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Sample records for model transmembrane peptide

  1. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides: transmembrane pH gradient driven translocation across phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzoub, Mazin; Pramanik, Aladdin; Gräslund, Astrid

    2005-11-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to mediate the efficient cellular uptake of a wide range of cargoes. Internalization of a number of CPPs requires uptake by endocytosis, initiated by binding to anionic cell surface heparan sulfate (HS), followed by escape from endosomes. To elucidate the endosomal escape mechanism, we have modeled the process for two CPPs: penetratin (pAntp) and the N-terminal signal peptide of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp). Large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) were produced encapsulating either peptide, and an ionophore, nigericin, was used to create a transmembrane pH gradient (DeltapH(mem), inside acidic) similar to the one arising in endosomes in vivo. In the absence of DeltapH(mem), no pAntp escape from the LUVs is observed, while a fraction of bPrPp escapes. In the presence of DeltapH(mem), a significant amount of pAntp escapes and an even higher degree of bPrPp escape takes place. These results, together with the differences in kinetics of escape, indicate different escape mechanisms for the two peptides. A minimum threshold peptide concentration exists for the escape of both peptides. Coupling of the peptides to a cargo reduces the fraction escaping, while complexation with HS significantly hinders the escape. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy results show that during the escape process the LUVs are intact. Taken together, these results suggest a model for endosomal escape of CPPs: DeltapH(mem)-mediated mechanism, following dissociation from HS of the peptides, above a minimum threshold peptide concentration, in a process that does not involve lysis of the vesicles.

  2. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides using a transmembrane pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Fatemeh; Abdo, Rania; Lindberg, Staffan; Hirose, Hisaaki; Futaki, Shiroh; Langel, Ulo; Gräslund, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can internalize into cells with covalently or non-covalently bound biologically active cargo molecules, which by themselves are not able to pass the cell membrane. Direct penetration and endocytosis are two main pathways suggested for the cellular uptake of CPPs. Cargo molecules which have entered the cell via an endocytotic pathway must be released from the endosome before degradation by enzymatic processes and endosomal acidification. Endosomal entrapment seems to be a major limitation in delivery of these molecules into the cytoplasm. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) asymmetrically introduced into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) was used to induce a pH gradient across the lipid bilayer. By measuring pH outside the LUVs, we observed light-induced proton pumping mediated by BR from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating an acidic pH inside the LUVs, similar to the late endosomes in vivo. Here we studied the background mechanism(s) of endosomal escape. 20% negatively charged LUVs were used as model endosomes with incorporated BR into the membrane and fluorescein-labeled CPPs entrapped inside the LUVs, together with a fluorescence quencher. The translocation of different CPPs in the presence of a pH gradient across the membrane was studied. The results show that the light-induced pH gradient induced by BR facilitates vesicle membrane translocation, particularly for the intermediately hydrophobic CPPs, and much less for hydrophilic CPPs. The presence of chloroquine inside the LUVs or addition of pyrenebutyrate outside the LUVs destabilizes the vesicle membrane, resulting in significant changes of the pH gradient across the membrane.

  3. Responses of Transmembrane Peptide and Lipid Chains to Hydrophobic Mismatch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lei; LI Jian-tao; QI Hai-yan; LI Fei

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic mismatch between the hydrophobic length of membrane proteins and hydrophobic thickness of membranes is a crucial factor in controlling protein function and assembly.We combined fluorescence with circular dichroism(CD) and attenuated total reflection infrared(ATR-IR) spectroscopic methods to investigate the behaviors of the peptide and lipids under hydrophobic mismatch using a model peptide from the fourth transmembrane domain of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp 1),the phosphatidylcholines(PCs) and phosphatidylglycerols(PGs) with different lengths of acyl chains(14:0,16:0 and 18:0).In all PG lipid membranes,the peptide forms stable α-helix structure,and the helix axis is parallel to lipid chains.The helical span and orientation hardly change in varying thickness of PG membranes,while the lipid chains can deform to accommodate to the hydrophobic surface of embedded peptide.By comparison,the helical structures of the model peptide in PC lipid membranes are less stable.Upon incorporation with PC lipid membranes,the peptide can deform itself to accommodate to the hydrophobic thickness of lipid membranes in response to hydrophobic mismatch.In addition,hydrophobic mismatch can increase the aggregation propensity of the peptide in both PC and PG lipid membranes and the peptide in PC membranes has more aggregation tendency than that in PG membranes.

  4. Advantages of combined transmembrane topology and signal peptide prediction--the Phobius web server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käll, Lukas; Krogh, Anders; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2007-01-01

    predicted transmembrane topologies overlap. This impairs predictions of 5-10% of the proteome, hence this is an important issue in protein annotation. To address this problem, we previously designed a hidden Markov model, Phobius, that combines transmembrane topology and signal peptide predictions....... The method makes an optimal choice between transmembrane segments and signal peptides, and also allows constrained and homology-enriched predictions. We here present a web interface (http://phobius.cgb.ki.se and http://phobius.binf.ku.dk) to access Phobius. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jul...

  5. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  6. Stability of transmembrane amyloid β-peptide and membrane integrity tested by molecular modeling of site-specific Aβ42 mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetan Poojari

    Full Text Available Interactions of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ with neuronal cell membranes, leading to the disruption of membrane integrity, are considered to play a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Natural mutations in Aβ42, such as the Arctic mutation (E22G have been shown to increase Aβ42 aggregation and neurotoxicity, leading to the early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. A correlation between the propensity of Aβ42 to form protofibrils and its effect on neuronal dysfunction and degeneration has been established. Using rational mutagenesis of the Aβ42 peptide it was further revealed that the aggregation of different Aβ42 mutants in lipid membranes results in a variety of polymorphic aggregates in a mutation dependent manner. The mutant peptides also have a variable ability to disrupt bilayer integrity. To further test the connection between Aβ42 mutation and peptide-membrane interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of membrane-inserted Aβ42 variants (wild-type and E22G, D23G, E22G/D23G, K16M/K28M and K16M/E22G/D23G/K28M mutants as β-sheet monomers and tetramers. The effects of charged residues on transmembrane Aβ42 stability and membrane integrity are analyzed at atomistic level. We observe an increased stability for the E22G Aβ42 peptide and a decreased stability for D23G compared to wild-type Aβ42, while D23G has the largest membrane-disruptive effect. These results support the experimental observation that the altered toxicity arising from mutations in Aβ is not only a result of the altered aggregation propensity, but also originates from modified Aβ interactions with neuronal membranes.

  7. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereau, Tristan; Bennett, W F Drew; Pfaendtner, Jim; Deserno, Markus; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-12-28

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA)n (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide's insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum-in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  8. Transmembrane Domain Targeting Peptide Antagonizing ErbB2/Neu Inhibits Breast Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Arpel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is still a deadly disease despite major achievements in targeted therapies designed to block ligands or ligand-binding subunits of major tyrosine kinase receptors. Relapse is significant and metastases deleterious, which demands novel strategies for fighting this disease. Here, we report a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating that small peptides interfering with the transmembrane domain of the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor ErbB2 exhibit anticancer properties when used at micromolar dosages in a genetically engineered mouse model of breast cancer. Different assays demonstrate the specificity of the ErbB2-targeting peptide, which induces long-term reduction of ErbB2 phosphorylation and Akt signaling consistent with reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased survival. Microcomputed tomography analysis established the antimetastatic activity of the peptide and its impact on primary tumor growth. This reveals the interior of the cell membrane as an unexplored dimension for drug design.

  9. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereau, Tristan, E-mail: bereau@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Bennett, W. F. Drew [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Pfaendtner, Jim [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Deserno, Markus [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Karttunen, Mikko [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science & Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, MetaForum, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-12-28

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA){sub n} (L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide’s insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum—in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even though the two coarse-grained models reproduce the free energy of insertion of individual amino acids side chains, they both underestimate its corresponding value for the full peptide (as compared with atomistic simulations), hinting at cooperative physics beyond the residue level. Folding of WALP in the two environments indicates the helix as the most stable structure, though with different relative stabilities and chain-length dependence.

  10. Folding and insertion thermodynamics of the transmembrane WALP peptide

    CERN Document Server

    Bereau, Tristan; Pfaendtner, Jim; Deserno, Markus; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The anchor of most integral membrane proteins consists of one or several helices spanning the lipid bilayer. The WALP peptide, GWW(LA)$_n$(L)WWA, is a common model helix to study the fundamentals of protein insertion and folding, as well as helix-helix association in the membrane. Its structural properties have been illuminated in a large number of experimental and simulation studies. In this combined coarse-grained and atomistic simulation study, we probe the thermodynamics of a single WALP peptide, focusing on both the insertion across the water-membrane interface, as well as folding in both water and a membrane. The potential of mean force characterizing the peptide's insertion into the membrane shows qualitatively similar behavior across peptides and three force fields. However, the Martini force field exhibits a pronounced secondary minimum for an adsorbed interfacial state, which may even become the global minimum---in contrast to both atomistic simulations and the alternative PLUM force field. Even tho...

  11. Lipid dependence of membrane anchoring properties and snorkeling behavior of aromatic and charged residues in transmembrane peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Erik; Morein, Sven; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Killian, J Antoinette

    2002-06-11

    31P NMR spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides with different flanking residues on the phase behavior of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylglycerol (molar ratio 7:3) model membranes. It was found that tryptophan-flanked (WALP) peptides and lysine-flanked (KALP) peptides both promote formation of nonlamellar phases in these lipid systems in a mismatch-dependent manner. Based on this mismatch dependence, it was concluded that the effective hydrophobic length of KALP peptides is considerably shorter than that of the corresponding WALP peptides. Peptides with other positively charged residues showed very similar effects as KALP. The results suggest that the peptides have a well-defined effective hydrophobic length, which is different for charged and aromatic flanking residues, but which is independent of the precise chemical nature of the side chain. Strikingly, the effective length of KALP peptides in the lipid systems investigated here is much smaller than that previously found for the same peptides in phosphatidylcholine. This suggests that snorkeling of lysine side chains, as proposed to occur in phosphatidylcholine, does not occur in lipid systems that are prone to form nonlamellar phases by themselves. This suggestion was supported by using peptides with shortened lysine side chains and by investigating the effects of mixtures of WALP and KALP peptides. The lipid dependency of the snorkeling behavior is explained by considering the free energy cost of snorkeling in relation to the free energy cost of the formation of nonlamellar phases.

  12. Transmembrane transport of peptide type compounds: prospects for oral delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, E.; Crison, J.; Amidon, G. L.

    1996-01-01

    Synthesis and delivery of potential therapeutic peptides and peptidomimetic compounds has been the focus of intense research over the last 10 years. While it is widely recognized that numerous limitations apply to oral delivery of peptides, some of the limiting factors have been addressed and their mechanisms elucidated, which has lead to promising strategies. This article will briefly summarize the challenges, results and current approaches of oral peptide delivery and give some insight on future strategies. The barriers determining peptide bioavailability after oral administration are intestinal membrane permability, size limitations, intestinal and hepatic metabolism and in some cases solubility limitations. Poor membrane permeabilities of hydrophilic peptides might be overcome by structurally modifying the compounds, thus increasing their membrane partition characteristics and/or their affinity to carrier proteins. Another approach is the site-specific delivery of the peptide to the most permeable parts of the intestine. The current view on size limitation for oral drug delivery has neglected partition considerations. Recent studies suggest that compounds with a molecular weight up to 4000 might be significantly absorbed, assuming appropriate partition behavior and stability. Metabolism, probably the most significant factor in the absorption fate of peptides, might be controlled by coadministration of competitive enzyme inhibitors, structural modifications and administration of the compound as a well absorbed prodrug that is converted into the therapeutically active agent after its absorption. For some peptides poor solubility might present a limitation to oral absorption, an issue that has been addressed by mechanistically defining and therefore improving formulation parameters. Effective oral peptide delivery requires further development in understanding these complex mechanisms in order to maximize the therapeutic potential of this class of compounds.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are loca

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the solvation of an alpha-helical transmembrane peptide by DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A.M.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    10-ns molecular dynamics study of the solvation of a hydrophobic transmembrane helical peptide in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is presented. The objective is to analyze how this aprotic polar solvent is able to solvate three groups of amino acid residues (i.e., polar, apolar, and charged) that are loca

  15. Artificial transmembrane ion channels from self-assembling peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, M. Reza; Granja, Juan R.; Buehler, Lukas K.

    1994-05-01

    NATURALLY occurring membrane channels and pores are formed from a large family of diverse proteins, peptides and organic secon-dary metabolites whose vital biological functions include control of ion flow, signal transduction, molecular transport and produc-tion of cellular toxins. But despite the availability of a large amount of biochemical information about these molecules1, the design and synthesis of artificial systems that can mimic the bio-logical function of natural compounds remains a formidable task2-12. Here we present a simple strategy for the design of artifi-cial membrane ion channels based on a self-assembled cylindrical β-sheet peptide architecture13. Our systems-essentially stacks of peptide rings-display good channel-mediated ion-transport activ-ity with rates exceeding 107 ions s-1, rivalling the performance of many naturally occurring counterparts. Such molecular assemblies should find use in the design of novel cytotoxic agents, membrane transport vehicles and drug-delivery systems.

  16. Tyrosine oxidation and nitration in transmembrane peptides is connected to lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, Silvina; Herrera, Daniel; Martinez, Débora M; Petruk, Ariel; Demicheli, Verónica; Trujillo, Madia; Martí, Marcelo A; Estrín, Darío A; Radi, Rafael

    2017-05-15

    Tyrosine nitration is an oxidative post-translational modification that can occur in proteins associated to hydrophobic bio-structures such as membranes and lipoproteins. In this work, we have studied tyrosine nitration in membranes using a model system consisting of phosphatidylcholine liposomes with pre-incorporated tyrosine-containing 23 amino acid transmembrane peptides. Tyrosine residues were located at positions 4, 8 or 12 of the amino terminal, resulting in different depths in the bilayer. Tyrosine nitration was accomplished by exposure to peroxynitrite and a peroxyl radical donor or hemin in the presence of nitrite. In egg yolk phosphatidylcholine liposomes, nitration was highest for the peptide with tyrosine at position 8 and dramatically increased as a function of oxygen levels. Molecular dynamics studies support that the proximity of the tyrosine phenolic ring to the linoleic acid peroxyl radicals contributes to the efficiency of tyrosine oxidation. In turn, α-tocopherol inhibited both lipid peroxidation and tyrosine nitration. The mechanism of tyrosine nitration involves a "connecting reaction" by which lipid peroxyl radicals oxidize tyrosine to tyrosyl radical and was fully recapitulated by computer-assisted kinetic simulations. Altogether, this work underscores unique characteristics of the tyrosine oxidation and nitration process in lipid-rich milieu that is fueled via the lipid peroxidation process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparisons of Interfacial Phe, Tyr, and Trp Residues as Determinants of Orientation and Dynamics for GWALP Transmembrane Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Sparks, Kelsey A.; Gleason, Nicholas J.; Gist, Renetra; Langston, Rebekah; Greathouse, Denise V.; Koeppe, Roger E.

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic amino acids often flank the transmembrane alpha helices of integral membrane proteins. By favoring locations within the membrane–water interface of the lipid bilayer, aromatic residues Trp, Tyr, and sometimes Phe may serve as anchors to help stabilize a transmembrane orientation. In this work, we compare the influence of interfacial Trp, Tyr, or Phe residues upon the properties of tilted helical transmembrane peptides. For such comparisons, it has been critical to start with no more ...

  18. Transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs through self-assembly of cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Bei; Xia, Fei; Xie, Yunchang; Jiang, Sifan; Su, Rui; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Breaking the natural barriers of cell membranes achieves fast entry of therapeutics, which leads to enhanced efficacy and helps overcome multiple drug resistance. Herein, transmembrane delivery of a series of small molecule anticancer drugs was achieved by the construction of artificial transmembrane nanochannels formed by self-assembly of cyclic peptide (cyclo[Gln-(d-Leu-Trp)4-d-Leu], CP) nanotubes (CPNTs) in the lipid bilayers. Our in vitro study in liposomes indicated that the transport of molecules with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm, which is the internal diameter of the CPNTs, could be significantly enhanced by CPNTs in a size-selective and dose-dependent manner. Facilitated uptake of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was also confirmed in the BEL7402 cell line. On the contrary, CPs could facilitate neither the transport across liposomal membranes nor the uptake by cell lines of cytarabine, a counterevidence drug with a size of 1.1 nm. CPs had a very weak anticancer efficacy, but could significantly reduce the IC50 of 5-FU in BEL7402, HeLa and S180 cell lines. Analysis by a q test revealed that a combination of 5-FU and CP had a synergistic effect in BEL7402 at all CP levels, in S180 at CP levels higher than 64 μg mL-1, but not in HeLa, where an additive effect was observed. Temporarily, intratumoral injection is believed to be the best way for CP administration. In vivo imaging using 125I radio-labelled CP confirmed that CPNPTs were completely localized in the tumor tissues, and translocation to other tissues was negligible. In vivo anticancer efficacy was studied in the grafted S180 solid tumor model in mice, and the results indicated that tumor growth was greatly inhibited by the combinatory use of 5-FU and CP, and a synergistic effect was observed at CP doses of 0.25 mg per kg bw. It is concluded that facilitated transmembrane delivery of anticancer drugs with sizes smaller than 1.0 nm was achieved, and the synergistic anticancer effect was confirmed both in cell lines

  19. Structural determinants for the membrane insertion of the transmembrane peptide of hemagglutinin from influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Bruno L; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2012-11-26

    Membrane fusion is a process involved in a high range of biological functions, going from viral infections to neurotransmitter release. Fusogenic proteins increase the slow rate of fusion by coupling energetically downhill conformational changes of the protein to the kinetically unfavorable fusion of the membrane lipid bilayers. Hemagglutinin is an example of a fusogenic protein, which promotes the fusion of the membrane of the influenza virus with the membrane of the target cell. The N-terminus of the HA2 subunit of this protein contains a fusion domain described to act as a destabilizer of the target membrane bilayers, leading eventually to a full fusion of the two membranes. On the other hand, the C-terminus of the same subunit contains a helical transmembrane domain which was initially described to act as the anchor of the protein to the membrane of the virus. However, in recent years the study of this peptide segment has been gaining more attention since it has also been described to be involved in the membrane fusion process. Yet, the structural characterization of the interaction of such a protein domain with membrane lipids is still very limited. Therefore, in this work, we present a study of this transmembrane peptide domain in the presence of DMPC membrane bilayers, and we evaluate the effect of several mutations, and the effect of peptide oligomerization in this interaction process. Our results allowed us to identify and confirm amino acid residue motifs that seem to regulate the interaction between the segment peptide and membrane bilayers. Besides these sequence requirements, we have also identified length and tilt requirements that ultimately contribute to the hydrophobic matching between the peptide and the membrane. Additionally, we looked at the association of several transmembrane peptide segments and evaluated their direct interaction and stability inside a membrane bilayer. From our results we could conclude that three independent TM peptide

  20. Peptide microarray analysis of substrate specificity of the transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase KPI-2 reveals reactivity with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2006-11-01

    Human lemur (Lmr) kinases are predicted to be Tyr kinases based on sequences and are related to neurotrophin receptor Trk kinases. This study used homogeneous recombinant KPI-2 (Lmr2, LMTK2, Cprk, brain-enriched protein kinase) kinase domain and a library of 1,154 peptides on a microarray to analyze substrate specificity. We found that KPI-2 is strictly a Ser/Thr kinase that reacts with Ser either preceded by or followed by Pro residues but unlike other Pro-directed kinases does not strictly require an adjacent Pro residue. The most reactive peptide in the library corresponds to Ser-737 of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, and the recombinant R domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was a preferred substrate. Furthermore the KPI-2 kinase phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the single site in phosphorylase and purified phosphorylase b, making this only the second known phosphorylase b kinase. Phosphorylase was used as a specific substrate to show that KPI-2 is inhibited in living cells by addition of nerve growth factor or serum. The results demonstrate the utility of the peptide library to probe specificity and discover kinase substrates and offer a specific assay that reveals hormonal regulation of the activity of this unusual transmembrane kinase.

  1. Modelling of a transmembrane evaporation module for desalination of seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Caroliene M.; Rácz, Imre G.; Heuven, van Jan Willem; Reith, Tom; Haan, de André B.

    1999-01-01

    Transmembrane evaporation (often called membrane distillation) carried out in a countercurrent flow module, in which incoming cold seawater is heated by the condensing product water flow, is a promising technology for low-cost seawater desalination. This paper presents a model for preliminary design

  2. A hidden Markov model for prediction transmembrane helices in proteinsequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; von Heijne, Gunnar; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    1998-01-01

    and constraints involved. Models were estimated both by maximum likelihood and a discriminative method, and a method for reassignment of the membrane helix boundaries were developed. In a cross validated test on single sequences, our transmembrane HMM, TMHMM, correctly predicts the entire topology for 77...

  3. Cleavage specificity analysis of six type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs using PICS with proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Barré

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS. Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P and C-terminal prime (P' sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1' position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. CONCLUSIONS: Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1' positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity.

  4. Exploring the dynamic behaviors and transport properties of gas molecules in a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Fan, Jianfen; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiliang; Yu, Yi

    2013-12-05

    The dynamic behaviors and transport properties of O2, CO2, and NH3 molecules through a transmembrane cyclic peptide nanotube (CPNT) of 8×cyclo-(WL)4/POPE have been investigated by steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and adaptive biasing force (ABF) samplings. Different external forces are needed for three gas molecules to enter the channel. The periodic change of the pulling force curve for a gas traveling through the channel mainly arises from the regular and periodic arrangement of the composed CP subunits of the CPNT. Radial distribution functions (RDFs) between gas and water disclose the density decrease of channel water, which strongly aggravates the discontinuity of H-bond formation between a gas molecule and the neighboring water. Compared to hardly any H-bond formation between CO2 (or O2) and the framework of the CPNT, NH3 can form abundant H-bonds with the carbonyl/amide groups of the CPNT, leading to a fierce competition to NH3-water H-bonded interactions. In addition to direct H-bonded interactions, all three gases can form water bridges with the tube. The potential profile of mean force coincides with the occurring probability of a gas molecule along the tube axis. The energy barriers at two mouths of the CPNT elucidate the phenomenon that CO2 and O2 are thoroughly confined in the narrow lumen while NH3 can easily go outside the tube. Intermolecular interactions of each gas with channel water and the CPNT framework and the formation of H-bonds and water bridges illuminate the different gas translocation behaviors. The results uncover interesting and comprehensive mechanisms underlying the permeation characteristics of three gas molecules traveling through a transmembrane CPNT.

  5. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane-solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane-solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor.

  6. Modeling of Transmembrane Potential in Realistic Multicellular Structures before Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murovec, Tomo; Sweeney, Daniel C; Latouche, Eduardo; Davalos, Rafael V; Brosseau, Christian

    2016-11-15

    Many approaches for studying the transmembrane potential (TMP) induced during the treatment of biological cells with pulsed electric fields have been reported. From the simple analytical models to more complex numerical models requiring significant computational resources, a gamut of methods have been used to recapitulate multicellular environments in silico. Cells have been modeled as simple shapes in two dimensions as well as more complex geometries attempting to replicate realistic cell shapes. In this study, we describe a method for extracting realistic cell morphologies from fluorescence microscopy images to generate the piecewise continuous mesh used to develop a finite element model in two dimensions. The preelectroporation TMP induced in tightly packed cells is analyzed for two sets of pulse parameters inspired by clinical irreversible electroporation treatments. We show that high-frequency bipolar pulse trains are better, and more homogeneously raise the TMP of tightly packed cells to a simulated electroporation threshold than conventional irreversible electroporation pulse trains, at the expense of larger applied potentials. Our results demonstrate the viability of our method and emphasize the importance of considering multicellular effects in the numerical models used for studying the response of biological tissues exposed to electric fields. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hidden markov model for the prediction of transmembrane proteins using MATLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Shanker, Sudhanshu; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Sinha, Dhiraj; Pandey, Paras Nath

    2011-01-01

    Since membranous proteins play a key role in drug targeting therefore transmembrane proteins prediction is active and challenging area of biological sciences. Location based prediction of transmembrane proteins are significant for functional annotation of protein sequences. Hidden markov model based method was widely applied for transmembrane topology prediction. Here we have presented a revised and a better understanding model than an existing one for transmembrane protein prediction. Scripting on MATLAB was built and compiled for parameter estimation of model and applied this model on amino acid sequence to know the transmembrane and its adjacent locations. Estimated model of transmembrane topology was based on TMHMM model architecture. Only 7 super states are defined in the given dataset, which were converted to 96 states on the basis of their length in sequence. Accuracy of the prediction of model was observed about 74 %, is a good enough in the area of transmembrane topology prediction. Therefore we have concluded the hidden markov model plays crucial role in transmembrane helices prediction on MATLAB platform and it could also be useful for drug discovery strategy. The database is available for free at bioinfonavneet@gmail.comvinaysingh@bhu.ac.in.

  8. Single tryptophan and tyrosine comparisons in the N-terminal and C-terminal interface regions of transmembrane GWALP peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Nicholas J; Greathouse, Denise V; Grant, Christopher V; Opella, Stanley J; Koeppe, Roger E

    2013-11-07

    Hydrophobic membrane-spanning helices often are flanked by interfacial aromatic or charged residues. In this paper, we compare the consequences of single Trp → Tyr substitutions at each interface for the properties of a defined transmembrane helix in the absence of charged residues. The choice of molecular framework is critical for these single-residue experiments because the presence of "too many" aromatic residues (more than one at either membrane-water interface) introduces excess dynamic averaging of solid state NMR observables. To this end, we compare the outcomes when changing W(5) or W(19), or both of them, to tyrosine in the well-characterized transmembrane peptide acetyl-GGALW(5)(LA)6LW(19)LAGA-amide ("GWALP23"). By means of solid-state (2)H and (15)N NMR experiments, we find that Y(19)GW(5)ALP23 displays similar magnitudes of peptide helix tilt as Y(5)GW(19)ALP23 and responds similarly to changes in bilayer thickness, from DLPC to DMPC to DOPC. The presence of Y(19) changes the azimuthal rotation angle ρ (about the helix axis) to a similar extent as Y(5), but in the opposite direction. When tyrosines are substituted for both tryptophans to yield GY(5,19)ALP23, the helix tilt angle is again of comparable magnitude, and furthermore, the preferred azimuthal rotation angle ρ is relatively unchanged from that of GW(5,19)ALP23. The extent of dynamic averaging increases marginally when Tyr replaces Trp. Yet, importantly, all members of the peptide family having single Tyr or Trp residues near each interface exhibit only moderate and not highly extensive dynamic averaging. The results provide important benchmarks for evaluating conformational and dynamic control of membrane protein function.

  9. NMR structures and localization of the potential fusion peptides and the pre-transmembrane region of SARS-CoV: Implications in membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Mukesh; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2015-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a serious public health hazard. The S2 subunit of the S glycoprotein of SARS-CoV carries out fusion between the virus and the host cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cell fusion process is not well understood. Current model suggests that a conformational transition, upon receptor recognition, of the two heptad core regions of S2 may expose the hydrophobic fusogenic peptide or fusion peptide for membrane insertion. Three regions of the S2 subunit have been proposed to be involved in cell-cell fusion. The N-terminal fusion peptide (FP, residues 770-788), an internal fusion peptide (IFP, residues 873-888) and the pre-transmembrane region (PTM, residues 1185-1202) demonstrated interactions with model lipid membranes and potentially involved in the fusion process. Here, we have determined atomic resolution structures of these three peptides in DPC detergent micelles by solution NMR. FP assumes α-helical conformation with significant distortion at the central Gly residues; enabling a close packing among sidechains of aromatic residues including W, Y and F. The 3-D structure of PMT is characterized by a helix-loop-helix with extensive aromatic interactions within the helices. IFP adopts a rather straight α-helical conformation defined by packing among sidechains of aromatic and aliphatic residues. Paramagnetic spin labeled NMR has demonstrated surface localization of PMT whereas FP and IFP inserted into the micelles. Collectively, data presented in this study will aid in understanding fusion mechanism of SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  11. Inhibition of PlexA1-mediated brain tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis using a transmembrane domain targeting peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Laurent; Goetz, Jacky; Vermot, Julien; Fernandez, Aurore; Baumlin, Nadège; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Orend, Gertraud; Roussel, Guy; Crémel, Gérard; Genest, Monique; Hubert, Pierre; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The neuropilin-plexin receptor complex regulates tumor cell migration and proliferation and thus is an interesting therapeutic target. High expression of neuropilin-1 is indeed associated with a bad prognosis in glioma patients. Q-RTPCR and tissue-array analyses showed here that Plexin-A1 is highly expressed in glioblastoma and that the highest level of expression correlates with the worse survival of patients. We next identified a developmental and tumor-associated pro-angiogenic role of Plexin-A1. Hence, by using molecular simulations and a two-hybrid like assay in parallel with biochemical and cellular assays we developed a specific Plexin-A1 peptidic antagonist disrupting transmembrane domain-mediated oligomerization of the receptor and subsequent signaling and functional activity. We found that this peptide exhibits anti-tumor activity in vivo on different human glioblastoma models including glioma cancer stem cells. Thus, screening Plexin-A1 expression and targeting Plexin-A1 in glioblastoma patients exhibit diagnostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27506939

  12. A quantitative model for using acridine orange as a transmembrane pH gradient probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, S; Barenholz, Y

    1998-05-15

    Monitoring the acidification of the internal space of membrane vesicles by proton pumps can be achieved easily with optical probes. Transmembrane pH gradients cause a blue-shift in the absorbance spectrum and the quenching of the fluorescence of the cationic dye acridine orange. It has been postulated that these changes are caused by accumulation and aggregation of the dye inside the vesicles. We tested this hypothesis using liposomes with transmembrane concentration gradients of ammonium sulfate as model system. Fluorescence intensity of acridine orange solutions incubated with liposomes was affected by magnitude of the gradient, volume trapped by vesicles, and temperature. These experimental data were compared to a theoretical model describing the accumulation of acridine orange monomers in the vesicles according to the inside-to-outside ratio of proton concentrations, and the intravesicular formation of sandwich-like piles of acridine orange cations. This theoretical model predicted quantitatively the relationship between the transmembrane pH gradients and spectral changes of acridine orange. Therefore, adequate characterization of aggregation of dye in the lumen of biological vesicles provides the theoretical basis for using acridine orange as an optical probe to quantify transmembrane pH gradients.

  13. Modeling the Q-cycle mechanism of transmembrane energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Anatoly Yu

    2011-01-01

    The Q-cycle mechanism plays an important role in the conversion of the redox energy into the energy of the proton electrochemical gradient across the biomembrane. The bifurcated electron transfer reaction, which is built into this mechanism, recycles one electron, thus, allowing to translocate two protons per one electron moving to the high-potential redox chain. We study a kinetic model of the Q-cycle mechanism in an artificial system which mimics the bf complex of plants and cyanobacteria in the regime of ferredoxin-dependent cyclic electron flow. Using methods of condensed matter physics, we derive a set of master equations and describe a time sequence of electron and proton transfer reactions in the complex. We find energetic conditions when the bifurcation of the electron pathways at the positive side of the membrane occurs naturally, without any additional gates. For reasonable parameter values, we show that this system is able to translocate more than 1.8 protons, on average, per one electron, with a t...

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel.

  15. Development of a Proteoliposome Model to Probe Transmembrane Electron-Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Gaye F. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Shi, Zhi [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dohnalkova, Alice [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fredrickson, Jim K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Butt, Julea N. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Richardson, David J. [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom); Clarke, Thomas [Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-01

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system has been developed that contains methyl viologen (MV) as an internalised electron acceptor and valinomycin (V) as a membrane associated cation exchanger. These proteoliposomes can be used as a model system to investigate MtrCAB function.

  16. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting lipid affects on the crystallization and structure of a transmembrane peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-04-06

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating D-and L-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesised lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  17. Modeling the structure of SARS 3a transmembrane protein using a minimum unfavorable contact approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramakrishna; Siladitya Padhi; U Deva Priyakumar

    2015-12-01

    3a is an accessory protein from SARS coronavirus that is known to play a significant role in the proliferation of the virus by forming tetrameric ion channels. Although the monomeric units are known to consist of three transmembrane (TM) domains, there are no solved structures available for the complete monomer. The present study proposes a structural model for the transmembrane region of the monomer by employing our previously tested approach, which predicts potential orientations of TM -helices by minimizing the unfavorable contact surfaces between the different TM domains. The best model structure comprising all three -helices has been subjected to MD simulations to examine its quality. The TM bundle was found to form a compact and stable structure with significant intermolecular interactions. The structural features of the proposed model of 3a account for observations from previous experimental investigations on the activity of the protein. Further analysis indicates that residues from the TM2 and TM3 domains are likely to line the pore of the ion channel, which is in good agreement with a recent experimental study. In the absence of an experimental structure for the protein, the proposed structure can serve as a useful model for inferring structure-function relationships about the protein.

  18. Functional and Modeling Studies of the Transmembrane Region of the TRPM8 Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Sgobba, Miriam; Lemonnier, Loic; Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Noyer, Lucile; Jovanovic, Srdan; Zholos, Alexander V; Haider, Shozeb

    2015-11-03

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family act as polymodal cellular sensors, which aid in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis. Within the TRP family, TRPM8 is the cold receptor that forms a nonselective homotetrameric cation channel. In the absence of TRPM8 crystal structure, little is known about the relationship between structure and function. Inferences of TRPM8 structure have come from mutagenesis experiments coupled to electrophysiology, mainly regarding the fourth transmembrane helix (S4), which constitutes a moderate voltage-sensing domain, and about cold sensor and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites, which are both located in the C-terminus of TRPM8. In this study, we use a combination of molecular modeling and experimental techniques to examine the structure of the TRPM8 transmembrane and pore helix region including the conducting conformation of the selectivity filter. The model is consistent with a large amount of functional data and was further tested by mutagenesis. We present structural insight into the role of residues involved in intra- and intersubunit interactions and their link with the channel activity, sensitivity to icilin, menthol and cold, and impact on channel oligomerization.

  19. Exploring the in meso crystallization mechanism by characterizing the lipid mesophase microenvironment during the growth of single transmembrane α-helical peptide crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Knoblich, Konstantin; Seabrook, Shane A; Kirby, Nigel M; Mudie, Stephen T; Lau, Deborah; Li, Xu; Gras, Sally L; Mulet, Xavier; Call, Matthew E; Call, Melissa J; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2016-07-28

    The proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization of transmembrane proteins suggests that a protein or peptide is initially uniformly dispersed in the lipid self-assembly cubic phase but that crystals grow from a local lamellar phase, which acts as a conduit between the crystal and the bulk cubic phase. However, there is very limited experimental evidence for this theory. We have developed protocols to investigate the lipid mesophase microenvironment during crystal growth using standard procedures readily available in crystallography laboratories. This technique was used to characterize the microenvironment during crystal growth of the DAP12-TM peptide using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) with a micro-sized X-ray beam. Crystal growth was found to occur from the gyroid cubic mesophase. For one in four crystals, a highly oriented local lamellar phase was observed, providing supporting evidence for the proposed mechanism for in meso crystallization. A new observation of this study was that we can differentiate diffraction peaks from crystals grown in meso, from peaks originating from the surrounding lipid matrix, potentially opening up the possibility of high-throughput SAXS analysis of in meso grown crystals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'.

  20. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of the Structural Topology and Lipid Interactions of a Viral Fusion Protein Chimera Containing the Fusion Peptide and Transmembrane Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Myungwoon; Liao, Shu-Yu; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-13

    The fusion peptide (FP) and transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins play important roles during virus-cell membrane fusion, by inducing membrane curvature and transient dehydration. The structure of the water-soluble ectodomain of viral fusion proteins has been extensively studied crystallographically, but the structures of the FP and TMD bound to phospholipid membranes are not well understood. We recently investigated the conformations and lipid interactions of the separate FP and TMD peptides of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein F using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. These studies provide structural information about the two domains when they are spatially well separated in the fusion process. To investigate how these two domains are structured relative to each other in the postfusion state, when the ectodomain forms a six-helix bundle that is thought to force the FP and TMD together in the membrane, we have now expressed and purified a chimera of the FP and TMD, connected by a Gly-Lys linker, and measured the chemical shifts and interdomain contacts of the protein in several lipid membranes. The FP-TMD chimera exhibits α-helical chemical shifts in all the membranes examined and does not cause strong curvature of lamellar membranes or membranes with negative spontaneous curvature. These properties differ qualitatively from those of the separate peptides, indicating that the FP and TMD interact with each other in the lipid membrane. However, no (13)C-(13)C cross peaks are observed in two-dimensional correlation spectra, suggesting that the two helices are not tightly associated. These results suggest that the ectodomain six-helix bundle does not propagate into the membrane to the two hydrophobic termini. However, the loosely associated FP and TMD helices are found to generate significant negative Gaussian curvature to membranes that possess spontaneous positive curvature, consistent with the notion that the FP-TMD assembly may

  1. A model of a transmembrane drug-efflux pump from Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Walas, Fabien; Federici, Luca; Venkatesh Pratap, J; Bavro, Vassiliy N; Miguel, Ricardo Nunez; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Luisi, Ben

    2004-12-03

    In Gram-negative bacteria, drug resistance is due in part to the activity of transmembrane efflux-pumps, which are composed of three types of proteins. A representative pump from Escherichia coli is an assembly of the trimeric outer-membrane protein TolC, which is an allosteric channel, the trimeric inner-membrane proton-antiporter AcrB, and the periplasmic protein, AcrA. The pump displaces drugs vectorially from the bacterium using proton electrochemical force. Crystal structures are available for TolC and AcrB from E. coli, and for the AcrA homologue MexA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on homology modelling and molecular docking, we show how AcrA, AcrB and TolC might assemble to form a tripartite pump, and how allostery may occur during transport.

  2. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  3. Transmembrane Signaling Proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all metazoan cells contain at least one and usually several types of transmembrane proteoglycans. These are varied in protein structure and type of polysaccharide, but the total number of vertebrate genes encoding transmembrane proteoglycan core proteins is less than 10. Some core...... proteins, including those of the syndecans, always possess covalently coupled glycosaminoglycans; others do not. Syndecan has a long evolutionary history, as it is present in invertebrates, but many other transmembrane proteoglycans are vertebrate inventions. The variety of proteins......, and linkage to PDZ protein networks. Many transmembrane proteoglycans associate on the cell surface with metzincin proteases and can be shed by them. Work with model systems in vivo and in vitro reveal roles in growth, adhesion, migration, and metabolism. Furthermore, a wide range of phenotypes for the core...

  4. Membrane topologies of the PGLa antimicrobial peptide and a transmembrane anchor sequence by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization/solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salnikov, Evgeniy Sergeevich; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Aussenac, Fabien; Ouari, Olivier; Sarrouj, Hiba; Reiter, Christian; Tordo, Paul; Engelke, Frank; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2016-02-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has been introduced to overcome the sensitivity limitations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy also of supported lipid bilayers. When investigated by solid-state NMR techniques the approach typically involves doping the samples with biradicals and their investigation at cryo-temperatures. Here we investigated the effects of temperature and membrane hydration on the topology of amphipathic and hydrophobic membrane polypeptides. Although the antimicrobial PGLa peptide in dimyristoyl phospholipids is particularly sensitive to topological alterations, the DNP conditions represent well its membrane alignment also found in bacterial lipids at ambient temperature. With a novel membrane-anchored biradical and purpose-built hardware a 17-fold enhancement in NMR signal intensity is obtained by DNP which is one of the best obtained for a truly static matrix-free system. Furthermore, a membrane anchor sequence encompassing 19 hydrophobic amino acid residues was investigated. Although at cryotemperatures the transmembrane domain adjusts it membrane tilt angle by about 10 degrees, the temperature dependence of two-dimensional separated field spectra show that freezing the motions can have beneficial effects for the structural analysis of this sequence.

  5. Multiscale modeling and computation of nano-electronic transistors and transmembrane proton channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Duan

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic transistors, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. In biology, proton dynamics and transport across membrane proteins are of paramount importance to the normal function of living cells. Similar physical characteristics are behind the two subjects, and model simulations share common mathematical interests/challenges. In this thesis work, multiscale and multiphysical models are proposed to study the mechanisms of nanotransistors and proton transport in transmembrane at the atomic level. For nano-electronic transistors, we introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions on an equal footing at nano-scale. Additionally, this model includes layered structures and random doping effect of nano-transistors. For transmembrane proton channels, we describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly treat numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered in atomic details. We formulate a total free energy functional to include kinetic and potential energies of protons, as well as electrostatic energy of all other ions on an equal footing. For both nano-transistors and proton channels systems, the variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations. The Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations are derived for nano-transistors while the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained for proton channels. Related numerical

  6. Metal ion site engineering indicates a global toggle switch model for seven-transmembrane receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Christian E; Frimurer, Thomas M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole;

    2006-01-01

    Much evidence indicates that, during activation of seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the intracellular segments of the transmembrane helices (TMs) move apart with large amplitude, rigid body movements of especially TM-VI and TM-VII. In this study, AspIII:08 (Asp113), the anchor point for monoa...... that the pivots for these vertical seesaw movements are the highly conserved proline bends of the involved helices....

  7. A new theoretical model for transmembrane potential and ion currents induced in a spherical cell under low frequency electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Gao, Yang; Chen, Ruijuan; Wang, Huiquan; Dong, Lei; Dou, Junrong

    2016-10-01

    Time-varying electromagnetic fields (EMF) can induce some physiological effects in neuronal tissues, which have been explored in many applications such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. Although transmembrane potentials and induced currents have already been the subjects of many theoretical studies, most previous works about this topic are mainly completed by utilizing Maxwell's equations, often by solving a Laplace equation. In previous studies, cells were often considered to be three-compartment models with different electroconductivities in different regions (three compartments are often intracellular regions, membrane, and extracellular regions). However, models like that did not take dynamic ion channels into consideration. Therefore, one cannot obtain concrete ionic current changes such as potassium current change or sodium current change by these models. The aim of the present work is to present a new and more detailed model for calculating transmembrane potentials and ionic currents induced by time-varying EMF. Equations used in the present paper originate from Nernst-Plank equations, which are ionic current-related equations. The main work is to calculate ionic current changes induced by EMF exposure, and then transmembrane potential changes are calculated with Hodgkin-Huxley model. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:481-492, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Yeast as a model system for mammalian seven-transmembrane segment receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeansonne, N.E. [East Carolina Univ. Medical School, Greenville, NC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Investigators have used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in which to study the {beta}-adrenergic receptor, the T-cell receptor pathway, initiation of mammalian DNA replication, initiation of mammalian transcription, secretion, the CDC2 kinase system, cell cycle control, and aging, as well as the function of oncogenes. This list continues to growth with the discovery of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding homologue in yeast, an Rb binding protein homologue, and a possible yeast arrestin. Yeast is relatively easy to maintain, to grow, and to genetically manipulate. A single gene can be overexpressed, selectively mutated or deleted from its chromosomal location. In this way, the in vivo function of a gene can be studied. It has become reasonable to consider yeast as a model system for studying the seven transmembrane segments (7-TMS) receptor family. Currently, subtypes of the {beta}-adrenergic receptor are being studied in yeast. The receptor and its G{sub {alpha}}-G-protein, trigger the mating pheromone receptor pathway. This provides a powerful assay for determining receptor function. Studies expressing the muscarinic cholinergic receptor in yeast are underway. The yeast pheromone receptor belongs to this receptor family, sharing sequences and secondary structure homology. An effective strategy has been to identify a yeast pathway or process which is homologous to a mammalian system. The pathway is delineated in yeast, identifying other genetic components. Then yeast genes are used to screen for human homologues of these components. The putative human homologues are then expressed in yeast and in mammalian cells to determine function. When this type of {open_quotes}mixing and matching{close_quotes} works, yeast genetics can be a powerful tool. 115 refs.

  9. In Silico Models for Designing and Discovering Novel Anticancer Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Atul; Kapoor, Pallavi; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, G. P. S.

    2013-10-01

    Use of therapeutic peptides in cancer therapy has been receiving considerable attention in the recent years. Present study describes the development of computational models for predicting and discovering novel anticancer peptides. Preliminary analysis revealed that Cys, Gly, Ile, Lys, and Trp are dominated at various positions in anticancer peptides. Support vector machine models were developed using amino acid composition and binary profiles as input features on main dataset that contains experimentally validated anticancer peptides and random peptides derived from SwissProt database. In addition, models were developed on alternate dataset that contains antimicrobial peptides instead of random peptides. Binary profiles-based model achieved maximum accuracy 91.44% with MCC 0.83. We have developed a webserver, which would be helpful in: (i) predicting minimum mutations required for improving anticancer potency; (ii) virtual screening of peptides for discovering novel anticancer peptides, and (iii) scanning natural proteins for identification of anticancer peptides (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/anticp/).

  10. Complete coding sequence, sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase (TbOST II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baticados, Waren N; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Nagasawa, Hideyuki; Baticados, Abigail M

    2011-01-01

    The partial nucleotide sequence of putative Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense oligosaccharyl transferase gene was previously reported. Here, we describe the determination of its full-length nucleotide sequence by Inverse PCR (IPCR), subsequent biological sequence analysis and transmembrane topology modelling. The full-length DNA sequence has an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2406 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 801 amino acid residues. Protein and DNA sequence analyses revealed that homologues within the genome of other kinetoplastid and various origins exist. Protein topology analysis predicted that Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense putative oligosaccharyl transferase clone II (TbOST II) is a transmembrane protein with transmembrane helices in probably an N(cytosol)-C(cytosol) orientation. Data from the GenBank database assembly and sequence analyses in general clearly state that TbOST II is the STT3 subunit of OST in T.b. rhodesiense that necessitates further characterisation and functional studies with RNAi. TbOST II sequence had been deposited in the GenBank (accession number GU245937).

  11. Molecular modeling of transmembrane delivery of paclitaxel by shock waves with nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue-mei; Yuan, Bing; Zhang, Xian-ren; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of advanced delivery strategies for anticancer drugs that can permeate through cellular membranes is urgently required for biomedical applications. In this work, we investigated the dynamic transmembrane behavior of paclitaxel (PTX), a powerful anticancer drug, under the combined impact of shock waves and nanobubbles, by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations show that the PTX molecule experiences complicated motion modes during the action process with the membrane, as a consequence of its interplay with the lipid bilayer and water, under the joint effect of the shock wave and nanobubble. Moreover, it was found that the transmembrane movement of PTX is closely associated with the conformation changes of PTX, as well as the structural changes of the membrane (e.g., compression and poration in membrane). The nanobubble collapse induced by the shock wave, the proper PTX location with respect to the nanobubble, and a suitable nanobubble size and shock impulse are all necessary for the delivery of PTX into the cell. This work provides a molecular understanding of the interaction mechanism between drug molecules and cell membranes under the influence of shock waves and nanobubbles, and paves the way for exploiting targeted drug delivery systems that combine nanobubbles and ultrasound.

  12. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jeehyeon, E-mail: jeehyeon@cau.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Sangmyung, E-mail: sangmyung.rhee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  13. Efficient isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion translocators and assembly of heteromeric transmembrane pores in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabian B; Rossi, Kyle C; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Clerico, Eugenia M; Heuck, Alejandro P

    2011-08-23

    Translocation of bacterial toxins or effectors into host cells using the type III secretion (T3S) system is a conserved mechanism shared by many Gram-negative pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects different proteins across the plasma membrane of target cells, altering the normal metabolism of the host. Protein translocation presumably occurs through a proteinaceous transmembrane pore formed by two T3S secreted protein translocators, PopB and PopD. Unfolded translocators are secreted through the T3S needle prior to insertion into the target membrane. Purified PopB and PopD form pores in model membranes. However, their tendency to form heterogeneous aggregates in solution had hampered the analysis of how these proteins undergo the transition from a denatured state to a membrane-inserted state. Translocators were purified as stable complexes with the cognate chaperone PcrH and isolated from the chaperone using 6 M urea. We report here the assembly of stable transmembrane pores by dilution of urea-denatured translocators in the presence of membranes. PopB and PopD spontaneously bound liposomes containing anionic phospholipids and cholesterol in a pH-dependent manner as observed by two independent assays, time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and sucrose-step gradient ultracentrifugation. Using Bodipy-labeled proteins, we found that PopB interacts with PopD on the membrane surface as determined by excitation energy migration and fluorescence quenching. Stable transmembrane pores are more efficiently assembled at pH <5.0, suggesting that acidic residues might be involved in the initial membrane binding and/or insertion. Altogether, the experimental setup described here represents an efficient method for the reconstitution and analysis of membrane-inserted translocators.

  14. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design.

  15. The effect of solution nonideality on modeling transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited intracellular ice formation during cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; He, Xiaoming

    2014-04-14

    A new model was developed to predict transmembrane water transport and diffusion-limited ice formation in cells during freezing without the ideal-solution assumption that has been used in previous models. The model was applied to predict cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation (IIF) during cryopreservation of mouse oocytes and bovine carotid artery endothelial cells in aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with glycerol as the cryoprotectant or cryoprotective agent. A comparison of the predictions between the present model and the previously reported models indicated that the ideal-solution assumption results in under-prediction of the amount of intracellular ice at slow cooling rates (<50 K/min). In addition, the lower critical cooling rates for IIF that is lethal to cells predicted by the present model were much lower than those estimated with the ideal-solution assumption. This study represents the first investigation on how accounting for solution nonideality in modeling water transport across the cell membrane could affect the prediction of diffusion-limited ice formation in biological cells during freezing. Future studies are warranted to look at other assumptions alongside nonideality to further develop the model as a useful tool for optimizing the protocol of cell cryopreservation for practical applications.

  16. A globin domain in a neuronal transmembrane receptor of Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum: molecular modeling and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilleman, Lesley; Germani, Francesca; De Henau, Sasha; Helbo, Signe; Desmet, Filip; Berghmans, Herald; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Hoogewijs, David; Schoofs, Liliane; Braeckman, Bart P; Moens, Luc; Fago, Angela; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2015-04-17

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of GLB-33, a putative neuropeptide receptor that is exclusively expressed in the nervous system of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This unique chimeric protein is composed of a 7-transmembrane domain (7TM), GLB-33 7TM, typical of a G-protein-coupled receptor, and of a globin domain (GD), GLB-33 GD. Comprehensive sequence similarity searches in the genome of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, revealed a chimeric protein that is similar to a Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide neuropeptide receptor. The three-dimensional structures of the separate domains of both species and of the full-length proteins were modeled. The 7TM domains of both proteins appeared very similar, but the globin domain of the A. suum receptor surprisingly seemed to lack several helices, suggesting a novel truncated globin fold. The globin domain of C. elegans GLB-33, however, was very similar to a genuine myoglobin-type molecule. Spectroscopic analysis of the recombinant GLB-33 GD showed that the heme is pentacoordinate when ferrous and in the hydroxide-ligated form when ferric, even at neutral pH. Flash-photolysis experiments showed overall fast biphasic CO rebinding kinetics. In its ferrous deoxy form, GLB-33 GD is capable of reversibly binding O2 with a very high affinity and of reducing nitrite to nitric oxide faster than other globins. Collectively, these properties suggest that the globin domain of GLB-33 may serve as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor and/or as a nitrite reductase. Both properties are potentially able to modulate the neuropeptide sensitivity of the neuronal transmembrane receptor. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Graph-Theoretic Models of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra J. Knisley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by a mutation in a membrane protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. This protein serves as a chloride channel and regulates the viscosity of mucus lining the ducts of a number of organs. Although much has been learned about the consequences of mutations on the energy landscape and the resulting disrupted folding pathway of CFTR, a level of understanding needed to correct the misfolding has not been achieved. The most common mutations of CFTR are located in one of two nucleotide binding domains, namely, the nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1. We model NBD1 using a nested graph model. The vertices in the lowest layer each represent an atom in the structure of an amino acid residue, while the vertices in the mid layer each represent the residue. The vertices in the top layer each represent a subdomain of the nucleotide binding domain. We use this model to quantify the effects of a single point mutation on the protein domain. We compare the wildtype structure with eight of the most common mutations. The graph-theoretic model provides insight into how a single point mutation can have such profound structural consequences.

  18. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Transmembrane Movement of a Fluorescent Phospholipid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Nisin is a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide. The capacity of nisin to induce transmembrane movement of a fluorescent phospholipid in lipid vesicles was investigated. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles that contained a fluorescent phospholipid

  19. A unified resistor-capacitor model for impedance, dielectrophoresis, electrorotation, and induced transmembrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimsa, J; Wachner, D

    1998-08-01

    Dielectric properties of suspended cells are explored by analysis of the frequency-dependent response to electric fields. Impedance (IMP) registers the electric response, and kinetic phenomena like orientation, translation, deformation, or rotation can also be analyzed. All responses can generally be described by a unified theory. This is demonstrated by an RC model for the structural polarizations of biological cells, allowing intuitive comparison of the IMP, dielectrophoresis (DP), and electrorotation (ER) methods. For derivations, cells of prismatic geometry embedded in elementary cubes formed by the external solution were assumed. All geometrical constituents of the model were described by parallel circuits of a capacitor and a resistor. The IMP of the suspension is given by a meshwork of elementary cubes. Each elementary cube was modeled by two branches describing the current flow through and around the cell. To model DP and ER, the external branch was subdivided to obtain a reference potential. Real and imaginary parts of the potential difference of the cell surface and the reference reflect the frequency behavior of DP and ER. The scheme resembles an unbalanced Wheatstone bridge, in which IMP measures the current-voltage behavior of the feed signal and DP and ER are the measuring signal. Model predictions were consistent with IMP, DP, and ER experiments on human red cells, as well as with the frequency dependence of field-induced hemolysis. The influential radius concept is proposed, which allows easy derivation of simplified equations for the characteristic properties of a spherical single-shell model on the basis of the RC model.

  20. Mathematical Models for Quantitative Assessment of Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET: Application to Seven Transmembrane Receptors (7TMRs Oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka eDrinovec

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The idea that seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also designated G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs might form dimers or higher order oligomeric complexes was formulated more than 20 years ago and has been intensively studied since then. In the last decade, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET has been one of the most frequently used biophysical methods for studying 7TMRs oligomerization. This technique enables monitoring physical interactions between protein partners in living cells fused to donor and acceptor moieties. It relies on non-radiative transfer of energy between donor and acceptor, depending on their intermolecular distance (1–10 nm and relative orientation. Results derived from BRET-based techniques are very persuasive; however, they need appropriate controls and critical interpretation. To overcome concerns about the specificity of BRET-derived results, a set of experiments has been proposed, including negative control with a non-interacting receptor or protein, BRET dilution, saturation and competition assays. This article presents the theoretical background behind BRET assays, then outlines mathematical models for quantitative interpretation of BRET saturation and competition assay results, gives examples of their utilization and discusses the possibilities of quantitative analysis of data generated with other RET-based techniques.

  1. Transmembrane Signal Transduction in Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization: Focusing on Xenopus laevis as a Model Animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sato

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a cell biological phenomenon of crucial importance for the birth of new life in a variety of multicellular and sexual reproduction species such as algae, animal and plants. Fertilization involves a sequence of events, in which the female gamete “egg” and the male gamete “spermatozoon (sperm” develop, acquire their functions, meet and fuse with each other, to initiate embryonic and zygotic development. Here, it will be briefly reviewed how oocyte cytoplasmic components are orchestrated to undergo hormone-induced oocyte maturation and sperm-induced activation of development. I then review how sperm-egg membrane interaction/fusion and activation of development in the fertilized egg are accomplished and regulated through egg coat- or egg plasma membrane-associated components, highlighting recent findings and future directions in the studies using Xenopus laevis as a model experimental animal.

