WorldWideScience

Sample records for model training curriculum

  1. Training Counselors to Use Computer-Assisted Career Guidance Systems More Effectively: A Model Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Becky L.; Robbins, Steven B.; Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Harris-Bowlsbey, JoAnn; Lapan, Richard T.; Dahir, Carol A.; Jepsen, David A.

    2005-01-01

    A model graduate training curriculum that emphasizes the counselor's role in assisting clients in the effective use of computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems is described in this article. This 4-module graduate training program emphasizes client readiness and exploration using CACG systems, skill building and simulation exercises, and…

  2. [Chicano Counselor Training: Curriculum and Beyond Curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon

    The particulars of the evolved curriculum and how the training has evolved around the change-agent concept are stressed in this presentation. The measure of success achieved in attempting to influence the staff and course of studies of the regular guidance department is also emphasized. The curriculum of this counselor training institute has, from…

  3. Model training curriculum for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyner, C.J.; Birk, S.M.

    1995-09-01

    This document is to assist in the development of the training programs required to be in place for the operating license for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It consists of an introductory document and four additional appendixes of individual training program curricula. This information will provide the starting point for the more detailed facility-specific training programs that will be developed as the facility hires and trains new personnel and begins operation. This document is comprehensive and is intended as a guide for the development of a company- or facility-specific program. The individual licensee does not need to use this model training curriculum as written. Instead, this document can be used as a menu for the development, modification, or verification of customized training programs.

  4. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellenberger Sylvia

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008, presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for

  5. The North Dakota Mental Health and Aging Education Project: Curriculum Design and Training Outcomes for a Train-the-Trainer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Margaret A.; Chromy, Barbara; Philbrick, Candace A.; Sanders, Gregory F.; Muske, Kara L.; Bratteli, Marlys

    2009-01-01

    A training curriculum on mental health and aging was developed and disseminated to 32 natural caregivers throughout a frontier state using a train-the-trainer model. Those certified as trainers included social workers, religious professionals, volunteers, long-term care employees, nurses, home health workers, and professional and informal…

  6. The North Dakota Mental Health and Aging Education Project: Curriculum Design and Training Outcomes for a Train-the-Trainer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Margaret A.; Chromy, Barbara; Philbrick, Candace A.; Sanders, Gregory F.; Muske, Kara L.; Bratteli, Marlys

    2009-01-01

    A training curriculum on mental health and aging was developed and disseminated to 32 natural caregivers throughout a frontier state using a train-the-trainer model. Those certified as trainers included social workers, religious professionals, volunteers, long-term care employees, nurses, home health workers, and professional and informal…

  7. A person-task-context model for designing curriculum and in-training assessment in postgraduate education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Anne Marie; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke; Henriksen, Ann-Helen

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to trial a person-task-context model in designing a curriculum and in-training assessment programme that embraces trainee level of professional development and the work-based context of postgraduate medical education. The model was applied to the design of a programme...

  8. 24 CFR 3286.308 - Training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Training curriculum. 3286.308... States § 3286.308 Training curriculum. (a) Curriculum for initial installer licensing. The training... regulations in this part. The curriculum must include, at a minimum, training in the following areas: (1) An...

  9. Integrating Spanish language training across a Doctor of Physical Therapy curriculum: a case report of one program's evolving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Diaz, Deborah; Dillon, Loretta

    2014-12-01

    As the Hispanic population continues to expand in the United States, health professionals increasingly may encounter people who speak Spanish and have limited English proficiency. Responding to these changes, various health profession educators have incorporated Spanish language training into their curricula. Of 12 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) programs identified as including elective or required Spanish courses, the program at The University of Texas at El Paso is the only one integrating required Spanish language training across the curriculum. The purpose of this case report is to describe the development, implementation, and preliminary outcomes of the evolving educational model at The University of Texas at El Paso. The University of Texas at El Paso is situated immediately across the border from Mexico. Responding to the large population with limited English proficiency in the community, faculty began to integrate required Spanish language training during a transition from a master-level to a DPT curriculum. The Spanish language curriculum pillar includes a Spanish medical terminology course, language learning opportunities threaded throughout the clinical courses, clinical education courses, and service-learning. Forty-five DPT students have completed the curriculum. Assessment methods were limited for early cohorts. Clinically relevant Spanish verbal proficiency was assessed with a practical examination in the Spanish course, a clinical instructor-rated instrument, and student feedback. Preliminary data suggested that the model is improving Spanish language proficiency. The model still is evolving. Spanish language learning opportunities in the curriculum are being expanded. Also, problems with the clinical outcome measure have been recognized. Better definition of intended outcomes and validation of a revised tool are needed. This report should promote opportunities for collaboration with others who are interested in linguistic competence. © 2014

  10. Central Florida Film Production Technology Training Program. Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Community Coll., Orlando, FL.

    The Central Florida Film Production Technology Training program provided training to prepare 134 persons for employment in the motion picture industry. Students were trained in stagecraft, sound, set construction, camera/editing, and post production. The project also developed a curriculum model that could be used for establishing an Associate in…

  11. Development of a training curriculum for microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundaram, Indran; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Darzi, Lord Ara

    2010-12-01

    Recent changes in healthcare necessitate revision of the current apprenticeship model of surgical training. Current methods of assessment such as examinations and logbooks are not criteria-based, so are subjective and lack validity and reliability. The objective feedback of technical skills is crucial to the structured learning of surgical skills. We review current publications about training and methods of assessment in microsurgery. Searches on PubMed using keywords (microsurgery, training, assessment, simulation, and skill) were used to retrieve relevant articles, and further cross-referencing was done to obtain more information. New methods of assessment that are objective include checklists, global rating scales (GRS), and dexterity analysis, which give feedback of technical skills during training. Vital (living), non-vital, prosthetic, and virtual reality simulation models can be used to train surgeons to a proficient level outside the operating theatre before they operate on real patients. After reviewing the current evidence we propose a curriculum for microsurgical training that starts outside the operating theatre. The surgical community should follow the example of other high-risk industries such as aviation, where continuous assessment on simulators is a part of training, but further research is necessary before such methods can be used for summative assessment and revalidation. Copyright © 2009 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Model curriculum outline for Alternatively Fueled Vehicle (AFV) automotive technician training in light and medium duty CNG and LPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This model curriculum outline was developed using a turbo-DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process which utilizes practicing experts to undertake a comprehensive job and task analysis. The job and task analysis serves to establish current baseline data accurately and to improve both the process and the product of the job through constant and continuous improvement of training. The DACUM process is based on the following assumptions: (1) Expert workers are the best source for task analysis. (2) Any occupation can be described effectively in terms of tasks. (3) All tasks imply knowledge, skills, and attitudes/values. A DACUM panel, comprised of six experienced and knowledgeable technicians who are presently working in the field, was given an orientation to the DACUM process. The panel then identified, verified, and sequenced all the necessary job duty areas and tasks. The broad duty categories were rated according to relative importance and assigned percentage ratings in priority order. The panel then rated every task for each of the duties on a scale of 1 to 3. A rating of 3 indicates an {open_quotes}essential{close_quotes} task, a rating of 2 indicates an {open_quotes}important{close_quotes} task, and a rating of 1 indicates a {open_quotes}desirable{close_quotes} task.

  13. 14 CFR 142.39 - Training program curriculum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program curriculum requirements... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS Aircrew Curriculum and Syllabus Requirements § 142.39 Training program curriculum requirements. Each training program curriculum...

  14. Digestive oncologist in the gastroenterology training curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chris Jacob Johan Mulder; Marc Peeters; Annemieke Cats; Anna Dahele; Jochim Terhaar sive Droste

    2011-01-01

    Until the late 1980s, gastroenterology (GE) was consid-ered a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. Today, GE also incorporates Hepatology. However, Digestive Oncology training is poorly defined in the Hepatogastroenterology (HGE)-curriculum. Therefore, a Digestive Oncology cur-riculum should be developed and this document might be a starting point for such a curriculum. HGE-specialists are increasingly resisting the paradigm in which they play only a diagnostic and technical role in the manage-ment of digestive tumors. We suggest minimum end-points in the standard HGE-curriculum for oncology, and recommend a focus year in the Netherlands for Diges-tive Oncology in the HGE-curriculum. To produce well-trained digestive oncologists, an advanced Digestive Oncology training program with specific qualifications in Digestive Oncology (2 years) has been developed. The schedule in Belgium includes a period of at least 6 mo to be spent in a medical oncology department. The goal of these programs remains the production of well-trained digestive oncologists. HGE specialists are part of the multidisciplinary oncological teams, and some have been administering chemotherapy in their countries for years. In this article, we provide a road map for the organiza-tion of a proper training in Digestive Oncology. We hope that the World Gastroenterology Organisation and other (inter)national societies will support the necessary certi-fications for this specific training in the HGE-curriculum.

  15. 14 CFR 121.403 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 121.403...: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum... airplane. The curriculum must include ground and flight training required by this subpart. (b) Each...

  16. A Proposed Athletic Training Curriculum Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Sue

    An athletic training curriculum for the training of high school coaches and physical education teachers in Virginia includes courses on: (1) athletic injuries--a basic study of human physiology and anatomy relevant to different athletic injuries; (2) the art and science of sports medicine--prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of…

  17. Global Organizational Psychology: Internationalizing the Training Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavis Kung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid of globalization in the Information Age, students must become adept at navigating the complex and ambiguous nature of the global business environment. One major roadblock for training students to become global professionals is the lack of international curriculum within Industrial/Organizational (I/O Psychology programs at leading post-graduate training institutions. This article examines the methodologies and best practices used in establishing an International I/O Psychology curriculum at the graduate level developed to train students to better understand and work within the complexities of the global business environment. In this article we discuss the process we used to identify the major curriculum components needed for training in international I/O Psychology, and we provide specific advice for programs considering internationalization as well as lessons learned.

  18. Alienating Curriculum Work in Australian Vocational Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Competency-based training (CBT) is a curriculum model employed in educational sectors, professions and industries around the world. A significant feature of the model is its permeability to control by interests outside education. In this article, a "Neoliberal" version of CBT is described and analysed in the context of Australian…

  19. The PIC [Process Individualization Curriculum] Model: Structure with Humanistic Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Doris T.

    This paper describes a curriculum design model to train research and development personnel under USOE-NIE funding. This design model, called PIC (Process Individualization Curriculum), was chosen for coverting on-campus courses to extra-mural self-instructional courses. The curriculum specialists who work with professors to individualize their…

  20. 14 CFR 91.1079 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 91.1079... Operations Program Management § 91.1079 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each program manager must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember...

