. The proposed smoothing splines are quite flexible in modeling different growth patterns. In addition, using this procedure, we can obtain tumor growth and growth rate over time for each treatment group and for each subject, and examine whether tumor growth follows certain growth pattern. To examine the overall treatment effect and group differences, the scaled chi-squared test statistics based on the fitted group-level growth curves are proposed. A case study is provided to illustrate the application of this method, and simulations are carried out to examine the performances of the scaled chi-squared tests. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  11. Single and 30 fraction tumor control doses correlate in xenografted tumor models: implications for predictive assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Dubois, Willum; Baumann, Michael; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    , the rank-order correlation coefficient between the single dose hypoxic versus fractionated dose TCD50s under hypoxic or aerobic conditions was 1.0. For all 5 tumors examined, a trend for rank correlation was observed between the single dose and the fractionated dose TCD50s performed under normal or clamp hypoxic conditions (r=0.7, p=0.16 in both cases). The linear correlation coefficients were 0.83, p=0.08 and 0.72, p=0.17, respectively. Failure to attain a rank correlation of 1.0 was due to one tumor exhibiting an insignificant fractionation effect. The rank correlation between the TCD50s for fractionated treatments under normal versus the extrapolated TCD50s under clamp hypoxic conditions was 1.00; the linear correlation coefficient was 0.97 (p=0.01). Conclusions: In the tumor models examined, factors controlling the single fraction tumor control dose, also impact the response to fractionated treatments. These results suggest that laboratory estimates of intrinsic radiosensitivity and tumor clonogen number at the onset of treatment, will be of use in predicting radiocurability for fractionated treatments, as has been observed for single dose treatments

  12. Scaling of interfacial jump conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quezada G, S.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G.

    2015-09-01

    To model the behavior of a nuclear reactor accurately is needed to have balance models that take into account the different phenomena occurring in the reactor. These balances have to be coupled together through boundary conditions. The boundary conditions have been studied and different treatments have been given to the interface. In this paper is a brief description of some of the interfacial jump conditions that have been proposed in recent years. Also, the scaling of an interfacial jump condition is proposed, for coupling the different materials that are in contact within a nuclear reactor. (Author)

  13. Heralding a new paradigm in 3D tumor modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Eliza L S; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Yu, Hanry

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies to date have contributed to a paradigm shift in modeling cancer, moving from the traditional two-dimensional culture system to three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for cancer cell culture. This led to the inception of tumor engineering, which has undergone rapid advances over the years. In line with the recognition that tumors are not merely masses of proliferating cancer cells but rather, highly complex tissues consisting of a dynamic extracellular matrix together with stromal, immune and endothelial cells, significant efforts have been made to better recapitulate the tumor microenvironment in 3D. These approaches include the development of engineered matrices and co-cultures to replicate the complexity of tumor-stroma interactions in vitro. However, the tumor engineering and cancer biology fields have traditionally relied heavily on the use of cancer cell lines as a cell source in tumor modeling. While cancer cell lines have contributed to a wealth of knowledge in cancer biology, the use of this cell source is increasingly perceived as a major contributing factor to the dismal failure rate of oncology drugs in drug development. Backing this notion is the increasing evidence that tumors possess intrinsic heterogeneity, which predominantly homogeneous cancer cell lines poorly reflect. Tumor heterogeneity contributes to therapeutic resistance in patients. To overcome this limitation, cancer cell lines are beginning to be replaced by primary tumor cell sources, in the form of patient-derived xenografts and organoids cultures. Moving forward, we propose that further advances in tumor engineering would require that tumor heterogeneity (tumor variants) be taken into consideration together with tumor complexity (tumor-stroma interactions). In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of what has been achieved in recapitulating tumor complexity, and discuss the importance of incorporating tumor heterogeneity into 3D in vitro tumor models. This

  14. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  15. The Constrained Vapor Bubble Experiment - Interfacial Flow Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundan, Akshay; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.; Plawsky, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal heat transfer coefficient of the CVB correlated to the presence of the interfacial flow region. Competition between capillary and Marangoni flow caused Flooding and not a Dry-out region. Interfacial flow region growth is arrested at higher power inputs. 1D heat model confirms the presence of interfacial flow region. 1D heat model confirms the arresting phenomena of interfacial flow region Visual observations are essential to understanding.

  16. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  17. Accurate prediction of interfacial residues in two-domain proteins using evolutionary information: implications for three-dimensional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskara, Ramachandra M; Padhi, Amrita; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-07-01

    With the preponderance of multidomain proteins in eukaryotic genomes, it is essential to recognize the constituent domains and their functions. Often function involves communications across the domain interfaces, and the knowledge of the interacting sites is essential to our understanding of the structure-function relationship. Using evolutionary information extracted from homologous domains in at least two diverse domain architectures (single and multidomain), we predict the interface residues corresponding to domains from the two-domain proteins. We also use information from the three-dimensional structures of individual domains of two-domain proteins to train naïve Bayes classifier model to predict the interfacial residues. Our predictions are highly accurate (∼85%) and specific (∼95%) to the domain-domain interfaces. This method is specific to multidomain proteins which contain domains in at least more than one protein architectural context. Using predicted residues to constrain domain-domain interaction, rigid-body docking was able to provide us with accurate full-length protein structures with correct orientation of domains. We believe that these results can be of considerable interest toward rational protein and interaction design, apart from providing us with valuable information on the nature of interactions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Numerical modeling of fluid flow in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of interstitial fluid flow is developed, based on the application of the governing equations for fluid flow, i.e., the conservation laws for mass and momentum, to physiological systems containing solid tumors. The discretized form of the governing equations, with appropriate boundary conditions, is developed for a predefined tumor geometry. The interstitial fluid pressure and velocity are calculated using a numerical method, element based finite volume. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a homogeneous solid tumor demonstrate that, in a uniformly perfused tumor, i.e., one with no necrotic region, because of the interstitial pressure distribution, the distribution of drug particles is non-uniform. Pressure distribution for different values of necrotic radii is examined and two new parameters, the critical tumor radius and critical necrotic radius, are defined. Simulation results show that: 1 tumor radii have a critical size. Below this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is less than what is generally considered to be effective pressure (a parameter determined by vascular pressure, plasma osmotic pressure, and interstitial osmotic pressure. Above this size, the maximum interstitial fluid pressure is equal to effective pressure. As a consequence, drugs transport to the center of smaller tumors is much easier than transport to the center of a tumor whose radius is greater than the critical tumor radius; 2 there is a critical necrotic radius, below which the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is at its maximum value. If the tumor radius is greater than the critical tumor radius, this maximum pressure is equal to effective pressure. Above this critical necrotic radius, the interstitial fluid pressure at the tumor center is below effective pressure. In specific ranges of these critical sizes, drug amount and therefore therapeutic effects are higher because the opposing force, interstitial fluid

  19. Scrap melting model for steel converter founded on interfacial solid/liquid phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Holappa, Lauri

    2017-12-01

    The primary goal in steel converter operation is the removal of carbon from the hot metal. This is achieved by blowing oxygen into the melt. The oxidation of carbon produces a lot of heat. To avoid too high temperatures in the melt cold scrap (recycled steel) is charged into the converter. The melting rate is affected by heat and carbon mass transfer. A process model for steel converter is in development. This model is divided into several modules, which are fluid dynamics, heat- and mass-transfer, scrap melting and chemical reactions. This article focuses on the development of the scrap melting module. A numerical model for calculating temperature and carbon concentration in the melt is presented. The melt model is connected with the solid scrap model via solid/liquid interface. The interface model can take into account solidification of iron melt, melting of solidified layer, a situation without such phase changes, and scrap melting. The aim is to predict the melting rate of the scrap including the properties of the hot metal. The model is tested by calculating the melting rates for different scrap thicknesses. All of the stages in the interface model were taking place in the test calculations.

  20. Generalized corresponding states model for bulk and interfacial properties in pure fluids and fluid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, S. B.; Ely, J. F.

    2003-10-01

    We have formulated a general approach for transforming an analytical equation of state (EOS) into the crossover form and developed a generalized cubic (GC) EOS for pure fluids, which incorporates nonanalytic scaling laws in the critical region and in the limit ρ→0 is transformed into the ideal gas equation EOS. Using the GC EOS as a reference equation, we have developed a generalized version of the corresponding states (GCS) model, which contains the critical point parameters and accentric factor as input as well as the Ginzburg number Gi. For nonionic fluids we propose a simple correlation between the Ginzburg number Gi and Zc, ω, and molecular weight Mw. In the second step, we develop on the basis of the GCS model and the density functional theory a GCS-density functional theory (DFT) crossover model for the vapor-liquid interface and surface tension. We use the GCS-DFT model for the prediction of the PVT, vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) and surface properties of more than 30 pure fluids. In a wide range of thermodynamic states, including the nearest vicinity of the critical point, the GCS reproduces the PVT and VLE surface and the surface tension of one-component fluids (polar and nonpolar) with high accuracy. In the critical region, the GCS-DFT predictions for the surface tension are in excellent agreement with experimental data and theoretical renormalization-group model developed earlier. Using the principle of the critical-point universality we extended the GCS-DFT model to fluid mixtures and developed a field-variable based GCS-FV model. We provide extensive comparisons of the GCS-FV model with experimental data and with the GCS-XV model formulated in terms of the conventional density variable—composition. Far from the critical point both models, GCS-FV and GCS-XV, give practically similar results, but in the critical region, the GCS-FV model yields a better representation of the VLE surface of binary mixtures than the GCS-XV model. We also show that

  1. Interfacial mixing in high-energy-density matter with a multiphysics kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Jeffrey R; Hauck, Cory D; Murillo, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    We have extended a recently developed multispecies, multitemperature Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model [Haack et al., J. Stat. Phys. 168, 822 (2017)JSTPBS0022-471510.1007/s10955-017-1824-9], to include multiphysics capabilities that enable modeling of a wider range of physical conditions. In terms of geometry, we have extended from the spatially homogeneous setting to one spatial dimension. In terms of the physics, we have included an atomic ionization model, accurate collision physics across coupling regimes, self-consistent electric fields, and degeneracy in the electronic screening. We apply the model to a warm dense matter scenario in which the ablator-fuel interface of an inertial confinement fusion target is heated, but for larger length and time scales and for much higher temperatures than can be simulated using molecular dynamics. Relative to molecular dynamics, the kinetic model greatly extends the temperature regime and the spatiotemporal scales over which we are able to model. In our numerical results we observe hydrogen from the ablator material jetting into the fuel during the early stages of the implosion and compare the relative size of various diffusion components (Fickean diffusion, electrodiffusion, and barodiffusion) that drive this process. We also examine kinetic effects, such as anisotropic distributions and velocity separation, in order to determine when this problem can be described with a hydrodynamic model.

  2. Interfacial mixing in high-energy-density matter with a multiphysics kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Jeffrey R.; Hauck, Cory D.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2017-12-01

    We have extended a recently developed multispecies, multitemperature Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model [Haack et al., J. Stat. Phys. 168, 822 (2017), 10.1007/s10955-017-1824-9], to include multiphysics capabilities that enable modeling of a wider range of physical conditions. In terms of geometry, we have extended from the spatially homogeneous setting to one spatial dimension. In terms of the physics, we have included an atomic ionization model, accurate collision physics across coupling regimes, self-consistent electric fields, and degeneracy in the electronic screening. We apply the model to a warm dense matter scenario in which the ablator-fuel interface of an inertial confinement fusion target is heated, but for larger length and time scales and for much higher temperatures than can be simulated using molecular dynamics. Relative to molecular dynamics, the kinetic model greatly extends the temperature regime and the spatiotemporal scales over which we are able to model. In our numerical results we observe hydrogen from the ablator material jetting into the fuel during the early stages of the implosion and compare the relative size of various diffusion components (Fickean diffusion, electrodiffusion, and barodiffusion) that drive this process. We also examine kinetic effects, such as anisotropic distributions and velocity separation, in order to determine when this problem can be described with a hydrodynamic model.

  3. Human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes cooperatively regulate prostate tumor growth in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Michael D; Harui, Airi

    2015-01-01

    The complex interactions that occur between human tumors, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the systemic immune system are likely to define critical factors in the host response to cancer. While conventional animal models have identified an array of potential anti-tumor therapies, mouse models often fail to translate into effective human treatments. Our goal is to establish a humanized tumor model as a more effective pre-clinical platform for understanding and manipulating TIL. The immune system in NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice was reconstituted by the co-administration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) or subsets (CD4+ or CD8+) and autologous human dendritic cells (DC), and animals simultaneously challenged by implanting human prostate cancer cells (PC3 line). Tumor growth was evaluated over time and the phenotype of recovered splenocytes and TIL characterized by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Serum levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines were also assessed. A tumor-bearing huPBL-NSG model was established in which human leukocytes reconstituted secondary lymphoid organs and promoted the accumulation of TIL. These TIL exhibited a unique phenotype when compared to splenocytes with a predominance of CD8+ T cells that exhibited increased expression of CD69, CD56, and an effector memory phenotype. TIL from huPBL-NSG animals closely matched the features of TIL recovered from primary human prostate cancers. Human cytokines were readily detectible in the serum and exhibited a different profile in animals implanted with PBL alone, tumor alone, and those reconstituted with both. Immune reconstitution slowed but could not eliminate tumor growth and this effect required the presence of CD4+ T cell help. Simultaneous implantation of human PBL, DC and tumor results in a huPBL-NSG model that recapitulates the development of human TIL and allows an assessment of tumor and immune system interaction that cannot be carried out in humans

  4. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt; Ebert, William

    2015-07-01

    The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO2 and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO2 and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO2 and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H2O2 and O2). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit fuel degradation to chemical dissolution, which results in radionuclide source term values that are four or five orders of magnitude lower than when oxidative dissolution processes are operative. This paper presents the scientific basis of the model, the approach for modeling used fuel in a disposal system, and preliminary

  5. Interfacial characteristics of propylene carbonate and validation of simulation models for electrochemical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xinli

    Supercapacitors have occupy an indispensable role in today's energy storage systems due to their high power density and long life. The introduction of car- bon nanotube (CNT) forests as electrode offers the possibility of nano-scale design and high capacitance. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations on a CNT forest-based electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) and a widely used electrolyte solution (tetra-ethylammonium tetra-fluoroborate in propylene carbonate, TEABF4 /PC). We compare corresponding primitive model and atomically detailed model of TEABF4 /P, emphasizing the significance of ion clustering in electrolytes. The molecular dynamic simulation results suggests that the arrangement of closest neigh- bors leads to the formation of cation-anion chains or rings. Fuoss's discussion of ion-pairing model provides the approximation for a primitive model of 1-1 electrolyte is not broadly satisfactory for both primitive and atomically detailed cases. A more general Poisson statistical assumption is shown to be satisfactory when coordina- tion numbers are low, as is likely to be the case when ion-pairing initiates. We examined the Poisson-based model over a range of concentrations for both models of TEABF4 /P, and the atomically detailed model results identified solvent-separated nearest-neighbor ion-pairs. Large surface areas plays an essential role in nanomaterial properties, which calls for an accurate description of interfaces through modeling. We studied propylene carbonate, a widely used solvent in EDLC systems. PC wets graphite with a contact angle of 31°. The MD simulation model reproduced this contact angle after reduction 40% of the strength of graphite-C atom Lennard-Jones interactions with the solvent. The critical temperature of PC was accurately evaluated by extrapolating the PC liquid-vapor surface tensions. PC molecules tend to lie flat on the PC liquid-vapor surface, and project the propyl carbon toward the vapor phase. Liquid PC

  6. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerden, James L., E-mail: jerden@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Frey, Kurt [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ebert, William [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • This model accounts for chemistry, temperature, radiolysis, U(VI) minerals, and hydrogen effect. • The hydrogen effect dominates processes determining spent fuel dissolution rate. • The hydrogen effect protects uranium oxide spent fuel from oxidative dissolution. - Abstract: The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO{sub 2} and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO{sub 2} and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO{sub 2} and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit

  7. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  8. Modeling the Effect of Tumor Size in Early Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschraegen, Claire; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gábor; Gordon, Richard; Royce, Melanie E.; Vlastos, Georges; Tai, Patricia; Storme, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Summary Background Data: The purpose of this study was to determine the type of relationship between tumor size and mortality in early breast carcinoma. Methods: The data was abstracted from 83,686 cases registered in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of women diagnosed with primary breast carcinoma between 1988 and 1997 presenting with a T1–T2 lesion and no metastasis in whom axillary node dissection was performed: 58,070 women were node-negative (N0) and 25,616 were node-positive (N+). End point was death from any cause. Tumor size was modeled as a continuous variable by proportional hazards using a generalized additive models procedure. Results: Functionally, a Gompertzian expression exp(-exp(-(size-15)/10)) provided a good fit to the effect of tumor size (in millimeters) on mortality, irrespective of nodal status. Quantitatively, for tumor size between 3 and 50 mm, the increase of crude cumulative death rate (number of observed deaths divided by the number of patients at risk) increased with size from 10% to 25% for N0 and from 20% to 40% for N+. Conclusions: The functional relationship of tumor size with mortality is concordant with current knowledge of tumor growth. However, its qualitative and quantitative independence of nodal status is in contradiction with the prevailing concept of sequential disease progression from primary tumor to regional nodes. This argues against the perception that nodal metastases are caused by the primary tumor. PMID:15650642

  9. Modeling interfacial glass-water reactions: recent advances and current limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Frugier, Pierre; Criscenti, Louise J.; Kwon, Kideok D.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-01-01

    Describing the reactions that occur at the glass-water interface and control the development of the altered layer constitutes one of the main scientific challenges impeding existing models from providing accurate radionuclide release estimates. Radionuclide release estimates are a critical component of the safety basis for geologic repositories. The altered layer (i.e., amorphous hydrated surface layer and crystalline reaction products) represents a complex region, both physically and chemically, sandwiched between two distinct boundaries-pristine glass surface at the inner most interface and aqueous solution at the outer most interface. Computational models, spanning different length and timescales, are currently being developed to improve our understanding of this complex and dynamic process with the goal of accurately describing the mesoscale changes that occur as the system evolves. These modeling approaches include geochemical simulations (i.e., classical reaction path simulations and glass reactivity in allowance for alteration layer simulations), Monte Carlo simulations, and molecular dynamics methods. Discussed in this manuscript are the advances and limitations of each modeling approach placed in the context of the glass-water reaction and how collectively these approaches provide insights into the mechanisms that control the formation and evolution of altered layers. New results are presented as examples of each approach. (authors)

  10. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  12. Chemical, spectroscopic, and ab initio modelling approach to interfacial reactivity applied to anion retention by siderite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badaut, V.

    2010-07-01

    Among the many radionuclides contained in high-level nuclear waste, 79 Se was identified as a potential threat to the safety of long term underground storage. However, siderite (FeCO 3 ) is known to form upon corrosion of the waste container, and the impact of this mineral on the fate of selenium was not accounted for. In this work, the interactions between selenium oxyanions - selenate and selenite - and siderite were investigated. To this end, both experimental characterizations (solution chemistry, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy - XAS) and theoretical studies (ab initio modelling using Density Functional Theory - DFT ) were performed. Selenite and selenate (≤ 10 3 M) retention experiments by siderite suspensions (75 g/L ) at neutral pH in reducing glovebox (5 % H 2 ) showed that selenite is quantitatively immobilized by siderite after 48 h of reaction time, when selenate is only partly immobilized after 10 days. In the selenite case, XAS showed that immobilized selenium is initially present as Se(IV) probably sorbed on siderite surface. After 10 days of reaction, selenite ions are quantitatively reduced and form poorly crystalline elementary selenium. Selenite retention and reduction kinetics are therefore distinct. On the other hand, the fraction of immobilized selenate retained in the solid fraction does not appear to be significantly reduced over the probed timescale (10 days). For a better understanding of the reduction mechanism of selenite ions by siderite, the properties of bulk and perfect surfaces of siderite were modelled using DFT. We suggest that the properties of the valence electrons can be correctly described only if the symmetry of the fundamental state electronic density is lower than the experimental crystallographic symmetry. We then show that the retention of simple molecules as O 2 or H 2 O on siderite and magnesite (10 -14 ) perfect surfaces (perfect cleavage plane, whose surface energy is the lowest according to DFT) can be modelled with

  13. Modeling of Long-Term Fate of Mobilized Fines due to Dam-Embankment Interfacial Dislocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoe, L. G.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Kanarska, Y.; Lomov, I.; Antoun, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Transverse cracks in embankment dams can develop as a result of post-construction settlements, earthquake deformations, or anthropogenic loads such as emplaced explosives. During these dislocations, fine particles are released from the damaged zones and can create unwanted inertial erosion and piping through the transverse cracks. These processes are equally critical to the overall stability of the dam. We present numerical results related to the problem of the fluid flow, transport, and filtration of particulates from damaged zones between the concrete sections of a gravity dam and the embankment wraparound sections. The model solves simultaneously the flow, attachment, and washout of fine particles within a wraparound heterogeneous porous media. We used a state-of-the-art finite element method with adaptive mesh refinement to capture 1) the interface between water dense with fines and clear water, and 2) the non-linearity of the free surface itself. A few scenarios of sediment entrapment in the filter layers of a gravity dam were considered. Several parameterizations of the filtration model and constitutive laws of soil behavior were also investigated. Through these analyses, we concluded that the attachment kinetic isotherm is the key function of the model. More parametric studies need to be conducted to assess the sensitivity of the kinetic isotherm parameters on the overall stability of the embankment. These kinetic parameters can be obtained, for example, through numerical micro- and meso-scale studies. It is worth mentioning that the current model, for the more realistic non-linear kinetic isotherms, has predicted a self-rehabilitation of the breached core with retention of 50% of the mobilized fines using a very conservative filtration length. A more realistic value should exceed the assumed one, resulting in a retention exceeding 50%. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  14. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%–25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors. PMID:28333115

  15. Mathematical and Computational Modeling for Tumor Virotherapy with Mediated Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timalsina, Asim; Tian, Jianjun Paul; Wang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new mathematical modeling framework based on partial differential equations to study tumor virotherapy with mediated immunity. The model incorporates both innate and adaptive immune responses and represents the complex interaction among tumor cells, oncolytic viruses, and immune systems on a domain with a moving boundary. Using carefully designed computational methods, we conduct extensive numerical simulation to the model. The results allow us to examine tumor development under a wide range of settings and provide insight into several important aspects of the virotherapy, including the dependence of the efficacy on a few key parameters and the delay in the adaptive immunity. Our findings also suggest possible ways to improve the virotherapy for tumor treatment.

  16. Interfacial heat transfer - State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.

    1987-01-01

    Interfacial heat exchanges control the interfacial mass exchange rate, depend on the interfacial area, and are tied to the prediction of thermal nonequilibrium. The nature of the problem usually requires the formulation of mechanistic laws and precludes the general use of universal correlations. This is partly due to the fact that the length scale controlling the interfacial exchanges varies widely from one situation to another and has a strong influence on the exchange coefficients. Within the framework of the ''two-fluid models'', the exchanges occurring at the interfaces are explicitly taken into consideration by the jump condition linking the volumetric mass exchange (evaporation) rate between the phases, to the interfacial energy transfer rates

  17. Interfacial effects in multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Interfacial structure and the atomic interactions between atoms at interfaces in multilayers or nano-laminates have significant impact on the physical properties of these materials. A technique for the experimental evaluation of interfacial structure and interfacial structure effects is presented and compared to experiment. In this paper the impact of interfacial structure on the performance of x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultra-violet multilayer optic structures is emphasized. The paper is concluded with summary of these results and an assessment of their implications relative to multilayer development and the study of buried interfaces in solids in general

  18. Computer Implementation of a New Therapeutic Model for GBM Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jamali Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the tumor behavior in the host organ as function of time and radiation dose has been a major study in the previous decades. Here the effort in estimation of cancerous and normal cell proliferation and growth in glioblastoma multiform (GBM tumor is presented. This paper introduces a new mathematical model in the form of differential equation of tumor growth. The model contains dose delivery amount in the treatment scheme as an input term. It also can be utilized to optimize the treatment process in order to increase the patient survival period. Gene expression programming (GEP as a new concept is used for estimating this model. The LQ model has also been applied to GEP as an initial value, causing acceleration and improvement of the algorithm estimation. The model shows the number of the tumor and normal brain cells during the treatment process using the status of normal and cancerous cells in the initiation of treatment, the timing and amount of dose delivery to the patient, and a coefficient that describes the brain condition. A critical level is defined for normal cell when the patient’s death occurs. In the end the model has been verified by clinical data obtained from previous accepted formulae and some of our experimental resources. The proposed model helps to predict tumor growth during treatment process in which further treatment processes can be controlled.

  19. A fractional motion diffusion model for grading pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, M Muge; Wang, He; Sui, Yi; Engelhard, Herbert H; Li, Yuhua; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a novel fractional motion (FM) diffusion model for distinguishing low- versus high-grade pediatric brain tumors; and to investigate its possible advantage over apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and/or a previously reported continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) diffusion model. With approval from the institutional review board and written informed consents from the legal guardians of all participating patients, this study involved 70 children with histopathologically-proven brain tumors (30 low-grade and 40 high-grade). Multi- b -value diffusion images were acquired and analyzed using the FM, CTRW, and mono-exponential diffusion models. The FM parameters, D fm , φ , ψ (non-Gaussian diffusion statistical measures), and the CTRW parameters, D m , α , β (non-Gaussian temporal and spatial diffusion heterogeneity measures) were compared between the low- and high-grade tumor groups by using a Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon U test. The performance of the FM model for differentiating between low- and high-grade tumors was evaluated and compared with that of the CTRW and the mono-exponential models using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The FM parameters were significantly lower ( p  CTRW model. Similar to the CTRW model, the FM model can improve differentiation between low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumors over ADC.

  20. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What is lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Leccia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs, and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs. Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely functional, i.e producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism. In contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in PKA, Wnt/β-catenin and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered of adrenocortical tumors by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases.

  1. International Workshop on Mathematical Modeling of Tumor-Immune Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Peter; Mallet, Dann

    2014-01-01

    This collection of papers offers a broad synopsis of state-of-the-art mathematical methods used in modeling the interaction between tumors and the immune system. These papers were presented at the four-day workshop on Mathematical Models of Tumor-Immune System Dynamics held in Sydney, Australia from January 7th to January 10th, 2013. The workshop brought together applied mathematicians, biologists, and clinicians actively working in the field of cancer immunology to share their current research and to increase awareness of the innovative mathematical tools that are applicable to the growing field of cancer immunology. Recent progress in cancer immunology and advances in immunotherapy suggest that the immune system plays a fundamental role in host defense against tumors and could be utilized to prevent or cure cancer. Although theoretical and experimental studies of tumor-immune system dynamics have a long history, there are still many unanswered questions about the mechanisms that govern the interaction betwe...

  2. Tumor dormancy and frailty models: A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancoita, Paola M V; Valberg, Morten; Demicheli, Romano; Biganzoli, Elia; Di Serio, Clelia

    2017-03-01

    Frailty models are here proposed in the tumor dormancy framework, in order to account for possible unobservable dependence mechanisms in cancer studies where a non-negligible proportion of cancer patients relapses years or decades after surgical removal of the primary tumor. Relapses do not seem to follow a memory-less process, since their timing distribution leads to multimodal hazards. From a biomedical perspective, this behavior may be explained by tumor dormancy, i.e., for some patients microscopic tumor foci may remain asymptomatic for a prolonged time interval and, when they escape from dormancy, micrometastatic growth results in a clinical disease appearance. The activation of the growth phase at different metastatic states would explain the occurrence of metastatic recurrences and mortality at different times (multimodal hazard). We propose a new frailty model which includes in the risk function a random source of heterogeneity (frailty variable) affecting the components of the hazard function. Thus, the individual hazard rate results as the product of a random frailty variable and the sum of basic hazard rates. In tumor dormancy, the basic hazard rates correspond to micrometastatic developments starting from different initial states. The frailty variable represents the heterogeneity among patients with respect to relapse, which might be related to unknown mechanisms that regulate tumor dormancy. We use our model to estimate the overall survival in a large breast cancer dataset, showing how this improves the understanding of the underlying biological process. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  3. Cytoreductive Chemotherapy Improves the Biodistribution of Antibodies Directed Against Tumor Necrosis in Murine Solid Tumor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Julie K.; Khawli, Leslie A.; Park, Ryan; Wu, Brian W.; Li, Zibo; Canter, David; Conti, Peter S.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies in cancer treatment employ combinations of different treatment modalities, which include chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Consistent with that approach, the present study demonstrates how chemotherapeutic agents can potentiate the delivery of radiolabeled, necrosis-targeting antibodies (chTNT-3, NHS76) to tumor. All chemotherapeutics in this study (5-fluorouracil, etoposide, vinblastine, paclitaxel, and doxorubicin) resulted in statistically significant increases in tumor uptake of radiolabeled antibodies and their F(ab')2 fragments compared to no pretreatment with chemotherapy. Labeled antibodies were administered at various time points following a single dose of chemotherapy in multiple tumor models, and the biodistribution of the antibodies were determined by measuring radioactivity in harvested tissues. MicroPET/CT was also done to demonstrate clinical relevancy of using chemotherapy pretreatment to increase antibody uptake. Results of biodistribution and imaging data reveal specific time frames following chemotherapy when necrosis-targeting antibodies are best delivered, either for imaging or radiotherapy. Thus, the present work offers the prospect of using cytoreductive chemotherapy to increase tumor accumulation of select therapeutic antibodies, especially when combined with other forms of immunotherapy, for the successful treatment of solid tumors. PMID:24130055

  4. Cellular Interaction and Tumoral Penetration Properties of Cyclodextrin Nanoparticles on 3D Breast Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Varan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic cyclodextrins are biocompatible oligosaccharides that can be used for drug delivery especially for the delivery of drugs with solubility problems thanks to their unique molecular structures. In this paper, Paclitaxel was used as a model anticancer drug to determine the inclusion complex properties of amphiphilic cyclodextrins with different surface charge. Paclitaxel-loaded cyclodextrin nanoparticles were characterized in terms of mean particle diameter, zeta potential, encapsulation efficacy, drug release profile and cell culture studies. It was determined that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex according to characterization studies have a longer release profile than the conventionally prepared nanoparticles. In order to mimic the tumor microenvironment, breast cancer cells and healthy fibroblast cells were used in 3-dimensional (3D cell culture studies. It was determined that the activities of nanoparticles prepared by conventional methods behave differently in 2-dimensional (2D and 3D cell cultures. In addition, it was observed that the nanoparticles prepared from the inclusion complex have a stronger anti-tumoral activity in the 3D multicellular tumor model than the drug solution. Furthermore, polycationic amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles can diffuse and penetrate through multilayer cells in a 3D tumor model, which is crucial for an eventual antitumor effect.

  5. Modeling evolutionary dynamics of epigenetic mutations in hierarchically organized tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sottoriva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC concept is a highly debated topic in cancer research. While experimental evidence in favor of the cancer stem cell theory is apparently abundant, the results are often criticized as being difficult to interpret. An important reason for this is that most experimental data that support this model rely on transplantation studies. In this study we use a novel cellular Potts model to elucidate the dynamics of established malignancies that are driven by a small subset of CSCs. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic mutations that occur during mitosis display highly altered dynamics in CSC-driven malignancies compared to a classical, non-hierarchical model of growth. In particular, the heterogeneity observed in CSC-driven tumors is considerably higher. We speculate that this feature could be used in combination with epigenetic (methylation sequencing studies of human malignancies to prove or refute the CSC hypothesis in established tumors without the need for transplantation. Moreover our tumor growth simulations indicate that CSC-driven tumors display evolutionary features that can be considered beneficial during tumor progression. Besides an increased heterogeneity they also exhibit properties that allow the escape of clones from local fitness peaks. This leads to more aggressive phenotypes in the long run and makes the neoplasm more adaptable to stringent selective forces such as cancer treatment. Indeed when therapy is applied the clone landscape of the regrown tumor is more aggressive with respect to the primary tumor, whereas the classical model demonstrated similar patterns before and after therapy. Understanding these often counter-intuitive fundamental properties of (non-hierarchically organized malignancies is a crucial step in validating the CSC concept as well as providing insight into the therapeutical consequences of this model.

  6. Modelling of interfacial transition zone effect on resistance to crack propagation in fine-grained cement-based composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimonová, H.; Vyhlídal, M.; Kucharczyková, B.; Bayer, P.; Keršner, Z.; Malíková, Lucie; Klusák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 41 (2017), s. 211-219 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18702S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Effective fracture toughness * Fine-grained concrete * Interfacial transition zone * Three-point bending fracture test * Scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  7. Interfacial area and interfacial transfer in two-phase systems. DOE final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Hibiki, T.; Revankar, S.T.; Kim, S.; Le Corre, J.M.

    2002-07-01

    In the two-fluid model, the field equations are expressed by the six conservation equations consisting of mass, momentum and energy equations for each phase. The existence of the interfacial transfer terms is one of the most important characteristics of the two-fluid model formulation. The interfacial transfer terms are strongly related to the interfacial area concentration and to the local transfer mechanisms such as the degree of turbulence near interfaces. This study focuses on the development of a closure relation for the interfacial area concentration. A brief summary of several problems of the current closure relation for the interfacial area concentration and a new concept to overcome the problem are given.

  8. Dynamic modeling of lung tumor motion during respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakou, E; McKenzie, D R, E-mail: e.kyriakou@physics.usyd.edu.au, E-mail: d.mckenzie@physics.usyd.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-05-21

    A dynamic finite element model of the lung that incorporates a simplified geometry with realistic lung material properties has been developed. Observations of lung motion from respiratory-gated computed tomography were used to provide a database against which the predictions of the model are assessed. Data from six patients presenting with lung tumors were processed to give sagittal sections of the lung containing the tumor as a function of the breathing phase. Statistical shape modeling was used to outline the diaphragm, the tumor volume and the thoracic wall at each breathing phase. The motion of the tumor in the superior-inferior direction was plotted against the diaphragm displacement. The finite element model employed a simplified geometry in which the lung material fills a rectangular volume enabling two-dimensional coordinates to be used. The diaphragm is represented as a piston, driving the motion. Plots of lung displacement against diaphragm displacement form hysteresis loops that are a sensitive indicator of the characteristics of the motion. The key parameters of lung material that determine the motion are the density and elastic properties of lung material and the airway permeability. The model predictions of the hysteresis behavior agreed well with observation only when lung material is modeled as viscoelastic. The key material parameters are suggested for use as prognostic indicators of the progression of disease and of changes arising from the response of the lung to radiation treatment.

  9. Development of interfacial drag model for bubbly flow in downcomer annulus during late-reflood phase of DVI plant, APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Bub Dong; Song, Chul Hwa; Kwon, Tae Soon; Kim, In Goo; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-01-01

    APR1400 LBLOCA safety issues have been raised during the design evaluation process. The downcomer boiling is one of these LBLOCA safety issues. The possibility of boiling during LBLOCA reflood phase had been stimulated from the best estimate (BE) calculation using RELAP5/MOD3 code. Many controversial arguments in BE calculation have been followed, since there is no reflood boiling model in licensing calculation and no direct evidence of boiling. The possibility of downcomer boiling during late and/or post reflood phase has been also indicated by the independent PIRT expert group The prediction of void fraction of downcomer during post-reflood phase has a significant importance to evaluate the reheating of core. The void fraction of vertical geometry is highly dependent with interfacial drag of two fluid model. However the interfacial drag model of RELAP5 is mainly based on the circular pipe data, the model should be examined for annulus downcomer geometry and improved to get more reliable calculation

  10. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  11. Finite Element Modeling of Avascular Tumor Growth Using a Stress-Driven Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranmanesh, Faezeh; Nazari, Mohammad Ali

    2017-08-01

    Tumor growth being a multistage process has been investigated from different aspects. In the present study, an attempt is made to represent a constitutive-structure-based model of avascular tumor growth in which the effects of tensile stresses caused by collagen fibers are considered. Collagen fibers as a source of anisotropy in the structure of tissue are taken into account using a continuous fiber distribution formulation. To this end, a finite element modeling is implemented in which a neo-Hookean hyperelastic material is assigned to the tumor and its surrounding host. The tumor is supplied with a growth term. The growth term includes the effect of parameters such as nutrient concentration on the tumor growth and the tumor's solid phase content in the formulation. Results of the study revealed that decrease of solid phase is indicative of decrease in growth rate and the final steady-state value of tumor's radius. Moreover, fiber distribution affects the final shape of the tumor, and it could be used to control the shape and geometry of the tumor in complex morphologies. Finally, the findings demonstrated that the exerted stresses on the tumor increase as time passes. Compression of tumor cells leads to the reduction of tumor growth rate until it gradually reaches an equilibrium radius. This finding is in accordance with experimental data. Hence, this formulation can be deployed to evaluate both the residual stresses induced by growth and the mechanical interactions with the host tissue.

  12. Building Context with Tumor Growth Modeling Projects in Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Julie C.; Gevertz, Jana L.; Howard, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling projects serves to integrate, reinforce, and extend student knowledge. Here we present two projects related to tumor growth appropriate for a first course in differential equations. They illustrate the use of problem-based learning to reinforce and extend course content via a writing or research experience. Here we discuss…

  13. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total

  14. Fluctuation of Parameters in Tumor Cell Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Guo-Tao; Liu, Liang-Gang

    2003-07-01

    We study the steady state properties of a logistic growth model in the presence of Gaussian white noise. Based on the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation the steady state solution of the probability distribution function and its extrema have been investigated. It is found that the fluctuation of the tumor birth rate reduces the population of the cells while the fluctuation of predation rate can prevent the population of tumor cells from going into extinction. Noise in the system can induce the phase transition. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 10275099 and Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province of China under Grant Nos. 021707 and 001182

  15. The analysis of interfacial waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galimov, Azat Yu.; Drew, Donald A.; Lahey, Richard T.; Moraga, Francisco J.

    2005-01-01

    We present analytical results for stable stratified wavy two-phase flow and functional forms for the various interfacial force densities in a two-fluid model. In particular, we have derived analytically the components of the non-drag interfacial force density [Drew, D.A., Passman, S.L., 1998. Theory of Multicomponent Fluids. Springer-Verlag, New York; Nigmatulin, T.R., Drew, D.A., Lahey, R.T., Jr., 2000. An analysis of wavy annular flow. In: International Conference on Multiphase Systems, ICMS'2000, Ufa, Russia, June 15-17], Reynolds stress tensor, and the term, (p-bar cl i -p-bar cl )-bar α cl , where p-bar cl i is interfacial average pressure, p-bar cl the average pressure, and α cl is the volume fraction of the continuous liquid phase. These functional forms should be useful for assessing two-fluid closure relations and Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) numerical models for stratified wavy flows. Moreover, it appears that this approach can be generalized to other flow regimes (e.g., annular flows)

  16. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  17. A study of the dispersed flow interfacial heat transfer model of RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreani, M. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Analytis, G.T.; Aksan, S.N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-09-01

    The model of interfacial heat transfer for the dispersed flow regime used in the RELAP5 computer codes is investigated in the present paper. Short-transient calculations of two low flooding rate tube reflooding experiments have been performed, where the hydraulic conditions and the heat input to the vapour in the post-dryout region were controlled for the predetermined position of the quench front. Both RELAP5/MOD2.5 and RELAP5/MOD3 substantially underpredicted the exit vapour temperature. The mass flow rate and quality, however, were correct and the heat input to the vapour was larger than the actual one. As the vapour superheat at the tube exit depends on the balance between the heat input from the wall and the heat exchange with the droplets, the discrepancy between the calculated and the measured exit vapour temperature suggested that the inability of both codes to predict the vapour superheat in the dispersed flow region is due to the overprediction of the interfacial heat transfer rate.