  2. The transmembrane tyrosines Y56, Y91 and Y167 play important roles in determining the affinity and transport rate of the rabbit proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, Myrtani; Gan, Christine; Bailey, Patrick; Meredith, David

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian proton-coupled peptide transporter PepT1 is widely accepted as the major route of uptake for dietary nitrogen, as well as being responsible for the oral absorption of a number of classes of drugs, including beta-lactam antibiotics and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Using site-directed mutagenesis and zero-trans transport assays, we investigated the role of conserved tyrosines in the transmembrane domains (TMDs) of rabbit PepT1 as predicted by hydropathy plots. All the individual TMD tyrosines were substituted with phenylalanine and shown to retain the ability to traffic to the plasma membrane of Xenopus laevis oocytes. These single substitutions of TMD tyrosines by phenylalanine residues did not affect the proton dependence of peptide uptake, with all retaining wild-type PepT1-like pH dependence. Individual mutations of four of the nine TMD residue tyrosines (Y64, Y287, Y345 and Y587) were without measurable effect on PepT1 function, whereas the other five (Y12, Y56, Y91, Y167 and Y345) were shown to result in altered transport function compared to the wild-type PepT1. Intriguingly, the affinity of Y56F-PepT1 was found to be dramatically increased (approximately 100-fold) in comparison to that of the wild-type rabbit PepT1. Y91 mutations also affected the substrate affinity of the transporter, which increased in line with the hydrophilicity of the substituted amino acid (F>Y>Q>R). Y167 was demonstrated to play a pivotal role in rabbit PepT1 function since Y167F, Y167R and Y167Q demonstrated very little transport function. These results are discussed with regard to a proposed mechanism for PepT1 substrate binding.

  3. A transmembrane polymorphism in FcgammaRIIb (FCGR2B) is associated with the production of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies in Taiwanese RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-Y; Wang, C-M; Ma, C-C; Hsu, L-A; Ho, H-H; Wu, Y-J J; Kuo, S-N; Wu, J

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine whether the FcgammaRIIb 187-Ile/Thr polymorphism is a predisposition factor for subtypes of RA defined by disease severity and production of autoantibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCPs) in Taiwanese RA patients. Genotype distributions and allele frequencies of FcgammaRIIb 187-Ile/Thr were compared between 562 normal healthy controls and 640 RA patients as stratified by clinical parameters and autoantibodies. Significant enrichment of 187-Ile allele was observed in RA patients positive for anti-CCP antibodies as compared with the anti-CCP negative RA patients (P=0.001, OR 1.652 (95% CI 1.210-2.257)) or as compared with the normal controls (P=0.005, OR 1.348 (95% CI 1.092-1.664)). In addition, 187-Ile allele was found to be enriched in RA patients positive for rheumatoid factor (RF) compared to the RF negative RA patients (P=0.024, OR 1.562 (95% CI 1.059-2.303)). Furthermore, the homozygotes were enriched in destructive male RA patients (P=0.035; OR 2.038 (95% CI 1.046-3.973)) and the 187-Ile allele was associated with early-onset of RA in Taiwanese patients (P=0.045, OR 1.548 (95% CI 1.007-2.379)). Thus, FcgammaRIIb SNP 187-Ile/Thr may influence the RA phenotypes in Taiwanese RA.

  4. Biomimetic peptide-based models of [FeFe]-hydrogenases: utilization of phosphine-containing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Souvik; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai D; Gan, Lu; Jones, Anne K

    2015-09-07

    Two synthetic strategies for incorporating diiron analogues of [FeFe]-hydrogenases into short peptides via phosphine functional groups are described. First, utilizing the amine side chain of lysine as an anchor, phosphine carboxylic acids can be coupled via amide formation to resin-bound peptides. Second, artificial, phosphine-containing amino acids can be directly incorporated into peptides via solution phase peptide synthesis. The second approach is demonstrated using three amino acids each with a different phosphine substituent (diphenyl, diisopropyl, and diethyl phosphine). In total, five distinct monophosphine-substituted, diiron model complexes were prepared by reaction of the phosphine-peptides with diiron hexacarbonyl precursors, either (μ-pdt)Fe2(CO)6 or (μ-bdt)Fe2(CO)6 (pdt = propane-1,3-dithiolate, bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate). Formation of the complexes was confirmed by UV/Vis, FTIR and (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Electrocatalysis by these complexes is reported in the presence of acetic acid in mixed aqueous-organic solutions. Addition of water results in enhancement of the catalytic rates.

  5. Dimerization of the transmembrane domain of amyloid precursor proteins and familial Alzheimer's disease mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid precursor protein (APP is enzymatically cleaved by γ-secretase to form two peptide products, either Aβ40 or the more neurotoxic Aβ42. The Aβ42/40 ratio is increased in many cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD. The transmembrane domain (TM of APP contains the known dimerization motif GXXXA. We have investigated the dimerization of both wild type and FAD mutant APP transmembrane domains. Results Using synthetic peptides derived from the APP-TM domain, we show that this segment is capable of forming stable transmembrane dimers. A model of a dimeric APP-TM domain reveals a putative dimerization interface, and interestingly, majority of FAD mutations in APP are localized to this interface region. We find that FAD-APP mutations destabilize the APP-TM dimer and increase the population of APP peptide monomers. Conclusion The dissociation constants are correlated to both the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio and the mean age of disease onset in AD patients. We also show that these TM-peptides reduce Aβ production and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios when added to HEK293 cells overexpressing the Swedish FAD mutation and γ-secretase components, potentially revealing a new class of γ-secretase inhibitors.

  6. Modeling transmembrane domain dimers/trimers of plexin receptors: implications for mechanisms of signal transmission across the membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqun Zhang

    Full Text Available Single-pass transmembrane (TM receptors transmit signals across lipid bilayers by helix association or by configurational changes within preformed dimers. The structure determination for such TM regions is challenging and has mostly been accomplished by NMR spectroscopy. Recently, the computational prediction of TM dimer structures is becoming recognized for providing models, including alternate conformational states, which are important for receptor regulation. Here we pursued a strategy to predict helix oligomers that is based on packing considerations (using the PREDDIMER webserver and is followed by a refinement of structures, utilizing microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We applied this method to plexin TM receptors, a family of 9 human proteins, involved in the regulation of cell guidance and motility. The predicted models show that, overall, the preferences identified by PREDDIMER are preserved in the unrestrained simulations and that TM structures are likely to be diverse across the plexin family. Plexin-B1 and -B3 TM helices are regular and tend to associate, whereas plexin-A1, -A2, -A3, -A4, -C1 and -D1 contain sequence elements, such as poly-Glycine or aromatic residues that distort helix conformation and association. Plexin-B2 does not form stable dimers due to the presence of TM prolines. No experimental structural information on the TM region is available for these proteins, except for plexin-C1 dimeric and plexin-B1 - trimeric structures inferred from X-ray crystal structures of the intracellular regions. Plexin-B1 TM trimers utilize Ser and Thr sidechains for interhelical contacts. We also modeled the juxta-membrane (JM region of plexin-C1 and plexin-B1 and show that it synergizes with the TM structures. The structure and dynamics of the JM region and TM-JM junction provide determinants for the distance and distribution of the intracellular domains, and for their binding partners relative to the membrane. The

  7. Model-based design of peptide chromatographic purification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gétaz, David; Stroehlein, Guido; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-04-05

    In this work we present a general procedure for the model-based optimization of a polypeptide crude mixture purification process through its application to a case of industrial relevance. This is done to show how much modeling can be beneficial to optimize complex chromatographic processes in the industrial environment. The target peptide elution profile was modeled with a two sites adsorption equilibrium isotherm exhibiting two inflection points. The variation of the isotherm parameters with the modifier concentration was accounted for. The adsorption isotherm parameters of the target peptide were obtained by the inverse method. The elution of the impurities was approximated by lumping them into pseudo-impurities and by regressing their adsorption isotherm parameters directly as a function of the corresponding parameters of the target peptide. After model calibration and validation by comparison with suitable experimental data, Pareto optimizations of the process were carried out so as to select the optimal batch process.

  8. PeptideBuilder: A simple Python library to generate model peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Z. Tien

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple Python library to construct models of polypeptides from scratch. The intended use case is the generation of peptide models with pre-specified backbone angles. For example, using our library, one can generate a model of a set of amino acids in a specific conformation using just a few lines of python code. We do not provide any tools for energy minimization or rotamer packing, since powerful tools are available for these purposes. Instead, we provide a simple Python interface that enables one to add residues to a peptide chain in any desired conformation. Bond angles and bond lengths can be manipulated if so desired, and reasonable values are used by default.

  9. Modeling the amide I bands of small peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas la Cour; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Watson, Tim M.; Hirst, Jonathan D.; Knoester, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    In this paper different floating oscillator models for describing the amide I band of peptides and proteins are compared with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Models for the variation of the frequency shifts of the oscillators and the nearest-neighbor coupling between them with respect

  10. Modeling Amyloid Beta Peptide Insertion into Lipid Bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Mobley, D L; Singh, R R P; Maddox, M W; Longo, M J; Mobley, David L.; Cox, Daniel L.; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Maddox, Michael W.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by recent suggestions that the Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide (A-beta), can insert into cell membranes and form harmful ion channels, we model insertion of the peptide into cell membranes using a Monte Carlo code which is specific at the amino acid level. We examine insertion of the regular A-beta peptide as well as mutants causing familial Alzheimer's disease. We present our results and develop the hypothesis that partial insertion into the membrane, leaving the peptide in one leaflet, increases the probability of harmful channel formation. This hypothesis can partly explain why these mutations are neurotoxic simply due to peptide insertion behavior, and also explains why, normally, A-beta 42 is more toxic to some cultured cells than A-beta 40, but the E22Q mutation reverses this effect. We further apply this model to various artificial A-beta mutants which have been examined experimentally, and offer testable experimental predictions contrasting the roles of aggregation and insertion with regard ...

  11. pH-dependent coarse-grained model of peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Enciso, Marta; Site, Luigi Delle

    2012-01-01

    We propose a coarse-grained modeling strategy for peptides where the effect of changes of the pH can be efficiently described. The idea is based on modeling the effects of the pH value on the main driving interactions using reference data from atomistic simulations and experimental databases and transferring its main physical features to the coarse-grained resolution according the principle of consistency across the scales. After refining the coarse-grained model appropriately this was achieved by finding a unique set of parameters for the coarse-grained model that, when applied to peptides with different sequences and experimental properties, reproduces the experimental and atomistic data of reference. We used the such parametrized model for performing several numerical tests to check the universality of the model. We have tried systems with rather different response to pH variations, showing a highly satisfactory performance of the model.

  12. β淀粉样前体蛋白17肽对糖尿病大鼠海马神经细胞线粒体膜电位和凋亡的干预%APP17-mer peptide in regulation of neuronal mitochondrial transmembrane potentials and apoptosis in the hippocampus of diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红星; 王蓉; 杜怡峰; 姬志娟; 盛树力

    2005-01-01

    组高于糖尿病模型组[(705.99±89.92)道,P<0.05],与正常对照组相近(P=0.146).②海马单细胞凋亡率:糖尿病模型组明显高于正常对照组和β淀粉样前体蛋白17肽治疗组[(5.32±1.37)%,(1.03±0.55)%,(2.80±0.92)%,P<0.01,0.05].结论:海马线粒体膜电位下降和细胞的凋亡可能参与糖尿病脑病的发生发展;β淀粉样前体蛋白17肽具有改善这一病理过程的作用.%BACKGROUND: Learning and memory disorder exist in diabetic rats,which can be improved by APP 17-mer peptide. However, it is unclear whether learning and memory disorder in diabetes mellitus is caused by influencing neuronal mitochondrial transmembrane potentials and apoptosis in hippocampus or not and what is the related action mechanism of APP17-mer peptide.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of APP17-mer peptide on neuronal mitochondrial transmembrane potentials (△ψm) and apoptosis in hippocampal area of diabetic rats.DESIGN: A completely randomized, grouping and controlled trial.SETTING: Beijing Research Laboratory for Brain Aging, Beijing Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences; the Department of Endocrine, the First Central Hospital of Baoding.MATERIALS: The data measurement of the experiment was carried out in the Instrument Testing Center, the General Hospital of Chinese PLA between May 2002 and August 2002. The modeling and intervention of the experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratory of Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences. Eighteen male Wistar rats were enrolled and randomized into control group, model group and APP17-mer peptide group with 6 rats in each group.METHODS: ① Diabetic models in the model and APP17-mer peptide groups were established by intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin (pH=4.4) in fasted rats(fasting for 12 hours). Three days later, modeling was successful if blood sugar level in caudal vein was more than 15 mmol/L. Rats in the control group were not subjected to modeling.Then, the rats

  13. Prediction of peptide bonding affinity: kernel methods for nonlinear modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Bergeron, Charles; Sundling, C Matthew; Krein, Michael; Katt, Bill; Sukumar, Nagamani; Breneman, Curt M; Bennett, Kristin P

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents regression models obtained from a process of blind prediction of peptide binding affinity from provided descriptors for several distinct datasets as part of the 2006 Comparative Evaluation of Prediction Algorithms (COEPRA) contest. This paper finds that kernel partial least squares, a nonlinear partial least squares (PLS) algorithm, outperforms PLS, and that the incorporation of transferable atom equivalent features improves predictive capability.

  14. Transmembrane TNF-α is sufficient for articular inflammation and hypernociception in a mouse model of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Flávio A; Bastos, Leandro F S; Oliveira, Thiago H C; Dias, Ana C F; Oliveira, Vívian L S; Tavares, Lívia D; Costa, Vivian V; Galvão, Izabela; Soriani, Frederico M; Szymkowski, David E; Ryffel, Bernhard; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2016-01-01

    Gout manifests as recurrent episodes of acute joint inflammation and pain due to the deposition of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals within the affected tissue in a process dependent on NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The synthesis, activation, and release of IL-1β are crucial for MSU-induced inflammation. The current study evaluated the mechanism by which TNF-α contributed to MSU-induced inflammation. Male C57BL/6J or transgenic mice were used in this study and inflammation was induced by the injection of MSU crystals into the joint. TNF-α was markedly increased in the joint after the injection of MSU. There was inhibition in the infiltration of neutrophils, production of CXCL1 and IL-1β, and decreased hypernociception in mice deficient for TNF-α or its receptors. Pharmacological blockade of TNF-α with Etanercept or pentoxyfylline produced similar results. Mechanistically, TNF-α blockade resulted in lower amounts of IL-1β protein and pro-IL-1β mRNA transcripts in joints. Gene-modified mice that express only transmembrane TNF-α had an inflammatory response similar to that of WT mice and blockade of soluble TNF-α (XPro™1595) did not decrease MSU-induced inflammation. In conclusion, TNF-α drives expression of pro-IL-1β mRNA and IL-1β protein in experimental gout and that its transmembrane form is sufficient to trigger MSU-induced inflammation in mice.

  15. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  16. A synthetic peptide derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 downregulates the expression and function of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in monocytes by activating the 7-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor FPRL1/LXA4R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, X; Ueda, H; Su, S B; Gong, W; Dunlop, N M; Gao, J L; Murphy, P M; Wang, J M

    1999-08-15

    Because envelope gp120 of various strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) downregulates the expression and function of a variety of chemoattractant receptors through a process of heterologous desensitization, we investigated whether epitopes derived from gp120 could mimic the effect. A synthetic peptide domain, designated F peptide, corresponding to amino acid residues 414-434 in the V4-C4 region of gp120 of the HIV-1 Bru strain, potently reduced monocyte binding and chemotaxis response to macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta) and stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha), chemokines that use the receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, respectively. Further study showed that F peptide by itself is an inducer of chemotaxis and calcium mobilization in human monocytes and neutrophils. In cross-desensitization experiments, among the numerous chemoattractants tested, only the bacterial chemotactic peptide fMLF, when used at high concentrations, partially attenuated calcium mobilization induced by F peptide in phagocytes, suggesting that this peptide domain might share a 7-transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptor with fMLF. By using cells transfected with cDNAs encoding receptors that interact with fMLF, we found that F peptide uses an fMLF receptor variant, FPRL1, as a functional receptor. The activation of monocytes by F peptide resulted in downregulation of the cell surface expression of CCR5 and CXCR4 in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that activation of FPRL1 on human moncytes by a peptide domain derived from HIV-1 gp120 could lead to desensitization of cell response to other chemoattractants. This may explain, at least in part, the initial activation of innate immune responses in HIV-1-infected patients followed by immune suppression.

  17. UV damage of collagen: insights from model collagen peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariashvili, Ketevan; Madhan, Balaraman; Brodsky, Barbara; Kuchava, Ana; Namicheishvili, Louisa; Metreveli, Nunu

    2012-03-01

    Fibrils of Type I collagen in the skin are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light and there have been claims that collagen photo-degradation leads to wrinkles and may contribute to skin cancers. To understand the effects of UV radiation on collagen, Type I collagen solutions were exposed to the UV-C wavelength of 254 nm for defined lengths of time at 4°C. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments show that irradiation of collagen leads to high loss of triple helical content with a new lower thermal stability peak and SDS-gel electrophoresis indicates breakdown of collagen chains. To better define the effects of UV radiation on the collagen triple-helix, the studies were extended to peptides which model the collagen sequence and conformation. CD studies showed irradiation for days led to lower magnitudes of the triple-helix maximum at 225 nm and lower thermal stabilities for two peptides containing multiple Gly-Pro-Hyp triplets. In contrast, the highest radiation exposure led to little change in the T(m) values of (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) and (Ala-Hyp-Gly)(10) , although (Gly-Pro-Pro)(10) did show a significant decrease in triple helix intensity. Mass spectroscopy indicated preferential cleavage sites within the peptides, and identification of some of the most susceptible sites of cleavage. The effect of radiation on these well defined peptides gives insight into the sequence and conformational specificity of photo-degradation of collagen.

  18. Modeling the self-assembly of lipids and nanotubes in solution: forming vesicles and bicelles with transmembrane nanotube channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Nayhouse, Michael J; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-06-28

    Via dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate the self-assembly of end-functionalized, amphiphilic nanotubes and lipids in a hydrophilic solvent. Each nanotube encompasses a hydrophobic stalk and two hydrophilic ends, which are functionalized with end-tethered chains. With a relatively low number of the nanotubes in solution, the components self-assemble into stable lipid-nanotube vesicles. As the number of nanotubes is increased, the system exhibits a vesicle-to-bicelle transition, resulting in stable hybrid bicelle. Moreover, our results reveal that the nanotubes cluster into distinct tripod-like structures within the vesicles and aggregate into a ring-like assembly within the bicelles. For both the vesicles and bicelles, the nanotubes assume trans-membrane orientations, with the tethered hairs extending into the surrounding solution or the encapsulated fluid. Thus, the hairs provide a means of regulating the transport of species through the self-assembled structures. Our findings provide guidelines for creating nanotube clusters with distinctive morphologies that might be difficult to achieve through more conventional means. The results also yield design rules for creating synthetic cell-like objects or microreactors that can exhibit biomimetic functionality.

  19. Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transmembrane Protein-Lipid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Spijker

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Many biological cellular processes occur at the micro- or millisecond time scale. With traditional all-atom molecular modeling techniques it is difficult to investigate the dynamics of long time scales or large systems, such as protein aggregation or activation. Coarse graining (CG can be used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in such a system, and reduce the computational complexity. In this paper the first version of a coarse grained model for transmembrane proteins is presented. This model differs from other coarse grained protein models due to the introduction of a novel angle potential as well as a hydrogen bonding potential. These new potentials are used to stabilize the backbone. The model has been validated by investigating the adaptation of the hydrophobic mismatch induced by the insertion of WALP-peptides into a lipid membrane, showing that the first step in the adaptation is an increase in the membrane thickness, followed by a tilting of the peptide.

  20. Collagen model peptides: Sequence dependence of triple-helix stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persikov, A V; Ramshaw, J A; Brodsky, B

    2000-01-01

    The triple helix is a specialized protein motif, found in all collagens as well as in noncollagenous proteins involved in host defense. Peptides will adopt a triple-helical conformation if the sequence contains its characteristic features of Gly as every third residue and a high content of Pro and Hyp residues. Such model peptides have proved amenable to structural studies by x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, suitable for thermodynamic and kinetic analysis, and a valuable tool in characterizing the binding activities of the collagen triple helix. A systematic approach to understanding the amino acid sequence dependence of the collagen triple helix has been initiated, based on a set of host-guest peptides of the form, (Gly-Pro-Hyp)(3)-Gly-X-Y-(Gly-Pro-Hyp)(4). Comparison of their thermal stabilities has led to a propensity scale for the X and Y positions, and the additivity of contributions of individual residues is now under investigation. The local and global stability of the collagen triple helix is normally modulated by the residues in the X and Y positions, with every third position occupied by Gly in fibril-forming collagens. However, in collagen diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta, a single Gly may be substituted by another residue. Host-guest studies where the Gly is replaced by various amino acids suggest that the identity of the residue in the Gly position affects the degree of destabilization and the clinical severity of the disease.

  1. Crystal Structure of a Model Spider Silk Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shujun; Gido, Samuel; Valluzzi, Regina; Kaplan, David

    2001-03-01

    Crystallization study on a novel model silk peptide has been carried out using optical microscopy, AFM, TEM and electron diffraction. The sequence of the peptide, (E)5(GDVGGAGATGGS)2(E)5, is based on the GXYGGZ motif in the less repetitive amorphous blocks of Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk. When the peptide was crystallized out of aqueous solution, spherulites as well as dendritic crystals on the order of several to tens of microns in diameter were observed under polarizing optical microscope, depending on drying speed, volume of the droplet and concentration. The same crystals were collected and sonicated in methanol, a non-solvent, to yield individual crystals that were later examined in the electron microscope. Regular-shaped lamellar crystals of micron size were observed in the TEM. The lamellar thickness as determined by Pt/Pd shadowing and AFM is 50 Å. Selected area electron diffraction showed single crystal diffraction patterns indicating a possible orthorhombic unit cell of 9.91 x 5.57 x 20.40 Å.

  2. Modeling of mixed-mode chromatography of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Susanna; Gétaz, David; Forrer, Nicola; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-03-29

    Mixed-mode chromatographic materials are more and more often used for the purification of biomolecules, such as peptides and proteins. In many instances they in fact exhibit better selectivity values and therefore improve the purification efficiency compared to classical materials. In this work, a model to describe biomolecules retention in cation-exchange/reversed-phase (CIEX-RP) mixed-mode columns under diluted conditions has been developed. The model accounts for the effect of the salt and organic modifier concentration on the biomolecule Henry coefficient through three parameters: α, β and γ. The α parameter is related to the adsorption strength and ligand density, β represents the number of organic modifier molecules necessary to displace one adsorbed biomolecule and γ represents the number of salt molecules necessary to desorb one biomolecule. The latter parameter is strictly related to the number of charges on the biomolecule surface interacting with the ion-exchange ligands and it is shown experimentally that its value is close to the biomolecule net charge. The model reliability has been validated by a large set of experimental data including retention times of two different peptides (goserelin and insulin) on five columns: a reversed-phase C8 column and four CIEX-RP columns with different percentages of sulfonic groups and various concentration values of the salt and organic modifier. It has been found that the percentage of sulfonic groups on the surface strongly affects the peptides adsorption strength, and in particular, in the cases investigated, a CIEX ligand density around 0.04μmol/m(2) leads to optimal retention values.

  3. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Transmembrane Movement of a Fluorescent Phospholipid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Nisin is a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide. The capacity of nisin to induce transmembrane movement of a fluorescent phospholipid in lipid vesicles was investigated. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles that contained a fluorescent phospholipid (1-acyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ca

  4. Prediction of signal peptides and signal anchors by a hidden Markov model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Nielsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    A hidden Markov model of signal peptides has been developed. It contains submodels for the N-terminal part, the hydrophobic region, and the region around the cleavage site. For known signal peptides, the model can be used to assign objective boundaries between these three regions. Applied to our ...... is the poor discrimination between signal peptides and uncleaved signal anchors, but this is substantially improved by the hidden Markov model when expanding it with a very simple signal anchor model....

  5. Insights into the molecular interactions between aminopeptidase and amyloid beta peptide using molecular modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2014-08-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The accumulation of Aβ peptides in AD brain was caused due to overproduction or insufficient clearance and defects in the proteolytic degradation of Aβ peptides. Hence, Aβ peptide degradation could be a promising therapeutic approach in AD treatment. Recent experimental report suggests that aminopeptidase from Streptomyces griseus KK565 (SGAK) can degrade Aβ peptides but the interactive residues are yet to be known in detail at the atomic level. Hence, we developed the three-dimensional model of aminopeptidase (SGAK) using SWISS-MODEL, Geno3D and MODELLER. Model built by MODELLER was used for further studies. Molecular docking was performed between aminopeptidase (SGAK) with wild-type and mutated Aβ peptides. The docked complex of aminopeptidase (SGAK) and wild-type Aβ peptide (1IYT.pdb) shows more stability than the other complexes. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the residues His93, Asp105, Glu139, Glu140, Asp168 and His255 are involved in the hydrogen bonding with Aβ peptide and zinc ions. The interactions between carboxyl oxygen atoms of Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) with water molecule suggest that the Glu139 may be involved in the nucleophilic attack on Ala2-Glu3 peptide bond of Aβ peptide. Hence, amino acid Glu139 of aminopeptidase (SGAK) might play an important role to degrade Aβ peptides, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-03

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  7. The role of transmembrane segment II in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2009-01-01

    During the two past decades tremendous effort has been put into uncovering the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors. The majority of such studies have focused on the major binding pocket, comprised of transmembrane segments (TM) -III through -VII, as most non-peptide and peptide ligands, in addi......During the two past decades tremendous effort has been put into uncovering the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors. The majority of such studies have focused on the major binding pocket, comprised of transmembrane segments (TM) -III through -VII, as most non-peptide and peptide ligands...

  8. Single methyl groups can act as toggle switches to specify transmembrane protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Li; Steinocher, Helena; Shelar, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) engage in protein-protein interactions that regulate many cellular processes, but the rules governing the specificity of these interactions are poorly understood. To discover these principles, we analyzed 26-residue model transmembrane proteins consisting exclusively ...

  9. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  10. Detection of selective cationic amphipatic antibacterial peptides by Hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, Jose L

    2009-01-01

    Antibacterial peptides are researched mainly for the potential benefit they have in a variety of socially relevant diseases, used by the host to protect itself from different types of pathogenic bacteria. We used the mathematical-computational method known as Hidden Markov models (HMMs) in targeting a subset of antibacterial peptides named Selective Cationic Amphipatic Antibacterial Peptides (SCAAPs). The main difference in the implementation of HMMs was focused on the detection of SCAAP using principally five physical-chemical properties for each candidate SCAAPs, instead of using the statistical information about the amino acids which form a peptide. By this method a cluster of antibacterial peptides was detected and as a result the following were found: 9 SCAAPs, 6 synthetic antibacterial peptides that belong to a subregion of Cecropin A and Magainin 2, and 19 peptides from the Cecropin A family. A scoring function was developed using HMMs as its core, uniquely employing information accessible from the databases.

  11. Hydrophobic pulses predict transmembrane helix irregularities and channel transmembrane units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustres Mireille

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few high-resolution structures of integral membranes proteins are available, as crystallization of such proteins needs yet to overcome too many technical limitations. Nevertheless, prediction of their transmembrane (TM structure by bioinformatics tools provides interesting insights on the topology of these proteins. Methods We describe here how to extract new information from the analysis of hydrophobicity variations or hydrophobic pulses (HPulses in the sequence of integral membrane proteins using the Hydrophobic Pulse Predictor, a new tool we developed for this purpose. To analyze the primary sequence of 70 integral membrane proteins we defined two levels of analysis: G1-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 2 to 6 and G2-HPulses for sliding windows of n = 12 to 16. Results The G2-HPulse analysis of 541 transmembrane helices allowed the definition of the new concept of transmembrane unit (TMU that groups together transmembrane helices and segments with potential adjacent structures. In addition, the G1-HPulse analysis identified helix irregularities that corresponded to kinks, partial helices or unannotated structural events. These irregularities could represent key dynamic elements that are alternatively activated depending on the channel status as illustrated by the crystal structures of the lactose permease in different conformations. Conclusions Our results open a new way in the understanding of transmembrane secondary structures: hydrophobicity through hydrophobic pulses strongly impacts on such embedded structures and is not confined to define the transmembrane status of amino acids.

  12. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide-treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance.

  13. Modeling of ion-pairing effect in peptide reversed-phase chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gétaz, David; Hariharan, Subrahmaniam B; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-03

    The modeling of counterion and organic modifier concentration effects in peptide APIs reversed-phase preparative chromatography is discussed in this manuscript. A stoichiometric retention model based on the counterion binding to the charged functional groups of the peptide is proposed. The model parameters were evaluated using a rather large set of retention data measured in mobile phases with various counterions and acetonitrile concentrations. The model parameters were experimentally validated by a new counterion binding measurement technique. The n(max) model parameter value was found to be equal to the peptide net charge, whereas the K model parameter value was found to be specific to the counterion type (i.e. AcO(-)peptide saturation capacity was also investigated. It was shown that, at low acetonitrile concentration, the peptide saturation capacity was constant for all investigated counterion types and concentrations. On the other hand, at intermediate acetonitrile concentration, the peptide saturation capacity was significantly lower and with a tendency to increase with the counterion concentration. On the whole, the developed model provides a reliable a reliable tool for the design and development of peptide purification processes at the preparative and industrial scale.

  14. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  15. Copper-induced oligomerization of peptides: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Gitta; Stefanescu, Raluca; Przybylski, Michael; Murariu, Manuela; Hudecz, Ferenc; Drochioiu, Gabi

    2007-01-01

    In this work, copper-binding of the tetraglycine peptide (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly) was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Experiments were performed under alkaline conditions, in the presence of ethanolamine (pH 10.95). We observed that the presence of copper(II) ions induces the aggregation of the peptide and the formation of copper-bound complexes with higher molecular mass is favored, such as the oligomer complexes [3M+2Cu-3H](+) and [4M+3Cu-5H](+). At 1:1 peptide-copper(II) ion ratio, the singly charged [3M+2Cu-3H](+) oligomer complex is the base peak in the mass spectrum. Metal ion-induced oligomer-ization of neurotoxic peptides is well known in the literature; however, there are very few examples in which such oligomerization was directly observed by mass spectrometry. Our results show that application of short peptides can be useful to study the -mechanism of metal ion binding and metal ion-induced oligomerization of peptides.

  16. Development of an in vitro digestive model for studying the peptide profile of breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Asta, Chiara; Florio, Paola; Lammardo, Anna Maria; Prandi, Barbara; Mazzeo, Teresa; Budelli, Andrea; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is a highly valuable food for newborns and infants. Its protein fraction plays an important role for the development of the newborn. In the present study, an in vitro digestive model, developed for resembling closely the digestive system of an infant, was applied to human milk in order to identify and characterize the peptide profile. The peptide profile obtained after digestion was analyzed by μLC-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS. A total of 149 peptides from β-casein, 30 peptides from α-lactalbumin, 26 peptides from αs1-casein, 24 peptides from κ-casein, 28 peptides from osteopontin, and 29 from lactoferrin was recovered. The identified peptide profile of partially hydrolyzed proteins, such as caseins, α-lactalbumin, and osteopontin, was different from that previously reported demonstrating a different performance of the developed neonatal digestive system with respect to other previously applied. These results would be useful as a starting point to investigate the physiological function of breast milk peptides.

  17. Isolated Toll-like receptor transmembrane domains are capable of oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I Godfroy

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs act as the first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens by initiating critical defense signals upon dimer activation. The contribution of the transmembrane domain in the dimerization and signaling process has heretofore been overlooked in favor of the extracellular and intracellular domains. As mounting evidence suggests that the transmembrane domain is a critical region in several protein families, we hypothesized that this was also the case for Toll-like receptors. Using a combined biochemical and biophysical approach, we investigated the ability of isolated Toll-like receptor transmembrane domains to interact independently of extracellular domain dimerization. Our results showed that the transmembrane domains had a preference for the native dimer partners in bacterial membranes for the entire receptor family. All TLR transmembrane domains showed strong homotypic interaction potential. The TLR2 transmembrane domain demonstrated strong heterotypic interactions in bacterial membranes with its known interaction partners, TLR1 and TLR6, as well as with a proposed interaction partner, TLR10, but not with TLR4, TLR5, or unrelated transmembrane receptors providing evidence for the specificity of TLR2 transmembrane domain interactions. Peptides for the transmembrane domains of TLR1, TLR2, and TLR6 were synthesized to further study this subfamily of receptors. These peptides validated the heterotypic interactions seen in bacterial membranes and demonstrated that the TLR2 transmembrane domain had moderately strong interactions with both TLR1 and TLR6. Combined, these results suggest a role for the transmembrane domain in Toll-like receptor oligomerization and as such, may be a novel target for further investigation of new therapeutic treatments of Toll-like receptor mediated diseases.

  18. Interaction of the Alzheimer Aβ(25-35) peptide segment with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuco, Andreia; Serro, Ana Paula; Farinha, José Paulo; Saramago, Benilde; da Silva, Amélia Gonçalves

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The main components of these plaques are the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) peptides but the Aβ(25-35) sequence is the most frequently studied fragment because it represents a biologically active region of the longer Aβ peptides. In the present work, the interactions of Aβ(25-35) peptide with model membranes were investigated, taking into consideration the aggregation state of the peptide. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: the equimolar ternary mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol) and the equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with the monolayers, investigated at low concentrations (0.25-4μM), suggested a three step mechanism: adsorption-monomers or dimers adsorb at the polar region of the lipid monolayer; nucleation-adsorbed peptides act as nucleation sites for higher aggregates; and penetration-these aggregates insert in the hydrophobic region of the monolayer. Chol slightly enhances the peptide-lipid monolayer interaction. The large aggregates nucleated in the bulk solution evidenced a weak interaction with monolayers. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with liposomes, followed by a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) in a large range of peptide concentrations (10-80μM), was very small, independently of the peptide concentration.

  19. [Bacterial synthesis, purification, and solubilization of transmembrane segments of ErbB family members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, M V; Shul'ga, A A; Ermoliuk, Ia S; Tkach, E N; Goncharuk, S A; Pustovalova, Iu E; Mineev, K S; Bocharov, É V; Maslennikov, I V; Arsen'ev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-01-01

    A family of epidermal growth factor receptors, ErbB, represents an important class of receptor tyrosine kinases, playing a leading role in cellular growth, development and differentiation. Transmembrane domains of these receptors transduce biochemical signals across plasma membrane via lateral homo- and heterodimerization. Relatively small size of complexes of ErbB transmembrane domains with detergents or lipids allows one to study their detailed spatial structure using three-dimensional heteronuclear high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Here, we describe the effective expression system and purification procedure for preparative-scale production of transmembrane peptides from four representatives of ErbB family, ErbB1, ErbB2, ErbB3, ErbB4, for structural studies. The recombinant peptides were produced in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS as C-terminal extensions of thioredoxin A. The fusion protein cleavage was accomplished with the light subunit of human enterokinase. Several (10-30) milligrams of purified isotope-labeled transmembrane peptides were isolated with the use of a simple and convenient procedure, which consists of consecutive steps of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and cation-exchange chromatography. The purified peptides were reconstituted in lipid/detergent environment (micelles or bicelles) and characterized using dynamic light scattering, CD and NMR spectroscopy. The data obtained indicate that the purified ErbB transmembrane peptides are suitable for structural and dynamic studies of their homo- and heterodimer complexes using high resolution NMR spectroscopy.

  20. PredSTP: a highly accurate SVM based model to predict sequential cystine stabilized peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S M Ashiqul; Sajed, Tanvir; Kearney, Christopher Michel; Baker, Erich J

    2015-07-05

    Numerous organisms have evolved a wide range of toxic peptides for self-defense and predation. Their effective interstitial and macro-environmental use requires energetic and structural stability. One successful group of these peptides includes a tri-disulfide domain arrangement that offers toxicity and high stability. Sequential tri-disulfide connectivity variants create highly compact disulfide folds capable of withstanding a variety of environmental stresses. Their combination of toxicity and stability make these peptides remarkably valuable for their potential as bio-insecticides, antimicrobial peptides and peptide drug candidates. However, the wide sequence variation, sources and modalities of group members impose serious limitations on our ability to rapidly identify potential members. As a result, there is a need for automated high-throughput member classification approaches that leverage their demonstrated tertiary and functional homology. We developed an SVM-based model to predict sequential tri-disulfide peptide (STP) toxins from peptide sequences. One optimized model, called PredSTP, predicted STPs from training set with sensitivity, specificity, precision, accuracy and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 94.86%, 94.11%, 84.31%, 94.30% and 0.86, respectively, using 200 fold cross validation. The same model outperforms existing prediction approaches in three independent out of sample testsets derived from PDB. PredSTP can accurately identify a wide range of cystine stabilized peptide toxins directly from sequences in a species-agnostic fashion. The ability to rapidly filter sequences for potential bioactive peptides can greatly compress the time between peptide identification and testing structural and functional properties for possible antimicrobial and insecticidal candidates. A web interface is freely available to predict STP toxins from http://crick.ecs.baylor.edu/.

  1. A toy model of prebiotic peptide evolution: the possible role of relative amino acid abundances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón González, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical-computational toy model based on the assumed dynamic principles of prebiotic peptide evolution. Starting from a pool of amino acid monomers, the model describes in a generalized manner the generation of peptides and their sequential information. The model integrates the intrinsic and dynamic key elements of the initiation of biopolymerization, such as the relative amino acid abundances and polarities, as well as the oligomer reversibility, i.e. fragmentation and recombination, and peptide self-replication. Our modeling results suggest that the relative amino acid abundances, as indicated by Miller-Urey type electric discharge experiments, played a principal role in the early sequential information of peptide profiles. Moreover, the computed profiles display an astonishing similarity to peptide profiles observed in so-called biological common ancestors found in the following three microorganisms; E. coli, M. jannaschii, and S. cereviasiae. The prebiotic peptide fingerprint was obtained by the so-called polarity index method that was earlier reported as a tool for the identification of cationic amphipathic antibacterial short peptides.

  2. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Design of amphiphilic oligopeptides as models for fine tuning peptide assembly with plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha N; Gupta, Pardeep K

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the design of novel amphiphilic oligopeptides with hydrophobic and cationic amino acids to serve as models to understand peptide-DNA assembly. Biophysical and thermodynamic characterization of interaction of these amphiphilic peptides with plasmid DNA is presented. Peptides with at least +4 charges favor stable complex formation. Surface potential is dependent on the type of hydrophobic amino acid for a certain charge. Thermodynamically it is a spontaneous interaction between most of the peptides and plasmid DNA. Lys(7) and Tyr peptides with +4/+5 charges indicate cooperative binding with pDNA without saturation of interaction while Val(2)-Gly-Lys(4), Val-Gly-Lys(5), and Phe-Gly-Lys(5) lead to saturation of interaction indicating condensed pDNA within the range of N/Ps studied. We show that the biophysical properties of DNA-peptide complexes could be modulated by design and the peptides presented here could be used as building blocks for creating DNA-peptide complexes for various biomedical applications, mainly nucleic acid delivery.

  4. Probing Site-Specific Structural Information of Peptides at Model Membrane Interface In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Panahi, Afra; Ho, Jia-Jung; Laaser, Jennifer E; Brooks, Charles L; Zanni, Martin T; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-19

    Isotope labeling is a powerful technique to probe detailed structures of biological molecules with a variety of analytical methods such as NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. It is important to obtain molecular structural information on biological molecules at interfaces such as cell membranes, but it is challenging to use the isotope labeling method to study interfacial biomolecules. Here, by individually (13)C═(16)O labeling ten residues of a peptide, Ovispirin-1, we have demonstrated for the first time that a site-specific environment of membrane associated peptide can be probed by the submonolayer surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy in situ. With the peptide associated with a single lipid bilayer, the sinusoidal trend of the SFG line width and peak-center frequency suggests that the peptide is located at the interface beneath the lipid headgroup region. The constructive interferences between the isotope labeled peaks and the main peptide amide I peak contributed by the unlabeled components were used to determine the membrane orientation of the peptide. From the SFG spectral peak-center frequency, line width, and polarization dependence of the isotope labeled units, we deduced structural information on individual units of the peptide associated with a model cell membrane. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand peptide-membrane interactions. The physical pictures described by simulation agree well with the SFG experimental result. This research demonstrates the feasibility and power of using isotope labeling SFG to probe molecular structures of interfacial biological molecules in situ in real time.

  5. Asymmetry in structural response of inner and outer transmembrane segments of CorA protein by a coarse-grain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Khrutto, Channarong; Sompornpisut, Pornthep; Farmer, B. L.; Pandey, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    Structure of CorA protein and its inner (i.corA) and outer (o.corA) transmembrane (TM) components are investigated as a function of temperature by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. Thermal response of i.corA is found to differ considerably from that of the outer component, o.corA. Analysis of the radius of gyration reveals that the inner TM component undergoes a continuous transition from a globular conformation to a random coil structure on raising the temperature. In contrast, the outer transmembrane component exhibits an abrupt (nearly discontinuous) thermal response in a narrow range of temperature. Scaling of the structure factor shows a globular structure of i.corA at a low temperature with an effective dimension D ˜ 3 and a random coil at a high temperature with D ˜ 2. The residue distribution in o.corA is slightly sparser than that of i.corA in a narrow thermos-responsive regime. The difference in thermos-response characteristics of these components (i.corA and o.corA) may reflect their unique transmembrane functions.

  6. Correlated Inflammatory Responses and Neurodegeneration in Peptide-Injected Animal Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. McLarnon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which emphasize activation of microglia may have particular utility in correlating proinflammatory activity with neurodegeneration. This paper reviews injection of amyloid-β (Aβ into rat brain as an alternative AD animal model to the use of transgenic animals. In particular, intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 peptide demonstrates prominent microglial mobilization and activation accompanied by a significant loss of granule cell neurons. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory reactivity is demonstrated by a broad spectrum of drugs with a common endpoint in conferring neuroprotection in peptide-injected animals. Peptide-injection models provide a focus on glial cell responses to direct peptide injection in rat brain and offer advantages in the study of the mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in AD brain.

  7. Abacavir and the altered peptide repertoire model: clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallal S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Structural and biochemical studies showing that abacavir binds non-covalently to the floor of the peptide binding groove of HLA-B*5701 with exquisite specificity to alter the self-peptides that load on the molecule to be presented to the immune system have recently been published [1–4]. This precise mechanistic explanation of why abacavir binds to HLA-B*5701 and no other allele accounts for the 100% negative predictive value of HLA-B*5701 testing for hypersensitivity which underpins its utility as a screening test. The specificity of the interaction between abacavir, peptide and HLA-B*5701 provides strong evidence that abacavir will not cause any off-target, HLA restricted immune-mediated side effects in HLA-B*5701 negative individuals. The rapid and direct non-covalent binding of abacavir to HLA-B*5701 without the requirement for metabolism of the drug explain the clinical symptoms of hypersensitivity including dose-related escalation of symptoms and rapid offset of symptoms following drug cessation. Importantly, if abacavir were being developed today its propensity to bind HLA-B*5701, alter the peptide repertoire presented, and the functional consequences of this interaction between HLA-B*5701 and abacavir could be determined in vitro and before use in man. This provides an important pre-clinical screening strategy to identify compounds in development that bind HLA and alter peptide presentation which could then be structurally modified to abrogate this property to avert hypersensitivity while retaining on-target effects.

  8. Prediction of lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Willenbrock, Hanni; Von Heijne, G.

    2003-01-01

    A method to predict lipoprotein signal peptides in Gram-negative Eubacteria, LipoP, has been developed. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was able to distinguish between lipoproteins (SPaseII-cleaved proteins), SPaseI-cleaved proteins, cytoplasmic proteins, and transmembrane proteins. This predictor...... was able to predict 96.8% of the lipoproteins correctly with only 0.3% false positives in a set of SPaseI-cleaved, cytoplasmic, and transmembrane proteins. The results obtained were significantly better than those of previously developed methods. Even though Gram-positive lipoprotein signal peptides differ...... from Gram-negatives, the HMM was able to identify 92.9% of the lipoproteins included in a Gram-positive test set. A genome search was carried out for 12 Gram-negative genomes and one Gram-positive genome. The results for Escherichia coli K12 were compared with new experimental data, and the predictions...

  9. Physicochemical characterization of GBV-C E1 peptides as potential inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion peptide: interaction with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, Maria Jesús; Cruz, Antonio; Busquets, M Antònia; Haro, Isabel; Alsina, M Asunción; Pujol, Montserrat

    2012-10-15

    Four peptide sequences corresponding to the E1 protein of GBV-C: NCCAPEDIGFCLEGGCLV (P7), APEDIGFCLEGGCLVALG (P8), FCLEGGCLVALGCTICTD (P10) and QAGLAVRPGKSAAQLVGE (P18) were studied as they were capable of interfering with the HIV-1 fusion peptide (HIV-1 FP). In this work, the surface properties of the E1 peptide sequences are investigated and their physicochemical characterization is done by studying their interaction with model membranes; moreover, their mixtures with HIV-1 FP were also studied in order to observe whether they are capable to modify the HIV-1 FP interaction with model membranes as liposomes or monolayers. Physicochemical properties of peptides (pI and net charge) were predicted showing similarities between P7 and P8, and P10 and HIV-1 FP, whereas P18 appears to be very different from the rest. Circular dichroism experiments were carried out showing an increase of the percentage of α-helix of P7 and P8 when mixed with HIV-1 FP corroborating a conformational change that could be the cause of their inhibition ability. Penetration experiments show that all the peptides can spontaneously insert into phospholipid membranes. Analysis of compression isotherms indicates that the peptides interact with phospholipids and the E1 peptides modify the compression isotherms of HIV-1 FP, but there is one of the peptides that excelled as the best candidate for inhibiting the activity of HIV-1 FP, P7, and therefore, that could be potentially used in future anti-HIV-1 research.

  10. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the four P regions of Electrophorus electricus Na+ channel: interaction with and organization in model phospholipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouny, Y; Shai, Y

    1995-06-13

    The hydropathy plot of the alpha subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel reveals four homologous repeats, each of which is homologous to Shaker type K+ channel monomer and contains six putative transmembrane segments and a hydrophobic segment within the loop connecting transmembrane segments S5 and S6. Current models predict that the four homologous segments [designated H5 or P regions (PR)] from the S5-S6 loop of each repeat lie in the aqueous pore. Peptides corresponding to the P regions of the four domains of the Electrophorus electricus (eel) Na+ channel (25-36 aa long, designated as PR-I, PR-II, PR-III, and PR-IV) and a 23-mer preceding PR-II (designated pre-PR-II) were synthesized and fluorescently labeled. The segments were then structurally and functionally characterized for their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Although the sequences of the four P regions are significantly different, they all bind to zwitterionic phospholipid membranes with similar partition coefficients (approximately 10(4) M-1). The pre-PR-II does not bind membranes at all. Resonance energy transfer measurements, between donor/acceptor-labeled pairs of peptides, revealed that besides the PR-I/PR-III pair, all other pairs form heteroaggregates but do not coassemble with unrelated membrane-bound peptide. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed that PR-I, PR-II, and PR-III adopt similar partial alpha-helical structures (approximately 30%) in 40% trifluoroethanol and in solutions of 1% sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS). The PR-IV (36 aa) adopts approximately 18% alpha-helical structure, and pre-PR-II gives a low CD signal. These findings are in line with proposed models in which the P regions are packed in close proximity in the lumen of the hydrophobic core of the channel. Furthermore, the finding that the PRs adopt similar partial alpha-helical structures in two different hydrophobic environments might suggest that partial alpha-helical structures also exist in the native channel

  11. The antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 disrupts model membranes via the carpet mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, David I; Le Brun, Anton P; Whitwell, Thomas C; Sani, Marc-Antoine; James, Michael; Separovic, Frances

    2012-12-05

    The membrane interactions of the antimicrobial peptide aurein 1.2 were studied using a range of biophysical techniques to determine the location and the mechanism of action in DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) and DMPC/DMPG (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) model membranes that mimic characteristics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes, respectively. Neutron reflectometry and solid-state NMR revealed subtle changes in membrane structure caused by the peptide. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, vesicle dye leakage and atomic force microscopy measurements were used to investigate the global mode of peptide interaction. Aurein 1.2 displayed an enhanced interaction with the anionic DMPC/DMPG membrane while exhibiting primarily a surface interaction with both types of model membranes, which led to bilayer disruption and membrane lysis. The antimicrobial peptide interaction is consistent with the carpet mechanism for aurein 1.2 with discrete structural changes depending on the type of phospholipid membrane.

  12. Lipid-packing perturbation of model membranes by pH-responsive antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Dayane S; Viegas, Taisa Giordano; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2017-08-29

    The indiscriminate use of conventional antibiotics is leading to an increase in the number of resistant bacterial strains, motivating the search for new compounds to overcome this challenging problem. Antimicrobial peptides, acting only in the lipid phase of membranes without requiring specific membrane receptors as do conventional antibiotics, have shown great potential as possible substituents of these drugs. These peptides are in general rich in basic and hydrophobic residues forming an amphipathic structure when in contact with membranes. The outer leaflet of the prokaryotic cell membrane is rich in anionic lipids, while the surface of the eukaryotic cell is zwitterionic. Due to their positive net charge, many of these peptides are selective to the prokaryotic membrane. Notwithstanding this preference for anionic membranes, some of them can also act on neutral ones, hampering their therapeutic use. In addition to the electrostatic interaction driving peptide adsorption by the membrane, the ability of the peptide to perturb lipid packing is of paramount importance in their capacity to induce cell lysis, which is strongly dependent on electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. In the present research, we revised the adsorption of antimicrobial peptides by model membranes as well as the perturbation that they induce in lipid packing. In particular, we focused on some peptides that have simultaneously acidic and basic residues. The net charges of these peptides are modulated by pH changes and the lipid composition of model membranes. We discuss the experimental approaches used to explore these aspects of lipid membranes using lipid vesicles and lipid monolayer as model membranes.

  13. Cellular uptake of antisense oligonucleotides after complexing or conjugation with cell-penetrating model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, J; Birth, P; Klauschenz, E; Wiesner, B; Beyermann, M; Oksche, A; Bienert, M

    2002-08-01

    The uptake by mammalian cells of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides was compared with that of their respective complexes or conjugates with cationic, cell-penetrating model peptides of varying helix-forming propensity and amphipathicity. An HPLC-based protocol for the synthesis and purification of disulfide bridged conjugates in the 10-100 nmol range was developed. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with gel-capillary electrophoresis and laser induced fluorescence detection (GCE-LIF) revealed cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulationin all cases. The uptake differences between naked oligonucleotides and their respective peptide complexes or conjugates were generally confined to one order of magnitude. No significant influence of the structural properties of the peptide components upon cellular uptake was found. Our results question the common belief that the increased biological activity of oligonucleotides after derivatization with membrane permeable peptides may be primarily due to improved membrane translocation.

  14. Sol-gel transition of charged fibrils composed of a model amphiphilic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarz, Marta; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Arosio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the sol-gel transition of positively charged fibrils composed of the model amphiphilic peptide RADARADARADARADA (RADA 16-I) using a combination of microscopy, light scattering, microrheology and rheology techniques, and we investigated the dependence of the hydrogel formation on fibril concentration and ionic strength. The peptide is initially present as a dispersion of short rigid fibrils with average length of about 100 nm. During incubation, the fibrils aggregate irreversibly into longer fibrils and fibrillar aggregates. At peptide concentrations in the range 3-6.5 g/L, the fibrillar aggregates form a weak gel network which can be destroyed upon dilution. Percolation occurs without the formation of a nematic phase at a critical peptide concentration which decreases with increasing ionic strength. The gel structure can be well described in the frame of the fractal gel theory considering the network as a collection of fibrillar aggregates characterized by self-similar structure with a fractal dimension of 1.34.

  15. Correlation of in vitro and in vivo models for the oral absorption of peptide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föger, F; Kopf, A; Loretz, B; Albrecht, K; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two in vitro models, Caco-2 monolayer and rat intestinal mucosa, regarding their linear correlation with in vivo bioavailability data of therapeutic peptide drugs after oral administration in rat and human. Furthermore the impact of molecular mass (Mm) of the according peptides on their permeability was evaluated. Transport experiments with commercially available water soluble peptide drugs were conducted using Caco-2 cell monolayer grown on transwell filter membranes and with freshly excised rat intestinal mucosa mounted in Using type chambers. Apparent permeability coefficients (P (app)) were calculated and compared with in vivo data derived from the literature. It was shown that, besides a few exceptions, the Mm of peptides linearly correlates with permeability across rat intestinal mucosa (R (2) = 0.86; y = -196.22x + 1354.24), with rat oral bioavailability (R (2) = 0.64; y = -401.90x + 1268.86) as well as with human oral bioavailability (R (2) = 0.91; y = -359.43x + 1103.83). Furthermore it was shown that P (app) values of investigated hydrophilic peptides across Caco-2 monolayer displayed lower permeability than across rat intestinal mucosa. A correlation between P (app) values across rat intestinal mucosa and in vivo oral bioavailability in human (R (2) = 0.98; y = 2.11x + 0.34) attests the rat in vitro model to be a very useful prediction model for human oral bioavailability of hydrophilic peptide drugs. Presented correlations encourage the use of the rat in vitro model for the prediction of human oral bioavailabilities of hydrophilic peptide drugs.

  16. The viral transmembrane superfamily: possible divergence of Arenavirus and Filovirus glycoproteins from a common RNA virus ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchmeier Michael J

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of viral entry proteins from influenza, measles, human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1, and Ebola virus have shown, first with molecular modeling, and then X-ray crystallographic or other biophysical studies, that these disparate viruses share a coiled-coil type of entry protein. Results Structural models of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GP-2 of the Arenaviruses, lymphochoriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Lassa fever virus, are presented, based on consistent structural propensities despite variation in the amino acid sequence. The principal features of the model, a hydrophobic amino terminus, and two antiparallel helices separated by a glycosylated, antigenic apex, are common to a number of otherwise disparate families of enveloped RNA viruses. Within the first amphipathic helix, demonstrable by circular dichroism of a peptide fragment, there is a highly conserved heptad repeat pattern proposed to mediate multimerization by coiled-coil interactions. The amino terminal 18 amino acids are 28% identical and 50% highly similar to the corresponding region of Ebola, a member of the Filovirus family. Within the second, charged helix just prior to membrane insertion there is also high similarity over the central 18 amino acids in corresponding regions of Lassa and Ebola, which may be further related to the similar region of HIV-1 defining a potent antiviral peptide analogue. Conclusions These findings indicate a common pattern of structure and function among viral transmembrane fusion proteins from a number of virus families. Such a pattern may define a viral transmembrane superfamily that evolved from a common precursor eons ago.

  17. Model of the complex of Parathyroid hormone-2 receptor and Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aim to propose interactions between the parathyroid hormone-2 receptor (PTH2R and its ligand the tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39 by constructing a homology model of their complex. The two related peptides parathyroid hormone (PTH and parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP are compared with the complex to examine their interactions. Findings In the model, the hydrophobic N-terminus of TIP39 is buried in a hydrophobic part of the central cavity between helices 3 and 7. Comparison of the peptide sequences indicates that the main discriminator between the agonistic peptides TIP39 and PTH and the inactive PTHrP is a tryptophan-phenylalanine replacement. The model indicates that the smaller phenylalanine in PTHrP does not completely occupy the binding site of the larger tryptophan residue in the other peptides. As only TIP39 causes internalisation of the receptor and the primary difference being an aspartic acid in position 7 of TIP39 that interacts with histidine 396 in the receptor, versus isoleucine/histidine residues in the related hormones, this might be a trigger interaction for the events that cause internalisation. Conclusions A model is constructed for the complex and a trigger interaction for full agonistic activation between aspartic acid 7 of TIP39 and histidine 396 in the receptor is proposed.