  1. 14 CFR 135.327 - Training program: Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program: Curriculum. 135.327... § 135.327 Training program: Curriculum. (a) Each certificate holder must prepare and keep current a written training program curriculum for each type of aircraft for each crewmember required for that type...

  2. A Proficiency-Based Progression Training Curriculum Coupled With a Model Simulator Results in the Acquisition of a Superior Arthroscopic Bankart Skill Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Richard L; Ryu, Richard K N; Pedowitz, Robert A; Beach, William; Burns, Joseph; Dodds, Julie; Field, Larry; Getelman, Mark; Hobgood, Rhett; McIntyre, Louis; Gallagher, Anthony G

    2015-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of proficiency-based progression (PBP) training using simulation both compared with the same training without proficiency requirements and compared with a traditional resident course for learning to perform an arthroscopic Bankart repair (ABR). In a prospective, randomized, blinded study, 44 postgraduate year 4 or 5 orthopaedic residents from 21 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved US orthopaedic residency programs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 skills training protocols for learning to perform an ABR: group A, traditional (routine Arthroscopy Association of North America Resident Course) (control, n = 14); group B, simulator (modified curriculum adding a shoulder model simulator) (n = 14); or group C, PBP (PBP plus the simulator) (n = 16). At the completion of training, all subjects performed a 3 suture anchor ABR on a cadaveric shoulder, which was videotaped and scored in blinded fashion with the use of previously validated metrics. The PBP-trained group (group C) made 56% fewer objectively assessed errors than the traditionally trained group (group A) (P = .011) and 41% fewer than group B (P = .049) (both comparisons were statistically significant). The proficiency benchmark was achieved on the final repair by 68.7% of participants in group C compared with 36.7% in group B and 28.6% in group A. When compared with group A, group B participants were 1.4 times, group C participants were 5.5 times, and group C(PBP) participants (who met all intermediate proficiency benchmarks) were 7.5 times as likely to achieve the final proficiency benchmark. A PBP training curriculum and protocol coupled with the use of a shoulder model simulator and previously validated metrics produces a superior arthroscopic Bankart skill set when compared with traditional and simulator-enhanced training methods. Surgical training combining PBP and a simulator is efficient and effective. Patient safety could be improved if

  3. A model curriculum for a course on the built environment and public health: training for an interdisciplinary workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchwey, Nisha D; Hobson, Susan E; Dannenberg, Andrew L; Mumford, Karen G; Contant, Cheryl K; McMillan, Tracy E; Jackson, Richard J; Lopez, Russell; Winkle, Curtis

    2009-02-01

    Despite growing evidence of the direct and indirect effects of the built environment on public health, planners, who shape the built environment, and public health professionals, who protect the public's health, rarely interact. Most public health professionals have little experience with urban planners, zoning boards, city councils, and others who make decisions about the built environment. Likewise, few planners understand the health implications of design, land use, or transportation decisions. One strategy for bridging this divide is the development of interdisciplinary courses in planning and public health that address the health implications of the built environment. Professional networking and Internet-based searches in 2007 led to the identification of six primarily graduate-level courses in the U.S. that address the links between the built environment and public health. Common content areas in most of the identified courses included planning and public health histories, health disparities, interdisciplinary approaches, air and water quality, physical activity, social capital, and mental health. Instructors of these courses collaborated on course content, assignments, and evaluations to develop a model curriculum that follows an active learning-centered approach to course design. The proposed model curriculum is adaptable by both planning and public health departments to promote interdisciplinary learning. Results show that students gain planning and public health perspectives through this instruction, benefiting from active-learning opportunities. Faculty implementation of the proposed interdisciplinary model curriculum will help bridge the divide between the built environment and public health and enable both planners and public health professionals to value, create, and promote healthy environments.

  4. Training for MIS in pediatric urology: proposition of a structured training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolino, Maria; Turrà, Francesco; Settimi, Alessandro; Esposito, Ciro

    2016-10-01

    In Europe there are a lot of training centers for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) but a standardized MIS training program in pediatric urology doesn't exist at the moment. We performed a literature review with the last goals to propose a structured training curriculum in MIS urology for pediatric surgeons. Pediatric urologists have to obtain a valid MIS training curriculum completing the following 4 steps: (I) Theoretical part (theoretical courses, masterclass) to acquire theoretical knowledge; (II) experimental training (simulation on pelvic trainer, virtual reality simulators, animal models, 3-D ex-vivo models) to acquire basic laparoscopic skills; (III) stages in European centers of reference for pediatric MIS urology to learn all surgery aspects; (IV) personal operative experience. At the end of the training period, the trainee would be expected to perform several MIS urological procedures independently, under supervision of an expert tutor. At the end of the training program, each center will analyze the candidate training booklet and release for each applicant a certification after an exam. We think that this MIS training program in pediatric urology may assure an integrated acquisition of basic and advanced laparoscopic skills during residency training in pediatric urology. Each European country should adopt this program so as to secure a standardized technical qualification in MIS urology for all future pediatric urologists.

  5. Gastroenterology Fellowship Training: Approaches to Curriculum Assessment and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitreyi Raman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medical education requires ongoing curriculum development and evaluation to incorporate new knowledge and competencies. The Kern model of curricular development is a generic model to guide curriculum design, whereas the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC has a specific model for curriculum development through its accreditation structure.

  6. Comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Boris; Dedy, Nicolas J; Bonrath, Esther M; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-05-01

    There is no comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum to address cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills for an advanced minimally invasive procedure. 1) To develop and provide evidence of validity for a comprehensive simulation-enhanced training (SET) curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure; (2) to demonstrate transfer of acquired psychomotor skills from a simulation laboratory to live porcine model; and (3) to compare training outcomes of SET curriculum group and chief resident group. University. This prospective single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial allocated 20 intermediate-level surgery residents to receive either conventional training (control) or SET curriculum training (intervention). The SET curriculum consisted of cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical training modules. Psychomotor skills in a live anesthetized porcine model in the OR was the primary outcome. Knowledge of advanced minimally invasive and bariatric surgery and nontechnical skills in a simulated OR crisis scenario were the secondary outcomes. Residents in the SET curriculum group went on to perform a laparoscopic jejunojejunostomy in the OR. Cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills of SET curriculum group were also compared to a group of 12 chief surgery residents. SET curriculum group demonstrated superior psychomotor skills in a live porcine model (56 [47-62] versus 44 [38-53], Psuperior nontechnical skills (41 [38-45] versus 31 [24-40], Ptraining group. SET curriculum group and conventional training group demonstrated equivalent knowledge (14 [12-15] versus 13 [11-15], P = 0.47). SET curriculum group demonstrated equivalent psychomotor skills in the live porcine model and in the OR in a human patient (56 [47-62] versus 63 [61-68]; P = .21). SET curriculum group demonstrated inferior knowledge (13 [11-15] versus 16 [14-16]; Psuperior nontechnical skills (41 [38-45] versus 34 [27-35], Psuperior training outcomes, compared with conventional

  7. Developing an In-house Training Curriculum in Written Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, William J.

    1983-01-01

    Stresses the fact that on-the-job training in written communication is a continuous process. Presents a writing curriculum, developed by the Illinois Office of the Auditor General, that offers a planned sequence of learning activities. (PD)

  8. Joining University Affiliated Programs and Schools of Social Work: A Collaborative Model for Disabilities Curriculum Development and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Hank; Clevenger, Richard; Hanley, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 58 university-affiliated programs serving persons with mental retardation and developmental disabilities (MR/DD) found that 74% were affiliated with a school of social work and identified types of and settings for MR/DD training opportunities. Results suggest that potential exists for creating and expanding such training relationships.…

  9. Paving the road for a European postgraduate training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Goverde, Angelique J; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    2016-08-01

    The 'Project for Achieving Consensus in Training' has been initiated by the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology to harmonise training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology throughout Europe. In this project called the EBCOG-PACT, a state of the art pan-European training curriculum will be developed. Implementation of a pan-European curriculum will enhance harmonisation of both quality standards of women's healthcare practice and standards of postgraduate training. Secondly, it will assure equal quality of training of gynaecologists, promoting mobility throughout Europe. Thirdly, it will enhance cooperation and exchange of best practices between medical specialists and hospitals within Europe. The project is expecting to deliver (1) a description of the core and electives of the curriculum based on previously defined standards of care, (2) a societally responsive competency framework based on input from societal stakeholders and (3) strategies for education and assessment based on the current literature. Also, the project focuses on implementation and sustainability of the curriculum by delivering (4) a SWOT-analysis for the implementation based on insights into transcultural differences, (5) recommendations for implementation, change management and sustainability based on the SWOT analysis (6) and finally a handbook for other specialties initiating European curriculum development. The development and the implementation of this modern pan-European curriculum in Obstetrics and Gynaecology aims to serve as an example for the harmonisation of postgraduate training in Europe.

  10. Gastroenterology Fellowship Training: Approaches to Curriculum Assessment and Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Maitreyi Raman; Eldon Shaffer; Jocelyn Lockyear

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical education requires ongoing curriculum development and evaluation to incorporate new knowledge and competencies. The Kern model of curricular development is a generic model to guide curriculum design, whereas the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) has a specific model for curriculum development through its accreditation structure.OBJECTIVE: To apply the Kern model to an assessment of a residency program in gastroenterology.METHODS: A case study was u...

  11. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, David S; Levy, Bruce P; Lane, William J; Lee, Roy E; Baron, Jason M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Onozato, Maristela L; Kim, Jiyeon; Dighe, Anand S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a

  12. Trainning of Special Education Teachers about Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Deniz; Uzunboylu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the needs of special education teachers about curriculum development, and to implement the constructivist approach to in-service training programme for special education teachers. Furthermore, this study seeks to evaluate the developed in-service training programme. The descriptive and experimental methods…

  13. What Is Missing in the International Teaching Assistants Training Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2009-01-01

    The increasing number of international teaching assistants (ITAs) in American undergraduate courses presents continued sociocultural, linguistic, and pedagogical challenges. Remaining underdeveloped, ITA training has attracted less attention in recent years. I urge a renewed enthusiasm for developing effective training curriculum. I review the…

  14. Machine Operator Training Program and Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, David; And Others

    This curriculum contains materials for use in duplicating the 11-week course for machine operators that was implemented at New Hampshire Vocational-Technical College in Nashua, New Hampshire. Addressed in the course, which is designed to prepare entry-level employees, are the following topics: basic math, blueprint reading, layout tools and…

  15. Disease surveillance system evaluation as a model for improved integration and standardization of the laboratory component in the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) curriculum worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Integration of laboratory training into the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) began in 2004 and has advanced the training of laboratory scientists worldwide on the basic principles of epidemiology, disease surveillance, and outbreak investigation. The laboratory component of the FE(L)TP training has traditionally been disease specific, revolving around classroom and bench training on laboratory methods, and field placement in areas where services are needed. There is however a need to improve the integration of epidemiology elements used in surveillance, outbreak investigation, and evaluation activities with specific measurable laboratory activities that could in turn impact the overall disease surveillance and response. A systematic and clear evaluation guideline for the laboratory components of disease surveillance systems alongside the corresponding epidemiological indicators can better identify, address, and mitigate weaknesses that may exist in the entire surveillance system, and also help to integrate and standardize the FE(L)TP curriculum content. The institution of laboratory Quality Management System principles linked to a comprehensive surveillance evaluation scheme will result in improved disease surveillance, response, and overall laboratory capacity over time.