  18. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong John M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB permeability in brain tumors, but not in normal brain. Iberiotoxin, a KCa channel antagonist, significantly attenuated NS1619-induced BTB permeability increase. We found KCa channels and bradykinin type 2 receptors (B2R expressed in cultured human metastatic brain tumor cells (CRL-5904, non-small cell lung cancer, metastasized to brain, human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung cancer brain metastasis tissues. Potentiometric assays demonstrated the activity of KCa channels in metastatic brain tumor cells and HBMEC. Furthermore, we detected higher expression of KCa channels in the metastatic brain tumor tissue and tumor capillary endothelia as compared to normal brain tissue. Co-culture of metastatic brain tumor cells and brain microvessel endothelial cells showed an upregulation of KCa channels, which may contribute to the overexpression of KCa channels in tumor microvessels and selectivity of BTB opening. Conclusion These findings suggest that KCa channels in metastatic brain tumors may serve as an effective target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to metastatic brain tumors.

  19. Tumor hypoxia - A confounding or exploitable factor in interstitial brachytherapy? Effects of tissue trauma in an experimental rat tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, AP; van Geel, CAJF; van Hooije, CMC; van der Kleij, AJ; Visser, AG

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential effects of tumor hypoxia induced by afterloading catheter implantation on the effectiveness of brachytherapy in a rat tumor model. Methods and Materials: Afterloading catheters (4) Here implanted in subcutaneously growing R1M rhabdomyosarcoma in female Wag/Rij

  20. Emulsions for interfacial filtration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

  1. Evaluation of Tumor Angiogenesis with a Second-Generation US Contrast Medium in a Rat Breast Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Eun Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Nam Kug; Gong, Gyung Yub [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Tumor angiogenesis is an important factor for tumor growth, treatment response and prognosis. Noninvasive imaging methods for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis have been studied, but a method for the quantification of tumor angiogenesis has not been established. This study was designed to evaluate tumor angiogenesis in a rat breast tumor model by the use of a contrast enhanced ultrasound (US) examination with a second-generation US contrast agent. The alkylating agent 19N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of 30-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats. Three to four months later, breast tumors were detected along the mammary lines of the rats. A total of 17 breast tumors larger than 1 cm in nine rats were evaluated by gray-scale US, color Doppler US and contrast-enhanced US using SonoVue. The results were recorded as digital video images; time-intensity curves and hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. Pathological breast tumor specimens were obtained just after the US examinations. The tumor specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) and the expression of CD31, an endothelial cell marker, was determined by immunohistochemical staining. We also evaluated the pathological diagnosis of the tumors and the microvessel density (MVD). Spearman's correlation and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for the analysis. The pathological diagnoses were 11 invasive ductal carcinomas and six benign intraductal epithelial proliferations. The MVD did not correlate with the pathological diagnosis. However, blood volume (BV) showed a statistically significant correlation with MVD (Spearman's correlation, p < 0.05). Contrast-enhanced US using a second-generation US contrast material was useful for the evaluation of tumor angiogenesis of breast tumors in the rat.

  2. Stress, microstructure and evolution under ion irradiation in thin films grown by ion beam sputtering: modelling and application to interfacial effects in metallic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debelle, A.

    2006-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of the interfacial chemical mixing in Mo/Ni multilayers, and particularly the influence of ballistic effects during the growth. For this purpose, hetero-epitaxial b.c.c./f.c.c. Mo(110)/Ni(111) multilayers were grown by two deposition methods: thermal evaporation and direct ion beam sputtering. As a preliminary, an accurate description of the stress state in pure sputtered Mo thin films was required. Microstructural and stress state analyses were essentially carried out by X-ray diffraction, and ion irradiation was used as a powerful tool to control the stress level. We showed that thermal evaporated thin films exhibit a weak tensile growth stress (∼ 0.6 GPa) that can be accounted for by the grain boundary relaxation model, whereas sputtered thin films develop large compressive growth stress (- 2 to - 4 GPa). This latter results from the bombardment of the growing film by the energetic particles involved during the sputtering process (atomic peening phenomenon), which induces the formation of defects in the layers, generating volume distortions. We thus developed a stress model that includes a hydrostatic stress component to account for these volume strains. This model allowed us to determine the 'unstressed and free of defects lattice parameter' a 0 , solely linked to chemical effects. For epitaxial Mo layers, it was possible to separate coherency stress from growth stress due to their distinct kinetic evolution during ion irradiation. Therefore, the stress analysis enabled us to determine the a 0 values in Mo sub-layers of Mo/Ni superlattices. A tendency to the formation of an interfacial alloy is observed independently of the growth conditions, which suggests that thermodynamic forces favour the exchange mechanism. However, the extent of the intermixing effect is clearly enhanced by ballistic effects. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagane, Masaki, E-mail: nagane@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yasui, Hironobu, E-mail: yassan@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yamamori, Tohru, E-mail: yamamorit@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Zhao, Songji, E-mail: zsi@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji, E-mail: kuge@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Central Institute of Isotope Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara, E-mail: natamaki@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kameya, Hiromi, E-mail: kameya@affrc.go.jp [Food Safety Division, National Food Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Nakamura, Hideo, E-mail: naka@science-edu.org [Department of Chemistry, Hokkaido University of Education, Hakodate (Japan); Fujii, Hirotada, E-mail: hgfujii@sapmed.ac.jp [Center for Medical Education, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Inanami, Osamu, E-mail: inanami@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Department of Environmental Veterinary Sciences, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  4. Atomistic modeling of interfacial interaction between polyvinyl chloride and polypropylene with Boron-Nitride monolayer sheet: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed Mashhadzadeh, A.; Fereidoon, A.; Ghorbanzadeh Ahangari, M.

    2017-11-01

    In present work, we performed Density Functional Theory calculation (DFT) to prepare polypropylene (PP) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) nanocomposite. For mentioned purpose, we chose Boron-Nitride graphene (BN-graphene) sheet as nano reinforcement. Next, we calculated adsorbed energy between these two polymeric matrixes with BN-monolayer sheet. Our DFT results demonstrated that interaction energy between PP/BN-graphene and PVC/BN-graphene are equal, approximately, because in mentioned two nanocomposite systems, polymer matrix approached to nano reinforcement from hydrogen atom in optimized structure. Then, the adsorbed energy and equilibrium distance between mentioned polymeric matrixes and BN-graphene sheet in nanocomposite with increasing the number of polymer monomers onto surface of BN-graphene were calculated. Finally, we modeled van der Waals interfacial interaction between polymer matrixes and nano reinforcement with linear classical spring by using lennard-jones parameters.

  5. Measurement of local interfacial area concentration in boiling loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoung, Ho Kang; Byong, Jo Yun; Goon, Cherl Park

    1995-01-01

    An accurate prediction of two-phase flow is essential to many energy systems, including nuclear reactors. To model the two-phase flow, detailed information on the internal flow structure is required. The void fraction and interfacial area concentration are important fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. The interfacial area concentration is defined as the available interfacial area per unit volume of the two-phase mixture in calculations of the interfacial transport of mass, momentum, and energy. Although a number of studies have been made in this area, the interfacial area concentration in two-phase flow has not been sufficiently investigated either experimentally or analytically. Most existing models for interfacial area concentration are limited to area-averaged interfacial area concentration in a flow channel. And the studies on local interfacial area concentration are limited to the case of air-water two-phase flow. However, the internal flow structure of steam-water two-phase flow having various bubble sizes could be quite different from that of air-water two-phase flow, the reliability of which weak in practical applications. In this study, the local interfacial area concentration steam-water two-phase flow has been investigated experimentally in a circular boiling tube having a heating rod in the center, and for the low flow with liquid superficial velocity <1 m/s

  6. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  7. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, B; Pannetier, N; Coquery, N; Boisserand, Ligia S B; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N; Moseley, M; Zaharchuk, G; Barbier, E L; Christen, T

    2016-11-24

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases.

  8. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging. The mechan......Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging....... The mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...... of the Septin family protein Peanut. Cytokinesis failure due to downregulation of Peanut is required for tumorigenesis. This study provides evidence that the cellular mechanisms that drive cell competition during normal tissue growth can be co-opted to drive tumor formation and metastasis. Analogous mechanisms...

  9. Mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, James

    In this dissertation we develop mathematical models of tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy. Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the major causes of the failure of cancer treatment. Furthermore, recent experimental evidence suggests that drug resistance is a complex biological phenomena, with many influences that interact nonlinearly. Here we study the influence of such heterogeneity on treatment outcomes, both in general frameworks and under specific mechanisms. We begin by developing a mathematical framework for describing multi-drug resistance to cancer. Heterogeneity is reflected by a continuous parameter, which can either describe a single resistance mechanism (such as the expression of P-gp in the cellular membrane) or can account for the cumulative effect of several mechanisms and factors. The model is written as a system of integro-differential equations, structured by the continuous "trait," and includes density effects as well as mutations. We study the limiting behavior of the model, both analytically and numerically, and apply it to study treatment protocols. We next study a specific mechanism of tumor heterogeneity and its influence on cell growth: the cell-cycle. We derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations, when the number of cells is large. The model is closely tied to experimental data of cell growth, and includes a novel implementation of

  10. Cat Mammary Tumors: Genetic Models for the Human Counterpart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Adega

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The records are not clear, but Man has been sheltering the cat inside his home for over 12,000 years. The close proximity of this companion animal, however, goes beyond sharing the same roof; it extends to the great similarity found at the cellular and molecular levels. Researchers have found a striking resemblance between subtypes of feline mammary tumors and their human counterparts that goes from the genes to the pathways involved in cancer initiation and progression. Spontaneous cat mammary pre-invasive intraepithelial lesions (hyperplasias and neoplasias and malignant lesions seem to share a wide repertoire of molecular features with their human counterparts. In the present review, we tried to compile all the genetics aspects published (i.e., chromosomal alterations, critical cancer genes and their expression regarding cat mammary tumors, which support the cat as a valuable alternative in vitro cell and animal model (i.e., cat mammary cell lines and the spontaneous tumors, respectively, but also to present a critical point of view of some of the issues that really need to be investigated in future research.

  11. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the "five Rs" (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider "stem-like cancer cells" (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α∕β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are the ones appropriate for individualized

  12. Repopulation of interacting tumor cells during fractionated radiotherapy: Stochastic modeling of the tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakir, Hatim; Hlatky, Lynn; Li, Huamin; Sachs, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment planning for fractionated external beam radiation therapy requires inputs from radiobiology based on recent thinking about the “five Rs” (repopulation, radiosensitivity, reoxygenation, redistribution, and repair). The need is especially acute for the newer, often individualized, protocols made feasible by progress in image guided radiation therapy and dose conformity. Current stochastic tumor control probability (TCP) models incorporating tumor repopulation effects consider “stem-like cancer cells” (SLCC) to be independent, but the authors here propose that SLCC-SLCC interactions may be significant. The authors present a new stochastic TCP model for repopulating SLCC interacting within microenvironmental niches. Our approach is meant mainly for comparing similar protocols. It aims at practical generalizations of previous mathematical models. Methods: The authors consider protocols with complete sublethal damage repair between fractions. The authors use customized open-source software and recent mathematical approaches from stochastic process theory for calculating the time-dependent SLCC number and thereby estimating SLCC eradication probabilities. As specific numerical examples, the authors consider predicted TCP results for a 2 Gy per fraction, 60 Gy protocol compared to 64 Gy protocols involving early or late boosts in a limited volume to some fractions. Results: In sample calculations with linear quadratic parameters α = 0.3 per Gy, α/β = 10 Gy, boosting is predicted to raise TCP from a dismal 14.5% observed in some older protocols for advanced NSCLC to above 70%. This prediction is robust as regards: (a) the assumed values of parameters other than α and (b) the choice of models for intraniche SLCC-SLCC interactions. However, α = 0.03 per Gy leads to a prediction of almost no improvement when boosting. Conclusions: The predicted efficacy of moderate boosts depends sensitively on α. Presumably, the larger values of α are

  13. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  14. Tumor penetration with intact MAb and fragments demonstrated in vitro on tumor spheroids and in vivo in the nude mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Halpern, S.E.; Sutherland, R.M.; Schreyer, M.; Mach, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Tumor spheroids grown in culture represent a good in vitro model for the study of tumor penetration phenomena of potential radiotherapeutics. Using this system, it was found that Fab-fragments penetrate tumors more quickly and deeply than complete antibodies. These results were confirmed in tumor bearing nephrectomized nude mice

  15. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  16. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood accounting for approximately 8-10% of all pediatric malignancies and 15% of cancer deaths in...participants were able to present their results to date at the annual American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting in April, 2015.  How...individual tumors. Using IHC techniques we will measure tumor response spatial patterns ( bread loafing fixed tumor tissue). We will use IHC

  17. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    .3 and 0.4 deg. C higher during SNP infusion in the MFF and pentobarbital group, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed a small animal model in inbred rats feasible for exploring the influence of a stable blood pressure reduction induced by SNP, on the effect of HT given alone or in combination with other treatment modalities to a transplantable tumor. The greatly increased cytotoxic effect of local waterbath HT in the present tumor response experiments is probably a consequence of increased tumor temperature during SNP infusion

  18. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fecher

    Full Text Available Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future.

  19. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  20. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  1. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyerly H Kim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is an emerging non-invasive treatment modality for localized treatment of cancers. While current clinical strategies employ HIFU exclusively for thermal ablation of the target sites, biological responses associated with both thermal and mechanical damage from focused ultrasound have not been thoroughly investigated. In particular, endogenous danger signals from HIFU-damaged tumor cells may trigger the activation of dendritic cells. This response may play a critical role in a HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immune response which can be harnessed for more effective treatment. Methods Mice bearing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma tumors were treated with thermal and mechanical HIFU exposure settings in order to independently observe HIFU-induced effects on the host's immunological response. In vivo dendritic cell activity was assessed along with the host's response to challenge tumor growth. Results Thermal and mechanical HIFU were found to increase CD11c+ cells 3.1-fold and 4-fold, respectively, as compared to 1.5-fold observed for DC injection alone. In addition, thermal and mechanical HIFU increased CFSE+ DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes 5-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Moreover, focused ultrasound treatments not only caused a reduction in the growth of primary tumors, with tumor volume decreasing by 85% for thermal HIFU and 43% for mechanical HIFU, but they also provided protection against subcutaneous tumor re-challenge. Further immunological assays confirmed an enhanced CTL activity and increased tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in the mice treated by focused ultrasound, with cytotoxicity induced by mechanical HIFU reaching as high as 27% at a 10:1 effector:target ratio. Conclusion These studies present initial encouraging results confirming that focused ultrasound treatment can elicit a systemic anti-tumor immune response, and they suggest that this immunity is closely related to

  2. Block of purinergic P2X7R inhibits tumor growth in a C6 glioma brain tumor animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae K; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Serrano-Perez, Maria C; McGeer, Patrick L; McLarnon, James G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the expression and pharmacological modulation of the purinergic receptor P2X7R in a C6 glioma model. Intrastriatal injection of C6 cells induced a time-dependent growth of tumor; at 2 weeks postinjection immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher levels of P2X7R in glioma-injected versus control vehicle-injected brains. P2X7R immunoreactivity colocalized with tumor cells and microglia, but not endogenous astrocytes. Intravenous administration of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) inhibited tumor growth in a spatially dependent manner from the C6 injection site. Treatment with BBG reduced tumor volume by 52% versus that in controls. Double immunostaining indicated that BBG treatment did not alter microgliosis, astrogliosis, or vasculature vessels in C6-injected animals. In vitro, BBG reduced the expression of P2X7R and glioma chemotaxis induced by the P2X7R ligand, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (BzATP). Immunohistochemical staining of human glioblastoma tissue samples demonstrated greater expression of P2X7R compared to control nontumor samples. These results suggest that the efficacy of BBG in inhibiting tumor growth is primarily mediated by direct actions of the compound on P2X7R in glioma cells and that pharmacological inhibition of this purinergic receptor might serve as a strategy to slow the progression of brain tumors.

  3. Modeling tissue contamination to improve molecular identification of the primary tumor site of metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Perell, Katharina; Nielsen, Finn Cilius

    2014-01-01

    with any predictor model. The usability of the model is illustrated on primary tumor site identification of liver biopsies, specifically, on a human dataset consisting of microRNA expression measurements of primary tumor samples, benign liver samples and liver metastases. For a predictor trained on primary...... tumor and benign liver samples, the contamination model decreased the test error on biopsies from liver metastases from 77 to 45%. A further reduction to 34% was obtained by including biopsies in the training data....

  4. Coupled Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Model of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lyu

    Full Text Available The processes governing tumor growth and angiogenesis are codependent. To study the relationship between them, we proposed a coupled hybrid continuum-discrete model. In this model, tumor cells, their microenvironment (extracellular matrixes, matrix-degrading enzymes, and tumor angiogenic factors, and their network of blood vessels, described by a series of discrete points, were considered. The results of numerical simulation reveal the process of tumor growth and the change in microenvironment from avascular to vascular stage, indicating that the network of blood vessels develops gradually as the tumor grows. Our findings also reveal that a tumor is divided into three regions: necrotic, semi-necrotic, and well-vascularized. The results agree well with the previous relevant studies and physiological facts, and this model represents a platform for further investigations of tumor therapy.

  5. Tumor microenvironmental changes induced by the sulfamate carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitor S4 in a laryngeal tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tineke W H Meijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX plays a pivotal role in pH homeostasis, which is essential for tumor cell survival. We examined the effect of the CAIX inhibitor 4-(3'(3",5"-dimethylphenyl-ureidophenyl sulfamate (S4 on the tumor microenvironment in a laryngeal tumor model by analyzing proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia, metabolism and CAIX ectodomain shedding. METHODS: SCCNij202 tumor bearing-mice were treated with S4 for 1, 3 or 5 days. CAIX ectodomain shedding was measured in the serum after therapy. Effects on tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX were investigated with quantitative immunohistochemistry. Metabolic transporters and enzymes were quantified with qPCR. RESULTS: CAIX ectodomain shedding decreased after treatment with S4 (p<0.01. S4 therapy did neither influence tumor cell proliferation nor the amount of apoptosis and necrosis. Hypoxia (pimonidazole and CAIX expression were also not affected by S4. CHOP and MMP9 mRNA as a reference of intracellular pH did not change upon treatment with S4. Compensatory mechanisms of pH homeostasis at the mRNA level were not observed. CONCLUSION: As the clinical and biological meaning of the decrease in CAIX ectodomain shedding after S4 therapy is not clear, studies are required to elucidate whether the CAIX ectodomain has a paracrine or autocrine signaling function in cancer biology. S4 did not influence the amount of proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis and hypoxia. Therefore, it is unlikely that S4 can be used as single agent to influence tumor cell kill and proliferation, and to target primary tumor growth.

  6. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a substrate for culture of PC12 cells: an interfacial model for functional studies in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Jaime Medina Benavente

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions.

  7. Evaluation of Silicon Nitride as a Substrate for Culture of PC12 Cells: An Interfacial Model for Functional Studies in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina Benavente, Johan Jaime; Mogami, Hideo; Sakurai, Takashi; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nitride is a biocompatible material that is currently used as an interfacial surface between cells and large-scale integration devices incorporating ion-sensitive field-effect transistor technology. Here, we investigated whether a poly-L-lysine coated silicon nitride surface is suitable for the culture of PC12 cells, which are widely used as a model for neural differentiation, and we characterized their interaction based on cell behavior when seeded on the tested material. The coated surface was first examined in terms of wettability and topography using contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy and then, conditioned silicon nitride surface was used as the substrate for the study of PC12 cell culture properties. We found that coating silicon nitride with poly-L-lysine increased surface hydrophilicity and that exposing this coated surface to an extracellular aqueous environment gradually decreased its roughness. When PC12 cells were cultured on a coated silicon nitride surface, adhesion and spreading were facilitated, and the cells showed enhanced morphological differentiation compared to those cultured on a plastic culture dish. A bromodeoxyuridine assay demonstrated that, on the coated silicon nitride surface, higher proportions of cells left the cell cycle, remained in a quiescent state and had longer survival times. Therefore, our study of the interaction of the silicon nitride surface with PC12 cells provides important information for the production of devices that need to have optimal cell culture-supporting properties in order to be used in the study of neuronal functions. PMID:24587271

  8. Use of self assembled monolayers at variable coverage to control interface bonding in a model study of interfacial fracture: Pure shear loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KENT,MICHAEL S.; YIM,HYUN; MATHESON,AARON J.; COGDILL,C.; NELSON,GERALD C.; REEDY JR.,EARL DAVID

    2000-05-16

    The relationships between fundamental interfacial interactions, energy dissipation mechanisms, and fracture stress or fracture toughness in a glassy thermoset/inorganic solid joint are not well understood. This subject is addressed with a model system involving an epoxy adhesive on a polished silicon wafer containing its native oxide. The proportions of physical and chemical interactions at the interface, and the in-plane distribution, are varied using self-assembling monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS). The epoxy interacts strongly with the bare silicon oxide surface, but forms only a very weak interface with the methylated tails of the ODTS monolayer. The fracture stress is examined as a function of ODTS coverage in the napkin-ring (pure shear) loading geometry. The relationship between fracture stress and ODTS coverage is catastrophic, with a large change in fracture stress occurring over a narrow range of ODTS coverage. This transition in fracture stress does not correspond to a wetting transition of the epoxy. Rather, the transition in fracture stress corresponds to the onset of deformation in the epoxy, or the transition from brittle to ductile fracture. The authors postulate that the transition in fracture stress occurs when the local stress that the interface can support becomes comparable to the yield stress of the epoxy. The fracture results are independent of whether the ODTS deposition occurs by island growth (T{sub dep} = 10 C) or by homogeneous growth (T{sub dep} = 24 C).

  9. Scaling of interfacial jump conditions; Escalamiento de condiciones de salto interfacial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quezada G, S.; Vazquez R, A.; Espinosa P, G., E-mail: sequga@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Apdo. Postal 55-535, 09340 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    To model the behavior of a nuclear reactor accurately is needed to have balance models that take into account the different phenomena occurring in the reactor. These balances have to be coupled together through boundary conditions. The boundary conditions have been studied and different treatments have been given to the interface. In this paper is a brief description of some of the interfacial jump conditions that have been proposed in recent years. Also, the scaling of an interfacial jump condition is proposed, for coupling the different materials that are in contact within a nuclear reactor. (Author)

  10. In vitro tumor models: advantages, disadvantages, variables, and selecting the right platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moriah eKatt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro tumor models have provided important tools for cancer research and serve as low-cost screening platforms for drug therapies; however, cancer recurrence remains largely unchecked due to metastasis, which is the cause of the majority of cancer related deaths. The need for an improved understanding of the progression and treatment of cancer has pushed for increased accuracy and physiological relevance of in vitro tumor models. As a result, in vitro tumor models have concurrently increased in complexity and their output parameters further diversified, since these models have progressed beyond simple proliferation, invasion, and cytotoxicity screens and have begun recapitulating critical steps in the metastatic cascade, such as intravasation, extravasation, angiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and tumor cell dormancy. Advances in tumor cell biology, 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, biomaterials, microfabrication, and microfluidics have enabled rapid development of new in vitro tumor models that often incorporate multiple cell types, extracellular matrix materials, and spatial and temporal introduction of soluble factors. Other innovations include the incorporation of perfusable microvessels to simulate the tumor vasculature and model intravasation and extravasation. The drive towards precision medicine has increased interest in adapting in vitro tumor models for patient-specific therapies, clinical management, and assessment of metastatic potential. Here, we review the wide range of current in vitro tumor models and summarize their advantages, disadvantages, and suitability in modeling specific aspects of the metastatic cascade and drug treatment.

  11. The Use of Porous Scaffold as a Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human cancer is a three-dimensional (3D structure consisting of neighboring cells, extracellular matrix, and blood vessels. It is therefore critical to mimic the cancer cells and their surrounding environment during in vitro study. Our aim was to establish a 3D cancer model using a synthetic composite scaffold. Methods. High-density low-volume seeding was used to promote attachment of a non-small-cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460 to scaffolds. Growth patterns in 3D culture were compared with those of monolayers. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to compare the expression of Ki67, CD44, and carbonic anhydrase IX. Results. NCI-H460 readily attached to the scaffold without surface pretreatment at a rate of 35% from a load of 1.5 × 106 cells. Most cells grew vertically to form clumps along the surface of the scaffold, and cell morphology resembled tissue origin; 2D cultures exhibited characteristics of adherent epithelial cancer cell lines. Expression patterns of Ki67, CD44, and CA IX varied markedly between 3D and monolayer cultures. Conclusions. The behavior of cancer cells in our 3D model is similar to tumor growth in vivo. This model will provide the basis for future study using 3D cancer culture.

  12. First-principles prediction of liquid/liquid interfacial tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Bennetzen, M.V.; Klamt, A.

    2014-01-01

    of groundwater aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents to drug delivery and a host of industrial processes. Here, we present a model for predicting interfacial tension from first principles using density functional theory calculations. Our model requires no experimental input and is applicable to liquid/liquid......The interfacial tension between two liquids is the free energy per unit surface area required to create that interface. Interfacial tension is a determining factor for two-phase liquid behavior in a wide variety of systems ranging from water flooding in oil recovery processes and remediation...

  13. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules.......This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...

  14. Combination of PDT and a DNA demethylating agent produces anti-tumor immune response in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which involve DNA methylation and histone modifications, result in the heritable silencing of genes without a change in their coding sequence. However, these changes must be actively maintained after each cell division rendering them a promising target for pharmacologic inhibition. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors like 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) induce and/or up-regulate the expression of MAGE-type antigens in human and mice cancer cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of stimulating tumor-directed immune response. We studied the effects of a new therapy that combined the demethylating agent 5-aza-dC with PDT in the breast cancer model 4T1 syngenic to immunocompetent BALB/c mice. PDT was used as a locally ablating tumor treatment that is capable of eliciting strong and tumor directed immune response while 5-aza-dC pretreatment was used promote de novo induction of the expression of P1A.protein. This is the mouse homolog of human MAGE family antigens and is reported to function as a tumor rejection antigen in certain mouse tumors. This strategy led to an increase in PDT-mediated immune response and better treatment outcome. These results strongly suggest that the MAGE family antigens are important target for PDT mediated immune response but that their expression can be silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. Therefore the possibility that PDT can be combined with epigenetic strategies to elicit anti-tumor immunity in MAGE-positive tumor models is highly clinically significant and should be studied in detail.

  15. Drug delivery to solid tumors: the predictive value of the multicellular tumor spheroid model for nanomedicine screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marie Millard,1,2 Ilya Yakavets,1–3 Vladimir Zorin,3,4 Aigul Kulmukhamedova,1,2,5 Sophie Marchal,1,2 Lina Bezdetnaya1,2 1Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 7039, Université de Lorraine, 2Research Department, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France; 3Laboratory of Biophysics and Biotechnology, 4International Sakharov Environmental Institute, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus; 5Department of Radiology, Medical Company Sunkar, Almaty, Kazakhstan Abstract: The increasing number of publications on the subject shows that nanomedicine is an attractive field for investigations aiming to considerably improve anticancer chemotherapy. Based on selective tumor targeting while sparing healthy tissue, carrier-mediated drug delivery has been expected to provide significant benefits to patients. However, despite reduced systemic toxicity, most nanodrugs approved for clinical use have been less effective than previously anticipated. The gap between experimental results and clinical outcomes demonstrates the necessity to perform comprehensive drug screening by using powerful preclinical models. In this context, in vitro three-dimensional models can provide key information on drug behavior inside the tumor tissue. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS model closely mimics a small avascular tumor with the presence of proliferative cells surrounding quiescent cells and a necrotic core. Oxygen, pH and nutrient gradients are similar to those of solid tumor. Furthermore, extracellular matrix (ECM components and stromal cells can be embedded in the most sophisticated spheroid design. All these elements together with the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs play a key role in drug transport, and therefore, the MCTS model is appropriate to assess the ability of NP to penetrate the tumor tissue. This review presents recent developments in MCTS models for a

  16. Two Dimensional Mathematical Model of Tumor Angiogenesis: Coupling of Avascular Growth and Vascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As a tumor grows, the demand for oxygen and nutrients increases and it grows further if acquires the ability to induce angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed to present a two-dimensional continuous mathematical model for avascular tumor growth, coupled with a discrete model of angiogenesis. Materials and Methods In the avascular growth model, tumor is considered as a single mass, which uptakes oxygen through diffusion and invades the extracellular matrix (ECM. After the tumor reaches its maximum size in the avascular growth phase, tumor cells may be in three different states (proliferative, quiescent and apoptotic, depending on oxygen availability. Quiescent cells are assumed to secrete tumor angiogenic factors, which diffuse into the surrounding tissue until reaching endothelial cells. The mathematical model for tumor angiogenesis is consisted of a five-point finite difference scheme to simulate the progression of endothelial cells in ECM and their penetration into the tumor. Results The morphology of produced networks was investigated, based on various ECM degradation patterns. The generated capillary networks involved the rules of microvascular branching and anastomosis. Model predictions were in qualitative agreement with experimental observations and might have implications as a supplementary model to facilitate mathematical analyses for anti-cancer therapies. Conclusion Our numerical simulations could facilitate the qualitative comparison between three layers of tumor cells, their TAF-producing abilities and subsequent penetration of micro-vessels in order to determine the dynamics of microvascular branching and anastomosis in ECM and three different parts of the tumor.

  17. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was

  18. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  19. Effect of Irradiation on Tumor Microenvironment and Bone Marrow Cell Migration in a Preclinical Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Jonathan L. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krueger, Sarah A.; Hanna, Alaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Raffel, Thomas R. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Madlambayan, Gerard J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: Brian.Marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the tumor microenvironment after standard radiation therapy (SRT) and pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) allografts. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous LLC tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice. Standard RT or PRT was given at 2 Gy/d for a total dose of 20 Gy using a 5 days on, 2 days off schedule to mimic clinical delivery. Radiation-induced tumor microenvironment changes were examined after treatment using flow cytometry and antibody-specific histopathology. Normal tissue effects were measured using noninvasive {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after naïve animals were given whole-lung irradiation to 40 Gy in 4 weeks using the same 2-Gy/d regimens. Results: Over the 2 weeks of therapy, PRT was more effective than SRT at reducing tumor growth rate (0.31 ± 0.02 mm{sup 3}/d and 0.55 ± 0.04 mm{sup 3}/d, respectively; P<.007). Histopathology showed a significant comparative reduction in the levels of Ki-67 (14.5% ± 3%), hypoxia (10% ± 3.5%), vascular endothelial growth factor (2.3% ± 1%), and stromal-derived factor-1α (2.5% ± 1.4%), as well as a concomitant decrease in CD45{sup +} bone marrow–derived cell (BMDC) migration (7.8% ± 2.2%) after PRT. The addition of AMD3100 also decreased CD45{sup +} BMDC migration in treated tumors (0.6% ± 0.1%). Higher vessel density was observed in treated tumors. No differences were observed in normal lung tissue after PRT or SRT. Conclusions: Pulsed RT–treated tumors exhibited slower growth and reduced hypoxia. Pulsed RT eliminated initiation of supportive mechanisms utilized by tumors in low oxygen microenvironments, including angiogenesis and recruitment of BMDCs.

  20. Interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device – Numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A novel crack arresting device is implemented in foam-cored composite sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test (STT) configuration. A finite element model of the setup is developed, and the predictions are correlated with observations and results from a recently conducted experimental...... fatigue test study. Based on a linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, the developed FE model is utilised to simulate crack propagation and arrest in foam-cored sandwich beam specimens subjected to fatigue loading conditions. The effect of the crack arresters on the fatigue life is analysed......, and the predictive results are subsequently compared with the observations from the previously conducted fatigue tests. The FE model predicts the energy release rate and the mode mixity based on the derived crack surface displacements, utilising algorithms for the prediction of accelerated fatigue crack growth...

  1. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; McAvoy, Thomas J.; George, Rohini; Dieterich, Sonja; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor–surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor–surrogate correlation and the precision in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor–surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3–3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.

  2. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felfer, Peter; Scherrer, Barbara; Demeulemeester, Jelle; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Cairney, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm 2 of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal–ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET. - Highlights: • Using computational geometry, interfacial excess can be mapped for various features in APT. • Suitable analysis models can be created by combining manual modelling and mesh generation algorithms. • Thin film thickness can be mapped with high accuracy using this technique.

  3. Microencapsulated tumor assay: Evaluation of the nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Dong-Feng; Ye, Jin-Hua; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Shi, Min-Min; Han, Bao-San; Peng, Cheng-Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish a more stable and accurate nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer using cancer cell microencapsulation. METHODS: The assay is based on microencapsulation technology, wherein human tumor cells are encapsulated in small microcapsules (approximately 420 μm in diameter) constructed of semipermeable membranes. We implemented two kinds of subcutaneous implantation models in nude mice using the injection of single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells. The size of subcutaneously implanted tumors was observed on a weekly basis using two methods, and growth curves were generated from these data. The growth and metastasis of orthotopically injected single tumor cells and encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells were evaluated at four and eight weeks postimplantation by positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan and necropsy. The pancreatic tumor samples obtained from each method were then sent for pathological examination. We evaluated differences in the rates of tumor incidence and the presence of metastasis and variations in tumor volume and tumor weight in the cancer microcapsules vs single-cell suspensions. RESULTS: Sequential in vitro observations of the microcapsules showed that the cancer cells in microcapsules proliferated well and formed spheroids at days 4 to 6. Further in vitro culture resulted in bursting of the membrane of the microcapsules and cells deviated outward and continued to grow in flasks. The optimum injection time was found to be 5 d after tumor encapsulation. In the subcutaneous implantation model, there were no significant differences in terms of tumor volume between the encapsulated pancreatic tumor cells and cells alone and rate of tumor incidence. There was a significant difference in the rate of successful implantation between the cancer cell microencapsulation group and the single tumor-cell suspension group (100% vs 71.43%, respectively, P = 0.0489) in the orthotropic implantation model. The former method

  4. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Caceres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106 IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors.

  5. An artificial blood vessel implanted three-dimensional microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ying; Pei, Ying; Xie, Min; Jin, Zi-He; Xiao, Ya-Shi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Li-Na; Li, Yan; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2015-02-21

    Reproducing a tumor microenvironment consisting of blood vessels and tumor cells for modeling tumor invasion in vitro is particularly challenging. Here, we report an artificial blood vessel implanted 3D microfluidic system for reproducing transvascular migration of tumor cells. The transparent, porous and elastic artificial blood vessels are obtained by constructing polysaccharide cellulose-based microtubes using a chitosan sacrificial template, and possess excellent cytocompatibility, permeability, and mechanical characteristics. The artificial blood vessels are then fully implanted into the collagen matrix to reconstruct the 3D microsystem for modeling transvascular migration of tumor cells. Well-defined simulated vascular lumens were obtained by proliferation of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) lining the artificial blood vessels, which enables us to reproduce structures and functions of blood vessels and replicate various hemodynamic parameters. Based on this model, the adhesion and transvascular migration of tumor cells across the artificial blood vessel have been well reproduced.

  6. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value <5%, p < 0.01), especially in case of tumor late responses, which can hardly be handled by models entailing a constant radiosensitivity, failing to model changes from initial severe hypoxia to aerobic conditions during the treatment course. The model predictive capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level).

  7. Differentiating between borderline and invasive malignancies in ovarian tumors using a multivariate logistic regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabin Chen

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Differentiation between borderline and invasive ovarian tumors can be achieved using a model based on the following criteria: menopausal status; cancer antigen 125 level; and ultrasound parameters. The model is helpful to oncologists and patients in the initial evaluation phase of ovarian tumors.

  8. Effect of transarterial pulsed perfusion with heated saline on tumor vascular permeability in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Li Jinghua; Feng Dayun; Wan Yi; Liu Yufeng; Yang Qingfeng; Cheng Jianwei; Zhao Siyuan; Zhang Hongxin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline on vascular permeability of tumor tissue, as well as its hepatic and renal toxicity, in a rabbit VX2 liver model. Materials and methods: VX2 carcinomas were grown in rabbit livers, forty male New Zealand white tumor-bearing rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, followed by transarterial perfusion with 37 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (control 1 group), transarterial pulsed perfusion with 37 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (control 2 group), transarterial continuous perfusion with 60 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (TCP group), transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline 60 ml (n = 10) (TPP group), the duration of time for tumor tissues in the range 43–45 °C of the treated groups was measured with needle thermometer during perfusion. Vascular permeability was assessed using the extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye in the tumor or normal liver tissues of the four groups separately, the tumor or normal liver tissues of the four groups were estimated by histopathologic examination, and hepatic and renal toxicity was evaluated by means of blood biochemical analysis. The vascular endothelial cells in the tumor were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: The duration of time for tumor tissues in the range 43–45 °C of TPP group showed significantly longer than that of TCP group (12.3 ± 3.3 min vs. 5.7 ± 2.5 min) (P 0.05), and there was no significant difference in the serum BUN, Cr levels among the four groups at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 h after perfusion. Observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in liver tissue and tumor tissue. TEM indicating the endothelial cell gap was broadened and the endothelial cells’ microvillus was decreased after heated perfusion. Conclusions: The vascular permeability of the rabbit VX2 tumor was significantly increased after transarterial pulsed perfusion with 60 °C saline without

  9. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  10. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Raabe, D. [Max Planck Inst. fur Eisenforshung. Dusseldorf (Germany); Roters, F. [Max Planck Inst. fur Eisenforshung. Dusseldorf (Germany); Arsenlis, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  11. Optimal definition of biological tumor volume using positron emission tomography in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ingrid; Wang, Hao; Huso, David; Wahl, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the study is to investigate (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET)'s ability to delineate the viable portion of a tumor in an animal model using cross-sectional histology as the validation standard. Syngeneic mammary tumors were grown in female Lewis rats. Macroscopic histological images of the transverse tumor sections were paired with their corresponding FDG micro-PET slices of the same cranial-caudal location to form 51 pairs of co-registered images. A binary classification system based on four FDG-PET tumor contouring methods was applied to each pair of images: threshold based on (1) percentage of maximum tumor voxel counts (Cmax), (2) percentage of tumor peak voxel counts (Cpeak), (3) multiples of liver mean voxel counts (Cliver) derived from PERCIST, and (4) an edge-detection-based automated contouring system. The sensitivity, which represented the percentage of viable tumor areas correctly delineated by the gross tumor area (GTA) generated from a particular tumor contouring method, and the ratio (expressed in percentage) of the overestimated areas of a gross tumor area (GTAOE)/whole tumor areas on the macroscopic histology (WTAH), which represented how much a particular GTA extended into the normal structures surrounding the primary tumor target, were calculated. The receiver operating characteristic curves of all pairs of FDG-PET images have a mean area under the curve value of 0.934 (CI of 0.911-0.954), for representing how well each contouring method accurately delineated the viable tumor area. FDG-PET single value threshold tumor contouring based on 30 and 35 % of tumor Cmax or Cpeak and 6 × Cliver + 2 × SD achieved a sensitivity greater than 90 % with a GTAOE/WTAH ratio less than 10 %. Contouring based on 50 % of Cmax or Cpeak had a much lower sensitivity of 67.2-75.6 % with a GTAOE/WTAH ratio of 1.1-1.7 %. Automated edge detection was not reliable in this system. Single

  12. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J. M.; Custidiano, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  13. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J M; Custidiano, E R

    2011-01-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  14. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDiarmid, Jennifer A; Langova, Veronika; Bailey, Dale; Pattison, Scott T; Pattison, Stacey L; Christensen, Neil; Armstrong, Luke R; Brahmbhatt, Vatsala N; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Harrison, Matthew T; Costa, Marylia; Mugridge, Nancy B; Sedliarou, Ilya; Grimes, Nicholas A; Kiss, Debra L; Stillman, Bruce; Hann, Christine L; Gallia, Gary L; Graham, Robert M; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox) to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers. EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry) and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume) were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973). No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs). Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of EGFR

  15. Targeted Doxorubicin Delivery to Brain Tumors via Minicells: Proof of Principle Using Dogs with Spontaneously Occurring Tumors as a Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A MacDiarmid

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy can be very effective for the treatment of cancer but toxicity on normal tissues often limits patient tolerance and often causes long-term adverse effects. The objective of this study was to assist in the preclinical development of using modified, non-living bacterially-derived minicells to deliver the potent chemotherapeutic doxorubicin via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeting. Specifically, this study sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of EGFR targeted, doxorubicin loaded minicells (designated EGFRminicellsDox to deliver doxorubicin to spontaneous brain tumors in 17 companion dogs; a comparative oncology model of human brain cancers.EGFRminicellsDox were administered weekly via intravenous injection to 17 dogs with late-stage brain cancers. Biodistribution was assessed using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Anti-tumor response was determined using MRI, and blood samples were subject to toxicology (hematology, biochemistry and inflammatory marker analysis. Targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells rapidly localized to the core of brain tumors. Complete resolution or marked tumor regression (>90% reduction in tumor volume were observed in 23.53% of the cohort, with lasting anti-tumor responses characterized by remission in three dogs for more than two years. The median overall survival was 264 days (range 49 to 973. No adverse clinical, hematological or biochemical effects were observed with repeated administration of EGFRminicellsDox (30 to 98 doses administered in 10 of the 17 dogs.Targeted minicells loaded with doxorubicin were safely administered to dogs with late stage brain cancer and clinical activity was observed. These findings demonstrate the strong potential for clinical applications of targeted, doxorubicin-loaded minicells for the effective treatment of patients with brain cancer. On this basis, we have designed a Phase 1 clinical study of

  16. Multiresolution texture models for brain tumor segmentation in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Ahmed, Shaheen; Hossen, Jakir

    2011-01-01

    In this study we discuss different types of texture features such as Fractal Dimension (FD) and Multifractional Brownian Motion (mBm) for estimating random structures and varying appearance of brain tissues and tumors in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We use different selection techniques including KullBack - Leibler Divergence (KLD) for ranking different texture and intensity features. We then exploit graph cut, self organizing maps (SOM) and expectation maximization (EM) techniques to fuse selected features for brain tumors segmentation in multimodality T1, T2, and FLAIR MRI. We use different similarity metrics to evaluate quality and robustness of these selected features for tumor segmentation in MRI for real pediatric patients. We also demonstrate a non-patient-specific automated tumor prediction scheme by using improved AdaBoost classification based on these image features.