  18. Organization and Dynamics of Fas Transmembrane Domain in Raft Membranes and Modulation by Ceramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Bruno M.; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To comprehend the molecular processes that lead to the Fas death receptor clustering in lipid rafts, a 21-mer peptide corresponding to its single transmembrane domain (TMD) was reconstituted into mammalian raft model membranes composed of an unsaturated glycerophospholipid, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. The peptide membrane lateral organization and dynamics, and its influence on membrane properties, were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques and by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that Fas TMD is preferentially localized in liquid-disordered membrane regions and undergoes a strong reorganization as the membrane composition is changed toward the liquid-ordered phase. This results from the strong hydrophobic mismatch between the length of the peptide hydrophobic stretch and the hydrophobic thickness of liquid-ordered membranes. The stability of nonclustered Fas TMD in liquid-disordered domains suggests that its sequence may have a protective function against nonligand-induced Fas clustering in lipid rafts. It has been reported that ceramide induces Fas oligomerization in lipid rafts. Here, it is shown that neither Fas TMD membrane organization nor its conformation is affected by ceramide. These results are discussed within the framework of Fas membrane signaling events. PMID:21961589

  19. Interaction of 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandrasekaran Sivakamasundari; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2009-06-01

    We investigated the interaction of six 18-residue peptides derived from amphipathic helical segments of globular proteins with model membranes. The net charge of the peptides at neutral pH varies from –1 to +6. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that peptides with a high net positive charge tend to fold into a helical conformation in the presence of negatively charged lipid vesicles. In helical conformation, their average hydrophobic moment and hydrophobicity would render them surface-active. The composition of amino acids on the polar face of the helix in the peptides is considerably different. The peptides show variations in their ability to permeabilise zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles. Whereas increased net positive charge favours greater permeabilisation, the distribution of charged residues in the polar face also plays a role in determining membrane activity. The distribution of amino acids in the polar face of the helix in the peptides that were investigated do not fall into the canonical classes described. Amphipathic helices, which are part of proteins, with a pattern of amino acid distribution different from those observed in class L, A and others, could help in providing newer insights into peptide–membrane interactions.

  20. Lipid tail protrusion in simulations predicts fusogenic activity of influenza fusion peptide mutants and conformational models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Larsson

    Full Text Available Fusion peptides from influenza hemagglutinin act on membranes to promote membrane fusion, but the mechanism by which they do so remains unknown. Recent theoretical work has suggested that contact of protruding lipid tails may be an important feature of the transition state for membrane fusion. If this is so, then influenza fusion peptides would be expected to promote tail protrusion in proportion to the ability of the corresponding full-length hemagglutinin to drive lipid mixing in fusion assays. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of influenza fusion peptides in lipid bilayers, comparing the X-31 influenza strain against a series of N-terminal mutants. As hypothesized, the probability of lipid tail protrusion correlates well with the lipid mixing rate induced by each mutant. This supports the conclusion that tail protrusion is important to the transition state for fusion. Furthermore, it suggests that tail protrusion can be used to examine how fusion peptides might interact with membranes to promote fusion. Previous models for native influenza fusion peptide structure in membranes include a kinked helix, a straight helix, and a helical hairpin. Our simulations visit each of these conformations. Thus, the free energy differences between each are likely low enough that specifics of the membrane environment and peptide construct may be sufficient to modulate the equilibrium between them. However, the kinked helix promotes lipid tail protrusion in our simulations much more strongly than the other two structures. We therefore predict that the kinked helix is the most fusogenic of these three conformations.

  1. Contribution of Electrostatics in the Fibril Stability of a Model Ionic-Complementary Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarz, Marta; Casalini, Tommaso; Motta, Anna C; Morbidelli, Massimo; Arosio, Paolo

    2015-12-14

    In this work we quantified the role of electrostatic interactions in the self-assembly of a model amphiphilic peptide (RADA 16-I) into fibrillar structures by a combination of size exclusion chromatography and molecular simulations. For the peptide under investigation, it is found that a net charge of +0.75 represents the ideal condition to promote the formation of regular amyloid fibrils. Lower net charges favor the formation of amorphous precipitates, while larger net charges destabilize the fibrillar aggregates and promote a reversible dissociation of monomers from the ends of the fibrils. By quantifying the dependence of the equilibrium constant of this reversible reaction on the pH value and the peptide net charge, we show that electrostatic interactions contribute largely to the free energy of fibril formation. The addition of both salt and a charged destabilizer (guanidinium hydrochloride) at moderate concentration (0.3-1 M) shifts the monomer-fibril equilibrium toward the fibrillar state. Whereas the first effect can be explained by charge screening of electrostatic repulsion only, the promotion of fibril formation in the presence of guanidinium hydrochloride is also attributed to modifications of the peptide conformation. The results of this work indicate that the global peptide net charge is a key property that correlates well with the fibril stability, although the peptide conformation and the surface charge distribution also contribute to the aggregation propensity.

  2. Peptide environment specifies conformation. Helicity of hydrophobic segments compared in aqueous, organic, and membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S C; Deber, C M

    1993-11-05

    Transmembrane segments in integral membrane proteins exist characteristically as helices in lipid bilayers, yet are often rich in residues considered helix-destabilizing (Val, Ile, Gly) in soluble proteins. We propose that helicity of a transmembrane segment is likely to be affected by factors other than the "intrinsic" helical propensities of its component amino acids. This hypothesis is tested by comparing the conformation(s) in aqueous, organic, membrane-mimetic (micellar), and membrane (bilayer) environments of designed model peptides with systematically altered helical propensity and/or segmental hydrophobicity. Peptides of prototypic sequence NH2-(Ser-Lys)2-Ala5-Leu6-Ala7-Ala8-Leu9-Ala10-++ +Trp11-Ala12-Leu13-Ala14- (Lys-Ser)3-OH were synthesized, which incorporate a hydrophobic core "guest" segment (residues 5-14) into a water-soluble hydrophilic host matrix. Related peptides featured substitution of Leu6,9,13-->Gly, Leu6,9,13-->Ala, and Ala7,10,14-->Gly. Circular dichroism spectra revealed that algorithms for soluble proteins correctly predicted peptide helical proclivities in aqueous solutions, but peptide helicity in organic (trifluoroethanol) solvents, membrane-mimetic SDS micelles, and negatively charged lipid bilayer vesicles, was found to be governed almost exclusively by the segmental hydrophobicity of the peptide mid-hydrophobic core segment. In related Trp fluorescence studies, peptide-membrane association was similarly correlated with extent of hydrophobic interaction.

  3. Role of transmembrane pH gradient and membrane binding in nisin pore formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, G N; Clark, J; Chan, W C; Bycroft, B W; Roberts, G C; Konings, W N; Driessen, A J

    1997-01-01

    Nisin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that belongs to the group of lantibiotics. It is thought to form oligomeric pores in the target membrane by a mechanism that requires the transmembrane electrical potential delta psi and that involves local pertubation of the lipid bilayer structure. Here we show that nisin does not form exclusively voltage-dependent pores: even in the absence of a delta psi, nisin is able to dissipate the transmembrane pH gradient (delta pH) in sensitive Lactococcus lactis cells and proteoliposomes. The rate of dissipation increases with the magnitude of the delta pH. Nisin forms pores only when the delta pH is inside alkaline. The efficiency of delta psi-induced pore formation is strongly affected by the external pH, whereas delta pH-induced pore formation is rather insensitive to the external pH. Nisin(1-12), an amino-terminal fragment of nisin, and (des-deltaAla5)-(nisin(1-32) amide have a strongly reduced capacity to dissipate the delta psi and delta pH in cytochrome c oxidase proteoliposomes and L. lactis cells. Both variants bind with reduced efficiency to liposomes containing negatively charged phospholipids, suggesting that both ring A and rings C to E play a role in membrane binding. Nisin(1-12) competes with nisin for membrane binding and antagonizes pore formation. These findings are consistent with the wedge model of nisin-induced pore formation.

  4. A minimal model of peptide binding predicts ensemble properties of serum antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiff Victor

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The importance of peptide microarrays as a tool for serological diagnostics has strongly increased over the last decade. However, interpretation of the binding signals is still hampered by our limited understanding of the technology. This is in particular true for arrays probed with antibody mixtures of unknown complexity, such as sera. To gain insight into how signals depend on peptide amino acid sequences, we probed random-sequence peptide microarrays with sera of healthy and infected mice. We analyzed the resulting antibody binding profiles with regression methods and formulated a minimal model to explain our findings. Results Multivariate regression analysis relating peptide sequence to measured signals led to the definition of amino acid-associated weights. Although these weights do not contain information on amino acid position, they predict up to 40-50% of the binding profiles' variation. Mathematical modeling shows that this position-independent ansatz is only adequate for highly diverse random antibody mixtures which are not dominated by a few antibodies. Experimental results suggest that sera from healthy individuals correspond to that case, in contrast to sera of infected ones. Conclusions Our results indicate that position-independent amino acid-associated weights predict linear epitope binding of antibody mixtures only if the mixture is random, highly diverse, and contains no dominant antibodies. The discovered ensemble property is an important step towards an understanding of peptide-array serum-antibody binding profiles. It has implications for both serological diagnostics and B cell epitope mapping.

  5. Representing environment-induced helix-coil transitions in a coarse grained peptide model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Globisch, Christoph; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Coarse grained (CG) models are widely used in studying peptide self-assembly and nanostructure formation. One of the recurrent challenges in CG modeling is the problem of limited transferability, for example to different thermodynamic state points and system compositions. Understanding transferability is generally a prerequisite to knowing for which problems a model can be reliably used and predictive. For peptides, one crucial transferability question is whether a model reproduces the molecule's conformational response to a change in its molecular environment. This is of particular importance since CG peptide models often have to resort to auxiliary interactions that aid secondary structure formation. Such interactions take care of properties of the real system that are per se lost in the coarse graining process such as dihedral-angle correlations along the backbone or backbone hydrogen bonding. These auxiliary interactions may then easily overstabilize certain conformational propensities and therefore destroy the ability of the model to respond to stimuli and environment changes, i.e. they impede transferability. In the present paper we have investigated a short peptide with amphiphilic EALA repeats which undergoes conformational transitions between a disordered and a helical state upon a change in pH value or due to the presence of a soft apolar/polar interface. We designed a base CG peptide model that does not carry a specific (backbone) bias towards a secondary structure. This base model was combined with two typical approaches of ensuring secondary structure formation, namely a C α -C α -C α -C α pseudodihedral angle potential or a virtual site interaction that mimics hydrogen bonding. We have investigated the ability of the two resulting CG models to represent the environment-induced conformational changes in the helix-coil equilibrium of EALA. We show that with both approaches a CG peptide model can be obtained that is environment-transferable and that

  6. Role of transmembrane pH gradient and membrane binding in nisin pore formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Clark, Jonathan; Chan, Weng C.; Bycroft, Barrie W.; Roberts, Gordon C.K.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Nisin is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that belongs to the group of lantibiotics. It is thought to form oligomeric pores in the target membrane by a mechanism that requires the transmembrane electrical potential (Delta psi) and that involves local pertubation of the lipid bilayer structure. Here

  7. Antigenicity of the HCV HVR1 Peptide Analyzed by Computer Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑宇; 苏琴; 林芳; 赵军; 何卫平; 李伯安; 李静; 高蓉; 程云

    2003-01-01

    To find out the protective polypeptide epitopes of HCV HVR1, the antigenieity of the synthetic pepfide was predicted by computer modeling and verified by ELISA and lymphocyte transformation test. It was found that the outcome of the computer modeling was in accord with the experimental results. The method by using computer modeling would be a economic approach by which the protective peptides could be identified quickly.

  8. Far/Mid-Infrared Signatures of Solvent–Solute Interactions in a Microhydrated Model Peptide Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirtog, M.; Rijs, A. M.; Loquais, Y.; Brenner, V.; Tardivel, B.; Gloaguen, E.; Mons, M.

    2012-01-01

    Far/mid-IR signatures of the first hydration step of a flexible biomolecule, the model peptide chain Ac-Phe-NH2, have been investigated in the gas phase using the selective IR/UV double-resonance laser technique. The broad spectral region investigated with the free-electron laser FELIX (150–800

  9. Prophylactic uses of integrin CD18-βA peptide in a murine polymicrobial peritonitis model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong-Fai; Wong; Jana; Wo; David; Ho; Ronnie; T; Poon; José; M; Casasnovas; John; M; Luk

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the prophylactic properties of integrin CD18-βA peptide in a murine model of abdominal polymicrobial peritonitis and sepsis.METHODS:Bacterial sepsis was induced in Institute of Cancer Research(ICR) mice by cecal ligation and puncture(CLP) surgery.Inflicted mice were then injected with either sterile saline or CD18-βA peptide intraperitoneally at 2 h after surgery,and were sacrificed at 12 and 24 h after surgery.Blood samples were immediately collected,and analyzed for endotoxin activity and ...

  10. Conformational study of melectin and antapin antimicrobial peptides in model membrane environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocourková, Lucie; Novotná, Pavlína; Čujová, Sabína; Čeřovský, Václav; Urbanová, Marie; Setnička, Vladimír

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have long been considered as promising compounds against drug-resistant pathogens. In this work, we studied the secondary structure of antimicrobial peptides melectin and antapin using electronic (ECD) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies that are sensitive to peptide secondary structures. The results from quantitative ECD spectral evaluation by Dichroweb and CDNN program and from the qualitative evaluation of the VCD spectra were compared. The antimicrobial activity of the selected peptides depends on their ability to adopt an amphipathic α-helical conformation on the surface of the bacterial membrane. Hence, solutions of different zwitterionic and negatively charged liposomes and micelles were used to mimic the eukaryotic and bacterial biological membranes. The results show a significant content of α-helical conformation in the solutions of negatively charged liposomes mimicking the bacterial membrane, thus correlating with the antimicrobial activity of the studied peptides. On the other hand in the solutions of zwitterionic liposomes used as models of the eukaryotic membranes, the fraction of α-helical conformation was lower, which corresponds with their moderate hemolytic activity.

  11. Effective adjunctive therapy by an innate defense regulatory peptide in a preclinical model of severe malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtman, Ariel H; Pilat, Sandra; Law, Charity W; Lynn, David J; Janot, Laure; Mayer, Matt L; Ma, Shuhua; Kindrachuk, Jason; Finlay, B Brett; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Smyth, Gordon K; Hancock, Robert E W; Schofield, Louis

    2012-05-23

    Case fatality rates for severe malaria remain high even in the best clinical settings because antimalarial drugs act against the parasite without alleviating life-threatening inflammation. We assessed the potential for host-directed therapy of severe malaria of a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs, the innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides, based on host defense peptides. The Plasmodium berghei ANKA model of experimental cerebral malaria was adapted to use as a preclinical screen by combining late-stage intervention in established infections with advanced bioinformatic analysis of early transcriptional changes in co-regulated gene sets. Coadministration of IDR-1018 with standard first-line antimalarials increased survival of infected mice while down-regulating key inflammatory networks associated with fatality. Thus, IDR peptides provided host-directed adjunctive therapy for severe disease in combination with antimalarial treatment.

  12. The potential of chitosan in enhancing peptide and protein absorption across the TR146 cell culture model-an in vitro model of the buccal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portero, Ana; Remuñán-López, Carmen; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the potential of chitosan (CS) to enhance buccal peptide and protein absorption, the TR146 cell culture model, a model of the buccal epithelium, was used.......To investigate the potential of chitosan (CS) to enhance buccal peptide and protein absorption, the TR146 cell culture model, a model of the buccal epithelium, was used....

  13. Discovery of peptide ligands through docking and virtual screening at nicotinic acetylcholine receptor homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Abba E; Kuryatov, Alexander; Zebroski, Henry A; Powell, Susan R; Filipenko, Petr; Hussein, Adel K; Gorson, Juliette; Heizmann, Anna; Lyskov, Sergey; Tsien, Richard W; Poget, Sébastien F; Nicke, Annette; Lindstrom, Jon; Rudy, Bernardo; Bonneau, Richard; Holford, Mandë

    2017-09-19

    Venom peptide toxins such as conotoxins play a critical role in the characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) structure and function and have potential as nervous system therapeutics as well. However, the lack of solved structures of conotoxins bound to nAChRs and the large size of these peptides are barriers to their computational docking and design. We addressed these challenges in the context of the α4β2 nAChR, a widespread ligand-gated ion channel in the brain and a target for nicotine addiction therapy, and the 19-residue conotoxin α-GID that antagonizes it. We developed a docking algorithm, ToxDock, which used ensemble-docking and extensive conformational sampling to dock α-GID and its analogs to an α4β2 nAChR homology model. Experimental testing demonstrated that a virtual screen with ToxDock correctly identified three bioactive α-GID mutants (α-GID[A10V], α-GID[V13I], and α-GID[V13Y]) and one inactive variant (α-GID[A10Q]). Two mutants, α-GID[A10V] and α-GID[V13Y], had substantially reduced potency at the human α7 nAChR relative to α-GID, a desirable feature for α-GID analogs. The general usefulness of the docking algorithm was highlighted by redocking of peptide toxins to two ion channels and a binding protein in which the peptide toxins successfully reverted back to near-native crystallographic poses after being perturbed. Our results demonstrate that ToxDock can overcome two fundamental challenges of docking large toxin peptides to ion channel homology models, as exemplified by the α-GID:α4β2 nAChR complex, and is extendable to other toxin peptides and ion channels. ToxDock is freely available at rosie.rosettacommons.org/tox_dock.

  14. Theoretical modeling of peptide α-helical circular dichroism in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminský, Jakub; Kubelka, Jan; Bour, Petr

    2011-03-10

    Reliable modeling of protein and peptide circular dichroism (CD) spectra in the far UV presents a challenge for current theoretical approaches. In this study, the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), configuration interaction with single excitation (CIS), and transition dipole coupling (TDC) were used to assess the most important factors contributing to the CD spectra of the α-helical secondary structure. The dependence on the peptide chain length and also the role of the flexibility and solvent environment were investigated with a model oligopeptide Ac-(Ala)(N)-NH-Me, (N = 1, ..., 18). Both the TDDFT and TDC-like methods suggest that the CD curve typical for the α-helix arises gradually, but its basic characteristic is discernible already for peptides with 4-5 amino acid residues. The calculated dependence was in a qualitative agreement with experimental spectra of short α-helices stabilized by the histidine-metal binding. The TDDFT computations of the CD were found to be unusually sensitive to the basis set and solvent model. Explicit hydration and temperature fluctuations of the peptide geometry, simulated with the aid of molecular dynamics (MD), significantly influenced the CD and absorption spectral shapes. An extensive averaging over MD configurations is thus required to obtain a converged spectral profile in cluster simulations. On the other hand, both the TDDFT and TDC models indicate only a minor influence of the alanine side chains. The CIS and TDC calculations also point toward a relatively small effect of the helix-helix interaction on the CD spectral profiles. For a model system of two helices, the CIS method predicted larger changes in the spectra than TDC. This suggests other than interactions between peptide chains, such as mutual polarization, can have a minor, but measurable, effect on the CD spectrum.

  15. Peptomics, identification of novel cationic Arabidopsis peptides with conserved sequence motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Mundy, John; Skriver, Karen

    2002-01-01

    Few plant peptides involved in intercellular communication have been experimentally isolated. Sequence analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome has revealed numerous transmembrane receptors predicted to bind proteinacious ligands, emphasizing the importance of identifying peptides with signali...

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK model for biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Popov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The objectives of this work was to assess the benefits of the application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK models in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours (NET who were treatedwith Lu-177 DOTATATE. The model utilises clinical data on biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs obtained by whole body scintigraphy (WBS of the patients.Methods: The blood flow restricted (perfusion rate limited type of the PBPK model for biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs in individual human organs is based on the multi-compartment approach, which takes into account the main physiological processes in the organism: absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME. The approachcalibrates the PBPK model for each patient in order to increase the accuracy of the dose estimation. Datasets obtained using WBS in four patients have been used to obtain the unknown model parameters. The scintigraphic data were acquired using a double head gamma camera in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours who were treated with Lu-177 DOTATATE. The activity administered to each patient was 7400MBq.Results: Satisfactory agreement of the model predictions with the data obtained from the WBS for each patient has been achieved. Conclusion: The study indicates that the PBPK model can be used for more accurate calculation of biodistribution and absorbed doses in patients. This approach is the first attempt of utilizing scintigraphic data in PBPK models, which was obtained during Lu-177 peptide therapy of patients with NET.

  17. Influence of Hofmeister Ions on the Structure of Proline-Based Peptide Models: A Combined Experimental and Molecular Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröhl, Andreas; Albrecht, Benjamin; Zhang, Yong; Maginn, Edward; Giernoth, Ralf

    2017-02-23

    The influence of three sodium salts, covering a wide range of the Hofmeister series, on the conformation of three proline-based peptide models in aqueous solution is examined using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The anions preferentially interact with the cis conformers of the peptide models, which is rationalized by the respective electrostatic potential surfaces. These preferred interactions have a strong impact on the thermodynamics of the cis/trans equilibria, leading to a higher population of the cis conformers. In distinct cases, these equilibria are nearly independent of temperature, showing that the salts are also able to stabilize the conformers over wide temperature ranges.

  18. Multipole correction of atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution. I. Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokalski, W. A.; Keller, D. A.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    The defects in atomic monopole models of molecular charge distribution have been analyzed for several model-blocked peptides and compared with accurate quantum chemical values. The results indicate that the angular characteristics of the molecular electrostatic potential around functional groups capable of forming hydrogen bonds can be considerably distorted within various models relying upon isotropic atomic charges only. It is shown that these defects can be corrected by augmenting the atomic point charge models by cumulative atomic multipole moments (CAMMs). Alternatively, sets of off-center atomic point charges could be automatically derived from respective multipoles, providing approximately equivalent corrections. For the first time, correlated atomic multipoles have been calculated for N-acetyl, N'-methylamide-blocked derivatives of glycine, alanine, cysteine, threonine, leucine, lysine, and serine using the MP2 method. The role of the correlation effects in the peptide molecular charge distribution are discussed.

  19. Utilization of the Monte Carlo method to build up QSAR models for hemolysis and cytotoxicity of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A; Beeg, Marten; Gobbi, Marco; Salmona, Mario

    2017-05-24

    Traditional quantitative structure - property / activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) are based on representation of molecular structure by molecular graph or simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES). It is attractive idea to develop predictive models for large molecules in general and for peptides in particular. However, the representation of these molecules by molecular graph or SMILES is problematic owing to large size of these molecules. A possible alternative of SMILES is representation of peptides via sequence of abbreviations of amino acids. Models for hemolysis and cytotoxicity of peptides are suggested. These models are based on representation of the peptides by sequences of amino acids. Correlation weights, which are calculated for each amino acid using the Monte Carlo method are basis for quantitative sequence - activity relationships (QSAR) for antimicrobial peptides. The correlation weights are basis for optimal descriptors, which are correlated with experimental data for hemolysis and cytotoxicity. The basic hypothesis is that if optimal descriptors correlated with endpoints of peptides for the training set, also they should correlate with the endpoints for validation set. Checking up of correlations between the above-mentioned descriptors and antimicrobial activity of peptides (cytotoxicity or hemolysis) has shown that these models have good predictive potential. Suggested approach can be used as a tool to develop predictive models of biological activity of peptides as a mathematical function of sequences of amino acids. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/41n

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Vaquer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2 trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology

  1. Entropic control of the relative stability of triple-helical collagen peptide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Ernesto; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2008-11-27

    Herein, we show that current methodologies in atomistic simulations can yield reliable standard free energy values in aqueous solution for the transition from the dissociated monomeric form to the triple-helix state of collagen model peptides. The calculations are performed on a prototypical highly stable triple-helical peptide, [(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10]3 (POG10), and on the so-called T3-785 triple-helix mimicking a fragment from the type III human collagen, which is more thermally labile. On the basis of extensive MD simulations in explicit solvent followed by molecular-mechanical and electrostatic Poisson-Boltzmann calculations complemented with an accurate estimation of the nonpolar contributions to solvation, the computed free energy change for the aggregation processes of the POG10 and T3-785 peptides leading to their triple-helices is -6.6 and -6.1 kcal/mol, respectively. For POG10, this value is in agreement with differential scanning calorimetric data. However, it is shown that conformational entropy, which is estimated by means of an expansion of mutual information functions, preferentially destabilizes the triple-helical state of T3-785 by around 4.6 kcal/mol, thus explaining its lower thermal stability. Altogether, our computational results allow us to ascertain, for the first time, the actual thermodynamic forces controlling the absolute and relative stability of collagen model peptides.

  2. Study of Two Bioactive Peptides in Vacuum and Solvent by Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaşar, F.; Demir, K.

    The thermodynamic and structural properties of Tyrosine-Glycine-Leusine-Phenylalanine (YGLF, in a one letter code) and Lysine-Valine-Leusine-Proline-Valine-Proline-Glutamine (KVLPVPQ) peptide sequences were studied by three-dimensional molecular modeling in vacuum and solution. All the three-dimensional conformations of each peptide sequences were obtained by multicanonical simulations with using ECEPP/2 force field and each simulation started from completely random initial conformation. Solvation contributions are included by a term that is proportional to solvent-accessible surface areas of peptides. In the present study, we calculated the average values of total energy, specific heat, fourth-order cumulant and end-to-end distance for two peptide sequences of milk protein as a function of temperature. With using major advantage of this simulation technique, Ramachandran plots were prepared and analysed to predict the relative occurrence probabilities of β-turn, γ-turn and helical structures. Although structural predictions of these sequences indicate both the presence of high level of γ-turns and low level of β-turns in vacuum and solvent, it was observed that these probabilities in vacuum were higher than the ones in solvent model.

  3. Alanine scan of an immunosuppressive peptide (CP): analysis of structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguine, Laura; Ali, Marina; Bender, Veronika; Diefenbach, Eve; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Hibbs, David; Manolios, Nicholas

    2013-02-01

    Core peptide is a hydrophobic peptide, the sequence of which is derived from the T-cell antigen receptor alpha-chain transmembrane region. Previous studies have shown that core peptide can inhibit T-cell-mediated immune responses both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report the role each constituent amino acid plays within core peptide using an alanine scan and the amino acid effect on function using a biological antigen presentation assay. The biophysical behaviour of these analogues in model membranes was analysed using surface plasmon resonance studies and then binding correlated with T-cell function. Removal of any single hydrophobic amino acid between the two charged amino acids in core peptide (R, K) resulted in lower binding. Changing the overall net charge of core peptide, by removing either of the positively charged residues (R or K), had varying effects on peptide binding and IL-2 production. There was a direct correlation (ρ = 0.718) between peptide binding to model membranes and peptide ability to inhibit IL-2. Except for IL-2 inhibition, production of other T-cell cytokines such as GM-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and T-cell antigen receptor alpha-chain was not detected using a fluorescent bead immunoassay. This study provides important structure-function relationships essential for further drug design. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. TMV recombinants encoding fused foreign transmembrane domains to the CP subunit caused local necrotic response on susceptible tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoli; Li, Mangmang; Jiang, Lubin; Zhang, Qingqi; Song, Rentao; Xu, Zhengkai

    2006-05-10

    With regard to the effects of various foreign peptides fused to the coat protein subunits on the infectivity of corresponding TMV recombinants, some of TMV recombinants were found to induce necrotic local lesions on the inoculated leaves of susceptible tobacco. This paper reported that there existed a group of TMV recombinants in which the fused foreign peptides contained a transmembrane domain according to the predictions by three programs of SOSUI, TMpred and DAS. Further studies showed for the first time that a foreign transmembrane domain in a fused peptide of the corresponding TMV recombinant would result in the local lesions on the susceptible tobacco leaves. In addition, it was concluded that none of the TMV recombinants that systematically infected susceptible tobacco contained a transmembrane domain in the coat protein subunits.

  5. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  6. QSAR modeling of the antimicrobial activity of peptides as a mathematical function of a sequence of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Mariya A; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Stojanović, Dušica B; Toropov, Andrey A

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have emerged as new therapeutic agents for fighting multi-drug-resistant bacteria. However, the process of optimizing peptide antimicrobial activity and specificity using large peptide libraries is both tedious and expensive. Therefore, computational techniques had to be applied for process optimization. In this work, the representation of the molecular structure of peptides (mastoparan analogs) by a sequence of amino acids has been used to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for their antibacterial activity. The data for the studied peptides were split three times into the training, calibration and test sets. The Monte Carlo method was used as a computational technique for QSAR models calculation. The statistical quality of QSAR for the antibacterial activity of peptides for the external validation set was: n=7, r(2)=0.8067, s=0.248 (split 1); n=6, r(2)=0.8319, s=0.169 (split 2); and n=6, r(2)=0.6996, s=0.297 (split 3). The stated statistical parameters favor the presented QSAR models in comparison to 2D and 3D descriptor based ones. The Monte Carlo method gave a reasonably good prediction for the antibacterial activity of peptides. The statistical quality of the prediction is different for three random splits. However, the predictive potential is reasonably well for all cases. The presented QSAR modeling approach can be an attractive alternative of 3D QSAR at least for the described peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterisation of neuroprotective efficacy of modified poly-arginine-9 (R9) peptides using a neuronal glutamic acid excitotoxicity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; Knuckey, Neville W; Meloni, Bruno P

    2017-02-01

    In a recent study, we highlighted the importance of cationic charge and arginine residues for the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine and arginine-rich peptides. In this study, using cortical neuronal cultures and an in vitro glutamic acid excitotoxicity model, we examined the neuroprotective efficacy of different modifications to the poly-arginine-9 peptide (R9). We compared an unmodified R9 peptide with R9 peptides containing the following modifications: (i) C-terminal amidation (R9-NH2); (ii) N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9); (iii) C-terminal amidation with N-terminal acetylation (Ac-R9-NH2); and (iv) C-terminal amidation with D-amino acids (R9D-NH2). The three C-terminal amidated peptides (R9-NH2, Ac-R9-NH2, and R9D-NH2) displayed neuroprotective effects greater than the unmodified R9 peptide, while the N-terminal acetylated peptide (Ac-R9) had reduced efficacy. Using the R9-NH2 peptide, neuroprotection could be induced with a 10 min peptide pre-treatment, 1-6 h before glutamic acid insult, or when added to neuronal cultures up to 45 min post-insult. In addition, all peptides were capable of reducing glutamic acid-mediated neuronal intracellular calcium influx, in a manner that reflected their neuroprotective efficacy. This study further highlights the neuroprotective properties of poly-arginine peptides and provides insight into peptide modifications that affect efficacy.

  8. Simulation and Numerical Modeling of the Self-assembly of an Optoelectronic Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Rachael; Ferguson, Andrew

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of the self-assembly of synthetic π-conjugated oligopeptides into optoelectronic nanostructures. The electronic properties provide the basis for an array of organic electronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and solar cells. Control of the structure, stability, and kinetics of self-assembled organic electronics by tuning monomer chemistry and environmental conditions presents a powerful route to the fabrication of biocompatible ``designer materials.'' We have performed coarse-grained simulations of the self-assembly of several hundred peptides over microsecond time scales to probe the morphology and kinetics of aggregation with molecular-level detail. We have subsequently used this simulation data to parameterize a kinetic aggregation model based on Smoluchowski coagulation theory to enable prediction of aggregation dynamics on millisecond time scales. These numerical models are now being integrated into a multi-physics model of peptide aggregation in a microfluidic flow cell developed by our experimental collaborators to model the self-assembly of diverse peptide architectures under tailored flow-fields for the fabrication of biocompatible assemblies with defined morphology and optoelectronic function.

  9. Basic amphipathic model peptides: Structural investigations in solution, studied by circular dichroism, fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangavel, C.; Sy, D.; Reynaud, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    A twenty amino acid residue long amphipathic peptide made of ten leucine and ten lysine residues and four derivatives, in which a tryptophan, as a fluorescent probe, is substituted for a leucine, are studied. The peptides in water are mainly in an unordered conformation (~90%), and undergo a two state reversible transition upon heating, leading to a partially helical conformation (cold denaturation). Time resolved fluorescence results show that fluorescence decay for the four Trp containing peptides is best described by triple fluorescence decay kinetics. In TFE/water mixture, peptides adopt a single α-helix conformation but the Leu-Trp9 substitution leads to an effective helix destabilizing effect. In salted media, the peptides are fully helical and present a great tendency to self associate by bringing the hydrophobic faces of helices into close contact. This proceeds in non-cooperative multisteps leading to the formation of α helix aggregates with various degrees of complexation. Using modelling, the relative hydrophobic surface areas accessible to water molecules in n-mer structures are calculated and discussed. Nous avons étudié un peptide amphipathique composé de dix lysine et dix leucine, ainsi que quatre dérivés comportant un résidu tryptophane pour les études par fluorescence. Dans l'eau, les peptides ne sont pas structurés (~90%), et se structurent partiellement en hélice α par chauffage (dénaturation froide). Les mesures de déclin de fluorescence font apparaître une cinétique à trois temps de vie. Dans un mélange eau/TFE, les peptides adoptent une conformation en hélice α, mais la substitution Leu-Trp9 possède un effet déstabilisant. En mileu salin, les peptides sont totalement hélicoïdaux et ont tendance à s'agréger de façon à regrouper leur face hydrophobe. Ce processus se fait en plusieurs étapes avec des agrégats de taille variable. L'existence de tels agrégats est discutée sur la base de la modélisation mol

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis at the human B2 receptor and molecular modelling to define the pharmacophore of non-peptide bradykinin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meini, Stefania; Cucchi, Paola; Bellucci, Francesca; Catalani, Claudio; Faiella, Angela; Rotondaro, Luigi; Quartara, Laura; Giolitti, Alessandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2004-02-15

    Combining site-directed mutagenesis with information obtained from molecular modelling of the bradykinin (BK) human B2 receptor (hB2R) as derived from the bovine rhodopsin crystal structure [Science 289 (2000) 739], we previously defined a putative binding mode for the non-peptide B2 receptor antagonists, FR173657 and LF16-0687 [Can J Physiol Pharmacol 80 (2002) 303]. The present work is aimed to define the specific role of the quinoline moiety in the pharmacophore of these non-peptide antagonists. The effect of the mutations I110A, L114A (TM, transmembrane 3), W256A (TM6), F292A, Y295A and Y295F (TM7) was evaluated. None of the mutations affected the binding interaction of peptide ligands: the agonist BK and the peptide antagonist MEN 11270. The affinities in competing for [3H]-BK binding and in blocking the BK-induced IP production by the non-peptide antagonists LF16-0687 and FR173657 at the wild type and mutant receptors were analysed. While the affinities of LF16-0687 and FR173657 were crucially decreased at the I110A, Y295A, and Y295F mutants, the W256A mutation affected the affinity of the LF16-0687 only. The important contribution of the quinoline moiety was shown by the inability of an analogue of LF16-0687, lacking this moiety, to affect BK binding at the wild type receptor. On the other hand, the benzamidine group did not interact with mutated residues, since LF16-0687 analogues without this group or with an oxidated benzamidine displayed pairwise loss of affinity on wild type and mutated receptors. Further differences between FR173657 and LF16-0687 were highlighted at the I110 and Y295 mutants when comparing binding (pK(i)) and functional antagonist (pKB) affinity. First, the I110A mutation similarly impaired their binding affinity (250-fold), but at a less extent the antagonist potency of FR173657 only. Second, both the hydroxyl and the phenyl moieties of the Y295 residue had a specific role in the LF16-0687 interaction with the receptor, as

  11. Structure activity relationship modelling of milk protein-derived peptides with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative structure activity type models were developed in an attempt to predict the key features of peptide sequences having dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitory activity. The models were then employed to help predict the potential of peptides, which are currently reported in the literature to be present in the intestinal tract of humans following milk/dairy product ingestion, to act as inhibitors of DPP-IV. Two models (z- and v-scale) for short (2-5 amino acid residues) bovine milk peptides, behaving as competitive inhibitors of DPP-IV, were developed. The z- and the v-scale models (p<0.05, R(2) of 0.829 and 0.815, respectively) were then applied to 56 milk protein-derived peptides previously reported in the literature to be found in the intestinal tract of humans which possessed a structural feature of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides (P at the N2 position). Ten of these peptides were synthetized and tested for their in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory properties. There was no agreement between the predicted and experimentally determined DPP-IV half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for the competitive peptide inhibitors. However, the ranking for DPP-IV inhibitory potency of the competitive peptide inhibitors was conserved. Furthermore, potent in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity was observed with two peptides, LPVPQ (IC50=43.8±8.8μM) and IPM (IC50=69.5±8.7μM). Peptides present within the gastrointestinal tract of human may have promise for the development of natural DPP-IV inhibitors for the management of serum glucose.

  12. Biophysical Aspects of Transmembrane Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovich, Sandor

    2005-01-01

    Transmembrane signaling is one of the most significant cell biological events in the life and death of cells in general and lymphocytes in particular. Until recently biochemists and biophysicists were not accustomed to thinking of these processes from the side of a high number of complex biochemical events and an equally high number of physical changes at molecular and cellular levels at the same time. Both types of researchers were convinced that their findings are the most decisive, having higher importance than the findings of the other scientist population. Both casts were wrong. Life, even at cellular level, has a number of interacting physical and biochemical mechanisms, which finally build up the creation of an "excited" cell that will respond to particular signals from the outer or inner world. This book handles both aspects of the signalling events, and in some cases tries to unify our concepts and help understand the signals that govern the life and death of our cells. Not only the understanding, bu...

  13. Understanding Peptide Dendrimer Interactions with Model Cell Membrane Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup

    membranes or highly conserved motifs, effectively making resistance due to mutations less likely to develop and spread. For this we studied the conditions to form supported lipid bilayers with basic systems and further established a protocol for producing biomimetic bacterial model membranes via the vesicle...... fusion method, which presents improved means for studying drug-membrane interactions in the future. The interaction mechanism of a family of dendrimers was examined and in particular one dendrimer (BALY) was extensively studied by the combined use of quartz crystal microbalance, atomic force microscopy...... and neutron reection. The application of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques allowed for systematically addressing the interface-related processes and gain insights into different aspects of the interaction. BALY was found to interact via a uidity-dependent mechanism. It inserted into the outer...

  14. Membrane Peptides and their Role in Protobiological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Chipot, Christophe

    2003-04-01

    How simple membrane peptides performed such essential protocellular functions as transport of ions and organic matter across membranes separating the interior of the cell from the environment, capture and utilization of energy, and transduction of environmental signals, is a key question in protobiological evolution. On the basis of detailed, molecular-level computer simulations we explain how these peptides fold at water-membrane interfaces, insert into membranes, self-assemble into higher-order structures and acquire functions. We have investigated the interfacial behavior and folding of several peptides built of leucine and glutamine residues and have demonstrated that many of them tend to adopt ordered structures. Further, we have studied the insertion of an α-helical peptide containing leucine (L) and serine (S) of the form (LSLLLSL)3 into a model membrane. The transmembrane state is metastable, and approximately 15 kcal mol-1 is required to insert the peptide into the membrane. Investigations of dimers formed by (LSLLLSL)3 and glycophorin A demonstrate how the favorable free energy of helix association can offset the unfavorable free energy of insertion, leading to self-assembly of peptide helices in the membrane. An example of a self-assembled structure is the tetrameric transmembrane pore of the influenza virus M2 protein, which is an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel. Our simulations explain the gating mechanism and provide guidelines how to re-engineer the channel to act as a simple proton pump. In general, emergence of integral membrane proteins appears to be quite feasible and may be easier to envision than the emergence of water-soluble proteins.

  15. Free energy barrier for melittin reorientation from a membrane-bound state to a transmembrane state

    CERN Document Server

    Irudayam, Sheeba J; Berkowitz, Max L

    2013-01-01

    An important step in a phospholipid membrane pore formation by melittin antimicrobial peptide is a reorientation of the peptide from a surface into a transmembrane conformation. In this work we perform umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for the reorientation of melittin from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane state and provide a molecular level insight into understanding peptide and lipid properties that influence the existence of the free energy barrier. The PMFs were calculated for a peptide to lipid (P/L) ratio of 1/128 and 4/128. We observe that the free energy barrier is reduced when the P/L ratio increased. In addition, we study the cooperative effect; specifically we investigate if the barrier is smaller for a second melittin reorientation, given that another neighboring melittin was already in the transmembrane state. We observe that indeed the barrier of the PMF curve is reduced in this case, thus confirming the presence of a cooperative effect.

  16. Peptide identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  17. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoseletsky, V N; Volyntseva, A D; Shaitan, K V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feofanov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application.

  18. General aspects of peptide selectivity towards lipid bilayers and cell membranes studied by variation of the structural parameters of amphipathic helical model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Margitta; Meyer, Jana; Beyermann, Michael; Maul, Björn; Hoischen, Christian; Bienert, Michael

    2002-02-01

    Model compounds of modified hydrophobicity (Eta), hydrophobic moment (mu) and angle subtended by charged residues (Phi) were synthesized to define the general roles of structural motifs of cationic helical peptides for membrane activity and selectivity. The peptide sets were based on a highly hydrophobic, non-selective KLA model peptide with high antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. Variation of the investigated parameters was found to be a suitable method for modifying peptide selectivity towards either neutral or highly negatively charged lipid bilayers. Eta and mu influenced selectivity preferentially via modification of activity on 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers, while the size of the polar/hydrophobic angle affected the activity against 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidyl-DL-glycerol (POPG). The influence of the parameters on the activity determining step was modest in both lipid systems and the activity profiles were the result of the parameters' influence on the second less pronounced permeabilization step. Thus, the activity towards POPC vesicles was determined by the high permeabilizing efficiency, however, changes in the structural parameters preferentially influenced the relatively moderate affinity. In contrast, intensive peptide accumulation via electrostatic interactions was sufficient for the destabilization of highly negatively charged POPG lipid membranes, but changes in the activity profile, as revealed by the modification of Phi, seem to be preferentially caused by variation of the low permeabilizing efficiency. The parameters proved very effective also in modifying antimicrobial and hemolytic activity. However, their influence on cell selectivity was limited. A threshold value of hydrophobicity seems to exist which restricted the activity modifying potential of mu and Phi on both lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

  19. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified ...

  20. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmin, Thomas; Soto, Cinque S; Clinthorne, Graham; DeGrado, William F; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM) domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  1. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  2. Phage Display Screening for Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Binding Peptides: Detection of Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Sclavons

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-α is one of the most abundant cytokines produced in many inflammatory and autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis, chronic hepatitis C, or neurodegenerative diseases. These pathologies remain difficult to diagnose and consequently difficult to treat. The aim of this work is to offer a new diagnostic tool by seeking new molecular probes for medical imaging. The target-specific part of the probe consists here of heptameric peptides selected by the phage display technology for their affinity for TNF-α. Several affinity tests allowed isolating 2 peptides that showed the best binding capacity to TNF-α. Finally, the best peptide was synthesized in both linear and cyclic forms and tested on the histological sections of concanavalin-A-(ConA-treated mice liver. In this well-known hepatitis mouse model, the best results were obtained with the cyclic form of peptide 2, which allowed for the staining of inflamed areas in the liver. The cyclic form of peptide 2 (2C was, thus, covalently linked to iron oxide nanoparticles (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent and tested in the ConA-induced hepatitis mouse model. The vectorized nanoparticles allowed for the detection of inflammation as well as of the free peptide. These ex vivo results suggest that phage display-selected peptides can direct imaging contrast agents to inflammatory areas.

  3. A Peptide to Reduce Pulmonary Edema in a Rat Model of Lung Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudia Schossleitner

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques and perioperative care, primary graft dysfunction is a serious medical problem in transplantation medicine in general and a specific problem in patients undergoing lung transplantation. As a result, patients develop lung edema, causing reduced tissue oxygenation capacity, reduced lung compliance and increased requirements for mechanical ventilatory support. Yet, there is no effective strategy available to protect the grafted organ from stress reactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion and by the surgical procedure itself.We assessed the effect of a cingulin-derived peptide, XIB13 or a random peptide in an established rat model of allogeneic lung transplantation. Donor lungs and recipients received therapeutic peptide at the time of transplantation and outcome was analyzed 100min and 28 days post grafting.XIB13 improved blood oxygenation and reduced vascular leak 100min post grafting. Even after 28 days, lung edema was significantly reduced by XIB13 and lungs had reduced fibrotic or necrotic zones. Moreover, the induction of an allogeneic T cell response was delayed indicating a reduced antigen exchange between the donor and the host.In summary, we provide a new tool to strengthen endothelial barrier function thereby improving outcomes in lung transplantation.

  4. A Peptide to Reduce Pulmonary Edema in a Rat Model of Lung Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterwalder, Richard; Friedl, Heinz P.; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Kocher, Alfred; Wagner, Christine; Wagner, Stephan N.; Fischer, Gottfried; Schultz, Marcus J.; Wiedemann, Dominik; Petzelbauer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite significant advances in organ preservation, surgical techniques and perioperative care, primary graft dysfunction is a serious medical problem in transplantation medicine in general and a specific problem in patients undergoing lung transplantation. As a result, patients develop lung edema, causing reduced tissue oxygenation capacity, reduced lung compliance and increased requirements for mechanical ventilatory support. Yet, there is no effective strategy available to protect the grafted organ from stress reactions induced by ischemia/reperfusion and by the surgical procedure itself. Methods We assessed the effect of a cingulin-derived peptide, XIB13 or a random peptide in an established rat model of allogeneic lung transplantation. Donor lungs and recipients received therapeutic peptide at the time of transplantation and outcome was analyzed 100min and 28 days post grafting. Results XIB13 improved blood oxygenation and reduced vascular leak 100min post grafting. Even after 28 days, lung edema was significantly reduced by XIB13 and lungs had reduced fibrotic or necrotic zones. Moreover, the induction of an allogeneic T cell response was delayed indicating a reduced antigen exchange between the donor and the host. Conclusions In summary, we provide a new tool to strengthen endothelial barrier function thereby improving outcomes in lung transplantation. PMID:26536466

  5. Apoptosis imaging studies in various animal models using radio-iodinated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Wonjung; Ha, Yeong Su; Soni, Nisarg; Lee, Woonghee; Park, Se-Il; Ahn, Heesu; An, Gwang Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has a role in many medical disorders and treatments; hence, its non-invasive evaluation is one of the most riveting research topics. Currently annexin V is used as gold standard for imaging apoptosis. However, several drawbacks, including high background, slow body clearance, make it a suboptimum marker for apoptosis imaging. In this study, we radiolabeled the recently identified histone H1 targeting peptide (ApoPep-1) and evaluated its potential as a new apoptosis imaging agent in various animal models. ApoPep-1 (CQRPPR) was synthesized, and an extra tyrosine residue was added to its N-terminal end for radiolabeling. This peptide was radiolabeled with (124)I and (131)I and was tested for its serum stability. Surgery- and drug-induced apoptotic rat models were prepared for apoptosis evaluation, and PET imaging was performed. Doxorubicin was used for xenograft tumor treatment in mice, and the induced apoptosis was studied. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET imaging and compared with ApoPep-1 after doxorubicin treatment. The peptide was radiolabeled at high purity, and it showed reasonably good stability in serum. Cell death was easily imaged by radiolabeled ApoPep-1 in an ischemia surgery model. And, liver apoptosis was more clearly identified by ApoPep-1 rather than [(124)I]annexin V in cycloheximide-treated models. Three doxorubicin doses inhibited tumor growth, which was evaluated by 30-40% decreases of [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET uptake in the tumor area. However, ApoPep-1 demonstrated more than 200% increase in tumor uptake after chemotherapy, while annexin V did not show any meaningful uptake in the tumor compared with the background. Biodistribution data were also in good agreement with the microPET imaging results. All of the experimental data clearly demonstrated high potential of the radiolabeled ApoPep-1 for in vivo apoptosis imaging.

  6. Models of self-peptide sampling by developing T cells identify candidate mechanisms of thymic selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren Bains

    Full Text Available Conventional and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus where they are exposed to samples of self-peptide MHC (pMHC ligands. This probabilistic process selects for cells within a range of responsiveness that allows the detection of foreign antigen without excessive responses to self. Regulatory T cells are thought to lie at the higher end of the spectrum of acceptable self-reactivity and play a crucial role in the control of autoimmunity and tolerance to innocuous antigens. While many studies have elucidated key elements influencing lineage commitment, we still lack a full understanding of how thymocytes integrate signals obtained by sampling self-peptides to make fate decisions. To address this problem, we apply stochastic models of signal integration by T cells to data from a study quantifying the development of the two lineages using controllable levels of agonist peptide in the thymus. We find two models are able to explain the observations; one in which T cells continually re-assess fate decisions on the basis of multiple summed proximal signals from TCR-pMHC interactions; and another in which TCR sensitivity is modulated over time, such that contact with the same pMHC ligand may lead to divergent outcomes at different stages of development. Neither model requires that T(conv and T(reg are differentially susceptible to deletion or that the two lineages need qualitatively different signals for development, as have been proposed. We find additional support for the variable-sensitivity model, which is able to explain apparently paradoxical observations regarding the effect of partial and strong agonists on T(conv and T(reg development.

  7. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  8. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  9. Structural and thermodynamic insight into the process of "weak" dimerization of the ErbB4 transmembrane domain by solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Eduard V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Goncharuk, Marina V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2012-09-01

    Specific helix-helix interactions between the single-span transmembrane domains of receptor tyrosine kinases are believed to be important for their lateral dimerization and signal transduction. Establishing structure-function relationships requires precise structural-dynamic information about this class of biologically significant bitopic membrane proteins. ErbB4 is a ubiquitously expressed member of the HER/ErbB family of growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases that is essential for the normal development of various adult and fetal human tissues and plays a role in the pathobiology of the organism. The dimerization of the ErbB4 transmembrane domain in membrane-mimicking lipid bicelles was investigated by solution NMR. In a bicellar DMPC/DHPC environment, the ErbB4 membrane-spanning α-helices (651-678)(2) form a right-handed parallel dimer through the N-terminal double GG4-like motif A(655)GxxGG(660) in a fashion that is believed to permit proper kinase domain activation. During helix association, the dimer subunits undergo a structural adjustment (slight bending) with the formation of a network of inter-monomeric polar contacts. The quantitative analysis of the observed monomer-dimer equilibrium provides insights into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the folding process of the helical transmembrane domain in the model environment that may be directly relevant to the process that occurs in biological membranes. The lipid bicelles occupied by a single ErbB4 transmembrane domain behave as a true ("ideal") solvent for the peptide, while multiply occupied bicelles are more similar to the ordered lipid microdomains of cellular membranes and appear to provide substantial entropic enhancement of the weak helix-helix interactions, which may be critical for membrane protein activity.

  10. Modeling the dynamic folding and surface-activity of a helical peptide adsorbing to a pendant bubble interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vikas P; Maldarelli, Charles; Tu, Raymond S

    2009-03-15

    We have designed a peptide with switchable surface activity, where the folded (alpha-helical) form of the peptide is amphiphilic and the unfolded form is not. To understand the factors influencing the dynamics of the switchability, a model is developed for the transport of the surface active form of the peptide from the solution onto air-water interface. As is the case with the low molecular weight head-tail surfactants, the transport involves the bulk diffusion of the folded form to the surface and the kinetic adsorption onto the interface. Unlike the head-tail surfactants, the diffusion can be augmented by the kinetics of the folding of the peptide from the unfolded form. The model is formulated within the context of the transport of the peptide from a uniform bulk solution onto an initially clean air-water interface in a pendant bubble system, where the transport rate can be measured by recording the reduction in surface tension using the shape analysis of the bubble. Experiments are undertaken and compared to the predictions of the model simulations of the tension reduction for a range of values of the kinetic adsorption constant and the folding kinetic constant. The results indicate that the kinetic adsorption rate of the folded peptide onto air-water interface dominates the dynamic process, which contrasts many head-tail surfactants where diffusion typically dominates over kinetics adsorption. Moreover, our 'best-fits' suggest that there is a phase transition at high surface concentrations that slows the long-time adsorption of the peptides to the interface. Finally, the numerical solution is compared with an asymptotic solution, showing agreement with our findings that the fundamental dynamics of the tunable surface-active peptide are indeed controlled by the adsorption step.

  11. Trimerization of the HIV Transmembrane Domain in Lipid Bilayers Modulates Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, Timothy M; Baksh, Michael M; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Fiedler, Jason D; Sligar, Stephen G; Finn, M G; Zwick, Michael B; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-02-18

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV gp41 is an established target of antibodies that neutralize a broad range of HIV isolates. To evaluate the role of the transmembrane (TM) domain, synthetic MPER-derived peptides were incorporated into lipid nanoparticles using natural and designed TM domains, and antibody affinity was measured using immobilized and solution-based techniques. Peptides incorporating the native HIV TM domain exhibit significantly stronger interactions with neutralizing antibodies than peptides with a monomeric TM domain. Furthermore, a peptide with a trimeric, three-helix bundle TM domain recapitulates the binding profile of the native sequence. These studies suggest that neutralizing antibodies can bind the MPER when the TM domain is a three-helix bundle and this presentation could influence the binding of neutralizing antibodies to the virus. Lipid-bilayer presentation of viral antigens in Nanodiscs is a new platform for evaluating neutralizing antibodies.

  12. Rigidity of transmembrane proteins determines their cluster shape

    CERN Document Server

    Jafarinia, Hamidreza; Jalali, Mir Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation in cell membrane is vital for majority of biological functions. Recent experimental results suggest that transmembrane domains of proteins such as $\\alpha$-helices and $\\beta$-sheets have different structural rigidity. We use molecular dynamics simulation of a coarse-grained model of protein-embedded lipid membranes to investigate the mechanisms of protein clustering. For a variety of protein concentrations, our simulations in thermal equilibrium conditions reveal that the structural rigidity of transmembrane domains dramatically affects interactions and changes the shape of the cluster. We have observed stable large aggregates even in the absence of hydrophobic mismatch which has been previously proposed as the mechanism of protein aggregation. According to our results, semi-flexible proteins aggregate to form two-dimensional clusters while rigid proteins, by contrast, form one-dimensional string-like structures. By assuming two probable scenarios for the formation of a two-dimensional tr...

  13. Detection of alpha-helical coiled-coil dimer formation by spin-labeled synthetic peptides: a model parallel coiled-coil peptide and the antiparallel coiled coil formed by a replica of the ProP C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillar, Alexander; Tripet, Brian; Zoetewey, David; Wood, Janet M; Hodges, Robert S; Boggs, Joan M

    2003-12-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine relative peptide orientation within homodimeric, alpha-helical coiled-coil structures. Introduction of cysteine (Cys) residues into peptides/proteins for spin labeling allows detection of their oligomerization from exchange broadening or dipolar interactions between residues within 25 A of each other. Two synthetic peptides containing Cys substitutions were used: a 35-residue model peptide and the 30-residue ProP peptide. The model peptide is known to form a stable, parallel homodimeric coiled coil, which is partially destabilized by Cys substitutions at heptad a and d positions (peptides C30a and C33d). The ProP peptide, a 30-residue synthetic peptide, corresponds to residues 468-497 of osmoregulatory transporter ProP from Escherichia coli. It forms a relatively unstable, homodimeric coiled coil that is predicted to be antiparallel in orientation. Cys was introduced in heptad g positions of the ProP peptide, near the N-terminus (K473C, creating peptide C473g) or closer to the center of the sequence (E480C, creating peptide C480g). In contrast to the destabilizing effect of Cys substitution at the core heptad a or d positions of model peptides C30a and C33d, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that Cys substitutions at the heptad g positions of the ProP peptide had little or no effect on coiled-coil stability. Thermal denaturation analysis showed that spin labeling increased the stability of the coiled coil for all peptides. Strong exchange broadening was detected for both C30a and C33d, in agreement with a parallel structure. EPR spectra of C480g had a large hyperfine splitting of about 90 G, indicative of strong dipole-dipole interactions and a distance between spin-labeled residues of less than 9 A. Spin-spin interactions were much weaker for C473g. These results supported the hypothesis that the ProP peptide primarily formed an antiparallel coiled coil, since formation of a parallel dimer

  14. Full membrane spanning self-assembled monolayers as model systems for UHV-based studies of cell-penetrating peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Johannes [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Graham, Daniel J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). NESAC/BIO; Schmüser, Lars [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Baio, Joe E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lelle, Marco [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Peneva, Kalina [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Müllen, Klaus [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Castner, David G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). NESAC/BIO; Bonn, Mischa [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Weidner, Tobias [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Biophysical studies of the interaction of peptides with model membranes provide a simple yet effective approach to understand the transport of peptides and peptide based drug carriers across the cell membrane. Therein, the authors discuss the use of self-assembled monolayers fabricated from the full membrane-spanning thiol (FMST) 3-((14-((4'-((5-methyl-1-phenyl-35-(phytanyl)oxy-6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30,33,37-undecaoxa-2,3-dithiahenpentacontan-51-yl)oxy)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)oxy)tetradecyl)oxy)-2-(phytanyl)oxy glycerol for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) based experiments. UHV-based methods such as electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide important information about how peptides bind and interact with membranes, especially with the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer. Moreover, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data showed that FMST forms UHV-stable and ordered films on gold. XPS and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles indicated that a proline-rich amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, known as sweet arrow peptide is located at the outer perimeter of the model membrane.