  16. Research training in dental undergraduate curriculum in Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Moreno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research plays a central role in professional training in dentistry. There is a clear recommendation to include a minimum training in biomedical research at undergraduate level. In Chile, there is no standardized curriculum structure including research training for undergraduate students. Objective: To describe the presence of research courses in the undergraduate dental curriculum in Chile during 2014. Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional study. The curriculum for all Chilean universities teaching dental careers and updated during 2014 were analyzed. Results: The dental curriculum for twenty Chilean universities was analyzed. On average, each university has 4.05±2.06 research courses (semesterly from which 1±0.92 are thesis courses. In the private universities, these numbers were 4.64±1.91 and 1.18±0.87 respectively. Meanwhile, these numbers were 3.33±2.12 and 0.78±0.97 respectively in the traditional universities. Sixty percent of universities have thesis or research project courses. Conclusion: There is a disparate presence of research courses in the undergraduate dental curriculum in Chile, with a higher presence in private institutions. However, this does not actualize a greater scientific production by them.

  17. Emotional intelligence competencies provide a developmental curriculum for medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, James K; Taylor, Christine A; Farver, Carol F

    2013-01-01

    Since healthcare faces challenges of access, quality, and cost, effective leadership for healthcare is needed. This need is especially acute among physicians, whose demanding training focuses on scientific and clinical skills, eclipsing attention to leadership development. Among the competencies needed by leaders, emotional intelligence (EI) - defined as the ability to understand and manage oneself and to understand others and manage relationships - has been shown to differentiate between great and average leaders. In this context, teaching EI as part of the medical training curriculum is recommended. Furthermore, because physicians' developmental needs evolve over the course of prolonged training, specific components of EI (e.g., teambuilding, empathy, and negotiation) should be taught at various phases of medical training. Consistent with the concept of a spiral curriculum, such EI competencies should be revisited iteratively throughout training, with differing emphasis and increasing sophistication to meet evolving needs. For example, teamwork training is needed early in undergraduate medical curricula to prompt collaborative learning. Teamwork training is also needed during residency, when physicians participate with differing roles on patient care teams. Training in EI should also extend beyond graduate medical training to confer the skills needed by clinicians and by faculty in academic medical centers.

  18. A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S McClintock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1 Information Fundamentals, (2 Information Systems, (3 Workflow and Process, and (4 Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012. Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world

  19. Phonetic Training in the Foreign Language Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    In this experiment we evaluate phonetic training as a tool for language learning. Specifically, we take a group of native speakers (NS) of English (n = 24) currently enrolled in Arabic classes at American universities, and evaluate the effectiveness of a high variability phonetic training program (HVPT) to improve their perception of a difficult…

  20. Teaching Reform of DSP Curriculum Group Goal-oriented by Abilities Training on Hierarchy Model for IT Majors%分层能力目标导向的IT专业DSP课程群改革

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈芬; 王晓东; 章联军; 彭宗举; 严迪群

    2016-01-01

    针对目前高校IT专业DSP(Digital Signal Processing)课程群技术革新快、知识覆盖面广、课程难度大、综合性实践环节缺失等问题,探索了“能力本位教育”理念下进阶式分层培养的DSP课程群教学改革。构建了分层能力目标导向的 DSP 课程教学体系和实践能力培养体系,明确了各能力层级的教学任务和能力培养目标。尝试了工程素养融合培养的教学模式改革,探索应用了行业真实项目驱动下的 PBL 教学法、线上线下混合式教学法改革。教学实践结果表明,DSP课程群改革具有一定成效,学生创新意识与工程应用能力提升显著,得到行业用人单位的认可。%This paper aims to consider the teaching reform of DSP curriculum group oriented by abilities training based on hierarchy model in the perspective of Competency Based Education (CBE) to tackle the pressing issues of IT major students in universities, such as the rapid DSP technology innovation, wide and difficult literacy in curriculum group, and inadequate abilities training of DSP technology. It focuses on the construction of the DSP curriculum group system and the practical ability training system to be goal-oriented by abilities training based on hierarchy model for IT majors students. The sub-goals of abilities training and the teaching tasks of each ability level are divided clearly, to cultivate students’ DSP applied abilities and engineering quality. Driven by real industrial projects, teaching methods of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) and Blended Teaching online and offline is explored. The reform of DSP curriculum group for IT major students based on the hierarchy abilities training has been proven to effectively improve graduates’ innovation skills and DSP engineering applied abilities recognized by peers and employers.

  1. Aircraft Electronics Maintenance Training Simulator. Curriculum Outlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhawk Technical Coll., Janesville, WI.

    Instructional materials are provided for nine courses in an aircraft electronics maintenance training program. Courses are as follows: aviation basic electricity, direct current and alternating current electronics, basic avionic installations, analog electronics, digital electronics, microcomputer electronics, radio communications, aircraft…

  2. Asbestos Training Curriculum Project. [Draft Copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Ron

    This package contains two types of asbestos training materials: (1) an instructor's guide for "Asbestos in the Home: A Homeowner's Course"; and (2) "Asbestos Abatement Certification: Small-Scale Worker Student Manual," a 16-hour course, with instructor's guide. The instructor's guide for the 6-hour homeowner's course contains…

  3. Communication skills training curriculum for pulmonary and critical care fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Jennifer W; Gustin, Jillian L; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; Way, David P; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires physicians training in pulmonary and critical care medicine to demonstrate competency in interpersonal communication. Studies have shown that residency training is often insufficient to prepare physicians to provide end-of-life care and facilitate patient and family decision-making. Poor communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) can adversely affect outcomes for critically ill patients and their family members. Despite this, communication training curricula in pulmonary and critical care medicine are largely absent in the published literature. We evaluated the effectiveness of a communication skills curriculum during the first year of a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship using a family meeting checklist to provide formative feedback to fellows during ICU rotations. We hypothesized that fellows would demonstrate increased competence and confidence in the behavioral skills necessary for facilitating family meetings. We evaluated a 12-month communication skills curriculum using a pre-post, quasiexperimental design. Subjects for this study included 11 first-year fellows who participated in the new curriculum (intervention group) and a historical control group of five fellows who had completed no formal communication curriculum. Performance of communication skills and self-confidence in family meetings were assessed for the intervention group before and after the curriculum. The control group was assessed once at the beginning of their second year of fellowship. Fellows in the intervention group demonstrated significantly improved communication skills as evaluated by two psychologists using the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist, with an increase in total observed skills from 51 to 65% (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's D effect size [es], 1.13). Their performance was also rated significantly higher when compared with the historical control group, who demonstrated only 49% of observed skills

  4. Vocational Skills Training Model for English Normal Students in the Setting of New Curriculum Reform%新课改背景下英语师范生职业技能训练模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨渊艺; 黄莉

    2015-01-01

    新一轮基础课程改革顺应时代发展潮流,摒弃落后的教学内容和模式,构建以素质教育为核心的基础课程体系。本文分析了传统教育模式中存在的问题,并且根据新课改的要求提出了英语师范生职业技能训练新模式,来弥补和完善传统模式的不足。%The new curriculum reform follows the development trend of the times, abandons outdated teaching content and mode, and builds a foundation curriculum concentrated on quality education. The paper analyses the problems in the traditional education mode, and proposes a new vocational training model for English normal students based on the requirements of new curriculum, so as to make up and improve the shortcomings of traditional models.

  5. 76 FR 6159 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-State Jail Inspector: Training Curriculum Revision and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Cooperative Agreement--State Jail Inspector: Training Curriculum Revision and Update AGENCY: National... revision and update of its curriculum for State jail inspector training. The project will be for a 12-month... inspections, and (4) expertise and experience in developing curriculums based on adult learning principles as...

  6. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Gonzaga, Mubuuke A., E-mail: gmubuuke@gmail.co [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  7. The critical thinking curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William Haviland

    The Critical Thinking Curriculum Model (CTCM) utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that integrates effective learning and teaching practices with computer technology. The model is designed to be flexible within a curriculum, an example for teachers to follow, where they can plug in their own critical issue. This process engages students in collaborative research that can be shared in the classroom, across the country or around the globe. The CTCM features open-ended and collaborative activities that deal with current, real world issues which leaders are attempting to solve. As implemented in the Critical Issues Forum (CIF), an educational program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the CTCM encompasses the political, social/cultural, economic, and scientific realms in the context of a current global issue. In this way, students realize the importance of their schooling by applying their efforts to an endeavor that ultimately will affect their future. This study measures student attitudes toward science and technology and the changes that result from immersion in the CTCM. It also assesses the differences in student learning in science content and problem solving for students involved in the CTCM. A sample of 24 students participated in classrooms at two separate high schools in New Mexico. The evaluation results were analyzed using SPSS in a MANOVA format in order to determine the significance of the between and within-subjects effects. A comparison ANOVA was done for each two-way MANOVA to see if the comparison groups were equal. Significant findings were validated using the Scheffe test in a Post Hoc analysis. Demographic information for the sample population was recorded and tracked, including self-assessments of computer use and availability. Overall, the results indicated that the CTCM did help to increase science content understanding and problem-solving skills for students, thereby positively effecting critical thinking. No matter if the

  8. Developing a Successful Open Source Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Lopez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Training programs for open source software provide a tangible, and sellable, product. A successful training program not only builds revenue, it also adds to the overall body of knowledge available for the open source project. By gathering best practices and taking advantage of the collective expertise within a community, it may be possible for a business to partner with an open source project to build a curriculum that promotes the project and supports the needs of the company's training customers. This article describes the initial approach used by Canonical, the commercial sponsor of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, to engage the community in the creation of its training offerings. We then discuss alternate curriculum creation models and some of the conditions that are necessary for successful collaboration between creators of existing documentation and commercial training providers.