  17. Predictive models for lymph node metastases in patients with testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yun; Hedgire, Sandeep; Prapruttam, Duangkamon; Harisinghani, Mukesh

    2015-10-01

    To develop predictive models for lymph node (LN) metastasis in testicular germ cell tumors. 291 patients with testicular germ cell tumors were included, which were divided into seminomatous and nonseminomatous groups. For screening the risk factors for LN metastasis, the tumor-related characteristics (including histopathological information and tumor markers) alpha fetoprotein and the lymph node-related features on CT were compared between metastatic cases and nonmetastatic cases. Two logistic regression models were built for each histological group, one depending on all tumor- and lymph node-related risk factors (Model 1) and another only on tumor-related factors (Model 2). Receivers operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the predictive abilities of these models. 117 positive nodes/regions were identified in 68 patients, including 51 metastases and 17 occult metastases. Based on the selected independent risk factors, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of Models 1 and 2 in seminomatous and nonseminomatous groups were (95.5%, 95.3%, 95.3%, 77.8%, and 99.2%), (63.6%, 83.6%, 80.7%, 40.0%, and 93.0%), (93.5%, 94.7%, 94.3%, 89.6%, and 96.8%), and (89.1%, 44.2%, 58.9%, 43.6%, and 89.4%), respectively. Two predictive models for each seminomatous and nonseminomatous testicular tumor were established based on lymph node- and tumor-related risk factors. In patients with tumor and lymph node-related risk factors, regular CT surveillance is likely sufficient for predicting LN status, while in the patients without any tumor and lymph node-related risk factors a long interval-time CT follow-up should be considered. Additionally, right side tumors tend to involve contralateral LNs compared to left side ones. Positive inguinal LNs more frequently occur in patients with a history of groin surgery.

  18. Interfacial Instabilities in Evaporating Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Ross; Sefiane, Khellil; Matar, Omar

    2007-11-01

    We study the effect of substrate thermal properties on the evaporation of sessile drops of various liquids. An infra-red imaging technique was used to record the interfacial temperature. This technique illustrates the non-uniformity in interfacial temperature distribution that characterises the evaporation process. Our results also demonstrate that the evaporation of methanol droplets is accompanied by the formation of wave-trains in the interfacial temperature field; similar patterns, however, were not observed in the case of water droplets. More complex patterns are observed for FC-72 refrigerant drops. The effect of substrate thermal conductivity on the structure of the complex pattern formation is also elucidated.

  19. Interfacial forces in aqueous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Oss, Carel J

    2006-01-01

    Thoroughly revised and reorganized, the second edition of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Media examines the role of polar interfacial and noncovalent interactions among biological and nonbiological macromolecules as well as biopolymers, particles, surfaces, cells, and both polar and apolar polymers. The book encompasses Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrical double layer interactions, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions between colloidal entities in polar liquids such as water. New in this Edition: Four previously unpublished chapters comprising a new section on interfacial propertie

  20. Referent 3D tumor model at cellular level in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaic, R.; Ilic, R.D.; Petrovic, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim Conventional internal dosimetry has a lot of limitations because of tumor dose nonuniformity. The best approach for absorbed dose at cellular level for different tumors in radionuclide therapy calculation is Monte Carlo method. The purpose of this study is to introduce referent tumor 3D model at cellular level for Monte Carlo simulation study in radionuclide therapy. Material and Methods The moment when tumor is detectable and when same therapy can start is time period in which referent 3D tumor model at cellular level was defined. In accordance with tumor growth rate at that moment he was a sphere with same radius (10 000 μm). In that tumor there are cells or cluster of cells, which are randomly distributed spheres. Distribution of cells/cluster of cells can be calculated from histology data but it was assumed that this distribution is normal with the same mean value and standard deviation (100±50 mm). Second parameter, which was selected to define referent tumor, is volume density of cells (30%). In this referent tumor there are no necroses. Stroma is defined as space between spheres with same concentration of materials as in spheres. Results: Referent tumor defined on this way have about 2,2 10 5 cells or cluster of cells random distributed. Using this referent 3D tumor model and for same concentration of radionuclides (1:100) and energy of beta emitters (1000 keV) which are homogeneously distributed in labeled cells absorbed dose for all cells was calculated. Simulations are done using FOTELP Monte Carlo code, which is modified for this purposes. Results of absorbed dose in cells are given in numerical values (1D distribution) and as the images (2D or 3D distributions). Conclusion Geometrical module for Monte Carlo simulation study can be standardized by introducing referent 3D tumor model at cellular level. This referent 3D tumor model gives most realistic presentation of different tumors at the moment of their detectability. Referent 3D tumor model at

  1. Increased Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure Facilitates the Uptake of Therapeutic Macromolecules in a Xenograft Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hofmann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP is a characteristic of most solid tumors. Clinically, TIFP may hamper the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumor tissue reducing their therapeutic efficacy. In this study, a means of modulating TIFP to increase the flux of macromolecules into tumor tissue is presented, which is based on the rationale that elevated plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP pulls water from tumor interstitium lowering the TIFP. Concentrated human serum albumin: (20% HSA, used as an agent to enhance COP, reduced the TIFP time-dependently from 8 to 2 mm Hg in human tumor xenograft models bearing A431 epidermoid vulva carcinomas. To evaluate whether this reduction facilitates the uptake of macromolecules, the intratumoral distribution of fluorescently conjugated dextrans (2.5 mg/ml and cetuximab (2.0 mg/ml was probed using novel time domain nearinfrared fluorescence imaging. This method permitted discrimination and semiquantification of tumor-accumulated conjugate from background and unspecific probe fluorescence. The coadministration of 20% HSA together with either dextrans or cetuximab was found to lower the TIFP significantly and increase the concentration of the substances within the tumor tissue in comparison to control tumors. Furthermore, combined administration of 20%HSA plus cetuximab reduced the tumor growth significantly in comparison to standard cetuximab treatment. These data demonstrate that increased COP lowers the TIFP within hours and increases the uptake of therapeutic macromolecules into the tumor interstitium leading to reduced tumor growth. This model represents a novel approach to facilitate the delivery of therapeutics into tumor tissue, particularly monoclonal antibodies.

  2. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juliachs, Mercè; Viñals, Francesc; Vidal, August; Muro, Xavier Garcia del; Piulats, Josep M; Condom, Enric; Casanovas, Oriol; Graupera, Mariona; Germà, Jose R; Villanueva, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies

  3. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 μCi of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor

  4. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashank, Priya [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  5. Multiple-Tumor Analysis with MS_Combo Model (Use with BMDS Wizard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercises and procedures on setting up and using the MS_Combo Wizard. The MS_Combo model provides BMD and BMDL estimates for the risk of getting one or more tumors for any combination of tumors observed in a single bioassay.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Prostate Tumor Growth Under Hormone Therapy with Mutation Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2010-04-01

    This paper extends Jackson’s model describing the growth of a prostate tumor with hormone therapy to a new one with hypothetical mutation inhibitors. The new model not only considers the mutation by which androgen-dependent (AD) tumor cells mutate into androgen-independent (AI) ones but also introduces inhibition which is assumed to change the mutation rate. The tumor consists of two types of cells (AD and AI) whose proliferation and apoptosis rates are functions of androgen concentration. The mathematical model represents a free-boundary problem for a nonlinear system of parabolic equations, which describe the evolution of the populations of the above two types of tumor cells. The tumor surface is a free boundary, whose velocity is equal to the cell’s velocity there. Global existence and uniqueness of solutions of this model is proved. Furthermore, explicit formulae of tumor volume at any time t are found in androgen-deprived environment under the assumption of radial symmetry, and therefore the dynamics of tumor growth under androgen-deprived therapy could be predicted by these formulae. Qualitative analysis and numerical simulation show that controlling the mutation may improve the effect of hormone therapy or delay a tumor relapse.

  7. Resonant spectra of malignant breast cancer tumors using the three-dimensional electromagnetic fast multipole model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shenawee, Magda

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an intensive numerical study of the resonance scattering of malignant breast cancer tumors. The three-dimensional electromagnetic model, based on the equivalence theorem, is used to obtain induced electric and magnetic currents on breast and tumor surfaces. The results show that the nonspherical malignant tumor can be characterized, based on its spectra, regardless of orientation, incident polarization, or incident or scattered directions. The spectra of the tumor depend solely upon its physical characteristics (i.e., shape and electrical properties); however, their locations are not functions of the depth of the tumor beneath the breast surface. This paper can be a guide in the selection of the frequency range at which the tumor resonates to produce the maximum signature at the receiver.

  8. Tumor-immune interaction, surgical treatment, and cancer recurrence in a mathematical model of melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Eikenberry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is a cancer of the skin arising in the melanocytes. We present a mathematical model of melanoma invasion into healthy tissue with an immune response. We use this model as a framework with which to investigate primary tumor invasion and treatment by surgical excision. We observe that the presence of immune cells can destroy tumors, hold them to minimal expansion, or, through the production of angiogenic factors, induce tumorigenic expansion. We also find that the tumor-immune system dynamic is critically important in determining the likelihood and extent of tumor regrowth following resection. We find that small metastatic lesions distal to the primary tumor mass can be held to a minimal size via the immune interaction with the larger primary tumor. Numerical experiments further suggest that metastatic disease is optimally suppressed by immune activation when the primary tumor is moderately, rather than minimally, metastatic. Furthermore, satellite lesions can become aggressively tumorigenic upon removal of the primary tumor and its associated immune tissue. This can lead to recurrence where total cancer mass increases more quickly than in primary tumor invasion, representing a clinically more dangerous disease state. These results are in line with clinical case studies involving resection of a primary melanoma followed by recurrence in local metastases.

  9. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr.; Vikis, Haris G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting

  10. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase in models of lung tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P; Gelman, Andrew E; Jarzembowski, Jason A; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Vikis, Haris G

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  11. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Gelman, Andrew E. [Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Jarzembowski, Jason A. [Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A. Jr. [Department of Surgery and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States); Vikis, Haris G., E-mail: hvikis@mcw.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and MCW Cancer Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States)

    2014-05-09

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  12. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Rymaszewski

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC, a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting.

  13. Mathematical modeling of tumor-associated macrophage interactions with the cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlbacher, Grace; Curtis, Louis T; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2018-01-30

    Immuno-oncotherapy has emerged as a promising means to target cancer. In particular, therapeutic manipulation of tumor-associated macrophages holds promise due to their various and sometimes opposing roles in tumor progression. It is established that M1-type macrophages suppress tumor progression while M2-types support it. Recently, Tie2-expressing macrophages (TEM) have been identified as a distinct sub-population influencing tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling as well as monocyte differentiation. This study develops a modeling framework to evaluate macrophage interactions with the tumor microenvironment, enabling assessment of how these interactions may affect tumor progression. M1, M2, and Tie2 expressing variants are integrated into a model of tumor growth representing a metastatic lesion in a highly vascularized organ, such as the liver. Behaviors simulated include M1 release of nitric oxide (NO), M2 release of growth-promoting factors, and TEM facilitation of angiogenesis via Angiopoietin-2 and promotion of monocyte differentiation into M2 via IL-10. The results show that M2 presence leads to larger tumor growth regardless of TEM effects, implying that immunotherapeutic strategies that lead to TEM ablation may fail to restrain growth when the M2 represents a sizeable population. As TEM pro-tumor effects are less pronounced and on a longer time scale than M1-driven tumor inhibition, a more nuanced approach to influence monocyte differentiation taking into account the tumor state (e.g., under chemotherapy) may be desirable. The results highlight the dynamic interaction of macrophages within a growing tumor, and, further, establish the initial feasibility of a mathematical framework that could longer term help to optimize cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  15. A mathematical model for IL-6-mediated, stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nör, Jacques Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Targeting key regulators of the cancer stem cell phenotype to overcome their critical influence on tumor growth is a promising new strategy for cancer treatment. Here we present a modeling framework that operates at both the cellular and molecular levels, for investigating IL-6 mediated, cancer stem cell driven tumor growth and targeted treatment with anti-IL6 antibodies. Our immediate goal is to quantify the influence of IL-6 on cancer stem cell self-renewal and survival, and to characterize the subsequent impact on tumor growth dynamics. By including the molecular details of IL-6 binding, we are able to quantify the temporal changes in fractional occupancies of bound receptors and their influence on tumor volume. There is a strong correlation between the model output and experimental data for primary tumor xenografts. We also used the model to predict tumor response to administration of the humanized IL-6R monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab (TCZ), and we found that as little as 1mg/kg of TCZ administered weekly for 7 weeks is sufficient to result in tumor reduction and a sustained deceleration of tumor growth. PMID:29351275

  16. Ultrasonic characterization of three animal mammary tumors from three-dimensional acoustic tissue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan M.

    This dissertation investigated how three-dimensional (3D) tissue models can be used to improve ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) techniques. Anatomic sites in tissue responsible for ultrasonic scattering are unknown, which limits the potential applications of ultrasound for tumor diagnosis. Accurate 3D models of tumor tissues may help identify the scattering sites. Three mammary tumors were investigated: a rat fibroadenoma, a mouse carcinoma, and a mouse sarcoma. A 3D acoustic tissue model, termed 3D impedance map (3DZM), was carefully constructed from consecutive histologic sections for each tumor. Spectral estimates (scatterer size and acoustic concentration) were obtained from the 3DZMs and compared to the same estimates obtained with ultrasound. Scatterer size estimates for three tumors were found to be similar (within 10%). The 3DZMs were also used to extract tissue-specific scattering models. The scattering models were found to allow clear distinction between the three tumors. This distinction demonstrated that UTC techniques may be helpful for noninvasive clinical tumor diagnosis.

  17. A switching control law approach for cancer immunotherapy of an evolutionary tumor growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doban, Alina I; Lazar, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new approach for tumor immunotherapy which is based on a switching control strategy defined on domains of attraction of equilibria of interest. For this, we consider a recently derived model which captures the effects of the tumor cells on the immune system and viceversa, through predator-prey competition terms. Additionally, it incorporates the immune system's mechanism for producing hunting immune cells, which makes the model suitable for immunotherapy strategies analysis and design. For computing domains of attraction for the tumor nonlinear dynamics, and thus, for deriving immunotherapeutic strategies we employ rational Lyapunov functions. Finally, we apply the switching control strategy to destabilize an invasive tumor equilibrium and steer the system trajectories to tumor dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Petterson, Stine Asferg

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking...... invasion and tumor stemness into account. METHODS: Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains...... of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. RESULTS: We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice...

  19. Long-term BPA infusions. Evaluation in the rat brain tumor and rat spinal cord models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Joel, D.D.; Morris, G.M.

    2000-01-01

    In the BPA-based dose escalation clinical trial, the observations of tumor recurrence in areas of extremely high calculated tumor doses suggest that the BPA distribution is non-uniform. Longer (6-hour) i.v. infusions of BPA are evaluated in the rat brain tumor and spinal cord models to address the questions of whether long-term infusions are more effective against the tumor and whether long-term infusions are detrimental in the central nervous system. In the rat spinal cord, the 50% effective doses (ED 50 ) for myeloparesis were not significantly different after a single i.p. injection of BPA-fructose or a 6 hour i.v. infusion. In the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model, BNCT following 2-hr or 6-hr infusions of BPA-F produced similar levels of long term survival. (author)

  20. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  1. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  2. A novel xenograft model in zebrafish for high-resolution investigating dynamics of neovascularization in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjian Zhao

    Full Text Available Tumor neovascularization is a highly complex process including multiple steps. Understanding this process, especially the initial stage, has been limited by the difficulties of real-time visualizing the neovascularization embedded in tumor tissues in living animal models. In the present study, we have established a xenograft model in zebrafish by implanting mammalian tumor cells into the perivitelline space of 48 hours old Tg(Flk1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos. With this model, we dynamically visualized the process of tumor neovascularization, with unprecedented high-resolution, including new sprouts from the host vessels and the origination from VEGFR2(+ individual endothelial cells. Moreover, we quantified their contributions during the formation of vascular network in tumor. Real-time observations revealed that angiogenic sprouts in tumors preferred to connect each other to form endothelial loops, and more and more endothelial loops accumulated into the irregular and chaotic vascular network. The over-expression of VEGF165 in tumor cells significantly affected the vascularization in xenografts, not only the number and size of neo-vessels but the abnormalities of tumor vascular architecture. The specific inhibitor of VEGFR2, SU5416, significantly inhibited the vascularization and the growth of melanoma xenografts, but had little affects to normal vessels in zebrafish. Thus, this zebrafish/tumor xenograft model not only provides a unique window to investigate the earliest events of tumoral neoangiogenesis, but is sensitive to be used as an experimental platform to rapidly and visually evaluate functions of angiogenic-related genes. Finally, it also offers an efficient and cost-effective means for the rapid evaluation of anti-angiogenic chemicals.

  3. Modeling the Dichotomy of the Immune Response to Cancer: Cytotoxic Effects and Tumor-Promoting Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Kathleen P; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Although the immune response is often regarded as acting to suppress tumor growth, it is now clear that it can be both stimulatory and inhibitory. The interplay between these competing influences has complex implications for tumor development, cancer dormancy, and immunotherapies. In fact, early immunotherapy failures were partly due to a lack in understanding of the nonlinear growth dynamics these competing immune actions may cause. To study this biological phenomenon theoretically, we construct a minimally parameterized framework that incorporates all aspects of the immune response. We combine the effects of all immune cell types, general principles of self-limited logistic growth, and the physical process of inflammation into one quantitative setting. Simulations suggest that while there are pro-tumor or antitumor immunogenic responses characterized by larger or smaller final tumor volumes, respectively, each response involves an initial period where tumor growth is stimulated beyond that of growth without an immune response. The mathematical description is non-identifiable which allows an ensemble of parameter sets to capture inherent biological variability in tumor growth that can significantly alter tumor-immune dynamics and thus treatment success rates. The ability of this model to predict non-intuitive yet clinically observed patterns of immunomodulated tumor growth suggests that it may provide a means to help classify patient response dynamics to aid identification of appropriate treatments exploiting immune response to improve tumor suppression, including the potential attainment of an immune-induced dormant state.

  4. Efficacy of continuous treatment with radiation in a rat brain-tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, K.T.; Kaufman, K.

    1981-01-01

    Rats bearing intracerebral 9L/Ro tumors were treated with 10 daily fractions of cesium-137 gamma-rays, BCNU, or combinations of these to agents beginning on either Day 10 or Day 12 after implantation. The treatments were administered either 5 days/week for 2 weeks, with the weekend off, or 10 consecutive days. The median day of death for untreated tumor-bearing rats was Day 15, so Day 12 tumors can be considered late tumors and Day 10 tumors can be considered moderately early. Although all single- and multiple-agent treatments significantly (p less than 0.05) increased the lifespan of tumor-bearing rats over that of the untreated controls, and all multiple-agent schedules significantly (p less than 0.05) increased the lifespan over that of the single-agent therapies, none of the 10 consecutive day schedules increased the lifespan of tumor-bearing rats significantly (p less than 0.2) over that obtained with the 5-day/week schedules. Thus, the evidence from this tumor model suggests that no significant improvement in lifespan would be expected if malignant brain tumors were treated with radiation 7 days a week, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents such as BCNU

  5. Dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine inhibits tumor growth in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; He, Sisi; Shen, Guobo; Ye, Tinghong; Guo, Fuchun; Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological factors have been shown to influence tumor progression and therapeutic response. The present study investigated the effect of the dopamine receptor antagonist thioridazine on murine breast cancer. The anti‑tumor efficacy of thioridazine was assessed using a murine breast cancer model. Cell apoptosis and proliferation were analyzed in vitro using flow cytometry (FCM) and the MTT assay, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess Akt, phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, p‑STAT3 and p‑p65 in tumor cells following treatment with thioridazine. The Ki67 index and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)‑positive apoptotic cells were assessed in the tumor sections. Thioridazine was found to reduce tumor growth, inhibit tumor cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner in vitro. Thioridazine was also found to markedly inhibit tumor proliferation and induce tumor cell apoptosis in vivo as shown by the lower Ki67 index and increase in TUNEL‑positive cells. In addition, thioridazine was observed to inhibit the activation of the canonical nuclear factor κ‑light‑chain‑enhancer of activated B cells pathway and exert anti‑tumor effects by remodeling the tumor stroma, as well as inhibit angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In conclusion, thioridazine was found to significantly inhibit breast tumor growth and the potential for thioridazine to be used in cancer therapy may be re‑evaluated and investigated in clinical settings.

  6. Delay equations modeling the effects of phase-specific drugs and immunotherapy on proliferating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarossa, Maria Vittoria; Kuttler, Christina; Zinsl, Jonathan

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present a mathematical model for tumor growth based on the biology of the cell cycle. For an appropriate description of the effects of phase-specific drugs, it is necessary to look at the cell cycle and its phases. Our model reproduces the dynamics of three different tumor cell populations: quiescent cells, cells during the interphase and mitotic cells. Starting from a partial differential equations (PDEs) setting, a delay differential equations (DDE) model is derived for an easier and more realistic approach. Our equations also include interactions of tumor cells with immune system effectors. We investigate the model both from the analytical and the numerical point of view, give conditions for positivity of solutions and focus on the stability of the cancer-free equilibrium. Different immunotherapeutic strategies and their effects on the tumor growth are considered, as well.

  7. Cystatin C deficiency suppresses tumor growth in a breast cancer model through decreased proliferation of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Janja; Butinar, Miha; Prebanda, Mojca Trstenjak; Krajnc, Aleksander; Vidmar, Robert; Fonović, Marko; Grubb, Anders; Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Vasiljeva, Olga

    2017-09-26

    Cysteine cathepsins are proteases that, in addition to their important physiological functions, have been associated with multiple pathologies, including cancer. Cystatin C (CstC) is a major endogenous inhibitor that regulates the extracellular activity of cysteine cathepsins. We investigated the role of cystatin C in mammary cancer using CstC knockout mice and a mouse model of breast cancer induced by expression of the polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT) in the mammary epithelium. We showed that the ablation of CstC reduced the rate of mammary tumor growth. Notably, a decrease in the proliferation of CstC knockout PyMT tumor cells was demonstrated ex vivo and in vitro , indicating a role for this protease inhibitor in signaling pathways that control cell proliferation. An increase in phosphorylated p-38 was observed in CstC knockout tumors, suggesting a novel function for cystatin C in cancer development, independent of the TGF-β pathway. Moreover, proteomic analysis of the CstC wild-type and knockout PyMT primary cell secretomes revealed a decrease in the levels of 14-3-3 proteins in the secretome of knock-out cells, suggesting a novel link between cysteine cathepsins, cystatin C and 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis, calling for further investigations.

  8. Dosimetry study of PHOTOFRIN-mediated photodynamic therapy in a mouse tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haixia; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well known in photodynamic therapy (PDT) that there is a large variability between PDT light dose and therapeutic outcomes. An explicit dosimetry model using apparent reacted 1O2 concentration [1O2]rx has been developed as a PDT dosimetric quantity to improve the accuracy of the predicted ability of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, this explicit macroscopic singlet oxygen model was adopted to establish the correlation between calculated reacted [1O2]rx and the tumor growth using Photofrin-mediated PDT in a mouse tumor model. Mice with radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors were injected with Photofrin at a dose of 5 mg/kg. PDT was performed 24h later with different fluence rates (50, 75 and 150 mW/cm2) and different fluences (50 and 135 J/cm2) using a collimated light applicator coupled to a 630nm laser. The tumor volume was monitored daily after PDT and correlated with the total light fluence and [1O2]rx. Photophysical parameters as well as the singlet oxygen threshold dose for this sensitizer and the RIF tumor model were determined previously. The result showed that tumor growth rate varied greatly with light fluence for different fluence rates while [1O2]rx had a good correlation with the PDT-induced tumor growth rate. This preliminary study indicated that [1O2]rx could serve as a better dosimetric predictor for predicting PDT outcome than PDT light dose.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Medaka Tumors: New Models for Carcinogenicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-07

    51 A1 4 INTRODUCTION For over twenty years, tumors in fish and other lower vertebrates and invertebrates have been systematically...class of vertebrates , with over 20,000 described species. Their phylogenetic position relative to the other vertebrates makes them ideal for comparative...provide large numbers of eggs and are easy to culture. The genetics, developmental biology and embryology are well-documented (Yamamoto 1975). Induction

  10. Ovarian Tumor-Stroma Interactions in an In Vivo Orthotopic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    dog brain [31]; Ugt8a, transfers galactose to ceramide [32]; Zc4h2, mental retardation [33]; Kctd12b, GABA(B) receptor subunit [34]; Lrrk2...chamber model is to make possible the visualization of tumors that are normally buried and inaccessi- ble, such as pancreatic , prostate or lung tu...angiogenesis and pancreatic tumor growth [78]. Finally, this model is widely used to demonstrate the vascular effects of new anti-angiogenic

  11. Reactive astrocytes potentiate tumor aggressiveness in a murine glioma resection and recurrence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolie, Onyinyechukwu; Bago, Juli R; Schmid, Ralf S; Irvin, David M; Bash, Ryan E; Miller, C Ryan; Hingtgen, Shawn D

    2016-12-01

    Surgical resection is a universal component of glioma therapy. Little is known about the postoperative microenvironment due to limited preclinical models. Thus, we sought to develop a glioma resection and recurrence model in syngeneic immune-competent mice to understand how surgical resection influences tumor biology and the local microenvironment. We genetically engineered cells from a murine glioma mouse model to express fluorescent and bioluminescent reporters. Established allografts were resected using image-guided microsurgery. Postoperative tumor recurrence was monitored by serial imaging, and the peritumoral microenvironment was characterized by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Coculture techniques were used to explore how astrocyte injury influences tumor aggressiveness in vitro. Transcriptome and secretome alterations in injured astrocytes was examined by RNA-seq and Luminex. We found that image-guided resection achieved >90% reduction in tumor volume but failed to prevent both local and distant tumor recurrence. Immunostaining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and nestin showed that resection-induced injury led to temporal and spatial alterations in reactive astrocytes within the peritumoral microenvironment. In vitro, we found that astrocyte injury induced transcriptome and secretome alterations and promoted tumor proliferation, as well as migration. This study demonstrates a unique syngeneic model of glioma resection and recurrence in immune-competent mice. Furthermore, this model provided insights into the pattern of postsurgical tumor recurrence and changes in the peritumoral microenvironment, as well as the impact of injured astrocytes on glioma growth and invasion. A better understanding of the postsurgical tumor microenvironment will allow development of targeted anticancer agents that improve surgery-mediated effects on tumor biology. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro

  12. Nicotine promotes tumor growth and metastasis in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Davis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco smoke. Although nicotine is generally thought to have limited ability to initiate cancer, it can induce cell proliferation and angiogenesis in a variety of systems. These properties might enable nicotine to facilitate the growth of tumors already initiated. Here we show that nicotine significantly promotes the progression and metastasis of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer. This effect was observed when nicotine was administered through intraperitoneal injections, or through over-the-counter transdermal patches.In the present study, Line1 mouse adenocarcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into syngenic BALB/c mice. Nicotine administration either by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection or transdermal patches caused a remarkable increase in the size of implanted Line1 tumors. Once the tumors were surgically removed, nicotine treated mice had a markedly higher tumor recurrence (59.7% as compared to the vehicle treated mice (19.5%. Nicotine also increased metastasis of dorsally implanted Line1 tumors to the lungs by 9 folds. These studies on transplanted tumors were extended to a mouse model where the tumors were induced by the tobacco carcinogen, NNK. Lung tumors were initiated in A/J mice by i.p. injection of NNK; administration of 1 mg/kg nicotine three times a week led to an increase in the size and the number of tumors formed in the lungs. In addition, nicotine significantly reduced the expression of epithelial markers, E-Cadherin and beta-Catenin as well as the tight junction protein ZO-1; these tumors also showed an increased expression of the alpha(7 nAChR subunit. We believe that exposure to nicotine either by tobacco smoke or nicotine supplements might facilitate increased tumor growth and metastasis.Our earlier results indicated that nicotine could induce invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in cultured lung, breast and pancreatic cancer cells. This study

  13. Failure of the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) to induce tumors in the A/J mouse lung tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Kristiansen, E.; Meyer, Otto A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied whether the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) or 4-(carboxy)phenylhydrazine (CP) induce lung adenomas in the A/J mouse lung tumor model. For 26 weeks female mice were fed a semisynthetic diet where 11 or 22% of the diet was replaced by freeze-dried mushrooms. The intake...... of the mushroom diets was equivalent to an intake of agaritine, the major phenylhydrazine derivative occurring in the mushroom, of 92 or 166 mg/kg body weight per day. The intake of CP was 106 mg/kg body weight per day. Neither the;freeze-dried mushroom nor CP induced statistically significant increased numbers...

  14. Adsorption induced losses in interfacial cohesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaro, R.J.

    1977-07-01

    A model for interfacial cohesion is developed which describes the loss in the strength of an interface due to the segregation and adsorption of impurities on it. Distinctions are made between interface separations that occur too rapidly for any significant redistribution of adsorbing matter to take place and separations that are slow enough to allow full adsorption equilibrium. Expressions for the total work of complete decohesion are presented for both cases. The results are applied to well-known model adsorption isotherms and some experimental data for grain boundary adsorption of phosphorus in iron is analyzed with respect to the losses in intergranular cohesion

  15. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma in an orthotopic zebrafish tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jian; Cao, Ziquan; Hosaka, Kayoko; Jensen, Lasse; Yang, Huasheng; Sun, Yuping; Zhuang, Rujie; Liu, Yizhi; Cao, Yihai

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a highly invasive malignant tumor that often invades the brain and metastasizes to distal organs through the blood stream. Invasiveness and metastasis of retinoblastoma can occur at the early stage of tumor development. However, an optimal preclinical model to study retinoblastoma invasiveness and metastasis in relation to drug treatment has not been developed. Here, we developed an orthotopic zebrafish model in which retinoblastoma invasion and metastasis can be monitored at a single cell level. We took the advantages of immune privilege and transparent nature of developing zebrafish embryos. Intravitreal implantation of color-coded retinoblastoma cells allowed us to kinetically monitor tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Further, interactions between retinoblastoma cells and surrounding microvasculatures were studied using a transgenic zebrafish that exhibited green fluorescent signals in blood vessels. We discovered that tumor cells invaded neighboring tissues and blood stream when primary tumors were at the microscopic sizes. These findings demonstrate that retinoblastoma metastasis occurs at the early stage and antiangiogenic drugs such as Vegf morpholino and sunitinib could potentially interfere with tumor invasiveness and metastasis. Thus, this orthotopic retinoblastoma model offers a new and unique opportunity to study the early events of tumor invasion, metastasis and drug responses. PMID:26169357

  16. Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence in a model of tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dongxi; Xu, Wei; Sun, Chunyan; Wang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon that stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between tumor extinction and recurrence in the model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis–Menten reaction. We analyze the probability transitions between the extinction state and the state of the stable tumor by the Mean First Extinction Time (MFET) and Mean First Return Time (MFRT). It is found that the positional fluctuations hinder the transition, but the environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. The observed behavior could be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer. -- Highlights: ► Stochastic fluctuation induced the competition between extinction and recurrence. ► The probability transitions are investigated. ► The positional fluctuations hinder the transition. ► The environmental fluctuations, to a certain level, facilitate the tumor extinction. ► The observed behavior can be used as prior information for the treatment of cancer.

  17. The Pig as a Large Animal Model for Studying Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr

    The immune system plays a crucial role in cancer development and progression. Cancer immunoediting encompasses three phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape; together, describing the complex interplay between tumor and immune cells. Specifically, the immune system both protects against cancer...... of autologous tumor cells, underlining the capacity of the Oncopig immune system to mount a cytotoxic anti-tumor response. Using the results from RNA-seq analysis, we propose a potential mechanism for in vivo inhibition of anti-tumor cytotoxicity based on elevated expression of the immunosuppressive genes IDO1...... support that the Oncopig provides a crucial platform for studying anti-tumor immune responses in a large in vivo system, although the model currently only allows preclinical testing of therapeutics against the early stages of cancer....