  15. Schisandra chinensis Peptidoglycan-Assisted Transmembrane Transport of Lignans Uniquely Altered the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Mechanisms in Human HepG2 Cell Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Ker, Yaw-Bee; Chang, Chi-Huang; Huang, Shiau-Huei; Wang, Hui-Er; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y.

    2014-01-01

    Schisandra chinensis (Turz Baill) (S. chinensis) (SC) fruit is a hepatoprotective herb containing many lignans and a large amount of polysaccharides. A novel polysaccharide (called SC-2) was isolated from SC of MW 841 kDa, which exhibited a protein-to-polysaccharide ratio of 0.4089, and showed a characteristic FTIR spectrum of a peptidoglycan. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed microcrystalline structures within SC-2. SC-2 contained 10 monosaccharides and 15 amino acids (essential amino acids of 78.12%w/w). In a HepG2 cell model, SC-2 was shown by MTT and TUNEL assay to be completely non-cytotoxic. A kinetic analysis and fluorescence-labeling technique revealed no intracellular disposition of SC-2. Combined treatment of lignans with SC-2 enhanced the intracellular transport of schisandrin B and deoxyschisandrin but decreased that of gomisin C, resulting in alteration of cell-killing bioactivity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics allows this type of unidirectional transport. Conclusively, SC-2 alters the transport and cell killing capability by a “Catcher-Pitcher Unidirectional Transport Mechanism”. PMID:24475039

  16. Schisandra chinensis peptidoglycan-assisted transmembrane transport of lignans uniquely altered the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms in human HepG2 cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charng-Cherng Chyau

    Full Text Available Schisandra chinensis (Turz Baill (S. chinensis (SC fruit is a hepatoprotective herb containing many lignans and a large amount of polysaccharides. A novel polysaccharide (called SC-2 was isolated from SC of MW 841 kDa, which exhibited a protein-to-polysaccharide ratio of 0.4089, and showed a characteristic FTIR spectrum of a peptidoglycan. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed microcrystalline structures within SC-2. SC-2 contained 10 monosaccharides and 15 amino acids (essential amino acids of 78.12%w/w. In a HepG2 cell model, SC-2 was shown by MTT and TUNEL assay to be completely non-cytotoxic. A kinetic analysis and fluorescence-labeling technique revealed no intracellular disposition of SC-2. Combined treatment of lignans with SC-2 enhanced the intracellular transport of schisandrin B and deoxyschisandrin but decreased that of gomisin C, resulting in alteration of cell-killing bioactivity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics allows this type of unidirectional transport. Conclusively, SC-2 alters the transport and cell killing capability by a "Catcher-Pitcher Unidirectional Transport Mechanism".

  17. Fusion of cell-penetrating peptides to thermally responsive biopolymer improves tumor accumulation of p21 peptide in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker LR

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leslie R Walker,1 Jung Su Ryu,1 Eddie Perkins,2 Lacey R McNally,3 Drazen Raucher1 1Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA; 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USAAbstract: Current therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are limited. The limitations of this type of treatment are abundant. The majority of chemotherapeutic agents used in clinics are highly toxic to both tumor cells and normal tissues due to the lack of specificity. Resistance can develop due to overexposure of these agents. To address these issues, these agents must be made more exclusive toward the tumor site. We have developed a macromolecular carrier based on the sequence of the biopolymer elastin-like polypeptide (ELP that is able to aggregate upon reaching the externally heated tumor environment. This carrier is specific to the tumor as it only aggregates at the heated tumor site. ELP is soluble below its transition temperature but will aggregate when the temperature is raised above its transition temperature. ELP was modified by p21, a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, and the addition of Bac, a cell-penetrating peptide with nuclear localization capabilities. In this study, p21-ELP-Bac and its control, ELP-p21, were used in cell proliferation studies using the pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1, MiaPaca-2, and S2013. ELP-p21 had little effect on proliferation, while the half maximal inhibitory concentration of p21-ELP-Bac was ~30 µM. As translocation across the plasma membrane is a limiting step for delivery of macromolecules, these polypeptides were utilized in a pancreatic xenograft model to study the plasma clearance, biodistribution, tumor accumulation, and tumor reduction capabilities of the polypeptide with and without a cell-penetrating peptide.Keywords: elastin-like polypeptide, peptide, targeted drug delivery, macromolecule

  18. A model of peptide triazole entry inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp120 and the mechanism of bridging sheet disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emileh, Ali; Tuzer, Ferit; Yeh, Herman; Umashankara, Muddegowda; Moreira, Diogo R M; Lalonde, Judith M; Bewley, Carole A; Abrams, Cameron F; Chaiken, Irwin M

    2013-04-02

    Peptide triazole (PT) entry inhibitors prevent HIV-1 infection by blocking the binding of viral gp120 to both the HIV-1 receptor and the coreceptor on target cells. Here, we used all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) to propose a model for the encounter complex of the peptide triazoles with gp120. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and single-site mutagenesis experiments were performed to test the simulation results. We found that docking of the peptide to a conserved patch of residues lining the "F43 pocket" of gp120 in a bridging sheet naïve gp120 conformation of the glycoprotein led to a stable complex. This pose prevents formation of the bridging sheet minidomain, which is required for receptor-coreceptor binding, providing a mechanistic basis for dual-site antagonism of this class of inhibitors. Burial of the peptide triazole at the gp120 inner domain-outer domain interface significantly contributed to complex stability and rationalizes the significant contribution of hydrophobic triazole groups to peptide potency. Both the simulation model and STD NMR experiments suggest that the I-X-W [where X is (2S,4S)-4-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)pyrrolidine] tripartite hydrophobic motif in the peptide is the major contributor of contacts at the gp120-PT interface. Because the model predicts that the peptide Trp side chain hydrogen bonding with gp120 S375 contributes to the stability of the PT-gp120 complex, we tested this prediction through analysis of peptide binding to gp120 mutant S375A. The results showed that a peptide triazole KR21 inhibits S375A with 20-fold less potency than WT, consistent with predictions of the model. Overall, the PT-gp120 model provides a starting point for both the rational design of higher-affinity peptide triazoles and the development of structure-minimized entry inhibitors that can trap gp120 into an inactive conformation and prevent infection.

  19. Experimental investigation of initial steps of helix propagation in model peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goch, Grazyna; Maciejczyk, Maciej; Oleszczuk, Marta; Stachowiak, Damian; Malicka, Joanna; Bierzyński, Andrzej

    2003-06-10

    It is not certain whether the helix propagation parameters s(n)() (i.e., the equilibrium constants between (n - 1)- and n-residue long alpha-helices) determined from numerous studies of rather long model peptides are applicable for description of the initial steps of the helix formation during the protein folding process. From fluorescence, NMR, and calorimetric studies of a series of model peptides, containing the La(3+)-binding sequence nucleating the helix (Siedlecka, M., Goch, G., Ejchart, A., Sticht, H., and Bierzynski, A. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96, 903-908), we have determined, at 25 degrees C, the average values of the enthalpy DeltaH(n)() and of the helix growth parameters s(n)() describing the first four steps of helix propagation in polyalanine. The absolute values of the C-cap parameters, describing the contribution of the C-terminal residues to the helix free energy, have also been estimated for alanine (1.2 +/- 0.5) and NH(2) group (1.6 +/- 0.7). The initial four steps of the helix growth in polyalanine can be described by a common propagation parameter s = 1.54 +/- 0.04. The enthalpy DeltaH(n)() is also constant and equals -980 +/- 100 cal mol(-)(1).

  20. Peptides as Model Systems for the Unfolded State of Proteins Explored By Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Measey, Thomas; Hagarman, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Unfolded proteins are generally thought to be structurally random with a minimum of non-local interactions. This concept implies that with the exception of glycine and proline the conformational propensities of amino acid residues in polypeptides should be comparable in that they all sample the statistically allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. However, over the last ten years experimental and computational evidence has emerged for the notion that the conformational space of residues might be more restricted than predicted by random or statistical coil models. We have developed several algorithms which can be used to simulate the amide I band profile of the IR, isotropic Raman, anisotropic Raman and Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD) spectra of polypeptides based on assumed ensembles of side chain conformations. The simulations are generally restricted by 3JcαHNH coupling constants obtained from NMR spectroscopy. A comparison with experimental results reveals that e.g. alanine has a clear preference for the so called polyproline II (PPII) conformation in short peptides. The situation becomes more complex if longer polyalanines are doped with negatively charged residues. For the so-called XAO-peptide (X2A7O2, X: diaminobutyric acid, O;ornithine) we found a more compact structure owing to multiple turn conformations sampled by the X2A7 interfaces. For Salmon Calcitonin, a 32-residue hormone, we identified a mixture of PPII, β-strand and helical conformations. Currently, we are in the process of investigating short GxG (x; different natural amino acid residues) peptides in terms of conformational distributions obtained from coil libraries. This will enable us obtain the conformational preferences of amino acid residues in the absence of nearest neighbor interactions.

  1. Time-resolved fluorescence study of electron transfer in a model peptide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Fiona; Hungerford, Graham; Moore, Barry D.; Birch, David J. S.

    1994-08-01

    At present there is a great deal of interest in the study of the transference of energy in biological systems. For example, electron transfer is of major importance in many synthetic and biological processes and in nature is mediated by proteins. Information regarding this process is therefore useful in leading to a greater understanding of phenomena such as photosynthesis and respiration. Previous work on protein systems has shown the electron transfer process to be complex to analyze because of the presence of competing pathways. This has led to the use of model systems to simplify the kinetics. We have synthesized novel model systems using peptides containing both a fluorescent methoxy- naphthalene donor and a dicyanoethylene group as a potential electron acceptor and observed fluorescence quenching for both dipeptide and oligopeptide systems. Biexponential fluorescence decay behavior was observed for all donor acceptor systems, with an increase in the amount of the shorter fluorescence decay component on increasing temperature.

  2. Metabolic cleavage of cell-penetrating peptides in contact with epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the metabolic degradation kinetics and cleavage patterns of some selected CPP (cell-penetrating peptides) after incubation with confluent epithelial models. Synthesis of N-terminal CF [5(6)-carboxyfluorescein]-labelled CPP, namely hCT (human calcitonin)-derived sequences, Tat(47......-57) and penetratin(43-58), was through Fmoc (fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Metabolic degradation kinetics of the tested CPP in contact with three cell-cultured epithelial models, MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney), Calu-3 and TR146, was evaluated by reversed-phase HPLC. Identification of the resulting...... metabolites of CF-hCT(9-32) was through reversed-phase HPLC fractionation and peak allocation by MALDI-TOF-MS (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry) or direct MALDI-TOF-MS of incubates. Levels of proteolytic activity varied highly between the investigated epithelial...

  3. Ion-pair mediated transport of small model peptides in liquid phase micro extraction under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reubsaet, J Léon E; Paulsen, Jonas V

    2005-02-01

    This paper discusses the behaviour of five small model peptides in a three phase (aqueous donor-organic-aqueous acceptor) liquid phase micro extraction system in relation to their physico-chemical properties (charge, hydrophobicity). It is proved that for all peptides transport over the organic phase is mediated by aliphatic sulphonic acids. Heptane-1-sulphonic acid gave the best overall recoveries. It appeared that peptides with hydrophobic properties (IPI) and a high number of positive charges (KYK) show good recoveries and are enriched in the acceptor phase. Variation in the pH (1.6-4.4) of the donor phase shows that there are peptide-dependent optimal pH-values for their recovery. Increasing pH in the acceptor phase shows that in most cases the recovery decreases due to decreased ion-pair mediated membrane transport. For KYK the partition between the organic phase and the aqueous acceptor-phase is also driven by the solubility in the aqueous acceptor phase. Increase of the ion strength of the acceptor phase did not affect the recovery of the peptides. Except for KYK, which showed decreased recovery when the ion strength increased. Another finding is that delocalisation of positive charge causes bad recovery, probably due to incomplete ion-pair-peptide complex formation.

  4. Accurate prediction of DnaK-peptide binding via homology modelling and experimental data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Van Durme

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones are essential elements of the protein quality control machinery that governs translocation and folding of nascent polypeptides, refolding and degradation of misfolded proteins, and activation of a wide range of client proteins. The prokaryotic heat-shock protein DnaK is the E. coli representative of the ubiquitous Hsp70 family, which specializes in the binding of exposed hydrophobic regions in unfolded polypeptides. Accurate prediction of DnaK binding sites in E. coli proteins is an essential prerequisite to understand the precise function of this chaperone and the properties of its substrate proteins. In order to map DnaK binding sites in protein sequences, we have developed an algorithm that combines sequence information from peptide binding experiments and structural parameters from homology modelling. We show that this combination significantly outperforms either single approach. The final predictor had a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.819 when assessed over the 144 tested peptide sequences to detect true positives and true negatives. To test the robustness of the learning set, we have conducted a simulated cross-validation, where we omit sequences from the learning sets and calculate the rate of repredicting them. This resulted in a surprisingly good MCC of 0.703. The algorithm was also able to perform equally well on a blind test set of binders and non-binders, of which there was no prior knowledge in the learning sets. The algorithm is freely available at http://limbo.vib.be.

  5. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  6. Gramicidin S: a peptide model for protein glycation and reversal of glycation using nucleophilic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, V G; Sudha, R; Balaram, P

    2002-08-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of proteins has been implicated in various diabetic complications and age-related disorders. Proteins undergo glycation at the N-terminus or at the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues. Glycation of proteins proceeds through the stages of Schiff base formation, conversion to ketoamine product and advanced glycation end products. Gramicidin S, which has two ornithine residues, was used as a model system to study the various stages of glycation of proteins using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The proximity of two ornithine residues in the peptide favors the glycation reaction. Formation of advanced glycation end products and diglycation on ornithine residues in gramicidin S were observed. The formation of Schiff base adduct is reversible, whereas the Amadori rearrangement to the ketoamine product is irreversible. Nucleophilic amines and hydrazines can deglycate the Schiff base adduct of glucose with peptides and proteins. Hydroxylamine, isonicotinic acid hydrazide and aminoguanidine effectively removed glucose from the Schiff base adduct of gramicidin S. Hydroxylamine is more effective in deglycating the adduct compared with isonicotinic acid hydrazide and aminoguanidine. The observation that the hydrazines are effective in deglycating the Schiff base adduct even in the presence of high concentrations of glucose, may have a possible therapeutic application in preventing complications of diabetes mellitus. Hydrazines may be used to distinguish between the Schiff base and the ketoamine products formed at the initial stages of glycation.

  7. Predicting Antitumor Activity of Peptides by Consensus of Regression Models Trained on a Small Data Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Jerić

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Predicting antitumor activity of compounds using regression models trained on a small number of compounds with measured biological activity is an ill-posed inverse problem. Yet, it occurs very often within the academic community. To counteract, up to some extent, overfitting problems caused by a small training data, we propose to use consensus of six regression models for prediction of biological activity of virtual library of compounds. The QSAR descriptors of 22 compounds related to the opioid growth factor (OGF, Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met with known antitumor activity were used to train regression models: the feed-forward artificial neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, sparseness constrained linear regression, the linear and nonlinear (with polynomial and Gaussian kernel support vector machine. Regression models were applied on a virtual library of 429 compounds that resulted in six lists with candidate compounds ranked by predicted antitumor activity. The highly ranked candidate compounds were synthesized, characterized and tested for an antiproliferative activity. Some of prepared peptides showed more pronounced activity compared with the native OGF; however, they were less active than highly ranked compounds selected previously by the radial basis function support vector machine (RBF SVM regression model. The ill-posedness of the related inverse problem causes unstable behavior of trained regression models on test data. These results point to high complexity of prediction based on the regression models trained on a small data sample.

  8. Conditional solvation thermodynamics of isoleucine in model peptides and the limitations of the group-transfer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2014-04-17

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in extended penta-peptides, and in helical deca-peptides. Butane in gauche conformation serves as a small-molecule analog for the isoleucine side chain. Parsing the hydrophobic and hydrophilic contributions to hydration for the side chain shows that both of these aspects of hydration are context-sensitive. Furthermore, analyzing the solute-solvent interaction contribution to the conditional excess enthalpy of the side chain shows that what is nominally considered a property of the side chain includes entirely nonobvious contributions of the background. The context-sensitivity of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration and the conflation of background contributions with energetics attributed to the side chain limit the ability of a single scaling factor, such as the fractional solvent exposure of the group in the protein, to map the component energetic contributions of the model-compound data to their value in the protein. But ignoring the origin of cancellations in the underlying components the group-transfer model may appear to provide a reasonable estimate of the free energy for a given error tolerance.

  9. Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Human Erythrocytes Involves PATMK, a Member of the Transmembrane Kinase Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettner, Douglas R; Huston, Christopher D; Linford, Alicia S; Buss, Sarah N; Houpt, Eric; Sherman, Nicholas E; Petri, William A

    2008-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK), was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i) incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii) PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii) expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMKΔ932). Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMKΔ932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection. PMID:18208324

  10. Entamoeba histolytica phagocytosis of human erythrocytes involves PATMK, a member of the transmembrane kinase family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R Boettner

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Entamoeba histolytica is the cause of amebic colitis and liver abscess. This parasite induces apoptosis in host cells and utilizes exposed ligands such as phosphatidylserine to ingest the apoptotic corpses and invade deeper into host tissue. The purpose of this work was to identify amebic proteins involved in the recognition and ingestion of dead cells. A member of the transmembrane kinase family, phagosome-associated TMK96 (PATMK, was identified in a proteomic screen for early phagosomal proteins. Anti-peptide affinity-purified antibody produced against PATMK demonstrated that it was a type I integral membrane protein that was expressed on the trophozoite surface, and that co-localized with human erythrocytes at the site of contact. The role of PATMK in erythrophagocytosis in vitro was demonstrated by: (i incubation of ameba with anti-PATMK antibodies; (ii PATMK mRNA knock-down using a novel shRNA expression system; and (iii expression of a carboxy-truncation of PATMK (PATMK(delta932. Expression of the carboxy-truncation of PATMK(delta932 also caused a specific reduction in the ability of E. histolytica to establish infection in the intestinal model of amebiasis, however these amebae retained the ability to cause hepatic abscesses when directly injected in the liver. In conclusion, PATMK was identified as a member of the TMK family that participates in erythrophagocytosis and is uniquely required for intestinal infection.

  11. Effects of antimicrobial peptide revealed by simulations: translocation, pore formation, membrane corrugation and euler buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Licui; Jia, Nana; Gao, Lianghui; Fang, Weihai; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-04-11

    We explore the effects of the peripheral and transmembrane antimicrobial peptides on the lipid bilayer membrane by using the coarse grained Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations. We study peptide/lipid membrane complexes by considering peptides with various structure, hydrophobicity and peptide/lipid interaction strength. The role of lipid/water interaction is also discussed. We discuss a rich variety of membrane morphological changes induced by peptides, such as pore formation, membrane corrugation and Euler buckling.

  12. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittelmann Hans D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/.

  13. A variational model for oligomer-formation process of GNNQQNY peptide from yeast prion protein Sup35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianghong; Hong, Liu; Zhang, Yang

    2012-02-08

    Many human neurodegenerative diseases are associated with the aggregation of insoluble amyloid-like fibrous proteins. However, the processes by which the randomly diffused monomer peptides aggregate into the highly regulated amyloid fibril structures are largely unknown. We proposed a residue-level coarse-grained variational model for the investigation of the aggregation pathway for a small assembly of amyloid proteins, the peptide GNNQQNY from yeast prion protein Sup35. By examining the free energy surface, we identified the residue-level sequential pathways for double parallel and antiparallel β-peptides, which show that the central dry polar zipper structure is the major folding core in both cases. The critical nucleus size is determined to be three peptides for the homogeneous nucleation process, whereas the zig-zag growth pattern appears most favorably for heterogeneous nucleation. Consistent with the dock-and-lock mechanism, the aggregation process of free peptides to the fibril core was found to be highly cooperative. The quantitative validation with the computational simulations and experimental data demonstrated the usefulness of the proposed model in understanding the general mechanism of the amyloid fibril system. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular modeling of the ion channel-like nanotube structure of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yong; YANG Pin

    2007-01-01

    The ion channel-like nanotube structure of the oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) was first investigated by molecular modeling. The results reveal that the hydrogen bond net is one of the key factors to stabilize the structure. The hydrophobicity distribution mode of the side chains is in favor of the structure inserting into the bilayers and forming a hydrophilic pore. The lumen space is under the control of the negative potential, weaker but spreading continuously, to which the cation selectivity attributes; meanwhile, the alternate distribution of the stronger positive and negative potentials makes the electrostatic distribution of the structure framework balance, which is also one of the key factors stabilizing the structure. The results lay the theoretical foundation for illuminating the structure stability and the ion permeability, and give a clue to elucidating the molecular mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and designing novel drugs to prevent or reverse AD at the root.

  15. Stabilization of collagen-model, triple-helical peptides for in vitro and in vivo applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Fields, Gregg B

    2013-01-01

    The triple-helical structure of collagen has been accurately reproduced in numerous chemical and recombinant model systems. Triple-helical peptides and proteins have found application for dissecting collagen-stabilizing forces, isolating receptor- and protein-binding sites in collagen, mechanistic examination of collagenolytic proteases, and development of novel biomaterials. Introduction of native-like sequences into triple-helical constructs can reduce the thermal stability of the triple-helix to below that of the physiological environment. In turn, incorporation of nonnative amino acids and/or templates can enhance triple-helix stability. We presently describe approaches by which triple-helical structure can be modulated for use under physiological or near-physiological conditions.

  16. Determinants of Helix Formation for a Kv1.3 Transmembrane Segment inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, LiWei; Deutsch, Carol

    2017-06-02

    Proteins begin to fold in the ribosome, and misfolding has pathological consequences. Among the earliest folding events in biogenesis is the formation of a helix, an elementary structure that is ubiquitously present and required for correct protein folding in all proteomes. The determinants underlying helix formation in the confined space of the ribosome exit tunnel are relatively unknown. We chose the second transmembrane segment, S2, of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.3, as a model to probe this issue. Since the N terminus of S2 is initially in an extended conformation in the folding vestibule of the ribosome yet ultimately emerges at the exit port as a helix, S2 is ideally suited for delineating sequential events and folding determinants of helix formation inside the ribosome. We show that S2's extended N terminus inside the tunnel is converted into a helix by a single, distant mutation in the nascent peptide. This transition depends on nascent peptide sequence at specific tunnel locations. Co-translational secondary folding of nascent chains inside the ribosome has profound physiological consequences that bear on correct membrane insertion, tertiary folding, oligomerization, and biochemical modification of the newborn protein during biogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Insights into the Transmembrane Domain of the Thyrotropin Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Chantreau

    Full Text Available The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that is member of the leucine-rich repeat subfamily (LGR. In the absence of crystal structure, the success of rational design of ligands targeting the receptor internal cavity depends on the quality of the TSHR models built. In this subfamily, transmembrane helices (TM 2 and 5 are characterized by the absence of proline compared to most receptors, raising the question of the structural conformation of these helices. To gain insight into the structural properties of these helices, we carried out bioinformatics and experimental studies. Evolutionary analysis of the LGR family revealed a deletion in TM5 but provided no information on TM2. Wild type residues at positions 2.58, 2.59 or 2.60 in TM2 and/or at position 5.50 in TM5 were substituted to proline. Depending on the position of the proline substitution, different effects were observed on membrane expression, glycosylation, constitutive cAMP activity and responses to thyrotropin. Only proline substitution at position 2.59 maintained complex glycosylation and high membrane expression, supporting occurrence of a bulged TM2. The TSHR transmembrane domain was modeled by homology with the orexin 2 receptor, using a protocol that forced the deletion of one residue in the TM5 bulge of the template. The stability of the model was assessed by molecular dynamics simulations. TM5 straightened during the equilibration phase and was stable for the remainder of the simulations. Our data support a structural model of the TSHR transmembrane domain with a bulged TM2 and a straight TM5 that is specific of glycoprotein hormone receptors.

  18. Melanocortin Peptide Therapy for the Treatment of Arthritic Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Getting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritic pathologies are a major cause of morbidity within the western world, with rheumatoid arthritis affecting approximately 1% of adults. This review highlights the therapeutic potential of naturally occurring hormones and their peptides, in both arthritic models of disease and patients. The arthritides represent a group of closely related pathologies in which cytokines, joint destruction, and leukocytes play a causal role. Here we discuss the role of naturally occurring pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC-derived melanocortin peptides (e.g., alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone [a-MSH] and synthetic derivatives in these diseases. Melanocortins exhibit their biological efficacy by modulating proinflammatory cytokines and subsequent leukocyte extravasation. Their biological effects are mediated via seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, of which five have been cloned, identified, and termed MC1 to MC5. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone represents the parent molecule of the melanocortins; the first 13 amino acids of which (termed a-MSH have been shown to be the most pharmacologically active region of the parent hormone. The melanocortin peptides have been shown to display potent anti-inflammatory effects in both animal models of disease and patients. The potential anti-inflammatory role for endogenous peptides in arthritic pathologies is in its infancy. The ability to inhibit leukocyte migration, release of cytokines, and induction of anti-inflammatory proteins appears to play an important role in affording protection in arthritic injury, and thus may lead to potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Spider peptide Phα1β induces analgesic effect in a model of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rosa, Fernanda; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cueto, Ana Paula; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurelio; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Richardson, Michael; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-09-01

    The marine snail peptide ziconotide (ω-conotoxin MVIIA) is used as an analgesic in cancer patients refractory to opioids, but may induce severe adverse effects. Animal venoms represent a rich source of novel drugs, so we investigated the analgesic effects and the side-effects of spider peptide Phα1β in a model of cancer pain in mice with or without tolerance to morphine analgesia. Cancer pain was induced by the inoculation of melanoma B16-F10 cells into the hind paw of C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, painful hypersensitivity was detected and Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA (10-100 pmol/site) was intrathecally injected to evaluate the development of antinociception and side-effects in control and morphine-tolerant mice. The treatment with Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA fully reversed cancer-related painful hypersensitivity, with long-lasting results, at effective doses 50% of 48 (32-72) or 33 (21-53) pmol/site, respectively. Phα1β produced only mild adverse effects, whereas ω-conotoxin MVIIA induced dose-related side-effects in mice at analgesic doses (estimated toxic dose 50% of 30 pmol/site). In addition, we observed that Phα1β was capable of controlling cancer-related pain even in mice tolerant to morphine antinociception (100% of inhibition) and was able to partially restore morphine analgesia in such animals (56 ± 5% of inhibition). In this study, Phα1β was as efficacious as ω-conotoxin MVIIA in inducing analgesia in a model of cancer pain without producing severe adverse effects or losing efficacy in opioid-tolerant mice, indicating that Phα1β has a good profile for the treatment of cancer pain in patients.

  20. Comprehensive analysis of the numbers, lengths and amino acid compositions of transmembrane helices in prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral integral membrane proteins of high-resolution structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidijam, Massoud; Azizpour, Sonia; Patching, Simon G

    2017-02-15

    We report a comprehensive analysis of the numbers, lengths and amino acid compositions of transmembrane helices in 235 high-resolution structures of integral membrane proteins. The properties of 1551 transmembrane helices in the structures were compared with those obtained by analysis of the same amino acid sequences using topology prediction tools. Explanations for the 81 (5.2%) missing or additional transmembrane helices in the prediction results were identified. Main reasons for missing transmembrane helices were mis-identification of N-terminal signal peptides, breaks in α-helix conformation or charged residues in the middle of transmembrane helices and transmembrane helices with unusual amino acid composition. The main reason for additional transmembrane helices was mis-identification of amphipathic helices, extramembrane helices or hairpin re-entrant loops. Transmembrane helix length had an overall median of 24 residues and an average of 24.9 ± 7.0 residues and the most common length was 23 residues. The overall content of residues in transmembrane helices as a percentage of the full proteins had a median of 56.8% and an average of 55.7 ± 16.0%. Amino acid composition was analysed for the full proteins, transmembrane helices and extramembrane regions. Individual proteins or types of proteins with transmembrane helices containing extremes in contents of individual amino acids or combinations of amino acids with similar physicochemical properties were identified and linked to structure and/or function. In addition to overall median and average values, all results were analysed for proteins originating from different types of organism (prokaryotic, eukaryotic, viral) and for subgroups of receptors, channels, transporters and others.

  1. Sequence-specific conformational flexibility of SNARE transmembrane helices probed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Walter; Poschner, Bernhard C; Stalz, Holger; Heck, Albert J; Langosch, Dieter

    2008-08-01

    SNARE proteins mediate fusion of intracellular eukaryotic membranes and their alpha-helical transmembrane domains are known to contribute to lipid bilayer mixing. Synthetic transmembrane domain peptides were previously shown to mimic the function of SNARE proteins in that they trigger liposome fusion in a sequence-specific fashion. Here, we performed a detailed investigation of the conformational dynamics of the transmembrane helices of the presynaptic SNAREs synaptobrevin II and syntaxin 1a. To this end, we recorded deuterium/hydrogen-exchange kinetics in isotropic solution as well as in the membrane-embedded state. In solution, the exchange kinetics of each peptide can be described by three different classes of amide deuteriums that exchange with different rate constants. These are likely to originate from exchange at different domains of the helices. Interestingly, the rate constants of each class vary with the TMD sequence. Thus, the exchange rate is position-specific and sequence-specific. Further, the rate constants correlate with the previously determined membrane fusogenicities. In membranes, exchange is retarded and a significant proportion of amide hydrogens are protected from exchange. We conclude that the conformational dynamics of SNARE TMD helices is mechanistically linked to their ability to drive lipid mixing.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  3. Beyond the nearest-neighbor Zimm-Bragg model for helix-coil transition in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murza, Adrian; Kubelka, Jan

    2009-02-01

    The nearest-neighbor (micro = 1) variant of the Zimm and Bragg (ZB) model has been extensively used to describe the helix-coil transition in biopolymers. In this work, we investigate the helix-coil transition for a 21-residue alanine peptide (AP) with the ZB model up to fourth nearest neighbor (micro = 1, 2, 3, and 4). We use a matrix approach that takes into account combinations of any number of helical stretches of any length and therefore gives the exact statistical weight of the chain within the assumptions of the ZB model. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting the temperature-dependent circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared experimental spectra of the AP. All variants of the model fit the experimental data, thus giving similar results in terms of the macroscopic observables, such as temperature-dependent fractional helicity. However, the resulting microscopic parameters, such as distributions of the individual residue helical probabilities and free energy surfaces, vary significantly depending on the variant of the model. Overall, the mean residue enthalpy and entropy (in the absolute value) both increase with micro, but combined yield essentially the same "effective" value of the ZB propagation parameters for all micro. Greater helical probabilities for individual residues are predicted for larger micro, in particular, near the center of the sequence. The ZB nucleation parameters increase with increasing micro, which results in a lower free energy barrier to helix nucleation and lower apparent "cooperativity" of the transition. The significance of the long-range interactions for the predictions of ZB model for helix-coil transition, the calculated model parameters and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  4. Structure of the integrin beta3 transmembrane segment in phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Tong-Lay; Partridge, Anthony W; Ginsberg, Mark H; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2008-04-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors transduce bidirectional signals across the plasma membrane, with the integrin transmembrane domains acting as conduits in this process. Here, we report the first high-resolution structure of an integrin transmembrane domain. To assess the influence of the membrane model system, structure determinations of the beta3 integrin transmembrane segment and flanking sequences were carried out in both phospholipid bicelles and detergent micelles. In bicelles, a 30-residue linear alpha-helix, encompassing residues I693-H772, is adopted, of which I693-I721 appear embedded in the hydrophobic bicelle core. This relatively long transmembrane helix implies a pronounced helix tilt within a typical lipid bilayer, which facilitates the snorkeling of K716's charged side chain out of the lipid core while simultaneously immersing hydrophobic L717-I721 in the membrane. A shortening of bicelle lipid hydrocarbon tails does not lead to the transfer of L717-I721 into the aqueous phase, suggesting that the reported embedding represents the preferred beta3 state. The nature of the lipid headgroup affected only the intracellular part of the transmembrane helix, indicating that an asymmetric lipid distribution is not required for studying the beta3 transmembrane segment. In the micelle, residues L717-I721 are also embedded but deviate from linear alpha-helical conformation in contrast to I693-K716, which closely resemble the bicelle structure.

  5. Peptide and glycopeptide dendrimer apple trees as enzyme models and for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Darbre, Tamis

    2012-02-28

    Solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) provides peptides with a dendritic topology when diamino acids are introduced in the sequences. Peptide dendrimers with one to three amino acids between branches can be prepared with up to 38 amino acids (MW ~ 5,000 Da). Larger peptide dendrimers (MW ~ 30,000) were obtained by a multivalent chloroacetyl cysteine (ClAc) ligation. Structural studies of peptide dendrimers by CD, FT-IR, NMR and molecular dynamics reveal molten globule states containing up to 50% of α-helix. Esterase and aldolase peptide dendrimers displaying dendritic effects and enzyme kinetics (k(cat)/k(uncat) ~ 10(5)) were designed or discovered by screening large combinatorial libraries. Strong ligands for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecA and LecB able to inhibit biofilm formation were obtained with glycopeptide dendrimers. Efficient ligands for cobalamin, cytotoxic colchicine conjugates and antimicrobial peptide dendrimers were also developed showing the versatility of dendritic peptides. Complementing the multivalency, the amino acid composition of the dendrimers strongly influenced the catalytic or biological activity obtained demonstrating the importance of the "apple tree" configuration for protein-like function in peptide dendrimers.

  6. Mapping transmembrane residues of proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2) that influence ligand-modulated calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, J Y; Adams, M N; Lim, J; Madala, P K; Xu, W; Cotterell, A J; He, Y; Yau, M K; Hooper, J D; Fairlie, D P

    2017-03-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor involved in metabolism, inflammation, and cancers. It is activated by proteolysis, which exposes a nascent N-terminal sequence that becomes a tethered agonist. Short synthetic peptides corresponding to this sequence also activate PAR2, while small organic molecules show promising PAR2 antagonism. Developing PAR2 ligands into pharmaceuticals is hindered by a lack of knowledge of how synthetic ligands interact with and differentially modulate PAR2. Guided by PAR2 homology modeling and ligand docking based on bovine rhodopsin, followed by cross-checking with newer PAR2 models based on ORL-1 and PAR1, site-directed mutagenesis of PAR2 was used to investigate the pharmacology of three agonists (two synthetic agonists and trypsin-exposed tethered ligand) and one antagonist for modulation of PAR2 signaling. Effects of 28 PAR2 mutations were examined for PAR2-mediated calcium mobilization and key mutants were selected for measuring ligand binding. Nineteen of twenty-eight PAR2 mutations reduced the potency of at least one ligand by >10-fold. Key residues mapped predominantly to a cluster in the transmembrane (TM) domains of PAR2, differentially influence intracellular Ca(2+) induced by synthetic agonists versus a native agonist, and highlight subtly different TM residues involved in receptor activation. This is the first evidence highlighting the importance of the PAR2 TM regions for receptor activation by synthetic PAR2 agonists and antagonists. The trypsin-cleaved N-terminus that activates PAR2 was unaffected by residues that affected synthetic peptides, challenging the widespread practice of substituting peptides for proteases to characterize PAR2 physiology.

  7. Thrombin related peptide TP508 promoted fracture repair in a mouse high energy fracture model

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    Pan Xiao-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombin related peptide (TP508 is a 23 amino-acid synthetic peptide that represents a portion of the receptor-binding domain of thrombin molecule. Previous studies have shown that TP508 can accelerate musculoskeletal tissue repair including fracture healing. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TP508 on fracture healing in a murine fracture model representing high energy fracture situation. Methods Eighty CD 1 mice underwent controlled quadriceps muscle crush and open transverse mid diaphyseal femoral fracture that was then fixed with an external fixator. Animals were randomised into four groups to receive an intra-operative dose of either 100 μg TP508 into the fracture gap; 100 μg TP508 into the surrounding damaged muscle tissues; 10 μg TP508 into the fracture gap, or control equal amount of saline into the fracture gap. Radiographic assessment was performed weekly for 5 weeks; histological analysis was at 3 and 5 weeks post fracture and biomechanical testing of the fractured bone was performed at 5 weeks post fracture. Results Mechanical testing data showed that the fracture stiffness was significantly higher in the group receiving 100 μg TP508 into the fracture gap than other groups. Histological and radiographic analysis revealed a trend of increase in bone formation in the 100 μg TP508 injected into the fracture gap group compared to the saline control group. It was noted that the scar tissues was significantly less in Group II comparing with the saline control group and there was increased blood vessel formation in the crushed muscles and fracture gap areas in the groups receiving TP508 comparing to the saline control group. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrated the use of thrombin related peptide TP508 in the situation of a high energy fracture can promote fracture healing and reduce the potential complications such as muscle fibrosis and fracture delayed or non-union.

  8. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

  9. Peptides modeled after the alpha-domain of metallothionein induce neurite outgrowth and promote survival of cerebellar granule neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Johanne Wirenfeldt; Ambjørn, Malene; Bock, Elisabeth;

    2009-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is a metal-binding protein capable of preventing oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in the central nervous system of mammals, and hence is of putative therapeutic value in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, we demonstrated that a peptide modeled...

  10. Enhancement of intracellular concentration and biological activity of PNA after conjugation with a cell-penetrating synthetic model peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlke, Johannes; Wallukat, Gerd; Wolf, Yvonne; Ehrlich, Angelika; Wiesner, Burkhard; Berger, Hartmut; Bienert, Michael

    2004-07-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of the cell-penetrating alpha-helical amphipathic model peptide KLALKLALKALKAALKLA-NH(2) (MAP) to deliver peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) into mammalian cells, MAP was covalently linked to the 12-mer PNA 5'-GGAGCAGGAAAG-3' directed against the mRNA of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor. The cellular uptake of both the naked PNA and its MAP-conjugate was studied by means of capillary electrophoresis combined with laser-induced fluorescence detection, confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Incubation with the fluorescein-labelled PNA-peptide conjugate led to three- and eightfold higher intracellular concentrations in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and CHO cells, respectively, than found after exposure of the cells to the naked PNA. Correspondingly, pretreatment of spontaneously-beating neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with the PNA-peptide conjugate and the naked PNA slowed down the positive chronotropic effect elicited by the neuropeptide nociceptin by 10- and twofold, respectively. The main reasons for the higher bioavailability of the PNA-peptide conjugate were found to be a more rapid cellular uptake in combination with a lowered re-export and resistance against influences of serum.

  11. Kinin Peptides Enhance Inflammatory and Oxidative Responses Promoting Apoptosis in a Parkinson’s Disease Cellular Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Niewiarowska-Sendo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinin peptides ubiquitously occur in nervous tissue and participate in inflammatory processes associated with distinct neurological disorders. These substances have also been demonstrated to promote the oxidative stress. On the other hand, the importance of oxidative stress and inflammation has been emphasized in disorders that involve the neurodegenerative processes such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. A growing number of reports have demonstrated the increased expression of kinin receptors in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, the effect of bradykinin and des-Arg10-kallidin, two representative kinin peptides, was analyzed with respect to inflammatory response and induction of oxidative stress in a PD cellular model, obtained after stimulation of differentiated SK-N-SH cells with a neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. Kinin peptides caused an increased cytokine release and enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and NO by cells. These changes were accompanied by a loss of cell viability and a greater activation of caspases involved in apoptosis progression. Moreover, the neurotoxin and kinin peptides altered the dopamine receptor 2 expression. Kinin receptor expression was also changed by the neurotoxin. These results suggest a mediatory role of kinin peptides in the development of neurodegeneration and may offer new possibilities for its regulation by using specific antagonists of kinin receptors.

  12. Transmembrane anion transport and cytotoxicity of synthetic tambjamine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Elsa; Soto-Cerrato, Vanessa; Cortés-Arroyo, Susana; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2014-03-21

    Ten synthetic analogs of the marine alkaloids tambjamines, bearing aromatic enamine moieties, have been synthesized. These compounds proved to be highly efficient transmembrane anion transporters in model liposomes. Changes in the electronic nature of the substituents of the aromatic enamine or the alkoxy group of the central pyrrole group did not affect this anionophore activity. The in vitro activity of these compounds has also been studied. They trigger apoptosis in several cancer cell lines with IC50 values in the low micromolar range as well as modify the intracellular pH, inducing the basification of acidic organelles.

  13. Snorkeling of lysine side chains in transmembrane helices: how easy can it get?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Erik; Killian, J Antoinette

    2003-06-05

    Transmembrane segments of proteins are often flanked by lysine residues. The side chains of these residues may snorkel, i.e. they may bury themselves with their aliphatic part in the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer, while positioning the charged amino group in the more polar interface. Here we estimate the free energy cost of snorkeling from thermodynamical calculations based on studies with synthetic transmembrane peptides [Strandberg et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 7190-7198]. The value is estimated to be between 0.07 and 0.7 kcal mol(-1) for a lysine side chain. This very low value indicates that snorkeling may be a common process, which should be taken into consideration both in experimental and in theoretical studies on protein-lipid interactions.

  14. Localized lipid packing of transmembrane domains impedes integrin clustering.

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    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Integrin clustering plays a pivotal role in a host of cell functions. Hetero-dimeric integrin adhesion receptors regulate cell migration, survival, and differentiation by communicating signals bidirectionally across the plasma membrane. Thus far, crystallographic structures of integrin components are solved only separately, and for some integrin types. Also, the sequence of interactions that leads to signal transduction remains ambiguous. Particularly, it remains controversial whether the homo-dimerization of integrin transmembrane domains occurs following the integrin activation (i.e. when integrin ectodomain is stretched out or if it regulates integrin clustering. This study employs molecular dynamics modeling approaches to address these questions in molecular details and sheds light on the crucial effect of the plasma membrane. Conducting a normal mode analysis of the intact αllbβ3 integrin, it is demonstrated that the ectodomain and transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains are connected via a membrane-proximal hinge region, thus merely transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains are modeled. By measuring the free energy change and force required to form integrin homo-oligomers, this study suggests that the β-subunit homo-oligomerization potentially regulates integrin clustering, as opposed to α-subunit, which appears to be a poor regulator for the clustering process. If α-subunits are to regulate the clustering they should overcome a high-energy barrier formed by a stable lipid pack around them. Finally, an outside-in activation-clustering scenario is speculated, explaining how further loading the already-active integrin affects its homo-oligomerization so that focal adhesions grow in size.

  15. Extended molecular dynamics and optimized Rouse-Zimm model studies of a short peptide: Various friction approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yi; Kostov, Konstantin; Perico, Angelo; Smithline, Shepard; Freed, Karl F.

    1995-11-01

    Developing a theory for the long time dynamics of polypeptides requires not only a proper choice of the relevant dynamic variables, but also a meaningful definition of friction coefficients for the individual atoms or groups of atoms in the reduced system. We test various aspects of the optimized Rouse-Zimm model for describing the long time rotational dynamics of a peptide fragment. The necessary equilibrium input information is constructed from a 1 ns molecular dynamics simulation for the solvated peptide by using a parallel Cray version of CHARMm, whose new features are described here. The simulations also provide time autocorrelation functions for comparisons with both theoretical predictions and with experiment. Two atomic friction models (van der Waals radii and accessible surface area) are chosen, and tests are made of the applicability of two combining rules for calculating the group friction coefficients. While the rotational dynamics of the peptide is insensitive to the friction models used, the combining rules are found to impact profoundly upon the theoretical descriptions for the behavior of the peptide dynamics for the reduced descriptions with fewer variables. The calculations study the role of the memory functions, neglected in this dynamical theory, and the interatomic hydrodynamic interactions in constructing the group friction coefficients. While the 1 ns trajectory is longer than customarily used for very complex systems, there are nontrivial influences of the duration of the molecular dynamics trajectory on the description of the dynamics.

  16. Modeling of protein-peptide interactions using the CABS-dock web server for binding site search and flexible docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczyk, Maciej; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kouza, Maksim; Wieteska, Lukasz; Debinski, Aleksander; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-01-15

    Protein-peptide interactions play essential functional roles in living organisms and their structural characterization is a hot subject of current experimental and theoretical research. Computational modeling of the structure of protein-peptide interactions is usually divided into two stages: prediction of the binding site at a protein receptor surface, and then docking (and modeling) the peptide structure into the known binding site. This paper presents a comprehensive CABS-dock method for the simultaneous search of binding sites and flexible protein-peptide docking, available as a user's friendly web server. We present example CABS-dock results obtained in the default CABS-dock mode and using its advanced options that enable the user to increase the range of flexibility for chosen receptor fragments or to exclude user-selected binding modes from docking search. Furthermore, we demonstrate a strategy to improve CABS-dock performance by assessing the quality of models with classical molecular dynamics. Finally, we discuss the promising extensions and applications of the CABS-dock method and provide a tutorial appendix for the convenient analysis and visualization of CABS-dock results. The CABS-dock web server is freely available at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock/. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard D. Ye; François Boulay; Ji Ming Wang; Claes Dahlgren; Craig Gerard; Marc Parmentier; Charles N. Serhan; Philip M. Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation...

  18. Administration of bovine casein-derived peptide prevents cognitive decline in Alzheimer disease model mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukuda, Kana; Yamada, Akio; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Iwanami, Jun; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying natural food ingredients that may serve to prevent dementia such as that due to Alzheimer disease (AD). Peptides derived from food proteins have been demonstrated to have various physiological activities such as a hypotensive action. Recent findings have indicated possible associations of hypertension with AD progression, and suggest that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with potential to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) may reduce the risk of AD. In this study, we investigated the effect of milk peptide (CH-3) on cognitive function in AD model mice. CH-3 contains a tripeptide (methionine-lysine-proline, MKP) that has been found to have a strong ACE inhibitory effect and the potential to pass through the BBB. Adult male ddY mice were used in this study, and an animal model of AD was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ1–42. CH-3 (250 mg/kg/day) or MKP (0.5 mg/kg/day) was orally administered every day starting 2 days before ICV injection. At 3 weeks after ICV injection, cognitive function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test. Brain samples were obtained after behavioral testing, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and NADPH oxidase subunits was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. ICV injection of Aβ1–42 significantly impaired cognitive function compared with that in PBS-injected mice. Daily administration of CH-3 markedly attenuated this Aβ1-42-induced cognitive decline. Aβ1–42 injection significantly enhanced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and p22phox in the mouse hippocampus compared with PBS injection, and showed a tendency to increase the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), p47phox and gp91phox, whereas CH-3 treatment markedly reduced Aβ1-42-induced TNF-α, MCP-1, iNOS, p47phox and gp91phox expression. Finally, administration of MKP also attenuated Aβ1-42-induced

  19. Rational design of a bimodular model system for the investigation of heterocyclization in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerfahrt, Thomas; Eppelmann, Katrin; Müller, Rolf; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2004-02-01

    Cyclization (Cy) domains in NRPS catalyze the heterocyclization of cysteine and serine/threonine to thiazoline and oxazoline rings. A model system consisting of the first two modules of bacitracin synthetase A fused to the thioesterase (Te) domain of tyrocidine synthetase was constructed (BacA1-2-Te) and shown to be active in production of the heterocyclic IleCys(thiazoline). Based on this model system, the feasibility of Cy domain module fusions was investigated by replacing the BacA2 Cy-A-PCP-module with modules of MbtB and MtaD from the biosynthesis systems of mycobactin and myxothiazol, revealing the formation of novel heterocyclic dipeptides. To dissect the reaction sequence of the Cy domain in peptide bond formation and heterocyclization, several residues of the BacA1-2-Te Cy domain were analyzed by mutagenesis. Two mutants exhibited formation of the noncyclic dipeptide, providing clear evidence for the independence of condensation and cyclization.

  20. Genetic Mechanisms of Coffee Extract Protection in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of β-Amyloid Peptide Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Dostal, Vishantie; Roberts, Christine M; Link, Christopher D

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that coffee and/or caffeine consumption may reduce Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. We found that coffee extracts can similarly protect against β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) toxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer's disease model. The primary protective component(s) in this model is not caffeine, although caffeine by itself can show moderate protection. Coffee exposure did not decrease Aβ transgene expression and did not need to be present during...

  1. Oral Administration of T Cell Epitope Peptide Inhibits the Systemic IL-4 Response Elicited by an Egg-White Diet in a TCR Transgenic Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    HIRAIDE, Erika; NAKAJIMA-ADACHI, Haruyo; Hachimura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy with T cell epitope peptides is a promising treatment for food allergy. We examined the effect of oral administration of an ovalbumin T cell epitope peptide (OVA323-339) in a TCR transgenic mouse model (OVA23-3 mice). OVA23-3 mice were fed egg-white diet containing ovalbumin and subsequently orally administrated the OVA323-339 peptide. Cytokine measurements revealed that the IL-4 production of splenic CD4+ T cells was significantly decreased by feeding the OVA323-339 peptid...

  2. VCD Robustness of the Amide-I and Amide-II Vibrational Modes of Small Peptide Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Tarczay, György

    2015-09-01

    The rotational strengths and the robustness values of amide-I and amide-II vibrational modes of For(AA)n NHMe (where AA is Val, Asn, Asp, or Cys, n = 1-5 for Val and Asn; n = 1 for Asp and Cys) model peptides with α-helix and β-sheet backbone conformations were computed by density functional methods. The robustness results verify empirical rules drawn from experiments and from computed rotational strengths linking amide-I and amide-II patterns in the vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of peptides with their backbone structures. For peptides with at least three residues (n ≥ 3) these characteristic patterns from coupled amide vibrational modes have robust signatures. For shorter peptide models many vibrational modes are nonrobust, and the robust modes can be dependent on the residues or on their side chain conformations in addition to backbone conformations. These robust VCD bands, however, provide information for the detailed structural analysis of these smaller systems.

  3. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers.

  4. First Multitarget Chemo-Bioinformatic Model To Enable the Discovery of Antibacterial Peptides against Multiple Gram-Positive Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Ruso, Juan M; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2016-03-28

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have emerged as promising therapeutic alternatives to fight against the diverse infections caused by different pathogenic microorganisms. In this context, theoretical approaches in bioinformatics have paved the way toward the creation of several in silico models capable of predicting antimicrobial activities of peptides. All current models have several significant handicaps, which prevent the efficient search for highly active AMPs. Here, we introduce the first multitarget (mt) chemo-bioinformatic model devoted to performing alignment-free prediction of antibacterial activity of peptides against multiple Gram-positive bacterial strains. The model was constructed from a data set containing 2488 cases of AMPs sequences assayed against at least 1 out of 50 Gram-positive bacterial strains. This mt-chemo-bioinformatic model displayed percentages of correct classification higher than 90.00% in both training and prediction (test) sets. For the first time, two computational approaches derived from basic concepts in genetics and molecular biology were applied, allowing the calculations of the relative contributions of any amino acid (in a defined position) to the antibacterial activity of an AMP and depending on the bacterial strain used in the biological assay. The present mt-chemo-bioinformatic model constitutes a powerful tool to enable the discovery of potent and versatile AMPs.

  5. IR investigation on dehydrophenylalanine containing model peptides in helical conformation deposited on a crystal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta; Mehrotra; Tewari; Jain; Chauhan

    1999-11-01

    Fourier transform ir spectra have been recorded for three 3(10)-helical and one alpha-helical pentapeptides containing dehydrophenylalanine, in a thin solid film, in order to find marker bands for various secondary structures encountered in peptides containing dehydroaminoacids. The peptide solutions were deposited and dried as thin film on zinc selenide crystal surface. This convenient sampling method has provided reliable estimates of peptide secondary structure in solid state. Detailed vibrational assignments in the spectral region between 1200-1700 cm(-1) are reported. In this region, peptide amide I, II, and III vibrations occur. Spectra-structure correlation has been presented based on the amide modes. Comparison of the ir spectra with available crystal structure data provides qualitative support for assignments of ir bands to 3(10)-helical structure and alpha-helical structure in dehydrophenylalanine containing pentapeptides. Band frequency assignments for 3(10)-helical conformation are consistent for all three peptides. All the assignments agree closely with the theoretical predictions. The spectral differences between 3(10)-helical peptides and the alpha-helical peptide have been highlighted. These findings demonstrate that a method based on ir spectroscopy can be developed for a useful approximation of three-dimensional structure of dehydropeptides in solid state. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Modeling of peptides containing D-amino acids: implications on cyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongye, Austin B.; Li, Yangmei; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Yu, Yongping; Houghten, Richard A.; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina

    2009-09-01

    Cyclic peptides are therapeutically attractive due to their high bioavailability, potential selectivity, and scaffold novelty. Furthermore, the presence of D-residues induces conformational preferences not followed by peptides consisting of naturally abundant L-residues. Therefore, comprehending how amino acids induce turns in peptides, subsequently facilitating cyclization, is significant in peptide design. Here, we performed 20-ns explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations for three diastereomeric peptides with stereochemistries: LLLLL, LLLDL, and LDLDL. Experimentally LLLLL and LDLDL readily cyclize, whereas LLLDL cyclizes in low yield. Simulations at 310 K produced conformations with inter-terminal hydrogen bonds that correlated qualitatively with the experimental cyclization trend. Energies obtained for representative structures from quantum chemical (B3LYP/PCM/cc-pVTZ//HF/6-31G*) calculations predicted pseudo-cyclic and extended conformations as the most stable for LLLLL and LLLDL, respectively, in agreement with the experimental data. In contrast, the most stable conformer predicted for peptide LDLDL was not a pseudo-cyclic structure. Moreover, D-residues preferred the experimentally less populated αL rotamers even when simulations were performed at a higher temperature and with strategically selected starting conformations. Energies calculated with molecular mechanics were consistent only with peptide LLLLL. Thus, the conformational preferences obtained for the all L-amino acid peptide were in agreement with the experimental observations. Moreover, refinement of the force field is expected to provide far-reaching conformational sampling of peptides containing D-residues to further develop force field-based conformational-searching methods.

  7. MemBrain: improving the accuracy of predicting transmembrane helices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Shen

    Full Text Available Prediction of transmembrane helices (TMH in alpha helical membrane proteins provides valuable information about the protein topology when the high resolution structures are not available. Many predictors have been developed based on either amino acid hydrophobicity scale or pure statistical approaches. While these predictors perform reasonably well in identifying the number of TMHs in a protein, they are generally inaccurate in predicting the ends of TMHs, or TMHs of unusual length. To improve the accuracy of TMH detection, we developed a machine-learning based predictor, MemBrain, which integrates a number of modern bioinformatics approaches including sequence representation by multiple sequence alignment matrix, the optimized evidence-theoretic K-nearest neighbor prediction algorithm, fusion of multiple prediction window sizes, and classification by dynamic threshold. MemBrain demonstrates an overall improvement of about 20% in prediction accuracy, particularly, in predicting the ends of TMHs and TMHs that are shorter than 15 residues. It also has the capability to detect N-terminal signal peptides. The MemBrain predictor is a useful sequence-based analysis tool for functional and structural characterization of helical membrane proteins; it is freely available at http://chou.med.harvard.edu/bioinf/MemBrain/.