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for a Distance Education Course in Urban Agriculture Based on an Eclectic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaum, Wilma G.; van Rooyen, Hugo G.

    1997-01-01

    Describes research to develop curriculum guidelines for a distance education course in urban agriculture. The course, designed to train the teacher, is based on an eclectic curriculum design model. The course is aimed at the socioeconomic empowerment of urban farmers and is based on sustainable ecological-agricultural principles, an…

  10. A model curriculum vitae: what are the trainers looking for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambler, A F; Chapman-Sheath, P J; Pearse, M F

    1998-04-01

    In this new era of Calman, the curriculum vitae (CV) still remains the most important document in furthering the careers of doctors. A survey of postgraduate deans and college regional training advisors opinions on CVs was undertaken. The results have allowed a model CV to be compiled expressing the layout and most of the features which senior trainers feel are important when producing a CV.

  11. Little by Little the Bird Builds Its Nest: First Steps in Cross Cultural Curriculum Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Helene Arbouet; Jones, Melissa M.; Wray, Francis

    2015-01-01

    With the goal of raising awareness of child slavery and devastation of the natural environment in Haiti, while simultaneously supporting active teaching strategies, a team of educators collaborated to develop The Respecting Haiti curriculum. Following development of the curriculum, representatives from the team facilitated curriculum training with…

  12. The Curriculum Development for Science Teachers' Training: The Action Lesson Focusing on Science Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayotha, Jesda; Sitti, Somsong; Sonsupap, Kanyarat

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop innovation curriculum and study the effect of curriculum usage in science teachers' training in establishing the supplementary subject curriculum for action lesson. It focuses on science process skills with 10 teachers for 4 days, and 236 Grade 9 students from 10 schools during the first semester of…

  13. Beyond teacher training: the critical role of professional development in maintaining curriculum fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaChausse, Robert G; Clark, Kim R; Chapple, Sabrina

    2014-03-01

    To examine how teacher characteristics affected program fidelity in an impact evaluation study of the Positive Prevention PLUS program, and to propose a comprehensive teacher training and professional development structure to increase program fidelity. Curriculum fidelity logs, lesson observations, and teacher surveys were used to measure teacher characteristics and implementation fidelity including adherence, adaptation, and lesson quality. Compared with non-health credentialed teachers, credential health education teachers had greater comfort and self-efficacy regarding sex-related instruction. Teacher self-efficacy and comfort were significant predictors of adherence. Implementation fidelity may be linked to teacher characteristics that can be enhanced during curriculum training. A 2-day teacher training may not adequately address teacher facilitation skills or the maintenance of institutional supports for implementing a program with fidelity and quality. A new model of comprehensive teacher training and support is offered. This new training infrastructure is intended to contribute to the school district's institutionalization of higher-quality comprehensive sexual health education and increase program fidelity. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  15. International core curriculum for capsule endoscopy training courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Urien, Ignacio; Panter, Simon; Carretero, Cristina; Davison, Carolyn; Dray, Xavier; Fedorov, Evgeny; Makins, Richard; Mascarenhas, Miguel; McAlindon, Mark; McNamara, Deirdre; Palmer, Hansa; Rey, Jean Francoise; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Seitz, Uwe; Spada, Cristiano; Toth, Ervin; Wiedbrauck, Felix; Keuchel, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has become a first-line noninvasive tool for visualisation of the small bowel (SB) and is being increasingly used for investigation of the colon. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines have specified requirements for the clinical applications of CE. However, there are no standardized recommendations yet for CE training courses in Europe. The following suggestions in this curriculum are based on the experience of European CE training courses directors. It is suggested that 12 hours be dedicated for either a small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) or a colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) course with 4 hours for an introductory CCE course delivered in conjunction with SBCE courses. SBCE courses should include state-of-the-art lectures on indications, contraindications, complications, patient management and hardware and software use. Procedural issues require approximately 2 hours. For CCE courses 2.5 hours for theoretical lessons and 3.5 hours for procedural issued are considered appropriate. Hands-on training on reading and interpretation of CE cases using a personal computer (PC) for 1 or 2 delegates is recommended for both SBCE and CCE courses. A total of 6 hours hands-on session- time should be allocated. Cases in a SBCE course should cover SB bleeding, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), tumors and variants of normal and cases with various types of polyps covered in CCE courses. Standardization of the description of findings and generation of high-quality reports should be essential parts of the training. Courses should be followed by an assessment of trainees' skills in order to certify readers' competency.

  16. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Course Sessions (October 2006-March 2007) The Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, currently scheduled until March 2007: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20 October 2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 October -1 November 2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2 November 2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 18-20 December 2006 (3 days) C++ for Particle Physicists:...

  17. 75 FR 1814 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Curriculum Development: Training for Correctional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... priorities, identify strategic objectives, create measurable goals, establish collaborative partnerships... a curriculum, which follows NIC's Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP) model, to be written... Agreement, a curriculum will have been developed using NIC's Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP)...

  18. General surgery training in Spain: core curriculum and specific areas of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguelena Bobadilla, José Ma; Morales-García, Dieter; Iturburu Belmonte, Ignacio; Alcázar Montero, José Antonio; Serra Aracil, Xabier; Docobo Durantez, Fernando; López de Cenarruzabeitia, Ignacio; Sanz Sánchez, Mercedes; Hernández Hernández, Juan Ramón

    2015-03-01

    The royal decree RD 639/2014 has been published, regulating among others, the core curriculum, and specific areas of training (SAT). It is of great interest for the specialty of General and Digestive Surgery (GS and DS). The aim is to expose and clarify the main provisions and reflect on their implications for the practical application of the core curriculum and SAT in the specialty of General and Digestive Surgery, to promote initiatives and regulations. This RD will be a milestone in our specialty that will test the strength of the specialty, if it does not finally culminate in its degradation against the emergence of new surgical specialties. A new stage begins in which the Spanish Association of Surgeons should be involved to define the conceptual basis of GS and DS in the XXI century, and the creation of new SAT to continue to maintain the "essence of our specialty".

  19. Mid-Level Healthcare Personnel Training: An Evaluation of the Revised, Nationally-Standardized, Pre-Service Curriculum for Clinical Officers in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldacker, Caryl; Chicumbe, Sergio; Dgedge, Martinho; Augusto, Gerito; Cesar, Freide; Robertson, Molly; Mbofana, Francisco; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG)), in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009–2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH) and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH), University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1) if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2) do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum? Methods T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the pcurriculum, respectively. Mean scores at graduation of initial curriculum TMGs were 56.7%, 63.5%, and 49.1% on the clinical cases, knowledge test, and physical exam, respectively. Scores did not differ significantly from TMGs in the revised curriculum. Results from linear regression models find that training institute was the most significant predictor of TMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam. Conclusion TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may result in improvements in TMG capacity and patient care over time. PMID:25068590

  20. An Innovative Model for Training Orientation and Mobility Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    A model was developed to prepare specialists in orientation and mobility (O&M) who work with people with visual impairments, with the specialists in turn training and supervising O&M assistants. The project developed curriculum guidelines, training methods, a national workshop, and regional seminars. (DB)

  1. Building a competency-based workplace curriculum around entrustable professional activities: The case of physician assistant training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Hanneke; Ten Cate, Olle; Daalder, Rieneke; Berkvens, Josephine

    2010-01-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME) is increasingly dominating clinical training, but also poses questions as to its practical implementation. There is a need for practical guidelines to translate CBME to the clinical work floor. This article aims to provide a practical model, based on the concept of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) to make this translation, derived from curriculum building for physician assistants (PAs). For the training of PAs at the Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, a three-step model was developed to guide competency-based curriculum development, teaching and assessment. It includes specific guidelines for the identification, systematic description and planning of EPAs. The EPA concept appeared to be a useful tool to build competency-based clinical workplace curricula. Implementation of the curriculum requires use of trainee portfolios and progress interviews, statements of rewarded responsibility and training of supervisors. The individualised approach and flexibility that true CBME implies is brought into practice with this model. The model may also be transferred to other domains of clinical training, among which postgraduate training for medical specialties.

  2. Development of Multi-Media Programmed Instructional Materials for the Training of Law Enforcement Officers. Initial Curriculum Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph; Schaeffer, Geraldine

    The purposes of this study were to determine what information on basic police training programs was available and to determine the status of such police training. A literature review was completed on police functions, police training, basic police training curriculums, professional police journals, and curriculum textbooks. Chapter titles are…

  3. Evaluation of Mathematics Curriculum in Primary Teacher Training Institute in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development & Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama, Mohamed A. F.

    This study sought to evaluate the mathematics curriculum of the Halane Teacher Training Institute in Somalia with a view toward: (1) determining its weaknesses and recommending measures for improvement; (2) examining its relevance to the present needs of the Somali society; (3) determining the suitability of instructional materials and other…

  4. The Supervisor Training Curriculum: Evidence-Based Ways to Promote Work Quality and Enjoyment among Support Staff (Trainee Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Trainee Guide for the Supervisor Training Curriculum" summarizes key points in the Curriculum and is meant as a note taking and reference tool. The Supervisor Training Curriculum instructs supervisors on ways in which they can direct and motivate staff working with people with intellectual disabilities. Based on three decades of applied…

  5. Application and evaluation of improved surgical aseptic technique curriculum in specialty nurse training in Henan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Bai

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Novel surgical aseptic technique and application in the curriculum design of training for OR nurses should be developed to enhance their mastery of theoretical and practical skills and to modify their behaviors.

  6. Curriculum Development: A Philosophical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, William H.

    Presenting models based on the philosophies of Carl Rogers, John Dewey, Erich Fromm, and Jean-Paul Sartre, this paper proposes a philosophical approach to education and concludes with pragmatic suggestions concerning teaching based on a fully-functioning-person model. The fully-functioning person is characterized as being open to experience,…

  7. State-of-the-Art Pediatric Hypnosis Training: Remodeling Curriculum and Refining Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Daniel P; Kaiser, Pamela; Olness, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Training in pediatric hypnosis has been part of clinical hypnosis education in the United States since 1976. Workshops expanded over time and are now taught by highly experienced pediatric clinicians across the globe. In 1987, a small vanguard of North American faculty, academic pediatricians, and pediatric psychologists taught a 3-day pediatric hypnosis workshop at the national meeting of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP). This model of annual tri-level concurrent workshops (introductory, intermediate, and advanced) was sponsored by the SDBP for 24 years. In 2009, the National Pediatric Hypnosis Training Institute (NPHTI) assembled, and in 2010, offered its first annual workshops. This article documents this history of pediatric hypnosis education and describes NPHTI's remodeling and ongoing refinement toward a state-of-the-art curriculum with innovative methodology based upon (1) current research about adult experiential and small group learning; (2) design principles for presentations that maximize adult learning and memory; and (3) evaluations by participants and faculty. These underpinnings-including clinical training videos, individualized learning choices, emphasis on personalized, goal-oriented sessions, and advances in faculty selection, and ongoing development-are applicable to adult training models. Integration of developmental and self-regulation strategies may be more unique to pediatric hypnosis skills training programs. The conclusion proposes expansion of pediatric hypnosis education and elimination of related barriers toward goals that all children learn self-hypnosis (SH) for mind-body health.