  18. Microarray profiling shows distinct differences between primary tumors and commonly used preclinical models in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weining; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Tay, Hsien Ts’ung; Wu, Yonghui; Lim, Tony K. H.; Zheng, Lin; Song, In Chin; Kwoh, Chee Keong; Huynh, Hung; Tan, Patrick O. B.; Chow, Pierce K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in therapeutics, outcomes for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain poor and there is an urgent need for efficacious systemic therapy. Unfortunately, drugs that are successful in preclinical studies often fail in the clinical setting, and we hypothesize that this is due to functional differences between primary tumors and commonly used preclinical models. In this study, we attempt to answer this question by comparing tumor morphology and gene expression profiles between primary tumors, xenografts and HCC cell lines. Hep G2 cell lines and tumor cells from patient tumor explants were subcutaneously (ectopically) injected into the flank and orthotopically into liver parenchyma of Mus Musculus SCID mice. The mice were euthanized after two weeks. RNA was extracted from the tumors, and gene expression profiling was performed using the Gene Chip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0. Principal component analyses (PCA) and construction of dendrograms were conducted using Partek genomics suite. PCA showed that the commonly used HepG2 cell line model and its xenograft counterparts were vastly different from all fresh primary tumors. Expression profiles of primary tumors were also significantly divergent from their counterpart patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, regardless of the site of implantation. Xenografts from the same primary tumors were more likely to cluster together regardless of site of implantation, although heat maps showed distinct differences in gene expression profiles between orthotopic and ectopic models. The data presented here challenges the utility of routinely used preclinical models. Models using HepG2 were vastly different from primary tumors and PDXs, suggesting that this is not clinically representative. Surprisingly, site of implantation (orthotopic versus ectopic) resulted in limited impact on gene expression profiles, and in both scenarios xenografts differed significantly from the original primary tumors, challenging the long

  19. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  20. More Reasonable Animal Model for Study the Effect of Pneumoperitoneum on Abdominal Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qijun, Lv; Jiang, Du; Chongshu, Wang

    2018-01-27

    Background: Many animal experimental studies showed that abdominal tumor cells will be widely spread during laparoscopic treatment and grow into metastases. These results are different from clinical observations. There is a hypothesis that too much tumor cells was injected in the animals lead to the results of theses bias. We aim to learn the difference of abdominal cavity volume between human body and the nude mice and to determine reasonable amount of tumor cells in the animal experiments. Methods: The insufflated CO2 volume which represents the capacity of the abdominal cavity was recorded during laparoscopic process in 212 patients and 20 nude mice respectively, the relative volume of nude mice and human body was calculated.Based on data from the literature and this study , the amount of tumor cells in the animal experiments was determined.According to these data, we set up a new animal model and a traditional one respectively,and compared the rate of successful modeling and tumor formation between two animal models. Results: The intraperitoneal volumes of humans and nude mice were 3.01±0.36 L and 0.011±0.001 L respectively.The number of tumor cells that be uesd in animal should be approximately 0.26×105 in terms of known data in human beings.Compared with the traditional animal model which formed a large number of intraperitoneal tumor metastasis, the new animal model was shows more moderately,and the rate of successful modeling was similar. Conclusion: In animal experiments, to simulate the clinical situation, about 0.26×105 tumor cells should be inject in peritoneal cavity of the nude mice. Creative Commons Attribution License

  1. Predicting anti-tumor effect of deoxypodophyllotoxin in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice based on in vitro pharmacodynamics and physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Fei; Li, Ying; Zhong, Zeyu; Hong, Shijin; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2018-04-04

    Anti-tumor evaluation in tumor-bearing mouse is time- and energy-consuming. We aimed to investigate whether in vivo anti-tumor efficacy could be predicted based on in vitro pharmacodynamics using deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), a developing anti-tumor candidate, as a model compound. Proliferation kinetics of monolayer cultivated NCI-H460 cells under various DPT concentrations was quantitatively investigated accompanied by calibration curves. Koch's two-phase natural growth model combined with sigmoid Emax model, i.e. dM/dt=2λ 0 λ 1 M/(λ 1 +2λ 0 M)-EmaxC γ /(EC 50 γ +C γ )·M, was introduced to describe cell proliferation (M) against time under DPT treatment (C). Estimated in vitro pharmacodynamic parameters were: EC 50 , 8.97 nM; Emax, 0.820 day -1 and γ, 7.13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model including tumor compartment was introduced, which could predict DPT disposition in plasma, tumor tissue and main normal tissues of NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice following single dose. In vivo pharmacodynamic model and parameters were assumed the same as in vitro ones, and linked with simulated tumor pharmacokinetic profiles by PBPK model, to build a physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model. After estimating natural growth parameters (λ 0 and λ 1 ), we desirably predicted the tumor growth in NCI-H460 tumor-bearing mice during multi-dose DPT treatment, both in this study and literature, by the PBPK-PD model. The model was further successfully applied to predict tumor growth in SGC-7901 tumor-bearing mice. These data indicated that in vivo anti-tumor efficacy might be predicted based on in vitro cytotoxic assays via PBPK-PD model approach. The approach was demonstrated reasonable and applicable, which might facilitate and accelerate anti-cancer candidate screening and dose regimen design in drug discovery process. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Uncertainty analysis of an interfacial area reconstruction algorithm and its application to two group interfacial area transport equation validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, A.J., E-mail: akshayjd@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Rad. Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Manera, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Rad. Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); Beyer, M.; Lucas, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Prasser, H.-M. [Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    Wire mesh sensors (WMS) are state of the art devices that allow high resolution (in space and time) measurement of 2D void fraction distribution over a wide range of two-phase flow regimes, from bubbly to annular. Data using WMS have been recorded at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) (Lucas et al., 2010; Beyer et al., 2008; Prasser et al., 2003) for a wide combination of superficial gas and liquid velocities, providing an excellent database for advances in two-phase flow modeling. In two-phase flow, the interfacial area plays an integral role in coupling the mass, momentum and energy transport equations of the liquid and gas phase. While current models used in best-estimate thermal-hydraulic codes (e.g. RELAP5, TRACE, TRACG, etc.) are still based on algebraic correlations for the estimation of the interfacial area in different flow regimes, interfacial area transport equations (IATE) have been proposed to predict the dynamic propagation in space and time of interfacial area (Ishii and Hibiki, 2010). IATE models are still under development and the HZDR WMS experimental data provide an excellent basis for the validation and further advance of these models. The current paper is focused on the uncertainty analysis of algorithms used to reconstruct interfacial area densities from the void-fraction voxel data measured using WMS and their application towards validation efforts of two-group IATE models. In previous research efforts, a surface triangularization algorithm has been developed in order to estimate the surface area of individual bubbles recorded with the WMS, and estimate the interfacial area in the given flow condition. In the present paper, synthetically generated bubbles are used to assess the algorithm’s accuracy. As the interfacial area of the synthetic bubbles are defined by user inputs, the error introduced by the algorithm can be quantitatively obtained. The accuracy of interfacial area measurements is characterized for different bubbles

  3. Uncertainty analysis of an interfacial area reconstruction algorithm and its application to two group interfacial area transport equation validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, A.J.; Manera, A.; Beyer, M.; Lucas, D.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Wire mesh sensors (WMS) are state of the art devices that allow high resolution (in space and time) measurement of 2D void fraction distribution over a wide range of two-phase flow regimes, from bubbly to annular. Data using WMS have been recorded at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) (Lucas et al., 2010; Beyer et al., 2008; Prasser et al., 2003) for a wide combination of superficial gas and liquid velocities, providing an excellent database for advances in two-phase flow modeling. In two-phase flow, the interfacial area plays an integral role in coupling the mass, momentum and energy transport equations of the liquid and gas phase. While current models used in best-estimate thermal-hydraulic codes (e.g. RELAP5, TRACE, TRACG, etc.) are still based on algebraic correlations for the estimation of the interfacial area in different flow regimes, interfacial area transport equations (IATE) have been proposed to predict the dynamic propagation in space and time of interfacial area (Ishii and Hibiki, 2010). IATE models are still under development and the HZDR WMS experimental data provide an excellent basis for the validation and further advance of these models. The current paper is focused on the uncertainty analysis of algorithms used to reconstruct interfacial area densities from the void-fraction voxel data measured using WMS and their application towards validation efforts of two-group IATE models. In previous research efforts, a surface triangularization algorithm has been developed in order to estimate the surface area of individual bubbles recorded with the WMS, and estimate the interfacial area in the given flow condition. In the present paper, synthetically generated bubbles are used to assess the algorithm’s accuracy. As the interfacial area of the synthetic bubbles are defined by user inputs, the error introduced by the algorithm can be quantitatively obtained. The accuracy of interfacial area measurements is characterized for different bubbles

  4. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  5. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A theoretical model for the effects of reduced hemoglobin-oxygen affinity on tumor oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Hsu, Richard; Lin, P.-S.; Venitz, Jurgen; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a theoretical model for oxygen delivery to tumors, and to use the model to simulate the effects of changing the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen on tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Hemoglobin affinity is expressed in terms of P 50 , the partial pressure of oxygen (Po 2 ) at half saturation. Effects of changing P 50 on arterial Po 2 are predicted using an effective vessel approach to describe diffusive oxygen transport in the lungs, assuming fixed systemic oxygen demand and fixed blood flow rate. The decline in oxygen content of blood as it flows through normal tissue before entering the tumor region is assumed fixed. The hypoxic fraction of the tumor region is predicted using a three-dimensional simulation of diffusion from a network of vessels whose geometry is derived from observations of tumor microvasculature in the rat. Results: In air-breathing rats, predicted hypoxic fraction decreases with moderate increases in P 50 , but increases with further increases of P 50 , in agreement with previous experimental results. In rats breathing hyperoxic gases, and in humans breathing either normoxic or hyperoxic gases, increased P 50 is predicted to improve tumor oxygenation. Conclusions: The results support the administration of synthetic agents to increase P 50 during radiation treatment of tumors

  7. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Vilaseca

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH, a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50 of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001 and circulating VEGF (p<0.001 in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  8. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Antoni; Campillo, Noelia; Torres, Marta; Musquera, Mireia; Gozal, David; Montserrat, Josep M; Alcaraz, Antonio; Touijer, Karim A; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH), a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50) of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001) and circulating VEGF (p<0.001) in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  9. Interfacial characteristics of hybrid nanocomposite under thermomechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choyal, Vijay; Kundalwal, Shailesh I.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, an improved shear lag model was developed to investigate the interfacial characteristics of three-phase hybrid nanocomposite which is reinforced with microscale fibers augmented with carbon nanotubes on their circumferential surfaces. The shear lag model accounts for (i) radial and axial deformations of different transversely isotropic constituents, (ii) thermomechanical loads on the representative volume element (RVE), and (iii) staggering effect of adjacent RVEs. The results from the current newly developed shear lag model are validated with the finite element simulations and found to be in good agreement. This study reveals that the reduction in the maximum value of the axial stress in the fiber and the interfacial shear stress along its length become more pronounced in the presence of applied thermomechanical loads on the staggered RVEs. The existence of shear tractions along the RVE length plays a significant role in the interfacial characteristics and cannot be ignored.

  10. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Dittmann, Florian; Shih, Helen A; Menze, Bjoern H; Ayache, Nicholas; Konukoglu, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher–Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm −1 . It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm −1 . The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a

  11. Biological models in vivo for boron neutronic capture studies as tumors therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreimann, Erica L.; Dagrosa, Maria A.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Pisarev, Mario A.; Farias, Silvia S.; Garavaglia, Ricardo N.; Batistoni, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    The use of experimental models for Boron Neutronic Capture studies as Tumors Therapy have as two main objectives: 1) To contribute to the basic knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved to increase the method therapeutical advantage, and 2) To explore the possible application of this therapeutic method to other pathologies. In this frame it was studied the carcinogenesis model of hamster cheek pouch, a type of human buccal cancer. Biodistribution studies of boron compound were performed in tumor, blood and in different precancerous and normal tissues as well as BNCT studies. Results validated this method for BNCT studies and show the capacity of the oral mucosa tumors of selectively concentrate the boron compound, showing a deleterious clear effect on the tumor after 24 hours with BNCT treatment. (author)

  12. An orthotopic bladder tumor model and the evaluation of intravesical saRNA treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Rim; Yang, Glen; Charisse, Klaus; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Manoharan, Muthiah; Li, Long-Cheng

    2012-07-28

    We present a novel method for treating bladder cancer with intravesically delivered small activating RNA (saRNA) in an orthotopic xenograft mouse bladder tumor model. The mouse model is established by urethral catheterization under inhaled general anesthetic. Chemical burn is then introduced to the bladder mucosa using intravesical silver nitrate solution to disrupt the bladder glycosaminoglycan layer and allows cells to attach. Following several washes with sterile water, human bladder cancer KU-7-luc2-GFP cells are instilled through the catheter into the bladder to dwell for 2 hours. Subsequent growth of bladder tumors is confirmed and monitored by in vivo bladder ultrasound and bioluminescent imaging. The tumors are then treated intravesically with saRNA formulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). Tumor growth is monitored with ultrasound and bioluminescence. All steps of this procedure are demonstrated in the accompanying video.

  13. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  14. A simulation model investigating the impact of tumor volume doubling time and mammographic tumor detectability on screening outcomes in women aged 40-49 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephanie L; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-08-18

    Compared with women aged 50-69 years, the lower sensitivity of mammographic screening in women aged 40-49 years is largely attributed to the lower mammographic tumor detectability and faster tumor growth in the younger women. We used a Monte Carlo simulation model of breast cancer screening by age to estimate the median tumor size detectable on a mammogram and the mean tumor volume doubling time. The estimates were calculated by calibrating the predicted breast cancer incidence rates to the actual rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and the predicted distributions of screen-detected tumor sizes to the actual distributions obtained from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC). The calibrated parameters were used to estimate the relative impact of lower mammographic tumor detectability vs faster tumor volume doubling time on the poorer screening outcomes in younger women compared with older women. Mammography screening outcomes included sensitivity, mean tumor size at detection, lifetime gained, and breast cancer mortality. In addition, the relationship between screening sensitivity and breast cancer mortality was investigated as a function of tumor volume doubling time, mammographic tumor detectability, and screening interval. Lowered mammographic tumor detectability accounted for 79% and faster tumor volume doubling time accounted for 21% of the poorer sensitivity of mammography screening in younger women compared with older women. The relative contributions were similar when the impact of screening was evaluated in terms of mean tumor size at detection, lifetime gained, and breast cancer mortality. Screening sensitivity and breast cancer mortality reduction attributable to screening were almost linearly related when comparing annual or biennial screening with no screening. However, when comparing annual with biennial screening, the greatest reduction in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening did not

  15. Inhibition of tumor growth in a glioma model treated with boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Soloway, A.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This investigation attempts to determine whether increased survival time seen when the F98 glioma model is treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a result of inhibition of tumor growth caused by radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cells and normal tissue components. This indirect effect of radiation has been called the tumor bed effect. A series of tumor-bearing rats was studied, using a standardized investigational BNCT protocol consisting of 50 mg/kg of Na2B12H11SH injected intravenously 14 to 17 hours before neutron irradiation at 4 x 10(12) n/cm2. Ten rats, serving as controls, received no treatment either before or after tumor implantation. A second group of 10 rats was treated with BNCT 4 days before tumor implantation; these animals received no further treatment. The remaining group of 10 rats received no pretreatment but was treated with BNCT 10 days after implantation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses were performed in 2 animals from each group 17 days after implantation. Survival times of the untreated control animals (mean, 25.8 days) did not differ statistically from the survival times of the rats in the pretreated group (mean, 25.5 days). The rats treated with BNCT after implantation survived significantly longer (P less than 0.02; mean, 33.2 days) than the controls and the preirradiated animals. Tumor size indices calculated from measurements taken at the time of death were similar in all groups. These results indicate that, with this tumor model, BNCT does not cause a tumor bed effect in cerebral tissue. The therapeutic gains observed with BNCT result from direct effects on tumor cells or on the peritumoral neovascularity

  16. Impact of MR-guided boiling histotripsy in distinct murine tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan C; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Heerschap, Arend; Wesseling, Pieter; den Brok, Martijn H; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2017-09-01

    Interest in mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is rapidly growing. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is applied for mechanical fragmentation of soft tissue into submicron fragments with limited temperature increase using the shock wave and cavitation effects of HIFU. Research on BH has been largely limited to ex vivo experiments. As a consequence, the in vivo pathology after BH treatment and the relation to preexistent tissue characteristics are not well understood. This study reports on in vivo MR guided BH treatment, either with 100 or 200 pulses per focal spot, in three different subcutaneous mouse tumor models: a soft-tissue melanoma (B16OVA), a compact growing thymoma (EL4), and a highly vascularized neuroblastoma (9464D). Extensive treatment evaluation was performed using MR imaging followed by histopathology 2h after treatment. T2 weighted MRI allowed direct in vivo visualization of the BH lesions in all tumor models. The 100-pulse treated area in the B16OVA tumors was larger than the predicted treatment volume (500±10%). For the more compact growing EL4 and 9464D tumors this was 95±13% and 55±33%, respectively. Histopathology after the 100-pulse treatment revealed completely disintegrated lesions in the treated area with sharp borders in the compact EL4 and 9464D tumors, while for B16OVA tumors the lesion contained a mixture of discohesive (partly viable) clusters of cells, micro-vessel remainings, and tumor cell debris. The treatment of B16OVA with 200 pulses increased the fragmentation of tumor tissue. In all tumor types only micro-hemorrhages were detected after ablation (slightly higher after 200-pulse treatment for the highly vascularized 9464D tumors). Collagen staining revealed that the collagen fibers were to a greater or lesser extent still intact and partly clotted together near the lesion border in all tumor models. In conclusion, this study reveals effective mechanical fragmentation of different tumor types using BH without

  17. On the Mutual Effect of Viscoplasticity and Interfacial Damage Progression in Interfacial Fracture of Lead-Free Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Milad; Cugnoni, Joel; Botsis, John

    2011-10-01

    The main goal of this paper is to shed light on the effect of strain rate and viscoplastic deformation of bulk solder on the interfacial failure of lead-free solder joints. For this purpose, interfacial damage evolution and mode I fracture behavior of the joint were evaluated experimentally by performing stable fracture tests at different strain rates employing an optimized tapered double cantilever beam (TDCB) design. The viscoplastic behavior of the solder was characterized in shear, and the constitutive parameters related to the Anand model were determined. A rate-independent cohesive zone damage model was identified to best simulate the interfacial damage progression in the TDCB tests by developing a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element (FE) model and considering the viscoplastic response of the bulk solder. The influence of strain rate on the load capability and failure mode of the joint was clarified by analyzing the experimental and simulation results. It was shown how, at the lower strain rates, the normal stress generated at the interface is limited by the significant creep relaxation developed in the bulk solder and thus is not sufficiently high to initiate interfacial damage, whereas at higher rates, a large amount of the external energy is dissipated into interfacial damage development.

  18. Analyses of tumor-suppressor genes in germline mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes are critical regulators of growth and functioning of cells, whose loss of function contributes to tumorigenesis. Accordingly, analyses of the consequences of their loss of function in genetically engineered mouse models have provided important insights into mechanisms of human cancer, as well as resources for preclinical analyses and biomarker discovery. Nowadays, most investigations of genetically engineered mouse models of tumor-suppressor function use conditional or inducible alleles, which enable analyses in specific cancer (tissue) types and overcome the consequences of embryonic lethality of germline loss of function of essential tumor-suppressor genes. However, historically, analyses of genetically engineered mouse models based on germline loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes were very important as these early studies established the principle that loss of function could be studied in mouse cancer models and also enabled analyses of these essential genes in an organismal context. Although the cancer phenotypes of these early germline models did not always recapitulate the expected phenotypes in human cancer, these models provided the essential foundation for the more sophisticated conditional and inducible models that are currently in use. Here, we describe these "first-generation" germline models of loss of function models, focusing on the important lessons learned from their analyses, which helped in the design and analyses of "next-generation" genetically engineered mouse models. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. A mechanistic tumor penetration model to guide antibody drug conjugate design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Vasalou

    Full Text Available Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs represent novel anti-cancer modalities engineered to specifically target and kill tumor cells expressing corresponding antigens. Due to their large size and their complex kinetics, these therapeutic agents often face heterogeneous distributions in tumors, leading to large untargeted regions that escape therapy. We present a modeling framework which includes the systemic distribution, vascular permeability, interstitial transport, as well as binding and payload release kinetics of ADC-therapeutic agents in mouse xenografts. We focused, in particular, on receptor dynamics such as endocytic trafficking mechanisms within cancer cells, to simulate their impact on tumor mass shrinkage upon ADC administration. Our model identified undesirable tumor properties that can impair ADC tissue homogeneity, further compromising ADC success, and explored ADC design optimization scenarios to counteract upon such unfavorable intrinsic tumor tissue attributes. We further demonstrated the profound impact of cytotoxic payload release mechanisms and the role of bystander killing effects on tumor shrinkage. This model platform affords a customizable simulation environment which can aid with experimental data interpretation and the design of ADC therapeutic treatments.

  20. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Skov Jensen

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account.Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models.We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo.The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery.

  1. A mouse model of luciferase-transfected stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Carol P Y; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Huang, Lin; Li, Gang; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    A major barrier towards the study of the effects of drugs on Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCT) has been the lack of an animal model. In this study, we created an animal model in which GCT stromal cells survived and functioned as proliferating neoplastic cells. A proliferative cell line of GCT stromal cells was used to create a stable and luciferase-transduced cell line, Luc-G33. The cell line was characterized and was found that there were no significant differences on cell proliferation rate and recruitment of monocytes when compared with the wild type GCT stromal cells. We delivered the Luc-G33 cells either subcutaneously on the back or to the tibiae of the nude mice. The presence of viable Luc-G33 cells was assessed using real-time live imaging by the IVIS 200 bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system. The tumor cells initially propagated and remained viable on site for 7 weeks in the subcutaneous tumor model. We also tested in vivo antitumor effects of Zoledronate (ZOL) and Geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) alone or their combinations in Luc-G33-transplanted nude mice. ZOL alone at 400 µg/kg and the co-treatment of ZOL at 400 µg/kg and GGTI-298 at 1.16 mg/kg reduced tumor cell viability in the model. Furthermore, the anti-tumor effects by ZOL, GGTI-298 and the co-treatment in subcutaneous tumor model were also confirmed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In conclusion, we established a nude mice model of GCT stromal cells which allows non-invasive, real-time assessments of tumor development and testing the in vivo effects of different adjuvants for treating GCT.

  2. A volume-equivalent spherical necrosis-tumor-normal liver model for estimating absorbed dose in yttrium-90 microsphere therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Hui; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Sun, Shung-Shung; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors are highly malignant tumors in Asia. The incidence of fatal liver cancer is also increasing in the United States. The aim of this study was to establish a spherical tumor model and determine its accuracy in predicting the absorbed dose in yttrium-90 (Y-90) microsphere therapy for liver cancer. Liver morphology can be approximated by a spherical model comprising three concentric regions representing necrotic, tumor, and normal liver tissues. The volumes of these three regions represent those in the actual liver. A spherical tumor model was proposed to calculate the absorbed fractions in the spherical tumor, necrotic, and normal tissue regions. The THORplan treatment planning system and Monte Carlo N-particle extended codes were used for this spherical tumor model. Using the volume-equivalent method, a spherical tumor model was created to calculate the total absorbed fraction [under different tumor-to-healthy-liver ratios (TLRs)]. The patient-specific model (THORplan) results were used to verify the spherical tumor model results. The results for both the Y-90 spectrum and the Y-90 mean energy indicated that the absorbed fraction was a function of the tumor radius and mass. The absorbed fraction increased with tumor radius. The total absorbed fractions calculated using the spherical tumor model for necrotic, liver tumor, and normal liver tissues were in good agreement with the THORplan results, with differences of less than 3% for TLRs of 2-5. The results for the effect of TLR indicate that for the same tumor configuration, the total absorbed fraction decreased with increasing TLR; for the same shell tumor thickness and TLR, the total absorbed fraction was approximately constant; and for tumors with the same radius, the total fraction absorbed by the tumor increased with the shell thickness. The results from spherical tumor models with different tumor-to-healthy-liver ratios were highly consistent with the

  3. Modelling Tumor-induced Angiogenesis: Combination of Stochastic Sprout Spacing and Sprout Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini F.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Angiogenesis initiated by cancerous cells is the process by which new blood vessels are formed to enhance oxygenation and growth of tumor. Objective: In this paper, we present a new multiscale mathematical model for the formation of a vascular network in tumor angiogenesis process. Methods: Our model couples an improved sprout spacing model as a stochastic mathematical model of sprouting along an existing parent blood vessel, with a mathematical model of sprout progression in the extracellular matrix (ECM in response to some tumor angiogenic factors (TAFs. We perform simulations of the siting of capillary sprouts on an existing blood vessel using finite difference approximation of the dynamic equations of some angiogenesis activators and inhibitors. Angiogenesis activators are chemicals secreted by hypoxic tumor cells for initiating angiogenesis, and inhibitors of the angiogenesis are chemicals that are produced around every new sprout during tumor angiogenesis to inhibit the formation of further sprouts as a feedback of sprouting in angiogenesis. Moreover, for modelling sprout progression in ECM, we use three equations for the motility of endothelial cells at the tip of the activated sprouts, the consumption of TAF and the production and uptake of Fibronectin by endothelial cells. Results: Coupling these two basic models not only does provide a better time estimation of angiogenesis process, but also it is more compatible with reality. Conclusion: This model can be used to provide basic information for angiogenesis in the related studies. Related simulations can estimate the position and number of sprouts along parent blood vessel during the initial steps of angiogenesis and models the process of sprout progression in ECM until they vascularize a tumor.

  4. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sébastien; Lamont, Clare; Beheshti, Afshin; Tracz, Amanda; Ebos, John M L; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma) and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1) to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2) to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3) to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80%) extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70%) beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  5. Classical mathematical models for description and prediction of experimental tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Benzekry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite internal complexity, tumor growth kinetics follow relatively simple laws that can be expressed as mathematical models. To explore this further, quantitative analysis of the most classical of these were performed. The models were assessed against data from two in vivo experimental systems: an ectopic syngeneic tumor (Lewis lung carcinoma and an orthotopically xenografted human breast carcinoma. The goals were threefold: 1 to determine a statistical model for description of the measurement error, 2 to establish the descriptive power of each model, using several goodness-of-fit metrics and a study of parametric identifiability, and 3 to assess the models' ability to forecast future tumor growth. The models included in the study comprised the exponential, exponential-linear, power law, Gompertz, logistic, generalized logistic, von Bertalanffy and a model with dynamic carrying capacity. For the breast data, the dynamics were best captured by the Gompertz and exponential-linear models. The latter also exhibited the highest predictive power, with excellent prediction scores (≥80% extending out as far as 12 days in the future. For the lung data, the Gompertz and power law models provided the most parsimonious and parametrically identifiable description. However, not one of the models was able to achieve a substantial prediction rate (≥70% beyond the next day data point. In this context, adjunction of a priori information on the parameter distribution led to considerable improvement. For instance, forecast success rates went from 14.9% to 62.7% when using the power law model to predict the full future tumor growth curves, using just three data points. These results not only have important implications for biological theories of tumor growth and the use of mathematical modeling in preclinical anti-cancer drug investigations, but also may assist in defining how mathematical models could serve as potential prognostic tools in the clinic.

  6. State-Dependent Impulsive Control Strategies for a Tumor-Immune Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Su Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the number of tumor cells leads us to expect more efficient strategies for treatment of tumor. Towards this goal, a tumor-immune model with state-dependent impulsive treatments is established. This model may give an efficient treatment schedule to control tumor’s abnormal growth. By using the Poincaré map and analogue of Poincaré criterion, some conditions for the existence and stability of a positive order-1 periodic solution of this model are obtained. Moreover, we carry out numerical simulations to illustrate the feasibility of our main results and compare fixed-time impulsive treatment effects with state-dependent impulsive treatment effects. The results of our simulations say that, in determining optimal treatment timing, the model with state-dependent impulsive control is more efficient than that with fixed-time impulsive control.

  7. Conditional mouse models demonstrate oncogene-dependent differences in tumor maintenance and recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilli, Maddalena T; Furth, Priscilla A

    2003-01-01

    Diversity in the pathophysiology of breast cancer frustrates therapeutic progress. We need to understand how mechanisms activated by specific combinations of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, and hormonal signaling pathways govern response to therapy and prognosis. A recent series of investigations conducted by Chodosh and colleagues offers new insights into the similarities and differences between specific oncogenic pathways. Expression of three oncogenes relevant to pathways activated in human breast cancers (c-myc, activated neu and Wnt1) were targeted to murine mammary epithelial cells using the same transgenic tetracycline-responsive conditional gene expression system. While the individual transgenic lines demonstrate similarly high rates of tumor penetrance, rates of oncogene-independent tumor maintenance and recurrence following initial regression are significantly different, and are modifiable by mutations in specific cooperating oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressor gene expression. The experiments make three notable contributions. First, they illustrate that rates of tumor regression and recurrence following initial regression are dependent upon the pathways activated by the initiating oncogene. The experiments also demonstrate that altered expression or mutation of specific cooperating oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes results in different rates of tumor regression and recurrence. Finally, they exemplify the power of conditional mouse models for elucidating how specific molecular mechanisms give rise to the complexity of human cancer

  8. A Western-type diet accelerates tumor progression in an autochthonous mouse model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaverias, Gemma; Danilo, Christiane; Wang, Yu; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Daumer, Kristin; Lisanti, Michael P; Frank, Philippe G

    2010-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have provided evidence suggesting an important role for diet and obesity in the development of cancer. Specifically, lipid nutrients of the diet have been identified as important regulators of tumor development and progression. In the present study, we have examined the role of dietary fat and cholesterol in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer using the well-characterized TRAMP mouse model. Consumption of a Western-type diet--that is, enriched in both fat and cholesterol--accelerated prostate tumor incidence and tumor burden compared to mice fed a control chow diet. Furthermore, we also show that this diet increased the extent and the histological grade of prostate tumors. These findings were confirmed by the presence of increased levels of protein markers of advanced tumors in prostates obtained from animals fed a Western-type diet compared to those obtained from control animals. Increased lung metastases in animals fed a Western-type diet were also observed. In addition, we found that with a Western diet, animals bearing tumors presented with reduced plasma cholesterol levels compared with animals fed a control diet. Finally, we show that tumors obtained from animals fed a Western-type diet displayed increased expression of the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI and increased angiogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that dietary fat and cholesterol play an important role in the development of prostate cancer.

  9. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milcah C. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2 for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of

  10. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  11. Advantages of a dual-tracer model over reference tissue models for binding potential measurement in tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, K M; Samkoe, K S; Klubben, W S; Hasan, T; Pogue, B W

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of tumor molecular expression in vivo could have a significant impact for informing and monitoring immerging targeted therapies in oncology. Molecular imaging of targeted tracers can be used to quantify receptor expression in the form of a binding potential (BP) if the arterial input curve or a surrogate of it is also measured. However, the assumptions of the most common approaches (reference tissue models) may not be valid for use in tumors. In this study, the validity of reference tissue models is investigated for use in tumors experimentally and in simulations. Three different tumor lines were grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and the mice were injected with a mixture of an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR-) targeted fluorescent tracer and an untargeted fluorescent tracer. A one-compartment plasma input model demonstrated that the transport kinetics of both tracers were significantly different between tumors and all potential reference tissues, and using the reference tissue model resulted in a theoretical underestimation in BP of 50 ± 37%. On the other hand, the targeted and untargeted tracers demonstrated similar transport kinetics, allowing a dual-tracer approach to be employed to accurately estimate binding potential (with a theoretical error of 0.23 ± 9.07%). These findings highlight the potential for using a dual-tracer approach to quantify receptor expression in tumors with abnormal hemodynamics, possibly to inform the choice or progress of molecular cancer therapies. PMID:23022732

  12. Mapping interfacial excess in atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felfer, Peter, E-mail: peter.felfer@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney (Australia); Scherrer, Barbara [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney (Australia); Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule Zürich (Switzerland); Demeulemeester, Jelle [Imec vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Vandervorst, Wilfried [Imec vzw, Kapeldreef 75, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Cairney, Julie M. [School of Aerospace Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Using modern wide-angle atom probes, it is possible to acquire atomic scale 3D data containing 1000 s of nm{sup 2} of interfaces. It is therefore possible to probe the distribution of segregated species across these interfaces. Here, we present techniques that allow the production of models for interfacial excess (IE) mapping and discuss the underlying considerations and sampling statistics. We also show, how the same principles can be used to achieve thickness mapping of thin films. We demonstrate the effectiveness on example applications, including the analysis of segregation to a phase boundary in stainless steel, segregation to a metal–ceramic interface and the assessment of thickness variations of the gate oxide in a fin-FET. - Highlights: • Using computational geometry, interfacial excess can be mapped for various features in APT. • Suitable analysis models can be created by combining manual modelling and mesh generation algorithms. • Thin film thickness can be mapped with high accuracy using this technique.

  13. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

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    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  14. Fluctuations induced extinction and stochastic resonance effect in a model of tumor growth with periodic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dongxi; Xu Wei; Guo, Yongfeng; Xu Yong

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a stochastic model of tumor growth derived from the catalytic Michaelis-Menten reaction with positional and environmental fluctuations under subthreshold periodic treatment. Firstly, the influences of environmental fluctuations on the treatable stage are analyzed numerically. Applying the standard theory of stochastic resonance derived from the two-state approach, we derive the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analytically, which is used to measure the stochastic resonance phenomenon. It is found that the weak environmental fluctuations could induce the extinction of tumor cells in the subthreshold periodic treatment. The positional stability is better in favor of the treatment of the tumor cells. Besides, the appropriate and feasible treatment intensity and the treatment cycle should be highlighted considered in the treatment of tumor cells.

  15. Immunological tumor destruction in a murine melanoma model by targeted LTalpha independent of secondary lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrama, D.; Voigt, H.; Eggert, A.O.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that targeting lymphotoxin alpha (LTalpha) to the tumor evokes its immunological destruction in a syngeneic B16 melanoma model. Since treatment was associated with the induction of peritumoral tertiary lymphoid tissue, we speculated that the induced immune...... of specific T-cell responses even in the absence of secondary lymphoid organs. In addition, this effect is accompanied by the initiation of tertiary lymphoid tissue at the tumor site in which B and T lymphocytes are compartmentalized in defined areas and which harbor expanded numbers of tumor specific T cells...... as demonstrated by in situ TRP-2/K(b) tetramer staining. Mechanistically, targeted LTalpha therapy seems to induce changes at the tumor site which allows a coordinated interaction of immune competent cells triggering the induction of tertiary lymphoid tissue. CONCLUSION: Thus, our data demonstrate that targeted...

  16. Induction of Anti-Tumor Immune Responses by Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE in a Murine Model of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bzorek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT is a relatively new mode of internally targeted radiotherapy currently in clinical trials. In PRRT, ionizing radioisotopes conjugated to somatostatin analogues are targeted to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs via somatostatin receptors. Despite promising clinical results, very little is known about the mechanism of tumor control. By using NCI-H727 cells in an in vivo murine xenograft model of human NETs, we showed that 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT led to increased infiltration of CD86+ antigen presenting cells into tumor tissue. We also found that following treatment with PRRT, there was significantly increased tumor infiltration by CD49b+/FasL+ NK cells potentially capable of tumor killing. Further investigation into the immunomodulatory effects of PRRT will be essential in improving treatment efficacy.

  17. Interfacial morphologies and growth modes of F.C.C. metallic crystals from liquid alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camel, Denis

    1980-01-01

    Equilibrium and growth morphologies of f.c.c. metallic crystals in contact with liquid alloys have been observed in-situ using transmission electron microscopy. These morphologies have been discussed in terms of atomic interfacial structure and growth mechanisms with the help of a statistical thermodynamic model which takes into account the effects of chemical interactions and interfacial adsorption. (author) [fr

  18. Combination therapy targeting the tumor microenvironment is effective in a model of human ocular melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafer Peter H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular melanoma is the leading intraocular malignancy. There is no effective treatment for metastatic ocular melanoma. We sought a treatment targeting the tumor microenvironment as well as the tumor cells. Methods Migration of HUVEC cells, the ability of HUVEC cells to form tubes, and proliferative capacity of a human ocular melanoma cell line were tested in the presence of lenalidomide and sorafenib alone and in combination. The compounds were also tested in a rat aortic ring assay and were tested in a highly aggressive human ocular melanoma xenograft model. Results Lenalidomide and Sorafenib inhibit HUVEC ability to migrate and form tubes and when used in combination the inhibition is increased. The agents alone and in combination inhibit outgrowth in the rat aortic ring model. The combination of the agents improved the inhibition over either single agent. In a xenograft model, combination therapy inhibited tumor growth over inhibition by single agent alone in a significant fashion (p Conclusion Lenalidomide and sorafenib are effective at targeting endothelial cells, inhibiting growth of ocular melanoma cells and can inhibit growth of tumors in a xenograft model as well as inhibit development of metastases. Combining these agents works in an additive to synergistic way to inhibit the growth of tumors and development of metastases.

  19. Mathematical modeling of interleukin-27 induction of anti-tumor T cells response.

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    Kang-Ling Liao

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which promotes Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities, such as Interferon-[Formula: see text] secretion. For this reason Interleukin-12 could be a powerful therapeutic agent for cancer treatment. However, Interleukin-12 is also excessively toxic. Interleukin-27 is an immunoregulatory cytokine from the Interleukin-12 family, but it is not as toxic as Interleukin-12. In recent years, Interleukin-27 has been considered as a potential anti-tumor agent. Recent experiments in vitro and in vivo have shown that cancer cells transfected with IL-27 activate CD8+ T cells to promote the secretion of anti-tumor cytokines Interleukin-10, although, at the same time, IL-27 inhibits the secretion of Interferon-[Formula: see text] by CD8+ T cells. In the present paper we develop a mathematical model based on these experimental results. The model involves a dynamic network which includes tumor cells, CD8+ T cells and cytokines Interleukin-27, Interleukin-10 and Interferon-[Formula: see text]. Simulations of the model show how Interleukin-27 promotes CD8+ T cells to secrete Interleukin-10 to inhibit tumor growth. On the other hand Interleukin-27 inhibits the secretion of Interferon-[Formula: see text] by CD8+ T cells which somewhat diminishes the inhibition of tumor growth. Our numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. We use the model to design protocols of IL-27 injections for the treatment of cancer and find that, for some special types of cancer, with a fixed total amount of drug, within a certain range, continuous injection has better efficacy than intermittent injections in reducing the tumor load while the treatment is ongoing, although the decrease in tumor load is only temporary.

  20. Image-based modeling of tumor shrinkage in head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Ming; Xie Yaoqin; Moros, Eduardo G.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Xing Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the kinetics of tumor growth/shrinkage represents a critical step in quantitative assessment of therapeutics and realization of adaptive radiation therapy. This article presents a novel framework for image-based modeling of tumor change and demonstrates its performance with synthetic images and clinical cases. Methods: Due to significant tumor tissue content changes, similarity-based models are not suitable for describing the process of tumor volume changes. Under the hypothesis that tissue features in a tumor volume or at the boundary region are partially preserved, the kinetic change was modeled in two steps: (1) Autodetection of homologous tissue features shared by two input images using the scale invariance feature transformation (SIFT) method; and (2) establishment of a voxel-to-voxel correspondence between the images for the remaining spatial points by interpolation. The correctness of the tissue feature correspondence was assured by a bidirectional association procedure, where SIFT features were mapped from template to target images and reversely. A series of digital phantom experiments and five head and neck clinical cases were used to assess the performance of the proposed technique. Results: The proposed technique can faithfully identify the known changes introduced when constructing the digital phantoms. The subsequent feature-guided thin plate spline calculation reproduced the ''ground truth'' with accuracy better than 1.5 mm. For the clinical cases, the new algorithm worked reliably for a volume change as large as 30%. Conclusions: An image-based tumor kinetic algorithm was developed to model the tumor response to radiation therapy. The technique provides a practical framework for future application in adaptive radiation therapy.

  1. Combined thermal and elastic modeling of the normal and tumorous breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray

    2008-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer, but an open question is how to quantify the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying physiological/pathological conditions. Previous thermal modeling techniques generally did not utilize the breast geometry determined by the gravity-induced elastic deformations arising from various body postures. In this paper, a 3-D finite-element method is developed for combined modeling of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast, including the mechanical nonlinearity associated with large deformations. The effects of the thermal and elastic properties of the breast tissues are investigated quantitatively. For the normal breast in a standing/sitting up posture, the gravity-induced deformation alone is found to be able to cause an asymmetric temperature distribution even though all the thermal/elastic properties are symmetrical, and this temperature asymmetry increases for softer and more compressible breast tissues. For a tumorous breast, we found that the surface-temperature alterations generally can be recognizable for superficial tumors at depths less than 20 mm. Tumor size plays a less important role than the tumor depth in determining the tumor-induced temperature difference. This result may imply that a higher thermal sensitivity is critical for a breast thermogram system when deeper tumors are present, even if the tumor is relatively large. We expect this new method to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis and treatment of breast tumors.

  2. MicroRNA signature characterizes primary tumors that metastasize in an esophageal adenocarcinoma rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Zaidi

    Full Text Available To establish a miRNA signature for metastasis in an animal model of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC.The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC has dramatically increased and esophageal cancer is now the sixth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Mortality rates remain high among patients with advanced stage disease and esophagectomy is associated with high complication rates. Hence, early identification of potentially metastatic disease would better guide treatment strategies.The modified Levrat's surgery was performed to induce EAC in Sprague-Dawley rats. Primary EAC and distant metastatic sites were confirmed via histology and immunofluorescence. miRNA profiling was performed on primary tumors with or without metastasis. A unique subset of miRNAs expressed in primary tumors and metastases was identified with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA along with upstream and downstream targets. miRNA-linked gene expression analysis was performed on a secondary cohort of metastasis positive (n=5 and metastasis negative (n=28 primary tumors.The epithelial origin of distant metastasis was established by IF using villin (VIL1 and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC antibodies. miRNome analysis identified four down-regulated miRNAs in metastasis positive primary tumors compared to metastasis negative tumors: miR-92a-3p (p=0.0001, miR-141-3p (p=0.0022, miR-451-1a (p=0.0181 and miR133a-3p (p=0.0304. Six target genes identified in the top scoring networks by IPA were validated as significantly, differentially expressed in metastasis positive primary tumors: Ago2, Akt1, Kras, Bcl2L11, CDKN1B and Zeb2.In vivo metastasis was confirmed in the modified Levrat's model. Analysis of the primary tumor identified a distinctive miRNA signature for primary tumors that metastasized.

  3. Measurement of Interfacial Area Production and Permeability within Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of the pore-level interactions that affect multi-phase flow in porous media is important in many subsurface engineering applications, including enhanced oil recovery, remediation of dense non-aqueous liquid contaminated sites, and geologic CO 2 sequestration. Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to have several shortcomings, which might partially be overcome using a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles that includes interfacial area as an additional parameter. A few static experimental studies have been previously performed, which allowed the determination of static parameters of the model, but no information exists concerning the interfacial area dynamic parameters. A new experimental porous flow cell that was constructed using stereolithography for two-phase gas-liquid flow studies was used in conjunction with an in-house analysis code to provide information on dynamic evolution of both fluid phases and gas-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the new generalized model of two-phase flow model and describe how the stereolithography flow cell experimental setup was used to obtain the dynamic parameters for the interfacial area numerical model. In particular, the methods used to determine the interfacial area permeability and production terms are shown.