  8. Solid-phase synthesis, characterization, and cellular activities of collagen-model nanodiamond-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapinska, Anna M; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Amar, Sabrina; Tokmina-Roszyk, Michal; Mochalin, Vadym N; Gogotsi, Yury; Cosme, Patrick; Terentis, Andrew C; Fields, Gregg B

    2015-05-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) have received considerable attention as potential drug delivery vehicles. NDs are small (∼5 nm diameter), can be surface modified in a controllable fashion with a variety of functional groups, and have little observed toxicity in vitro and in vivo. However, most biomedical applications of NDs utilize surface adsorption of biomolecules, as opposed to covalent attachment. Covalent modification provides reliable and reproducible ND-biomolecule ratios, and alleviates concerns over biomolecule desorption prior to delivery. The present study has outlined methods for the efficient solid-phase conjugation of ND to peptides and characterization of ND-peptide conjugates. Utilizing collagen-derived peptides, the ND was found to support or even enhance the cell adhesion and viability activities of the conjugated sequence. Thus, NDs can be incorporated into peptides and proteins in a selective manner, where the presence of the ND could potentially enhance the in vivo activities of the biomolecule it is attached to.

  9. Activity of potent and selective host defense peptide mimetics in mouse models of oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lisa K; Freeman, Katie B; Masso-Silva, Jorge A; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W; Diamond, Gill

    2014-07-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides as model molecules for the development of novel antiviral agents in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, A; Ortega-Villaizan, M; Chico, V; Brocal, I; Perez, L; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2009-09-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the components of the non-specific immune system that operate first lines of protection in many animal species including fish. They exert broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, apart from many other potential roles in innate immunity, and represent a promising class of antiviral agents. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of their antiviral action(s) indicate that they have a dual role in antiviral defence, acting not only directly on the virion but also on the host cell. Despite the acute problems of viral diseases and restrictions in using chemicals in aquaculture, few but successful attempts to assess the antiviral activities of fish AMPs have been reported. This review focuses on the antiviral activities and mechanisms of action of some AMPs, and their potential relevance in the aquaculture industry, one of the most important sources of fishery products in the near future. It is a matter of notable concern to understand whether the AMPs can be used as model molecules for designing antiviral drugs that might help to solve the problems with viruses in the fish farming industry worldwide. In addition, because fish rely more heavily on their innate immune defences than mammals, they might constitute a potential rich source of antiviral compounds for fighting against mammalian viral infections.

  11. Radiation-Guided Peptide Delivery in a Mouse Model of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-cheng; He, Jun-yan; Le, Yu-yin; Du, Kai-xin; Zhu, Wei-feng; Peng, Qing-qin; Dong, Ya-ping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of the HVGGSSV peptide, exploring radiation-guided delivery in a mouse model of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods. Mice with CNE-1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma were assigned to two different groups treated with Cy7-NHS and Cy7-HVGGSSV, respectively. Meanwhile, each mouse received a single dose of 3 Gy radiation. Biological distribution of the recombinant peptide was assessed on an in vivo small animal imaging system. Results. The experimental group showed maximum fluorescence intensity in irradiated tumors treated with Cy7-labeled HVGGSSV, while untreated (0 Gy) control tumors showed lower intensity levels. Fluorescence intensities of tumors in the right hind limbs of experimental animals were 7.84 × 107 ± 1.13 × 107, 1.35 × 108 ± 2.66 × 107, 4.05 × 108 ± 1.75 × 107, 5.57 × 108 ± 3.47 × 107, and 9.26 × 107 ± 1.73 × 107 photons/s/cm2 higher compared with left hind limb values at 1, 2, 15, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Fluorescence intensities of tumor in the right hind limbs of the experimental group were 1.66 × 108 ± 1.71 × 107, 1.51 × 108 ± 3.23 × 107, 5.38 × 108 ± 1.96 × 107, 5.89 × 108 ± 3.57 × 107, and 1.62 × 108 ± 1.69 × 107 photons/s/cm2 higher compared with control group values at 1, 2, 15, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Fluorescence was not specifically distributed in the control group. Compared with low fluorescence intensity in the heart, lungs, and tumors, high fluorescence distribution was found in the liver and kidney at 48 h. Conclusions. HVGGSSV was selectively bound to irradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, acting as a targeting transport carrier for radiation-guided drugs that are mainly metabolized in the kidney and liver.

  12. Radiation-Guided Peptide Delivery in a Mouse Model of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-cheng Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of the HVGGSSV peptide, exploring radiation-guided delivery in a mouse model of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods. Mice with CNE-1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma were assigned to two different groups treated with Cy7-NHS and Cy7-HVGGSSV, respectively. Meanwhile, each mouse received a single dose of 3 Gy radiation. Biological distribution of the recombinant peptide was assessed on an in vivo small animal imaging system. Results. The experimental group showed maximum fluorescence intensity in irradiated tumors treated with Cy7-labeled HVGGSSV, while untreated (0 Gy control tumors showed lower intensity levels. Fluorescence intensities of tumors in the right hind limbs of experimental animals were 7.84×107±1.13×107, 1.35×108±2.66×107, 4.05×108±1.75×107, 5.57×108±3.47×107, and 9.26×107±1.73×107 photons/s/cm2 higher compared with left hind limb values at 1, 2, 15, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Fluorescence intensities of tumor in the right hind limbs of the experimental group were 1.66×108±1.71×107, 1.51×108±3.23×107, 5.38×108±1.96×107, 5.89×108±3.57×107, and 1.62×108±1.69×107 photons/s/cm2 higher compared with control group values at 1, 2, 15, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Fluorescence was not specifically distributed in the control group. Compared with low fluorescence intensity in the heart, lungs, and tumors, high fluorescence distribution was found in the liver and kidney at 48 h. Conclusions. HVGGSSV was selectively bound to irradiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, acting as a targeting transport carrier for radiation-guided drugs that are mainly metabolized in the kidney and liver.

  13. Identification and relative quantification of tyrosine nitration in a model peptide using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende Valim, Lays; Davies, Julia A; Tveen Jensen, Karina; Guo, Rui; Willison, Keith R; Spickett, Corinne M; Pitt, Andrew R; Klug, David R

    2014-11-13

    Nitration of tyrosine in proteins and peptides is a post-translational modification that occurs under conditions of oxidative stress. It is implicated in a variety of medical conditions, including neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, monitoring tyrosine nitration and understanding its role in modifying biological function remains a major challenge. In this work, we investigate the use of electron-vibration-vibration (EVV) two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy for the study of tyrosine nitration in model peptides. We demonstrate the ability of EVV 2DIR spectroscopy to differentiate between the neutral and deprotonated states of 3-nitrotyrosine, and we characterize their spectral signatures using information obtained from quantum chemistry calculations and simulated EVV 2DIR spectra. To test the sensitivity of the technique, we use mixed-peptide samples containing various levels of tyrosine nitration, and we use mass spectrometry to independently verify the level of nitration. We conclude that EVV 2DIR spectroscopy is able to provide detailed spectroscopic information on peptide side-chain modifications and to detect nitration levels down to 1%. We further propose that lower nitration levels could be detected by introducing a resonant Raman probe step to increase the detection sensitivity of EVV 2DIR spectroscopy.

  14. Steviol glycoside rebaudioside A induces glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY release in a porcine ex vivo intestinal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, van der N.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Meijerink, J.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are hormones important for satiation and are involved in the process called "ileal brake". The aim of this study was to investigate the GLP-1- and PYY-stimulating efficacy of rebaudioside A, casein, and sucrose. This was studied using tissue segme

  15. Steviol Glycoside Rebaudioside A Induces Glucagon-like Peptide-1 and Peptide YY Release in a Porcine ex Vivo Intestinal Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripken, D.; Wielen, N. van der; Wortelboer, H.M.; Meijerink, J.; Witkamp, R.F.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are hormones important for satiation and are involved in the process called “ileal brake”. The aim of this study was to investigate the GLP-1- and PYY-stimulating efficacy of rebaudioside A, casein, and sucrose. This was studied using tissue segme

  16. Click chemistry generated model DNA-peptide heteroconjugates as tools for mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flett, Fiona J; Walton, Jeffrey G A; Mackay, C Logan; Interthal, Heidrun

    2015-10-01

    UV cross-linking of nucleic acids to proteins in combination with mass spectrometry is a powerful technique to identify proteins, peptides, and the amino acids involved in intermolecular interactions within nucleic acid-protein complexes. However, the mass spectrometric identification of cross-linked nucleic acid-protein heteroconjugates in complex mixtures and MS/MS characterization of the specific sites of cross-linking is extremely challenging. As a tool for the optimization of sample preparation, ionization, fragmentation, and detection by mass spectrometry, novel synthetic DNA-peptide heteroconjugates were generated to act as mimics of UV cross-linked heteroconjugates. Click chemistry was employed to cross-link peptides to DNA oligonucleotides. These heteroconjugates were fully characterized by high resolution FTICR mass spectrometry and by collision-induced dissociation (CID) following nuclease P1 digestion of the DNA moiety to a single nucleotide monophosphate. This allowed the exact site of the cross-linking within the peptide to be unambiguously assigned. These synthetic DNA-peptide heteroconjugates have the potential to be of use for a variety of applications that involve DNA-peptide heteroconjugates.

  17. Evolutionary and Comparative Genomics to Drive Rational Drug Design, with Particular Focus on Neuropeptide Seven-Transmembrane Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Furlong, Michael; Seong, Jae Young

    2017-01-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), also known as G protein-coupled receptors, are popular targets of drug development, particularly 7TMR systems that are activated by peptide ligands. Although many pharmaceutical drugs have been discovered via conventional bulk analysis techniques the increasing availability of structural and evolutionary data are facilitating change to rational, targeted drug design. This article discusses the appeal of neuropeptide-7TMR systems as drug targets and provi...

  18. Proline-induced hinges in transmembrane helices: possible roles in ion channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieleman, D P; Shrivastava, I H; Ulmschneider, M R; Sansom, M S

    2001-08-01

    A number of ion channels contain transmembrane (TM) alpha-helices that contain proline-induced molecular hinges. These TM helices include the channel-forming peptide alamethicin (Alm), the S6 helix from voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the D5 helix from voltage-gated chloride (CLC) channels. For both Alm and KvS6, experimental data implicate hinge-bending motions of the helix in an aspect of channel gating. We have compared the hinge-bending motions of these TM helices in bilayer-like environments by multi-nanosecond MD simulations in an attempt to describe motions of these helices that may underlie possible modes of channel gating. Alm is an alpha-helical channel-forming peptide, which contains a central kink associated with a Gly-x-x-Pro motif in its sequence. Simulations of Alm in a TM orientation for 10 ns in an octane slab indicate that the Gly-x-x-Pro motif acts as a molecular hinge. The S6 helix from Shaker Kv channels contains a Pro-Val-Pro motif. Modeling studies and recent experimental data suggest that the KvS6 helix may be kinked in the vicinity of this motif. Simulations (10 ns) of an isolated KvS6 helix in an octane slab and in a POPC bilayer reveal hinge-bending motions. A pattern-matching approach was used to search for possible hinge-bending motifs in the TM helices of other ion channel proteins. This uncovered a conserved Gly-x-Pro motif in TM helix D5 of CLC channels. MD simulations of a model of hCLC1-D5 spanning an octane slab suggest that this channel also contains a TM helix that undergoes hinge-bending motion. In conclusion, our simulations suggest a model in which hinge-bending motions of TM helices may play a functional role in the gating mechanisms of several different families of ion channels.

  19. Induction of ELF transmembrane potentials in relation to power-frequency electric field bioeffects in a plant root model system. Pt. 2. The effect of 60 Hz electric fields on the growth of different regions of the cucurbit root elongation zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brayman, A.A.; Miller, M.W.; Brulfert, A.

    1986-08-01

    The region of elongation in Cucumis sativus and Cucurbita maxima roots was marked at increasing distances from the apex to provide an analog of increasing cell size. These roots were exposed/sham-exposed to 60 Hz electric fields and the growth rates of the root segments measured. The growth rate effect magnitude varied with increasing distance from the root tip at constant field strength, and with increasing applied field strength. These results provide strong, qualitative support for the postulate that ELF transmembrane potential induction is involved in the stimulation of ELF electric field effects in the plant root model system.

  20. Stability analysis of the inverse transmembrane potential problem in electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martin; Mardal, Kent-André; Nielsen, Bjørn Fredrik

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we study some mathematical properties of an inverse problem arising in connection with electrocardiograms (ECGs). More specifically, we analyze the possibility for recovering the transmembrane potential in the heart from ECG recordings, a challenge currently investigated by a growing number of groups. Our approach is based on the bidomain model for the electrical activity in the myocardium, and leads to a parameter identification problem for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). It turns out that this challenge can be split into two subproblems: the task of recovering the potential at the heart surface from body surface recordings; the problem of computing the transmembrane potential inside the heart from the potential determined at the heart surface. Problem (1), which can be formulated as the Cauchy problem for an elliptic PDE, has been extensively studied and is well known to be severely ill-posed. The main purpose of this paper is to prove that problem (2) is stable and well posed if a suitable prior is available. Moreover, our theoretical findings are illuminated by a series of numerical experiments. Finally, we discuss some aspects of uniqueness related to the anisotropy in the heart.

  1. Role of α and β Transmembrane Domains in Integrin Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shamloo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are transmembrane proteins playing a crucial role in the mechanical signal transduction from the outside to the inside of a cell, and vice versa. Nevertheless, this signal transduction could not be implemented by a single protein. Rather, in order for integrins to be able to participate in signal transduction, they need to be activated and produce clusters first. As integrins consist of α- and β-subunits that are separate in the active state, studying both subunits separately is of a great importance, for, in the active state, the distance between α- and β-subunits is long enough that they do not influence one another significantly. Thus, this study aims to investigate the tendency of transmembrane domains of integrins to form homodimers. We used both Steered and MARTINI Coarse-grained molecular dynamics method to perform our simulations, mainly because of a better resolution and computational feasibility that each of these methods could provide to us. Using the Steered molecular dynamics method for α- and β-subunits, we found that the localized lipid packing prevented them from clustering. Nonetheless, the lipid packing phenomenon was found to be an artifact after investigating this process using a coarse grained (CG model. Exploiting the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we found that α- and β-subunits tend to form a stable homo-dimer.

  2. Thermochemical Fragment Energy Method for Biomolecules: Application to a Collagen Model Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Ernesto; Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2009-06-09

    Herein, we first review different methodologies that have been proposed for computing the quantum mechanical (QM) energy and other molecular properties of large systems through a linear combination of subsystem (fragment) energies, which can be computed using conventional QM packages. Particularly, we emphasize the similarities among the different methods that can be considered as variants of the multibody expansion technique. Nevertheless, on the basis of thermochemical arguments, we propose yet another variant of the fragment energy methods, which could be useful for, and readily applicable to, biomolecules using either QM or hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics methods. The proposed computational scheme is applied to investigate the stability of a triple-helical collagen model peptide. To better address the actual applicability of the fragment QM method and to properly compare with experimental data, we compute average energies by carrying out single-point fragment QM calculations on structures generated by a classical molecular dynamics simulation. The QM calculations are done using a density functional level of theory combined with an implicit solvent model. Other free-energy terms such as attractive dispersion interactions or thermal contributions are included using molecular mechanics. The importance of correcting both the intermolecular and intramolecular basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the QM calculations is also discussed in detail. On the basis of the favorable comparison of our fragment-based energies with experimental data and former theoretical results, we conclude that the fragment QM energy strategy could be an interesting addition to the multimethod toolbox for biomolecular simulations in order to investigate those situations (e.g., interactions with metal clusters) that are beyond the range of applicability of common molecular mechanics methods.

  3. HMMpTM: improving transmembrane protein topology prediction using phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousis, Georgios N; Bagos, Pantelis G; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2014-02-01

    During the last two decades a large number of computational methods have been developed for predicting transmembrane protein topology. Current predictors rely on topogenic signals in the protein sequence, such as the distribution of positively charged residues in extra-membrane loops and the existence of N-terminal signals. However, phosphorylation and glycosylation are post-translational modifications (PTMs) that occur in a compartment-specific manner and therefore the presence of a phosphorylation or glycosylation site in a transmembrane protein provides topological information. We examine the combination of phosphorylation and glycosylation site prediction with transmembrane protein topology prediction. We report the development of a Hidden Markov Model based method, capable of predicting the topology of transmembrane proteins and the existence of kinase specific phosphorylation and N/O-linked glycosylation sites along the protein sequence. Our method integrates a novel feature in transmembrane protein topology prediction, which results in improved performance for topology prediction and reliable prediction of phosphorylation and glycosylation sites. The method is freely available at http://bioinformatics.biol.uoa.gr/HMMpTM.

  4. [Efficient extraction of transmembrane proteins using ProteoExtract Transmembrane Protein Extraction Kit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błachnio, Karina

    2010-01-01

    Detergents commonly used for solubilization of membrane proteins may be ionic or non-ionic. Exposing membrane proteins to detergents, however, can adversely affect their native structure, which can be a major hindrance for functional studies. This is especially true for proteins with multiple transmembrane domains. The ProteoExtract Transmembrane Protein Extraction Kit (TM-PEK), offered by Merck, provides a detergent-free novel reagents to enable the mild and efficient extraction of proteins containing seven transmembrane domains, such as GPCRs (G-Protein Coupled Receptors) e.g.: Frizzled-4 and CELSR-3, from mammalian cells. The fraction enriched in transmembrane proteins using TM-PEK is directly compatible with enzyme assays, non-denaturing gel electrophoresis, 1- and 2-D SDS-PAGE, MS analysis, Western blotting, immunoprecipitation and ELISA. Unlike many alternatives, TM-PEK extraction procedure does not require sonication, extended rigorous vortexing, ultracentrifugation, or incubation of samples at elevated temperatures--thus minimizing the risk of post-extraction degradation or modifications.

  5. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Model Peptides: Incorporation of Residues Replacing Gly within a Triple Helix Achieved by Renucleation and Local Flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jianxi; Madhan, Balaraman; Li, Yingjie; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Missense mutations, which replace one Gly with a larger residue in the repeating sequence of the type I collagen triple helix, lead to the hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Previous studies suggest that these mutations may interfere with triple-helix folding. NMR was used to investigate triple-helix formation in a series of model peptides where the residue replacing Gly, as well as the local sequence environment, was varied. NMR measurement of translational diffusion coef...

  6. A comprehensive proteomics and genomics analysis reveals novel transmembrane proteins in human platelets and mouse megakaryocytes including G6b-B, a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senis, Yotis A; Tomlinson, Michael G; García, Angel; Dumon, Stephanie; Heath, Victoria L; Herbert, John; Cobbold, Stephen P; Spalton, Jennifer C; Ayman, Sinem; Antrobus, Robin; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bicknell, Roy; Frampton, Jon; Authi, Kalwant S; Martin, Ashley; Wakelam, Michael J O; Watson, Stephen P

    2007-03-01

    The platelet surface is poorly characterized due to the low abundance of many membrane proteins and the lack of specialist tools for their investigation. In this study we identified novel human platelet and mouse megakaryocyte membrane proteins using specialist proteomics and genomics approaches. Three separate methods were used to enrich platelet surface proteins prior to identification by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry: lectin affinity chromatography, biotin/NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, and free flow electrophoresis. Many known, abundant platelet surface transmembrane proteins and several novel proteins were identified using each receptor enrichment strategy. In total, two or more unique peptides were identified for 46, 68, and 22 surface membrane, intracellular membrane, and membrane proteins of unknown subcellular localization, respectively. The majority of these were single transmembrane proteins. To complement the proteomics studies, we analyzed the transcriptome of a highly purified preparation of mature primary mouse megakaryocytes using serial analysis of gene expression in view of the increasing importance of mutant mouse models in establishing protein function in platelets. This approach identified all of the major classes of platelet transmembrane receptors, including multitransmembrane proteins. Strikingly 17 of the 25 most megakaryocyte-specific genes (relative to 30 other serial analysis of gene expression libraries) were transmembrane proteins, illustrating the unique nature of the megakaryocyte/platelet surface. The list of novel plasma membrane proteins identified using proteomics includes the immunoglobulin superfamily member G6b, which undergoes extensive alternate splicing. Specific antibodies were used to demonstrate expression of the G6b-B isoform, which contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif. G6b-B undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and association with the SH2 domain-containing phosphatase

  7. Evolution of vertebrate interferon inducible transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickford Danielle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have diverse roles, including the control of cell proliferation, promotion of homotypic cell adhesion, protection against viral infection, promotion of bone matrix maturation and mineralisation, and mediating germ cell development. Most IFITMs have been well characterised in human and mouse but little published data exists for other animals. This study characterised IFITMs in two distantly related marsupial species, the Australian tammar wallaby and the South American grey short-tailed opossum, and analysed the phylogeny of the IFITM family in vertebrates. Results Five IFITM paralogues were identified in both the tammar and opossum. As in eutherians, most marsupial IFITM genes exist within a cluster, contain two exons and encode proteins with two transmembrane domains. Only two IFITM genes, IFITM5 and IFITM10, have orthologues in both marsupials and eutherians. IFITM5 arose in bony fish and IFITM10 in tetrapods. The bone-specific expression of IFITM5 appears to be restricted to therian mammals, suggesting that its specialised role in bone production is a recent adaptation specific to mammals. IFITM10 is the most highly conserved IFITM, sharing at least 85% amino acid identity between birds, reptiles and mammals and suggesting an important role for this presently uncharacterised protein. Conclusions Like eutherians, marsupials also have multiple IFITM genes that exist in a gene cluster. The differing expression patterns for many of the paralogues, together with poor sequence conservation between species, suggests that IFITM genes have acquired many different roles during vertebrate evolution.

  8. Reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins II reactions at side-chain loci in model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, W.M.

    1983-11-01

    The major emphasis in radiation biology at the molecular level has been on the nucleic acid component of the nucleic acid-protein complex because of its primary genetic importance. But there is increasing evidence that radiation damage to the protein component also has important biological implications. Damage to capsid protein now appears to be a major factor in the radiation inactivation of phage and other viruses. And, there is increasing evidence that radiation-chemical change in the protein component of chromation leads to changes in the stability of the repressor-operator complexes involved in gene expression. Knowledge of the radiation chemistry of protein is also of importance in other fields such as the application of radiation sterilization to foods and drugs. Recent findings that a class of compounds, the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diaminodicarboxylic acids, not normally present in food proteins, are formed in protein radiolysis is of particular significance since certain of their peptide derivatives have been showing to exhibit immunological activity. The purpose of this review is to bring together and to correlate our present knowledge of products and mechanisms in the radiolysis of peptides, polypeptides and proteins both aqueous and solid-state. In part 1 we presented a discussion of the radiation-induced reactions of the peptide main-chain in model peptide and polypeptide systems. Here in part 2 the emphasis is on the competing radiation chemistry at side-chain loci of peptide derivatives of aliphatic, aromatic-unsaturated and sulfur-containing amino acids in similar systems. Information obtained with the various experimental techniques of product analysis, competition kinetics, spin-trapping, pulse radiolysis, and ESR spectroscopy are included.

  9. A minimalist chemical model of matrix metalloproteinases--can small peptides mimic the more rigid metal binding sites of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árus, Dávid; Nagy, Nóra Veronika; Dancs, Ágnes; Jancsó, Attila; Berkecz, Róbert; Gajda, Tamás

    2013-09-01

    In order to mimic the active center of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), we synthesized a pentadecapeptide (Ac-KAHEFGHSLGLDHSK-NH2) corresponding to the catalytic zinc(II) binding site of human MMP-13. The multi-domain structural organization of MMPs fundamentally determines their metal binding affinity, catalytic activity and selectivity. Our potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR, NMR, mass spectrometric and kinetic studies are aimed to explore the usefulness of such flexible peptides to mimic the more rigid metal binding sites of proteins, to examine the intrinsic metal binding properties of this naked sequence, as well as to contribute to the development of a minimalist, peptide-based chemical model of MMPs, including the catalytic properties. Since the multiimidazole environment is also characteristic for copper(II), and recently copper(II) containing variants of MMPs have been identified, we also studied the copper(II) complexes of the above peptide. Around pH 6-7 the peptide, similarly to MMPs, offers a {3Nim} coordination binding site for both zinc(II) and copper(II). In the case of copper(II), the formation of amide coordinated species at higher pH abolished the analogy with the copper(II) containing MMP variant. On the other hand, the zinc(II)-peptide system mimics some basic features of the MMP active sites: the main species around pH7 (ZnH2L) possesses a {3Nim,H2O} coordination environment, the deprotonation of the zinc-bound water takes place near the physiological pH, it forms relatively stable ternary complexes with hydroxamic acids, and the species ZnH2L(OH) and ZnH2L(OH)2 have notable hydrolytic activity between pH7 and 9.

  10. Sequence dependence of kinetics and morphology of collagen model peptide self-assembly into higher order structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The process of self-assembly of the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 into higher order structure resembles the nucleation-growth mechanism of collagen fibril formation in many features, but the irregular morphology of the self-assembled peptide contrasts with the ordered fibers and networks formed by collagen in vivo. The amino acid sequence in the central region of the (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 peptide was varied and found to affect the kinetics of self-assembly and nature of the higher order structure formed. Single amino acid changes in the central triplet produced irregular higher order structures similar to (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, but the rate of self-association was markedly delayed by a single change in one Pro to Ala or Leu. The introduction of a Hyp-rich hydrophobic sequence from type IV collagen resulted in a more regular suprastructure of extended fibers that sometimes showed supercoiling and branching features similar to those seen for type IV collagen in the basement membrane network. Several peptides, where central Pro-Hyp sequences were replaced by charged residues or a nine-residue hydrophobic region from type III collagen, lost the ability to self-associate under standard conditions. The inability to self-assemble likely results from loss of imino acids, and lack of an appropriate distribution of hydrophobic/electrostatic residues. The effect of replacement of a single Gly residue was also examined, as a model for collagen diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta and Alport syndrome. Unexpectedly, the Gly to Ala replacement interfered with self-assembly of (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10, while the peptide with a Gly to Ser substitution self-associated to form a fibrillar structure. PMID:18441232

  11. Annexin 1 and Melanocortin Peptide Therapy for Protection Against Ischaemic-Reperfusion Damage in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.N.E. Gavins

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality within the western world affecting 2.7 million British people. This review highlights the beneficial effects of naturally occurring hormones and their peptides, in myocardial ischaemic-injury (MI models, a disease pathology in which cytokines and neutrophils play a causal role. Here we discuss two distinct classes of endogenous peptides: the steroid inducible annexin 1 and the melanocortin peptides. Annexin 1 and the melanocortins counteract the most important part of the host inflammatory response, namely, the process of leukocyte extravasation, as well as release of proinflammatory mediators. Their biological effects are mediated via the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors, the fMLP receptor family (or FPR, and the melanocortin receptors, respectively. Pharmacological analysis has demonstrated that the first 24 amino acids of the N-terminus (termed Ac2-26 are the most active region. Both exogenous annexin 1 and its peptides demonstrate cardioprotectiveness and continuing work is required to understand this annexin 1/FPR relationship fully. The melanocortin peptides are derived from a precursor molecule called the POMC protein. These peptides display potent anti-inflammatory effects in human and animal models of disease. In MI, the MC3R has been demonstrated to play an important role in mediating the protective effects of these peptides. The potential anti-inflammatory role for endogenous peptides in cardiac disease is in its infancy. The inhibition of cell migration and release of cytokines and other soluble mediators appears to play an important role in affording protection in ischaemic injury and thus may lead to potential therapeutic targets.

  12. Modeling of the Ebola Virus Delta Peptide Reveals a Potential Lytic Sequence Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Gallaher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP and the full length glycoprotein (GP, which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the “delta peptide”, a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4 of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis.

  13. An Immunomodulatory Peptide Confers Protection in an Experimental Candidemia Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Camila G; Lima, Stella M F; Freire, Mirna S; Cantuária, Ana Paula C; Júnior, Nelson G O; Santos, Tatiane S; Folha, Jéssica S; Ribeiro, Suzana M; Dias, Simoni C; Rezende, Taia M B; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Hancock, Robert E W; Franco, Octávio L; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2017-08-01

    Fungal Candida species are commensals present in the mammalian skin and mucous membranes. Candida spp. are capable of breaching the epithelial barrier of immunocompromised patients with neutrophil and cell-mediated immune dysfunctions and can also disseminate to multiple organs through the bloodstream. Here we examined the action of innate defense regulator 1018 (IDR-1018), a 12-amino-acid-residue peptide derived from bovine bactenecin (Bac2A): IDR-1018 showed weak antifungal and antibiofilm activity against a Candida albicans laboratory strain (ATCC 10231) and a clinical isolate (CI) (MICs of 32 and 64 μg · ml(-1), respectively), while 8-fold lower concentrations led to dissolution of the fungal cells from preformed biofilms. IDR-1018 at 128 μg · ml(-1) was not hemolytic when tested against murine red blood cells and also has not shown a cytotoxic effect on murine monocyte RAW 264.7 and primary murine macrophage cells at the tested concentrations. IDR-1018 modulated the cytokine profile during challenge of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with heat-killed C. albicans (HKCA) antigens by increasing monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels, while suppressing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 levels. Mice treated with IDR-1018 at 10 mg · kg(-1) of body weight had an increased survival rate in the candidemia model compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated mice, together with a diminished kidney fungal burden. Thus, IDR-1018 was able to protect against murine experimental candidemia and has the potential as an adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  15. Structural basis for the enhanced stability of protein model compounds and peptide backbone unit in ammonium ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantha, T; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Devi, R S Rama

    2012-10-04

    Protein folding/unfolding is a fascinating study in the presence of cosolvents, which protect/disrupt the native structure of protein, respectively. The structure and stability of proteins and their functional groups may be modulated by the addition of cosolvents. Ionic liquids (ILs) are finding a vast array of applications as novel cosolvents for a wide variety of biochemical processes that include protein folding. Here, the systematic and quantitative apparent transfer free energies (ΔG'(tr)) of protein model compounds from water to ILs through solubility measurements as a function of IL concentration at 25 °C have been exploited to quantify and interpret biomolecular interactions between model compounds of glycine peptides (GPs) with ammonium based ILs. The investigated aqueous systems consist of zwitterionic glycine peptides: glycine (Gly), diglycine (Gly(2)), triglycine (Gly(3)), tetraglycine (Gly(4)), and cyclic glycylglycine (c(GG)) in the presence of six ILs such as diethylammonium acetate (DEAA), diethylammonium hydrogen sulfate (DEAS), triethylammonium acetate (TEAA), triethylammonium hydrogen sulfate (TEAS), triethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (TEAP), and trimethylammonium acetate (TMAA). We have observed positive values of ΔG'(tr) for GPs from water to ILs, indicating that interactions between ILs and GPs are unfavorable, which leads to stabilization of the structure of model protein compounds. Moreover, our experimental data ΔG'(tr) is used to obtain transfer free energies (Δg'(tr)) of the peptide backbone unit (or glycyl unit) (-CH(2)C═ONH-), which is the most numerous group in globular proteins, from water to IL solutions. To obtain the mechanism events of the ILs' role in enhancing the stability of the model compounds, we have further obtained m-values for GPs from solubility limits. These results explicitly elucidate that all alkyl ammonium ILs act as stabilizers for model compounds through the exclusion of ILs from model compounds of

  16. Continuum modeling investigation of gigahertz oscillators based on a C60 fullerene inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, F.; Ansari, R.; Darvizeh, M.

    2016-02-01

    Research concerning the fabrication of nano-oscillators with operating frequency in the gigahertz (GHz) range has become a focal point in recent years. In this paper, a new type of GHz oscillators is introduced based on a C60 fullerene inside a cyclic peptide nanotube (CPN). To study the dynamic behavior of such nano-oscillators, using the continuum approximation in conjunction with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function, analytical expressions are derived to determine the van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction force between the two interacting molecules. Employing Newton's second law, the equation of motion is solved numerically to arrive at the telescopic oscillatory motion of a C60 fullerene inside CPNs. It is shown that the fullerene molecule exhibits different kinds of oscillation inside peptide nanotubes which are sensitive to the system parameters. Furthermore, for the precise evaluation of the oscillation frequency, a novel semi-analytical expression is proposed based on the conservation of the mechanical energy principle. Numerical results are presented to comprehensively study the effects of the number of peptide units and initial conditions (initial separation distance and velocity) on the oscillatory behavior of C60 -CPN oscillators. It is found out that for peptide nanotubes comprised of one unit, the maximum achievable frequency is obtained when the inner core oscillates with respect to its preferred positions located outside the tube, while for other numbers of peptide units, such frequency is obtained when the inner core oscillates with respect to the preferred positions situated in the space between the two first or the two last units. It is further found out that four peptide units are sufficient to obtain the optimal frequency.

  17. Unbound position II in MXCXXC metallochaperone model peptides impacts metal binding mode and reactivity: Distinct similarities to whole proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshan, Michal S; Dekel, Noa; Goch, Wojciech; Shalev, Deborah E; Danieli, Tsafi; Lebendiker, Mario; Bal, Wojciech; Tshuva, Edit Y

    2016-06-01

    The effect of position II in the binding sequence of copper metallochaperones, which varies between Thr and His, was investigated through structural analysis and affinity and oxidation kinetic studies of model peptides. A first Cys-Cu(I)-Cys model obtained for the His peptide at acidic and neutral pH, correlated with higher affinity and more rapid oxidation of its complex; in contrast, the Thr peptide with the Cys-Cu(I)-Met coordination under neutral conditions demonstrated weaker and pH dependent binding. Studies with human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) and three of its mutants where S residues were replaced with Ala suggested that (a) the binding affinity is influenced more by the binding sequence than by the protein fold (b) pH may play a role in binding reactivity, and (c) mutating the Met impacted the affinity and oxidation rate more drastically than did mutating one of the Cys, supporting its important role in protein function. Position II thus plays a dominant role in metal binding and transport.

  18. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA): A model structure for the primordial genetic material?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Peter Egil

    1993-12-01

    It is proposed that the primordial genetic material could have been peptide nucleic aicds,i.e., DNA analogues having a peptide backbone. PNA momomers based on the amino acid, α, γ-diaminobutyric acid or ornithine are suggested as compounds that could have been formed in the prebiotic soup. Finally, the possibility of a PNA/RNA world is presented, in which PNA constitutes the stable genetic material, while RNA which may be polymerized using the PNA as template accounts for enzymatic activities including PNA replication.

  19. The triple helical structure and stability of collagen model peptide with 4(S)-hydroxyprolyl-Pro-Gly units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motooka, Daisuke; Kawahara, Kazuki; Nakamura, Shota; Doi, Masamitsu; Nishi, Yoshinori; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kang, Young Kee; Nakazawa, Takashi; Uchiyama, Susumu; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Extensive studies on the structure of collagen have revealed that the hydroxylation of Pro residues in a variety of model peptides with the typical (X-Y-Gly)(n) repeats (X and Y: Pro and its analogues) represents one of the major factors influencing the stability of triple helices. While(2S,4R)-hydroxyproline (Hyp) at the position Y stabilizes the triple helix, (2S,4S)-hydroxyproline (hyp) at the X-position destabilizes the helix as demonstrated that the triple helix of (hyp-Pro-Gly)(15) is less stable than that of (Pro-Pro-Gly)(15) and that a shorter peptide (hyp-Pro-Gly)(10) does not form the helix. To clarify the role of the hydroxyl group of Pro residues to play in the stabilization mechanism of the collagen triple helix, we synthesized and crystallized a model peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)(4) -(hyp-Pro-Gly)(2) -(Pro-Hyp-Gly)(4) and analyzed its structure by X-ray crystallography and CD spectroscopy. In the crystal, the main-chain of this peptide forms a typical collagen like triple helix. The majority of hyp residues take down pucker with exceptionally shallow angles probably to relieve steric hindrance, but the remainders protrude the hydroxyl group toward solvent with the less favorable up pucker to fit in a triple helix. There is no indication of the existence of an intra-molecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl moiety and the carbonyl oxygen of hyp supposed to destabilize the triple helix. We also compared the conformational energies of up and down packers of the pyrrolidine ring in Ac-hyp-NMe(2) by quantum mechanical calculations.

  20. Induction of ELF transmembrane potentials in relation to power-frequency electric field bioeffects in a plant root model system. Pt. 1. Relationship between applied field strength and cucurbitaceous root growth rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brayman, A.A.; Miller, M.W.

    1986-08-01

    Seminal roots of Cucumis sativus and Cucurbita maxima were exposed to 60 Hz electric fields of 100-500 V . m/sup -1/ in a conducting aqueous inorganic growth medium. Root growth rates were measured to produce a dose-response relationship for each species. The species were selected for study because of their familial relationship, reported sensitivity to 60 Hz, 360 V . m/sup -1/ electric fields, and differing average root cell sizes. The latter characteristic influences the magnitude of ELF membrane potentials induced by constant-strength applied electric fields, but does not affect the magnitude of the electric field strength tangent to the cell surface. The difference in average root cell size between C. sativus (smaller cells) and C. maxima (larger cells) was used to evaluate two alternate hypotheses that the observed effect on root growth is stimulated by the electric field tangent to the cell surface, or a field-induced perturbation in the normal transmembrane potential of the cells. The results of the dose-response relationship studies are qualitatively consistent with the hypothesis that the effect is elicited by induced transmembrane potentials. The smaller-celled roots showed a substantially higher response threshold (C. sativus; E/sub 0/sup(TH) approx.= 330 V . m/sup -1/) than did the larger-celled species (C. maxima; E/sub 0/sup(TH) approx.= 200 V . m/sup -1/). At field strengths above the response thresholds in both species, the growth rate of C. sativus roots was less affected than that of C. maxima roots exposed to the same field strength.

  1. Virus-Encoded 7 Transmembrane Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølleskov-Jensen, Ann-Sofie; Oliveira, MarthaTrindade; Farrell, Helen Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are an ancient group which have exploited gene capture of multiple cellular modulators of the immune response. Viral homologues of 7 transmembrane receptors (v7TMRs) are a consistent feature of beta- and gammaherpesviruses; the majority of the v7TMRs are homologous to cellular...... chemokine receptors (CKRs). Conserved families of v7TMRs distinguish between beta- versus gammaherpesviruses; furthermore, significant divisions within these subfamilies, such as between genera of the gammaherpesviruses or between the primate and rodent cytomegaloviruses, coincide with specific v7TMR gene...... families. Divergence of functional properties between the viral 7TMR and their cellular counterparts is likely, therefore, to reflect adaptation supporting various aspects of the viral lifecycle with concomitant effects upon viral pathogenesis. Consistent with their long evolutionary history, the v7TMRs...

  2. Transmembrane protein sorting driven by membrane curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, H.; Ronneau, S.; González, B. Solana; Klutsch, D.; Schaffner-Barbero, C.; Hamoen, L. W.

    2015-11-01

    The intricate structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells depends on the ability to target proteins to specific cellular locations. In most cases, we have a poor understanding of the underlying mechanisms. A typical example is the assembly of bacterial chemoreceptors at cell poles. Here we show that the classical chemoreceptor TlpA of Bacillus subtilis does not localize according to the consensus stochastic nucleation mechanism but accumulates at strongly curved membrane areas generated during cell division. This preference was confirmed by accumulation at non-septal curved membranes. Localization appears to be an intrinsic property of the protein complex and does not rely on chemoreceptor clustering, as was previously shown for Escherichia coli. By constructing specific amino-acid substitutions, we demonstrate that the preference for strongly curved membranes arises from the curved shape of chemoreceptor trimer of dimers. These findings demonstrate that the intrinsic shape of transmembrane proteins can determine their cellular localization.

  3. Molecular mechanisms for generating transmembrane proton gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M R; Amin, Muhamed; Zhu, Xuyu; Lu, Jianxun

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins use the energy of light or high energy substrates to build a transmembrane proton gradient through a series of reactions leading to proton release into the lower pH compartment (P-side) and proton uptake from the higher pH compartment (N-side). This review considers how the proton affinity of the substrates, cofactors and amino acids are modified in four proteins to drive proton transfers. Bacterial reaction centers (RCs) and photosystem II (PSII) carry out redox chemistry with the species to be oxidized on the P-side while reduction occurs on the N-side of the membrane. Terminal redox cofactors are used which have pKas that are strongly dependent on their redox state, so that protons are lost on oxidation and gained on reduction. Bacteriorhodopsin is a true proton pump. Light activation triggers trans to cis isomerization of a bound retinal. Strong electrostatic interactions within clusters of amino acids are modified by the conformational changes initiated by retinal motion leading to changes in proton affinity, driving transmembrane proton transfer. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) catalyzes the reduction of O2 to water. The protons needed for chemistry are bound from the N-side. The reduction chemistry also drives proton pumping from N- to P-side. Overall, in CcO the uptake of 4 electrons to reduce O2 transports 8 charges across the membrane, with each reduction fully coupled to removal of two protons from the N-side, the delivery of one for chemistry and transport of the other to the P-side.

  4. Specificity of transmembrane protein palmitoylation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayelén González Montoro

    Full Text Available Many proteins are modified after their synthesis, by the addition of a lipid molecule to one or more cysteine residues, through a thioester bond. This modification is called S-acylation, and more commonly palmitoylation. This reaction is carried out by a family of enzymes, called palmitoyltransferases (PATs, characterized by the presence of a conserved 50- aminoacids domain called "Asp-His-His-Cys- Cysteine Rich Domain" (DHHC-CRD. There are 7 members of this family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and each of these proteins is thought to be responsible for the palmitoylation of a subset of substrates. Substrate specificity of PATs, however, is not yet fully understood. Several yeast PATs seem to have overlapping specificity, and it has been proposed that the machinery responsible for palmitoylating peripheral membrane proteins in mammalian cells, lacks specificity altogether.Here we investigate the specificity of transmembrane protein palmitoylation in S. cerevisiae, which is carried out predominantly by two PATs, Swf1 and Pfa4. We show that palmitoylation of transmembrane substrates requires dedicated PATs, since other yeast PATs are mostly unable to perform Swf1 or Pfa4 functions, even when overexpressed. Furthermore, we find that Swf1 is highly specific for its substrates, as it is unable to substitute for other PATs. To identify where Swf1 specificity lies, we carried out a bioinformatics survey to identify amino acids responsible for the determination of specificity or Specificity Determination Positions (SDPs and showed experimentally, that mutation of the two best SDP candidates, A145 and K148, results in complete and partial loss of function, respectively. These residues are located within the conserved catalytic DHHC domain suggesting that it could also be involved in the determination of specificity. Finally, we show that modifying the position of the cysteines in Tlg1, a Swf1 substrate, results in lack of palmitoylation, as

  5. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  6. Metabolic changes precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of Abeta peptide toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibireT...

  7. Modeling the Interaction of Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles with the Anticoccidial Peptide PW2 Guided by NMR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gomes-Neto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are highly dynamic entities that acquire structure upon binding to a membrane interface. To better understand the structure and the mechanism for the molecular recognition of dodecylphosphocholine (DPC micelles by the anticoccidial peptide PW2, we performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations guided by NMR experimental data, focusing on strategies to explore the transient nature of micelles, which rearrange on a millisecond to second timescale. We simulated the association of PW2 with a pre-built DPC micelle and with free-DPC molecules that spontaneously forms micelles in the presence of the peptide along the simulation. The simulation with spontaneous micelle formation provided the adequate environment which replicated the experimental data. The unrestrained MD simulations reproduced the NMR structure for the entire 100 ns MD simulation time. Hidden discrete conformational states could be described. Coulomb interactions are important for initial approximation and hydrogen bonds for anchoring the aromatic region at the interface, being essential for the stabilization of the interaction. Arg9 is strongly attached with phosphate. We observed a helix elongation process stabilized by the intermolecular peptide-micelle association. Full association that mimics the experimental data only happens after complete micelle re-association. Fast micelle dynamics without dissociation of surfactants leads to only superficial binding.

  8. ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Ramjeesingh, M; Wang, W; Garami, E; Hewryk, M; Lee, D; Rommens, J M; Galley, K; Bear, C E

    1996-11-08

    The gene mutated in cystic fibrosis codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cyclic AMP-activated chloride channel thought to be critical for salt and water transport by epithelial cells. Plausible models exist to describe a role for ATP hydrolysis in CFTR channel activity; however, biochemical evidence that CFTR possesses intrinsic ATPase activity is lacking. In this study, we report the first measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis by purified, reconstituted CFTR. The mutation CFTRG551D resides within a motif conserved in many nucleotidases and is known to cause severe human disease. Following reconstitution the mutant protein exhibited both defective ATP hydrolysis and channel gating, providing direct evidence that CFTR utilizes ATP to gate its channel activity.

  9. Influence of glycine residues on peptide conformation in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S C; Deber, C M

    1992-01-01

    Transmembrane (TM) segments of integral membrane proteins are putatively alpha-helical in conformation, yet their primary sequences are rich in residues known in globular proteins as helix-breakers (Gly) and beta-sheet promoters (Ile, Val, Thr). To examine the specific 2 degrees structure propensities of such residues in membrane environments, we have now designed and synthesized a series of model 20-residue peptides with "guest" hydrophobia segments embedded in "host" N- and C-terminal hydrophilic matrices. Molecular design was based on the prototypical sequence NH2-(Ser-Lys)2-Ala5-Leu6-x7-Ala8-Leu9-y10-Trp 11-Ala12-Leu13-z14-(Lys-Ser)3-OH. The 10-residue hydrophobic mid-segment 5-14 is expected to act as ca. three turns of an alpha-helix. In the present work, we compare the 20-residue peptide having three "helix-forming" Ala residues [x = y = z = Ala (peptide 3A)] to the corresponding peptide 3G (x = y = z = Gly) which contains three "helix-breaking" Gly residues. Trp was inserted to provide a measure of aromatic character typical of TM segments; Ser and Lys enhanced solubility in aqueous media. Circular dichroism studies in water, in a membrane-mimetic [sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS)], medium, and in methanol solutions, demonstrated the exquisite sensitivity of the conformations of these peptides to environment, and proved that despite its backbone flexibility, Gly can be accommodated as readily as Ala into a hydrophobic alpha-helix in a membrane. Nevertheless, the relative stability of Ala- vs. Gly-containing helices emerged in methanol solvent titration and temperature dependence experiments in SDS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Stability improvement of natural food colors: Impact of amino acid and peptide addition on anthocyanin stability in model beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2017-03-01

    Anthocyanins are prone to chemical degradation and color fading in the presence of vitamin C. The potential of three amino acids (l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, l-tryptophan) and a polypeptide (ε-poly-l-lysine) in prolonging the color stability of purple carrot anthocyanins (0.025%) in model beverages (0.05% l-ascorbic acid, citric acid, pH 3.0) stored at elevated temperature (40°C/7 days) was examined. In the absence of amino acids or peptides, anthocyanin degraded at first-order reaction rate. Addition of amino acids or peptide (0.1%) increased the color stability of anthocyanins, with the most significant improvement observed for l-tryptophan. The average half-life of anthocyanin color increased from 2 days to 6 days with l-tryptophan addition. Fluorescence quenching measurements revealed that the l-tryptophan interacted with anthocyanins mainly through hydrogen bonding, although some hydrophobic interaction may also have been involved. Overall, this study suggests that amino acid or peptide addition may prolong the color stability of anthocyanin in beverage products.

  11. Reversal of diabetic vasculopathy in a rat model of type 1 diabetes by opiorphin-related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calenda, Giulia; Tong, Yuehong; Kanika, Nirmala D; Tar, Moses T; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Zhang, Xinhua; Melman, Arnold; Rougeot, Catherine; Davies, Kelvin P

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes results in a myriad of vascular complications, often referred to as diabetic vasculopathy, which encompasses both microvascular [erectile dysfunction (ED), retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy] and macrovascular complications (hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction). In diabetic animals and patients with ED, there is decreased opiorphin or opiorphin-related gene expression in corporal tissue. Both opiorphin and the rat homologous peptide sialorphin are found circulating in the plasma. In the present study, we investigated if diabetes induced changes in plasma sialorphin levels and if changes in these levels could modulate the biochemistry and physiology of vascular smooth muscle. We show that circulating sialorphin levels are reduced in a rat model of type I diabetes. Intracorporal injection of plasmids expressing sialorphin into diabetic rats restores sialorphin levels to those seen in the blood of nondiabetic animals and results in both improved erectile function and blood pressure. Sialorphin modulated the ability of C-type natriuretic peptide to relax both corporal and aortic smooth muscle strips and of bradykinin to regulate intracellular calcium levels in both corporal and aortic smooth muscle cells. We have previously shown that expression of genes encoding opiorphins is increased when erectile function is improved. Our findings thus suggest that by affecting circulating levels of opiorphin-related peptides, proper erectile function is not only an indicator but also a modulator of overall vascular health of a man.

  12. OMP Peptides Activate the DegS Stress-Sensor Protease by a Relief of Inhibition Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; MIT

    2010-03-19

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  13. Transmembrane helices in "classical" nuclear reproductive steroid receptors: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2015-01-01

    Steroid receptors of the nuclear receptor superfamily are proposed to be either: 1) located in the cytosol and moved to the cell nucleus upon activation, 2) tethered to the inside of the plasma membrane, or 3) retained in the nucleus until free steroid hormone enters and activates specific receptors. Using computational methods to analyze peptide receptor topology, we find that the "classical" nuclear receptors for progesterone (PRB/PGR), androgen (ARB/AR) and estrogen (ER1/ESR1) contain two transmembrane helices (TMH) within their ligand-binding domains (LBD).The MEMSAT-SVM algorithm indicates that ARB and ER2 (but not PRB or ER1) contain a pore-lining (channel-forming) region which may merge with other pore-lining regions to form a membrane channel. ER2 lacks a TMH, but contains a single pore-lining region. The MemBrain algorithm predicts that PRB, ARB and ER1 each contain one TMH plus a half TMH separated by 51 amino acids.ER2 contains two half helices. The TM-2 helices of ARB, ER1 and ER2 each contain 9-13 amino acid motifs reported to translocate the receptor to the plasma membrane, as well as cysteine palmitoylation sites. PoreWalker analysis of X-ray crystallographic data identifies a pore or channel within the LBDs of ARB and ER1 and predicts that 70 and 72 residues are pore-lining residues, respectively. The data suggest that (except for ER2), cytosolic receptors become anchored to the plasma membrane following synthesis. Half-helices and pore-lining regions in turn form functional ion channels and/or facilitate passive steroid uptake into the cell. In perspective, steroid-dependent insertion of "classical" receptors containing pore-lining regions into the plasma membrane may regulate permeability to ions such as Ca(2+), Na(+) or K(+), as well as facilitate steroid translocation into the nucleus.

  14. Peptide-induced de novo bone formation after tooth extraction prevents alveolar bone loss in a murine tooth extraction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Ono, Takashi; Murali, Ramachandran; Mise-Omata, Setsuko; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2016-07-05

    Tooth extraction causes bone resorption of the alveolar bone volume. Although recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) markedly promotes de novo bone formation after tooth extraction, the application of high-dose rhBMP-2 may induce side effects, such as swelling, seroma, and an increased cancer risk. Therefore, reduction of the necessary dose of rhBMP-2 which can still obtain sufficient bone mass is necessary by developing a new osteogenic reagent. Recently, we showed that the systemic administration of OP3-4 peptide, which was originally designed as a bone resorption inhibitor, had osteogenic ability both in vitro and in vivo. This study evaluated the ability of the local application of OP3-4 peptide to promote bone formation in a murine tooth extraction model with a very low-dose of BMP. The mandibular incisor was extracted from 10-week-old C57BL6/J male mice and a gelatin hydrogel containing rhBMP-2 with or without OP3-4 peptide (BMP/OP3-4) was applied to the socket of the incisor. Bone formation inside the socket was examined radiologically and histologically at 21 days after the extraction. The BMP/OP3-4-group showed significant bone formation inside the mandibular extraction socket compared to the gelatin-hydrogel-carrier-control group or rhBMP-2-applied group. The BMP/OP3-4-applied mice showed a lower reduction of alveolar bone and fewer osteoclast numbers, suggesting that the newly formed bone inside the socket may prevent resorption of the cortical bone around the extraction socket. Our data revealed that OP3-4 peptide promotes BMP-mediated bone formation inside the extraction socket of mandibular bone, resulting in preservation from the loss of alveolar bone.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Riz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP-channels to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release.

  16. Mathematical Modeling of Interacting Glucose-Sensing Mechanisms and Electrical Activity Underlying Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riz, Michela; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal L-cells sense glucose and other nutrients, and in response release glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY and other hormones with anti-diabetic and weight-reducing effects. The stimulus-secretion pathway in L-cells is still poorly understood, although it is known that GLP-1 secreting cells use sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT) and ATP-sensitive K+-channels (K(ATP)-channels) to sense intestinal glucose levels. Electrical activity then transduces glucose sensing to Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis. This particular glucose-sensing arrangement with glucose triggering both a depolarizing SGLT current as well as leading to closure of the hyperpolarizing K(ATP) current is of more general interest for our understanding of glucose-sensing cells. To dissect the interactions of these two glucose-sensing mechanisms, we build a mathematical model of electrical activity underlying GLP-1 secretion. Two sets of model parameters are presented: one set represents primary mouse colonic L-cells; the other set is based on data from the GLP-1 secreting GLUTag cell line. The model is then used to obtain insight into the differences in glucose-sensing between primary L-cells and GLUTag cells. Our results illuminate how the two glucose-sensing mechanisms interact, and suggest that the depolarizing effect of SGLT currents is modulated by K(ATP)-channel activity. Based on our simulations, we propose that primary L-cells encode the glucose signal as changes in action potential amplitude, whereas GLUTag cells rely mainly on frequency modulation. The model should be useful for further basic, pharmacological and theoretical investigations of the cellular signals underlying endogenous GLP-1 and peptide YY release.

  17. Model prodrugs designed for the intestinal peptide transporter. A synthetic approach for coupling of hydroxy-containing compounds to dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, G M; Nielsen, C U; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human peptide transporter, hPepT1, situated in the small intestine, may be exploited to increase absorption of drugs or model drugs by attaching them to a dipeptide, which is recognised by hPepT1. A synthetic protocol for this kind of model prodrugs was developed, in which model drugs...... intestine and be converted to the parent drug during or after transport into the blood circulation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent in the 4-position of the phenyl ring on stability in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4, corresponding to pH in jejunum...... and blood, respectively. In addition, the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent on stability upon storage was examined. Model prodrugs containing electron donating substituents in the 4-position of the phenyl ring decomposed upon storage, while model prodrugs containing no substituents...

  18. Modeling the interactions of a peptide-major histocompatibility class I ligand with its receptors. I. Recognition by two alpha beta T cell receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rognan, D; Stryhn, A; Fugger, L

    2000-01-01

    dynamics. Next, three-dimensional models of two different T cell receptors (TCRs) both specific for the Ha255-262/Kk complex were generated based on previously published TCR X-ray structures. Finally, guided by the recently published X-ray structures of ternary TCR/peptide/MHC-I complexes, the TCR models...... the models. They were found to account well for the experimentally obtained data, lending considerable support to the proposed models and suggesting a universal docking mode for alpha beta TCRs to MHC-peptide complexes. Such models may also be useful in guiding future rational experimentation....

  19. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  20. Symbiotic Plant Peptides Eliminate Candida albicans Both In Vitro and in an Epithelial Infection Model and Inhibit the Proliferation of Immortalized Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilla Ördögh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of multidrug-resistant microbes now emerging necessitates the identification of novel antimicrobial agents. Plants produce a great variety of antimicrobial peptides including hundreds of small, nodule-specific cysteine-rich NCR peptides that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, govern the differentiation of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria and, in vitro, can display potent antibacterial activities. In this study, the potential candidacidal activity of 19 NCR peptides was investigated. Cationic NCR peptides having an isoelectric point above 9 were efficient in killing Candida albicans, one of the most common fungal pathogens of humans. None of the tested NCR peptides were toxic for immortalized human epithelial cells at concentrations that effectively killed the fungus; however, at higher concentrations, some of them inhibited the division of the cells. Furthermore, the cationic peptides successfully inhibited C. albicans induced human epithelial cell death in an in vitro coculture model. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cationic NCR peptides in the treatment of candidiasis.