  8. The Humanistic Approach: A Model For Dental Health Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Sue; Hurley, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A special dental health curriculum, called the Tattletooth Curriculum, demonstrates the use of the humanistic model in health education and its concern for the learner as a total person. The main concept in the development of this curriculum is that the prospect for changing behavior is unlikely unless the health information is personally…

  9. Comprehensive training in suspected child abuse and neglect for dental students: a hybrid curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Hottel, Timothy L

    2013-06-01

    Child abuse and neglect are tragic realities of American society. However, most U.S. dental schools do not provide students with adequate training to deal with the problem. This article proposes expanding the predoctoral dental curriculum with a problem-based learning model that can effectively stimulate critical thinking skills to assist graduates in screening and reporting suspected child abuse and neglect throughout their careers. The unique multicultural environment of dental school offers students an unprecedented opportunity to develop awareness about child abuse and domestic violence, while increased vigilance can potentially save innocent young lives. Educating students about proper protocol when they suspect child abuse or neglect is imperative, particularly for dental schools involving students in community sealant and other preventive programs in public schools. By expanding their curriculum to include recognition and intervention, dental schools can help break the cycle of violence and transform attitudes towards taking decisive action. Clinical curricula that have moved to private practice preceptor models are well suited to screen for child abuse. The goal is to motivate dental schools to deal with this critical issue, develop reporting protocols and procedures for appropriate response, and provide their students with consummate training.

  10. The impact of a longitudinal curriculum on medical student obstetrics and gynecology clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Juliana; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Kellett, Lisa; Hiraoka, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Clinical training in most medical schools consists of separate rotations, based out of tertiary-care facilities, across the core medical disciplines. In addition to a traditional clinical curriculum, the University of Hawai'i offers a longitudinal clinical curriculum as an option to medical students. The longitudinal curriculum provides students with an innovative, alternative educational track to achieve their educational goals in clinical medicine. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetrics and gynecology procedural experiences of third-year medical students who participated in a longitudinal curriculum versus a traditional block clerkship. The number of procedures reported by third-year medical students who participated in a non-traditional, longitudinal clerkship was compared with the number of procedures reported by students who participated in the traditional block third-year curriculum between July 2007 and June 2009. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject scores, clerkship grade and chosen residency specialty were also compared. The mean number of pelvic exams (longitudinally-trained 36 [SD 33] versus block-trained 8 [SD 6], [t=4.3, P<.01]) and pap smears (longitudinally-trained 28 [SD 26] versus block-trained 7 [SD 3] [t=4.4, P<.01]) was significantly higher for longitudinally-trained students compared to block-trained students. No significant differences in overall clerkship grades or NBME shelf scores emerged.

  11. The Impact of a Longitudinal Curriculum on Medical Student Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Juliana; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Kellett, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Clinical training in most medical schools consists of separate rotations, based out of tertiary-care facilities, across the core medical disciplines. In addition to a traditional clinical curriculum, the University of Hawai‘i offers a longitudinal clinical curriculum as an option to medical students. The longitudinal curriculum provides students with an innovative, alternative educational track to achieve their educational goals in clinical medicine. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetrics and gynecology procedural experiences of third-year medical students who participated in a longitudinal curriculum versus a traditional block clerkship. The number of procedures reported by third-year medical students who participated in a non-traditional, longitudinal clerkship was compared with the number of procedures reported by students who participated in the traditional block third-year curriculum between July 2007 and June 2009. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject scores, clerkship grade and chosen residency specialty were also compared. The mean number of pelvic exams (longitudinally-trained 36 [SD 33] versus block-trained 8 [SD 6], [t=4.3, P<.01]) and pap smears (longitudinally-trained 28 [SD 26] versus block-trained 7 [SD 3] [t=4.4, P<.01]) was significantly higher for longitudinally-trained students compared to block-trained students. No significant differences in overall clerkship grades or NBME shelf scores emerged. PMID:24843837

  12. CURRICULUM MODEL LAW 5.692/1971 DURING MILITARY DICTATORSHIP FOR TRAVEL OF TEACHING AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN TEACHER TRAINING IN BRAZIL AND SANTA CATARINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéferson Silveira Dantas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the pedagogical implications brought about by the implementation of the Law 5.692/1971 in the context of the military dictatorship in Brazil (1964-1985 and their effects on teacher training in Brazil and Santa Catarina, especially in the early grades of school fundamental, formerly of primary education. Furthermore, this study seeks to under-take an analysis of curricular reorganization in teaching 1st and 2nd grades in accordance with the restructuring of productive capital, counting on the support of certain organic intellectuals who supported the military regime.

  13. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial on a multimodal training curriculum for laparoscopic cholecystectomy – LapTrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: This study assesses the value of a multimodal training platform in medical education and postgraduate training and aims at illustrating possible guidelines when establishing such a curriculum. Possible factors of influence, such as varying backgrounds, learning motivation and –success among participants are explored in the data analysis and add beneficially to further evaluating the efficacy of such training to more heterogeneous participant groups like medical students and other professionals.

  14. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored.

  15. Electronic In-Service Teacher-Training for The New National EFL Curriculum in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hakkı MIRICI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new national curriculum in all subject areas is about to be introduced in elementary schools in Turkey. The new curriculum is based on a “Constructivist” approach. This discussion paper focuses on the new curriculum for English as a foreign language, noting that teachers need information about the philosophy of the new curriculum and how its different elements support each other. The paper sets the curriculum reform in the context of international objectives in education such as the Dakar Conference, the Pisa project, Socrates programmes, the Common European Framework for Languages and the European Language Portfolio. The paper discusses the role of electronic learning in in-service training in both ongoing and one-shot teacher training programmes. The paper identifies four specific challenges and proposes solutions for a successful implementation of the new curriculum. The four challenges are how to make up the new curriculum comprehensible to teachers, how to help teachers develop their own materials, how to persuade teachers to participate in training process, and how to help teachers share their ideas.

  16. More confident trauma resuscitation team leaders: a novel simulation-based training curriculum utilizing video feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Falcone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There are deficiencies in trauma leader performance. Simulation training and video-based feedback can lead to durable changes in behavior. A trauma resuscitation team leader training curriculum was developed. The curriculum consisted of eight simulated trauma scenarios with a mix of acuities and injury patterns using patient simulators. Other team members included a surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a chief resident, a trauma nurse, a medical student, and presenting emergency medicine staff. Each scenario was followed by video-based feedback. Attitudes regarding this curriculum were evaluated before and after the intervention with Likert-based surveys. Eight residents completed the curriculum. On a seven-point Likert scale, the median overall curriculum rating, the video discussion quality, the plan to apply leadership skills, and the plan to apply learned knowledge and behaviors was 7/7. A Wilcoxon Sign-Rank test showed improved confidence for leading Level 1 trauma resuscitations, improved beliefs in adequate training, and improved attitudes regarding team leader training (P<0.05. There was reduced nervousness of being the team leader (P=0.048. Qualitative analyses showed that the learners valued the feedback process and scenario realism. This pilot curriculum was well-received by trauma residents and offers insight into meta-cognition of trauma team leaders.

  17. A train-the-trainer approach to a shared pharmacogenomics curriculum for US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kelly C; Ma, Joseph D; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Kuo, Grace M

    2012-12-12

    To assess pharmacy faculty trainers' perceptions of a Web-based train-the-trainer program for PharmGenEd, a shared pharmacogenomics curriculum for health professional students and licensed clinicians. Pharmacy faculty trainers (n=58, representing 39 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and 1 school from Canada) participated in a train-the-trainer program consisting of up to 9 pharmacogenomics topics. Posttraining survey instruments assessed faculty trainers' perceptions toward the training program and the likelihood of their adopting the educational materials as part of their institution's curriculum. Fifty-five percent of faculty trainers reported no prior formal training in pharmacogenomics. There was a significant increase (ptrain licensed health professionals, and 95% indicated that they would recommend the program to other pharmacy faculty members. As a result of participating in the train-the-trainer program in pharmacogenomics, faculty member participants gained confidence in teaching pharmacogenomics to their students, and the majority of participants indicated a high likelihood of adopting the program at their institution. A Web-based train-the-trainer model appears to be a feasible strategy for training pharmacy faculty in pharmacogenomics.

  18. [Realistic surgical training. The Aachen model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krones, C J; Binnebösel, M; Stumpf, M; Schumpelick, V

    2010-01-01

    The Aachen model is a practical mode in teaching and advanced training, which is closely geared to the areas of academic acquisition and training. During medical education optional student courses with constitutive curricula offer practical points of contact to the surgical department at all times. Besides improvement of manual training the aims are enhancing interests and acquisition of talents. This guided structure will be intensified with progression into advanced education. Next to the formal guidelines of the curriculum, education logbook and progression conversations, quality, transparency and reliability are particularly emphasized. An evaluation of both the reforms and the surgical trainers is still to be made. In addition procurement of an affirmative occupational image is essential.

  19. Emergency Medical Science (T-139). Curriculum Models, Guidelines, and Outcome-Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovin, Barbara Keelor

    Developed for use by curriculum planners in Emergency Medical Science (EMS) programs throughout the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS), and by evaluators in their reviews of existing programs, this manual provides a model set of guidelines for the education and training of the Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic (EMT-P) in…

  20. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology : systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.; Oudkerk, M.