  4. Oxygen distribution in tumors: A qualitative analysis and modeling study providing a novel Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a Monte Carlo (MC)-based simulation model for analyzing the dependence of tumor oxygen distribution on different variables related to tumor vasculature [blood velocity, vessel-to-vessel proximity (vessel proximity), and inflowing oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 )]. Methods: A voxel-based tissue model containing parallel capillaries with square cross-sections (sides of 10 μm) was constructed. Green's function was used for diffusion calculations and Michaelis-Menten's kinetics to manage oxygen consumption. The model was tuned to approximately reproduce the oxygenational status of a renal carcinoma; the depth oxygenation curves (DOC) were fitted with an analytical expression to facilitate rapid MC simulations of tumor oxygen distribution. DOCs were simulated with three variables at three settings each (blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO 2 ), which resulted in 27 combinations of conditions. To create a model that simulated variable oxygen distributions, the oxygen tension at a specific point was randomly sampled with trilinear interpolation in the dataset from the first simulation. Six correlations between blood velocity, vessel proximity, and inflowing pO 2 were hypothesized. Variable models with correlated parameters were compared to each other and to a nonvariable, DOC-based model to evaluate the differences in simulated oxygen distributions and tumor radiosensitivities for different tumor sizes. Results: For tumors with radii ranging from 5 to 30 mm, the nonvariable DOC model tended to generate normal or log-normal oxygen distributions, with a cut-off at zero. The pO 2 distributions simulated with the six-variable DOC models were quite different from the distributions generated with the nonvariable DOC model; in the former case the variable models simulated oxygen distributions that were more similar to in vivo results found in the literature. For larger tumors, the oxygen distributions became truncated in the lower

  5. In Vivo Imaging Reveals Significant Tumor Vascular Dysfunction and Increased Tumor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Expression Induced by High Single-Dose Irradiation in a Pancreatic Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Azusa [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Mujcic, Hilda [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wouters, Bradly G. [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); DaCosta, Ralph S., E-mail: rdacosta@uhnres.utoronto.ca [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of high-dose irradiation on pancreatic tumor vasculature and microenvironment using in vivo imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: A BxPC3 pancreatic tumor xenograft was established in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model and a subcutaneous hind leg model. Tumors were irradiated with a single dose of 4, 12, or 24 Gy. The dorsal skinfold window chamber model was used to assess tumor response, vascular function and permeability, platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium, and tumor hypoxia for up to 14 days after 24-Gy irradiation. The hind leg model was used to monitor tumor size, hypoxia, and vascularity for up to 65 days after 24-Gy irradiation. Tumors were assessed histologically to validate in vivo observations. Results: In vivo fluorescence imaging revealed temporary vascular dysfunction in tumors irradiated with a single dose of 4 to 24 Gy, but most significantly with a single dose of 24 Gy. Vascular functional recovery was observed by 14 days after irradiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with 24 Gy caused platelet and leukocyte adhesion to the vascular endothelium within hours to days after irradiation. Vascular permeability was significantly higher in irradiated tumors compared with nonirradiated controls 14 days after irradiation. This observation corresponded with increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in irradiated tumors. In the hind leg model, irradiation with a single dose of 24 Gy led to tumor growth delay, followed by tumor regrowth. Conclusions: Irradiation of the BxPC3 tumors with a single dose of 24 Gy caused transient vascular dysfunction and increased expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Such biological changes may impact tumor response to high single-dose and hypofractionated irradiation, and further investigations are needed to better understand the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  6. Germline genetic variation modulates tumor progression and metastasis in a mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank J Patel

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine (NE differentiation has gained increased attention as a prostate cancer (PC prognostic marker. The aim of this study is to determine whether host germline genetic variation influences tumor progression and metastasis in C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP8247Ng/J (TRAMP mouse model of aggressive NEPC. TRAMP mice were crossed to the eight progenitor strains of the Collaborative Cross recombinant inbred panel to address this. Tumor growth and metastasis burden were quantified in heterozygous transgene positive F1 male mice at 30 weeks of age. Compared to wild-type C57BL/6J-Tg(TRAMP824Ng/J males, TRAMP x CAST/EiJ, TRAMP x NOD/ShiLtJ and TRAMP x NZO/HlLtJ F1 males displayed significant increases in tumor growth. Conversely, TRAMP x WSB/EiJ and TRAMP x PWK/PhJ F1 males displayed significant reductions in tumor growth. Interestingly, despite reduced tumor burden, TRAMP x WSB/EiJ males had an increased nodal metastasis burden. Patterns of distant pulmonary metastasis tended to follow the same patterns as that of local dissemination in each of the strains. All tumors and metastases displayed positive staining for NE markers, synaptophysin, and FOXA2. These experiments conclusively demonstrate that the introduction of germline variation by breeding modulates tumor growth, local metastasis burden, and distant metastasis frequency in this model of NEPC. These strains will be useful as model systems to facilitate the identification of germline modifier genes that promote the development of aggressive forms of PC.

  7. Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models for cancer research and drug evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xian; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Jia, Xinqiao

    2014-11-15

    Cancer occurs when cells acquire genomic instability and inflammation, produce abnormal levels of epigenetic factors/proteins and tumor suppressors, reprogram the energy metabolism and evade immune destruction, leading to the disruption of cell cycle/normal growth. An early event in carcinogenesis is loss of polarity and detachment from the natural basement membrane, allowing cells to form distinct three-dimensional (3D) structures that interact with each other and with the surrounding microenvironment. Although valuable information has been accumulated from traditional in vitro studies in which cells are grown on flat and hard plastic surfaces (2D culture), this culture condition does not reflect the essential features of tumor tissues. Further, fundamental understanding of cancer metastasis cannot be obtained readily from 2D studies because they lack the complex and dynamic cell-cell communications and cell-matrix interactions that occur during cancer metastasis. These shortcomings, along with lack of spatial depth and cell connectivity, limit the applicability of 2D cultures to accurate testing of pharmacologically active compounds, free or sequestered in nanoparticles. To recapitulate features of native tumor microenvironments, various biomimetic 3D tumor models have been developed to incorporate cancer and stromal cells, relevant matrix components, and biochemical and biophysical cues, into one spatially and temporally integrated system. In this article, we review recent advances in creating 3D tumor models employing tissue engineering principles. We then evaluate the utilities of these novel models for the testing of anticancer drugs and their delivery systems. We highlight the profound differences in responses from 3D in vitro tumors and conventional monolayer cultures. Overall, strategic integration of biological principles and engineering approaches will both improve understanding of tumor progression and invasion and support discovery of more personalized

  8. Stereoscopic virtual reality models for planning tumor resection in the sellar region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shou-sen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult for neurosurgeons to perceive the complex three-dimensional anatomical relationships in the sellar region. Methods To investigate the value of using a virtual reality system for planning resection of sellar region tumors. The study included 60 patients with sellar tumors. All patients underwent computed tomography angiography, MRI-T1W1, and contrast enhanced MRI-T1W1 image sequence scanning. The CT and MRI scanning data were collected and then imported into a Dextroscope imaging workstation, a virtual reality system that allows structures to be viewed stereoscopically. During preoperative assessment, typical images for each patient were chosen and printed out for use by the surgeons as references during surgery. Results All sellar tumor models clearly displayed bone, the internal carotid artery, circle of Willis and its branches, the optic nerve and chiasm, ventricular system, tumor, brain, soft tissue and adjacent structures. Depending on the location of the tumors, we simulated the transmononasal sphenoid sinus approach, transpterional approach, and other approaches. Eleven surgeons who used virtual reality models completed a survey questionnaire. Nine of the participants said that the virtual reality images were superior to other images but that other images needed to be used in combination with the virtual reality images. Conclusions The three-dimensional virtual reality models were helpful for individualized planning of surgery in the sellar region. Virtual reality appears to be promising as a valuable tool for sellar region surgery in the future.

  9. Characterization of a switchable chimeric antigen receptor platform in a pre-clinical solid tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishali Bejestani, Elham; Cartellieri, Marc; Bergmann, Ralf; Ehninger, Armin; Loff, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Spehr, Johannes; Dietrich, Antje; Feldmann, Anja; Albert, Susann; Wermke, Martin; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Bornhäuser, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bachmann, Michael; von Bonin, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The universal modular chimeric antigen receptor (UniCAR) platform redirects CAR-T cells using a separated, soluble targeting module with a short half-life. This segregation allows precise controllability and flexibility. Herein we show that the UniCAR platform can be used to efficiently target solid cancers in vitro and in vivo using a pre-clinical prostate cancer model which overexpresses prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA). Short-term administration of the targeting module to tumor bearing immunocompromised mice engrafted with human UniCAR-T cells significantly delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival of recipient mice both in a low and high tumor burden model. In addition, we analyzed phenotypic and functional changes of cancer cells and UniCAR-T cells in association with the administration of the targeting module to reveal potential immunoevasive mechanisms. Most notably, UniCAR-T cell activation induced upregulation of immune-inhibitory molecules such as programmed death ligands. In conclusion, this work illustrates that the UniCAR platform mediates potent anti-tumor activity in a relevant in vitro and in vivo solid tumor model.

  10. Tumor-Derived Cell Lines as Molecular Models of Cancer Pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodspeed, Andrew; Heiser, Laura M; Gray, Joe W; Costello, James C

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal cells, tumor cells have undergone an array of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Often, these changes underlie cancer development, progression, and drug resistance, so the utility of model systems rests on their ability to recapitulate the genomic aberrations observed in primary tumors. Tumor-derived cell lines have long been used to study the underlying biologic processes in cancer, as well as screening platforms for discovering and evaluating the efficacy of anticancer therapeutics. Multiple -omic measurements across more than a thousand cancer cell lines have been produced following advances in high-throughput technologies and multigroup collaborative projects. These data complement the large, international cancer genomic sequencing efforts to characterize patient tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC). Given the scope and scale of data that have been generated, researchers are now in a position to evaluate the similarities and differences that exist in genomic features between cell lines and patient samples. As pharmacogenomics models, cell lines offer the advantages of being easily grown, relatively inexpensive, and amenable to high-throughput testing of therapeutic agents. Data generated from cell lines can then be used to link cellular drug response to genomic features, where the ultimate goal is to build predictive signatures of patient outcome. This review highlights the recent work that has compared -omic profiles of cell lines with primary tumors, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of cancer cell lines as pharmacogenomic models of anticancer therapies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Liquid flow along a solid surface reversibly alters interfacial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Dan; Backus, Ellen H G; Hunger, Johannes; Parekh, Sapun H; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-06-06

    In nature, aqueous solutions often move collectively along solid surfaces (for example, raindrops falling on the ground and rivers flowing through riverbeds). However, the influence of such motion on water-surface interfacial chemistry is unclear. In this work, we combine surface-specific sum frequency generation spectroscopy and microfluidics to show that at immersed calcium fluoride and fused silica surfaces, flow leads to a reversible modification of the surface charge and subsequent realignment of the interfacial water molecules. Obtaining equivalent effects under static conditions requires a substantial change in bulk solution pH (up to 2 pH units), demonstrating the coupling between flow and chemistry. These marked flow-induced variations in interfacial chemistry should substantially affect our understanding and modeling of chemical processes at immersed surfaces. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Kinetic modeling of tumor growth and dissemination in the craniospinal axis: implications for craniospinal irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halperin Edward C

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma and other types of tumors that gain access to the cerebrospinal fluid can spread throughout the craniospinal axis. The purpose of this study was to devise a simple multi-compartment kinetic model using established tumor cell growth and treatment sensitivity parameters to model the complications of this spread as well as the impact of treatment with craniospinal radiotherapy. Methods A two-compartment mathematical model was constructed. Rate constants were derived from previously published work and the model used to predict outcomes for various clinical scenarios. Results The model is simple and with the use of known and estimated clinical parameters is consistent with known clinical outcomes. Treatment outcomes are critically dependent upon the duration of the treatment break and the radiosensitivity of the tumor. Cross-plot analyses serve as an estimate of likelihood of cure as a function of these and other factors. Conclusion The model accurately describes known clinical outcomes for patients with medulloblastoma. It can help guide treatment decisions for radiation oncologists treating patients with this disease. Incorporation of other treatment modalities, such as chemotherapy, that enhance radiation sensitivity and/or reduce tumor burden, are predicted to significantly increase the probability of cure.

  13. A preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic guided microwave ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Wang, Guo-Bao; Xiang, Zhan-Wang; Yang, Bin; Xue, Jing-Bing; Mo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Fan, Wei-Jun

    2016-05-03

    This study sought to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of a preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic(CT) guided microwave(MW) ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors. This mathematic model was a regular cylinder quantifying appropriate puncture routes from the bottom up. A total of 103 patients with hepatic dome tumors were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups based on whether this model was used or not: Group A (using the model; n = 43) versus Group B (not using the model; n = 60). All tumors were treated by CT-guided MW ablation and follow-up contrast CT were reviewed. The average number of times for successful puncture, average ablation time, and incidence of right shoulder pain were less in Group A than Group B (1.4 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; 8.8 vs. 11.1 minutes, P = 0.003; and 4.7% vs. 20%, P = 0.039). The technical success rate was higher in Group A than Group B (97.7% vs. 85.0%, P = 0.032). There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary and secondary technique efficacy rates (97.7% vs. 88.3%, P = 0.081; 90.0% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.314). No major complications occurred in both groups. The mathematic model of regular cylinder is feasible and safe for CT-guided MW ablation in treating hepatic dome tumors.

  14. Innovative Disease Model: Zebrafish as an In Vivo Platform for Intestinal Disorder and Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Wei Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world’s most common cancers and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, causing more than 50,000 estimated deaths each year. Several risk factors are highly associated with CRC, including being overweight, eating a diet high in red meat and over-processed meat, having a history of inflammatory bowel disease, and smoking. Previous zebrafish studies have demonstrated that multiple oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can be regulated through genetic or epigenetic alterations. Zebrafish research has also revealed that the activation of carcinogenesis-associated signal pathways plays an important role in CRC. The biology of cancer, intestinal disorders caused by carcinogens, and the morphological patterns of tumors have been found to be highly similar between zebrafish and humans. Therefore, the zebrafish has become an important animal model for translational medical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to elucidate the characteristics of gastrointestinal diseases. This review article focuses on zebrafish models that have been used to study human intestinal disorders and tumors, including models involving mutant and transgenic fish. We also report on xenograft models and chemically-induced enterocolitis. This review demonstrates that excellent zebrafish models can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases and help facilitate the evaluation of novel anti-tumor drugs.

  15. Role of corner interfacial area in uniqueness of capillary pressure-saturation- interfacial area relation under transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez-Brizuela, Omar E.; Karadimitriou, Nikolaos K.; Joekar-Niasar, Vahid; Shore, Craig A.; Oostrom, Mart

    2017-09-01

    Capillary pressure (Pc) and phase saturation (Sw) in two-phase flow are well known to be hysteretically related. Thermodynamically-derived multiphase flow theories conjecture that this hysteresis will be lifted if specific interfacial area (anw) is included as a new state variable to create a unique Pc-S-anw surface. Specific interfacial area is defined as the total interfacial area per volume of a porous medium. Several studies have confirmed the existence of a unique Pc-Sw-anw surface under equilibrium conditions for a given porous medium. However, there is only one experimental work in the literature, where the uniqueness of this surface under transient conditions was questioned. However, in the data analysis only the terminal menisci were considered to calculate the specific interfacial area. In this paper, we investigate the uniqueness of Pc-S-anw surfaces with and without the inclusion of corner fluid-fluid interfacial area, under different dynamic conditions, in two different micro-models bearing two different (granular vs. triangulated) pore morphologies. We establish a systematic metric to analyze hysteresis under different hydrodynamic conditions.

  16. Short hairpin RNA targeting of fibroblast activation protein inhibits tumor growth and improves the tumor microenvironment in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast activation protein (FAP is a specific serine proteaseexpressed in tumor stroma proven to be a stimulatory factor inthe progression of some cancers. The purpose of this studywas to investigate the effects of FAP knockdown on tumorgrowth and the tumor microenvironment. Mice bearing 4T1subcutaneous tumors were treated with liposome-shRNAcomplexes targeting FAP. Tumor volumes and weights weremonitored, and FAP, collagen, microvessel density (MVD,and apoptosis were measured. Our studies showed thatshRNA targeting of FAP in murine breast cancer reduces FAPexpression, inhibits tumor growth, promotes collagenaccumulation (38%, and suppresses angiogenesis (71.7%, aswell as promoting apoptosis (by threefold. We suggest thatFAP plays a role in tumor growth and in altering the tumormicroenvironment. Targeting FAP may therefore represent asupplementary therapy for breast cancer. [BMB Reports 2013;46(5: 252-257

  17. Bigh3 silencing increases retinoblastoma tumor growth in the murine SV40-TAg-Rb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Oberson, Anne; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-02-28

    BIGH3, a secreted protein of the extracellular matrix interacts with collagen and integrins on the cell surface. BIGH3 can have opposing functions in cancer, acting either as tumor suppressor or promoter by enhancing tumor progression and angiogenesis. In the eye, BIGH3 is expressed in the cornea and the retinal pigment epithelium and could impact on the development of retinoblastoma, the most common paediatric intraocular neoplasm. Retinoblastoma initiation requires the inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene in the developing retina and tumor progression involves additional genomic changes. To determine whether BIGH3 affects retinoblastoma development, we generated a retinoblastoma mouse model with disruption of the Bigh3 genomic locus. Bigh3 silencing in these mice resulted in enhanced tumor development in the retina. A decrease in apoptosis is involved in the initial events of tumorigenesis, followed by an increased activity of the pro-survival ERK pathway as well as an upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Taken together, these data suggest that BIGH3 acts as a tumor suppressor in the retina.

  18. Interfacial transport processes and rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Howard

    1991-01-01

    This textbook is designed to provide the theory, methods of measurement, and principal applications of the expanding field of interfacial hydrodynamics. It is intended to serve the research needs of both academic and industrial scientists, including chemical or mechanical engineers, material and surface scientists, physical chemists, chemical and biophysicists, rheologists, physiochemical hydrodynamicists, and applied mathematicians (especially those with interests in viscous fluid mechanics and continuum mechanics).As a textbook it provides materials for a one- or two-semester graduate-level

  19. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  20. Comparison between model-predicted tumor oxygenation dynamics and vascular-/flow-related Doppler indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Vidal Urbinati, Ailyn M; Ciardo, Delia; Franchi, Dorella; Cattani, Federica; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful and flexible method to investigate complex phenomena. It discloses the possibility of reproducing expensive as well as invasive experiments in a safe environment with limited costs. This makes it suitable to mimic tumor evolution and response to radiotherapy although the reliability of the results remains an issue. Complexity reduction is therefore a critical aspect in order to be able to compare model outcomes to clinical data. Among the factors affecting treatment efficacy, tumor oxygenation is known to play a key role in radiotherapy response. In this work, we aim at relating the oxygenation dynamics, predicted by a macroscale model trained on tumor volumetric data of uterine cervical cancer patients, to vascularization and blood flux indices assessed on Ultrasound Doppler images. We propose a macroscale model of tumor evolution based on three dynamics, namely active portion, necrotic portion, and oxygenation. The model parameters were assessed on the volume size of seven cervical cancer patients administered with 28 fractions of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (1.8 Gy/fraction). For each patient, five Doppler ultrasound tests were acquired before, during, and after the treatment. The lesion was manually contoured by an expert physician using 4D View ® (General Electric Company - Fairfield, Connecticut, United States), which automatically provided the overall tumor volume size along with three vascularization and/or blood flow indices. Volume data only were fed to the model for training purpose, while the predicted oxygenation was compared a posteriori to the measured Doppler indices. The model was able to fit the tumor volume evolution within 8% error (range: 3-8%). A strong correlation between the intrapatient longitudinal indices from Doppler measurements and oxygen predicted by the model (about 90% or above) was found in three cases. Two patients showed an average correlation value (50-70%) and the remaining

  1. Sensitivity of MRI tumor biomarkers to VEGFR inhibitor therapy in an orthotopic mouse glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available MRI biomarkers of tumor edema, vascular permeability, blood volume, and average vessel caliber are increasingly being employed to assess the efficacy of tumor therapies. However, the dependence of these biomarkers on a number of physiological factors can compromise their sensitivity and complicate the assessment of therapeutic efficacy. Here we examine the response of these MRI tumor biomarkers to cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR inhibitor, in an orthotopic mouse glioma model. A significant increase in the tumor volume and relative vessel caliber index (rVCI and a slight decrease in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were observed for both control and cediranib treated animals. This contrasts with a clinical study that observed a significant decrease in tumor rVCI, ADC and volume with cediranib therapy. While the lack of a difference between control and cediranib treated animals in these biomarker responses might suggest that cediranib has no therapeutic benefit, cediranib treated mice had a significantly increased survival. The increased survival benefit of cediranib treated animals is consistent with the significant decrease observed for cediranib treated animals in the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative microvascular blood volume (rMBV, transverse relaxation time (T2, blood vessel permeability (K(trans, and extravascular-extracellular space (ν(e. The differential response of pre-clinical and clinical tumors to cediranib therapy, along with the lack of a positive response for some biomarkers, indicates the importance of evaluating the whole spectrum of different tumor biomarkers to properly assess the therapeutic response and identify and interpret the therapy-induced changes in the tumor physiology.

  2. Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica R Cappellari

    Full Text Available Ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5'-NT participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5'-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children.The effects of ecto-5'-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified.The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5'-NT (D283hCD73, revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5'-NT.This work suggests that ecto-5'-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5'-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy.

  3. Ecto-5’-Nucleotidase Overexpression Reduces Tumor Growth in a Xenograph Medulloblastoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellari, Angélica R.; Pillat, Micheli M.; Souza, Hellio D. N.; Dietrich, Fabrícia; Oliveira, Francine H.; Figueiró, Fabrício; Abujamra, Ana L.; Roesler, Rafael; Lecka, Joanna; Sévigny, Jean; Battastini, Ana Maria O.; Ulrich, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Background Ecto-5’-nucleotidase/CD73 (ecto-5’-NT) participates in extracellular ATP catabolism by converting adenosine monophosphate (AMP) into adenosine. This enzyme affects the progression and invasiveness of different tumors. Furthermore, the expression of ecto-5’-NT has also been suggested as a favorable prognostic marker, attributing to this enzyme contradictory functions in cancer. Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common brain tumor of the cerebellum and affects mainly children. Materials and Methods The effects of ecto-5’-NT overexpression on human MB tumor growth were studied in an in vivo model. Balb/c immunodeficient (nude) 6 to 14-week-old mice were used for dorsal subcutaneous xenograph tumor implant. Tumor development was evaluated by pathophysiological analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of adenosine receptors were verified. Results The human MB cell line D283, transfected with ecto-5’-NT (D283hCD73), revealed reduced tumor growth compared to the original cell line transfected with an empty vector. D283hCD73 generated tumors with a reduced proliferative index, lower vascularization, the presence of differentiated cells and increased active caspase-3 expression. Prominent A1 adenosine receptor expression rates were detected in MB cells overexpressing ecto-5’-NT. Conclusion This work suggests that ecto-5’-NT promotes reduced tumor growth to reduce cell proliferation and vascularization, promote higher differentiation rates and initiate apoptosis, supposedly by accumulating adenosine, which then acts through A1 adenosine receptors. Therefore, ecto-5’-NT might be considered an important prognostic marker, being associated with good prognosis and used as a potential target for therapy. PMID:26491983

  4. Interfacial friction in low flowrate vertical annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.M.; Freitas, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    During boil-off and reflood transients in nuclear reactors, the core liquid inventory and inlet flowrate are largely determined by the interfacial friction in the reactor core. For these transients, annular flow occurs at relatively modest liquid flowrates and at the low heat fluxes typical of decay heat conditions. The resulting low vapor Reynolds numbers, are out of the data range used to develop the generally accepted interfacial friction relations for annular flow. In addition, most existing annular flow data comes from air/liquid adiabatic experiments with fully developed flows. By contrast, in a reactor core, the flow is continuously developing along the heated length as the vapor flowrate increases and the flow regimes evolve from bubbly to annular flow. Indeed, the entire annular flow regime may exist only over tens of L/D's. Despite these limitations, many of the advanced reactor safety analysis codes employ the Wallis model for interfacial friction in annular flow. Our analyses of the conditions existing at the end-of-reflood in the PERICLES tests have indicated that the Wallis model seriously underestimates the interfacial shear for low vapor velocity cocurrent upflow. To extend the annular flow data base to diabatic low flowrate conditions, the DADINE tests were re-analyzed. In these tests, both pressure drop and local cross-section averaged void fractions were measured. Thus, both the wall and interfacial shear can be deduced. Based on the results of this analysis, a new correlation is proposed for interfacial friction in annular flow. (authors). 5 figs., 12 refs

  5. Modeling tumor control probability for spatially inhomogeneous risk of failure based on clinical outcome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; Löck, Steffen; Jakobi, Annika

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Objectives of this work are (1) to derive a general clinically relevant approach to model tumor control probability (TCP) for spatially variable risk of failure and (2) to demonstrate its applicability by estimating TCP for patients planned for photon and proton irradiation. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: The approach divides the target volume into sub-volumes according to retrospectively observed spatial failure patterns. The product of all sub-volume TCPi values reproduces the observed TCP for the total tumor. The derived formalism provides for each target sub-volume i the tumor control dose (D...... clinical target volume (CTV), and elective CTV (CTVE). The risk of a local failure in each of these sub-volumes was taken from the literature. RESULTS: Convenient expressions for D50,i and γ50,i were provided for the Poisson and the logistic model. Comparable TCP estimates were obtained for photon...

  6. Periodic and chaotic oscillations in a tumor and immune system interaction model with three delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Ping; Ruan, Shigui; Zhang, Xinan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a tumor and immune system interaction model consisted of two differential equations with three time delays is considered in which the delays describe the proliferation of tumor cells, the process of effector cells growth stimulated by tumor cells, and the differentiation of immune effector cells, respectively. Conditions for the asymptotic stability of equilibria and existence of Hopf bifurcations are obtained by analyzing the roots of a second degree exponential polynomial characteristic equation with delay dependent coefficients. It is shown that the positive equilibrium is asymptotically stable if all three delays are less than their corresponding critical values and Hopf bifurcations occur if any one of these delays passes through its critical value. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the rich dynamical behavior of the model with different delay values including the existence of regular and irregular long periodic oscillations

  7. Hmgb1-IL-23-IL-17-IL-6-Stat3 Axis Promotes Tumor Growth in Murine Models of Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Tang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand how tumor cells can escape immune surveillance mechanisms and thus develop antitumor therapies, it is critically important to investigate the mechanisms by which the immune system interacts with the tumor microenvironment. In our current study, IL-17 deficiency results in reduced melanoma tumor size, diminished numbers of proliferating cells and blood vessels, and decreased percentage of CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs in tumor tissues. IL-17 promotes IL-6 induction and Stat3 activation. Treatment of Stat3 inhibitor WP1066 in B16-F10 tumor cells inoculated wild-type mice inhibits tumor growth. Additional administration of recombinant IL-6 into B16-F10 tumor-bearing IL-17−/− mice results in markedly increased tumor size and p-Stat3 expression, whereas additional recombinant IL-17 administration into B16-F10 tumor-bearing wild-type mice treated with anti-IL-6 mAb does not significantly alter the tumor growth and p-Stat3 expression. In our further study, blockade of Hmgb1-RAGE pathway inhibits melanoma tumor growth and reduces production of IL-23 and IL-17. All these data suggest that Hmgb1-IL-23-IL-17-IL-6-Stat3 axis plays a pivotal role in tumor development in murine models of melanoma, and blocking any portion of this axis will attenuate melanoma tumor growth.

  8. Modeling tissue contamination to improve molecular identification of the primary tumor site of metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Martin; Perell, Katharina; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Daugaard, Gedske; Hansen, Niels Richard

    2014-05-15

    Contamination of a cancer tissue by the surrounding benign (non-cancerous) tissue is a concern for molecular cancer diagnostics. This is because an observed molecular signature will be distorted by the surrounding benign tissue, possibly leading to an incorrect diagnosis. One example is molecular identification of the primary tumor site of metastases because biopsies of metastases typically contain a significant amount of benign tissue. A model of tissue contamination is presented. This contamination model works independently of the training of a molecular predictor, and it can be combined with any predictor model. The usability of the model is illustrated on primary tumor site identification of liver biopsies, specifically, on a human dataset consisting of microRNA expression measurements of primary tumor samples, benign liver samples and liver metastases. For a predictor trained on primary tumor and benign liver samples, the contamination model decreased the test error on biopsies from liver metastases from 77 to 45%. A further reduction to 34% was obtained by including biopsies in the training data. http://www.math.ku.dk/∼richard/msgl/. vincent@math.ku.dk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Jacob L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies. PMID:28067628

  10. Optimizing Chemotherapeutic Anti-cancer Treatment and the Tumor Microenvironment: An Analysis of Mathematical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledzewicz, Urszula; Schaettler, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    We review results about the structure of administration of chemotherapeutic anti-cancer treatment that we have obtained from an analysis of minimally parameterized mathematical models using methods of optimal control. This is a branch of continuous-time optimization that studies the minimization of a performance criterion imposed on an underlying dynamical system subject to constraints. The scheduling of anti-cancer treatments has all the features of such a problem: treatments are administered in time and the interactions of the drugs with the tumor and its microenvironment determine the efficacy of therapy. At the same time, constraints on the toxicity of the treatments need to be taken into account. The models we consider are low-dimensional and do not include more refined details, but they capture the essence of the underlying biology and our results give robust and rather conclusive qualitative information about the administration of optimal treatment protocols that strongly correlate with approaches taken in medical practice. We describe the changes that arise in optimal administration schedules as the mathematical models are increasingly refined to progress from models that only consider the cancerous cells to models that include the major components of the tumor microenvironment, namely the tumor vasculature and tumor-immune system interactions.

  11. 3D bioprinting: improving in vitro models of metastasis with heterogeneous tumor microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L. Albritton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even with many advances in treatment over the past decades, cancer still remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite the recognized relationship between metastasis and increased mortality rate, surprisingly little is known about the exact mechanism of metastatic progression. Currently available in vitro models cannot replicate the three-dimensionality and heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment sufficiently to recapitulate many of the known characteristics of tumors in vivo. Our understanding of metastatic progression would thus be boosted by the development of in vitro models that could more completely capture the salient features of cancer biology. Bioengineering groups have been working for over two decades to create in vitro microenvironments for application in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Over this time, advances in 3D printing technology and biomaterials research have jointly led to the creation of 3D bioprinting, which has improved our ability to develop in vitro models with complexity approaching that of the in vivo tumor microenvironment. In this Review, we give an overview of 3D bioprinting methods developed for tissue engineering, which can be directly applied to constructing in vitro models of heterogeneous tumor microenvironments. We discuss considerations and limitations associated with 3D printing and highlight how these advances could be harnessed to better model metastasis and potentially guide the development of anti-cancer strategies.

  12. Tumor-derived exosomes confer antigen-specific immunosuppression in a murine delayed-type hypersensitivity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjie Yang

    Full Text Available Exosomes are endosome-derived small membrane vesicles that are secreted by most cell types including tumor cells. Tumor-derived exosomes usually contain tumor antigens and have been used as a source of tumor antigens to stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. However, many reports also suggest that tumor-derived exosomes can facilitate tumor immune evasion through different mechanisms, most of which are antigen-independent. In the present study we used a mouse model of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH and demonstrated that local administration of tumor-derived exosomes carrying the model antigen chicken ovalbumin (OVA resulted in the suppression of DTH response in an antigen-specific manner. Analysis of exosome trafficking demonstrated that following local injection, tumor-derived exosomes were internalized by CD11c+ cells and transported to the draining LN. Exosome-mediated DTH suppression is associated with increased mRNA levels of TGF-β1 and IL-4 in the draining LN. The tumor-derived exosomes examined were also found to inhibit DC maturation. Taken together, our results suggest a role for tumor-derived exosomes in inducing tumor antigen-specific immunosuppression, possibly by modulating the function of APCs.

  13. Osteopontin induces growth of metastatic tumors in a preclinical model of non-small lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shojaei Farbod

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteopontin (OPN, also known as SPP1 (secreted phosphoprotein, is an integrin binding glyco-phosphoprotein produced by a variety of tissues. In cancer patients expression of OPN has been associated with poor prognosis in several tumor types including breast, lung, and colorectal cancers. Despite wide expression in tumor cells and stroma, there is limited evidence supporting role of OPN in tumor progression and metastasis. Using phage display technology we identified a high affinity anti-OPN monoclonal antibody (hereafter AOM1. The binding site for AOM1 was identified as SVVYGLRSKS sequence which is immediately adjacent to the RGD motif and also spans the thrombin cleavage site of the human OPN. AOM1 efficiently inhibited OPNa binding to recombinant integrin αvβ3 with an IC50 of 65 nM. Due to its unique binding site, AOM1 is capable of inhibiting OPN cleavage by thrombin which has been shown to produce an OPN fragment that is biologically more active than the full length OPN. Screening of human cell lines identified tumor cells with increased expression of OPN receptors (αvβ3 and CD44v6 such as mesothelioma, hepatocellular carcinoma, breast, and non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma (NSCLC. CD44v6 and αvβ3 were also found to be highly enriched in the monocyte, but not lymphocyte, subset of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs. In vitro, OPNa induced migration of both tumor and hPBMCs in a transwell migration assay. AOM1 significantly blocked cell migration further validating its specificity for the ligand. OPN was found to be enriched in mouse plasma in a number of pre-clinical tumor model of non-small cell lung cancers. To assess the role of OPN in tumor growth and metastasis and to evaluate a potential therapeutic indication for AOM1, we employed a KrasG12D-LSLp53fl/fl subcutaneously implanted in vivo model of NSCLC which possesses a high capacity to metastasize into the lung. Our data indicated that treatment of tumor

  14. Fluorescence laparoscopy imaging of pancreatic tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Lee, Claudia; Snyder, Cynthia S.; Thompson, Kari J.; Horgan, Santiago; Talamini, Mark A.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of fluorescent proteins to label tumors is revolutionizing cancer research, enabling imaging of both primary and metastatic lesions, which is important for diagnosis, staging, and therapy. This report describes the use of fluorescence laparoscopy to image green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumors in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Methods The orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer was established by injecting GFP-expressing MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells into the pancreas of 6-week-old female athymic mice. On postoperative day 14, diagnostic laparoscopy using both white and fluorescent light was performed. A standard laparoscopic system was modified by placing a 480-nm short-pass excitation filter between the light cable and the laparoscope in addition to using a 2-mm-thick emission filter. A camera was used that allowed variable exposure time and gain setting. For mouse laparoscopy, a 3-mm 0° laparoscope was used. The mouse’s abdomen was gently insufflated to 2 mm Hg via a 22-gauge angiocatheter. After laparoscopy, the animals were sacrificed, and the tumors were collected and processed for histologic review. The experiments were performed in triplicate. Results Fluorescence laparoscopy enabled rapid imaging of the brightly fluorescent tumor in the pancreatic body. Use of the proper filters enabled simultaneous visualization of the tumor and the surrounding structures with minimal autofluorescence. Fluorescence laparoscopy thus allowed exact localization of the tumor, eliminating the need to switch back and forth between white and fluorescence lighting, under which the background usually is so darkened that it is difficult to maintain spatial orientation. Conclusion The use of fluorescence laparoscopy permits the facile, real-time imaging and localization of tumors labeled with fluorescent proteins. The results described in this report should have important clinical potential. PMID:20533064

  15. Effective treatment of diverse medulloblastoma models with mebendazole and its impact on tumor angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ren-Yuan; Staedtke, Verena; Rudin, Charles M; Bunz, Fred; Riggins, Gregory J

    2015-04-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Current standard treatments cure 40%-60% of patients, while the majority of survivors suffer long-term neurological sequelae. The identification of 4 molecular groups of medulloblastoma improved the clinical management with the development of targeted therapies; however, the tumor acquires resistance quickly. Mebendazole (MBZ) has a long safety record as antiparasitic in children and has been recently implicated in inhibition of various tyrosine kinases in vitro. Here, we investigated the efficacy of MBZ in various medulloblastoma subtypes and MBZ's impact on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and tumor angiogenesis. The inhibition of MBZ on VEGFR2 kinase was investigated in an autophosphorylation assay and a cell-free kinase assay. Mice bearing orthotopic PTCH1-mutant medulloblastoma allografts, a group 3 medulloblastoma xenograft, and a PTCH1-mutant medulloblastoma with acquired resistance to the smoothened inhibitor vismodegib were treated with MBZ. The survival benefit and the impact on tumor angiogenesis and VEGFR2 kinase function were analyzed. We determined that MBZ interferes with VEGFR2 kinase by competing with ATP. MBZ selectively inhibited tumor angiogenesis but not the normal brain vasculatures in orthotopic medulloblastoma models and suppressed VEGFR2 kinase in vivo. MBZ significantly extended the survival of medulloblastoma models derived from different molecular backgrounds. Our findings support testing of MBZ as a possible low-toxicity therapy for medulloblastomas of various molecular subtypes, including tumors with acquired vismodegib resistance. Its antitumor mechanism may be partially explained by inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A demonstration of enhancements in interfacial rheological characterisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodder, Peter; Baldursdottir, Stefania G.

    we have compared the performance of two models of the new Discovery Hybrid Rheometer and the AR G2 rheometer when studying the interfacial adsorption of lysozyme (from hen egg white, Sigma-Aldrich, Denmark) using the double wall ring geometry. The results show great improvement in the detection limit...

  17. Automatic Lung Tumor Segmentation on PET/CT Images Using Fuzzy Markov Random Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of positron emission tomography (PET and CT images provides complementary functional and anatomical information of human tissues and it has been used for better tumor volume definition of lung cancer. This paper proposed a robust method for automatic lung tumor segmentation on PET/CT images. The new method is based on fuzzy Markov random field (MRF model. The combination of PET and CT image information is achieved by using a proper joint posterior probability distribution of observed features in the fuzzy MRF model which performs better than the commonly used Gaussian joint distribution. In this study, the PET and CT simulation images of 7 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients were used to evaluate the proposed method. Tumor segmentations with the proposed method and manual method by an experienced radiation oncologist on the fused images were performed, respectively. Segmentation results obtained with the two methods were similar and Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC was 0.85 ± 0.013. It has been shown that effective and automatic segmentations can be achieved with this method for lung tumors which locate near other organs with similar intensities in PET and CT images, such as when the tumors extend into chest wall or mediastinum.

  18. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Junfeng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST.

  19. Effect of hepatic artery embolization on liver hypertrophy response in a rabbit liver VX2 tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lienden, Krijn P; Hoekstra, Lisette T; van Trigt, Jessica D; Roelofs, Joris J; van Delden, Otto M; van Gulik, Thomas M

    2013-12-01

    Portal vein embolization not only induces hypertrophy of the non-embolized liver, but also enhances tumor growth. The latter could be prevented by embolizing the hepatic arteries supplying the tumor-bearing liver segments. This study aimed to determine the effects of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on tumor volume and liver regeneration in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Twenty-three rabbits underwent subcapsular tumor implantation with a VX2 tumor. Two weeks after implantation, 18 rabbits were used for TAE experiments, 5 were for sham controls. Tumor response and liver regeneration response of the embolized cranial and non-embolized caudal liver lobes were assessed by CT volumetry, liver to body weight index, and the amount of proliferating hepatocytes. All super-selective arterial tumor embolization procedures were performed successfully. Despite embolization, the tumor volume increased after an initial steady state. The tumor volume after embolization was smaller than that of the sham group, but this difference was not significant. Massive necrosis of the tumor, however, was seen after embolization, without damage of the surrounding liver parenchyma. There was a significant atrophy response of the tumor bearing cranial lobe after super-selective arterial embolization of the tumor with a concomitant hypertrophy response of the non-embolized, caudal lobe. This regeneration response was confirmed histologically by a significantly higher number of proliferating hepatocytes on the Ki-67 stained slides. Super-selective, bland arterial coil embolization causes massive necrosis of the tumor, despite increase of volume on CT scan. Atrophy of the tumor bearing liver lobe is seen after arterial embolization of the tumor with a concomitant hypertrophy response of the non-embolized lobe, despite absence of histological damage of the tumor-surrounding liver parenchyma.