  1. Molecular Modeling of PEGylated Peptides, Dendrimers, and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwankyu Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG has been conjugated to many drugs or drug carriers to increase their solubility and circulating lifetime, and reduce toxicity. This has motivated many experimental studies to understand the effect of PEGylation on delivery efficiency. To complement the experimental findings and uncover the mechanism that cannot be captured by experiments, all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD simulations have been performed. This has become possible, due to recent advances in simulation methodologies and computational power. Simulations of PEGylated peptides show that PEG chains wrap antimicrobial peptides and weaken their binding interactions with lipid bilayers. PEGylation also influences the helical stability and tertiary structure of coiled-coil peptides. PEGylated dendrimers and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs were simulated, showing that the PEG size and grafting density significantly modulate the conformation and structure of the PEGylated complex, the interparticle aggregation, and the interaction with lipid bilayers. In particular, simulations predicted the structural transition between the dense core and dense shell of PEGylated dendrimers, the phase behavior of self-assembled complexes of lipids, PEGylated lipids, and SWNTs, which all favorably compared with experiments. Overall, these new findings indicate that simulations can now predict the experimentally observed structure and dynamics, as well as provide atomic-scale insights into the interactions of PEGylated complexes with other molecules.

  2. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  3. The CNTF-derived peptide mimetic Cintrofin attenuates spatial-learning deficits in a rat post-status epilepticus model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russmann, Vera; Seeger, Natalie; Zellinger, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic growth factor is considered a potential therapeutic agent for central nervous system diseases. We report first in vivo data of the ciliary neurotrophic growth factor peptide mimetic Cintrofin in a rat post-status epilepticus model. Cintrofin prevented long-term alterations...... in the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal progenitor cells and attenuated the persistence of basal dendrites. In contrast, Cintrofin did neither affect acute status epilepticus-associated alterations in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis nor reveal any relevant effect on seizure activity...

  4. Wheat peptides reduce oxidative stress and inhibit NO production through modulating μ-opioid receptor in a rat NSAID-induced stomach damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Cai, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Shao-Kang; Yang, Li-Gang; Sun, Gui-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce tissue damage and oxidative stress in animal models of stomach damage. In the present study, the protective effects of wheat peptides were evaluated in a NSAID-induced stomach damage model in rats. Different doses of wheat peptides or distilled water were administered daily by gavage for 30 days before the rat stomach damage model was established by administration of NSAIDs (aspirin and indomethacin) into the digestive tract twice. The treatment of wheat peptides decreased the NSAID-induced gastric epithelial cell degeneration and oxidative stress and NO levels in the rats. Wheat peptides significantly increased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and decreased iNOS activity in stomach. The mRNA expression level of μ-opioid receptor was significantly decreased in wheat peptides-treated rats than that in in the control rats. The results suggest that NSAID drugs induced stomach damage in rats, wchih can be prevented by wheat peptides. The mechanisms for the protective effects were most likely through reducing NSAID-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Model Peptide Studies Reveal a Mixed Histidine-Methionine Cu(I) Binding Site at the N-Terminus of Human Copper Transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushie, M Jake; Shaw, Katharine; Franz, Katherine J; Shearer, Jason; Haas, Kathryn L

    2015-09-08

    Copper is a vital metal cofactor in enzymes that are essential to myriad biological processes. Cellular acquisition of copper is primarily accomplished through the Ctr family of plasma membrane copper transport proteins. Model peptide studies indicate that the human Ctr1 N-terminus binds to Cu(II) with high affinity through an amino terminal Cu(II), Ni(II) (ATCUN) binding site. Unlike typical ATCUN-type peptides, the Ctr1 peptide facilitates the ascorbate-dependent reduction of Cu(II) bound in its ATCUN site by virtue of an adjacent HH (bis-His) sequence in the peptide. It is likely that the Cu(I) coordination environment influences the redox behavior of Cu bound to this peptide; however, the identity and coordination geometry of the Cu(I) site has not been elucidated from previous work. Here, we show data from NMR, XAS, and structural modeling that sheds light on the identity of the Cu(I) binding site of a Ctr1 model peptide. The Cu(I) site includes the same bis-His site identified in previous work to facilitate ascorbate-dependent Cu(II) reduction. The data presented here are consistent with a rational mechanism by which Ctr1 provides coordination environments that facilitate Cu(II) reduction prior to Cu(I) transport.

  6. Ability of innate defence regulator peptides IDR-1002, IDR-HH2 and IDR-1018 to protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Rivas-Santiago

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an ongoing threat to global health, especially with the emergence of multi drug-resistant (MDR and extremely drug-resistant strains that are motivating the search for new treatment strategies. One potential strategy is immunotherapy using Innate Defence Regulator (IDR peptides that selectively modulate innate immunity, enhancing chemokine induction and cell recruitment while suppressing potentially harmful inflammatory responses. IDR peptides possess only modest antimicrobial activity but have profound immunomodulatory functions that appear to be influential in resolving animal model infections. The IDR peptides HH2, 1018 and 1002 were tested for their activity against two M. tuberculosis strains, one drug-sensitive and the other MDR in both in vitro and in vivo models. All peptides showed no cytotoxic activity and only modest direct antimicrobial activity versus M. tuberculosis (MIC of 15-30 µg/ml. Nevertheless peptides HH2 and 1018 reduced bacillary loads in animal models with both the virulent drug susceptible H37Rv strain and an MDR isolate and, especially 1018 led to a considerable reduction in lung inflammation as revealed by decreased pneumonia. These results indicate that IDR peptides have potential as a novel immunotherapy against TB.

  7. [SPC/E and TIP4P models for investigation of the conformational mobility of the insulin superfamily peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontova, O I

    2014-01-01

    In this work we carried out a comparative analysis of the two most popular water models-SPC/E and TIP4P and estimated the ability of using ones for insulin superfamily peptides-proinsulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGF1 and IGF2). It was shown that root-mean-square deviations and radius of gyration had tend to be in reversed phase when both water models were used. Only IGF1 had a plateau after 9000 ps. In addition, it was shown that in spite of the general nature of insulin-like packing maintenance, there were some differences in the secondary structures, when we used TIP4P and SPC/E. These differences could influence on the overall molecule dynamics and the ability to accept necessary conformation for interaction with cognate receptors. On the basis of the received data we concluded that it is necessary to use several, not one, water models for the study of the peptides conformational mobility.

  8. Transmembrane potentials of canine AV junctional tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, W W

    1986-06-01

    The atrioventricular (AV) junction comprises the AV node, His bundle (HB), and specialized tissues proximal to the node called paranodal fibers (PNF). In the present study, an in vitro, dissection-exposed canine right atrial (RA), transitional fiber (TF), AV junctional preparation was used. The TF and PNF formed a pathway running along the base of the septal cusp of the tricuspid valve (SCTV). In the first experiment, impulses elicited at the RA were monitored to propagate sequentially through the TF, PNF, AV node, and then the HB. This functional evidence supports the concept that a conduction pathway connecting the RA and the AV node exists along the base of the SCTV. This internodal pathway is referred to as the septal cusp pathway. In another experiment, transmembrane potentials and Vmax were determined on each of the AV junctional tissues. Results showed that PNF had the lowest Vmax (2.5 V/sec), followed by AV node (7.0 V/sec) and HB (33 V/sec). This finding showed that PNF, and not the AV node, has the lowest Vmax, suggesting that the PNF has the lowest conductivity among the AV junctional tissues, and this study advances our understanding on the mechanism of AV conduction delay in dog hearts.

  9. Agonists and inverse agonists for the herpesvirus 8-encoded constitutively active seven-transmembrane oncogene product, ORF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1999-01-01

    A number of CXC chemokines competed with similar, nanomolar affinity against 125I-interleukin-8 (IL-8) binding to ORF-74, a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8. However, in competition against 125I-labeled growth-related oncogene (GRO)-alpha, the ORF-74...... receptor was highly selective for GRO peptides, with IL-8 being 10,000-fold less potent. The constitutive stimulating activity of ORF-74 on phosphatidylinositol turnover was not influenced by, for example, IL-8 binding. In contrast, GRO peptides acted as potent agonists in stimulating ORF-74 signaling......, whereas IP-10 and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha surprisingly acted as inverse agonists. These peptides had similar pharmacological properties with regard to enhancing or inhibiting, respectively, the stimulatory effect of ORF-74 on NIH-3T3 cell proliferation. Construction of a high affinity zinc...

  10. Coarse-grained simulations of hemolytic peptide δ-lysin interacting with a POPC bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Mariah J; Bennett, Ashley L; Almeida, Paulo F; Lee, Hee-Seung

    2016-12-01

    δ-lysin, secreted by a Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, is a 26-residue membrane active peptide that shares many common features with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). However, it possesses a few unique features that differentiate itself from typical AMPs. In particular, δ-lysin has zero net charge, even though it has many charged residues, and it preferentially lyses eukaryotic cells over bacterial cells. Here, we present the results of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of δ-lysin interacting with a zwitterionic membrane over a wide range of peptide concentrations. When the peptides concentration is low, spontaneous dimerization of peptides is observed on the membrane surface, but deep insertion of peptides or pore formation was not observed. However, the calculated free energy of peptide insertion suggests that a small fraction of peptides is likely to be present inside the membrane at the peptide concentrations typically seen in dye efflux experiments. When the simulations with multiple peptides are carried out with a single pre-inserted transmembrane peptide, spontaneous pore formation occurs with a peptide-to-lipid ratio (P/L) as low as P/L=1:42. Inter-peptide salt bridges among the transmembrane peptides seem to play a role in creating compact pores with very low level of hydration. More importantly, the transmembrane peptides making up the pore are constantly pushed to the opposite side of the membrane when the mass imbalance between the two sides of membrane is significant. Thus, the pore is very dynamic, allowing multiple peptides to translocate across the membrane simultaneously.

  11. Incorporation of antimicrobial peptides into membranes: a combined liquid-state NMR and molecular dynamics study of alamethicin in DMPC/DHPC bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, Jens; Thøgersen, Lea; Underhaug, Jarl; Bertelsen, Kresten; Vosegaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Jan M; Schiøtt, Birgit; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2009-05-14

    Detailed insight into the interplay between antimicrobial peptides and biological membranes is fundamental to our understanding of the mechanism of bacterial ion channels and the action of these in biological host-defense systems. To explore this interplay, we have studied the incorporation, membrane-bound structure, and conformation of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin in lipid bilayers using a combination of 1H liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. On the basis of experimental NMR data, we evaluate simple in-plane and transmembrane incorporation models as well as pore formation for alamethicin in DMPC/DHPC (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bicelles. Peptide-lipid nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data support a transmembrane configuration of the peptide in the bilayers, but they also reveal that the system cannot be described by a single simple conformational model because there is a very high degree of dynamics and heterogeneity in the three-component system. To explore the origin of this heterogeneity and dynamics, we have compared the NOE and PRE data with MD simulations of an ensemble of alamethicin peptides in a DMPC bilayer. From all-atom MD simulations, the contacts between peptide, lipid, and water protons are quantified over a time interval up to 95 ns. The MD simulations provide a statistical base that reflects our NMR data and even can explain some initially surprising NMR results concerning specific interactions between alamethicin and the lipids.

  12. Characterisation of the membrane affinity of an isoniazide peptide conjugate by tensiometry, atomic force microscopy and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, using a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katalin; Pénzes, Csanád Botond; Schnöller, Donát; Horváti, Kata; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc; Keszthelyi, Tamás; Kiss, Eva

    2010-10-07

    Tensiometry, sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed to assess the cell penetration ability of a peptide conjugate of the antituberculotic agent isoniazide. Isoniazide was conjugated to peptide (91)SEFAYGSFVRTVSLPV(106), a functional T-cell epitope of the immunodominant 16 kDa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a simple but versatile model of the cell membrane a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer at the liquid/air interface was used. Changes induced in the structure of the phospholipid monolayer by injection of the peptide conjugate into the subphase were followed by tensiometry and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The drug penetrated lipid films were transferred to a solid support by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and their structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Peptide conjugation was found to strongly enhance the cell penetration ability of isoniazide.

  13. MOLS 2.0: software package for peptide modeling and protein-ligand docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D Sam; Gautham, N

    2016-10-01

    We previously developed an algorithm to perform conformational searches of proteins and peptides, and to perform the docking of ligands to protein receptors. In order to identify optimal conformations and docked poses, this algorithm uses mutually orthogonal Latin squares (MOLS) to rationally sample the vast conformational (or docking) space, and then analyzes this relatively small sample using a variant of mean field theory. The conformational search part of the algorithm was denoted MOLS 1.0. The docking portion of the algorithm, which allows only "flexible ligand/rigid receptor" docking, was denoted MOLSDOCK. Both are FORTRAN-based command-line-only molecular docking computer programs, though a GUI was developed later for MOLS 1.0. Both the conformational search and the rigid receptor docking parts of the algorithm have been extensively validated. We have now further enhanced the capabilities of the program by incorporating "induced fit" side-chain receptor flexibility for docking peptide ligands. Benchmarking and extensive testing is now being carried out for the flexible receptor portion of the docking. Additionally, to make both the peptide conformational search and docking algorithms (the latter including both flexible ligand/rigid receptor and flexible ligand/flexible receptor techniques) more accessible to the research community, we have developed MOLS 2.0, which incorporates a new Java-based graphical user interface (GUI). Here, we give a detailed description of MOLS 2.0. The source code and binary for MOLS 2.0 are distributed free (under a GNU Lesser General Public License) to the scientific community. They are freely available for download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/mols2-0/files/ .

  14. Modeling deamidation in sheep α-keratin peptides and application to archeological wool textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solazzo, Caroline; Wilson, Julie; Dyer, Jolon M; Clerens, Stefan; Plowman, Jeffrey E; von Holstein, Isabella; Walton Rogers, Penelope; Peacock, Elizabeth E; Collins, Matthew J

    2014-01-07

    Deamidation of glutamine (Q) and asparagine (N) has been recognized as a marker of degradation and aging in ancient proteins. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) to study deamidation in wool textiles, we identified eight peptides from α-keratin proteins in sheep wool that could potentially be used to assess the level of degradation. For each chosen peptide, the extent of deamidation was determined by comparing the calculated theoretical distribution with the measured distribution using a genetic algorithm that gives the best fit to the measured distribution. Variations in the levels of deamidation were observed between peptides and in modern wool samples buried for up to 8 years in which deamidation levels were relatively low under short-term burial. In contrast, deamidation was higher in archeological textile fragments from medieval sites ranging from the 9th to 13th century in York (United Kingdom) and Newcastle (United Kingdom) and from the 13th to 16th century in Reykholt (Iceland). Major differences were observed between the British and the Icelandic samples, showing a negative correlation between age of samples and levels of deamidation, but highlighting the effect of local environment. In addition, nanoscale liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS) data indicated that deamidation in wool's α-keratin was influenced by primary and higher-order structures. Predominance of deamidation on glutamine rather than asparagine in the archeological samples was attributed to a higher abundance of Q in the α-helical core domain of keratins, neighboring residues and steric hindrance preventing deamidation of N.

  15. Modeling of peptide adsorption interactions with a poly(lactic acid) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, C P; Stuart, S J; Bruce, D A; Latour, R A

    2008-12-16

    The biocompatibility of implanted materials and devices is governed by the conformation, orientation, and composition of the layer of proteins that adsorb to the surface of the material immediately upon implantation, so an understanding of this adsorbed protein layer is essential to the rigorous and methodical design of implant materials. In this study, novel molecular dynamics techniques were employed in order to determine the change in free energy for the adsorption of a solvated nine-residue peptide (GGGG-K-GGGG) to a crystalline polylactide surface in an effort to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms that govern protein adsorption. This system, like many others, involves two distinct types of sampling problems: a spatial sampling problem, which arises due to entropic effects creating barriers in the free energy profile, and a conformational sampling problem, which occurs due to barriers in the potential energy landscape. In a two-step process that addresses each sampling problem in turn, the technique of biased replica exchange molecular dynamics was refined and applied in order to overcome these sampling problems and, using the information available at the atomic level of detail afforded by molecular simulation, both quantify and characterize the interactions between the peptide and a relevant biomaterial surface. The results from these simulations predict a fairly strong adsorption response with an adsorption free energy of -2.5 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol (mean +/- 95% confidence interval), with adsorption primarily due to hydrophobic interactions between the nonpolar groups of the peptide and the PLA surface. As part of a larger and ongoing effort involving both simulation and experimental investigations, this work contributes to the goal of transforming the engineering of biomaterials from one dominated by trial-and-error to one which is guided by an atomic-level understanding of the interactions that occur at the tissue-biomaterial interface.

  16. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits odontogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells and impairs mineralization in tooth models of X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Salmon

    Full Text Available Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH, a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif peptide - a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization - derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential

  17. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  18. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model (POSSIM) force field: Developing parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Kaminski, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A previously introduced POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) force field has been extended to include parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbones. New features were introduced into the fitting protocol, as compared to the previous generation of the polarizable force field for proteins. A reduced amount of quantum mechanical data was employed in fitting the electrostatic parameters. Transferability of the electrostatics between our recently developed NMA model and the protein backbone was confirmed. Binding energy and geometry for complexes of alanine dipeptide with a water molecule were estimated and found in a good agreement with high-level quantum mechanical results (for example, the intermolecular distances agreeing within ca. 0.06Å). Following the previously devised procedure, we calculated average errors in alanine di- and tetra-peptide conformational energies and backbone angles and found the agreement to be adequate (for example, the alanine tetrapeptide extended-globular conformational energy gap was calculated to be 3.09 kcal/mol quantim mechanically and 3.14 kcal/mol with the POSSIM force field). However, we have now also included simulation of a simple alpha-helix in both gas-phase and water as the ultimate test of the backbone conformational behavior. The resulting alanine and protein backbone force field is currently being employed in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins. PMID:21743799

  19. A parasite-derived 68-mer peptide ameliorates autoimmune disease in murine models of Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Maria E.; Greer, Judith; Dixit, Aakanksha; Alvarado, Raquel; McCauley-Winter, Padraig; To, Joyce; Tanaka, Akane; Hutchinson, Andrew T.; Robinson, Mark W.; Simpson, Ann M.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Dalton, John P.; Donnelly, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Helminth parasites secrete molecules that potently modulate the immune responses of their hosts and, therefore, have potential for the treatment of immune-mediated human diseases. FhHDM-1, a 68-mer peptide secreted by the helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica, ameliorated disease in two different murine models of autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes and relapsing-remitting immune-mediated demyelination. Unexpectedly, FhHDM-1 treatment did not affect the proliferation of auto-antigen specific T cells or their production of cytokines. However, in both conditions, the reduction in clinical symptoms was associated with the absence of immune cell infiltrates in the target organ (islets and the brain tissue). Furthermore, after parenteral administration, the FhHDM-1 peptide interacted with macrophages and reduced their capacity to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF and IL-6. We propose this inhibition of innate pro-inflammatory immune responses, which are central to the initiation of autoimmunity in both diseases, prevented the trafficking of autoreactive lymphocytes from the periphery to the site of autoimmunity (as opposed to directly modulating their function per se), and thus prevented tissue destruction. The ability of FhHDM-1 to modulate macrophage function, combined with its efficacy in disease prevention in multiple models, suggests that FhHDM-1 has considerable potential as a treatment for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27883079

  20. Differentiating effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 in a human neuronal cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Paola; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Cellai, Ilaria; Squecco, Roberta; Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Luciani, Giorgia; Danza, Giovanna; Di Stefano, Chiara; Francini, Fabio; Peri, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an insulinotropic peptide with neurotrophic properties, as assessed in animal cell models. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 analogue, has been recently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to morphologically, structurally, and functionally characterize the differentiating actions of exendin-4 using a human neuronal cell model (i.e., SH-SY5Y cells). We found that exendin-4 increased the number of neurites paralleled by dramatic changes in intracellular actin and tubulin distribution. Electrophysiological analyses showed an increase in cell membrane surface and in stretch-activated-channels sensitivity, an increased conductance of Na(+) channels and amplitude of Ca(++) currents (T- and L-type), typical of a more mature neuronal phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that exendin-4 promotes neuronal differentiation in human cells. Noteworthy, our data support the claimed favorable role of exendin-4 against diabetic neuropathy as well as against different neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. IMMUNOBIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF REGULATORY PEPTIDE FRACTIONS SYNTHESIZED BY NEUTROPHILS, AS TESTED IN A MACROPHAGE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Vasilieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental data on regulatory effect of neutrophilokine helper fractions on the macrophage (Mph functional activity in the course of antiplague immunity formation. It has revealed that these fractions content biologically active, low-molecular weight peptides. They stimulate Mph killing activity by increasing phagosome-lysosome fusion, thus boosting transformation of monocytes to Mph, and causing redistribution of macrophage subpopulations in the total cellular pool. The helper effect of neutrophilokine fractions upon functional activity of MPh is more pronounced during secondary immune response.

  2. Conditional solvation of isoleucine in model extended and helical peptides: context dependence of hydrophobic hydration and the failure of the group-transfer model

    CERN Document Server

    Tomar, Dheeraj; Pettitt, B M; Asthagiri, D

    2013-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the GXG tripeptide relative to the reference GGG defines the \\textit{conditional} hydration contribution of X. This quantity or the hydration thermodynamics of a small molecule analog of the side-chain or some combination of such estimates, have anchored the interpretation of many of the seminal experiments on protein stability and folding and in the genesis of the current views on dominant interactions stabilizing proteins. We show that such procedures to model protein hydration have significant limitations. We study the conditional hydration thermodynamics of the isoleucine side-chain in an extended pentapeptide and in helical deca-peptides, using as appropriate an extended penta-glycine or appropriate helical deca-peptides as reference. Hydration of butane in the gauche conformation provides a small molecule reference for the side-chain. We use the quasichemical theory to parse the hydration thermodynamics into chemical, packing, and long-range interaction contributions. The...

  3. New perspectives for natural antimicrobial peptides: application as antinflammatory drugs in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capparelli Rosanna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an ancient group of defense molecules. AMPs are widely distributed in nature (being present in mammals, birds, amphibians, insects, plants, and microorganisms. They display bactericidal as well as immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of a combination of two AMPs (temporin B and the royal jellein I against Staphylococcus epidermidis. Results The temporin B (TB-KK and the royal jelleins I, II, III chemically modified at the C terminal (RJI-C, RJII-C, RJIII-C, were tested for their activity against 10 different Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, alone and in combination. Of the three royal jelleins, RJI-C showed the highest activity. Moreover, the combination of RJI-C and TB-KK (MIX displayed synergistic activity. In vitro, the MIX displayed low hemolytic activity, no NO2- production and the ability to curb the synthesis of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ to the same extent as acetylsalicylic acid. In vivo, the MIX sterilized mice infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis in eleven days and inhibited the expression of genes encoding the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (COX-2 and CD64, two important parameters of inflammation. Conclusion The study shows that the MIX – a combination of two naturally occurring peptides - displays both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities.

  4. Recognition and transmembrane delivery of bioconjugated Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles with living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linlin; Wang, Jine; Wang, Zhenxin

    2010-02-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of peptide- and/or protein-functionalized Fe2O3 core-Au shell (Fe2O3@Au) nanoparticles for imaging and targeting of living cells. When functionalized with the transmembrane peptide RRRRRRRR (R8), the Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles (R8-Fe2O3@Au) are able to serve as cellular trafficking agents with excellent biocompatibility. The internalization mechanism and delivery efficiency of the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles have been characterized with dark-field microscopy and fluorescence confocal scanning laser microcopy. Experimental result suggests that the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles are internalized initially by binding with the membrane-associated proteoglycans on cell surfaces, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), following an energy-dependent endocytosis process to enter into living cells. After conjugation with the epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR), these nanoparticles can also be used for the recognition of cell membrane antigens to specifically label tumor cells.Here, we describe the synthesis of peptide- and/or protein-functionalized Fe2O3 core-Au shell (Fe2O3@Au) nanoparticles for imaging and targeting of living cells. When functionalized with the transmembrane peptide RRRRRRRR (R8), the Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles (R8-Fe2O3@Au) are able to serve as cellular trafficking agents with excellent biocompatibility. The internalization mechanism and delivery efficiency of the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles have been characterized with dark-field microscopy and fluorescence confocal scanning laser microcopy. Experimental result suggests that the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles are internalized initially by binding with the membrane-associated proteoglycans on cell surfaces, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), following an energy-dependent endocytosis process to enter into living cells. After conjugation with the epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR), these nanoparticles can also be used for the

  5. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  6. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  7. TSSOM:Transmembrane Segments Prediction by Self—Organizing Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi; ZHUYisheng; WANGBaohua; LIYixue

    2003-01-01

    A novel method ealled TSSOM(Transmembrane segments prediction by self-organizing map)is presented in the paper.The main idea of the method lies in the application of self-organizing feature map together with special visualization techniques to classify the multivariate "time" series of transmembrane proteins into flve classes.Through the analysis of resulting trajectories on the map,frequent patterns of transmembrane segments are detected and even some kind of "new"knowledge about membrane insertion mechanism is acquired.The discovered patterns and the knowledge are then used to predict transmembrane segments for auery sequence.The prediction results not only show that the method is powerful,but also prove that the patterns and the knowledge about the interaction bwtween the patterns are effective and acceptable.

  8. The role of lipophilicity in transmembrane anion transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saggiomo, Vittorio; Otto, Sijbren; Marques, Igor; Felix, Vitor; Torroba, Tomas; Quesada, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The transmembrane anion transport activity of a series of synthetic molecules inspired by the structure of tambjamine alkaloids can be tuned by varying the lipophilicity of the receptor, with carriers within a certain log P range performing best.

  9. Lipid bilayer microarray for parallel recording of transmembrane ion currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pioufle, Bruno; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Tabata, Kazuhito V; Noji, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a multiwell biochip for simultaneous parallel recording of ion current through transmembrane pores reconstituted in planar lipid bilayer arrays. Use of a thin poly(p-xylylene) (parylene) film having micrometer-sized apertures (phi=15-50 microm, t=20 microm) led to formation of highly stable bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) for incorporation of transmembrane pores; thus, a large number of BLMs could be arrayed without any skillful technique. We optically confirmed the simultaneous formation of BLMs in a 5x5 matrix, and in our durability test, the BLM lasted more than 15 h. Simultaneous parallel recording of alamethicin and gramicidin transmembrane pores in multiple contiguous recording sites demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput screening of transmembrane ion currents in artificial lipid bilayers.

  10. Penetration of three transmembrane segments of Slc11a1 in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Chu, Hongtao; Wang, Wenhua; Mao, Qidong

    2014-03-25

    Slc11a1 is a divalent metal cation transporter with 12 putative transmembrane domains (TM) and plays a role in host defense. In present work, we investigated the secondary structure and topology of the peptides associated to Slc11a1-TM2, TM3 and TM4 (wildtype peptides and function-relating mutants) in the phospholipid vesicles (DMPC, DMPG and their mixtures) using circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. We found that TM3 is obviously different in secondary structure and topology from TM2 to TM4 in the lipid membranes. The peptide TM3 is less structured and embedded in the lipid membranes less deeply than TM2 and TM4 at pH 5.5 and 7. The insertion position of TM3 in the lipid membranes is adjusted by pH, more deeply at more acidic pH environment, whereas the locations of TM2 and TM4 in the lipid membranes are less changed with pH. The E139A substitution of TM3 significantly impairs the pH dependence of the buried depth of TM3 and causes a pronounced increase in helicity in all DMPG-containing lipid vesicles at pH 5.5 and 7 and in DMPC at pH 4. In contrast, TM2 and TM4 are similar in topology. The G169D mutation has little effect on the topological arrangement of TM4 in membranes. The property of headgroups of the phospholipids has an effect on the secondary structure and topology of the peptides. All peptides could be structured with more helicity and embedded more deeply in DMPG-containing lipid vesicles than in DMPC membrane at pH 5.5 and 7.

  11. System and methods for predicting transmembrane domains in membrane proteins and mining the genome for recognizing G-protein coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabanino, Rene J; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E; Goddard, William A; Floriano, Wely

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides computer-implemented methods and apparatus implementing a hierarchical protocol using multiscale molecular dynamics and molecular modeling methods to predict the presence of transmembrane regions in proteins, such as G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCR), and protein structural models generated according to the protocol. The protocol features a coarse grain sampling method, such as hydrophobicity analysis, to provide a fast and accurate procedure for predicting transmembrane regions. Methods and apparatus of the invention are useful to screen protein or polynucleotide databases for encoded proteins with transmembrane regions, such as GPCRs.

  12. Human rhinovirus 3C protease: generation of pharmacophore models for peptidic and nonpeptidic inhibitors and their application in virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindl, Theodora; Laggner, Christian; Langer, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models for peptidic and small organic nonpeptidic inhibitors of the human rhinovirus 3C protease were generated in a structure-based as well as in a ligand-based approach, using the software package Catalyst. The inhibitors possess an electrophilic moiety, often a Michael acceptor function, which covalently binds to a cysteine in the active site of the enzyme. Since this process presents the key step for virus inactivation, the creation of a new function in Catalyst was required in order to include this decisive functionality into the pharmacophore models. In the present study we focus on this feature definition process because it presents an innovative strategy to expand the pharmacophore description ability of the Catalyst software to also include covalent bonds between ligand and binding site. The resulting hypotheses were then used for virtual screening of 3D databases in order to verify their quality and to search for structurally diverse, possible new lead substances.

  13. Mechanisms for quality control of misfolded transmembrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Houck, Scott A.; Cyr, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    To prevent the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins, the cell has developed a complex network of cellular quality control (QC) systems to recognize misfolded proteins and facilitate their refolding or degradation. The cell faces numerous obstacles when performing quality control on transmembrane proteins. Transmembrane proteins have domains on both sides of a membrane and QC systems in distinct compartments must coordinate to monitor the folding status of the protein. Additionall...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of T-2410 and T-2429 HIV fusion inhibitors interacting with model membranes: Insight into peptide behavior, structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavioso, I C V C; de Andrade, V C R; Palace Carvalho, A J; Martins do Canto, A M T

    2017-09-01

    T-2410 and T-2429 are HIV fusion inhibitor peptides (FI) designed to present a higher efficiency even against HIV strains that developed resistance against other FIs. Similar peptides were shown to interact with model membranes both in the liquid disordered phase and in the liquid ordered state. Those results indicated that such interaction is important to function and could be correlated with their effectiveness. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the interactions between both T-2410 and T-2429 with bilayers of pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and a mixture of POPC/cholesterol (Chol) (1:1). It was observed that both peptides interact strongly with both membrane systems, especially with the POPC/Chol systems, where these peptides show the highest number of H-bonds observed so far. T-2410 and T-2429 showed higher extent of interaction with bilayers when compared to T-20 or T-1249 in previous studies. This is most notable in POPC/Chol membranes where, although able to form H-bonds with Chol, they do so to a lesser extent than T-1249 does, the latter being the only FI peptide so far that was observed to form H-bonds with Chol. This behavior suggests that interaction of FI peptides with rigid Chol rich membranes may not be as dependent from peptide/Chol H-bond formation as previous results of T-1249 behavior led to believe. As in other similar peptides, the higher ability to interact with membranes shown by T-2410 and T2429 is probably correlated with its higher inhibitory efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic PET and Optical Imaging and Compartment Modeling using a Dual-labeled Cyclic RGD Peptide Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu, Ning Guo, Quanzheng Li, Ying Ma, Orit Jacboson, Seulki Lee, Hak Soo Choi, James R. Mansfield, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine if dynamic optical imaging could provide comparable kinetic parameters to that of dynamic PET imaging by a near-infrared dye/64Cu dual-labeled cyclic RGD peptide.Methods: The integrin αvβ3 binding RGD peptide was conjugated with a macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA for copper labeling and PET imaging and a near-infrared dye ZW-1 for optical imaging. The in vitro biological activity of RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 was characterized by cell staining and receptor binding assay. Sixty-min dynamic PET and optical imaging were acquired on a MDA-MB-435 tumor model. Singular value decomposition (SVD method was applied to compute the dynamic optical signal from the two-dimensional optical projection images. Compartment models were used to quantitatively analyze and compare the dynamic optical and PET data.Results: The dual-labeled probe 64Cu-RGD-C(DOTA-ZW-1 showed integrin specific binding in vitro and in vivo. The binding potential (Bp derived from dynamic optical imaging (1.762 ± 0.020 is comparable to that from dynamic PET (1.752 ± 0.026.Conclusion: The signal un-mixing process using SVD improved the accuracy of kinetic modeling of 2D dynamic optical data. Our results demonstrate that 2D dynamic optical imaging with SVD analysis could achieve comparable quantitative results as dynamic PET imaging in preclinical xenograft models.

  16. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-05

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production, as well as NF-κB and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta model peptides: incorporation of residues replacing Gly within a triple helix achieved by renucleation and local flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianxi; Madhan, Balaraman; Li, Yingjie; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2011-07-20

    Missense mutations, which replace one Gly with a larger residue in the repeating sequence of the type I collagen triple helix, lead to the hereditary bone disorder osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Previous studies suggest that these mutations may interfere with triple-helix folding. NMR was used to investigate triple-helix formation in a series of model peptides where the residue replacing Gly, as well as the local sequence environment, was varied. NMR measurement of translational diffusion coefficients allowed the identification of partially folded species. When Gly was replaced by Ala, the Ala residue was incorporated into a fully folded triple helix, whereas replacement of Gly by Ser or Arg resulted in the presence of some partially folded species, suggesting a folding barrier. Increasing the triple-helix stability of the sequence N-terminal to a Gly-to-Ser replacement allowed complete triple-helix folding, whereas with the substitution of Arg, with its large side chain, the peptide achieved full folding only after flexible residues were introduced N-terminal to the mutation site. These studies shed light on the factors important for accommodation of Gly mutations within the triple helix and may relate to the varying severity of OI.

  18. TMV-peptide fusion vaccines induce cell-mediated immune responses and tumor protection in two murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Alison A; Corbo, Tina A; Wykoff-Clary, Sherri; Nguyen, Long V; Smith, Mark L; Palmer, Kenneth E; Pogue, Gregory P

    2006-09-29

    Fusion of peptides to viral carriers has proven an effective method for improving cellular immunity. In this study we explore the ability of a plant virus, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), to stimulate cellular immunity by interacting directly with immune cells. Fluorescently labeled TMV was incubated in vitro with murine spleen or lymph node cells, and near quantitative labeling of lymphocytes was achieved after 2 h, which persisted for up to 48 h. Direct TMV uptake and upregulation of the CD86 activation marker was measured in nearly all dendritic cells (DCs) by flow cytometry. To demonstrate that TMV can also provide functional antigen delivery and immune stimulation in vivo, two well-characterized T-cell epitopes that provide protection against tumor challenge in mice were fused to TMV coat protein by genetic manipulation, or by chemical conjugation. Vaccination of C57BL/6 mice elicited measurable cellular responses by interferon gamma (IFN gamma) ELISpot and resulted in significantly improved protection from tumor challenge in both the EG.7-Ova and B16 melanoma models. From these results we conclude that TMV was an effective antigen carrier for inducing cellular immune responses to less than 1 microg of peptide.

  19. Structural basis of transmembrane domain interactions in integrin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Tobias S

    2010-01-01

    Cell surface receptors of the integrin family are pivotal to cell adhesion and migration. The activation state of heterodimeric alphabeta integrins is correlated to the association state of the single-pass alpha and beta transmembrane domains. The association of integrin alphaIIbbeta3 transmembrane domains, resulting in an inactive receptor, is characterized by the asymmetric arrangement of a straight (alphaIIb) and tilted (beta3) helix relative to the membrane in congruence to the dissociated structures. This allows for a continuous association interface centered on helix-helix glycine-packing and an unusual alphaIIb(GFF) structural motif that packs the conserved Phe-Phe residues against the beta3 transmembrane helix, enabling alphaIIb(D723)beta3(R995) electrostatic interactions. The transmembrane complex is further stabilized by the inactive ectodomain, thereby coupling its association state to the ectodomain conformation. In combination with recently determined structures of an inactive integrin ectodomain and an activating talin/beta complex that overlap with the alphabeta transmembrane complex, a comprehensive picture of integrin bi-directional transmembrane signaling has emerged.

  20. Simultaneous prediction of protein secondary structure and transmembrane spans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Mueller, Ralf; Karakas, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Meiler, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of transmembrane spans and secondary structure from the protein sequence is generally the first step in the structural characterization of (membrane) proteins. Preference of a stretch of amino acids in a protein to form secondary structure and being placed in the membrane are correlated. Nevertheless, current methods predict either secondary structure or individual transmembrane states. We introduce a method that simultaneously predicts the secondary structure and transmembrane spans from the protein sequence. This approach not only eliminates the necessity to create a consensus prediction from possibly contradicting outputs of several predictors but bears the potential to predict conformational switches, i.e., sequence regions that have a high probability to change for example from a coil conformation in solution to an α-helical transmembrane state. An artificial neural network was trained on databases of 177 membrane proteins and 6048 soluble proteins. The output is a 3 × 3 dimensional probability matrix for each residue in the sequence that combines three secondary structure types (helix, strand, coil) and three environment types (membrane core, interface, solution). The prediction accuracies are 70.3% for nine possible states, 73.2% for three-state secondary structure prediction, and 94.8% for three-state transmembrane span prediction. These accuracies are comparable to state-of-the-art predictors of secondary structure (e.g., Psipred) or transmembrane placement (e.g., OCTOPUS). The method is available as web server and for download at www.meilerlab.org.

  1. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  2. Repetitive BOP coupling (REBOP) in solid phase peptide synthesis. Luliberin synthesis as model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyer, R; Aumelas, A; Caraty, A; Rivaille, P; Castro, B

    1990-05-01

    The coupling reagent (benzotriazol-1-yloxy)tris-(dimethylamino)phosphonium (BOP) hexafluorophosphate was tested in the synthesis of luliberin (LH-RH) with inexpensive classically protected Boc-amino acids, in slight excess, and benzhydryl amino resin, without any other additive. The good solubility of this reagent and its by-products is of particular interest for automated peptide synthesis. [D-His2]LH-RH was also synthesized and compared with LH-RH by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As shown by the biological tests and the high performance liquid chromatography study, unprotected pyroGlu and Boc-His can be used without any significant racemization but Boc-His(Boc) was found to be preferable since it gave no detectable racemization and no by-products. The difficult isolation of the minority D-derivative from the crude preparation of LH-RH was resolved by a recycling procedure in reversed phase HPLC.

  3. Targeting formyl peptide receptor 2 reduces leukocyte-endothelial interactions in a murine model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Helen K; Gil, Cristiane Damas; Oliani, Sonia M; Gavins, Felicity N E

    2015-05-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury following stroke can worsen patient outcome through excess inflammation. This study investigated the pharmacologic potential of targeting an endogenous anti-inflammatory circuit via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 2/lipoxin receptor (ALX) (Fpr2/3 in mouse) in global cerebral I/R. Mice (C57BL/6 and Fpr2/3(-/-)) were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion and treatment with FPR agonists: AnxA1Ac2-26 [Annexin A1 mimetic peptide (Ac-AMVSEFLKQAWFIENEEQEYVQTVK), 2.5 μg/kg] and 15-epimer-lipoxin A4 (15-epi-LXA4; FPR2/ALX specific, 12.5 and 100 ng/kg). Leukocyte-endothelial (L-E) interactions in the cerebral microvasculature were then quantified in vivo using intravital fluorescence microscopy. 15-epi-LXA4 administration at the start of reperfusion reduced L-E interactions after 40 min (which was sustained at 2 h with high-dose 15-epi-LXA4) to levels seen in sham-operated animals. AnxA1Ac2-26 treatment decreased leukocyte adhesion at 40 min and all L-E interactions at 2 h (up to 95%). Combined treatment with AnxA1Ac2-26 plus FPR antagonists t-Boc-FLFLF (250 ng/kg) or WRW4 (FPR2/ALX selective, 1.4 μg/kg) abrogated the effects of AnxA1Ac2-26 fully at 40 min. Antagonists were less effective at 2 h, which we demonstrate is likely because of their impact on early L-E interactions. Our findings indicate that FPR2/ALX activity elicits considerable control over vascular inflammatory responses during cerebral I/R and, therefore, provide evidence that targeting FPR2/ALX may be beneficial for patients who suffered from stroke. © FASEB.

  4. Impact of obesity on the expression profile of natriuretic peptide system in a rat experimental model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Cabiati

    Full Text Available Natriuretic peptides (NPs play an important role in obesity and aim of this study was to evaluate, in cardiac tissue of obese Zucker rats (O, n = 29 their transcriptomic profile compared to controls (CO, n = 24 by Real-Time PCR study; CNP protein expression was evaluated by immunostaining and immunometric tests. Myocardial histology was performed, confirming no alteration of organ structure. While ANP and BNP are cardiac peptides, CNP is mainly an endothelial hormone; thus its expression, as well as that of NPR-B and NPR-C, was also evaluated in kidney and lung of an animal subgroup (n = 20. In heart, lower BNP mRNA levels in O vs CO (p = 0.02 as well as ANP and CNP (p = ns, were detected. NPR-B/NPR-A mRNA was similar in O and CO, while NPR-C was numerically lower (p = ns in O than in CO. In kidney, CNP/NPR-B/NPR-C mRNA was similar in O and CO, while in lung CNP/NPR-C expression decreased and NPR-B increased (p = ns in O vs CO. Subdividing into fasting and hyperglycemic rats, the pattern of mRNA expression for each gene analyzed remained unchanged. The trend observed in heart, kidney and lung for CNP protein concentrations and immunohistochemistry reflected the mRNA expression. TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA were measured in each tissue and no significant genotype effect was detected in any tissue. The main NP variations were observed at the cardiac level, suggesting a reduced release by cardiac cells. The understanding of mechanisms involved in the modulation of the NP system in obesity could be a useful starting point for future clinical study devoted to identifying new obesity treatment strategies.

  5. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras Gout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CFTR gene is unique within the ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein family, predominantly of transporters, by coding a chloride channel. The gating mechanism of ABC proteins has been characterized by the ATP Switch model in terms cycles of dimer formation and dissociation linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. It would be of interest to assess the extent that Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, a functional channel, fits the ATP Switch model for ABC transporters. Additional transporter mechanisms, namely those of Pgp and HlyB, are discussed for perspective. Literature search of databases selected key references in comparing and contrasting the gating mechanism. CFTR is a functional chloride channel facilitating transmembrane anion flow down electrochemical gradients. A dysfunctional CFTR protein results in cystic fibrosis, a fatal pleiotropic disease currently managed symptomatically. Understanding the gating mechanism will help target drug development aimed at alleviating and curing the disease.

  6. Channel Gating Regulation by the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) First Cytosolic Loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Annette; Chung, W Joon; Pyle, Louise C; Wang, Wei; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Mulvihill, Cory M; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Hong, Jeong; Velu, Sadanandan E; Lewis, Hal A; Atwell, Shane; Aller, Steve; Bear, Christine E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Kirk, Kevin L; Sorscher, Eric J

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present data indicating a robust and specific domain interaction between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) first cytosolic loop (CL1) and nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1) that allows ion transport to proceed in a regulated fashion. We used co-precipitation and ELISA to establish the molecular contact and showed that binding kinetics were not altered by the common clinical mutation F508del. Both intrinsic ATPase activity and CFTR channel gating were inhibited severely by CL1 peptide, suggesting that NBD1/CL1 binding is a crucial requirement for ATP hydrolysis and channel function. In addition to cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysregulation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prevalent diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acquired rhinosinusitis, pancreatitis, and lethal secretory diarrhea (e.g. cholera). On the basis of clinical relevance of the CFTR as a therapeutic target, a cell-free drug screen was established to identify modulators of NBD1/CL1 channel activity independent of F508del CFTR and pharmacologic rescue. Our findings support a targetable mechanism of CFTR regulation in which conformational changes in the NBDs cause reorientation of transmembrane domains via interactions with CL1 and result in channel gating.

  7. Cognitive improvement of compound danshen in an Aβ25-35 peptide-induced rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Guo, Haibiao; Li, Chuyuan; Wang, Deqin; Wu, Jingang; Wang, Canmao; Xu, Jiangping; Qin, Ren-An

    2015-10-23

    Senile dementia mainly includes Alzheimer' s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD). AD is a progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disorder that is accompanied with a great deal of social burden. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Compound Danshen (CDS) on learning and memory of alzheimer's disease (AD) rat model, as well as to explore the possible connection between CDS and the associated molecules of amyloid beta (Aβ). Rats were injected with Aβ25-35 peptide intracerebroventricularly and CDS were subsequently administered once daily for 23 days. Rats' behavior was monitored using Morris water maze and passive avoidance. Real time PCR and Western blotting were used in determining amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-site APP cleaved enzyme-1(BACE1), Presenilin-1 (PS1), Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and neprilysin (NEP) in hippocampus. The AD model group presented with spatial learning and memory impairments. CDS and donepezil administration significantly ameliorated the Aβ25-35 peptide-induced memory impairment in both Morris water maze (P < 0.05) and passive avoidance task (P < 0.01) compared to the AD model group. Real time PCR results suggested that CDS significantly decreased APP mRNA, PS1 mRNA and increased IDE and NEP mRNA levels. Western blotting analyses showed that CDS decreased the protein expression of APP and PS1 and increased IDE expression. CDS improved spatial learning and memory by down-regulating APP, PS1 levels and up-regulating IDE. In future, CDS may have significant therapeutic potential in the treatment of AD patients.

  8. Antineuroinflammatory and neurotrophic effects of CNTF and C16 peptide in an acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marong eFang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimentalallergic encephalomyelitis (EAE is an animal model for inflammatory demyelinating autoimmune disease, i.e., multiple sclerosis (MS. In the present study, we investigated the antineuroinflammatory/neuroprotective effects of C16, an ανβ3 integrin-binding peptide, and recombinant rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a cytokine that was originally identified as a survival factor for neurons, in an acute rodent EAE model. In this model, C16 peptide was injected intravenously every day for 2 weeks, and CNTF was delivered into the cerebral ventricles with Alzet miniosmotic pumps. Disease severity was assessed weekly using a scale ranging from 0 to 5. Multiple histological and molecular biological assays were employed to assess inflammation, axonal loss, neuronal apoptosis, white matter demyelination, and gliosis in the brain and spinal cord of different groups. Our results showed that the EAE induced rats revealed a significant increase in inflammatory cells infiltration, while C16 treatment could inhibit the infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages down to 2/3-1/3 of vehicle treated EAE control (P<0.05. The delayed onset of disease, reduced clinical score (P<0.01 in peak stage and more rapid recovery also were achieved in C16 treated group. Besides impairing inflammation, CNTF treatment also exerted direct neuroprotective effects, decreasing demyelination and axon loss score (P<0.05 Vs vehicle treated EAE control, and reducing the neuronal death from 40%-50% to 10%-20% (P<0.05. Both treatments suppressed the expression of cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-when compared with the vehicle control (P<0.05. Combined treatment with C16 and CNTF produced more obvious functional recovery and neuroprotective effects than individually treatment (P<0.05. These results suggested that combination treatment with C16 and CNTF, which target different neuroprotection pathways, may be an effective therapeutic alternative to

  9. Self-assembly of the beta2-microglobulin NHVTLSQ peptide using a coarse-grained protein model reveals a beta-barrel species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2008-04-10

    Although a wide variety of proteins can assemble into amyloid fibrils, the structure of the early oligomeric species on the aggregation pathways remains unknown at an atomic level of detail. In this paper we report, using molecular dynamics simulations with the OPEP coarse-grained force field, the free energy landscape of a tetramer and a heptamer of the beta2-microglobulin NHVTLSQ peptide. On the basis of a total of more than 17 ns trajectories started from various states, we find that both species are in equilibrium between amorphous and well-ordered aggregates with cross-beta-structure, a perpendicular bilayer beta-sheet, and, for the heptamer, six- or seven-stranded closed and open beta-barrels. Moreover, analysis of the heptamer trajectories shows that the perpendicular bilayer beta-sheet is one possible precursor of the beta-barrel, but that this barrel can also be formed from a twisted monolayer beta-sheet with successive addition of chains. Comparison with previous aggregation simulations and the fact that nature constructs transmembrane beta-sheet proteins with pores open the possibility that beta-barrels with small inner diameters may represent a common intermediate during the early steps of aggregation.

  10. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikder, K. U.; Stone, K. A.; Kumar, P. B. S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that mic...... that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC....

  11. Combined effect of cortical cytoskeleton and transmembrane proteins on domain formation in biomembranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Md. Kabir Uddin; Stone, Kyle A.; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Laradji, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the combined effects of transmembrane proteins and the subjacent cytoskeleton on the dynamics of phase separation in multicomponent lipid bilayers using computer simulations of a particle-based implicit solvent model for lipid membranes with soft-core interactions. We find that microphase separation can be achieved by the protein confinement by the cytoskeleton. Our results have relevance to the finite size of lipid rafts in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells.

  12. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeGrado William F

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4 linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefgn. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr, and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2 caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively. Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74, involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key

  13. The proline-rich peptide Bac7(1-35 reduces mortality from Salmonella typhimurium in a mouse model of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benincasa Monica

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bac7 is a proline-rich peptide with a potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Here we investigated its activity in biological fluids and in vivo using a mouse model of S. typhimurium infection. Results The efficacy of the active 1-35 fragment of Bac7 was assayed in serum and plasma, and its stability in biological fluids analyzed by Western blot and mass spectrometry. The ability of the peptide to protect mice against Salmonella was assayed in a typhoid fever model of infection by determination of survival rates and bacterial load in liver and spleen of infected animals. In addition, the peptide's biodistribution was evaluated by using time-domain optical imaging. Bac7(1-35 retained a substantial in vivo activity showing a very low toxicity. The peptide increased significantly the number of survivors and the mean survival times of treated mice reducing the bacterial load in their organs despite its rapid clearance. Conclusions Our results provide a first indication for a potential development of Bac7-based drugs in the treatment of salmonellosis and, eventually, other Gram-negative infections. The in vivo activity for this peptide might be substantially enhanced by decreasing its excretion rate or modifying the treatment schedule.

  14. Peptide Regulation of Cofilin Activity in the CNS: A Novel Therapeutic Approach for Treatment of Multiple Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Alisa E; Bamburg, James R

    2017-02-19

    Cofilin is a ubiquitous protein which cooperates with many other actin-binding proteins in regulating actin dynamics. Cofilin has essential functions in nervous system development including neuritogenesis, neurite elongation, growth cone pathfinding, dendritic spine formation, and the regulation of neurotransmission and spine function, components of synaptic plasticity essential for learning and memory. Cofilin's phosphoregulation is a downstream target of many transmembrane signaling processes, and its misregulation in neurons has been linked in rodent models to many different neurodegenerative and neurological disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD), aggression due to neonatal isolation, autism, manic/bipolar disorder, and sleep deprivation. Cognitive and behavioral deficits of these rodent models have been largely abrogated by modulation of cofilin activity using viral-mediated, genetic, and/or small molecule or peptide therapeutic approaches. Neuropathic pain in rats from sciatic nerve compression has also been reduced by modulating the cofilin pathway within neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Neuroinflammation, which occurs following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, but which also accompanies many other neurodegenerative syndromes, is markedly reduced by peptides targeting specific chemokine receptors, which also modulate cofilin activity. Thus, peptide therapeutics offer potential for cost-effective treatment of a wide variety of neurological disorders. Here we discuss some recent results from rodent models using therapeutic peptides with a surprising ability to cross the rodent blood brain barrier and alter cofilin activity in brain. We also offer suggestions as to how neuronal-specific cofilin regulation might be achieved.

  15. EMR1, an unusual member in the family of hormone receptors with seven transmembrane segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, V; Chissoe, S L; Viegas-Péquignot, E; Diriong, S; N'Guyen, V C; Roe, B A; Lipinski, M

    1995-03-20

    Proteins with seven transmembrane segments (7TM) define a superfamily of receptors (7TM receptors) sharing the same topology: an extracellular N-terminus, three extramembranous loops on either side of the plasma membrane, and a cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. Upon ligand binding, cytoplasmic portions of the activated receptor interact with heterotrimeric G-coupled proteins to induce various second messengers. A small group, recently recognized on the basis of homologous primary amino acid sequences, comprises receptors to hormones of the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide/glucagon family, parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptides, growth hormone-releasing factor, corticotropin-releasing factor, and calcitonin. A cDNA, extracted from a neuroectodermal cDNA library, was predicted to encode a new 886-amino-acid protein with three distinct domains. The C-terminal third contains the seven hydrophobic segments and characteristic residues that allow the protein to be readily aligned with the various hormone receptors in the family. Six egf-like modules, at the N-terminus of the predicted mature protein, are separated from the transmembrane segments by a serine/threonine-rich domain, a feature reminiscent of mucin-like, single-span, integral membrane glycoproteins with adhesive properties. Because of its unique characteristics, this putative egf module-containing, mucin-like hormone receptor has been named EMR1. Southern analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization have assigned the EMR1 gene to human chromosome 19p13.3.

  16. A novel chemosynthetic peptide with ß-sheet motif efficiently kills Klebsiella pneumoniae in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Shirui Tan,1,2,* Changpei Gan,1,3,* Rongpeng Li,1 Yan Ye,1 Shuang Zhang,1,3 Xu Wu,1 Yi Yan Yang,4 Weimin Fan,5 Min Wu11Department of Basic Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, USA; 2Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Life Sciences, Yunnan University, Kunming, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 4Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The Nanos, Singapore; 5Program of Innovative Cancer Therapeutics, First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University College of Medicine, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp is one of the most common pathogens in nosocomial infections and is increasingly becoming multiple drug resistant. However, the molecular pathogenesis of Kp in causing tissue injury and dysregulated host defense remains elusive, further dampening the development of novel therapeutic measures. We have previously screened a series of synthetic antimicrobial beta-sheet forming peptides and identified a peptide (IRIKIRIK; ie, IK8L with a broad range of bactericidal activity and low cytotoxicity in vitro. Here, employing an animal model, we investigated the antibacterial effects of IK8L in acute infection and demonstrated that peritoneal injection of IK8L to mice down-regulated inflammatory cytokines, alleviated lung injury, and importantly, decreased mortality compared to sham-injected controls. In addition, a math model was used to evaluate in vivo imaging data and predict infection progression in infected live animals. Mechanistically, IK8L can kill Kp by inhibiting biofilm formation and modulating production of inflammatory cytokines through the STAT3/JAK signaling both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these findings reveal that IK8L may have potential for

  17. Using scores of amino acid topological descriptors for quantitative sequence-mobility modeling of peptides based on support vector machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Guizhao; YANG Shanbin; ZHOU Yuan; ZHOU Peng; LI Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Scores of amino acid topological descriptors (SATD) derived from principle components analysis of a matrix of 1262 structural variables related to 23 amino acids were employed to express the structure of 125 peptides in different length.Quantitative sequence-mobility modelings (QSMMs)were constructed using partial least square (PLS)and support vector machine (SVM), respectively. As new amino acid scales, SATD including plentiful information related to biological activity were easily manipulated. Better results were obtained compared to those obtained with PLS, which indicated that SVM presented robust stability and excellent predictive ability for electrophoretic mobilities. These results show that there is a wide prospect for the applications of SATD and SVM regression in QSMMs.