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic

  1. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology : systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, E.; van Engelen, J.M.L.; Brand, P.L.P.; Oudkerk, M.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic

  2. GRACE and the development of an education and training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, R G; Blasi, F B; Verheij, T J M; Goossens, H; Coenen, S; Loens, K; Rohde, G; Saenz, H; Akova, M

    2012-09-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat and compromises the management of infectious disease. This has particular significance in relation to infections of the respiratory tract, which are the lead cause of antibiotic prescribing. Education is fundamental to the correct use of antibiotics. A novel open access curriculum has been developed in the context of a European Union funded research project Genomics to combat Resistance against Antibiotics in Community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in Europe (GRACE http://www.grace-lrti.org). The curriculum was developed in modular format and populated with clinical and scientific topics relevant to community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections. This curriculum informed the content of a series of postgraduate courses and workshops and permitted the creation of an open access e-Learning portal. A total of 153 presentations matching the topics within the curriculum together with slide material and handouts and 104 webcasts are available through the GRACE e-Learning portal, which is fully searchable using a 'mindmap' to navigate the contents. Metrics of access provided a means for assessing usage. The GRACE project has permitted the development of a unique on-line open access curriculum that comprehensively addresses the issues relevant to community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections and has provided a resource not only for personal learning, but also to support independent teaching activities such as lectures, workshops, seminars and course work. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  3. Recovery Act. Development of a Model Energy Conservation Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-07-05

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an updated model Energy Conservation training program for stationary engineers. This revision to the IUOE National Training Fund’s existing Energy Conservation training curriculum is designed to enable stationary engineers to incorporate essential energy management into routine building operation and maintenance tasks. The curriculum uses a blended learning approach that includes classroom, hands-on, computer simulation and web-based training in addition to a portfolio requirement for a workplace-based learning application. The Energy Conservation training program goal is development of a workforce that can maintain new and existing commercial buildings at optimum energy performance levels. The grant start date was July 6, 2010 and the project continued through September 30, 2012, including a three month non-funded extension.

  4. Integrating Numerical Computation into the Modeling Instruction Curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero, Marcos D; Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    We describe a way to introduce physics high school students with no background in programming to computational problem-solving experiences. Our approach builds on the great strides made by the Modeling Instruction reform curriculum. This approach emphasizes the practices of "Developing and using models" and "Computational thinking" highlighted by the NRC K-12 science standards framework. We taught 9th-grade students in a Modeling-Instruction-based physics course to construct computational models using the VPython programming environment. Numerical computation within the Modeling Instruction curriculum provides coherence among the curriculum's different force and motion models, links the various representations which the curriculum employs, and extends the curriculum to include real-world problems that are inaccessible to a purely analytic approach.

  5. Analysis of trauma care education in the South Sudan community health worker training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adedamola; Clark, Melissa; Donaldson, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the majority occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Allied health workers are often on the front lines of caring for trauma patients; this is the case in South Sudan, where a system of community health workers (CHWs) and clinical officers (COs) form an essential part of the health care structure. However, curricula for these workers vary, and it is unclear how much these training programs include trauma education. HYPOTHESIS/METHODS: The CHW training curriculum in South Sudan was reviewed to evaluate the degree to which it incorporates trauma education, according to established guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first formal comparison of a CHW curriculum with established WHO trauma guidelines. The curriculum incorporated a number of essential components of the WHO guidelines; however, the concepts taught were limited in scope. The curriculum only covered about 50% of the content required for basic providers, with major deficiencies being in the management of head and spinal injuries, safety protocols for health care personnel, and in the management of pediatric patients. The CHW training curriculum lacks the requisite content to provide adequately a basic level of trauma care and requires amending to ensure that all South Sudan citizens receive appropriate treatment. It is recommended that other LMICs review their existing training curricula in order to improve their ability to provide adequate trauma care and to ensure they meet the basic WHO guidelines.

  6. Cosmetology Curriculum and Training as Seen by Beauty Salons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo Coll., CA.

    To evaluate the effectiveness of its cosmetology program, the College of San Mateo sent a questionnaire to beauty salons in the college's service area. Of the 70 questionnaires sent, over half were returned. Eleven courses in the curriculum were ranked by the employer in order of importance to him, the first four being the 1,600 hours of…

  7. A Community Needs Assessment for the Development of an Interprofessional Palliative Care Training Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Heather; Paganelli, Tia; Starks, Helene; Lindhorst, Taryn; Starks Acosta, Anne; Mauksch, Larry; Doorenbos, Ardith

    2017-03-01

    There is a known shortage of trained palliative care professionals, and an even greater shortage of professionals who have been trained through interprofessional curricula. As part of an institutional Palliative Care Training Center grant, a core team of interprofessional palliative care academic faculty and staff completed a state-wide palliative care educational assessment to determine the needs for an interprofessional palliative care training program. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and results of our community needs assessment of interprofessional palliative care educational needs in Washington state. We approached the needs assessment through a cross-sectional descriptive design by using mixed-method inquiry. Each phase incorporated a variety of settings and subjects. The assessment incorporated multiple phases with diverse methodological approaches: a preparatory phase-identifying key informants; Phase I-key informant interviews; Phase II-survey; and Phase III-steering committee endorsement. The multiple phases of the needs assessment helped create a conceptual framework for the Palliative Care Training Center and developed an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. The input from key informants at multiple phases also allowed us to define priority needs and to refine an interprofessional palliative care curriculum. This curriculum will provide an interprofessional palliative care educational program that crosses disciplinary boundaries to integrate knowledge that is beneficial for all palliative care clinicians. The input from a range of palliative care clinicians and professionals at every phase of the needs assessment was critical for creating an interprofessional palliative care curriculum.

  8. Transforming LEND leadership training curriculum through the maternal and child health leadership competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Betsy P; Couse, Leslie J; Sonnenmeier, Rae M; Kurtz, Alan; Russell, Susan M; Antal, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Leadership Competencies (v 3.0) were used to examine and improve an MCH Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) training curriculum for New Hampshire and Maine. Over 15 % of the nation's children experience neurodevelopmental disabilities or special health care needs and estimates suggest 1 in every 68 children is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Across the Unites States critical shortages of qualified MCH professionals exist, particularly in poor and rural areas. A continued investment in training interdisciplinary leaders is critical. The MCH Leadership Competencies provide an effective foundation for leadership training through identification of requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions required of MCH leaders. This paper describes a three-step process, which began in 2010 and included utilizing the MCH Leadership Competencies as a tool to reflect on, develop, and evaluate the NH LEND leadership curriculum. Curriculum development was further supported through participation in a multi-state learning collaborative. Through a series of intentional decisions, the curriculum design of NH LEND utilized the competencies and evidence-based principles of instruction to engage trainees in the development of specific MCH content knowledge and leadership skills. The LEND network specifically, and MCH leadership programs more broadly, may benefit from the intentional use of the MCH competencies to assist in curriculum development and program evaluation, and as a means to support trainees in identifying specific leadership goals and evaluating their leadership skill development.

  9. Curriculum for education and training of Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Guerra, Alberto; Bardies, Manuel; Belcari, Nicola;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide a guideline curriculum covering theoretical and practical aspects of education and training for Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine within Europe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: National training programmes of Medical Physics, Radiation Physics and Nuclear Medicine physics from...... experience required to practice as a Medical Physicist in Nuclear Medicine in Europe. It is assumed that the precondition for the beginning of the training is a good initial degree in Medical Physics at master level (or equivalent). The Learning Outcomes are categorised using the Knowledge, Skill...... Medicine. CONCLUSIONS: This new joint EANM/EFOMP European guideline curriculum is a further step to harmonise specialist training of Medical Physicists in Nuclear Medicine within Europe. It provides a common framework for national Medical Physics societies to develop or benchmark their own curricula...

  10. Postgraduate Education in Quality Improvement Methods: Initial Results of the Fellows' Applied Quality Training (FAQT) Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Burkart, Thomas A; Choi, Calvin Y; McKillop, Matthew S; Beyth, Rebecca J; Dahm, Phillipp

    2016-06-01

    Training in quality improvement (QI) is a pillar of the next accreditation system of the Accreditation Committee on Graduate Medical Education and a growing expectation of physicians for maintenance of certification. Despite this, many postgraduate medical trainees are not receiving training in QI methods. We created the Fellows Applied Quality Training (FAQT) curriculum for cardiology fellows using both didactic and applied components with the goal of increasing confidence to participate in future QI projects. Fellows completed didactic training from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Open School and then designed and completed a project to improve quality of care or patient safety. Self-assessments were completed by the fellows before, during, and after the first year of the curriculum. The primary outcome for our curriculum was the median score reported by the fellows regarding their self-confidence to complete QI activities. Self-assessments were completed by 23 fellows. The majority of fellows (15 of 23, 65.2%) reported no prior formal QI training. Median score on baseline self-assessment was 3.0 (range, 1.85-4), which was significantly increased to 3.27 (range, 2.23-4; P = 0.004) on the final assessment. The distribution of scores reported by the fellows indicates that 30% were slightly confident at conducting QI activities on their own, which was reduced to 5% after completing the FAQT curriculum. An interim assessment was conducted after the fellows completed didactic training only; median scores were not different from the baseline (mean, 3.0; P = 0.51). After completion of the FAQT, cardiology fellows reported higher self-confidence to complete QI activities. The increase in self-confidence seemed to be limited to the applied component of the curriculum, with no significant change after the didactic component.

  11. Program Evaluation of the "PREPaRE" School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Serwacki, Michelle L.; Brock, Stephen E.; Savage, Todd A.; Woitaszewski, Scott A.; Louvar Reeves, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study details a program evaluation of the "PREPaRE School Crisis Prevention and Intervention Training Curriculum" ("PREPaRE"), conducted in the United States and Canada between 2009 and 2011. Significant improvements in crisis prevention and intervention attitudes and knowledge were shown among 875 "Crisis Prevention…

  12. Autism Training in Pediatric Residency: Evaluation of a Case-Based Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Nili E.; Peacock, Georgina; Ruben, Wendy; Thomas, Jana; Weitzman, Carol C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent studies indicating the high prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), there has been little focus on improving ASD education during pediatric residency training. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new curriculum developed in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Maternal and Child…

  13. Effects on Students of Teacher Training in Use of a Drug Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kenneth R.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined effects of differential teacher training in use of drug education curriculum on 12 grade 5 classrooms of students' knowledge levels, problem-solving and coping skills, attitudes toward planned decision making, behavioral intentions, and tobacco and alcohol use. Found significant differences in intentions to take a drink but not on other…

  14. Assigning Patients According to Curriculum: A Strategy for Improving Ambulatory Care Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, Alan D.; Moore, Gordon T.