  20. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1639-1658 ISSN 0951-7715 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Cahn-Hilliard equation * Darcy law * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6063/meta

  1. Establishment of a Novel Model for Anticancer Drug Resistance in Three-Dimensional Primary Culture of Tumor Microenvironment

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    Tatsuya Usui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment has been implicated in tumor development and progression. As a three-dimensional tumor microenvironment model, air liquid interface (ALI organoid culture from oncogene transgenic mouse gastrointestinal tissues was recently produced. However, ALI organoid culture system from tissues of colorectal cancer patients has not been established. Here, we developed an ALI organoid model from normal and tumor colorectal tissues of human patients. Both organoids were successfully generated and showed cystic structures containing an epithelial layer and surrounding mesenchymal stromal cells. Structures of tumor organoids closely resembled primary tumor epithelium. Expression of an epithelial cell marker, E-cadherin, a goblet cell marker, MUC2, and a fibroblast marker, vimentin, but not a myofibroblast marker, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA, was observed in normal organoids. Expression of E-cadherin, MUC2, vimentin, and α-SMA was observed in tumor organoids. Expression of a cancer stem cell marker, LGR5 in tumor organoids, was higher than that in primary tumor tissues. Tumor organoids were more resistant to toxicity of 5-fluorouracil and Irinotecan than colorectal cancer cell lines, SW480, SW620, and HCT116. These findings indicate that ALI organoid culture from colorectal cancer patients may become a novel model that is useful for examining resistance to chemotherapy in tumor microenvironment.

  2. Establishment of 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells

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    Zong-yu XIAO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish the 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells.  Methods Rat 9L gliosarcoma stem-like cells were cultured in serum-free suspension. The expression of CD133 and nestin were tested by immunohistochemistry. A total of 48 inbredline male F344 rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, and 9L tumor sphere cells and 9L monolayer cells were respectively implanted into the right caudate nucleus of F344 rats in 2 groups. Survival time was observed and determined using the method of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Fourteen days after implantation or when the rats were dying, their brains were perfused and sectioned for HE staining, and CD133 and nestin were detected by immunohistochemistry.  Results Rat 9L tumor spheres were formed with suspension culture in serum-free medium. The gliomas formed in both groups were invasive without obvious capsule. More new vessels, bleeding and necrosis could be detected in 9L tumor spheres group. The tumor cells in both groups were positive for CD133 and nestin. There was no significant difference in the expression of CD133 and nestin between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. According to the expression of nestin, the tumors formed by 9L tumor sphere cells were more invasive. The median survival time of the rats bearing 9L tumor sphere cells was 15 d (95%CI: 15.219-15.781, and the median survival time of the rats bearing 9L monolayer cells was 21 d (95%CI: 20.395-21.605. There was significant difference between 2 groups (χ2 = 12.800, P = 0.000.  Conclusions 9L/F344 rat intracerebral glioma model of brain tumor stem cells is successfully established, which provides a glioma model for the future research. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.04.012

  3. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The increased interest in 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an ''analysis region'' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  4. Immunological considerations of modern animal models of malignant primary brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in animal models of glioma have facilitated a better understanding of biological mechanisms underlying gliomagenesis and glioma progression. The limitations of existing therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, have prompted numerous investigators to search for new therapeutic approaches to improve quantity and quality of survival from these aggressive lesions. One of these approaches involves triggering a tumor specific immune response. However, a difficulty in this approach is the the scarcity of animal models of primary CNS neoplasms which faithfully recapitulate these tumors and their interaction with the host's immune system. In this article, we review the existing methods utilized to date for modeling gliomas in rodents, with a focus on the known as well as potential immunological aspects of these models. As this review demonstrates, many of these models have inherent immune system limitations, and the impact of these limitations on studies on the influence of pre-clinical therapeutics testing warrants further attention.

  5. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dai, M.; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, E.; Schimperna, G.; Schonbek, M.E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2017), s. 1639-1658 ISSN 0951-7715 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 320078 - MATHEF Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Cahn-Hilliard equation * Darcy law * diffuse interface model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6544/aa6063/meta;jsessionid=73B30CFD9F74DD027762D29C83D3094F.c3.iopscience.cld.iop.org

  6. Selenium prevents tumor development in a rat model for chemical carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorkhem-Bergman, L.; Torndal, U. B.; Eken, S.

    2005-01-01

    for chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, the resistant hepatocyte model. Selenite in supra-nutritional but subtoxic doses (1 and 5 p.p.m.) was administrated to the animals through the drinking water. Such supplementation during the initiation phase did not have a tumor preventive effect. However, selenite...

  7. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Gillies, Robert J; Rejniak, Katarzyna A

    2013-11-18

    Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  8. Toward in vivo lung's tissue incompressibility characterization for tumor motion modeling in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility parameter variations resulting from air content variation throughout respiration is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion is a major challenge in lung cancer radiotherapy, especially with external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion may lead to areas of radiation overdosage for normal tissue. Given the unavailability of imaging modality that can be used effectively for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer assisted approach based on tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. This approach involves lung biomechanical model where its fidelity depends on input tissue properties. This investigation shows that considering variable tissue incompressibility parameter is very important for predicting tumor motion accurately, hence improving the lung radiotherapy outcome. Methods: First, an in silico lung phantom study was conducted to demonstrate the importance of employing variable Poisson's ratio for tumor motion predication. After it was established that modeling this variability is critical for accurate tumor motion prediction, an optimization based technique was developed to estimate lung tissue Poisson's ratio as a function of respiration cycle time. In this technique, the Poisson's ratio and lung pressure value were varied systematically until optimal values were obtained, leading to maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT lung images. This technique was applied in an ex vivo porcine lung study where simulated images were constructed using the end exhale CT image and deformation fields obtained from the lung's FE modeling of each respiration time increment. To model the tissue, linear elastic and Marlow hyperelastic material models in conjunction with variable Poisson's ratio were used. Results: The phantom study showed that

  9. Experimental model of ultrasound thermotherapy in rats inoculated with Walker-236 tumor Modelo experimental de termoterapia ultrassônica em ratos inoculados com tumor de Walker-236

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    José Antonio Carlos Otaviano David Morano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a model to evaluate the effects of focal pulsed ultrasound (US waves as a source of heat for treatment of murine subcutaneous implanted Walker tumor. METHODS: An experimental, controlled, comparative study was conducted. Twenty male Wistar rats (160-300 g randomized in 2 equal groups (G-1: Control and G-2: Hyperthermia were inoculated with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tumor. After 5 days G-2 rats were submitted to 45ºC hyperthermia. Heat was delivered directly to the tumor by an ultrasound (US equipment (3 MHz frequency, 1,5W/cm³. Tumor temperature reached 45º C in 3 minutes and was maintained at this level for 5 minutes. Tumor volume was measured on days 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 post inoculation in both groups. Unpaired t-test was used for comparison. POBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo para avaliar os efeitos do ultra-som focal pulsado como fonte de calor para o tratamento de tumores de Walker subcutâneos implantados em ratos. MÉTODOS: Um estudo experimental, controlado, comparativo foi realizado. Vinte ratos Wistar machos (160-300 g divididos em dois grupos (G-1: Controle e G-2: hipertermia foram inoculados com tumor de Walker carcinossarcoma-256. Após cinco dias os ratos do grupo G-2 ratos foram submetidos a hipertermia (45ºC. O calor foi aplicado diretamente no tumor por um equipamento de ultrassonografia (3 MHz, 1,5 W/cm³. A temperatura no tumor atingiu 45ºC em 3 minutos e foi mantida nesse nível por 5 minutos. O volume do tumor foi medido nos dias 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 após a inoculação, em ambos os grupos. Teste t não pareado foi utilizado para comparação. P <0,05 foi considerado significante. RESULTADOS: O volume do tumor foi significativamente maior no 5º dia e diminuiu nos dias 11, 14 e 17 nos ratos tratados. Animais submetidos à hipertermia sobreviveram mais tempo que os animais do grupo controle. No 29º dia após a inoculação do tumor, 40% dos ratos do grupo controle e 77,78% dos ratos tratados com

  10. Ovarian tumor attachment, invasion and vascularization reflect unique microenvironments in the peritoneum:Insights from xenograft and mathematical models

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    Mara P. Steinkamp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian tumor cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-RFP cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that tumor cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM that examines ovarian tumor cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of tumor cell-cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum or spleen readily invade the open architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer relapse.

  11. Sunitinib malate provides activity against murine bladder tumor growth and invasion in a preclinical orthotopic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eddie Shu-yin; Patel, Amit R; Hansel, Donna E; Larchian, William A; Heston, Warren D

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of sunitinib on localized bladder cancer in a mouse orthotopic bladder tumor model. We used an established orthotopic mouse bladder cancer model in syngeneic C3H/He mice. Treatment doses of 40 mg/kg of sunitinib or placebo sterile saline were administrated daily by oral gavage. Tumor volume, intratumoral perfusion, and in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression were measured using a targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging system. The findings were correlated with the total bladder weight, tumor stage, and survival. The effects of sunitinib malate on angiogenesis and cellular proliferation were measured by immunostaining of CD31 and Ki-67. Significant inhibition of tumor growth was seen after sunitinib treatment compared with the control. The incidence of extravesical extension of the bladder tumor and hydroureter in the sunitinib-treated group (30% and 20%, respectively) was lower than the incidence in the control group (66.7% and 55.6%, respectively). Sunitinib therapy prolonged the survival in mice, with statistical significance (log-rank test, P = .03). On targeted contrast-enhanced micro-ultrasound imaging, in vivo vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression was reduced in the sunitinib group and correlated with a decrease in microvessel density. The results of our study have demonstrated the antitumor effects of sunitinib in the mouse localized bladder cancer model. Sunitinib inhibited the growth of bladder tumors and prolonged survival. Given that almost 30% of cases in our treatment arm developed extravesical disease, sunitinib might be suited as a part of a multimodal treatment regimen for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumor mouse model confirms MAGE-A3 cancer immunotherapeutic as an efficient inducer of long-lasting anti-tumoral responses.

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    Catherine Gérard

    Full Text Available MAGE-A3 is a potential target for immunotherapy due to its tumor-specific nature and expression in several tumor types. Clinical data on MAGE-A3 immunotherapy have raised many questions that can only be addressed by using animal models. In the present study, different aspects of the murine anti-tumor immune responses induced by a recombinant MAGE-A3 protein (recMAGE-A3 in combination with different immunostimulants (AS01, AS02, CpG7909 or AS15 were investigated.Based on cytokine profile analyses and protection against challenge with MAGE-A3-expressing tumor, the combination recMAGE-A3+AS15 was selected for further experimental work, in particular to study the mechanisms of anti-tumor responses. By using MHC class I-, MHC class II-, perforin-, B-cell- and IFN-γ- knock-out mice and CD4+ T cell-, CD8+ T cell- and NK cell- depleted mice, we demonstrated that CD4+ T cells and NK cells are the main anti-tumor effectors, and that IFN-γ is a major effector molecule. This mouse tumor model also established the need to repeat recMAGE-A3+AS15 injections to sustain efficient anti-tumor responses. Furthermore, our results indicated that the efficacy of tumor rejection by the elicited anti-MAGE-A3 responses depends on the proportion of tumor cells expressing MAGE-A3.The recMAGE-A3+AS15 cancer immunotherapy efficiently induced an antigen-specific, functional and long-lasting immune response able to recognize and eliminate MAGE-A3-expressing tumor cells up to several months after the last immunization in mice. The data highlighted the importance of the immunostimulant to induce a Th1-type immune response, as well as the key role played by IFN-γ, CD4+ T cells and NK cells in the anti-tumoral effect.

  13. Targeted hyperthermia after selective embolization with ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a VX2 rabbit liver tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun HL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hongliang Sun,1 Linfeng Xu,1 Tianyuan Fan,2 Hongzhi Zhan,3 Xiaodong Wang,3 Yanfei Zhou,2 Ren-jie Yang3 1Department of Interventional Therapy, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 2Pharmacy School of Beijing University, Beijing, 3Department of Interventional Therapy, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to observe the effect and feasibility of hyperthermia and the influence of heat on surrounding organs in a VX2 rabbit liver model exposed to an alternating magnetic field after embolization with ferromagnetic nanoparticles. Methods: Forty rabbits containing implanted hepatic VX2 carcinomas were divided into four groups, each containing ten rabbits. Fourteen days after tumor transplantation, we opened the abdomen to observe the size and shape of the tumor. A transfemoral retrograde approach was then used for hepatic arterial catheterization in groups B, C, and D to perform angiography and embolization. The next day, three rabbits in group B and all rabbits in group D were exposed to an alternating magnetic field, and the temperature was recorded simultaneously in the center of the tumor, at the edge of the tumor, and in the normal liver parenchyma. On day 28, all animals was euthanized to observe changes in the implanted liver tumor and the condition of the abdomen. A pathologic examination was also done. Results: Before surgery, there was no significant difference in tumor volume between the four groups. Three different temperature points (center of the tumor, edge of the tumor, and in the normal liver parenchyma of group B under an alternating magnetic field were 37.2°C ± 1.1°C, 36.8°C ± 1.2°C, and 36.9°C ± 2.1°C, none of which were significantly different from pretreatment values. Three points basal temperature in group D showed no significant difference (F = 1.038, P = 0.413. Seven to 26

  14. Modelo de tumor de pulmão em rato com o carcinossarcoma de Walker Lung tumor model in rats with Walker’s carcinosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antero Gomes Neto

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo de tumor pulmonar em ratos com o carcinossarcoma de Walker e verificar in vivo a presença de tumor por meio de tomografia computadorizada (TC. MÉTODOS: Ratos Wistar fêmeas (n=47 foram anestesiados com pentobarbital, intubados por traqueostomia e submetidos a toracotomia para injeção no parênquima pulmonar de células do tumor de Walker ou do veículo das mesmas. O estudo consistiu de duas etapas: na primeira desenvolveu-se a técnica de implante do tumor e estabeleceu-se o número de células necessário para um bom índice de pega tumoral. Na segunda etapa, determinou-se o volume do tumor em cm³ (Dxd²/2 através de TC e necropsia (6° dia do implante, e analizou-se a sobrevida dos animais. RESULTADOS: O índice de pega do tumor foi 93,3%, sendo 81,8% na primeira etapa e 100% na segunda. A mortalidade cirúrgica foi 17,0%. As medidas dos tumores foram semelhantes (0,099 vs. 0,111 cm³ na tomografia e na necropsia, respectivamente (r=0,993; pOBJECTIVE: To develop a lung tumor model in rats using Walker’s carcinosarcoma and to verify the presence in vivo of tumors using computerized tomography (CT. METHODS: Female Wistar rats (n=47 were anesthetized with pentobarbital, intubated through tracheostomy and submitted to thoracotomy; subsequently a 50-70 mu L volume containing Walker’s tumor cells, or the suspension of these same cells, was injected into the lung parenchyma. The study consisted of two phases: in the first a tumor implantation technique was developed and the number of cells required to attain a satisfactory tumor development rate was established. In the second phase, the tumor volume in cm³ (Dxd²/2 was determined through CT scan and necropsis, and the survival rates were analyzed. RESULTS: The overall tumor development rate was 93.3%, or rather, 81.1% in the first phase and 100% in the second. The surgical mortality rate was 17.0%. The average tumor volume was similar (0.099 vs. 0.111 cm

  15. Interfacial thermodynamics of water and six other liquid solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Tod A; Goddard, William A

    2014-06-05

    We examine the thermodynamics of the liquid-vapor interface by direct calculation of the surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy from extensive molecular dynamics simulations using the two-phase thermodynamics (2PT) method. Results for water, acetonitrile, cyclohexane, dimethyl sulfoxide, hexanol, N-methyl acetamide, and toluene are presented. We validate our approach by predicting the interfacial surface tensions (IFT--excess surface free energy per unit area) in excellent agreement with the mechanical calculations using Kirkwood-Buff theory. Additionally, we evaluate the temperature dependence of the IFT of water as described by the TIP4P/2005, SPC/Ew, TIP3P, and mW classical water models. We find that the TIP4P/2005 and SPC/Ew water models do a reasonable job of describing the interfacial thermodynamics; however, the TIP3P and mW are quite poor. We find that the underprediction of the experimental IFT at 298 K by these water models results from understructured surface molecules whose binding energies are too weak. Finally, we performed depth profiles of the interfacial thermodynamics which revealed long tails that extend far into what would be considered bulk from standard Gibbs theory. In fact, we find a nonmonotonic interfacial free energy profile for water, a unique feature that could have important consequences for the absorption of ions and other small molecules.

  16. Raloxifene inhibits tumor growth and lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model of metastatic mammary cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhong-Lian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of raloxifene, a novel selective estrogen receptor modulator, were studied in a mouse metastatic mammary cancer model expressing cytoplasmic ERα. Methods Mammary tumors, induced by inoculation of syngeneic BALB/c mice with BJMC3879luc2 cells, were subsequently treated with raloxifene at 0, 18 and 27 mg/kg/day using mini-osmotic pumps. Results In vitro study demonstrated that the ERα in BJMC3879luc2 cells was smaller (between 50 and 64 kDa than the normal-sized ERα (66 kDa and showed cytoplasmic localization. A statistically significant but weak estradiol response was observed in this cell line. When BJMC3879luc2 tumors were implanted into mice, the ERα mRNA levels were significantly higher in females than in males. In vitro studies showed that raloxifene induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in the G1-phase and a decrease in the cell population in the S-phase. In animal experiments, tumor volumes were significantly suppressed in the raloxifene-treated groups. The multiplicity of lymph node metastasis was significantly decreased in the 27 mg/kg group. Levels of apoptosis were significantly increased in the raloxifene-treated groups, whereas the levels of DNA synthesis were significantly decreased in these groups. No differences in microvessel density in tumors were observed between the control and raloxifene-treated groups. The numbers of dilated lymphatic vessels containing intraluminal tumor cells were significantly reduced in mammary tumors in the raloxifene-treated groups. The levels of ERα mRNA in mammary tumors tended to be decreased in the raloxifene-treated groups. Conclusion These results suggest that the antimetastatic activity of raloxifene in mammary cancer expressing cytoplasmic ERα may be a crucial finding with clinical applications and that raloxifene may be useful as an adjuvant therapy and for the chemoprevention of breast cancer development.

  17. Modeling Renal Cell Carcinoma in Mice: Bap1 and Pbrm1 Inactivation Drive Tumor Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yi-Feng; Cohn, Shannon; Christie, Alana; McKenzie, Tiffani; Wolff, Nicholas; Do, Quyen N; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Pedrosa, Ivan; Wang, Tao; Dey, Anwesha; Busslinger, Meinrad; Xie, Xian-Jin; Hammer, Robert E; McKay, Renée M; Kapur, Payal; Brugarolas, James

    2017-08-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by BAP1 and PBRM1 mutations, which are associated with tumors of different grade and prognosis. However, whether BAP1 and PBRM1 loss causes ccRCC and determines tumor grade is unclear. We conditionally targeted Bap1 and Pbrm1 (with Vhl ) in the mouse using several Cre drivers. Sglt2 and Villin proximal convoluted tubule drivers failed to cause tumorigenesis, challenging the conventional notion of ccRCC origins. In contrast, targeting with PAX8, a transcription factor frequently overexpressed in ccRCC, led to ccRCC of different grades. Bap1 -deficient tumors were of high grade and showed greater mTORC1 activation than Pbrm1 -deficient tumors, which exhibited longer latency. Disrupting one allele of the mTORC1 negative regulator, Tsc1 , in Pbrm1 -deficient kidneys triggered higher grade ccRCC. This study establishes Bap1 and Pbrm1 as lineage-specific drivers of ccRCC and histologic grade, implicates mTORC1 as a tumor grade rheostat, and suggests that ccRCCs arise from Bowman capsule cells. Significance: Determinants of tumor grade and aggressiveness across cancer types are poorly understood. Using ccRCC as a model, we show that Bap1 and Pbrm1 loss drives tumor grade. Furthermore, we show that the conversion from low grade to high grade can be promoted by activation of mTORC1. Cancer Discov; 7(8); 900-17. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Leung and Kim, p. 802 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 783 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. The Mouse Tumor Biology Database: A Comprehensive Resource for Mouse Models of Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupke, Debra M; Begley, Dale A; Sundberg, John P; Richardson, Joel E; Neuhauser, Steven B; Bult, Carol J

    2017-11-01

    Research using laboratory mice has led to fundamental insights into the molecular genetic processes that govern cancer initiation, progression, and treatment response. Although thousands of scientific articles have been published about mouse models of human cancer, collating information and data for a specific model is hampered by the fact that many authors do not adhere to existing annotation standards when describing models. The interpretation of experimental results in mouse models can also be confounded when researchers do not factor in the effect of genetic background on tumor biology. The Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) database is an expertly curated, comprehensive compendium of mouse models of human cancer. Through the enforcement of nomenclature and related annotation standards, MTB supports aggregation of data about a cancer model from diverse sources and assessment of how genetic background of a mouse strain influences the biological properties of a specific tumor type and model utility. Cancer Res; 77(21); e67-70. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  20. Emergent Stratification in Solid Tumors Selects for Reduced Cohesion of Tumor Cells: A Multi-Cell, Virtual-Tissue Model of Tumor Evolution Using CompuCell3D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej H Swat

    Full Text Available Tumor cells and structure both evolve due to heritable variation of cell behaviors and selection over periods of weeks to years (somatic evolution. Micro-environmental factors exert selection pressures on tumor-cell behaviors, which influence both the rate and direction of evolution of specific behaviors, especially the development of tumor-cell aggression and resistance to chemotherapies. In this paper, we present, step-by-step, the development of a multi-cell, virtual-tissue model of tumor somatic evolution, simulated using the open-source CompuCell3D modeling environment. Our model includes essential cell behaviors, microenvironmental components and their interactions. Our model provides a platform for exploring selection pressures leading to the evolution of tumor-cell aggression, showing that emergent stratification into regions with different cell survival rates drives the evolution of less cohesive cells with lower levels of cadherins and higher levels of integrins. Such reduced cohesivity is a key hallmark in the progression of many types of solid tumors.

  1. Small Animal [18F]FDG PET Imaging for Tumor Model Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2008-01-01

    PET allows non-invasive, quantitative and repetitive imaging of biological function in living animals. Small animal PET imaging with [ 18 F]FDG has been successfully applied to investigation of metabolism, receptor, ligand interactions, gene expression, adoptive cell therapy and somatic gene therapy. Experimental condition of animal handling impacts on the biodistribution of [ 18 F]FDG in small animal study. The small animal PET and CT images were registered using the hardware fiducial markers and small animal contour point. Tumor imaging in small animal with small animal [ 18 F]FDG PET should be considered fasting, warming, and isoflurane anesthesia level. Registered imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of tumor. Small animal experimental condition of animal handling and registration method will be of most importance for small lesion detection of metastases tumor model

  2. Tumoral stem cell reprogramming as a driver of cancer: Theory, biological models, implications in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Hauer, Julia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Ingenhag, Deborah; Rodríguez-Meira, Alba; Auer, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a clonal malignant disease originated in a single cell and characterized by the accumulation of partially differentiated cells that are phenotypically reminiscent of normal stages of differentiation. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumor cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that cancer stem cells could arise through a tumor stem cell reprogramming mechanism, suggesting that genetic lesions that initiate the cancer process might be dispensable for tumor progression and maintenance. This review addresses the impact of these results toward a better understanding of cancer development and proposes new approaches to treat cancer in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Applications of Magnetic Resonance in Model Systems: Tumor Biology and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Gillies

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid tumor presents a unique challenge as a system in which the dynamics of the relationship between vascularization, the physiological environment and metabolism are continually changing with growth and following treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies have demonstrated quantifiable linkages between the physiological environment, angiogenesis, vascularization and metabolism of tumors. The dynamics between these parameters continually change with tumor aggressiveness, tumor growth and during therapy and each of these can be monitored longitudinally, quantitatively and non-invasively with MRI and MRS. An important aspect of MRI and MRS studies is that techniques and findings are easily translated between systems. Hence, pre-clinical studies using cultured cells or experimental animals have a high connectivity to potential clinical utility. In the following review, leaders in the field of MR studies of basic tumor physiology using pre-clinical models have contributed individual sections according to their expertise and outlook. The following review is a cogent and timely overview of the current capabilities and state-of-the-art of MRI and MRS as applied to experimental cancers. A companion review deals with the application of MR methods to anticancer therapy.

  4. Using single cell sequencing data to model the evolutionary history of a tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung In; Simon, Richard

    2014-01-24

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has made it possible to detect genomic alterations within tumor cells on a large scale. However, most applications of NGS show the genetic content of mixtures of cells. Recently developed single cell sequencing technology can identify variation within a single cell. Characterization of multiple samples from a tumor using single cell sequencing can potentially provide information on the evolutionary history of that tumor. This may facilitate understanding how key mutations accumulate and evolve in lineages to form a heterogeneous tumor. We provide a computational method to infer an evolutionary mutation tree based on single cell sequencing data. Our approach differs from traditional phylogenetic tree approaches in that our mutation tree directly describes temporal order relationships among mutation sites. Our method also accommodates sequencing errors. Furthermore, we provide a method for estimating the proportion of time from the earliest mutation event of the sample to the most recent common ancestor of the sample of cells. Finally, we discuss current limitations on modeling with single cell sequencing data and possible improvements under those limitations. Inferring the temporal ordering of mutational sites using current single cell sequencing data is a challenge. Our proposed method may help elucidate relationships among key mutations and their role in tumor progression.

  5. Tocotrienol-adjuvanted dendritic cells inhibit tumor growth and metastasis: a murine model of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitti Rahma Abdul Hafid

    Full Text Available Tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF from palm oil is reported to possess anti-cancer and immune-enhancing effects. In this study, TRF supplementation was used as an adjuvant to enhance the anti-cancer effects of dendritic cells (DC-based cancer vaccine in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer. Female BALB/c mice were inoculated with 4T1 cells in mammary pad to induce tumor. When the tumor was palpable, the mice in the experimental groups were injected subcutaneously with DC-pulsed with tumor lysate (TL from 4T1 cells (DC+TL once a week for three weeks and fed daily with 1 mg TRF or vehicle. Control mice received unpulsed DC and were fed with vehicle. The combined therapy of using DC+TL injections and TRF supplementation (DC+TL+TRF inhibited (p<0.05 tumor growth and metastasis. Splenocytes from the DC+TL+TRF group cultured with mitomycin-C (MMC-treated 4T1 cells produced higher (p<0.05 levels of IFN-γ and IL-12. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL assay also showed enhanced tumor-specific killing (p<0.05 by CD8(+ T-lymphocytes isolated from mice in the DC+TL+TRF group. This study shows that TRF has the potential to be used as an adjuvant to enhance effectiveness of DC-based vaccines.

  6. A deep learning model integrating FCNNs and CRFs for brain tumor segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaomei; Wu, Yihong; Song, Guidong; Li, Zhenye; Zhang, Yazhuo; Fan, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Accurate and reliable brain tumor segmentation is a critical component in cancer diagnosis, treatment planning, and treatment outcome evaluation. Build upon successful deep learning techniques, a novel brain tumor segmentation method is developed by integrating fully convolutional neural networks (FCNNs) and Conditional Random Fields (CRFs) in a unified framework to obtain segmentation results with appearance and spatial consistency. We train a deep learning based segmentation model using 2D image patches and image slices in following steps: 1) training FCNNs using image patches; 2) training CRFs as Recurrent Neural Networks (CRF-RNN) using image slices with parameters of FCNNs fixed; and 3) fine-tuning the FCNNs and the CRF-RNN using image slices. Particularly, we train 3 segmentation models using 2D image patches and slices obtained in axial, coronal and sagittal views respectively, and combine them to segment brain tumors using a voting based fusion strategy. Our method could segment brain images slice-by-slice, much faster than those based on image patches. We have evaluated our method based on imaging data provided by the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Challenge (BRATS) 2013, BRATS 2015 and BRATS 2016. The experimental results have demonstrated that our method could build a segmentation model with Flair, T1c, and T2 scans and achieve competitive performance as those built with Flair, T1, T1c, and T2 scans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Invasion Precedes Tumor Mass Formation in a Malignant Brain Tumor Model of Genetically Modified Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oltea Sampetrean

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasiveness, cellular atypia, and proliferation are hallmarks of malignant gliomas. To effectively target each of these characteristics, it is important to understand their sequence during tumorigenesis. However, because most gliomas are diagnosed at an advanced stage, the chronology of gliomagenesis milestones is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset of these characteristics during tumor development. Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs were established by overexpressing H-RasV12 in normal neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mice harboring a homozygous deletion of the Ink4a/Arf locus. High-grade malignant brain tumors were then created by orthotopic implantation of 105 BTICs into the forebrain of 6-week-old wild-type mice. Micewere killed every week for 5 weeks, and tumors were assessed for cellular atypia, proliferation, hemorrhage, necrosis, and invasion. All mice developed highly invasive, hypervascular glioblastoma-like tumors. A 100% penetrance rate and a 4-week median survival were achieved. Tumor cell migration along fiber tracts started within days after implantation and was followed by perivascular infiltration of tumor cells with marked recruitment of reactive host cells. Next, cellular atypia became prominent. Finally, mass proliferation and necrosis were observed in the last stage of the disease. Video monitoring of BTICs in live brain slices confirmed the early onset of migration, as well as the main cell migration patterns. Our results showed that perivascular and intraparenchymal tumor cell migration precede tumor mass formation in the adult brain, suggesting the need for an early and sustained anti-invasion therapy.

  8. Interfacial Effects in Polymer Membranes for Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    Polymeric membranes are critical components in several emerging clean energy technologies. Examples include proton exchange membranes for hydrogen fuel cells, anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells, flow batteries, and even block copolymer membranes for solid electrolytes/separators in lithium ion and other battery technologies. In all of these examples the function of the membrane is to physically separate two reactive electrodes or reactants, but allow the transport or exchange of specific ions through the membrane between the active electrodes. The flow of the charged ionic species between the electrodes can be used to balance the flow of electrons through an external electrical circuit that connects the electrodes, thereby storing or delivering charge electrochemically. In this presentation I will review the use of polymeric membranes in electrochemical energy storage technologies and discuss the critical issues related to the membranes that hinder these technologies. In particular I will also focus on the role the polymer membrane interface on device performance. At some point the polymer membrane must be interfaced with an active electrode or catalyst and the nature of this interface can significantly impact performance. Simulations of device performance based on bulk membrane transport properties often fail to predict the actual performance and empirical interfacial impedance terms usually added to capture the device performance. In this presentation I will explore the origins of this interfacial impedance in the different types of fuel cell membranes (proton and alkaline) by creating model thin film membranes where all of the membrane can be considered interfacial. We then use these thin films as a surrogate for the interfacial regions of a bulk membrane and then quantify the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of water and ions in the confined interfacial films. Using neutron reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and

  9. Analysis of mice tumor models using dynamic MRI data and a dedicated software platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfke, H.; Maurer, E.; Klose, K.J. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kohle, S.; Rascher-Friesenhausen, R.; Behrens, S.; Peitgen, H.O. [MeVis - Center for Medical Diagnostic Systems and Visualization, Bremen (Germany); Celik, I. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Surgery; Heverhagen, J.T. [Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: To implement a software platform (DynaVision) dedicated to analyze data from functional imaging of tumors with different mathematical approaches, and to test the software platform in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Materials and Methods: A software program was developed for extraction and visualization of tissue perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced images. This includes regional parameter calculation from enhancement curves, parametric images (e.g., blood flow), animation, 3D visualization, two-compartment modeling a mode for comparing different datasets (e.g., therapy monitoring), and motion correction. We analyzed xenograft tumors from two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (B x PC3 and ASPC1) implanted in 14 SCID mice after injection of Gd-DTPA into the tail vein. These data were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: Image analysis was completed in approximately 15 minutes per data set. The possibility of drawing and editing ROIs within the whole data set makes it easy to obtain quantitative data from the intensity-time curves. In one animal, motion artifacts reduced the image quality to a greater extent but data analysis was still possible after motion correction. Dynamic MRI of mice tumor models revealed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the contrast-enhancement curves and derived parameters, which correlated with differences in histopathology. ASPc1 tumors showed a more hypervascular type of curves with faster and higher signal enhancement rate (wash-in) and a faster signal decrease (wash-out). BXPC3 tumors showed a more hypovascular type with slower wash-in and wash-out. This correlated with the biological properties of the tumors. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of mice tumor models using dynamic MRI data and a dedicated software platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfke, H.; Maurer, E.; Klose, K.J.; Celik, I.; Heverhagen, J.T.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To implement a software platform (DynaVision) dedicated to analyze data from functional imaging of tumors with different mathematical approaches, and to test the software platform in pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). Materials and Methods: A software program was developed for extraction and visualization of tissue perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced images. This includes regional parameter calculation from enhancement curves, parametric images (e.g., blood flow), animation, 3D visualization, two-compartment modeling a mode for comparing different datasets (e.g., therapy monitoring), and motion correction. We analyzed xenograft tumors from two pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (B x PC3 and ASPC1) implanted in 14 SCID mice after injection of Gd-DTPA into the tail vein. These data were correlated with histopathological findings. Results: Image analysis was completed in approximately 15 minutes per data set. The possibility of drawing and editing ROIs within the whole data set makes it easy to obtain quantitative data from the intensity-time curves. In one animal, motion artifacts reduced the image quality to a greater extent but data analysis was still possible after motion correction. Dynamic MRI of mice tumor models revealed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the contrast-enhancement curves and derived parameters, which correlated with differences in histopathology. ASPc1 tumors showed a more hypervascular type of curves with faster and higher signal enhancement rate (wash-in) and a faster signal decrease (wash-out). BXPC3 tumors showed a more hypovascular type with slower wash-in and wash-out. This correlated with the biological properties of the tumors. (orig.)

  11. Inference of tumor evolution during chemotherapy by computational modeling and in situ analysis of genetic and phenotypic cellular diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almendro, Vanessa; Cheng, Yu-Kang; Randles, Amanda; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Marusyk, Andriy; Ametller, Elisabet; Gonzalez-Farre, Xavier; Muñoz, Montse; Russnes, Hege G.; Helland, Åslaug; Rye, Inga H.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Maruyama, Reo; Van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Dowsett, Mitchell; Jones, Robin L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge; Gascon, Pere; Gönen, Mithat; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer therapy exerts a strong selection pressure that shapes tumor evolution, yet our knowledge of how tumors change during treatment is limited. Here, we report the analysis of cellular heterogeneity for genetic and phenotypic features and their spatial distribution in breast tumors pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We found that intratumor genetic diversity was tumor-subtype specific, and it did not change during treatment in tumors with partial or no response. However, lower pretreatment genetic diversity was significantly associated with pathologic complete response. In contrast, phenotypic diversity was different between pre- and post-treatment samples. We also observed significant changes in the spatial distribution of cells with distinct genetic and phenotypic features. We used these experimental data to develop a stochastic computational model to infer tumor growth patterns and evolutionary dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of integrated analysis of genotypes and phenotypes of single cells in intact tissues to predict tumor evolution

  12. Modeling freedom from progression for standard-risk medulloblastoma: a mathematical tumor control model with multiple modes of failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bjørk-Eriksson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As pediatric medulloblastoma (MB) is a relatively rare disease, it is important to extract the maximum information from trials and cohort studies. Here, a framework was developed for modeling tumor control with multiple modes of failure and time-to-progression for standard-risk MB, using published...

  13. Model of interconnection of temperature and vascular parameters of experimental S-45 tumor on growth and radiation action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkhvadze, R.Ya.; Gedenavishvili, Eh.G.; Karpov, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to search for analytical description of changes in vascularization, which could serve as the basis for a mathematical model to control without invasion the state of tumoral neoplasms in therapy 264 mongrel rats with tumor C-45 vaccinated subcutaneously and intramuscularly in the region of a right femur were examined; they were irradiated locally and once using X-ray unit with 15 and 30 Gy doses. Tumor and vascular tissue temperatures, area being under vessels are studied. Models, which can be used to estimate vascularization of tumoral tissue and to describe interaction of a vacular factor and temperature under radiation effect, are suggested. 4 refs

  14. Establishment and characterization of intraperitoneal xenograft models by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAO, YUQIN; ZHOU, YONGJUN; SU, XIAOLAN; DAI, LEI; YU, LIN; DENG, HONGXIN; GOU, LANTU; YANG, JINLIANG

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a feasible intraperitoneal (i.p.) xenograft model in nude mice is a good strategy to evaluate the antitumor effect of drugs in vivo. However, the manipulation of human cancer cells in establishing a stable peritoneal carcinomatosis model in nude mice is problematic. In the present study, the ovarian and colorectal peritoneal tumor models were successfully established in nude mice by co-injection of human tumor cells and extracellular matrix gel. In ovarian tumor models, the mean number tumor nodes was significantly higher in the experimental group (intraperitoneal tumor cell co-injection with ECM gel) compared with the PBS control group on the 30th day (21.0±3.0 vs. 3.6±2.5; P<0.05). The same results were observed in the colorectal peritoneal tumor models on the 28th day. The colorectal peritoneal tumor model was further used to evaluate the chemotherapy effect of irinotecan (CPT-11). The mean weight of peritoneal tumor nodes in CPT-11 treatment group was significantly less than that of the control group (0.81±0.16 vs. 2.18±0.21 g; P<0.05). The results confirmed the value of these i.p. xenograft models in nude mice as efficient and feasible tools for preclinical evaluation. PMID:26788149

  15. Combined IL-21 and Low-Dose IL-2 therapy induces anti-tumor immunity and long-term curative effects in a murine melanoma tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo studies have recently demonstrated that interleukin 21 (IL-21 enhances the anti-tumor function of T-cells and NK cells in murine tumor models, and the combined use of IL-21 and IL-15 has resulted in prolonged tumor regression and survival in mice with previously established tumors. However, the combined anti-tumor effects of IL-21 and low dose IL-2 have not been studied even though IL-2 has been approved for human use, and, at low dose administration, stimulates the proliferation of memory T cells, and does not significantly increase antigen-induced apoptosis or regulatory T cell (Treg expansion. This study examined whether recombinant IL-21 alone or in combination with low-dose IL-2 could improve the in vivo anti-tumor function of naïve, tumor-antigen specific CD8+ T cells in a gp10025–33 T cell receptor transgenic pmel murine melanoma model. Methods Congenic C57BL/6 (Ly5.2 mice bearing subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were sublethally irradiated to induce lymphopenia. After irradiation naive pmel splenocytes were adoptively transferred, and mice were immunized with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with human gp10025–33 (hgp10025–33. Seven days after vaccination groups of mice received 5 consecutive days of intraperitoneal administration of IL-2 alone (20 × 103 IU, IL-21 alone (20 μg or IL-21 and IL-2. Control animals received no cytokine therapy. Results IL-21 alone and IL-2 alone both delayed tumor progression, but only IL-21 significantly augmented long-term survival (20% compared to the control group. However, combination therapy with IL-21 and IL-2 resulted in the highest long-term (>150 days tumor-free survival frequency of 46%. Animals that were tumor-free for > 150 days demonstrated tumor-specific protection after rechallenge with B16F10 melanoma cells. At peak expansion (21 days post vaccination, the combination of IL-21 plus IL-2 resulted in a 2- to 3-fold higher absolute number of

  16. Nanotechnology meets 3D in vitro models: tissue engineered tumors and cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, E L; Porto, L M; Rambo, C R

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology are providing to medicine a new dimension. Multifunctional nanomaterials with diagnostics and treatment modalities integrated in one nanoparticle or in cooperative nanosystems are promoting new insights to cancer treatment and diagnosis. The recent convergence between tissue engineering and cancer is gradually moving towards the development of 3D disease models that more closely resemble in vivo characteristics of tumors. However, the current nanomaterials based therapies are accomplished mainly in 2D cell cultures or in complex in vivo models. The development of new platforms to evaluate nano-based therapies in parallel with possible toxic effects will allow the design of nanomaterials for biomedical applications prior to in vivo studies. Therefore, this review focuses on how 3D in vitro models can be applied to study tumor biology, nanotoxicology and to evaluate nanomaterial based therapies. © 2013.