  18. Femtomolar Zn(II) affinity in a peptide-based ligand designed to model thiolate-rich metalloprotein active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petros, Amy K; Reddi, Amit R; Kennedy, Michelle L; Hyslop, Alison G; Gibney, Brian R

    2006-12-11

    Metal-ligand interactions are critical components of metalloprotein assembly, folding, stability, electrochemistry, and catalytic function. Research over the past 3 decades on the interaction of metals with peptide and protein ligands has progressed from the characterization of amino acid-metal and polypeptide-metal complexes to the design of folded protein scaffolds containing multiple metal cofactors. De novo metalloprotein design has emerged as a valuable tool both for the modular synthesis of these complex metalloproteins and for revealing the fundamental tenets of metalloprotein structure-function relationships. Our research has focused on using the coordination chemistry of de novo designed metalloproteins to probe the interactions of metal cofactors with protein ligands relevant to biological phenomena. Herein, we present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Fe(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and[4Fe-4S]2(+/+) binding to IGA, a 16 amino acid peptide ligand containing four cysteine residues, H2N-KLCEGG-CIGCGAC-GGW-CONH2. These studies were conducted to delineate the inherent metal-ion preferences of this unfolded tetrathiolate peptide ligand as well as to evaluate the role of the solution pH on metal-peptide complex speciation. The [4Fe-4S]2(+/+)-IGA complex is both an excellent peptide-based synthetic analogue for natural ferredoxins and is flexible enough to accommodate mononuclear metal-ion binding. Incorporation of a single ferrous ion provides the FeII-IGA complex, a spectroscopic model of a reduced rubredoxin active site that possesses limited stability in aqueous buffers. As expected based on the Irving-Williams series and hard-soft acid-base theory, the Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes of IGA are significantly more stable than the Fe(II) complex. Direct proton competition experiments, coupled with determinations of the conditional dissociation constants over a range of pH values, fully define the thermodynamic stabilities and speciation of each MII-IGA complex. The

  19. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  20. Proteinase-Activated Receptor-1 and Immunomodulatory Effects of a PAR1-Activating Peptide in a Mouse Model of Prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mark Stanton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonbacterial prostatitis has no established etiology. We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1 can play a role in prostatitis. We therefore investigated the effects of PAR1 stimulation in the context of a new model of murine nonbacterial prostatitis. Methods. Using a hapten (ethanol-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS- induced prostatitis model with both wild-type and PAR1-null mice, we examined (1 the location of PAR1 in the mouse prostate and (2 the impact of a PAR1-activating peptide (TFLLR-NH2: PAR1-TF on ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation. Results. Ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation was maximal at 2 days. In the tissue, PAR1 was expressed predominantly along the apical acini of prostatic epithelium. Although PAR1-TF on its own did not cause inflammation, its coadministration with ethanol-DNBS reduced all indices of acute prostatitis. Further, PAR1-TF administration doubled the prostatic production of interleukin-10 (IL-10 compared with ethanol-DNBS treatment alone. This enhanced IL-10 was not observed in PAR1-null mice and was not caused by the reverse-sequence receptor-inactive peptide, RLLFT-NH2. Surprisingly, PAR1-TF, also diminished ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation in PAR1-null mice. Conclusions. PAR1 is expressed in the mouse prostate and its activation by PAR1-TF elicits immunomodulatory effects during ethanol-DNBS-induced prostatitis. However, PAR1-TF also diminishes ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation via a non-PAR1 mechanism by activating an as-yet unknown receptor.

  1. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 and immunomodulatory effects of a PAR1-activating peptide in a mouse model of prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M Mark; Nelson, Lisa K; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; Hollenberg, Morley D; Buret, Andre G; Ceri, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Nonbacterial prostatitis has no established etiology. We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) can play a role in prostatitis. We therefore investigated the effects of PAR1 stimulation in the context of a new model of murine nonbacterial prostatitis. Using a hapten (ethanol-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS-)) induced prostatitis model with both wild-type and PAR1-null mice, we examined (1) the location of PAR1 in the mouse prostate and (2) the impact of a PAR1-activating peptide (TFLLR-NH2: PAR1-TF) on ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation. Ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation was maximal at 2 days. In the tissue, PAR1 was expressed predominantly along the apical acini of prostatic epithelium. Although PAR1-TF on its own did not cause inflammation, its coadministration with ethanol-DNBS reduced all indices of acute prostatitis. Further, PAR1-TF administration doubled the prostatic production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with ethanol-DNBS treatment alone. This enhanced IL-10 was not observed in PAR1-null mice and was not caused by the reverse-sequence receptor-inactive peptide, RLLFT-NH2. Surprisingly, PAR1-TF, also diminished ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation in PAR1-null mice. PAR1 is expressed in the mouse prostate and its activation by PAR1-TF elicits immunomodulatory effects during ethanol-DNBS-induced prostatitis. However, PAR1-TF also diminishes ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation via a non-PAR1 mechanism by activating an as-yet unknown receptor.

  2. NMR studies of the fifth transmembrane segment of Na+,K+-ATPase reveals a non-helical ion-binding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhaug, Jarl; Jakobsen, Louise Odgaard; Esmann, Mikael;

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the fifth membrane-spanning segment (M5) in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was determined using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The spectra reveal that this peptide is substantially less ......-structured transmembrane element of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. Furthermore, this region spans the residues implicated in Na(+) and K(+) transport, where they are likely to offer the flexibility needed to coordinate Na(+) as well as K(+) during active transport....

  3. Inhalation therapy with the synthetic TIP-like peptide AP318 attenuates pulmonary inflammation in a porcine sepsis model

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Erik K; Ziebart, Alexander; Thomas, Rainer; Liu, Tanghua; Schad, Arno; Tews, Martha; Moosmann, Bernd; Kamuf, Jens; Duenges, Bastian; Thal, Serge C.; David, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background The lectin-like domain of TNF-α can be mimicked by synthetic TIP peptides and represents an innovative pharmacologic option to treat edematous respiratory failure. TIP inhalation was shown to reduce pulmonary edema and improve gas exchange. In addition to its edema resolution effect, TIP peptides may exert some anti-inflammatory properties. The present study therefore investigates the influence of the inhaled TIP peptide AP318 on intrapulmonary inflammatory response in a porcine mo...

  4. [Effect of acupuncture on transmembrane signal pathway in AD mice: an analysis based on lipid-raft proteomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kun; Zhang, Xue-Zhu; Zhao, Lan; Jia, Yu-Jie; Han, Jing-Xian

    2014-08-01

    To reveal the transmembrane signal pathway participating in regulating neuron functions of treating Alzheimer's disease (AD) by acupuncture. SAMP8 mice was used for AD animal model. The effect of acupuncture method for qi benefiting, blood regulating, health supporting, and root strengthening on the amount and varieties of transmembrane signal proteins from hippocampal lipid rafts in SAMP8 mice was detected using HPLC MS/MS proteomics method. Compared with the control group, acupuncture increased 39 transmembrane signal proteins from hippocampal lipid rafts in SAMP8 mice, of them, 14 belonged to ionophorous protein, 8 to G protein, 8 to transmembrane signal receptor, and 9 to kinase protein. Totally 3 main cell signal pathways were involved, including G-protein-coupled receptors signal, enzyme linked receptor signal, and ion-channel mediated signal. Compared with the sham-acupuncture group, acupuncture resulted in significant increase of kinase signal protein amount. From the aspect of functions, they were dominant in regulating synapse functions relevant to cytoskeleton and secreting neurotransmitters. The cell biological mechanism for treating AD by acupuncture might be achieved by improving synapse functions and promoting the secretion of neurotransmitters through transmembrane signal transduction, thus improving cognitive function of AD patients.

  5. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  6. Post-glucose-load urinary C-peptide and glucose concentration obtained during OGTT do not affect oral minimal model-based plasma indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Jainandunsing (Sjaam); J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); T. Rietveld (Trinet); J.N.I. van Miert (Joram); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); F.W.M. de Rooij (Felix)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate how renal loss of both C-peptide and glucose during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) relate to and affect plasma-derived oral minimal model (OMM) indices. All individuals were recruited during family screening between August 2007 and January

  7. Measurement and modeling of acid dissociation constants of tri-peptides containing Glu, Gly, and His using potentiometry and generalized multiplicative analysis of variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Rima Raffoul; Sutton, Gordon J; Hibbert, D Brynn; Ebrahimi, Diako

    2013-02-28

    We report pK(a) values with measurement uncertainties for all labile protons of the 27 tri-peptides prepared from the amino acids glutamic acid (E), glycine (G) and histidine (H). Each tri-peptide (GGG, GGE, GGH, …, HHH) was subjected to alkali titration and pK(a) values were calculated from triplicate potentiometric titrations data using HyperQuad 2008 software. A generalized multiplicative analysis of variance (GEMANOVA) of pK(a) values for the most acidic proton gave the optimum model having two terms, an interaction between the end amino acids plus an isolated main effect of the central amino acid.

  8. Identification of bioactive peptides in hypoallergenic infant milk formulas by CE-TOF-MS assisted by semiempirical model of electromigration behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Català-Clariana, Sergio; Benavente, Fernando; Giménez, Estela; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2013-07-01

    Biologically active peptides derived from complex bovine milk protein hydrolysates are of particular interest in food science and nutrition because they have been shown to play different physiological roles, providing benefits in human health. In this study, we used CE-TOF-MS for separation and identification of bioactive peptides in three hypoallergenic infant milk formulas. An appropriate sample cleanup using a citrate buffer with DTT and urea followed by SPE with Sep-Pack® C18 and StrataX™ cartridges allowed the detection of a large number of low molecular mass bioactive peptides. This preliminary identification was solely based on the measured experimental monoisotopic molecular mass values (M(exp)). Later, we evaluated the classical semiempirical relationships between electrophoretic mobility and charge-to-mass ratio (m(e) vs. q/M(α), α = 1/2 for the classical polymer model) to describe their migration behavior. The assistance of migration prediction proved to be useful to improve reliability of the identification, avoiding misinterpretations and solving some identity conflicts. After revision, the identity of 24, 30, and 38 bioactive peptides was confirmed in each of the three infant milk formulas. A significant number of these peptides were reported as inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme, however, the presence of sequences with other biological activities such as antihypertensive, antithrombotic, hypocholesterolemic, immunomodulation, cytotoxicity, antioxidant, antimicrobial, antigenic, or opioid was also confirmed.

  9. LF-15 & T7, synthetic peptides derived from tumstatin, attenuate aspects of airway remodelling in a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karryn T Grafton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumstatin is a segment of the collagen-IV protein that is markedly reduced in the airways of asthmatics. Tumstatin can play an important role in the development of airway remodelling associated with asthma due to its anti-angiogenic properties. This study assessed the anti-angiogenic properties of smaller peptides derived from tumstatin, which contain the interface tumstatin uses to interact with the αVβ3 integrin. METHODS: Primary human lung endothelial cells were exposed to the LF-15, T3 and T7 tumstatin-derived peptides and assessed for cell viability and tube formation in vitro. The impact of the anti-angiogenic properties on airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR was then examined using a murine model of chronic OVA-induced allergic airways disease. RESULTS: The LF-15 and T7 peptides significantly reduced endothelial cell viability and attenuated tube formation in vitro. Mice exposed to OVA+ LF-15 or OVA+T7 also had reduced total lung vascularity and AHR was attenuated compared to mice exposed to OVA alone. T3 peptides reduced cell viability but had no effect on any other parameters. CONCLUSION: The LF-15 and T7 peptides may be appropriate candidates for use as novel pharmacotherapies due to their small size and anti-angiogenic properties observed in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Prediction of transmembrane helix orientation in polytopic membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Jie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane proteins compose up to 30% of coding sequences within genomes. However, their structure determination is lagging behind compared with soluble proteins due to the experimental difficulties. Therefore, it is important to develop reliable computational methods to predict structures of membrane proteins. Results We present a method for prediction of the TM helix orientation, which is an essential step in ab initio modeling of membrane proteins. Our method is based on a canonical model of the heptad repeat originally developed for coiled coils. We identify the helical surface patches that interface with lipid molecules at an accuracy of about 88% from the sequence information alone, using an empirical scoring function LIPS (LIPid-facing Surface, which combines lipophilicity and conservation of residues in the helix. We test and discuss results of prediction of helix-lipid interfaces on 162 transmembrane helices from 18 polytopic membrane proteins and present predicted orientations of TM helices in TRPV1 channel. We also apply our method to two structures of homologous cytochrome b6f complexes and find discrepancy in the assignment of TM helices from subunits PetG, PetN and PetL. The results of LIPS calculations and analysis of packing and H-bonding interactions support the helix assignment found in the cytochrome b6f structure from green alga but not the assignment of TM helices in the cyanobacterium b6f structure. Conclusion LIPS calculations can be used for the prediction of helix orientation in ab initio modeling of polytopic membrane proteins. We also show with the example of two cytochrome b6f structures that our method can identify questionable helix assignments in membrane proteins. The LIPS server is available online at http://gila.bioengr.uic.edu/lab/larisa/lips.html.

  11. Stimulation of human formyl peptide receptors by calpain inhibitors: homology modeling of receptors and ligand docking simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hisakazu; Kato, Takayuki; Watanabe, Norifumi; Takahashi, Tatsuji; Kitagawa, Seiichi

    2011-12-15

    Calpain inhibitors, including peptide aldehydes (N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Met-CHO) and α-mercapto-acrylic acid derivatives (PD150606 and PD151746), have been shown to stimulate phagocyte functions via activation of human formyl peptide receptor (hFPR) and/or hFPR-like 1 (hFPRL1). Using the homology modeling of the receptors and the ligand docking simulation, here we show that these calpain inhibitors could bind to the putative N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) binding site on hFPR and/or hFPRL1. The studies with HEK-293 cells stably expressing hFPR or hFPRL1 showed that the concentrations of calpain inhibitors required to induce an increase in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) was much higher (>100 folds) than those of fMLF and Trp-Lys-Tyr-Met-Val-D-Met (WKYMVm). HEK-293 cells expressing hFPR or hFPRL1 with the mutated fMLF binding site never exhibited the [Ca(2+)](i) response to calpain inhibitors. When the optimal concentrations of each stimulus were used, pretreatment of cells with fMLF or WKYMVm abolished an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by calpain inhibitors as well as the same stimulus, whereas pretreatment of cells with calpain inhibitors significantly suppressed, but never abolished, the [Ca(2+)](i) response induced by fMLF or WKYMVm, suggesting that the binding affinity of the inhibitors to the putative fMLF binding site may be lower than that of fMLF or WKYMVm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Steviol glycoside rebaudioside A induces glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY release in a porcine ex vivo intestinal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripken, Dina; van der Wielen, Nikkie; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Meijerink, Jocelijn; Witkamp, Renger F; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2014-08-20

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) are hormones important for satiation and are involved in the process called "ileal brake". The aim of this study was to investigate the GLP-1- and PYY-stimulating efficacy of rebaudioside A, casein, and sucrose. This was studied using tissue segments collected from various regions of the pig small intestine. GLP-1 release was strongest from the distal ileum. There, control release was 0.06 ± 0.01 (GLP-1) and 0.07 ± 0.01 (PYY) pmol/cm(2) of tissue. Rebaudioside A (2.5, 12.5, and 25 mM) stimulated GLP-1 release (0.14 ± 0.02, 0.16 ± 0.02, and 0.13 ± 0.02 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.001) and PYY release (0.19 ± 0.02, 0.42 ± 0.06, and 0.27 ± 0.03 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.001). Sucrose stimulated GLP-1 release (0.08 ± 0.01 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.05) only at 10 mM. Casein (0.5%, 1%, and 2.5%, w/v) stimulated GLP-1 release (0.15 ± 0.03, 0.13 ± 0.02, and 0.14 ± 0.01 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.001) and PYY release (0.13 ± 0.02, 0.20 ± 0.03, and 0.27 ± 0.03 pmol/cm(2) of tissue, p < 0.01). These findings may help in developing dietary approaches for weight management.

  13. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new...... and detailed insight into the size and cooperative nature of transmembrane pores formed by antimicrobial peptides that is not available from the conventional quenching-based leakage assays....... highly warranted. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a biophysical technique that can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes from large unilamellar vesicle, thereby potentially becoming such a new tool. However, the usage of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy...

  14. Review. The mammalian proton-coupled peptide cotransporter PepT1: sitting on the transporter-channel fence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, David

    2009-01-27

    The proton-coupled di- and tripeptide transporter PepT1 (SLC15a1) is the major route by which dietary nitrogen is taken up from the small intestine, as well as being the route of entry for important therapeutic (pro)drugs such as the beta-lactam antibiotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and antiviral and anti-cancer agents. PepT1 is a member of the major facilitator superfamily of 12 transmembrane domain transporter proteins. Expression studies in Xenopus laevis on rabbit PepT1 that had undergone site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved arginine residue (arginine282 in transmembrane domain 7) to a glutamate revealed that this residue played a role in the coupling of proton and peptide transport and prevented the movement of non-coupled ions during the transporter cycle. Mutations of arginine282 to other non-positive residues did not uncouple proton-peptide cotransport, but did allow additional ion movements when substrate was added. By contrast, mutations to positive residues appeared to function the same as wild-type. These findings are discussed in relation to the functional role that arginine282 may play in the way PepT1 operates, together with structural information from the homology model of PepT1 based on the Escherichia coli lactose permease crystal structure.

  15. Web-based toolkits for topology prediction of transmembrane helical proteins, fold recognition, structure and binding scoring, folding-kinetics analysis and comparative analysis of domain combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2005-07-01

    We have developed the following web servers for protein structural modeling and analysis at http://theory.med.buffalo.edu: THUMBUP, UMDHMM(TMHP) and TUPS, predictors of transmembrane helical protein topology based on a mean-burial-propensity scale of amino acid residues (THUMBUP), hidden Markov model (UMDHMM(TMHP)) and their combinations (TUPS); SPARKS 2.0 and SP3, two profile-profile alignment methods, that match input query sequence(s) to structural templates by integrating sequence profile with knowledge-based structural score (SPARKS 2.0) and structure-derived profile (SP3); DFIRE, a knowledge-based potential for scoring free energy of monomers (DMONOMER), loop conformations (DLOOP), mutant stability (DMUTANT) and binding affinity of protein-protein/peptide/DNA complexes (DCOMPLEX & DDNA); TCD, a program for protein-folding rate and transition-state analysis of small globular proteins; and DOGMA, a web-server that allows comparative analysis of domain combinations between plant and other 55 organisms. These servers provide tools for prediction and/or analysis of proteins on the secondary structure, tertiary structure and interaction levels, respectively.

  16. Selective antinociceptive effects of a combination of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor peptide antagonist [Ser1]histogranin and morphine in rat models of pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Numerous rather than a few analgesic endogenous neuropeptides are likely to work in concert in vivo in ameliorating pain. Identification of effective neuropeptide combinations would also facilitate the development of gene or cell-based analgesics. In this study, opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and the peptide histogranin analogue [Ser1]histogranin (SHG), which possess activity as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, were intrathecally (i.t.) injected alone and in combination in rat models of acute and persistent pain. None of the peptides when injected alone altered hind paw responses of uninjured rats to acute noxious stimulation. EM-1 and EM-2 showed divergent efficacies in the persistent pain models. For example, EM-1 injected alone was antinociceptive in rats with neuropathic pain, whereas EM-2 demonstrated no efficacy. Demonstration of synergism was also divergent across the models. For example, while SHG combined with EM-1 did not alter the efficacy of EM-1 in rats with neuropathic pain, SHG significantly increased the efficacy of EM-1 in the formalin test. By contrast, the potency and efficacy of the peptides alone and combinations were much less than those of the reference analgesic morphine. Furthermore, morphine combined with the clinically used NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine showed synergism across a broad range of pain states. While the current set of neuropeptides could serve as a basis for analgesic therapeutics, there could be other neuropeptides with greater efficacy and potency and broader therapeutic application. PMID:25505581

  17. Probability-Based Pattern Recognition and Statistical Framework for Randomization: Modeling Tandem Mass Spectrum/Peptide Sequence False Match Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estimating and controlling the frequency of false matches between a peptide tandem mass spectrum and candidate peptide sequences is an issue pervading proteomics research. To solve this problem, we designed an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm for detecting patterns with various lengths fr...

  18. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Pro-oxidant activity of histatin 5 related Cu(II)-model peptide probed by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabras, Tiziana; Patamia, Maria; Melino, Sonia; Inzitari, Rosanna; Messana, Irene; Castagnola, Massimo; Petruzzelli, Raffaele

    2007-06-22

    Histatin 5 is a cationic salivary peptide with strong candidacidal and bactericidal activity at physiological concentration. In this paper we demonstrate by optical spectroscopy and ESI-IT-MS experiments that a synthetic peptide related to the N-terminus of histatin 5 specifically binds copper ions in vitro and that the complex metal-peptide generates reactive oxygen species at physiological concentration of ascorbate, leading to significant auto-oxidation of the peptide within short reaction time. The oxidative activity of this peptide is associated to the presence of a specific metal binding site present at its N-terminus. The motif is constituted by the amino acid sequence NH(2)-Asp-Ser-His, representing a copper and nickel amino terminal binding site, known as "ATCUN motif". The results of the study suggest that the production of reactive oxygen species can be an intrinsic property of histatin 5 connected to its ability to bind metals.

  20. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  1. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  2. Multiple γ-secretase product peptides are coordinately increased in concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid of a subpopulation of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hata Saori

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcadeinα (Alcα is a neuronal membrane protein that colocalizes with the Alzheimer's amyloid-β precursor protein (APP. Successive cleavage of APP by β- and γ-secretases generates the aggregatable amyloid-β peptide (Aβ, while cleavage of APP or Alcα by α- and γ-secretases generates non-aggregatable p3 or p3-Alcα peptides. Aβ and p3-Alcα can be recovered from human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. We have previously reported alternative processing of APP and Alcα in the CSF of some patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD (SAD. Results Using the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA system that detects total p3-Alcα, we determined levels of total p3-Alcα in CSF from subjects in one of four diagnostic categories (elderly controls, MCI, SAD, or other neurological disease derived from three independent cohorts. Levels of Aβ40 correlated with levels of total p3-Alcα in all cohorts. Conclusions We confirm that Aβ40 is the most abundant Aβ species, and we propose a model in which CSF p3-Alcα can serve as a either (1 a nonaggregatable surrogate marker for γ-secretase activity; (2 as a marker for clearance of transmembrane domain peptides derived from integral protein catabolism; or (3 both. We propose the specification of an MCI/SAD endophenotype characterized by co-elevation of levels of both CSF p3-Alcα and Aβ40, and we propose that subjects in this category might be especially responsive to therapeutics aimed at modulation of γ-secretase function and/or transmembrane domain peptide clearance. These peptides may also be used to monitor the efficacy of therapeutics that target these steps in Aβ metabolism

  3. Different mechanisms of action of antimicrobial peptides: insights from fluorescence spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Palleschi, Antonio; Orioni, Barbara; Grande, Giacinto; Formaggio, Fernando; Toniolo, Claudio; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Stella, Lorenzo

    2009-09-01

    Most antimicrobial peptides exert their activity by interacting with bacterial membranes, thus perturbing their permeability. They are investigated as a possible solution to the insurgence of bacteria resistant to the presently available antibiotic drugs. However, several different models have been proposed for their mechanism of membrane perturbation, and the molecular details of this process are still debated. Here, we compare fluorescence spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations regarding the association with lipid bilayers and lipid perturbation for two different amphiphilic helical antimicrobial peptides, PMAP-23 and trichogin GA IV. PMAP-23, a cationic peptide member of the cathelicidin family, is considered to induce membrane permeability according to the Shai-Matsuzaki-Huang "carpet" model, while trichogin GA IV is a neutral peptide, member of the peptaibol family. Although several lines of evidence suggest a "barrel-stave" mechanism of pore formation for the latter peptide, its length is only half the normal thickness of a lipid bilayer. Both fluorescence spectroscopy experiments and MD simulations indicated that PMAP-23 associates with membranes close to their surface and parallel to it, and in this arrangement it causes a severe perturbation to the bilayer, both regarding its surface tension and lipid order. By contrast, trichogin GA IV can undergo a transition from a surface-bound state to a transmembrane orientation. In the first arrangement, it does not cause any strong membrane perturbation, while in the second orientation it might be able to span the bilayer from one side to the other, despite its relatively short length, by causing a significant thinning of the membrane.

  4. Role of Electrostatic Interactions in Binding of Peptides and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Their Folded Targets: 2. The Model of Encounter Complex Involving the Double Mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 Domain and Peptide Sos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuwen, Tairan; Xue, Yi; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R

    2016-03-29

    In the first part of this work (paper 1, Xue, Y. et al. Biochemistry 2014 , 53 , 6473 ), we have studied the complex between the 10-residue peptide Sos and N-terminal SH3 domain from adaptor protein c-Crk. In the second part (this paper), we designed the double mutant of the c-Crk N-SH3 domain, W169F/Y186L, with the intention to eliminate the interactions responsible for tight peptide-protein binding, while retaining the interactions that create the initial electrostatic encounter complex. The resulting system was characterized experimentally by measuring the backbone and side-chain (15)N relaxation rates, as well as binding shifts and (1)H(N) temperature coefficients. In addition, it was also modeled via a series of ∼5 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations recorded in a large water box under an Amber ff99SB*-ILDN force field. Similar to paper 1, we have found that the strength of arginine-aspartate and arginine-glutamate salt bridges is overestimated in the original force field. To address this problem we have applied the empirical force-field correction described in paper 1. Specifically, the Lennard-Jones equilibrium distance for the nitrogen-oxygen pair across Arg-to-Asp/Glu salt bridges has been increased by 3%. This modification led to MD models in good agreement with the experimental data. The emerging picture is that of a fuzzy complex, where the peptide "dances" over the surface of the protein, making transient contacts via salt-bridge interactions. Every once in a while the peptide assumes a certain more stable binding pose, assisted by a number of adventitious polar and nonpolar contacts. On the other hand, occasionally Sos flies off the protein surface; it is then guided by electrostatic steering to quickly reconnect with the protein. The dynamic interaction between Sos and the double mutant of c-Crk N-SH3 gives rise to only small binding shifts. The peptide retains a high degree of conformational mobility, although it is appreciably slowed down due

  5. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-04-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies.

  6. Human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a peptides do not reliably suppress anti-HPA-1a responses using a humanized severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D J; Eastlake, J L; Kumpel, B M

    2014-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs most frequently when human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a-positive fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies. Pregnancies at risk are treated by administration of high-dose intravenous Ig (IVIG) to women, but this is expensive and often not well tolerated. Peptide immunotherapy may be effective for ameliorating some allergic and autoimmune diseases. The HPA-1a/1b polymorphism is Leu/Pro33 on β3 integrin (CD61), and the anti-HPA-1a response is restricted to HPA-1b1b and HLA-DRB3*0101-positive pregnant women with an HPA-1a-positive fetus. We investigated whether or not HPA-1a antigen-specific peptides that formed the T cell epitope could reduce IgG anti-HPA-1a responses, using a mouse model we had developed previously. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in blood donations from HPA-1a-immunized women were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with peptides and HPA-1a-positive platelets. Human anti-HPA-1a in murine plasma was quantitated at intervals up to 15 weeks. HPA-1a-specific T cells in PBMC were identified by proliferation assays. Using PBMC of three donors who had little T cell reactivity to HPA-1a peptides in vitro, stimulation of anti-HPA-1a responses by these peptides occurred in vivo. However, with a second donation from one of these women which, uniquely, had high HPA-1a-specific T cell proliferation in vitro, marked suppression of the anti-HPA-1a response by HPA-1a peptides occurred in vivo. HPA-1a peptide immunotherapy in this model depended upon reactivation of HPA-1a T cell responses in the donor. For FNAIT, we suggest that administration of antigen-specific peptides to pregnant women might cause either enhancement or reduction of pathogenic antibodies. PMID:24261689

  7. Estimation of serum insulin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and C-peptide can help identify possible cardiovascular disease risk in thyroid disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purvi Purohit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed at evaluating the cardiovascular disease (CVD risk of thyroid disorder patients at diagnosis, using the traditional lipid profile, apo-B and apo-A1 in correlation with serum insulin and insulin resistance (IR and C-peptide. Background: With an ever increasing incidence of CVD in most urban populations, there has been a demand for newer techniques that could help in the early detection of the risk of this disease complex. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 100 healthy controls and 150 hypothyroid and 70 hyperthyroid patients, coming for the first time to our OPDs. The patients were selected on the basis of symptomatology and serum T3, T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH evaluations. They were then analyzed for body mass index (BMI, blood pressure (BP, serum insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, C-peptide, lipid profile and apo-B and -A1. Statistical analysis was done using Student′s "t" test and Spearman′s coefficient of correlation. Results: The hypothyroid patients presented with high BMI, diastolic hypertension, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, IR and raised serum C-peptide. There was highly significant correlation of serum insulin, HOMA-IR and C-peptide with lipid fractions and CVD risk ratios, T. chol/HDLc and apo-B/apo-A1, in hypothyroid patients. The hyperthyroid patients presented with systolic hypertension and a significant correlation of T. chol/HDLc with HOMA-IR. Hyperthyroid patients also had hyperinsulinemia, but reduced serum C-peptide levels. Conclusion: We conclude that the estimation of traditional lipid profile along with serum insulin, IR, C-peptide, apo-A1 and apo-B would not only help assess the thyroid status, but can also help in the early evaluation of a possible risk of CVD.

  8. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  9. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Copper(II)-bis-histidine coordination structure in a fibrillar amyloid β-peptide fragment and model complexes revealed by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Jessica; Sun, Li; Mehta, Anil K; Dong, Jijun; Lynn, David G; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-09-23

    Truncated and mutated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are models for systematic study-in homogeneous preparations-of the molecular origins of metal ion effects on Aβ aggregation rates, types of aggregate structures formed, and cytotoxicity. The 3D geometry of bis-histidine imidazole coordination of Cu(II) in fibrils of the nonapetide acetyl-Aβ(13-21)H14A has been determined by powder (14) N electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. The method of simulation of the anisotropic combination modulation is described and benchmarked for a Cu(II) -bis-cis-imidazole complex of known structure. The revealed bis-cis coordination mode, and the mutual orientation of the imidazole rings, for Cu(II) in Ac-Aβ(13-21)H14A fibrils are consistent with the proposed β-sheet structural model and pairwise peptide interaction with Cu(II) , with an alternating [-metal-vacancy-]n pattern, along the N-terminal edge. Metal coordination does not significantly distort the intra-β-strand peptide interactions, which provides a possible explanation for the acceleration of Ac-Aβ(13-21)H14A fibrillization by Cu(II) , through stabilization of the associated state and low-reorganization integration of β-strand peptide pair precursors.

  11. Active conformation of the erythropoietin receptor: random and cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of the extracellular juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaohui; Gross, Alec W; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-17

    In the absence of erythropoietin (Epo) cell surface Epo receptors (EpoR) are dimeric; dimerization is mediated mainly by the transmembrane domain. Binding of Epo changes the orientation of the two receptor subunits. This conformational change is transmitted through the juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase and induction of proliferation and survival signals. To define the active EpoR conformation(s) we screened libraries of EpoRs with random mutations in the transmembrane domain and identified several point mutations that activate the EpoR in the absence of ligand, including changes of either of the first two transmembrane domain residues (Leu(226) and Ile(227)) to cysteine. Following this discovery, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis in the EpoR juxtamembrane and transmembrane domains. Many mutants formed disulfide-linked receptor dimers, but only EpoR dimers linked by cysteines at positions 223, 226, or 227 activated EpoR signal transduction pathways and supported proliferation of Ba/F3 cells in the absence of cytokines. These data suggest that activation of dimeric EpoR by Epo binding is achieved by reorienting the EpoR transmembrane and the connected cytosolic domains and that certain disulfide-bonded dimers represent the activated dimeric conformation of the EpoR, constitutively activating downstream signaling. Based on our data and the previously determined structure of Epo bound to a dimer of the EpoR extracellular domain, we present a model of the active and inactive conformations of the Epo receptor.

  12. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities C-peptide Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Insulin C-peptide; Connecting Peptide Insulin; Proinsulin C-peptide Formal ...

  13. Modeling the tetraphenylalanine-PEG hybrid amphiphile: from DFT calculations on the peptide to molecular dynamics simulations on the conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanuy, David; Hamley, Ian W; Alemán, Carlos

    2011-07-21

    The conformational properties of the hybrid amphiphile formed by the conjugation of a hydrophobic peptide with four phenylalanine (Phe) residues and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol), have been investigated using quantum mechanical calculations and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The intrinsic conformational preferences of the peptide were examined using the building-up search procedure combined with B3LYP/6-31G(d) geometry optimizations, which led to the identification of 78, 78, and 92 minimum energy structures for the peptides containing one, two, and four Phe residues. These peptides tend to adopt regular organizations involving turn-like motifs that define ribbon or helical-like arrangements. Furthermore, calculations indicate that backbone···side chain interactions involving the N-H of the amide groups and the π clouds of the aromatic rings play a crucial role in Phe-containing peptides. On the other hand, MD simulations on the complete amphiphile in aqueous solution showed that the polymer fragment rapidly unfolds maximizing the contacts with the polar solvent, even though the hydrophobic peptide reduce the number of waters of hydration with respect to an individual polymer chain of equivalent molecular weight. In spite of the small effect of the peptide in the hydrodynamic properties of the polymer, we conclude that the two counterparts of the amphiphile tend to organize as independent modules.

  14. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor stimulation reverses key deficits in distinct rodent models of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsbury Ann E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently become apparent that neuroinflammation may play a significant role in Parkinson's disease (PD. This is also the case in animal paradigms of the disease. The potential neuroprotective action of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (EX-4, which is protective against cytokine mediated apoptosis and may stimulate neurogenesis, was investigated In paradigms of PD. Methods Two rodent 'models' of PD, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and lipopolysaccaride (LPS, were used to test the effects of EX-4. Rats were then investigated in vivo and ex vivo with a wide range of behavioural, neurochemical and histological tests to measure integrity of the nigrostriatal system. Results EX-4 (0.1 and 0.5 μg/kg was given seven days after intracerebral toxin injection. Seven days later circling behaviour was measured following apomorphine challenge. Circling was significantly lower in rats given EX-4 at both doses compared to animals given 6-OHDA/LPS and vehicle. Consistent with these observations, striatal tissue DA concentrations were markedly higher in 6-OHDA/LPS + EX-4 treated rats versus 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle groups, whilst assay of L-DOPA production by tyrosine hydroxylase was greatly reduced in the striata of 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle rats, but this was not the case in rats co-administered EX-4. Furthermore nigral TH staining recorded in 6-OHDA/LPS + vehicle treated animals was markedly lower than in sham-operated or EX-4 treated rats. Finally, EX-4 clearly reversed the loss of extracellular DA in the striata of toxin lesioned freely moving rats. Conclusion The apparent ability of EX-4 to arrest progression of, or even reverse nigral lesions once established, suggests that pharmacological manipulation of the GLP-1 receptor system could have substantial therapeutic utility in PD. Critically, in contrast to other peptide agents that have been demonstrated to possess neuroprotective properties in pre-clinical models

  15. Progressive effect of beta amyloid peptides accumulation on CA1 pyramidal neurons: a model study suggesting possible treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana eCulmone

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several independent studies show that accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ peptides , one of the characteristic hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, can affect normal neuronal activity in different ways. However, in spite of intense experimental work to explain the possible underlying mechanisms of action, a comprehensive and congruent understanding is still lacking. Part of the problem might be the opposite ways in which Aβ have been experimentally found to affect the normal activity of a neuron; for example, making a neuron more excitable (by reducing the A- or DR-type K+ currents or less excitable (by reducing synaptic transmission and Na+ current. The overall picture is therefore confusing, since the interplay of many mechanisms makes it difficult to link individual experimental findings with the more general problem of understanding the progression of the disease. This is an important issue, especially for the development of new drugs trying to ameliorate the effects of the disease. We addressed these paradoxes through computational models. We first modeled the different stages of AD by progressively modifying the intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties of a realistic model neuron, while accounting for multiple and different experimental findings and by evaluating the contribution of each mechanism to the overall modulation of the cell’s excitability. We then tested a number of manipulations of channel and synaptic activation properties that could compensate for the effects of Aβ. The model predicts possible therapeutic treatments in terms of pharmacological manipulations of channels’ kinetic and activation properties. The results also suggest how and which mechanisms can be targeted by a drug to restore the original firing conditions.

  16. Sequence dependence of kinetics and morphology of collagen model peptide self-assembly into higher order structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Karunakar; Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    The process of self-assembly of the triple-helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 into higher order structure resembles the nucleation-growth mechanism of collagen fibril formation in many features, but the irregular morphology of the self-assembled peptide contrasts with the ordered fibers and networks formed by collagen in vivo. The amino acid sequence in the central region of the (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 peptide was varied and found to affect the kinetics of self-assembly and nature of the higher order st...

  17. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization by syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    Syndecans, a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, interact with numerous extracellular ligands through specific sequences in their heparan sulfate chains and have been considered to be co-receptors for matrix molecules and growth factors. In addition to their roles as co-receptors, many studies...

  18. DNA display selection of peptide ligands for a full-length human G protein-coupled receptor on CHO-K1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhide Doi

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, which form the largest group of transmembrane proteins involved in signal transduction, are major targets of currently available drugs. Thus, the search for cognate and surrogate peptide ligands for GPCRs is of both basic and therapeutic interest. Here we describe the application of an in vitro DNA display technology to screening libraries of peptide ligands for full-length GPCRs expressed on whole cells. We used human angiotensin II (Ang II type-1 receptor (hAT1R as a model GPCR. Under improved selection conditions using hAT1R-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells as bait, we confirmed that Ang II gene could be enriched more than 10,000-fold after four rounds of selection. Further, we successfully selected diverse Ang II-like peptides from randomized peptide libraries. The results provide more precise information on the sequence-function relationships of hAT1R ligands than can be obtained by conventional alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Completely in vitro DNA display can overcome the limitations of current display technologies and is expected to prove widely useful for screening diverse libraries of mutant peptide and protein ligands for receptors that can be expressed functionally on the surface of CHO-K1 cells.

  19. Peptides derived from the solvent-exposed loops 3 and 4 of BDNF bind TrkB and p75(NTR) receptors and stimulate neurite outgrowth and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fobian, Kristina; Owczarek, Sylwia; Budtz, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critically involved in modeling the developing nervous system and is an important regulator of a variety of crucial functions in the mature CNS. BDNF exerts its action through interactions with two transmembrane receptors, either separately or in concert....... BDNF has been implicated in several neurological disorders, and irregularities in BDNF function may have severe consequences. Administration of BDNF as a drug has thus far yielded few practicable results, and the potential side effects when using a multifunctional protein are substantial. In an effort...... to produce more specific compounds without side effects, small peptides mimicking protein function have been developed. The present study characterized two mimetic peptides, Betrofin 3 and Betrofin 4, derived from the BDNF sequence. Both Betrofins bound the cognate BDNF receptors, TrkB and p75(NTR...

  20. A generalised Davydov-Scott model for polarons in linear peptide chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingxi; Piette, Bernard M. A. G.

    2017-08-01

    We present a one-parameter family of mathematical models describing the dynamics of polarons in periodic structures, such as linear polypeptides, which, by tuning the model parameter, can be reduced to the Davydov or the Scott model. We describe the physical significance of this parameter and, in the continuum limit, we derive analytical solutions which represent stationary polarons. On a discrete lattice, we compute stationary polaron solutions numerically. We investigate polaron propagation induced by several external forcing mechanisms. We show that an electric field consisting of a constant and a periodic component can induce polaron motion with minimal energy loss. We also show that thermal fluctuations can facilitate the onset of polaron motion. Finally, we discuss the bio-physical implications of our results.

  1. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    chemical parameters with biological activities of the peptide, using statistical methods. In this review we will discuss two different in silico strategies of computer-aided antibacterial peptide design, a linear correlation model build as an extension of traditional principal component analysis (PCA......) and a non-linear artificial neural network model. Studies on structurally diverse peptides, have concluded that the PCA derived model are able to guide the antibacterial peptide design in a meaningful way, however requiring rather a high homology between the peptides in the test-set and the in silico...... library, to ensure a successful prediction. In contrast, the neural network model, though significantly less explored in relation to antimicrobial peptide design, has proven extremely promising, demonstrating impressive prediction success and ranking of random peptide libraries correlating well...

  2. The matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-3 cleaves laminin receptor at two distinct sites between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence within the extracellular domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tosikazu AMANO; Olivia KWAK; Liezhen FU; Anastasia MARSHAK; Yun-Bo SHI

    2005-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) stromelysin-3 (ST3) has long been implicated to play an important role in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and cell fate determination during normal and pathological processes. However,like other MMPs, the molecular basis of ST3 function in vivo remains unclear due to the lack of information on its physiological substrates. Furthermore, ST3 has only weak activities toward all tested ECM proteins. Using thyroid hormone-dependent Xenopus laevis metamorphosis as a model, we demonstrated previously that ST3 is important for apoptosis and tissue morphogenesis during intestinal remodeling. Here, we used yeast two-hybrid screen with mRNAs from metamorphosing tadpoles to identify potential substrate of ST3 during development. We thus isolated the 37 kd laminin receptor precursor (LR). We showed that LR binds to ST3 in vitro and can be cleaved by ST3 at two sites,distinct from where other MMPs cleave. Through peptide sequencing, we determined that the two cleavage sites are in the extracellular domain between the transmembrane domain and laminin binding sequence. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cleavage sites are conserved in human LR. These results together with high levels of human LR and ST3 expression in carcinomas suggest that LR is a likely in vivo substrate of ST3 and that its cleavage by ST3 may alter cell-extracellular matrix interaction, thus, playing a role in mediating the effects of ST3 on cell fate and behavior observed during development and pathogenesis.

  3. Glycine and beta-branched residues support and modulate peptide helicity in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S C; Deber, C M

    1992-10-26

    Transmembrane (TM) segments of integral membrane proteins are putatively alpha-helical in conformation once inserted into the membrane, yet consist of primary sequences rich in residues known in soluble proteins as helix-breakers (Gly) and beta-sheet promoters (Ile, Val, Thr). To examine the specific 2 degrees structure propensities of such residues in membrane environments, we have designed and synthesized a series of 20-residue peptides with 'guest' hydrophobic segments--expected to provide three turns of incipient alpha-helix content--embedded in 'host' hydrophilic (Lys-Ser) matrices. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the model peptides in water showed that significant helical content was observed only for peptides with high Ala content; others behaved as 'random coils'. However, in the membrane-mimetic environment of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) micelles, it was found that Gly can be accommodated as readily as Ala, and Ile or Val as readily as Leu, in hydrophobic alpha-helices. Further subtleties of structural preferences could be observed in electrically-neutral lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC) micelles, where helical propensity decreased in the order Ala-Leu-rich > Gly-Leu-rich > Gly-Ile(Val)-rich hydrophobic segments. The results conjure a role of environment-dependent helix-modulation for Gly, Ile, and Val residues--and suggest that these residues may provide, in part, the structural basis for conformational transitions within or adjacent to membrane domains, such as those accompanying membrane insertion and/or required for transport or signalling functions.

  4. A novel transmembrane topology of presenilin based on reconciling experimental and computational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricson, Anna; Käll, Lukas; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2005-06-01

    The transmembrane topology of presenilins is still the subject of debate despite many experimental topology studies using antibodies or gene fusions. The results from these studies are partly contradictory and consequently several topology models have been proposed. Studies of presenilin-interacting proteins have produced further contradiction, primarily regarding the location of the C-terminus. It is thus impossible to produce a topology model that agrees with all published data on presenilin. We have analyzed the presenilin topology through computational sequence analysis of the presenilin family and the homologous presenilin-like protein family. Members of these families are intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl proteases. Although the overall sequence homology between the two families is low, they share the conserved putative active site residues and the conserved 'PAL' motif. Therefore, the topology model for the presenilin-like proteins can give some clues about the presenilin topology. Here we propose a novel nine-transmembrane topology with the C-terminus in the extracytosolic space. This model has strong support from published data on gamma-secretase function and presenilin topology. Contrary to most presenilin topology models, we show that hydrophobic region X is probably a transmembrane segment. Consequently, the C-terminus would be located in the extracytosolic space. However, the last C-terminal amino acids are relatively hydrophobic and in conjunction with existing experimental data we cannot exclude the possibility that the extreme C-terminus could be buried within the gamma-secretase complex. This might explain the difficulties in obtaining consistent experimental evidence regarding the location of the C-terminal region of presenilin.

  5. Model-based design space determination of peptide chromatographic purification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gétaz, David; Butté, Alessandro; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-04-05

    Operating a chemical process at fixed operating conditions often leads to suboptimal process performances. It is important in fact to be able to vary the process operating conditions depending upon possible changes in feed composition, products requirements or economics. This flexibility in the manufacturing process was facilitated by the publication of the PAT initiative from the U.S. FDA [1]. In this work, the implementation of Quality-by-design in the development of a chromatographic purification process is discussed. A procedure to determine the design space of the process using chromatographic modeling is presented. Moreover, the risk of batch failure and the critical process parameters (CPP) are assessed by modeling. The ideal cut strategy is adopted and therefore only yield and productivity are considered as critical quality attributes (CQA). The general trends in CQA variations within the design space are discussed. The effect of process disturbances is also considered. It is shown that process disturbances significantly decrease the design space and that only simultaneous and specific changes in multiple process parameters (i.e. critical process parameters (CPP) lead to batch failure. The reliability of the obtained results is proven by comparing the model predictions to suitable experimental data. The case study presented in this work proves the reliability of process development using a model-based approach.

  6. CHARMM TIP3P Water Model Suppresses Peptide Folding by Solvating the Unfolded State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Sander; Onck, Patrick R.; van der Giessen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of molecular dynamics simulations depends on the underlying force field, defined by the form and parametrization of the interparticle potential functions and the water model. The treatment of the solvent is crucial in molecular dynamics force fields, as hydrophobic interactions and hydr

  7. CHARMM TIP3P Water Model Suppresses Peptide Folding by Solvating the Unfolded State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Sander; Onck, Patrick R; van der Giessen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of molecular dynamics simulations depends on the underlying force field, defined by the form and parametrization of the inter-particle potential functions and the water model. The treatment of the solvent is crucial in molecular dynamics force fields, as hydrophobic interactions and hyd

  8. Post-glucose-load urinary C-peptide and glucose concentration obtained during OGTT do not affect oral minimal model-based plasma indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jainandunsing, Sjaam; Wattimena, J L Darcos; Rietveld, Trinet; van Miert, Joram N I; Sijbrands, Eric J G; de Rooij, Felix W M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how renal loss of both C-peptide and glucose during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) relate to and affect plasma-derived oral minimal model (OMM) indices. All individuals were recruited during family screening between August 2007 and January 2011 and underwent a 3.5-h OGTT, collecting nine plasma samples and urine during OGTT. We obtained the following three subgroups: normoglycemic, at risk, and T2D. We recruited South Asian and Caucasian families, and we report separate analyses if differences occurred. Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations were analyzed as AUCs during OGTT, OMM estimate of renal C-peptide secretion, and OMM beta-cell and insulin sensitivity indices were calculated to obtain disposition indices. Post-glucose load glucose and C-peptide in urine were measured and related to plasma-based indices. Urinary glucose corresponded well with plasma glucose AUC (Cau r = 0.64, P oral (Cau r = -0.61, P indices in general nor in T2D patients (renal clearance range 0-2.1 %, with median 0.2 % of plasma glucose AUC). C-indices of urinary glucose to detect various stages of glucose intolerance were excellent (Cau 0.83-0.98; SA 0.75-0.89). The limited role of renal glucose secretion validates the neglecting of urinary glucose secretion in kinetic models of glucose homeostasis using plasma glucose concentrations. Both C-peptide and glucose in urine collected during OGTT might be used as non-invasive measures for endogenous insulin secretion and glucose tolerance state.

  9. Two states of the triple helix in the thermal transition of the collagen model peptide (Pro-Pro-Gly)10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, T; Uchiyama, S; Nishi, Y; Kobayashi, Y; Tomiyama, T

    2004-08-01

    The collagen model peptide (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 is known to fold into a triple helix in solution. So far, the triple helix has been considered to exist as a single state. However, our previous study of (Pro-Pro-Gly)10 in solution has indicated the presence of two different states of the triple helix, a lower (HL) and a higher temperature state (HH). In the present study, these triple-helical states were investigated in more detail by NMR. Complete stereospecific assignments of the methylene protons of the proline residues were accomplished by the use of NOESY and TOCSY spectra. The temperature dependence of the 1H chemical shifts showed that the HL-to-HH thermal transition can be attributed to a conformational change of the first proline (Pro1) residues of the (Pro-Pro-Gly) triplets. Since TOCSY spectra with a 10 ms mixing-time confirmed a down puckering of these Pro residues in the HL state, but interconverting down and up puckerings in the HH state, the HL-to-HH thermal transition corresponds to conformational changes of the pyrrolidine rings of the Pro1 residues from an uniform down puckering to a more flexible state. The results confirm that thermal unfolding of the triple helix proceeds through the intermediate HH state.

  10. Molecular modeling of the inhibitory mechanism of copper(II) on aggregation of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yong; HAN Daxiong; YANG Pin

    2005-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) into insoluble fibrils is a key pathological event in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Under certain conditions, Cu(Ⅱ) exhibits strong inhibitory effect on the Zn(Ⅱ)-induced aggregation, which occurs significantly even at nearly physiological concentrations of zinc ion in vitro. Cu(Ⅱ) is considered as a potential factor in the normal brain preventing Aβ from aggregating. The possible mechanism of the inhibitory effect of Cu(Ⅱ) is investigated for the first time by molecular modeling method. In the mono-ring mode, the Y10 residue promotes typical quasi-helix conformations of Aβ. Specially, [Cu-H13(Nπ)-Y10(OH)] complex forms a local 3.010 helix conformation. In the multi-ring mode, the side chains of Q15 and E11 residues collaborate harmoniously with other chelating ligands producing markedly low energies and quasi-helix conformations. [Cu-3N-Q15(O)-E11(O1)] and [Cu-H13(Nπ)-Y10(OH)] complex with quasi-helix conformations may prefer soluble forms in solution. In addition, hydrogen-bond interactions may be the main driving force for Aβaggregation. All the results will provide helpful clues for an improved understanding of the role of Cu(Ⅱ) in the pathogenesis of AD and contribute to the development of an "anti-amyloid" therapeutic strategy.

  11. Spontaneous formation of structurally diverse membrane channel architectures from a single antimicrobial peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yukun; Chen, Charles H.; Hu, Dan; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2016-11-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) selectively target and form pores in microbial membranes. However, the mechanisms of membrane targeting, pore formation and function remain elusive. Here we report an experimentally guided unbiased simulation methodology that yields the mechanism of spontaneous pore assembly for the AMP maculatin at atomic resolution. Rather than a single pore, maculatin forms an ensemble of structurally diverse temporarily functional low-oligomeric pores, which mimic integral membrane protein channels in structure. These pores continuously form and dissociate in the membrane. Membrane permeabilization is dominated by hexa-, hepta- and octamers, which conduct water, ions and small dyes. Pores form by consecutive addition of individual helices to a transmembrane helix or helix bundle, in contrast to current poration models. The diversity of the pore architectures--formed by a single sequence--may be a key feature in preventing bacterial resistance and could explain why sequence-function relationships in AMPs remain elusive.

  12. Low molecular weight peptides derived from sarcoplasmic proteins produced by an autochthonous starter culture in a beaker sausage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza M. López

    2015-06-01

    Significance: The selection of a specific autochthonous starter culture guarantees the hygiene and typicity of fermented sausages. The identification of new peptides as well as new target proteins by means of peptidomics represents a significant step toward the elucidation of the role of microorganisms in meat proteolysis. Moreover, these peptides may be further used as biomarkers capable to certify the use of the applied autochthonous starter culture described here.

  13. Design of potent inhibitors of human RAD51 recombinase based on BRC motifs of BRCA2 protein: modeling and experimental validation of a chimera peptide.

    KAUST Repository

    Nomme, Julian

    2010-08-01

    We have previously shown that a 28-amino acid peptide derived from the BRC4 motif of BRCA2 tumor suppressor inhibits selectively human RAD51 recombinase (HsRad51). With the aim of designing better inhibitors for cancer treatment, we combined an in silico docking approach with in vitro biochemical testing to construct a highly efficient chimera peptide from eight existing human BRC motifs. We built a molecular model of all BRC motifs complexed with HsRad51 based on the crystal structure of the BRC4 motif-HsRad51 complex, computed the interaction energy of each residue in each BRC motif, and selected the best amino acid residue at each binding position. This analysis enabled us to propose four amino acid substitutions in the BRC4 motif. Three of these increased the inhibitory effect in vitro, and this effect was found to be additive. We thus obtained a peptide that is about 10 times more efficient in inhibiting HsRad51-ssDNA complex formation than the original peptide.

  14. Accounting for the kinetics in order parameter analysis: lessons from theoretical models and a disordered peptide

    CERN Document Server

    Berezovska, Ganna; Mostarda, Stefano; Rao, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Molecular simulations as well as single molecule experiments have been widely analyzed in terms order parameters, the latter representing candidate probes for the relevant degrees of freedom. Notwithstanding this approach is very intuitive, mounting evidence showed that such description is not accurate, leading to ambiguous definitions of states and wrong kinetics. To overcome these limitations a framework making use of order parameter fluctuations in conjunction with complex network analysis is investigated. Derived from recent advances in the analysis of single molecule time traces, this approach takes into account of the fluctuations around each time point to distinguish between states that have similar values of the order parameter but different dynamics. Snapshots with similar fluctuations are used as nodes of a transition network, the clusterization of which into states provides accurate Markov-State-Models of the system under study. Application of the methodology to theoretical models with a noisy orde...

  15. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Kevrekidis, Ioannis G., E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hummer, Gerhard, E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Theoretical Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  16. Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity of a temporin B peptide analogue on an in vitro model of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzerri, Valentino; Avitabile, Concetta; Dechecchi, Maria Cristina; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Montagner, Giulia; Cabrini, Giulio; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2014-10-01

    Natural peptides with antimicrobial properties are deeply investigated as tools to fight bacteria resistant to common antibiotics. Small peptides, as those belonging to the temporin family, are very attractive because their activity can easily be tuned after small modification to their primary sequence. Structure-activity studies previously reported by us allowed the identification of one peptide, analogue of temporin B, TB_KKG6A, showing, unlike temporin B, antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this paper, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of the peptide TB_KKG6A against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, we found that the peptide exhibits antimicrobial activity at low concentrations, being able to downregulate the pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α produced downstream infected human bronchial epithelial cells. Experiments were carried out also with temporin B, which was found to show pro-inflammatory activity. Details on the interaction between TB_KKG6A and the P. aeruginosa LPS were obtained by circular dichroism and fluorescence studies. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. C-peptide attenuates acute lung inflammation in a murine model of hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation by reducing gut injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Raymond L C; Xu, Xuemei; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Parry, Neil; Mele, Tina; Martin, Claudio M; Rui, Tao

    2017-08-01

    The study aims to evaluate whether C-peptide can reduce gut injury during hemorrhagic shock (HS) and resuscitation (R) therefore attenuate shock-induced inflammation and subsequent acute lung injury. Twelve-week-old male mice (C57/BL6) were hemorrhaged (mean arterial blood pressure maintained at 35 mm Hg for 60 minutes) and then resuscitated with Ringer's lactate, followed by red blood cell transfusion with (HS/R) or without C-peptide (HS/R + C-peptide). Mouse gut permeability, bacterial translocation into the circulatory system and intestinal pathology, circulating HMGB1, and acute lung injury were assessed at different times after R. The mice in the control group underwent sham procedures without HS. Compared to the sham group, the mice in the HS/R group showed increased gut permeability (6.07 ± 3.41 μg of FD4/mL) and bacterial translocation into the circulatory system (10.05 ± 4.92, lipopolysaccharide [LPS] of pg/mL), and increased gut damage; conversely, mice in the HS/R + C-peptide group showed significantly reduced gut permeability (1.59 ± 1.39 μg of FD4/mL; p C-peptide group showed decreased HMGB1 (7.27 ± 1.93 ng/mL; p C-peptide exerts beneficial effects to attenuate gut injury and dysfunction, therefore diminishing lung inflammation and subsequent injury in mice with HS and R.