    1994-01-01

    The strategy used by one health maintenance organization (HMO) for balancing residents' training needs and patient health problems, often limited and routine in an HMO, is to allocate patients to residents by matching them with curriculum content. A process for handling patient resistance to such an arrangement was also instituted. (MSE)

  15. Curriculum Development and Discursive Practices: Building a Training Culture around Dual Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Steve

    Dual diagnosis of comorbid substance abuse and mental disorder is currently presenting great difficulties across Australia's health and community service sectors. Historically, mental health professionals have received relatively little formal education or training in substance abuse issues. A new curriculum on dual diagnosis was developed and…

  16. Certification of School Social Workers and Curriculum Content of Programs Offering Training in School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Ann Marie; Bye, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the status of certification requirements for school social workers across the United States and the policy context in which certification is embedded. The article also details findings of a study on the curriculum available at various schools of social work offering training in school social work. The article makes a case for…

  17. Integrating icts in the curriculum:training needs and techers’ interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azucena Hernández Martín

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the analysis of Primary, Secondary and High school teachers’ training needs in the Community of Castilla y León (Spain and on their interest in receiving training to include ICTs in curricular design and development. It also analyses their preferences on how to get this training. In order to discern what their needs are, we try to give an answer to the following questions: Are teachers conscious of the their need for training in order to integrate ICTs in the curriculum?, which is the most demanded type of training and what ways do they prefer to receive that training?, are they really interested in this training, which entails one’s willingness to invest time and effort in the master of the new ICTs?

  18. Challenges in developing competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Thippaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1 Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2 Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3 Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level, II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  19. Exploring communication skills training in undergraduate nurse education by means of a curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt-Maj Wikström

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to investigate by means of a curriculum how nurses are trained theoretically and practically throughout their specialist education to communicate competently and professionally in interaction with colleagues and patients. Research today shows that there are many different approaches to develop professionally skilled communication in nurse-patient interaction. It indicates that this aspect of nurse education is regarded as an important feature by educators. It is therefore of interest to study, by means of analysing a curriculum, how nurses’ communicative competence is developed. To this purpose a curriculum was presented related to nursing communication skills training, selected from a University College of Health Care Sciences in Sweden. Both students and teachers need clearly defined curricula to structure their studies and to evaluate communication skills. The investigated curriculum could be further developed to direct students and teachers in effective communication skills. It is of importance to have a curriculum that could be interpreted in the same way by teachers and students.

  20. Making the Hidden Curriculum the Formal Curriculum: Vocational Training in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, Andre

    1991-01-01

    Critical analysis of the ideological character of vocational training initiatives implemented in South Africa, 1976-89, and comparison to "new vocationalism" in Great Britain suggest that South African training programs aim to instill capitalist values and stabilize labor relations while doing little to improve Black participation in the…

  1. Curriculum Implementation and Re-Training of Teachers in English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Teachers in English Language: Pre-Conditions for. Functional Nigerian ... quality of education offered to learners at primary and secondary levels. It is also a pointer to ..... quality of training, low motivation, lack of quality control and lack of in-.

  2. The Importance of Curriculum-Based Training and Assessment in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belli, Anna-Maria, E-mail: anna.belli@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St. George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lee, Michael, E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2013-10-30

    Physician performance and outcomes are being scrutinised by health care providers to improve patient safety and cost efficiency. Patients are best served by physicians who have undergone appropriate specialist training and assessment and perform large numbers of cases to maintain their skills. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe has put into place a curriculum for training in interventional radiology (IR) and a syllabus with an examination, the European Board of Interventional Radiology, providing evidence of attainment of an appropriate and satisfactory skill set for the safe practice of IR. This curriculum is appropriate for IR where there is a high volume of image-guided procedures in vascular and nonvascular organ systems with cross-use of minimally invasive techniques in patients with a variety of disease processes. Other specialties may require different, longer, and more focused training if their experience is “diluted” by the need to master a different skill set.

  3. Choose Health Action Teens: A Review of a Teens as Teachers Nutritional Education Training Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Flesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review draws from published research related to the best practices for the utilization of teens as teachers to examine Choose Health Action Teens (CHAT, a teen’s as teachers (TAT training curriculum.  Research shows that there are various components necessary to build a high quality TAT program.  Most of these components fall under four areas in which training is necessary for teens and adults: Teaching strategies, youth/child development, subject matter to be taught, and youth-adult partnerships.  These four areas provide a framework to review the Choose Health Action Teens (CHAT (Crosiar & Wolfe, 2013 teens as teachers training program curriculum.

  4. Recommended Curriculum for Training in Pediatric Transplant Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Allen, Upton; Englund, Janet; Herold, Betsy; Hoffman, Jill; Green, Michael; Gantt, Soren; Kumar, Deepali; Michaels, Marian G

    2015-03-01

    A working group representing the American Society of Transplantation, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and International Pediatric Transplant Association has developed a collaborative effort to identify and develop core knowledge in pediatric transplant infectious diseases. Guidance for patient care environments for training and core competencies is included to help facilitate training directed at improving the experience for pediatric infectious diseases trainees and practitioners in the area of pediatric transplant infectious diseases. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Integrating Creativity Training into Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Curriculum in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    In order to foster creative engineers, a creativity training programme was carried out in medialogy education in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. This paper focuses on the question of how engineering students perceive the strategy of integrating...... creativity training into a PBL curriculum. A total of 20 medialogy students in the training programme were interviewed. The data shows that the training programme was thought useful and students get benefits such as gaining project work skills, creative concepts and confidence of being creative. However......, limitations of the programme show that only five days of training did not fit the requirements of learning skills in PBL. So the supervisors are suggested to offer more creativity techniques and process engagement to move projects forward....

  6. Development of a standardised training curriculum for robotic surgery: a consensus statement from an international multidisciplinary group of experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kamran; Khan, Reenam; Mottrie, Alexandre; Lovegrove, Catherine; Abaza, Ronny; Ahlawat, Rajesh; Ahlering, Thomas; Ahlgren, Goran; Artibani, Walter; Barret, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier; Challacombe, Ben; Coloby, Patrick; Khan, Muhammad S; Hubert, Jacques; Michel, Maurice Stephan; Montorsi, Francesco; Murphy, Declan; Palou, Joan; Patel, Vipul; Piechaud, Pierre-Thierry; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Rischmann, Pascal; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Siemer, Stefan; Stoeckle, Michael; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Terrier, Jean-Etienne; Thüroff, Joachim W; Vaessen, Christophe; Van Der Poel, Henk G; Van Cleynenbreugel, Ben; Volpe, Alessandro; Wagner, Christian; Wiklund, Peter; Wilson, Timothy; Wirth, Manfred; Witt, Jörn; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2015-07-01

    To explore the views of experts about the development and validation of a robotic surgery training curriculum, and how this should be implemented. An international expert panel was invited to a structured session for discussion. The study was of a mixed design, including qualitative and quantitative components based on focus group interviews during the European Association of Urology (EAU) Robotic Urology Section (ERUS) (2012), EAU (2013) and ERUS (2013) meetings. After introduction to the aims, principles and current status of the curriculum development, group responses were elicited. After content analysis of recorded interviews generated themes were discussed at the second meeting, where consensus was achieved on each theme. This discussion also underwent content analysis, and was used to draft a curriculum proposal. At the third meeting, a quantitative questionnaire about this curriculum was disseminated to attendees to assess the level of agreement with the key points. In all, 150 min (19 pages) of the focus group discussion was transcribed (21 316 words). Themes were agreed by two raters (median agreement κ 0.89) and they included: need for a training curriculum (inter-rater agreement κ 0.85); identification of learning needs (κ 0.83); development of the curriculum contents (κ 0.81); an overview of available curricula (κ 0.79); settings for robotic surgery training ((κ 0.89); assessment and training of trainers (κ 0.92); requirements for certification and patient safety (κ 0.83); and need for a universally standardised curriculum (κ 0.78). A training curriculum was proposed based on the above discussions. This group proposes a multi-step curriculum for robotic training. Studies are in process to validate the effectiveness of the curriculum and to assess transfer of skills to the operating room. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Impact of a simulation training curriculum on technical and nontechnical skills in colonoscopy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Samir C; Garg, Ankit; Scaffidi, Michael A; Yu, Jeffrey J; Plener, Ian S; Yong, Elaine; Cino, Maria; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Walsh, Catharine M

    2015-12-01

    GI endoscopy simulation-based training augments early clinical performance; however, the optimal manner by which to deliver training is unknown. We aimed to validate a simulation-based structured comprehensive curriculum (SCC) designed to teach technical, cognitive, and integrative competencies in colonoscopy. Single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Endoscopic simulation course at an academic hospital. Thirty-three novice endoscopists were allocated to an SCC group or self-regulated learning (SRL) group. The SCC group received a curriculum consisting of 6 hours of didactic lectures and 8 hours of virtual reality simulation-based training with expert feedback. The SRL group was provided a list of desired objectives and was instructed to practice on the simulator for an equivalent time (8 hours). Clinical transfer was assessed during 2 patient colonoscopies using the Joint Advisory Group Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (JAG DOPS) scale. Secondary outcome measures included differences in procedural knowledge, immediate post-training simulation performance, and delayed post-training (4-6 weeks) performance during an integrated scenario test on the JAG DOPS communication and integrated scenario global rating scales. There was no significant difference in baseline or post-training performance on the simulator task. The SCC group performed superiorly during their first and second clinical colonoscopies. Additionally, the SCC group demonstrated significantly better knowledge and colonoscopy-specific performance, communication, and global performance during the integrated scenario. We were unable to measure SRL participants' effort outside of mandatory training. In addition, feedback metrics and number of available simulation cases are limited. These results support integration of endoscopy simulation into a structured curriculum incorporating instructional feedback and complementary didactic knowledge as a means to augment technical, cognitive, and

  8. Pre-clinical pharmacology training in a student-centered veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buur, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    The appropriate use of therapeutics is important to both human and animal health. The field of pharmacology is rapidly progressing such that it is impossible to convey to students every possible piece of information they will need to know throughout their veterinary careers. Instead, it is more important to train students for lifelong and self-directed learning so that they will be able to adapt to the ever-changing pharmaceutical landscape. Western University of Health Sciences College of Veterinary Medicine teaches pharmacology using a student-centered and problem-based curriculum designed to teach students not only the basics of pharmacology and clinical pharmacology, but also the personal skills needed to continue to learn beyond their formal education. The aim of this manuscript is to document the pharmacology curriculum during phase I of the veterinary curriculum. Review of the graduating class of 2010's exposure to pharmacology learning issues reveals broad-based coverage of major functional and mechanistic drug classes as well as peripheral topics, including pharmacokinetics, legal and ethical issues, and dosing regimen calculations. Previous classes have scored well on external examinations leading to a belief that this pharmacology curriculum provides adequate training for graduate veterinarians.

  9. Definition of curriculum and approach: study of a training course for teachers of non-formal education in NGOs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deivis Perez

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a research aimed to analyze the approach and the definition of guiding curriculum of teacher training for work in the non-formal education in non-governmental organizations(NGOs...