  17. Parameterization des modeles tumoral bases sur des maillages des donnees experimentaux.

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiella , Nick

    2012-01-01

    In order to establish a predictive model for in-vivo tumor growth and therapy, a multiscale model has to be set-up and calibrated individually in a stepwise process to a targeted cell type and di erent environments (in-vitro and in-vivo). As a proof of principle we will present the process chain of model construction and parametrization from di erent data sources for the avascular growth of the EMT6/Ro and the SK-MES-1 cell line. In a rst step, a multiscale and individual-based model has been...

  18. Implementation of plaid model biclustering method on microarray of carcinoma and adenoma tumor gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaneswari, Gianinna; Bustamam, Alhadi; Sarwinda, Devvi

    2017-10-01

    A Tumor is an abnormal growth of cells that serves no purpose. Carcinoma is a tumor that grows from the top of the cell membrane and the organ adenoma is a benign tumor of the gland-like cells or epithelial tissue. In the field of molecular biology, the development of microarray technology is used in the data store of disease genetic expression. For each of microarray gene, an amount of information is stored for each trait or condition. In gene expression data clustering can be done with a bicluster algorithm, thats clustering method which not only the objects to be clustered, but also the properties or condition of the object. This research proposed Plaid Model Biclustering as one of biclustering method. In this study, we discuss the implementation of Plaid Model Biclustering Method on microarray of Carcinoma and Adenoma tumor gene expression data. From the experimental results, we found three biclusters are formed by Carcinoma gene expression data and four biclusters are formed by Adenoma gene expression data.

  19. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Akhtar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  20. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  1. IT-141, a Polymer Micelle Encapsulating SN-38, Induces Tumor Regression in Multiple Colorectal Cancer Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carie, Adam; Rios-Doria, Jonathan; Costich, Tara; Burke, Brian; Slama, Richard; Skaff, Habib; Sill, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Polymer micelles are promising drug delivery vehicles for the delivery of anticancer agents to tumors. Often, anticancer drugs display potent cytotoxic effects towards cancer cells but are too hydrophobic to be administered in the clinic as a free drug. To address this problem, a polymer micelle was designed using a triblock copolymer (ITP-101) that enables hydrophobic drugs to be encapsulated. An SN-38 encapsulated micelle, IT-141, was prepared that exhibited potent in vitro cytotoxicity against a wide array of cancer cell lines. In a mouse model, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that IT-141 had a much longer circulation time, plasma exposure, and tumor exposure compared to irinotecan. IT-141 was also superior to irinotecan in terms of antitumor activity, exhibiting greater tumor inhibition in HT-29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer xenograft models at half the dose of irinotecan. The antitumor effect of IT-141 was dose-dependent and caused complete growth inhibition and tumor regression at well-tolerated doses. Varying the specific concentration of SN-38 within the IT-141 micelle had no detectible effect on this antitumor activity, indicating no differences in activity between different IT-141 formulations. In summary, IT-141 is a potent micelle-based chemotherapy that holds promise for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  2. IT-141, a Polymer Micelle Encapsulating SN-38, Induces Tumor Regression in Multiple Colorectal Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Carie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer micelles are promising drug delivery vehicles for the delivery of anticancer agents to tumors. Often, anticancer drugs display potent cytotoxic effects towards cancer cells but are too hydrophobic to be administered in the clinic as a free drug. To address this problem, a polymer micelle was designed using a triblock copolymer (ITP-101 that enables hydrophobic drugs to be encapsulated. An SN-38 encapsulated micelle, IT-141, was prepared that exhibited potent in vitro cytotoxicity against a wide array of cancer cell lines. In a mouse model, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that IT-141 had a much longer circulation time, plasma exposure, and tumor exposure compared to irinotecan. IT-141 was also superior to irinotecan in terms of antitumor activity, exhibiting greater tumor inhibition in HT-29 and HCT116 colorectal cancer xenograft models at half the dose of irinotecan. The antitumor effect of IT-141 was dose-dependent and caused complete growth inhibition and tumor regression at well-tolerated doses. Varying the specific concentration of SN-38 within the IT-141 micelle had no detectible effect on this antitumor activity, indicating no differences in activity between different IT-141 formulations. In summary, IT-141 is a potent micelle-based chemotherapy that holds promise for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  3. Comparison of Kinetic Models for Dual-Tracer Receptor Concentration Imaging in Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzei, Nazanin; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Elliott, Jonathan T; Holt, Robert W; Gunn, Jason R; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    Molecular differences between cancerous and healthy tissue have become key targets for novel therapeutics specific to tumor receptors. However, cancer cell receptor expression can vary within and amongst different tumors, making strategies that can quantify receptor concentration in vivo critical for the progression of targeted therapies. Recently a dual-tracer imaging approach capable of providing quantitative measures of receptor concentration in vivo was developed. It relies on the simultaneous injection and imaging of receptor-targeted tracer and an untargeted tracer (to account for non-specific uptake of the targeted tracer). Early implementations of this approach have been structured on existing “reference tissue” imaging methods that have not been optimized for or validated in dual-tracer imaging. Using simulations and mouse tumor model experimental data, the salient findings in this study were that all widely used reference tissue kinetic models can be used for dual-tracer imaging, with the linearized simplified reference tissue model offering a good balance of accuracy and computational efficiency. Moreover, an alternate version of the full two-compartment reference tissue model can be employed accurately by assuming that the K1s of the targeted and untargeted tracers are similar to avoid assuming an instantaneous equilibrium between bound and free states (made by all other models). PMID:25414912

  4. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  5. Ultrasonic Guided Waves in Piezoelectric Layered Composite with Different Interfacial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining the propagation model of guided waves in a multilayered piezoelectric composite with the interfacial model of rigid, slip, and weak interfaces, the generalized dispersion characteristic equations of guided waves propagating in a piezoelectric layered composite with different interfacial properties are derived. The effects of the slip, weak, and delamination interfaces in different depths on the dispersion properties of the lowest-order mode ultrasonic guided wave are analyzed. The theory would be used to characterize the interfacial properties of piezoelectric layered composite nondestructively.

  6. Bioprinting of three dimensional tumor models: a preliminary study using a low cost 3D printer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polley Christian

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The deep understanding of cancer and tumor genesis, as well as the development of new therapy strategies still remains one of the emerging challenges in modern medicine. To meet these challenges it seems to be absolutely necessary to overcome the drawbacks of the established 2D in vitro models. Especially the missing microenvironment of the tumor, which means the absence of stroma and immune cells, results in a missing cell-cell and cell-stroma interaction as well as disrupted functional communication pathways. Modern 3D culture systems and 3D printing or rather bioprinting technologies attempt to solve this issue and aim to closely mimic natural tumor microenvironment. In this preliminary work we are going to present the first steps of establishing an artificial 3D tumor model utilising a low cost 3D printer. Therefore the printer had been modified with an open-source syringe pump to become a functional bioprinter using viscosity modulated alginate hydrogel. In the first attempts L929 mouse fibroblasts, which are an integral component of natural stroma, had been incorporated into the hydrogel matrix and printed into scaffolds. Subsequent to the printing process the scaffolds got ionically crosslinked with a 5% w/v aqueous solution of CaCl2 to become mechanically stable. After three days of cultivation viability testing had been performed by utilising FDG staining and PET CT to obtain a volumetric viability measurement. The viability imaging showed vital cells homogeneously distributed in the scaffold and therefore stands as an evidence for a working low cost bioprinting process and a successful first step for the development of an artificial 3D tumor model.

  7. Reovirus FAST Protein Enhances Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Oncolytic Virotherapy in Primary and Metastatic Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Le Boeuf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST proteins are the smallest known viral fusogens (∼100–150 amino acids and efficiently induce cell-cell fusion and syncytium formation in multiple cell types. Syncytium formation enhances cell-cell virus transmission and may also induce immunogenic cell death, a form of apoptosis that stimulates immune recognition of tumor cells. These properties suggest that FAST proteins might serve to enhance oncolytic virotherapy. The oncolytic activity of recombinant VSVΔM51 (an interferon-sensitive vesicular stomatitis virus [VSV] mutant encoding the p14 FAST protein (VSV-p14 was compared with a similar construct encoding GFP (VSV-GFP in cell culture and syngeneic BALB/c tumor models. Compared with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 exhibited increased oncolytic activity against MCF-7 and 4T1 breast cancer spheroids in culture and reduced primary 4T1 breast tumor growth in vivo. VSV-p14 prolonged survival in both primary and metastatic 4T1 breast cancer models, and in a CT26 metastatic colon cancer model. As with VSV-GFP, VSV-p14 preferentially replicated in vivo in tumors and was cleared rapidly from other sites. Furthermore, VSV-p14 increased the numbers of activated splenic CD4, CD8, natural killer (NK, and natural killer T (NKT cells, and increased the number of activated CD4 and CD8 cells in tumors. FAST proteins may therefore provide a multi-pronged approach to improving oncolytic virotherapy via syncytium formation and enhanced immune stimulation.

  8. Brain tumor modeling using the CRISPR/Cas9 system: state of the art and view to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Dai, Jin-Xiang; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2016-05-31

    Although brain tumors have been known tremendously over the past decade, there are still many problems to be solved. The etiology of brain tumors is not well understood and the treatment remains modest. There is in great need to develop a suitable brain tumor models that faithfully mirror the etiology of human brain neoplasm and subsequently get more efficient therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this review, we described the current status of animal models of brain tumors and analyzed their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9), a versatile genome editing technology for investigating the functions of target genes, and its application were also introduced in our present work. We firstly proposed that brain tumor modeling could be well established via CRISPR/Cas9 techniques. And CRISPR/Cas9-mediated brain tumor modeling was likely to be more suitable for figuring out the pathogenesis of brain tumors, as CRISPR/Cas9 platform was a simple and more efficient biological toolbox for implementing mutagenesis of oncogenes or tumor suppressors that were closely linked with brain tumors.

  9. SU-G-IeP4-11: Monitoring Tumor Growth in Subcutaneous Murine Tumor Model in Vivo: A Comparison Between MRI and Small Animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Fan, J; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare the volume measurement of subcutaneous tumors in mice with different imaging platforms, namely a GE MRI and a Sofie-Biosciences small animal CT scanner. Methods: A549 human lung carcinoma cells and FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into flanks of nude mice. Three FaDu tumors and three A549 tumors were included in this study. The MRI scans were done with a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla MR scanner using a fast T2-weighted sequence (70mm FOV and 1.2mm slice thickness), while the CT scans were done with the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT platform dedicated for small animal studies (48mm FOV and 0.2mm slice thickness). Imaging contrast agent was not used in this study. Based on the DICOM images from MRI and CT scans, the tumors were contoured with Philips DICOM Viewer and the tumor volumes were obtained by summing up the contoured area and multiplied by the slice thickness. Results: The volume measurements based on the CT scans agree reasonably with that obtained with MR images for the subcutaneous tumors. The mean difference in the absolute tumor volumes between MRI- and CT-based measurements was found to be −6.2% ± 1.0%, with the difference defined as (VMR – VCT)*100%/VMR. Furthermore, we evaluated the normalized tumor volumes, which were defined for each tumor as V/V{sub 0} where V{sub 0} stands for the volume from the first MR or CT scan. The mean difference in the normalized tumor volumes was found to be 0.10% ± 0.96%. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the difference between normal and abnormal tissues is often less clear on small animal CT images than on MR images, one can still obtain reasonable tumor volume information with the small animal CT scans for subcutaneous murine xenograft models.

  10. Dynamics of melanoma tumor therapy with vesicular stomatitis virus: explaining the variability in outcomes using mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, D M; Offord, C P; Dev, J; Bajzer, Z; Vile, R G; Dingli, D

    2012-05-01

    Tumor selective, replication competent viruses are being tested for cancer gene therapy. This approach introduces a new therapeutic paradigm due to potential replication of the therapeutic agent and induction of a tumor-specific immune response. However, the experimental outcomes are quite variable, even when studies utilize highly inbred strains of mice and the same cell line and virus. Recognizing that virotherapy is an exercise in population dynamics, we utilize mathematical modeling to understand the variable outcomes observed when B16ova malignant melanoma tumors are treated with vesicular stomatitis virus in syngeneic, fully immunocompetent mice. We show how variability in the initial tumor size and the actual amount of virus delivered to the tumor have critical roles on the outcome of therapy. Virotherapy works best when tumors are small, and a robust innate immune response can lead to superior tumor control. Strategies that reduce tumor burden without suppressing the immune response and methods that maximize the amount of virus delivered to the tumor should optimize tumor control in this model system.

  11. Development and Validity of a Silicone Renal Tumor Model for Robotic Partial Nephrectomy Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monda, Steven M; Weese, Jonathan R; Anderson, Barrett G; Vetter, Joel M; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna; Du, Kefu; Andriole, Gerald L; Figenshau, Robert S

    2018-02-05

    Objectives To provide a training tool to address the technical challenges of robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, we created silicone renal tumor models using 3D printed molds of a patient's kidney with a mass. In this study, we assessed the face, content, and construct validity of these models. Materials and Methods Surgeons of different training levels completed four simulations on silicone renal tumor models. Participants were surveyed on the usefulness and realism of the model as a training tool. Performance was measured using operation specific metrics, self-reported operative demands (NASA TLX), and blinded expert assessment (GEARS). Results 24 participants included attending urologists, endourology fellows, urology residents, and medical students. Post-training surveys of expert participants yielded mean results of 79.2 on the realism of the model's overall feel and 90.2 on the model's overall usefulness for training. Renal artery clamp times and GEARS scores were significantly better in surgeons further in training (p≤0.005, p≤0.025). Renal artery clamp times, preserved renal parenchyma, positive margins, NASA TLX, and GEARS scores were all found to improve across trials (psilicone renal tumor model in a cohort of surgeons of different training levels. Expert participants deemed the model useful and realistic. Surgeons of higher training levels performed better than less experienced surgeons in various study metrics, and improvements within individuals were observed over sequential trials. Future studies should aim to assess model predictive validity, namely the association between model performance improvements and improvements in live surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Immuno-therapy with anti-CTLA4 antibodies in tolerized and non-tolerized mouse tumor models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Persson

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (anti-CTLA4 are a novel form of cancer immunotherapy. While preclinical studies in mouse tumor models have shown anti-tumor efficacy of anti-CTLA4 injection or expression, anti-CTLA4 treatment in patients with advanced cancers had disappointing therapeutic benefit. These discrepancies have to be addressed in more adequate pre-clinical models. We employed two tumor models. The first model is based on C57Bl/6 mice and syngeneic TC-1 tumors expressing HPV16 E6/E7. In this model, the HPV antigens are neo-antigens, against which no central tolerance exists. The second model involves mice transgenic for the proto-oncogen neu and syngeneic mouse mammary carcinoma (MMC cells. In this model tolerance to Neu involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. Anti-CTLA4 delivery as a protein or expression from gene-modified tumor cells were therapeutically efficacious in the non-tolerized TC-1 tumor model, but had no effect in the MMC-model. We also used the two tumor models to test an immuno-gene therapy approach for anti-CTLA4. Recently, we used an approach based on hematopoietic stem cells (HSC to deliver the relaxin gene to tumors and showed that this approach facilitates pre-existing anti-tumor T-cells to control tumor growth in the MMC tumor model. However, unexpectedly, when used for anti-CTLA4 gene delivery in this study, the HSC-based approach was therapeutically detrimental in both the TC-1 and MMC models. Anti-CTLA4 expression in these models resulted in an increase in the number of intratumoral CD1d+ NKT cells and in the expression of TGF-β1. At the same time, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which potentially can support anti-tumor T-cell responses, were lower in tumors of mice that received anti-CTLA4-HSC therapy. The differences in outcomes between the tolerized and non-tolerized models also provide a potential explanation for the low efficacy

  13. The intraportal injection model: A practical animal model for hepatic metastases and tumor cell dissemination in human colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thalheimer, Andreas; Waaga-Gasser, Ana M; Otto, Christoph; Bueter, Marco; Illert, Bertram; Gattenlohner, Stefan; Gasser, Martin; Meyer, Detlef; Fein, Martin; Germer, Christoph T

    2009-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of metastasized colorectal carcinoma requires biologically relevant and adequate animal models that generate both reproducible metastasis and the dissemination of tumor cells in the form of so-called minimal residual disease (MRD), an expression of the systemic character of neoplastic disease. We injected immunoincompetent nude mice intraportally with different numbers (1 × 10 5 , 1 × 10 6 and 5 × 10 6 cells) of the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and SW-620 and investigated by histological studies and CK-20 RT-PCR the occurrence of hematogenous metastases and the dissemination of human tumor cells in bone marrow. Only the injection of 1 × 10 6 cells of each colon carcinoma cell line produced acceptable perioperative mortality with reproducible induction of hepatic metastases in up to 89% of all animals. The injection of 1 × 10 6 cells also generated tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow in up to 63% of animals with hepatic metastases. The present intraportal injection model in immunoincompetent nude mice represents a biologically relevant and adequate animal model for the induction of both reproducible hepatic metastasis and tumor cell dissemination in the bone marrow as a sign of MRD

  14. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  15. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immune response in mouse models: the role of regulatory Tcells, anti-tumor antibodies, and immune attacks on brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Fatma; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Chung, Hoon; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that photodynamic therapy mediated by a vascular regimen of benzoporphyrin derivative and 690nm light is capable of inducing a robust immune response in the mouse CT26.CL25 tumor model that contains a tumor-rejection antigen, beta-galactosidase (β-gal). For the first time we show that PDT can stimulate the production of serum IgG antibodies against the β-gal antigen. It is known that a common cause of death from cancer, particularly lung cancer, is brain metastases; especially the inoperable ones that do not respond to traditional cytotoxic therapies either. We asked whether PDT of a primary tumor could stimulate immune response that could attack the distant brain metastases. We have developed a mouse model of generating brain metastases by injecting CT26.CL25 tumor cells into the brain as well as injecting the same cancer cells under the skin at the same time. When the subcutaneous tumor was treated with PDT, we observed a survival advantage compared to mice that had untreated brain metastases alone.

  16. Nonlinear simulations of solid tumor growth using a mixture model: invasion and branching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Vittorio; Li, Xiangrong; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    We develop a thermodynamically consistent mixture model for avascular solid tumor growth which takes into account the effects of cell-to-cell adhesion, and taxis inducing chemical and molecular species. The mixture model is well-posed and the governing equations are of Cahn–Hilliard type. When there are only two phases, our asymptotic analysis shows that earlier single-phase models may be recovered as limiting cases of a two-phase model. To solve the governing equations, we develop a numerical algorithm based on an adaptive Cartesian block-structured mesh refinement scheme. A centered-difference approximation is used for the space discretization so that the scheme is second order accurate in space. An implicit discretization in time is used which results in nonlinear equations at implicit time levels. We further employ a gradient stable discretization scheme so that the nonlinear equations are solvable for very large time steps. To solve those equations we use a nonlinear multilevel/multigrid method which is of an optimal order O (N) where N is the number of grid points. Spherically symmetric and fully two dimensional nonlinear numerical simulations are performed. We investigate tumor evolution in nutrient-rich and nutrient-poor tissues. A number of important results have been uncovered. For example, we demonstrate that the tumor may suffer from taxis-driven fingering instabilities which are most dramatic when cell proliferation is low, as predicted by linear stability theory. This is also observed in experiments. This work shows that taxis may play a role in tumor invasion and that when nutrient plays the role of a chemoattractant, the diffusional instability is exacerbated by nutrient gradients. Accordingly, we believe this model is capable of describing complex invasive patterns observed in experiments. PMID:18787827

  17. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli, E-mail: pertteli.salmenpera@helsinki.fi [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Karhemo, Piia-Riitta [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Räsänen, Kati [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Research Programs Unit, Translational Cancer Biology, and Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63, FIN-00014 (Finland); Vaheri, Antti [Department of Virology, Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 21, FIN-00014 (Finland)

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts acquire a sustained quiescence when grown as multicellular spheroids. • This quiescence is associated with drastic change in gene expression. • Fibroblasts spheroids secrete various inflammation-linked cytokines and chemokines. • Fibroblasts spheroids reduced growth of RT3 SCC cells in xenograft model.

  18. Interfacial nanorheology: Probing molecular mobility in mesoscopic polymeric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Scott E.

    Investigating the finite size limited structural relaxations in mesoscopic polymer systems is central to nanotechnological applications involving thin films, complex structures, and nanoscale phase-separated systems; for example, polymer electrolyte membranes, optoelectronic devices, and ultrahigh-density thermomechanical data storage (terabit recording). In such systems, bulk statistical averaging and continuum models are jeopardized. Interfacial constraints lead to bulk-deviating molecular dynamics and dictate material and transport properties. The objective of this dissertation is to provide insight to the exotic mesoscopic behaviors in thin films by developing novel rheological and tribological analytical methods based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM). Activation energies are deduced for the molecular motions associated with internal friction dissipation, and the temperature resolved length scale for cooperative motion during the glass transition is directly obtained for polystyrene. These results confirm the dynamical heterogeneity of the glass transition and reveal a crossover from intra- to inter-molecular relaxation in the transition regime. The impact of dimensional constraints on molecular mobility in ultrathin polymer films is explored through interfacial glass-transition profiles. With these profiles, a structural model of the rheological changes near interfacial boundaries is constructed as function of molecular weight and crosslinking density. The manifestation of interfacial constraints in nanotechnological applications is illustrated for thermomechanical recording, where rheological gradients near the substrate dictate the contact pressure and strain shielding at the substrate compromises film stability. A foundation for the critical aspects of interfacial stability is developed, and mechanically graded interfaces and modulus-matching techniques are explored as a means of improving the stability, durability, and stress transmission characteristics

  19. Anti-tumor response induced by immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and laser irradiation using rat mammary tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph T. Acquaviva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ideal treatment modality for metastatic cancer would be a local treatment that can destroy primary tumors while inducing an effective systemic anti-tumor response. To this end, we developed laser immunotherapy, combining photothermal laser application with an immunoadjuvant for the treatment of metastatic cancer. Additionally, to enhance the selective photothermal effect, we integrated light-absorbing nanomaterials into this innovative treatment. Specifically, we developed an immunologically modified carbon nanotube combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs with the immunoadjuvant glycated chitosan (GC. To determine the effectiveness of laser irradiation, a series of experiments were performed using two different irradiation durations — 5 and 10 min. Rats were inoculated with DMBA-4 cancer cells, a metastatic cancer cell line. The treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 10 min had a 50% long-term survival rate without residual primary or metastatic tumors. The treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 5 min had no long-term survivors; all rats died with multiple metastases at several distant sites. Therefore, Laser+SWNT–GC treatment with 10 min of laser irradiation proved to be effective at reducing tumor size and inducing long-term anti-tumor immunity.

  20. On Statistical Modeling of Sequencing Noise in High Depth Data to Assess Tumor Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadan, Raul; Bhanot, Gyan; Marsilio, Sonia; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Pasqualucci, Laura; Khiabanian, Hossein

    2017-12-01

    One cause of cancer mortality is tumor evolution to therapy-resistant disease. First line therapy often targets the dominant clone, and drug resistance can emerge from preexisting clones that gain fitness through therapy-induced natural selection. Such mutations may be identified using targeted sequencing assays by analysis of noise in high-depth data. Here, we develop a comprehensive, unbiased model for sequencing error background. We find that noise in sufficiently deep DNA sequencing data can be approximated by aggregating negative binomial distributions. Mutations with frequencies above noise may have prognostic value. We evaluate our model with simulated exponentially expanded populations as well as data from cell line and patient sample dilution experiments, demonstrating its utility in prognosticating tumor progression. Our results may have the potential to identify significant mutations that can cause recurrence. These results are relevant in the pretreatment clinical setting to determine appropriate therapy and prepare for potential recurrence pretreatment.

  1. Mathematical modeling of tumor-induced immunosuppression by myeloid-derived suppressor cells: Implications for therapeutic targeting strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Pooya; Madjidzadeh, Keivan; Hassan, Moustapha; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr

    2018-04-07

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) belong to immature myeloid cells that are generated and accumulated during the tumor development. MDSCs strongly suppress the anti-tumor immunity and provide conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we present a mathematical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) to describe tumor-induced immunosuppression caused by MDSCs. The model consists of four equations and incorporates tumor cells, cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), natural killer (NK) cells and MDSCs. We also provide simulation models that evaluate or predict the effects of anti-MDSC drugs (e.g., l-arginine and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)) on the tumor growth and the restoration of anti-tumor immunity. The simulated results obtained using our model were in good agreement with the corresponding experimental findings on the expansion of splenic MDSCs, immunosuppressive effects of these cells at the tumor site and effectiveness of l-arginine and 5-FU on the re-establishment of antitumor immunity. Regarding this latter issue, our predictive simulation results demonstrated that intermittent therapy with low-dose 5-FU alone could eradicate the tumors irrespective of their origins and types. Furthermore, at the time of tumor eradication, the number of CTLs prevailed over that of cancer cells and the number of splenic MDSCs returned to the normal levels. Finally, our predictive simulation results also showed that the addition of l-arginine supplementation to the intermittent 5-FU therapy reduced the time of the tumor eradication and the number of iterations for 5-FU treatment. Thus, the present mathematical model provides important implications for designing new therapeutic strategies that aim to restore antitumor immunity by targeting MDSCs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the toxicity of tirapazamine plus cisplatin in a mouse tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, M.; Ottenjann, S.; Kuenzel, G.; Nieder, C.; Molls, M.; Busch, R.; Erhardt, W.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: tirapazamine (TPZ) is an anticancer drug that is selectively activated by the low oxygen environment in solid tumors. Furthermore, TPZ also enhances the tumor cell-killing effect of cisplatin. So far, detailed information on the toxicity of combined treatment is rare. The authors evaluated the toxicity of TPZ in combination with cisplatin in a mouse tumor model. For this purpose, general toxicity was monitored and all inner organs were examined histologically. Material and methods: RIF-1 fibrosarcomas of murine origin growing in the right hindfoot dorsum of C3H mice were used. The animals were treated with 10 x 2 Gy irradiation plus six i.p. injections of 4 mg/kg cisplatin (total dose 24 mg/kg) together with varying doses of TPZ (0-28 mg/kg per injection; total dose 0, 43.2, 86.4, 129.6, 151.2, 172.8 mg/kg). Treatment was applied within 2 weeks (figure 1). Total observation period was up to 35 days. Results: combined treatment with TPZ led to a dose-dependent, significant decrease in motor activity (table 1) and body weight and an increase in mortality (figures 2 and 3, tables 2 and 3). Histological analyses showed areas of necrosis in the heart, liver and kidney and gastric ulcers (table 4). Cisplatin alone produced no severe toxicity. Tumor doubling times were TPZ dose-dependent and comparable with data from the literature (figures 4 and 5, table 3). (orig.)

  3. Biological characterization of cetuximab-conjugated gold nanoparticles in a tumor animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hao-Wen; Lin, Yi-Yu; Chen, Chao-Cheng; Chi, Kwan-Hwa; Tien, Der-Chi; Hsia, Chien-Chung; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Chen, Fu-Du; Lin, Ming-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2014-07-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely applied to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and can be modified to contain target-specific ligands via gold-thiolate bonding. This study investigated the pharmacokinetics and microdistribution of antibody-mediated active targeting gold nanoparticles in mice with subcutaneous lung carcinoma. We conjugated AuNPs with cetuximab (C225), an antibody-targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and then labeled with In-111, which created EGFR-targeted AuNPs. In vitro studies showed that after a 2 h incubation, the uptake of C225-conjugated AuNPs in high EGFR-expression A549 cells was 14.9-fold higher than that of PEGylated AuNPs; furthermore, uptake was also higher at 3.8-fold when MCF7 cells with lower EGFR-expression were used. MicroSPECT/CT imaging and a biodistribution study conducted by using a A549 tumor xenograft mouse model provided evidence of elevated uptake of the C225-conjugated AuNPs into the tumor cells as a result of active targeting. Moreover, the microdistribution of PEGylated AuNPs revealed that a large portion of AuNPs remained in the tumor interstitium, whereas the C225-conjugated AuNPs displayed enhanced internalization via antibody-mediated endocytosis. Our findings suggest that the anti-EGFR antibody-conjugated AuNPs are likely to be a plausible nano-sized vehicle for drug delivery to EGFR-expressing tumors.

  4. Is 18F-FDG a surrogate tracer to measure tumor hypoxia? Comparison with the hypoxic tracer 14C-EF3 in animal tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Nicolas; Deheneffe, Stephanie; Bol, Anne; De Bast, Marc; Labar, Daniel; Lee, John A.; Gregoire, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has been reported as a surrogate tracer to measure tumor hypoxia with positron emission tomography (PET). The hypothesis is that there is an increased uptake of FDG under hypoxic conditions secondary to enhanced glycolysis, compensating the hypoxia-induced loss of cellular energy production. Several studies have already addressed this issue, some with conflicting results. This study aimed to compare the tracers 14 C-EF3 and 18 F-FDG to detect hypoxia in mouse tumor models. Materials and methods: C3H, tumor-bearing mice (FSAII and SCCVII tumors) were injected iv with 14 C-EF3, and 1 h later with 18 F-FDG. Using a specifically designed immobilization device with fiducial markers, PET (Mosaic (registered) , Philips) images were acquired 1 h after the FDG injection. After imaging, the device containing mouse was frozen, transversally sliced and imaged with autoradiography (AR) (FLA-5100, Fujifilm) to obtain high resolution images of the 18 F-FDG distribution within the tumor area. After a 48-h delay allowing for 18 F decay a second AR was performed to image 14 C-EF3 distribution. AR images were aligned to reconstruct the full 3D tumor volume, and were compared with the PET images. Image segmentation with threshold-based methods was applied on both AR and PET images to derive various tracer activity volumes. The matching index DSI (dice similarity index) was then computed. The comparison was performed under normoxic (ambient air, FSAII: n = 4, SCCVII, n = 5) and under hypoxic conditions (10% O 2 breathing, SCCVII: n = 4). Results: On AR, under both ambient air and hypoxic conditions, there was a decreasing similarity between 14 C-EF3 and FDG with higher activity sub-volumes. Under normoxic conditions, when comparing the 10% of tumor voxels with the highest 18 F-FDG or 14 C-EF3 activity, a DSI of 0.24 and 0.20 was found for FSAII and SCCVII, respectively. Under hypoxic conditions, a DSI of 0.36 was observed for SCCVII tumors. When

  5. Label-free multimodal microspectroscopic differentiation of glioblastoma tumor model cell lines combined with multivariate data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag, Edwin; Boldrini, Barbara; Luckow, Sabrina; Kessler, Rudolf W.

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme represents a highly lethal brain tumor. A tumor model has been developed based on the U-251 MG cell line from a human explant. The tumor model simulates different malignancies by controlled expression of the tumor suppressor proteins PTEN and TP53 within the cell lines derived from the wild type. The cells from each different malignant cell line are grown on slides, followed by a paraformaldehyde fixation. UV / VIS and IR spectra are recorded in the cell nuclei. For the differentiation of the cell lines a principal component analysis (PCA) is performed. The PCA demonstrates a good separation of the tumor model cell lines both with UV / VIS spectroscopy and with IR spectroscopy.

  6. An in vivo-like tumor stem cell-related glioblastoma in vitro model for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Nørregaard, Annette

    the effects of new drugs on tumor cells including tumor stem cells. Implantation of glioblastoma cells into organotypic brain slice cultures has previously been published as a model system, but not using a stem cell favourable environment. Organotypic corticostriatal rat brain slice cultures were prepared...... and cultured in a serum containing medium replaced after three days with a serum-free stem cell medium. Thereafter fluorescent DiI labelled glioblastoma spheroids from the cell line U87 and the tumor stem cell line SJ-1 established in our laboratory were implanted into the brain slices between cortex......The discovery of tumor stem cells being highly resistant against therapy makes new demands to model systems suitable for evaluation of the effects of new drugs on tumor stem cells. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop an in vivo-like in vitro glioblastoma model for testing...

  7. Myeloid leukemias and virally induced lymphomas in miniature inbred swine; development of a large animal tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAIMON eDURAN-STRUUCK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the MGH miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in MHC characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  8. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenperä, Pertteli; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Räsänen, Kati; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adipose tissue macrophage polarization by intermittent hypoxia in a mouse model of OSA: effect of tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley X; Carreras, Alba; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2015-06-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH)-induces alterations in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that are associated with adverse cancer outcomes, as reported in patients suffering from sleep apnea. Adipose tissues (AT) and bone-marrow (BM)-derived cells are the inferred sources of macrophages infiltrating malignant tumors. Here, the sources of TAMs and the phenotypic changes induced by IH in the ipsilateral and contralateral AT were investigated by using a syngeneic murine solid tumor model (TC1). C57/B6 male mice were exposed to either IH or room air (RA) for 6 weeks, with TC1 cells being inoculated in the 2nd week. Macrophage content, phenotype and tissue origin were assessed in tumors, and ipsilateral and contralateral AT. IH induced a ~2.2-fold increase in TAM tumor infiltration. However, differential responses in the tumor ipsilateral and contralateral AT emerged: IH increased infiltration of preferentially M1 macrophages in contralateral AT, while reductions in macrophages emerged in ipsilateral AT and primarily consisted of the M2 phenotype. These changes were accompanied by reciprocal increases in resident and BM-derived TAMs in the tumor. IH-induced phenotypic alterations in AT macrophages surrounding the tumor and their increased infiltration within the tumor may contribute to the accelerated tumor progression associated with IH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanoparticle-based sorting of circulating tumor cells by epithelial antigen expression during disease progression in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhanna, Nidal; Mepham, Adam; Mohamadi, Reza M; Chan, Harley; Khan, Tahsin; Akens, Margarete; Besant, Justin D; Irish, Jonathan; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used as markers for the detection, characterization, and targeted therapeutic management of cancer. We recently developed a nanoparticle-mediated approach for capture and sorting of CTCs based on their specific epithelial phenotype. In the current study, we investigate the phenotypic transition of tumor cells in an animal model and show the correlation of this transition with tumor progression. VX2 tumor cells were injected into rabbits, and CTCs were evaluated during tumor progression and correlated with computerized tomography (CT) measurements of tumor volume. The results showed a dramatic increase of CTCs during the four weeks of tumor growth. Following resection, CTC levels dropped but then rebounded, likely due to lymph node metastases. Additionally, CTCs showed a marked loss of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) relative to precursor cells. In conclusion, the device accurately traces disease progression and CTC phenotypic shift in an animal model. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been used to predict disease prognosis. In this study, the authors developed a nanoparticle-mediated platform based on microfluidics to analyze the differential expressions of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) on CTCs in an animal model. It was found that the loss of EpCAM correlated with disease progression. Hence, the use of this platform may be further applied in other cancer models in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SU-F-R-44: Modeling Lung SBRT Tumor Response Using Bayesian Network Averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, A; Ybarra, N; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The prediction of tumor control after a patient receives lung SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) has proven to be challenging, due to the complex interactions between an individual’s biology and dose-volume metrics. Many of these variables have predictive power when combined, a feature that we exploit using a graph modeling approach based on Bayesian networks. This provides a probabilistic framework that allows for accurate and visually intuitive predictive modeling. The aim of this study is to uncover possible interactions between an individual patient’s characteristics and generate a robust model capable of predicting said patient’s treatment outcome. Methods: We investigated a cohort of 32 prospective patients from multiple institutions whom had received curative SBRT to the lung. The number of patients exhibiting tumor failure was observed to be 7 (event rate of 22%). The serum concentration of 5 biomarkers previously associated with NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) was measured pre-treatment. A total of 21 variables were analyzed including: dose-volume metrics with BED (biologically effective dose) correction and clinical variables. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique estimated the posterior probability distribution of the potential graphical structures. The probability of tumor failure was then estimated by averaging the top 100 graphs and applying Baye’s rule. Results: The optimal Bayesian model generated throughout this study incorporated the PTV volume, the serum concentration of the biomarker EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and prescription BED. This predictive model recorded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.94(1), providing better performance compared to competing methods in other literature. Conclusion: The use of biomarkers in conjunction with dose-volume metrics allows for the generation of a robust predictive model. The preliminary results of this report demonstrate that it is possible

  12. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: −11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: −7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: −6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: −1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: −11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography

  13. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Ruddy, Bari H; Neelakkantan, Harini; Meeks, Sanford L; Kupelian, Patrick A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  14. A GPU-based framework for modeling real-time 3D lung tumor conformal dosimetry with subject-specific lung tumor motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Yugang; Santhanam, Anand; Ruddy, Bari H [University of Central Florida, FL (United States); Neelakkantan, Harini; Meeks, Sanford L [M D Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, FL (United States); Kupelian, Patrick A, E-mail: anand.santhanam@orlandohealth.co [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-07

    In this paper, we present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving lung tumor and its surrounding normal tissues, which are undergoing subject-specific lung deformations. The GPU-based simulation framework models the motion of the 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the dose delivery using the dose extracted from a treatment plan using Pinnacle Treatment Planning System, Phillips, for one of the 3DCTs of the 4DCT and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited inside the lung. The 4DCT lung datasets were registered with each other using a modified optical flow algorithm. The motion of the tumor and the motion of the surrounding tissues were simulated by measuring the changes in lung volume during the radiotherapy treatment using spirometry. The real-time dose delivered to the tumor for each beam is generated by summing the dose delivered to the target volume at each increase in lung volume during the beam delivery time period. The simulation results showed the real-time capability of the framework at 20 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the number of 4DCT steps (approximately 12) reconstructed during multiple breathing cycles.

  15. Tumor Accumulation of NIR Fluorescent PEG-PLA Nanoparticles: Impact of Particle Size and Human Xenograft Tumor Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schädlich, Andreas; Caysa, Henrike; Mueller, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    with extended size-dependent fluorescence imaging studies at two different xenograft tumor types, the HT29 (colorectal carcinoma) and the A2780 (ovarian carcinoma) cell lines. The combination of two different size measurement methods allowed the characterization of the dependence of nanoparticle accumulation...

  16. Intermittent hypoxia-induced changes in tumor-associated macrophages and tumor malignancy in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Becker, Lev; Lennon, Frances E; Zheng, Jiamao; Coats, Brittney R; Schoenfelt, Kelly S; Carreras, Alba; Hakim, Fahed; Zhang, Shelley X; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2014-03-01

    An increased cancer aggressiveness and mortality have been recently reported among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Intermittent hypoxia (IH), a hallmark of OSA, enhances melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. To assess whether OSA-related adverse cancer outcomes occur via IH-induced changes in host immune responses, namely tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Lung epithelial TC1 cell tumors were 84% greater in mice subjected to IH for 28 days compared with room air (RA). In addition, TAMs in IH-exposed tumors exhibited reductions in M1 polarity with a shift toward M2 protumoral phenotype. Although TAMs from tumors harvested from RA-exposed mice increased TC1 migration and extravasation, TAMs from IH-exposed mice markedly enhanced such effects and also promoted proliferative rates and invasiveness of TC1 cells. Proliferative rates of melanoma (B16F10) and TC1 cells exposed to IH either in single culture or in coculture with macrophages (RAW 264.7) increased only when RAW 264.7 macrophages were concurrently present. Our findings support the notion that IH-induced alterations in TAMs participate in the adverse cancer outcomes reported in OSA.