  18. Analysis of light-induced transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential in Photosystem I proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  19. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, Cristian P. [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Yoshida, Ken [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  20. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  1. Pressure dependence of side chain (13)C chemical shifts in model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck Erlach, Markus; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Munte, Claudia E; Kainosho, Masatsune; Kremer, Werner; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2017-09-14

    For evaluating the pressure responses of folded as well as intrinsically unfolded proteins detectable by NMR spectroscopy the availability of data from well-defined model systems is indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of (13)C chemical shifts of the side chain atoms in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx, one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of a number of nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The size of the polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 is dependent on the type of atom and amino acid studied. For H(N), N and C(α) the first order pressure coefficient B 1 is also correlated to the chemical shift at atmospheric pressure. The first and second order pressure coefficients of a given type of carbon atom show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure also are weakly correlated. The downfield shifts of the methyl resonances suggest that gauche conformers of the side chains are not preferred with pressure. The valine and leucine methyl groups in the model peptides were assigned using stereospecifically (13)C enriched amino acids with the pro-R carbons downfield shifted relative to the pro-S carbons.

  2. Topical Cathelicidin (LL-37) an Innate Immune Peptide Induces Acute Olfactory Epithelium Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Jeremiah A.; Qin, Xuan; Pulsipher, Abigail; Orb, Quinn; Orlandi, Richard R.; Zhang, Jianxing; Schults, Austin; Jia, Wanjian; Presson, Angela P.; Prestwich, Glenn; Oottamasathien, Siam

    2017-01-01

    Background Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an endogenous innate immune peptide that is elevated in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The role of LL-37 in olfactory epithelium (OE) inflammation remains unknown. We hypothesized that 1) LL-37 topically delivered would elicit profound OE inflammation, and 2) LL-37 induced inflammation is associated with increased infiltration of neutrophils and mast cells. Methods To test our hypothesis we challenged C57BL/6 mice intranasally with increasing concentrations of LL-37. At 24 hours tissues were examined histologically and scored for inflammatory cell infiltrate, edema, and secretory hyperplasia. In separate experiments, fluorescently conjugated LL-37 was instilled and tissues were examined at 0.5 and 24 hours. To test our last hypothesis, we performed tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) assays for neutrophil activity and immunohistochemistry for tryptase to determine the mean number of mast cells per mm2. Results LL-37 caused increased inflammatory cell infiltrate, edema, and secretory cell hyperplasia of the sinonasal mucosa with higher LL-37 concentrations yielding significantly more inflammatory changes (p < 0.01). Fluorescent LL-37 demonstrated global sinonasal epithelial binding and tissue distribution. Further, higher concentrations of LL-37 led to significantly greater MPO levels with dose-dependent increases in mast cell infiltration (p < 0.01). Conclusions LL-37 has dramatic inflammatory effects in the OE mucosa that is dose-dependent. The observed inflammatory changes in the olfactory mucosa were associated with the infiltration of both neutrophils and mast cells. Our biologic model represents a new model to further investigate the role of LL-37 in OE inflammation. PMID:26346056

  3. The impact of model peptides on structural and dynamic properties of egg yolk lecithin liposomes - experimental and DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wałęsa, Roksana; Man, Dariusz; Engel, Grzegorz; Siodłak, Dawid; Kupka, Teobald; Ptak, Tomasz; Broda, Małgorzata A

    2015-07-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR), (1) H-NMR, voltage and resistance experiments were performed to explore structural and dynamic changes of Egg Yolk Lecithin (EYL) bilayer upon addition of model peptides. Two of them are phenylalanine (Phe) derivatives, Ac-Phe-NHMe (1) and Ac-Phe-NMe2 (2), and the third one, Ac-(Z)-ΔPhe-NMe2 (3), is a derivative of (Z)-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine. The ESR results revealed that all compounds reduced the fluidity of liposome's membrane, and the highest activity was observed for compound 2 with N-methylated C-terminal amide bond (Ac-Phe-NMe2 ). This compound, being the most hydrophobic, penetrates easily through biological membranes. This was also observed in voltage and resistance studies. (1) H-NMR studies provided a sound evidence on H-bond interactions between the studied diamides and lecithin polar head. The most significant changes in H-atom chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times T1 were observed for compound 1. Our experimental studies were supported by theoretical calculations. Complexes EYLAc-Phe-NMe2 and EYLAc-(Z)-ΔPhe-NMe2 , stabilized by NH⋅⋅⋅O or/and CH⋅⋅⋅O H-bonds were created and optimized at M06-2X/6-31G(d) level of theory in vacuo and in H2 O environment. According to our molecular-modeling studies, the most probable lecithin site of H-bond interaction with studied diamides is the negatively charged O-atom in phosphate group which acts as H-atom acceptor. Moreover, the highest binding energy to hydrocarbon chains were observed in the case of Ac-Phe-NMe2 (2). Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  4. Establishment of a root proteome reference map for the model legume Medicago truncatula using the expressed sequence tag database for peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathesius, U; Keijzers, Guido; Natera, S H

    2001-01-01

    We have established a proteome reference map for Medicago truncatula root proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with peptide mass fingerprinting to aid the dissection of nodulation and root developmental pathways by proteome analysis. M. truncatula has been chosen as a model....... This proteome map will be updated continuously (http://semele.anu.edu.au/2d/2d.html) and will be a powerful tool for investigating the molecular mechanisms of root symbioses in legumes....

  5. Interaction structure of the complex between neuroprotective factor humanin and Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide revealed by affinity mass spectrometry and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftei, Madalina; Tian, Xiaodan; Manea, Marilena; Exner, Thomas E; Schwanzar, Daniel; von Arnim, Christine A F; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Humanin (HN) is a linear 24-aa peptide recently detected in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. HN specifically inhibits neuronal cell death in vitro induced by ß-amyloid (Aß) peptides and by amyloid precursor protein and its gene mutations in familial AD, thereby representing a potential therapeutic lead structure for AD; however, its molecular mechanism of action is not well understood. We report here the identification of the binding epitopes between HN and Aß(1-40) and characterization of the interaction structure through a molecular modeling study. Wild-type HN and HN-sequence mutations were synthesized by SPPS and the HPLC-purified peptides characterized by MALDI-MS. The interaction epitopes between HN and Aß(1-40) were identified by affinity-MS using proteolytic epitope excision and extraction, followed by elution and mass spectrometric characterization of the affinity-bound peptides. The affinity-MS analyses revealed HN(5-15) as the epitope sequence of HN, whereas Aß(17-28) was identified as the Aß interaction epitope. The epitopes and binding sites were ascertained by ELISA of the complex of HN peptides with immobilized Aß(1-40) and by ELISA with Aß(1-40) and Aß-partial sequences as ligands to immobilized HN. The specificity and affinity of the HN-Aß interaction were characterized by direct ESI-MS of the HN-Aß(1-40) complex and by bioaffinity analysis using a surface acoustic wave biosensor, providing a K(D) of the complex of 610 nm. A molecular dynamics simulation of the HN-Aß(1-40) complex was consistent with the binding specificity and shielding effects of the HN and Aß interaction epitopes. These results indicate a specific strong association of HN and Aß(1-40) polypeptide and provide a molecular basis for understanding the neuroprotective function of HN.

  6. The anti-inflammatory peptide stearyl-norleucine-VIP delays disease onset and extends survival in a rat model of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goursaud, Stéphanie; Schäfer, Sabrina; Dumont, Amélie O; Vergouts, Maxime; Gallo, Alessandro; Desmet, Nathalie; Deumens, Ronald; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has potent immune modulatory actions that may influence the course of neurodegenerative disorders associated with chronic inflammation. Here, we show the therapeutic benefits of a modified peptide agonist stearyl-norleucine-VIP (SNV) in a transgenic rat model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (mutated superoxide dismutase 1, hSOD1(G93A)). When administered by systemic every-other-day intraperitoneal injections during a period of 80 days before disease, SNV delayed the onset of motor dysfunction by no less than three weeks, while survival was extended by nearly two months. SNV-treated rats showed reduced astro- and microgliosis in the lumbar ventral spinal cord and a significant degree of motor neuron preservation. Throughout the treatment, SNV promoted the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 as well as neurotrophic factors commonly considered as beneficial in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis management (glial derived neuroptrophic factor, insulin like growth factor, brain derived neurotrophic factor). The peptide nearly totally suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and repressed the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators interleukin-1β, nitric oxide and of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α likely accounted for the observed down-regulation of nuclear factor kappa B that modulates the transcription of genes specifically involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sod1 and the glutamate transporter slc1a2). In line with this, levels of human superoxide dismutase 1 mRNA and protein were decreased by SNV treatment, while the expression and activity of the glutamate transporter-1 was promoted. Considering the large diversity of influences of this peptide on both clinical features of the disease and associated biochemical markers, we propose that SNV or related peptides may constitute promising candidates for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  7. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator fragments with the Phe508 deletion exert a dual allosteric control over the master kinase CK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Mario A.; Marin, Oriano; Cozza, Giorgio; Sarno, Stefania; Meggio, Flavio; Treharne, Kate J.; Mehta, Anil; Pinna, Lorenzo A.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis mostly follows a single Phe508 deletion in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) (CFTRΔF508), thereby causing premature fragmentation of the nascent protein with concomitant alterations of diverse cellular functions. We show that CK2, the most pleiotropic protein kinase, undergoes allosteric control of its different cellular forms in the presence of short CFTR peptides encompassing the Phe508 deletion: these CFTRΔF508 peptides drastically inhibit the isolated catalytic subunit (α) of the kinase and yet up-regulate the holoenzyme, composed of two catalytic and two non-catalytic (β) subunits. Remarkable agreement between in silico docking and our biochemical data point to different sites for the CFTRΔF508 peptide binding on isolated CK2α and on CK2β assembled into the holoenzyme, suggesting that CK2 targeting may be perturbed in cells expressing CFTRΔF508; this could shed light on some pleiotropic aspects of cystic fibrosis disease. PMID:19925455

  8. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie White

    Full Text Available This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  9. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  10. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Integration of genetic virtual screening patterns and latent multivariate modeling techniques for QSAR optimization based on combinations and/or interactions between peptides and proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Both the concept and the model of snug quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) were pro-posed and developed for molecular design through constructing QSAR based on some known mode of receptor/ligand interactions. Many disadvantages of traditional models can be avoided by using the proposed method because the traditional models only determined upon molecular structural features in sample sets themselves. A genetic virtual screening of peptide/protein combinations (GVSPPC) is proposed for the first time by utilizing this idea to examine peptide/protein affinity activities. A genetic algorithm (GA) was developed for screening combinative targets with an interaction mode for virtual receptors. GVSPPC succeeds in disposing difficulties in rational QSAR,in order to search for the ligand/receptor interactions on conditions of unknown structures. Some bioactive oligo-/poly-peptide systems covering 58 angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and 18 double site mutation residues in camel antibody protein cAb-Lys3 were investigated by GVSPPC with satisfactory results (R 2 cu>0.91,Q 2 cv > 0.86,ERMS=0.19-0.95),respectively,which demonstrates that GVSPPC is more inter-pretable in the ligand-receptor interaction than the traditional QSAR method.

  12. Integration of genetic virtual screening patterns and latent multivariate modeling techniques for QSAR optimization based on combinations and/or interactions between peptides and proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ZhiLiang; CHEN Gang; LI GenRong; TIAN FeiFei; WU ShiRong; YANG ShanBin; YANG ShengXi; ZHOU Yuan; ZHANG QiaoXia; QIN RenHui; MEI Hu

    2008-01-01

    Both the concept and the model of snug quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) were pro-posed and developed for molecular design through constructing QSAR based on some known mode of receptor/ligand interactions. Many disadvantages of traditional models can be avoided by using the proposed method because the traditional models only determined upon molecular structural features in sample sets themselves. A genetic virtual screening of peptide/protein combinations (GVSPPC) is proposed for the first time by utilizing this idea to examine peptide/protein affinity activities. A genetic algorithm (GA) was developed for screening combinative targets with an interaction mode for virtual receptors. GVSPPC succeeds in disposing difficulties in rational QSAR, in order to search for the ligand/receptor interactions on conditions of unknown structures. Some bioactive oligo-/poly-peptide systems covering 58 angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and 18 double site mutation residues in camel antibody protein cAb-Lys3 were investigated by GVSPPC with satisfactory results (Rcu2 > 0.91, Qcv2 0.86, ERMS = 0.19-0.95), respectively, which demonstrates that GVSPPC is more inter-pretable in the ligand-receptor interaction than the traditional QSAR method.

  13. Atomistic modeling of peptide adsorption on rutile (100) in the presence of water and of contamination by low molecular weight alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Wenke; Langel, Walter

    2014-09-01

    Previous models for the interface between titanium implants and biosystems take into account the oxide passivation layer and the hydroxylation, but omit the hydrocarbon contamination on air-exposed samples. The authors develop a consistent model for the contamination of the rutile (100) surface by small alcohols, which are known to be present in ambient atmosphere, and use this approach in molecular dynamics calculations. Contact angle evaluation reveals that hydrophobic surfaces can be generated. During molecular dynamics simulations with three peptides (RPRGFGMSRERQ, WFCLLGCDAGCW, and RKLPDA), polar side chains penetrate the hydrocarbons and become immobilized on the titanium dioxide. In the carbon layer, the peptide recognizes a hydrophobic environment, which was not present on the clean surface, and the authors attribute changes in the secondary structure in one case to this interaction. The authors further include the popular Matsui-Akaogi approach [M. Matsui and M. Akaogi, Mol. Simul. 6, 239 (1991)] into the frame of the AMBER force field and quote van der Waals parameters for fitting the original Buckingham part. With the new potential, the authors evaluated lattice parameters, thermal fluctuation, and bulk modulus. Translational diffusion coefficients and dipole autocorrelation functions of water on the surface are discussed in relation to surface properties, and it is shown that the water layers are more rigid than on earlier titanium dioxide models, and that contacts between peptide and surface are less direct.

  14. Cell-penetrating peptides for drug delivery across membrane barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne Moerck

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, cell-penetrating peptides have been investigated for their ability to overcome the plasma membrane barrier of mammalian cells for the intracellular or transcellular delivery of cargoes as diverse as low molecular weight drugs, imaging agents, oligonucleotides, peptides......-penetrating peptides as transmembrane drug delivery agents, according to the recent literature, and discusses critical issues and future challenges in relation to fully understanding the fundamental principles of the cell-penetrating peptide-mediated membrane translocation of cargoes and the exploitation......, proteins and colloidal carriers such as liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles. Their ability to cross biological membranes in a non-disruptive way without apparent toxicity is highly desired for increasing drug bioavailability. This review provides an overview of the application of cell...

  15. Short and long range functions of amino acids in the transmembrane region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. A mutational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Sumbilla, C; Lewis, D; Zhong, L; Strock, C; Kirtley, M E; Inesi, G

    1996-05-01

    Mutational analysis of several amino acids in the transmembrane region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase was performed by expressing wild type ATPase and 32 site-directed mutants in COS-1 cells followed by functional characterization of the microsomal fraction. Four different phenotype characteristics were observed in the mutants: (a) functions similar to those sustained by the wild type ATPase; (b) Ca2+ transport inhibited to a greater extent than ATPase hydrolytic activity; (c) inhibition of transport and hydrolytic activity in the presence of high levels of phosphorylated enzyme intermediate; and (d) total inhibition of ATP utilization by the enzyme while retaining the ability to form phosphoenzyme by utilization of P(i). Analysis of experimental observations and molecular models revealed short and long range functions of several amino acids within the transmembrane region. Short range functions include: (a) direct involvement of five amino acids in Ca2+ binding within a channel formed by clustered transmembrane helices M4, M5, M6, and M8; (b) roles of several amino acids in structural stabilization of the helical cluster for optimal channel function; and (c) a specific role of Lys297 in sealing the distal end of the channel, suggesting that the M4 helix rotates to allow vectorial flux of Ca2+ upon enzyme phosphorylation. Long range functions are related to the influence of several transmembrane amino acids on phosphorylation reactions with ATP or P(i), transmitted to the extramembranous region of the ATPase in the presence or in the absence of Ca2+.

  16. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  17. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  18. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  19. Observation of the side chain O-methylation of glutamic acid or aspartic acid containing model peptides by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, A Emin; Guray, Melda Z; Yalcin, Talat

    2017-03-15

    O-methylation of the side chains of glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues is generally observed modification when an acidified methanol/water (MeOH/dH2O) mixture is used as a solvent system during sample preparation for proteomic research. This chemical modification may result misidentification with endogenous protein methylation; therefore, a special care should be taken during sample handling prior to mass spectrometric analysis. In the current study, we systematically examined the extent of E/D methylation and C-terminus carboxyl group of synthetic model peptides in terms of different incubation temperatures, storage times, and added acid types as well as its percentages. To monitor these effects, C-terminus amidated and free acid forms of synthetic model peptides comprised of E or D residue(s) have been analyzed by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Additionally, LC-MS/MS experiments were performed to confirm the formation of methylated peptide product. The results showed that the rate of methylation was increased as the temperature increases along with prolong incubation times. Moreover, the extent of methylation was remarkably high when formic acid (FA) used as a protonation agent instead of acetic acid (AA). In addition, it was found that the degree of methylation was significantly decreased by lowering acid percentages in ESI solution. More than one acidic residue containing model peptides have been also used to explore the extent of multiple methylation reaction. Lastly, the ethanol (EtOH) and isopropanol (iPrOH) have been substituted separately with MeOH in sample preparation step to investigate the extent of esterification reaction under the same experimental conditions. However, in the positive perspective of view, this method can be used as a simple, rapid and cheap method for methylation of acidic residues under normal laboratory conditions.

  20. A potential smoothing algorithm accurately predicts transmembrane helix packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, R V; Marshall, G R; Ponder, J W

    1999-01-01

    Potential smoothing, a deterministic analog of stochastic simulated annealing, is a powerful paradigm for the solution of conformational search problems that require extensive sampling, and should be a useful tool in computational approaches to structure prediction and refinement. A novel potential smoothing and search (PSS) algorithm has been developed and applied to predict the packing of transmembrane helices. The highlight of this method is the efficient manner in which it circumvents the combinatorial explosion associated with the large number of minima on multidimensional potential energy surfaces in order to converge to the global energy minimum. Here we show how our potential smoothing and search method succeeds in finding the global minimum energy structure for the glycophorin A (GpA) transmembrane helix dimer by optimizing interhelical van der Waals interactions over rigid and semi-rigid helices. Structures obtained from our ab initio predictions are in close agreement with recent experimental data.

  1. Complementary and Overlapping Selectivity of the Two-Peptide Bacteriocins Plantaricin EF and JK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Akker, Emile van den; Hauge, Håvard H.; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Nes, Ingolf F.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Plantaricin EF and JK are both two-peptide bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus plantarum C11. The mechanism of plantaricin EF and JK action was studied on L. plantarum 965 cells. Both plantaricins form pores in the membranes of target cells and dissipate the transmembrane electrical potential (Δψ

  2. Complementary and Overlapping Selectivity of the Two-Peptide Bacteriocins Plantaricin EF and JK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moll, Gert N.; Akker, Emile van den; Hauge, Håvard H.; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Nes, Ingolf F.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Plantaricin EF and JK are both two-peptide bacteriocins produced by Lactobacillus plantarum C11. The mechanism of plantaricin EF and JK action was studied on L. plantarum 965 cells. Both plantaricins form pores in the membranes of target cells and dissipate the transmembrane electrical potential

  3. Antimicrobial peptide melimine coating for titanium and its in vivo antibacterial activity in rodent subcutaneous infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renxun; Willcox, Mark D P; Ho, Kitty Ka Kit; Smyth, Daniel; Kumar, Naresh

    2016-04-01

    Implant-associated infections represent a significant health problem and financial burden on healthcare systems. Current strategies for the treatment or prevention of such infections are still inadequate and new strategies are needed in this era of antibiotic resistance. Melimine, a synthetic antimicrobial peptide with broad spectrum activity against bacteria, fungi and protozoa, has been shown to be a promising candidate for development as antimicrobial coating for biomedical devices and implants. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial activity of melimine-coated titanium was tested. The titanium surface was amine-functionalised with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by reaction with a bifunctional linker 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic 3-sulfo-n-hydroxysuccinimide ester (Sulfo-SMCC) to yield a maleimide functionalised surface. Melimine was then tethered to the surface via a thioether linkage through a Michael addition reaction of the cysteine at its N-terminus with the maleimide moiety. Melimine coating significantly reduced in vitro adhesion and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by up to 62% and Staphylococcus aureus by up to 84% on the titanium substrates compared to the blank (p < 0.05). The activity was maintained after ethylene oxide gas sterilisation. The coating was also challenged in both mouse and rat subcutaneous infection models and was able to reduce the bacterial load by up to 2 log10 compared to the uncoated surface (p < 0.05). Melimine coating is a promising candidate for development as a surface antimicrobial that can withstand industrial sterilisation while showing good biocompatibility.

  4. The crystal structure of BlmI as a model for nonribosomal peptide synthetase peptidyl carrier proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Ma, Ming; Cuff, Marianne E; Bigelow, Lance; Bearden, Jessica; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N; Shen, Ben

    2014-07-01

    Carrier proteins (CPs) play a critical role in the biosynthesis of various natural products, especially in nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) enzymology, where the CPs are referred to as peptidyl-carrier proteins (PCPs) or acyl-carrier proteins (ACPs), respectively. CPs can either be a domain in large multifunctional polypeptides or standalone proteins, termed Type I and Type II, respectively. There have been many biochemical studies of the Type I PKS and NRPS CPs, and of Type II ACPs. However, recently a number of Type II PCPs have been found and biochemically characterized. In order to understand the possible interaction surfaces for combinatorial biosynthetic efforts we crystallized the first characterized and representative Type II PCP member, BlmI, from the bleomycin biosynthetic pathway from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC 15003. The structure is similar to CPs in general but most closely resembles PCPs. Comparisons with previously determined PCP structures in complex with catalytic domains reveals a common interaction surface. This surface is highly variable in charge and shape, which likely confers specificity for interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of a prototypical Type I PCP excised from the multimodular context revealed three conformational states. Comparison of the states with the structure of BlmI and other PCPs reveals that only one of the NMR states is found in other studies, suggesting the other two states may not be relevant. The state represented by the BlmI crystal structure can therefore serve as a model for both Type I and Type II PCPs.

  5. Structure of the human angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor bound to angiotensin II from multiple chemoselective photoprobe contacts reveals a unique peptide binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-03-22

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs.

  6. Structure of the Human Angiotensin II Type 1 (AT1) Receptor Bound to Angiotensin II from Multiple Chemoselective Photoprobe Contacts Reveals a Unique Peptide Binding Mode*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Dany; Cabana, Jérôme; Guillemette, Gaétan; Leduc, Richard; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in G protein-coupled receptor structure determination based on crystallography have been mainly obtained from receptors occupied in their transmembrane domain core by low molecular weight ligands, and we have only recently begun to elucidate how the extracellular surface of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) allows for the binding of larger peptide molecules. In the present study, we used a unique chemoselective photoaffinity labeling strategy, the methionine proximity assay, to directly identify at physiological conditions a total of 38 discrete ligand/receptor contact residues that form the extracellular peptide-binding site of an activated GPCR, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. This experimental data set was used in homology modeling to guide the positioning of the angiotensin II (AngII) peptide within several GPCR crystal structure templates. We found that the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 accommodated the results better than the other templates evaluated; ligand/receptor contact residues were spatially grouped into defined interaction clusters with AngII. In the resulting receptor structure, a β-hairpin fold in extracellular loop 2 in conjunction with two extracellular disulfide bridges appeared to open and shape the entrance of the ligand-binding site. The bound AngII adopted a somewhat vertical binding mode, allowing concomitant contacts across the extracellular surface and deep within the transmembrane domain core of the receptor. We propose that such a dualistic nature of GPCR interaction could be well suited for diffusible linear peptide ligands and a common feature of other peptidergic class A GPCRs. PMID:23386604

  7. Repositioning antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a disruptor of the lateral interactions of transmembrane domain 5 of EBV latent membrane protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Fiorini, Zeno; Smith, Christina; Zhang, Yingning; Li, Jing; Watkins, Linda R; Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI) have been regarded as "undruggable" despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5) of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions.

  8. Repositioning antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a disruptor of the lateral interactions of transmembrane domain 5 of EBV latent membrane protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohui Wang

    Full Text Available The lateral transmembrane protein-protein interactions (PPI have been regarded as "undruggable" despite their importance in many essential biological processes. The homo-trimerization of transmembrane domain 5 (TMD-5 of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1 is critical for the constitutive oncogenic activation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Herein we repurpose the antimicrobial agent pentamidine as a regulator of LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. The results of ToxR assay, tryptophan fluorescence assay, courmarin fluorescence dequenching assay, and Bis-Tris sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE consistently show pentamidine disrupts LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions. Furthermore, pentamidine inhibits LMP-1 signaling, inducing cellular apoptosis and suppressing cell proliferation in the EBV infected B cells. In contrast, EBV negative cells are less susceptible to pentamidine. This study provides a novel non-peptide small molecule agent for regulating LMP-1 TMD-5 lateral interactions.

  9. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendy, Robert F., E-mail: rfmelendy@liberty.edu [School of Engineering and Computational Sciences, Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia 24515 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  10. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  11. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Impact of Thermostats on Folding and Aggregation Properties of Peptides Using the Optimized Potential for Efficient Structure Prediction Coarse-Grained Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spill, Yannick G; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2011-05-10

    The simulation of amyloid fibril formation is impossible if one takes into account all chemical details of the amino acids and their detailed interactions with the solvent. We investigate the folding and aggregation of two model peptides using the optimized potential for efficient structure prediction (OPEP) coarse-grained model and replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations coupled with either the Langevin or the Berendsen thermostat. For both the monomer of blocked penta-alanine and the trimer of the 25-35 fragment of the Alzheimer's amyloid β protein, we find little variations in the equilibrium structures and heat capacity curves using the two thermostats. Despite this high similarity, we detect significant differences in the populations of the dominant conformations at low temperatures, whereas the configurational distributions remain the same in proximity of the melting temperature. Aβ25-35 trimers at 300 K have an averaged β-sheet content of 12% and are primarily characterized by fully disordered peptides or a small curved two-stranded β-sheet stabilized by a disordered peptide. In addition, OPEP molecular dynamics simulations of Aβ25-35 hexamers at 300 K with a small curved six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet do not show any extension of the β-sheet content. These data support the idea that the mechanism of Aβ25-35 amyloid formation does not result from a high fraction of extended β-sheet-rich trimers and hexamers.

  13. Examining the meaning of the peptide transfer free energy obtained from blocked (Gly)_n and cyclic-diglycine model compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Asthagiri, D; Weber, V

    2013-01-01

    In experiments, the free energy of transferring the peptide group from water to an osmolyte solution is obtained using the transfer free energy of (Gly)_n with the added assumption that a constant incremental change in free energy with n implies that each additional unit makes an independent contribution to the free energy. Here we test this assumption and uncover its limitations. Together with results for cyclic-diglycine, we show that, in principle, it is not possible to obtain a peptide group transfer free energy that is independent of the model system. We calculate the hydration free energy of acetyl-(Gly)_n-methyl amide (n=1..7) peptides modeled in the extended conformation in water and osmolyte solutions and find that the hydration free energy is linear in n, suggestive of independent, additive group-contributions. To probe the observed linearity further, we study the hydration of the solute bereft of water molecules in the first hydration shell. This conditioned solute arises naturally in the theoretic...

  14. Decoration of silicon nanostructures with copper particles for simultaneous selective capture and mass spectrometry detection of His-tagged model peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffinier, Yannick; Kurylo, Ievgen; Drobecq, Hervé; Szunerits, Sabine; Melnyk, Oleg; Zaitsev, Vladimir N; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2014-10-21

    We present in this work a simple and fast preparation method of a new affinity surface-assisted laser/desorption ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) substrate based on silicon nanostructures decorated with copper particles. The silicon nanostructures were fabricated by the metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) method. Then, superhydrophilic areas surrounded by superhydrophobic regions were formed through hydrosilylation reaction of 1-octadecene, followed by local degradation of the octadecyl layer. After that, copper particles were deposited in the hydrophilic areas by using the electroless method. We have demonstrated that these surfaces were able to perform high selective capture of model His-tag peptide even in a complex mixture such as serum solution. Then, the captured peptide was detected by mass spectrometry at a femtomolar level without the need of organic matrix.

  15. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R;

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease......-Abeta antibodies of the IgG1 and IgG2b classes, and mononuclear cells in the brain expressing the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and tumor growth factor-beta. Our results demonstrate that chronic nasal administration of Abeta peptide can induce an immune response to Abeta that decreases...

  16. Anti-Mycobacterial Peptides: From Human to Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan Teng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis (TB. With the growing problem of M. tuberculosis resistant to conventional antibiotics, especially multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and extensively-drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB, the need for new TB drugs is now more prominent than ever. Among the promising candidates for anti-TB drugs, anti-mycobacterial peptides have a few advantages, such as low immunogenicity, selective affinity to prokaryotic negatively charged cell envelopes, and diverse modes of action. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the anti-mycobacterial peptides, highlighting the sources, effectiveness and bactericidal mechanisms of these antimicrobial peptides. Most of the current anti-mycobacterial peptides are derived either from host immune cells, bacterial extraction, or mycobacteriophages. Besides trans-membrane pore formation, which is considered to be the common bactericidal mechanism, many of the anti-mycobacterial peptides have the second non-membrane targets within mycobacteria. Additionally, some antimicrobial peptides play critical roles in innate immunity. However, a few obstacles, such as short half-life in vivo and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, need overcoming before clinical applications. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of anti-mycobacterial peptides, especially direct killing of pathogens and immune-modulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions, indicate that they are promising candidates for future drug development.

  17. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    peptides and their interaction with membrane mimics. In this article, we discuss the promise and the challenges of widely used models and detail our recent work on peptide-micelle simulations as an attractive alternative to peptide-bilayer simulations. We detail our results with two large structural...

  18. Conserved aromatic residues in the transmembrane region VI of the V1a vasopressin receptor differentiate agonist vs. antagonist ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, N; Balestre, M N; Aumelas, A; Mahé, E; Phalipou, S; Morin, D; Hibert, M; Manning, M; Durroux, T; Barberis, C; Mouillac, B

    2000-07-01

    Despite their opposite effects on signal transduction, the nonapeptide hormone arginine-vasopressin (AVP) and its V1a receptor-selective cyclic peptide antagonist d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2]AVP display homologous primary structures, differing only at residues 1 and 2. These structural similarities led us to hypothesize that both ligands could interact with the same binding pocket in the V1a receptor. To determine receptor residues responsible for discriminating binding of agonist and antagonist ligands, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of conserved aromatic and hydrophilic residues as well as nonconserved residues, all located in the transmembrane binding pocket of the V1a receptor. Mutation of aromatic residues of transmembrane region VI (W304, F307, F308) reduced affinity for the d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2]AVP and markedly decreased affinity for the unrelated strongly hydrophobic V1a-selective nonpeptide antagonist SR 49059. Replacement of these aromatic residues had no effect on AVP binding, but increased AVP-induced coupling efficacy of the receptor for its G protein. Mutating hydrophilic residues Q108, K128 and Q185 in transmembrane regions II, III and IV, respectively, led to a decrease in affinity for both agonists and antagonists. Finally, the nonconserved residues T333 and A334 in transmembrane region VII, controlled the V1a/V2 binding selectivity for both nonpeptide and cyclic peptide antagonists. Thus, because conserved aromatic residues of the V1a receptor binding pocket seem essential for antagonists and do not contribute at all to the binding of agonists, we propose that these residues differentiate agonist vs. antagonist ligand binding.

  19. Antitumor activity of tripterine via cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers in a prostate cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan L

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ling Yuan,1 Congyan Liu,2 Yan Chen,2 Zhenhai Zhang,2 Lei Zhou,1 Ding Qu2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, 2Key Laboratory of New Drug Delivery System of Chinese Materia Medica, Jiangsu Provincial Academy of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (CT-NLC on prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods: CT-NLC were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of tripterine. The antiproliferative effects of CT-NLC, tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (T-NLC, and free tripterine in a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3 and a mouse prostate carcinoma cell line (RM-1 were evaluated using an MTT assay. The advantage of CT-NLC over T-NLC and free tripterine with regard to antitumor activity in vivo was evaluated in a prostate tumor-bearing mouse model. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the effect of CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine on immune responses. Histologic and TUNEL assays were carried out to investigate the mechanisms of tumor necrosis and apoptosis. Results: CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine showed high antiproliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 0.60, 0.81, and 1.02 µg/mL in the PC-3 cell line and 0.41, 0.54, and 0.89 µg/mL in the RM-1 cell line after 36 hours. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rates for cyclophosphamide, high-dose (4 mg/kg and low-dose (2 mg/kg tripterine, high-dose (4 mg/kg and low-dose (2 mg/kg T-NLC, high-dose (4 mg/kg and low-dose (2 mg/kg CT-NLC were 76.51%, 37.07%, 29.53%, 63.56%, 48.25%, 72.68%, and 54.50%, respectively, showing a dose-dependent pattern. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates inflammatory responses on oleic acid-induced acute lung injury model in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Dong-hai; LI Xiao-feng; LIU Ai-jun; FAN Xiang-ming; QIAO Chen-hui

    2013-01-01

    Background An inflammatory response leading to organ dysfunction and failure continues to be a major problem after injury in many clinical conditions such as sepsis,severe burns,and trauma.It is increasingly recognized that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) possesses a broad range of biological activities,including effects on endothelial function and inflammation.A recent study has revealed that ANP exerts anti-inflammatory effects.In this study we tested the effects of human ANP (hANP) on lung injury in a model of oleic acid (OA)-induced acute lung injury (ALl) in rats.Methods Rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=6 in each group).Rats in the control group received a 0.9% solution of NaCl (1 ml.kg1.h-1) by continuous intravenous infusion,after 30 minutes a 0.9% solution of NaCl (1 ml/kg) was injected intravenously,and then the 0.9% NaCl infusion was restarted.Rats in the ALl group received a 0.9% NaCl solution (1 ml·kg-1·h-1) intravenous infusion,after 30 minutes OA was injected intravenously (0.1 ml/kg),and then the 0.9% NaCl infusion was restarted.Rats in the hANP-treated ALI group received a hANP (0.1μg·kg-1·min-1) infusion,after 30 minutes OA was injected intravenously (0.1 ml/kg),and then the hANP infusion was restarted.The anti-inflammation effects of hANP were evaluated by histological examination and determination of serum cytokine levels.Results Serum intedeukin (IL)-1β,IL-6,IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α were increased in the ALI group at six hours.The levels of all factors were significantly lower in the hANP treated rats (P <0.005).Similarly,levels of IL-1β,IL-6,IL-10 and TNF-α were higher in the lung tissue in the ALI group at six hours.hANP treatment significantly reduced the levels of these factors in the lungs (P <0.005).Histological examination revealed marked reduction in interstitial congestion,edema,and inflammation.Conclusion hANP can attenuate inflammation in an OA-induced lung injury in rat model.

  1. Effects of side-chain orientation on the {sup 13}C chemical shifts of antiparallel {beta}-sheet model peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villegas, Myriam E.; Vila, Jorge A. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas y Naturales, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, CONICET (Argentina); Scheraga, Harold A. [Cornell University, Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology (United States)], E-mail: has5@cornell.edu

    2007-02-15

    The dependence of the {sup 13}C chemical shift on side-chain orientation was investigated at the density functional level for a two-strand antiparallel {beta}-sheet model peptide represented by the amino acid sequence Ac-(Ala){sub 3}-X-(Ala){sub 12}-NH{sub 2} where X represents any of the 17 naturally occurring amino acids, i.e., not including alanine, glycine and proline. The dihedral angles adopted for the backbone were taken from, and fixed at, observed experimental values of an antiparallel {beta}-sheet. We carried out a cluster analysis of the ensembles of conformations generated by considering the side-chain dihedral angles for each residue X as variables, and use them to compute the {sup 13}C chemical shifts at the density functional theory level. It is shown that the adoption of the locally-dense basis set approach for the quantum chemical calculations enabled us to reduce the length of the chemical-shift calculations while maintaining good accuracy of the results. For the 17 naturally occurring amino acids in an antiparallel {beta}-sheet, there is (i) good agreement between computed and observed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, with correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively; (ii) significant variability of the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts as a function of {chi}{sup 1} for all amino acid residues except Ser; and (iii) a smaller, although significant, dependence of the computed {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} chemical shifts on {chi}{sup {xi}} (with {xi} {>=} 2) compared to {chi}{sup 1} for eleven out of seventeen residues. Our results suggest that predicted {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shifts, based only on backbone ({phi},{psi}) dihedral angles from high-resolution X-ray structure data or from NMR-derived models, may differ significantly from those observed in solution if the dihedral-angle preferences for the side chains are not taken into

  2. Conditional Solvation Thermodynamics of Isoleucine in Model Peptides and the Limitations of the Group-Transfer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tomar, Dheeraj S.; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B. Montgomery; Asthagiri, D.

    2014-01-01

    The hydration thermodynamics of the amino acid X relative to the reference G (glycine) or the hydration thermodynamics of a small-molecule analog of the side chain of X is often used to model the contribution of X to protein stability and solution thermodynamics. We consider the reasons for successes and limitations of this approach by calculating and comparing the conditional excess free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of hydration of the isoleucine side chain in zwitterionic isoleucine, in ex...

  3. The fibrin-derived peptide Bbeta(15-42) significantly attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in a cardiac transplant model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedemann, D.; Schneeberger, S.; Friedl, P.H.A.; Zacharowski, K.; Wick, N.; Boesch, F.; Margreiter, R.; Laufer, G.; Petzelbauer, P.; Semsroth, S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory response after prolonged ischemia and subsequent reperfusion leads to increased risk of primary organ dysfunction after cardiac transplantation. It has been demonstrated that the fibrin-derived peptide Bbeta(15-42) (also called FX06) reduces infarct size in coronary arte

  4. Metabolic changes may precede proteostatic dysfunction in a Drosophila model of amyloid beta peptide toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Stanislav; Vishnivetskaya, Anastasia; Malmendal, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is linked to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease; accordingly, aggregation-prone isoforms of Aβ, expressed in the brain, shorten the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. However, the lethal effects of Aβ are not apparent until after day 15. We used shibire(...

  5. Neuregulin 1 expression and electrophysiological abnormalities in the Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora E Long

    Full Text Available The Neuregulin 1 transmembrane domain heterozygous mutant (Nrg1 TM HET mouse is used to investigate the role of Nrg1 in brain function and schizophrenia-like behavioural phenotypes. However, the molecular alterations in brain Nrg1 expression that underpin the behavioural observations have been assumed, but not directly determined. Here we comprehensively characterise mRNA Nrg1 transcripts throughout development of the Nrg1 TM HET mouse. In addition, we investigate the regulation of high-frequency (gamma electrophysiological oscillations in this mutant mouse to associate molecular changes in Nrg1 with a schizophrenia-relevant neurophysiological profile.Using exonic probes spanning the cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor (EGF-like, transmembrane and intracellular domain encoding regions of Nrg1, mRNA levels were measured using qPCR in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male and female Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like (WT mice throughout development. We also performed electrophysiological recordings in adult mice and analysed gamma oscillatory at baseline, in responses to auditory stimuli and to ketamine.In both hippocampus and cortex, Nrg1 TM HET mice show significantly reduced expression of the exon encoding the transmembrane domain of Nrg1 compared with WT, but unaltered mRNA expression encoding the extracellular bioactive EGF-like and the cysteine-rich (type III domains, and development-specific and region-specific reductions in the mRNA encoding the intracellular domain. Hippocampal Nrg1 protein expression was not altered, but NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation was lower in Nrg1 TM HET mice. We identified elevated ongoing and reduced sensory-evoked gamma power in Nrg1 TM HET mice.We found no evidence to support the claim that the Nrg1 TM HET mouse represents a simple haploinsufficient model. Further research is required to explore the possibility that mutation results in a gain of Nrg1 function.

  6. Bacterial Synthesis and Purification of Normal and Mutant Forms of Human FGFR3 Transmembrane Segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharuk, S A; Goncharuk, M V; Mayzel, M L; Lesovoy, D M; Chupin, V V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2011-07-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is a protein belonging to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases. FGFR3 plays an important role in human skeletal development. Mutations in this protein, including Gly380Arg or Ala391Glu substitutions in the transmembrane (TM) region, can cause different disorders in bone development. The determination of the spatial structure of the FGFR3 TM domain in a normal protein and in a protein with single Gly380Arg and Ala391Glu mutations is essential in order to understand the mechanisms that control dimerization and signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases. The effective system of expression of eukaryotic genes in bacteria and the purification protocol for the production of milligram amounts of both normal TM fragments of FGFR3 and those with single pathogenic mutations Gly380Arg and Ala391Glu, as well as their(15)N- and [(15)N,(13)C]-isotope-labelled derivatives, were described. Each peptide was produced inEscherichia coliBL21(DE3)pLysS cells as a C-terminal extension of thioredoxin A. The purification protocol involved immobilized metal affinity chromatography and cation- and anion-exchange chromatography, as well as the fusion protein cleavage with the light subunit of human enterokinase. The efficiency of the incorporation of target peptides into DPC/SDS and DPC/DPG micelles was confirmed using NMR spectroscopy. The described methodology of production of the native FGFR3 TM domain in norma and with single Gly380Arg and Ala391Glu mutations enables one to study their spatial structure using high-resolution heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Hydrophobic Clusters Raise the Threshold Hydrophilicity for Insertion of Transmembrane Sequences in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; Workewych, Natalie; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2016-10-11

    Insertion of a nascent membrane protein segment by the translocon channel into the bilayer is naturally promoted by high segmental hydrophobicity, but its selection as a transmembrane (TM) segment is complicated by the diverse environments (aqueous vs lipidic) the protein encounters and by the fact that most TM segments contain a substantial amount (∼30%) of polar residues, as required for protein structural stabilization and/or function. To examine the contributions of these factors systematically, we designed and synthesized a peptide library consisting of pairs of compositionally identical, but sequentially different, peptides with 19-residue core sequences varying (i) in Leu positioning (with five or seven Leu residues clustered into a contiguous "block" in the middle of the segment or "scrambled" throughout the sequence) and (ii) in Ser content (0-6 residues). The library was analyzed by a combination of biophysical and biological techniques, including HPLC retention times, circular dichroism measurements of helicity in micelle and phospholipid bilayer media, and relative blue shifts in Trp fluorescence maxima, as well as by the extent of membrane insertion in a translocon-mediated assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum. We found that local blocks of high hydrophobicity heighten the translocon's propensity to insert moderately hydrophilic sequences, until a "threshold hydrophilicity" is surpassed whereby segments no longer insert even in the presence of Leu blocks. This study codifies the prerequisites of apolar/polar content and residue positioning that define nascent TM segments, illustrates the accuracy in their prediction, and highlights how a single disease-causing mutation can tip the balance toward anomalous translocation/insertion.

  8. Identification of a Peptide for Systemic Brain Delivery of a Morpholino Oligonucleotide in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hammond, Suzan M; Abendroth, Frank; Hazell, Gareth; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides are emerging treatments for neuromuscular diseases, with several splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) currently undergoing clinical trials such as for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the development of systemically delivered antisense therapeutics has been hampered by poor tissue penetration and cellular uptake, including crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach targets in the central nervous system (CNS). For SMA application, we have investigated the ability of various BBB-crossing peptides for CNS delivery of a splice-switching phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) targeting survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 inclusion. We identified a branched derivative of the well-known ApoE (141-150) peptide, which as a PMO conjugate was capable of exon inclusion in the CNS following systemic administration, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN2 transcript. Treatment of newborn SMA mice with this peptide-PMO (P-PMO) conjugate resulted in a significant increase in the average lifespan and gains in weight, muscle strength, and righting reflexes. Systemic treatment of adult SMA mice with this newly identified P-PMO also resulted in small but significant increases in the levels of SMN2 pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) exon inclusion in the CNS and peripheral tissues. This work provides proof of principle for the ability to select new peptide paradigms to enhance CNS delivery and activity of a PMO SSO through use of a peptide-based delivery platform for the treatment of SMA potentially extending to other neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Reduced ability of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) to activate natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) causes dwarfism in lbab−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Andrea R.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Earhart, Cathleen A.; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) stimulates endochondrial ossification by activating the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase, natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B). Recently, a spontaneous autosomal recessive mutation that causes severe dwarfism in mice was identified. The mutant, called long bone abnormality (lbab), contains a single point mutation that converts an arginine to a glycine in a conserved coding region of the CNP gene, but how this mutation affects CNP activity has not been reported. Here, we determined that thirty to greater than one hundred-fold more CNPlbab was required to activate NPR-B as compared to wild-type CNP in whole cell cGMP elevation and membrane guanylyl cyclase assays. The reduced ability of CNPlbab to activate NPR-B was explained, at least in part, by decreased binding since ten-fold more CNPlbab than wild-type CNP was required to compete with [125I][Tyr0]CNP for receptor binding. Molecular modeling suggested that the conserved arginine is critical for binding to an equally conserved acidic pocket in NPR-B. These results indicate that reduced binding to and activation of NPR-B causes dwarfism in lbab−/− mice. PMID:18554750

  10. Comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of the carboxylate and amide forms of the HLDF-6 peptide in animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachouk, Anna P; Storozheva, Zinaida I; Solovjeva, Olga A; Sherstnev, Vyacheslav V; Zolotarev, Yury A; Azev, Vyacheslav N; Rodionov, Igor L; Surina, Elena A; Lipkin, Valery M

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the neuroprotective and nootropic activities of two pharmaceutical substances, the HLDF-6 peptide (HLDF-6-OH) and its amide form (HLDF-6-NH2), was conducted. The study was performed in male rats using two models of a neurodegenerative disorder. Cognitive deficit in rats was induced by injection of the beta-amyloid fragment 25-35 (βA 25-35) into the giant-cell nucleus basalis of Meynert or by coinjection of βA 25-35 and ibotenic acid into the hippocampus. To evaluate cognitive functions in animals, three tests were used: the novel object recognition test, the conditioned passive avoidance task and the Morris maze. Comparative analysis of the data demonstrated that the neuroprotective activity of HLDF-6-NH2, evaluated by improvement of cognitive functions in animals, surpassed that of the native HLDF-6-OH peptide. The greater cognitive/ behavioral effects can be attributed to improved kinetic properties of the amide form of the peptide, such as the character of biodegradation and the half-life time. The effects of HLDF-6-NH2 are comparable to, or exceed, those of the reference compounds. Importantly, HLDF-6-NH2 exerts its effects at much lower doses than the reference compounds.

  11. TM1-IR680 peptide for assessment of surgical margin and lymph node metastasis in murine orthotopic model of oral cancer

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    Suganya S., Annie A.; Kochurani, K. J.; Nair, Madhumathy G.; Louis, Jiss Maria; Sankaran, Santhosh; Rajagopal, R.; Kumar, K. Santhosh; Abraham, Parvin; P. G., Balagopal; Sebastian, Paul; Somananthan, Thara; Maliekal, Tessy Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Treatment outcome after surgical removal in oral carcinoma is poor due to inadequate methodologies available for marking surgical margins. Even though some methodologies for intraoperative margin assessment are under clinical and preclinical trials for other solid tumours, a promising modality for oral cancer surgery is not developed. Fluorescent-based optical imaging using Near Infrared (NIR) dyes tagged to tumour specific target will be an optimal tool for this purpose. One such target, Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor (GRPR) was selected for the study, and its binding peptide, TM1-IR680, was tested for its efficacy for surgical margin prediction in murine orthotopic model of oral cancer, derived from primary samples. Here, for the first time in a preclinical analysis, we show that the size and margin of oral cancer can be predicted, as revealed by 3D-imaging. Interestingly, the peptide was sensitive enough to detect lymph nodes that harboured dispersed tumour cells before colonization, which was impossible to identify by conventional histopathology. We recommend the use of TM1-NIR dyes alone or in combination with other technologies to improve the clinical outcome of oral cancer surgery. PMID:27827443

  12. Effects of rizatriptan on the expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and cholecystokinin in the periaqueductal gray of a rat migraine model.

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    Yao, Gang; Han, Ximei; Hao, Tingting; Huang, Qian; Yu, Tingmin

    2015-02-05

    Triptans are serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B/D agonists that are highly effective in the treatment of migraine. We previously found that rizatriptan can reduce the expression of proenkephalin and P substance in the rat midbrain, suggesting that rizatriptan may exert its analgesic effects by influencing the endogenous pain modulatory system. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK) are mainly responsible for antagonizing the analgesic effects of opioid peptides in the endogenous pain modulatory system. In this study, we investigated the effects of rizatriptan on the expression of CGRP and CCK in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), a key structure of the endogenous pain modulatory system, in a rat migraine model induced by nitroglycerin. We found that the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and CCK in the PAG of migraine rats were significantly increased compared to those in control rats, and these levels were significantly reduced upon treatment with rizatriptan in migraine rats (P<0.05). Our results suggest that the expression of CGRP and CCK in the endogenous pain modulatory system may be increased during migraine attacks, which further antagonizes the analgesic effects of endogenous opioid peptides and induces sustained migraine. Rizatriptan, however, significantly reduces the levels of CGRP and CCK to enhance the inhibition of pain signals via the endogenous pain modulatory system, resulting in effective treatment of migraine.

  13. Evolutionary analysis of Slc11 mechanism of proton-coupled metal-ion transmembrane import

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    Mathieu F. M. Cellier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the crystal structure of ScaDMT, a member of the Slc11 family, provided opportunity to advance understanding of proton-dependent metal-ion uptake by interfacing Slc11 molecular evolution and structural biology. Slc11 carriers belong to the ancient and broadly distributed APC superfamily characterized by the pseudo-symmetric LeuT-fold. This fold comprises two topologically inverted repeats (protomers that exchange alternate configurations during carrier cycling. Examining ScaDMT molecule inserted within a model membrane allowed to pinpoint residues that may interact with surrounding lipid solvent molecules. Three-dimensional mapping of Slc11-specific sites demonstrated they distribute at the protomer interface, along the transmembrane ion-conduction pathway. Functional sites were predicted by modeling hypothetical ScaDMT alternate conformers based on APC templates; these candidate homologous sites were found to co-localize with Slc11-specific sites, a distribution pattern that fits the functional diversity in the APC superfamily. Sites that diverged among eukaryotic Slc11 (Nramp types were located in transmembrane helices that may participate in discrete steps during co-substrate translocation, suggesting these sites influence transport activity. Adding some functional dimension to Slc11 carrier evolution will inform molecular understanding of metal-ion transport selectivity and regulation, Slc11 physiological roles and contribution to host resistance to microbial infection.

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

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    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  15. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

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    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects.

  16. The laminin β1-competing peptide YIGSR induces a hypercontractile, hypoproliferative airway smooth muscle phenotype in an animal model of allergic asthma

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    Zaagsma Johan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroproliferative airway remodelling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM mass and contractility, contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. In vitro studies have shown that maturation of ASM cells to a (hypercontractile phenotype is dependent on laminin, which can be inhibited by the laminin-competing peptide Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR. The role of laminins in ASM remodelling in chronic asthma in vivo, however, has not yet been established. Methods Using an established guinea pig model of allergic asthma, we investigated the effects of topical treatment of the airways with YIGSR on features of airway remodelling induced by repeated allergen challenge, including ASM hyperplasia and hypercontractility, inflammation and fibrosis. Human ASM cells were used to investigate the direct effects of YIGSR on ASM proliferation in vitro. Results Topical administration of YIGSR attenuated allergen-induced ASM hyperplasia and pulmonary expression of the proliferative marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. Treatment with YIGSR also increased both the expression of sm-MHC and ASM contractility in saline- and allergen-challenged animals; this suggests that treatment with the laminin-competing peptide YIGSR mimics rather than inhibits laminin function in vivo. In addition, treatment with YIGSR increased allergen-induced fibrosis and submucosal eosinophilia. Immobilized YIGSR concentration-dependently reduced PDGF-induced proliferation of cultured ASM to a similar extent as laminin-coated culture plates. Notably, the effects of both immobilized YIGSR and laminin were antagonized by soluble YIGSR. Conclusion These results indicate that the laminin-competing peptide YIGSR promotes a contractile, hypoproliferative ASM phenotype in vivo, an effect that appears to be linked to the microenvironment in which the cells are exposed to the peptide.

  17. Covalent modification of a melanoma-derived antigenic peptide with a natural quinone methide. Preliminary chemical, molecular modelling and immunological evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douat-Casassus, Céline; Marchand-Geneste, Nathalie; Diez, Elisabeth; Aznar, Céline; Picard, Philippe; Geoffre, Serge; Huet, Aline; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise; Gervois, Nadine; Jotereau, Francine; Quideau, Stéphane

    2006-05-01

    A LigandFit shape-directed docking methodology was used to identify the best position at which the melanoma-derived MHC class-I HLA-A2-binding antigenic peptide ELAGIGILTV could be modified by attaching a small molecule capable of fitting at the interface of complementary determining regional (CDR) loops of a T-cell receptor (TCR) while triggering T-cell responses. The small molecule selected here for determining the feasibility of this alternative track to chemical alteration of antigenic peptides was the electrophilic quinone methide (+)-puupehenone (), a natural product that belongs to a family of marine metabolites capable of expressing immunomodulatory activities. A preliminary chemical reactivity model study revealed the efficacy of the thiol group of a cysteine (C) side-chain in its nucleophilic addition reaction with in a regio- and diastereoselective manner. The best TCR/HLA-A2 ligand [i.e., ELAGCGILTV-S-puupehenol ()] then identified by the LigandFit docking procedure was synthesized and used to pulse HLA-A2(+) T2 cells for T-cell stimulation. Among the ELAGIGILTV-specific T-cell clones we tested, five of them recognized the conjugate in spite of its low binding affinity for the HLA-A2 molecules. The resulting T-cell stimulation was determined through the intracytoplasmic secretion of IFN-gamma and the percentage of T-cells thus activated. These highly encouraging results indicate that small non-peptidic natural product-derived molecules attached onto the central part of an antigenic peptide can fit at the TCR/HLA-A2 interface with induction of T-cell responses.

  18. Conformational response of influenza A M2 transmembrane domain to amantadine drug binding at low pH (pH 5.5

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    Elka R. Georgieva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21-49 fragment, upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21-49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21-49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21-49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER, in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L’s ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels by 5-8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD21-49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21-49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation

  19. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylation, has been consistently documented from the last ten years. Despite a growing interest of the scientific community to NEU1, its membrane organization is not understood and current structural and biochemical data cannot account for such membrane localization. By combining molecular biology and biochemical analyses with structural biophysics and computational approaches, we identified here two regions in human NEU1 - segments 139–159 (TM1) and 316–333 (TM2) - as potential transmembrane (TM) domains. In membrane mimicking environments, the corresponding peptides form stable α-helices and TM2 is suited for self-association. This was confirmed with full-size NEU1 by co-immunoprecipitations from membrane preparations and split-ubiquitin yeast two hybrids. The TM2 region was shown to be critical for dimerization since introduction of point mutations within TM2 leads to disruption of NEU1 dimerization and decrease of sialidase activity in membrane. In conclusion, these results bring new insights in the molecular organization of membrane-bound NEU1 and demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of two potential TM domains that may anchor NEU1 in the membrane, control its dimerization and sialidase activity. PMID:27917893

  20. New Insights into Molecular Organization of Human Neuraminidase-1: Transmembrane Topology and Dimerization Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pascal; Baud, Stéphanie; Bocharova, Olga V.; Bocharov, Eduard V.; Kuznetsov, Andrey S.; Kawecki, Charlotte; Bocquet, Olivier; Romier, Beatrice; Gorisse, Laetitia; Ghirardi, Maxime; Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Dauchez, Manuel; Efremov, Roman G.; Debelle, Laurent

    2016-12-01

    Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) is a lysosomal sialidase catalyzing the removal of terminal sialic acids from sialyloconjugates. A plasma membrane-bound NEU1 modulating a plethora of receptors by desialylat