  17. Cdh11 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor in a Murine Retinoblastoma Model by Facilitating Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchong, Mellone N.; Yurkowski, Christine; Ma, Clement; Spencer, Clarellen; Pajovic, Sanja; Gallie, Brenda L.

    2010-01-01

    CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01). Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8) (p = 0.01) and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016), compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003). In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers), while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121). Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and β-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death. PMID:20421947

  18. Cdh11 acts as a tumor suppressor in a murine retinoblastoma model by facilitating tumor cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellone N Marchong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01. Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8 (p = 0.01 and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016, compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003. In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers, while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121. Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and beta-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death.

  19. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  20. BET inhibition silences expression of MYCN and BCL2 and induces cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma tumor models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Wyce

    Full Text Available BET family proteins are epigenetic regulators known to control expression of genes involved in cell growth and oncogenesis. Selective inhibitors of BET proteins exhibit potent anti-proliferative activity in a number of hematologic cancer models, in part through suppression of the MYC oncogene and downstream Myc-driven pathways. However, little is currently known about the activity of BET inhibitors in solid tumor models, and whether down-regulation of MYC family genes contributes to sensitivity. Here we provide evidence for potent BET inhibitor activity in neuroblastoma, a pediatric solid tumor associated with a high frequency of MYCN amplifications. We treated a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines with a novel small molecule inhibitor of BET proteins, GSK1324726A (I-BET726, and observed potent growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in most cell lines irrespective of MYCN copy number or expression level. Gene expression analyses in neuroblastoma cell lines suggest a role of BET inhibition in apoptosis, signaling, and N-Myc-driven pathways, including the direct suppression of BCL2 and MYCN. Reversal of MYCN or BCL2 suppression reduces the potency of I-BET726-induced cytotoxicity in a cell line-specific manner; however, neither factor fully accounts for I-BET726 sensitivity. Oral administration of I-BET726 to mouse xenograft models of human neuroblastoma results in tumor growth inhibition and down-regulation MYCN and BCL2 expression, suggesting a potential role for these genes in tumor growth. Taken together, our data highlight the potential of BET inhibitors as novel therapeutics for neuroblastoma, and suggest that sensitivity is driven by pleiotropic effects on cell growth and apoptotic pathways in a context-specific manner.

  1. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  2. Numerical simulation of a thermodynamically consistent four-species tumor growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; van der Zee, Kristoffer G; Oden, J Tinsley

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a thermodynamically consistent four-species model of tumor growth on the basis of the continuum theory of mixtures. Unique to this model is the incorporation of nutrient within the mixture as opposed to being modeled with an auxiliary reaction-diffusion equation. The formulation involves systems of highly nonlinear partial differential equations of surface effects through diffuse-interface models. A mixed finite element spatial discretization is developed and implemented to provide numerical results demonstrating the range of solutions this model can produce. A time-stepping algorithm is then presented for this system, which is shown to be first order accurate and energy gradient stable. The results of an array of numerical experiments are presented, which demonstrate a wide range of solutions produced by various choices of model parameters.

  3. Impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution after curative surgical tumor resection in a murine orthotopic xenograft model for human MSI colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Katy; Ferron, Marianne; Calmel, Claire; Fléjou, Jean-François; Pocard, Marc; Praz, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) displaying microsatellite instability (MSI) most often result from MLH1 deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of MLH1 expression per se on tumor evolution after curative surgical resection using a xenograft tumor model. Transplantable tumors established with the human MLH1-deficient HCT116 cell line and its MLH1-complemented isogenic clone, mlh1-3, were implanted onto the caecum of NOD/SCID mice. Curative surgical resection was performed at day 10 in half of the animals. The HCT116-derived tumors were more voluminous compared to the mlh1-3 ones (P = .001). Lymph node metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred significantly more often in the group of mice grafted with HCT116 (P = .007 and P = .035, respectively). Mlh1-3-grafted mice did not develop peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastasis. After surgical resection, lymph node metastases only arose in the group of mice implanted with HCT116 and the rate of cure was significantly lower than in the mlh1-3 group (P = .047). The murine orthotopic xenograft model based on isogenic human CRC cell lines allowed us to reveal the impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution in mice who underwent curative surgical resection and in mice whose tumor was left in situ. Our data indicate that the behavior of MLH1-deficient CRC is not only governed by mutations arising in genes harboring microsatellite repeated sequences but also from their defect in MLH1 as such. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bifurcation for a free boundary problem modeling the growth of tumors with a drug induced nonlinear proliferation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjie; Liu, Bingchen

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study a free boundary model describing growth of tumors under action of drugs. To our knowledge, in theoretical discussion for free boundary problems, the proliferation rate in tumor models discussed in previous bifurcation results is a linear function of nutrients and inhibitors. Whereas in this paper we consider the net proliferation rate as a nonlinear function depending on both nutrients and drugs. First, the existence and the uniqueness of radially symmetric stationary solutions are obtained. Second, we prove that symmetry-breaking solutions bifurcate from the radially symmetric stationary solutions when the concentration of drug on the boundary of tumor is less than one in the rescaled model.

  5. In vitro and in vivo investigation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic tumor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprague, Jennifer E. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Li Wenping [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Liang Kexian [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Achilefu, Samuel [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Anderson, Carolyn J. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)]. E-mail: andersoncj@wustl.edu

    2006-02-15

    Introduction: Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, has been correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types including lung, colon and breast. Noninvasive detection of MMP expression might allow physicians to better determine when more aggressive cancer therapy is appropriate. The peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) was identified as a selective inhibitor of MMP-2/9 that inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer xenografts. Methods: CTT was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) for radiolabeling with {sup 64}Cu (t {sub 1/2}=12.7 h, 17.4% {beta}{sup +}, 39% {beta}{sup -}), a radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET). In vitro affinity was determined in a fluorogenic substrate assay. Tumor gelatinase targeting was evaluated in both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results: Cu(II)-DOTA-CTT inhibited hMMP-2 (EC{sub 5}=8.7 {mu}M) and mMMP-9 (EC{sub 5}=18.2 {mu}M) with similar affinity to CTT (hMMP-2 EC{sub 5}=13.2 {mu}M; mMMP-9 EC{sub 5}=11.0 {mu}M). In biodistribution and microPET imaging studies, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT was taken up by MMP-2/9-positive B16F10 murine melanoma tumors. Subsequently, imaging studies using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT were performed on MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice. With zymography, tumor MMP-2/9 expression in this model was shown to be inconsistent, resulting in microPET detection of the MDA-MB-435 tumor in only 1 of 24 imaged mice. Following limited imaging success, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT was shown to have poor in vivo stability. Conclusions: Despite some evidence for selective uptake of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT by gelatinase-expressing tumors, the low affinity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in vivo instability make this an inadequate radioligand for in vivo tumor evaluation.

  6. In vitro and in vivo investigation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, Jennifer E.; Li Wenping; Liang Kexian; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, has been correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types including lung, colon and breast. Noninvasive detection of MMP expression might allow physicians to better determine when more aggressive cancer therapy is appropriate. The peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) was identified as a selective inhibitor of MMP-2/9 that inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer xenografts. Methods: CTT was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) for radiolabeling with 64 Cu (t 1/2 =12.7 h, 17.4% β + , 39% β - ), a radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET). In vitro affinity was determined in a fluorogenic substrate assay. Tumor gelatinase targeting was evaluated in both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results: Cu(II)-DOTA-CTT inhibited hMMP-2 (EC 5 =8.7 μM) and mMMP-9 (EC 5 =18.2 μM) with similar affinity to CTT (hMMP-2 EC 5 =13.2 μM; mMMP-9 EC 5 =11.0 μM). In biodistribution and microPET imaging studies, 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT was taken up by MMP-2/9-positive B16F10 murine melanoma tumors. Subsequently, imaging studies using 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT were performed on MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice. With zymography, tumor MMP-2/9 expression in this model was shown to be inconsistent, resulting in microPET detection of the MDA-MB-435 tumor in only 1 of 24 imaged mice. Following limited imaging success, 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT was shown to have poor in vivo stability. Conclusions: Despite some evidence for selective uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT by gelatinase-expressing tumors, the low affinity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in vivo instability make this an inadequate radioligand for in vivo tumor evaluation

  7. Modelling of metastatic cure after radionuclide therapy: influence of tumor distribution, cross-irradiation, and variable activity concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Peter; Ahlman, Hakan; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2004-09-01

    The objective was to study the influence of tumor number and size, cross-irradiation from normal tissue, and of variable activity concentration on metastatic cure after radionuclide therapy. A model to calculate the metastatic cure probability (MCP) was developed, in which it was assumed that the tumor response was an exponential function of the absorbed dose. All calculations were performed for monoenergetic electron emitters with different energies (10-1000 keV). The influence of tumor size and number of tumors were investigated with different log uniform distributions; the basic tumor distribution consisted of tumors with 1, 10, ..., 10(11) cells. The influence of cross-irradiation was assessed by calculating MCP for various tumor-to-normal tissue activity concentration ratios (TNC). The influence of variable activity concentration between tumors was calculated by assuming that the activity concentration in tumors was an inverse power law function of tumor mass. The required activity concentration (C0.9) and absorbed dose (D0.9) to obtain MCP=0.9 was calculated in the different models. The C0.9 and D0.9 needed to obtain MCP were very high; more than 25 MBq/g and 80 Gy, respectively. The lowest C0.9 and D0.9 for equal activity concentration in the different tumor sizes were obtained for electron energies less than 80 keV. For higher energies the low absorbed energy fraction in small tumors will increase the required C0.9 and D0.9 markedly. Cross-irradiation from normal cells surrounding the tumor will cause sterilization of the smallest tumors and decrease the required C0.9 and D0.9 for higher electron energies. Assuming that the activity concentration decreased with increased tumor mass caused a marked increase in C0.9 and D0.9 in favor of higher electron energies. With the MCP model we demonstrated significant influence of the number of tumors, their size, TNC and variable activity concentration on MCP. The results are valuable when evaluating optimal choices

  8. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea, E-mail: caroponti@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojas, Paola, E-mail: parojas2010@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chiappini, Florencia, E-mail: florenciachiappini@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Efectos Biológicos de Contaminantes Ambientales, Departamento de Bioquímica Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sequeira, Gonzalo, E-mail: chicon27_7@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cocca, Claudia, E-mail: cm_cocca@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Radioisótopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Crocci, Máximo, E-mail: info@crescenti.com.ar [Instituto de Inmunooncología Crescenti, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas, E-mail: lucascol2003@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Oncología Angel Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires,Argentina (Argentina); Lanari, Claudia, E-mail: lanari.claudia@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Carcinogénesis Hormonal, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 μM) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 μM) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ► HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ► HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ► HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ► HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ► HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  9. Three-dimensional models of cancer for pharmacology and cancer cell biology: capturing tumor complexity in vitro/ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, John A; Graeser, Ralph; de Hoogt, Ronald; Vidic, Suzana; Brito, Catarina; Gutekunst, Matthias; van der Kuip, Heiko

    2014-09-01

    Cancers are complex and heterogeneous pathological "organs" in a dynamic interplay with their host. Models of human cancer in vitro, used in cancer biology and drug discovery, are generally highly reductionist. These cancer models do not incorporate complexity or heterogeneity. This raises the question as to whether the cancer models' biochemical circuitry (not their genome) represents, with sufficient fidelity, a tumor in situ. Around 95% of new anticancer drugs eventually fail in clinical trial, despite robust indications of activity in existing in vitro pre-clinical models. Innovative models are required that better capture tumor biology. An important feature of all tissues, and tumors, is that cells grow in three dimensions. Advances in generating and characterizing simple and complex (with added stromal components) three-dimensional in vitro models (3D models) are reviewed in this article. The application of stirred bioreactors to permit both scale-up/scale-down of these cancer models and, importantly, methods to permit controlled changes in environment (pH, nutrients, and oxygen) are also described. The challenges of generating thin tumor slices, their utility, and potential advantages and disadvantages are discussed. These in vitro/ex vivo models represent a distinct move to capture the realities of tumor biology in situ, but significant characterization work still remains to be done in order to show that their biochemical circuitry accurately reflects that of a tumor. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Models for anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates using refined topochemical descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Rakesh K.; Singh, G.; Madan, A. K.

    2011-10-01

    An in silico approach comprising of decision tree (DT), random forest (RF) and moving average analysis (MAA) was successfully employed for development of models for prediction of anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates. A dataset consisting of 65 analogues of both nitrogen-containing and non-nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates was selected for the present study. Four refinements of eccentric distance sum topochemical index termed as augmented eccentric distance sum topochemical indices 1-4 ( {ξ_{{1c}}^{{ADS}},ξ_{{2c}}^{{ADS}},ξ_{{3c}}^{{ADS}},ξ_{{4c}}^{{ADS}}} ) have been proposed so as to significantly augment discriminating power. Proposed topological indices (TIs) along with the exiting TIs (>1,400) were subsequently utilized for development of models for prediction of anti-tumor activity of bisphosphonates. A total of 43 descriptors of diverse nature, from a large pool of molecular descriptors, calculated through E-Dragon software (version 1.0) and an in-house computer program were selected for development of suitable models by employing DT, RF and MAA. DT identified two TIs as most important and classified the analogues of the dataset with an accuracy of 97% in training set and 90.7% in tenfold cross-validated set. Random forest correctly classified the analogues with an accuracy of 89.2%. Four independent models developed through MAA predicted the activity of analogues of the dataset with an accuracy of 87.6% to 89%. The statistical significance of proposed models was assessed through intercorrelation analysis, specificity, sensitivity and Matthew's correlation coefficient. The proposed models offer a vast potential for providing lead structures for development of potent anti-tumor agents for treatment of cancer that has spread to the bone.

  11. Model-Based Radiation Dose Correction for Yttrium-90 Microsphere Treatment of Liver Tumors With Central Necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ching-Sheng; Lin, Ko-Han; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Tseng, Hsiou-Shan; Wang, Ling-Wei; Huang, Pin-I; Chao, Liung-Sheau; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Yen, Sang-Hue; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Wang, Syh-Jen; Oliver Wong, Ching-yee; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to model and calculate the absorbed fraction φ of energy emitted from yttrium-90 ( 90 Y) microsphere treatment of necrotic liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The tumor necrosis model was proposed for the calculation of φ over the spherical shell region. Two approaches, the semianalytic method and the probabilistic method, were adopted. In the former method, the range--energy relationship and the sampling of electron paths were applied to calculate the energy deposition within the target region, using the straight-ahead and continuous-slowing-down approximation (CSDA) method. In the latter method, the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code was used to verify results from the first method. Results: The fraction of energy, φ, absorbed from 90 Y by 1-cm thickness of tumor shell from microsphere distribution by CSDA with complete beta spectrum was 0.832 ± 0.001 and 0.833 ± 0.001 for smaller (r T = 5 cm) and larger (r T = 10 cm) tumors (where r is the radii of the tumor [T] and necrosis [N]). The fraction absorbed depended mainly on the thickness of the tumor necrosis configuration, rather than on tumor necrosis size. The maximal absorbed fraction φ that occurred in tumors without central necrosis for each size of tumor was different: 0.950 ± 0.000, and 0.975 ± 0.000 for smaller (r T = 5 cm) and larger (r T = 10 cm) tumors, respectively (p 90 Y microsphere treatment of hepatic tumors with central necrosis. With this model, important information is provided regarding the absorbed fraction applicable to clinical 90 Y microsphere treatment.

  12. Origin of Androgen-Insensitive Poorly Differentiated Tumors in the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy J. Huss

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Following castration, the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model demonstrates rapid development of SV40-Tag-driven poorly differentiated tumors that express neuroendocrine cell markers. The cell population dynamics within the prostates of castrated TRAMP mice were characterized by analyzing the incorporation of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd and the expression of SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and androgen receptor (AR. Fourteen days postcastration, the remaining epithelial cells and adenocarcinoma cells were nonproliferative and lacked detectable SV40-Tag or synaptophysin expression. In contrast, morphologically distinct intraglandular foci were identified which expressed SV40-Tag, synaptophysin, and Ki67, but that lacked AR expression. These proliferative SV40-Tag and synaptophysin-expressing intraglandular foci were associated with the rare BrdUrd-retaining cells. These foci expanded rapidly in the postcastration prostate environment, in contrast to the AR- and SV40-Tag-expressing adenocarcinoma cells that lost SV40-Tag expression and underwent apoptosis after castration. Intraglandular foci of synaptophysin-expressing cells were also observed in the prostates of intact TRAMP mice at a comparable frequency; however, they did not progress to rapidly expanding tumors until much later in the life of the mice. This suggests that the foci of neuroendocrine-like cells that express SV40-Tag and synaptophysin, but lack AR, arise independent of androgen-deprivation and represent the source of the poorly differentiated tumors that are the lethal phenotype in the TRAMP model.

  13. Interfacial behavior of alkaline protease at the air-water and oil-water interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yue

    2018-03-01

    The interfacial behavior of alkaline protease at the air-water and n-hexane-water interfaces was investigated using interfacial tension, dilatational rheology and dynamic light scattering. Additionally, different adsorption models which are Langmuir, Frumkin, Reorientation-A and Reorientation-R were used to fitting the data of equilibrium interfacial tension for further understanding the interfacial behavior of alkaline protease. Data fitting of the equilibrium interfacial tension was achieved by IsoFit software. The results show that the molecules arrangement of the alkaline protease at the n-hexane-water interface is more tightly than at the air-water interface. The data were further analyzed to indicate that the hydrophobic chains of alkaline protease penetrate into oil phase deeper than the air phase. Also data indicate that the electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions at the n-hexane-water interface are stronger than at the air-water interface within molecules of the alkaline protease. Based on comprehensive analysis of the adsorption kinetics and interfacial rheological properties, interfacial structures mechanism of alkaline protease at n-hexane-water and air-water interfaces was proposed.

  14. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  15. Characterization, modeling and physical mechanisms of different surface treatment methods at room temperature on the oxide and interfacial quality of the SiO2 film using the spectroscopic scanning capacitance microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Mun Wong

    Full Text Available In this article, a simple, low cost and combined surface treatment method [pre-oxidation immersion of the p-type silicon (Si substrate in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and post oxidation ultra-violet (UV irradiation of the silicon-dioxide (SiO2 film] at room temperature is investigated. The interface trap density at midgap [Dit(mg] of the resulting SiO2 film (denoted as sample 1A is quantified from the full width at half-maximum of the scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM differential capacitance (dC/dV characteristics by utilizing a previously validated theoretical model. The Dit(mg of sample 1A is significantly lower than the sample without any surface treatments which indicates that it is a viable technique for improving the interfacial quality of the thicker SiO2 films prepared by wet oxidation. Moreover, the proposed combined surface treatment method may possibly complement the commonly used forming gas anneal process to further improve the interfacial quality of the SiO2 films. The positive shift of the flatband voltage due to the overall oxide charges (estimated from the probe tip dc bias at the peak dC/dV spectra of sample 1A suggests the presence of negative oxide fixed charge density (Nf in the oxide. In addition, an analytical formula is derived to approximate the difference of the Nf values between the oxide samples that are immersed in H2O2 and UV irradiated from their measured SCM dC/dV spectra. Conversely, some physical mechanisms are proposed that result in the ionization of the SiO− species (which are converted from the neutral SiOH groups that originate from the pre-oxidation immersion in H2O2 and ensuing wet oxidation during the UV irradiation as well as the UV photo-injected electrons from the Si substrate (which did not interact with the SiOH groups. They constitute the source of mobile electrons which partially passivate the positively charged empty donor-like interface traps at the Si-SiO2 interface. Keywords: Dielectrics

  16. Mathematical modeling of the implications of dominant tolerance for tumor biology and the response to combination therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Kalet; Garcia, Karina; Lage, Agustin

    2008-01-01

    The existence of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) that can control effector lymphocytes within the context of autoimmune, infectious and tumoral diseases is definitely accepted in current immunological research. Tregs confirm the theory of dominant tolerance, which holds that the choice of antigen rejection or tolerance in the immune system is the result of a dynamic equilibrium between populations of effector and regulatory T lymphocytes. The present paper summarizes the result of a recent theoretical study using mathematical modeling to analyze the dynamic interplay between T lymphocyte populations in the absence or presence of tumors and in response to different therapeutic treatments. The resulting model, developed at the Center of Molecular Immunology, which received an award from the Cuban Academy of Sciences in 2002, includes tumor cells and can simulate the effect of antitumoral mono- or combination therapies, by taking into account the way in which certain dynamic properties of tumors can, under specific circumstances, lead to the spontaneous expansion of Tregs populations. One of the advantages of the model is the prediction of several new strategies for the differential treatment of tumors, depending upon their ability of inducing the expansion of regulatory T cells. This is the first model available for the study of the impact of Tregs on the growth of malignant tumors, with results supported by international publications. Additionally, the model predicts the practical effects of several combination therapies, including vaccines, the excision of the tumor and depletion of lymphocyte populations. (Author)

  17. Real-time computed tomography fluoroscopy-guided solitary lung tumor model in a rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byeong Hyeon; Young, Hwan Seok; Quan, Yu Hua; Rho, Ji Yun; Eo, Jae Seon; Han, Kook Nam; Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Hyun Koo

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical studies of lung cancer require suitable large-animal models to allow evaluation and development of surgical and interventional techniques. We assessed the feasibility and safety of a novel rabbit lung cancer model of solitary tumors, in which real-time computed tomography fluoroscopy is used to guide inoculation of VX2 carcinoma single-cell suspensions. Thirty-eight rabbits were divided into four groups according to the volume of the VX2 tissue or cell suspension, the volume of lipiodol, the volume of Matrigel, and the injection needle size. The mixtures were percutaneously injected into rabbit lungs under real-time computed tomography fluoroscopy guidance. Two weeks later, VX2 lung carcinomas were confirmed via positron emission tomography/computed tomography, necropsy, and histology. Real-time computed tomography fluoroscopy allowed the precise inoculation of the tumor cell suspensions containing lipiodol, while the use of Matrigel and a small needle prevented leakage of the suspensions into the lung parenchyma. Solitary lung tumors were successfully established in rabbits (n = 22) inoculated with single-cell suspensions (150 μL), lipiodol (150 μL), and Matrigel (150 μL) using a 26-gauge needle. This combination was determined to be optimal. Pneumothorax was observed in only two of the 38 rabbits (5.3%), both of which survived to the end of the study without any intervention. Real-time computed tomography fluoroscopy-guided inoculation of VX2 single-cell suspensions with lipiodol and Matrigel using a small needle is an easy and safe method to establish solitary lung tumors in rabbits.

  18. Emerging tumor spheroids technologies for 3D in vitro cancer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Tânia; Kundu, Banani; Silva-Correia, Joana; Kundu, S C; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Reis, Rui L; Correlo, Vitor M

    2018-04-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Around 90% of deaths are caused by metastasis and just 10% by primary tumor. The advancement of treatment approaches is not at the same rhythm of the disease; making cancer a focal target of biomedical research. To enhance the understanding and prompts the therapeutic delivery; concepts of tissue engineering are applied in the development of in vitro models that can bridge between 2D cell culture and animal models, mimicking tissue microenvironment. Tumor spheroid represents highly suitable 3D organoid-like framework elucidating the intra and inter cellular signaling of cancer, like that formed in physiological niche. However, spheroids are of limited value in studying critical biological phenomenon such as tumor-stroma interactions involving extra cellular matrix or immune system. Therefore, a compelling need of tailoring spheroid technologies with physiologically relevant biomaterials or in silico models, is ever emerging. The diagnostic and prognostic role of spheroids rearrangements within biomaterials or microfluidic channel is indicative of patient management; particularly for the decision of targeted therapy. Fragmented information on available in vitro spheroid models and lack of critical analysis on transformation aspects of these strategies; pushes the urge to comprehensively overview the recent technological advancements (e.g. bioprinting, micro-fluidic technologies or use of biomaterials to attain the third dimension) in the shed of translationable cancer research. In present article, relationships between current models and their possible exploitation in clinical success is explored with the highlight of existing challenges in defining therapeutic targets and screening of drug efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody-Directed Effector Cell Therapy of Tumors: Analysis and Optimization Using a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart W. Friedrich

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The failure of the cellular immune response to stop solid tumor growth has been the subject of much research. Although the mechanisms for tumor evasion of immune response are poorly understood, one viable explanation is that tumor-killing lymphocytes cannot reach the tumor cells in sufficient quantity to keep the tumor in check. Recently, the use of bifunctional antibodies. (BFAs has been proposed as a way to direct immune cells to the tumor: one arm of the antibody is specific for a known tumor-associated antigen and the other for a lymphocyte marker such as CD3. Injecting this BFA should presumably result in cross-linking of lymphocytes. (either endogenous or adoptively transferred with tumor cells, thereby enhancing therapy. Results from such an approach, however, are often disappointing- frequently there is no benefit gained by using the BFA. We have analyzed the retargeting of endogenous effector cells by BFA using a physiologically based whole-body pharmacokinetic model that accounts for interactions between all relevant species in the various organs and tumor. Our results suggest that the design of the BFA is critical and the binding constants of the antigen and lymphocyte binding epitopes need to be optimized for successful therapy.

  20. Selective Inhibition of T Cell Tolerance as a Means of Enhancing Tumor Vaccines in a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powell, Jonathan D

    2005-01-01

    ...). In this model not only does the overexpression of neu lead to tumorogenesis but the neu protein is the target of both humoral and cellular immunity which prevent tumor-induced death in the non-transgenic mice (1, 4...

  1. On the stabilization of viscoelastic laminated beams with interfacial slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Muhammad I.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we consider a viscoelastic laminated beam model. This structure is given by two identical uniform layers on top of each other, taking into account that an adhesive of small thickness is bonding the two surfaces and produces an interfacial slip. We use viscoelastic damping with general assumptions on the relaxation function and establish explicit energy decay result from which we can recover the optimal exponential and polynomial rates. Our result generalizes the earlier related results in the literature.

  2. Molecular analysis of urothelial cancer cell lines for modeling tumor biology and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, M L; Witte, N; Im, K M; Turan, S; Owens, C; Misner, K; Tsang, S X; Cai, Z; Wu, S; Dean, M; Costello, J C; Theodorescu, D

    2017-01-05

    The utility of tumor-derived cell lines is dependent on their ability to recapitulate underlying genomic aberrations and primary tumor biology. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 25 bladder cancer (BCa) cell lines and compared mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression and drug response to BCa patient profiles in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We observed a mutation pattern associated with altered CpGs and APOBEC-family cytosine deaminases similar to mutation signatures derived from somatic alterations in muscle-invasive (MI) primary tumors, highlighting a major mechanism(s) contributing to cancer-associated alterations in the BCa cell line exomes. Non-silent sequence alterations were confirmed in 76 cancer-associated genes, including mutations that likely activate oncogenes TERT and PIK3CA, and alter chromatin-associated proteins (MLL3, ARID1A, CHD6 and KDM6A) and established BCa genes (TP53, RB1, CDKN2A and TSC1). We identified alterations in signaling pathways and proteins with related functions, including the PI3K/mTOR pathway, altered in 60% of lines; BRCA DNA repair, 44%; and SYNE1-SYNE2, 60%. Homozygous deletions of chromosome 9p21 are known to target the cell cycle regulators CDKN2A and CDKN2B. This loci was commonly lost in BCa cell lines and we show the deletions extended to the polyamine enzyme methylthioadenosine (MTA) phosphorylase (MTAP) in 36% of lines, transcription factor DMRTA1 (27%) and antiviral interferon epsilon (IFNE, 19%). Overall, the BCa cell line genomic aberrations were concordant with those found in BCa patient tumors. We used gene expression and copy number data to infer pathway activities for cell lines, then used the inferred pathway activities to build a predictive model of cisplatin response. When applied to platinum-treated patients gathered from TCGA, the model predicted treatment-specific response. Together, these data and analysis represent a valuable community resource to model basic tumor biology and to study

  3. Tumor microenvironment in focus: LA-ICP-MS bioimaging of a preclinical tumor model upon treatment with platinum(IV)-based anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiner, Sarah; Kornauth, Christoph; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Van Schoonhoven, Sushilla; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Egger, Alexander E; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-08-01

    The selection of drug candidates for entering clinical development relies on in vivo testing in (solid) tumor animal models. However, the heterogeneity of tumor tissue (e.g. in terms of drug uptake or tissue composition) is rarely considered when testing novel drug candidates. Therefore, we used the murine colon cancer CT-26 tumor model to study the spatially-resolved drug distribution in tumor tissue upon repetitive treatment of animals over two weeks with three investigational platinum(IV)-based anticancer agents, oxaliplatin or satraplatin. A quantitative laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging method revealed a heterogeneous platinum distribution, which correlated well with the histologic features of the tumor and surrounding tissue at the microscopic level. In most of the cases, higher amounts of intratumoral platinum were found in the surrounding tissue than in the malignant parts of the sample. This indicates that determination of average platinum amounts (e.g. by microwave-assisted digestion of the sample followed by analysis with ICP-MS) might overestimate the drug uptake in tumor tissue causing misleading conclusions. In addition, we studied the platinum distribution in the kidneys of treated animals to probe if accumulation in the cortex and medulla predict potential nephrotoxicity. A 10-fold increase of platinum in the cortex of the kidney over the medulla was observed for oxaliplatin and satraplatin. Although these findings are similar to those in the platinum distribution of the nephrotoxic anticancer drug cisplatin, treatment with the compounds of our study did not show signs of nephrotoxicity in clinical use or clinical trials (oxaliplatin, satraplatin) and did not result in the alteration of renal structures. Thus, predicting the side effects based on bioimaging data by LA-ICP-MS should be considered with caution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LA-ICP-MS study on spatially-resolved platinum

  4. Modeling and simulation of tumor-influenced high resolution real-time physics-based breast models for model-guided robotic interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylon, John; Hasse, Katelyn; Sheng, Ke; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2016-03-01

    Breast radiation therapy is typically delivered to the patient in either supine or prone position. Each of these positioning systems has its limitations in terms of tumor localization, dose to the surrounding normal structures, and patient comfort. We envision developing a pneumatically controlled breast immobilization device that will enable the benefits of both supine and prone positioning. In this paper, we present a physics-based breast deformable model that aids in both the design of the breast immobilization device as well as a control module for the device during every day positioning. The model geometry is generated from a subject's CT scan acquired during the treatment planning stage. A GPU based deformable model is then generated for the breast. A mass-spring-damper approach is then employed for the deformable model, with the spring modeled to represent a hyperelastic tissue behavior. Each voxel of the CT scan is then associated with a mass element, which gives the model its high resolution nature. The subject specific elasticity is then estimated from a CT scan in prone position. Our results show that the model can deform at >60 deformations per second, which satisfies the real-time requirement for robotic positioning. The model interacts with a computer designed immobilization device to position the breast and tumor anatomy in a reproducible location. The design of the immobilization device was also systematically varied based on the breast geometry, tumor location, elasticity distribution and the reproducibility of the desired tumor location.

  5. Systemic Distribution and Tumor Localization of Adoptively Transferred Lymphocytes in Mice: Comparison with Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Melder

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which tumors are able to evade cellular immune responses are still largely unknown. It is likely, however, that the initial recruitment of lymphocytes to tumor vessels is limited by cell retention in normal tissue, which results in a low flux of these cells into the tumor vasculature. We grew MCaIV. (20mouse mammary carcinoma tumors in the leg of SCID mice and injected 111In-oxine-labeled, primed T lymphocytes directed against the tumor intravenously. The systemic distribution of cells in normal organs was similar between mice injected with primed and control lymphocyte populations, except for a delayed clearance of primed lymphocytes from the lungs. Kinetics of lymphocyte localization to the tumor were identical between the primed and control lymphocyte populations. Splenectomy before the injection of primed lymphocytes increased delivery of cells to the lungs and liver after 1 hour with no significant improvement in tumor localization. Within 24 to 168 hours after injection, localization of cells in the liver of splenectomized mice was higher than in the control group. However, no significant difference in tumor localization was observed between groups. A physiologically based compartmental model of lymphocyte distribution predicted the compartmental sequestration and identified model parameters critical for experimental planning and therapeutic optimization.

  6. Selection and Validation of Predictive Models of Radiation Effects on Tumor Growth Based on Noninvasive Imaging Data.

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    Lima, E A B F; Oden, J T; Wohlmuth, B; Shahmoradi, A; Hormuth, D A; Yankeelov, T E; Scarabosio, L; Horger, T

    2017-12-01

    The use of mathematical and computational models for reliable predictions of tumor growth and decline in living organisms is one of the foremost challenges in modern predictive science, as it must cope with uncertainties in observational data, model selection, model parameters, and model inadequacy, all for very complex physical and biological systems. In this paper, large classes of parametric models of tumor growth in vascular tissue are discussed including models for radiation therapy. Observational data is obtained from MRI of a murine model of glioma and observed over a period of about three weeks, with X-ray radiation administered 14.5 days into the experimental program. Parametric models of tumor proliferation and decline are presented based on the balance laws of continuum mixture theory, particularly mass balance, and from accepted biological hypotheses on tumor growth. Among these are new model classes that include characterizations of effects of radiation and simple models of mechanical deformation of tumors. The Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL) is implemented to provide a Bayesian statistical calibration of the model classes, 39 models in all, as well as the determination of the most plausible models in these classes relative to the observational data, and to assess model inadequacy through statistical validation processes. Discussions of the numerical analysis of finite element approximations of the system of stochastic, nonlinear partial differential equations characterizing the model classes, as well as the sampling algorithms for Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods employed in solving the forward stochastic problem, and in computing posterior distributions of parameters and model plausibilities are provided. The results of the analyses described suggest that the general framework developed can provide a useful approach for predicting tumor growth and the effects of radiation.

  7. Patient-Derived Gastric Carcinoma Xenograft Mouse Models Faithfully Represent Human Tumor Molecular Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwei Zhang

    Full Text Available Patient-derived cancer xenografts (PDCX generally represent more reliable models of human disease in which to evaluate a potential drugs preclinical efficacy. However to date, only a few patient-derived gastric cancer xenograft (PDGCX models have been reported. In this study, we aimed to establish additional PDGCX models and to evaluate whether these models accurately reflected the histological and genetic diversities of the corresponding patient tumors. By engrafting fresh patient gastric cancer (GC tissues into immune-compromised mice (SCID and/or nude mice, thirty two PDGCX models were established. Histological features were assessed by a qualified pathologist based on H&E staining. Genomic comparison was performed for several biomarkers including ERBB1, ERBB2, ERBB3, FGFR2, MET and PTEN. These biomarkers were profiled to assess gene copy number by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and/or protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC. All 32 PDGCX models retained the histological features of the corresponding human tumors. Furthermore, among the 32 models, 78% (25/32 highly expressed ERBB1 (EGFR, 22% (7/32 were ERBB2 (HER2 positive, 78% (25/32 showed ERBB3 (HER3 high expression, 66% (21/32 lost PTEN expression, 3% (1/32 harbored FGFR2 amplification, 41% (13/32 were positive for MET expression and 16% (5/32 were MET gene amplified. Between the PDGCX models and their parental tumors, a high degree of similarity was observed for FGFR2 and MET gene amplification, and also for ERBB2 status (agreement rate = 94~100%; kappa value = 0.81~1. Protein expression of PTEN and MET also showed moderate agreement (agreement rate = 78%; kappa value = 0.46~0.56, while ERBB1 and ERBB3 expression showed slight agreement (agreement rate = 59~75%; kappa value = 0.18~0.19. ERBB2 positivity, FGFR2 or MET gene amplification was all maintained until passage 12 in mice. The stability of the molecular profiles observed across subsequent passages within the

  8. Sonic hedgehog in normal and neoplastic proliferation: insight gained from human tumors and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetmore, Cynthia

    2003-02-01

    Cancer arises when a cell accumulates multiple genetic changes that allow it to elude the highly regulated balance between proliferation and apoptosis that an organism employs to suppress inappropriate growth. It has become evident that malignant transformation of a cell or group of cells often involves pathways that are active during normal development but are inappropriately regulated in neoplastic proliferation. Signaling via the Sonic hedgehog pathway is critical to vertebrate development and also appears to play an integral role in the initiation and propagation of some tumors of the muscle, skin and nervous system. Analyses of human tumors have revealed mutations in various components of the Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway that appear to result in the activation of this pathway, as inferred by the increased expression of the transcription factor, Gli1. Interestingly, a proportion of the human tumors and most of those arising in mouse models continue to express the normal Patched allele, suggesting the involvement of additional molecular events in the transformation of the haploinsufficient cells.

  9. Investigating the role of macrophages in tumor formation using a MaFIA mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, A B; Elnaggar, A M; Robison, R A; O'Neill, K

    2013-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) interact with tumors in their development, growth and metastatic activities. Using a transgenic mouse model that allows for the selective depletion of macrophages we were able to access the macrophage's potential to facilitate metastasis. In the MaFIA (Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis) mouse, transgene-expressing cells of the myeloid lineage undergo death by apoptosis in the presence of the drug AP20187. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was fused to the suicide gene to allow identification of transgene-expressing cells. Tumor induction was accomplished by subdermal and intravenous injections of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Metastasis in mice with depleted macrophages was compared to metastasis in normal control mice. The lungs and kidneys were examined for metastatic cells. The macrophage-depleted groups showed significantly less metastasis (P>0.001) compared to the control groups. We theorize that macrophages may aid the metastatic process by fusing with melanoma cells. Using appropriate cell markers and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we were able to detect a small population of double-positive cells. We confirmed cell fusion by microscopic analysis, visualizing the cell's morphology by both immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. The presence of double-positive cells suggests macrophage/cancer cell fusion could be a possible mechanism for metastasis.

  10. Selective HDAC inhibition by ACY-241 enhances the activity of paclitaxel in solid tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pengyu; Almeciga-Pinto, Ingrid; Jarpe, Matthew; van Duzer, John H; Mazitschek, Ralph; Yang, Min; Jones, Simon S; Quayle, Steven N

    2017-01-10

    ACY-241 is a novel, orally available and selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) 6 inhibitor in Phase 1b clinical development in multiple myeloma (NCT 02400242). Like the structurally related drug ACY-1215 (ricolinostat), ACY-241 has the potential for a substantially reduced side effect profile versus current nonselective HDAC inhibitor drug candidates due to reduced potency against Class I HDACs while retaining the potential for anticancer effectiveness. We now show that combination treatment of xenograft models with paclitaxel and either ricolinostat or ACY-241 significantly suppresses solid tumor growth. In cell lines from multiple solid tumor lineages, combination treatment with ACY-241 and paclitaxel enhanced inhibition of proliferation and increased cell death relative to either single agent alone. Combination treatment with ACY-241 and paclitaxel also resulted in more frequent occurrence of mitotic cells with abnormal multipolar spindles and aberrant mitoses, consistent with the observed increase of aneuploid cells. At the molecular level, multipolar mitotic spindle formation was observed to be NuMA-dependent and γ-tubulin independent, suggesting that treatment-induced multipolar spindle formation does not depend on centrosomal amplification. The significantly enhanced efficacy of ACY-241 plus paclitaxel observed here, in addition to the anticipated superior safety profile of a selective HDAC6 inhibitor versus pan-HDAC inhibitors, provides a strong rationale for clinical development of this combination in patients with advanced solid tumors.

  11. Choindroitinase ABC I-Mediated Enhancement of Oncolytic Virus Spread and Anti Tumor Efficacy: A Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yangjin; Lee, Hyun Geun; Dmitrieva, Nina; Kim, Junseok; Kaur, Balveen; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are genetically engineered viruses that are designed to kill cancer cells while doing minimal damage to normal healthy tissue. After being injected into a