  10. Abortion training to be required in standard Ob / Gyn curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-24

    On February 15, (1995) the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education announced that it will now require medical schools seeking accreditation to provide abortion training for all residents in obstetrics and gynecology. The new "Program Requirements for Residency Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology," approved unanimously, will take effect on January 1, 1996. According to the Council, the newly issued standards are the first to refer specifically to abortion. The language states, "Experience with induced abortion must be part of residency training, except for residents with moral or religious objections .... Experience with management of complications of abortion must be provided to all residents." The Council also mandates that if a medical school itself has "a religious, moral or legal" objection to teaching the procedure, it must "ensure that residents ... who do not have a religious or moral objection receive education and experience in performing abortion at another institution." Other revisions provide for expanded resident education in "primary and preventive care," due to the fact that many women rely on their obstetricians and gynecologists as their primary care physicians, as well as additional training experience in family planning, including "all reversible methods of contraception" and sterilization. In order to be certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ob/gyns must graduate from an accredited residency program. In addition, teaching hospitals must be accredited to secure federal reimbursements for the medical services patients receive from residents. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education operates under the aegis of the American Medical Association, the American Board of Medical Specialties, the American Hospital Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies. Both the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the American College of

  11. Developing a comprehensive training curriculum for integrated predictive maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.

    2002-03-01

    On-line equipment condition monitoring is a critical component of the world-class production and safety histories of many successful nuclear plant operators. From addressing availability and operability concerns of nuclear safety-related equipment to increasing profitability through support system reliability and reduced maintenance costs, Predictive Maintenance programs have increasingly become a vital contribution to the maintenance and operation decisions of nuclear facilities. In recent years, significant advancements have been made in the quality and portability of many of the instruments being used, and software improvements have been made as well. However, the single most influential component of the success of these programs is the impact of a trained and experienced team of personnel putting this technology to work. Changes in the nature of the power generation industry brought on by competition, mergers, and acquisitions, has taken the historically stable personnel environment of power generation and created a very dynamic situation. As a result, many facilities have seen a significant turnover in personnel in key positions, including predictive maintenance personnel. It has become the challenge for many nuclear operators to maintain the consistent contribution of quality data and information from predictive maintenance that has become important in the overall equipment decision process. These challenges can be met through the implementation of quality training to predictive maintenance personnel and regular updating and re-certification of key technology holders. The use of data management tools and services aid in the sharing of information across sites within an operating company, and with experts who can contribute value-added data management and analysis. The overall effectiveness of predictive maintenance programs can be improved through the incorporation of newly developed comprehensive technology training courses. These courses address the use of

  12. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  13. Integrating Surface Modeling into the Engineering Design Graphics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nathan W.

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested there is a knowledge base that surrounds the use of 3D modeling within the engineering design process and correspondingly within engineering design graphics education. While solid modeling receives a great deal of attention and discussion relative to curriculum efforts, and rightly so, surface modeling is an equally viable 3D…

  14. MEDLINE training for medical students integrated into the clinical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, D G; Schwartz, S A

    1995-03-01

    This study was initiated in response to the availabilty of unlimited access to MEDLINE via the PaperChase interface at the host institution. The goal of the study was to analyse the usage of MEDLINE by medical students during their third-year clinical clerkship in paediatrics. This was achieved by first giving them a formal demonstration of MEDLINE and then longitudinally administering a structured questionnaire at several points during their paediatric clerkship. Since medical students were required to write a thesis for this clerkship, which included an analysis of the primary literature, there was an identified need for using the system. This study analyses the students' perceptions and searching activities after formal training and upon having unlimited access to MEDLINE.

  15. Models and automation technologies for the curriculum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Volkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the sequence of the curriculum development stages on the basis of the system analysis, as well as to create models and information technologies for the implementation of thesestages.The methods and the models of the systems’ theory and the system analysis, including methods and automated procedures for structuring organizational aims, models and automated procedures for organizing complex expertise.On the basis of the analysis of existing studies in the field of curriculum modeling, using formal mathematical language, including optimization models, that help to make distribution of disciplines by years and semesters in accordance with the relevant restrictions, it is shown, that the complexity and dimension of these tasks require the development of special software; the problem of defining the input data and restrictions requires a large time investment, that seems to be difficult to provide in real conditions of plans’ developing, thus it is almost impossible to verify the objectivity of the input data and the restrictions in such models. For a complete analysis of the process of curriculum development it is proposed to use the system definition, based on the system-targeted approach. On the basis of this definition the reasonable sequence of the integrated stages for the development of the curriculum was justified: 1 definition (specification of the requirements for the educational content; 2 determining the number of subjects, included in the curriculum; 3 definition of the sequence of the subjects; 4 distribution of subjects by semesters. The models and technologies for the implementation of these stages of curriculum development were given in the article: 1 models, based on the information approach of A.Denisov and the modified degree of compliance with objectives based on Denisov’s evaluation index (in the article the idea of evaluating the degree of the impact of disciplines for realization

  16. Specialty Training's Organizational Readiness for curriculum Change (STORC): development of a questionnaire in a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Lindsay; Jippes, Mariëlle; van Luijk, Scheltus; den Rooyen, Corry; Scherpbier, Albert; Scheele, Fedde

    2015-08-05

    In postgraduate medical education (PGME), programs have been restructured according to competency-based frameworks. The scale and implications of these adjustments justify a comprehensive implementation plan. Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) is seen as a critical precursor for a successful implementation of change initiatives. Though, ORC in health care settings is mostly assessed in small scale settings and in relation to new policies and practices rather than educational change. Therefore our aim with this work was to develop an instrument to asses Specialty Training's Organizational Readiness for curriculum Change (STORC). A Delphi procedure was conducted to examine the applicability of a preliminary questionnaire in PGME, which was based on existing instruments designed for business and health care organizations. The 41 panellists (19 trainees and 22 supervisors from 6 specialties) from four different countries who were confronted with an apparent curriculum change, or would be in the near future, were asked to rate the relevance of a 89-item web-based questionnaire with regard to changes in specialty training on a 5-point Likert scale. Furthermore, they were invited to make qualitative comments on the items. In two rounds the 89-item preliminary questionnaire was reduced to 44 items. Items were either removed, kept, adapted or added based on individual item scores and qualitative comments. In the absence of a gold standard, this Delphi procedure was considered complete when the overall questionnaire rating exceeded 4.0 (scale 0-5). The overall item score reached 4.1 in the second round, meeting our criteria for completion of this Delphi procedure. This Delphi study describes the initial validating step in the development of an instrument to asses Specialty Training's Organisational Readiness for curriculum Change (STORC). Since ORC is measured on various subscales and presented as such, its strength lies in analysing these subscales. The latter makes

  17. Accreditation of Interpreter Training Courses Curriculum in Bachelors of English Translation in Iranian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Dabaghi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study attempts to see to what extent interpreter training courses offered in bachelor’s degree of English translation in Iranian universities are able to prepare students by teaching them the necessary skills of interpreting.  Semi-structured interviews with experts and review of literature were used to find the skills required in interpreter training.  A researcher made questionnaire, containing 69 items with a four point Likert scale was made to find out how much the students felt they had learned each necessary skill during their courses.  A total of 103 students from six different universities completed the questionnaire.  SPSS 17 was used to the analysis the data.  The data gathered revealed that 67% of the students received a mean score of less than half the highest possible score. There was a significant difference between the six universities (P<0.001.  The results of this study can be used by curriculum planners in the reformation and improvement of interpreter training courses. Keywords: interpreter training; simultaneous interpreting; consecutive interpreting; curriculum evaluation

  18. Designing a Community-Based Lay Health Advisor Training Curriculum to Address Cancer Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwede, Clement K.; Ashley, Atalie A.; McGinnis, Kara; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Standifer, Maisha; Baldwin, Julie; Williams, Coni; Sneed, Kevin B.; Wathington, Deanna; Dash-Pitts, Lolita; Green, B. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic minorities have disproportionately higher cancer incidence and mortality than their White counterparts. In response to this inequity in cancer prevention and care, community-based lay health advisors (LHAs) may be suited to deliver effective, culturally relevant, quality cancer education, prevention/screening, and early detection services for underserved populations. Approach and Strategies Consistent with key tenets of community-based participatory research (CBPR), this project engaged community partners to develop and implement a unique LHA training curriculum to address cancer health disparities among medically underserved communities in a tricounty area. Seven phases of curriculum development went into designing a final seven-module LHA curriculum. In keeping with principles of CBPR and community engagement, academic–community partners and LHAs themselves were involved at all phases to ensure the needs of academic and community partners were mutually addressed in development and implementation of the LHA program. Discussion and Conclusions Community-based LHA programs for outreach, education, and promotion of cancer screening and early detection, are ideal for addressing cancer health disparities in access and quality care. When community-based LHAs are appropriately recruited, trained, and located in communities, they provide unique opportunities to link, bridge, and facilitate quality cancer education, services, and research. PMID:22982709

  19. Updated European core curriculum for radiotherapists (radiation oncologists). Recommended curriculum for the specialist training of medical practitioners in radiotherapy (radiation oncology) within Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, M.; Leer, J.W.H.; Dahl, O.; Neve, W. de; Hunter, R.; Rampling, R.; Verfaillie, C.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To produce updated state-of-the-art recommendations for harmonised medical specialist training in radiotherapy within Europe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Minimum Curriculum for the Theoretical Education in Radiation Oncology in Europe from 1991 was updated under consideration of new developments

  20. Detection and Description of Small Breast Masses by Residents Trained Using a Standardized Clinical Breast Exam Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Donald F.; Prouser, Nancy C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We evaluated the effect of standardized clinical breast examination (CBE) training on residents’ ability to detect a 3-mm breast mass in a silicone breast model. METHODS In this nonrandomized controlled trial, 75 first year residents (R1s) at 8 family medicine, internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology training programs received the intervention and second year residents (R2s) did not. Trained residency faculty taught R1s vertical strip, three-pressure method (VS3PM) CBE using a standardized curriculum, including a 1- to 2-hour online self-study with video and 2.5-hour practicum using silicone models and a trained patient surrogate. RESULTS Solitary mass detection: 84% by R1s, 46% by R2s (RR = 1.82, 95%CI = 1.36, 2.43, P < 0.0001). Of those finding a mass, 62% of R1s and 10% of R2s used at least 5 of 8 standardized descriptors (RR = 6.19, 95%CI = 2.06, 18.59, P = 0.001). R1s false positive findings were not statistically different from R2s (P = 0.54). Both the use of VS3PM and total time spent on CBE were independently highly predictive of finding the mass in either group. CONCLUSIONS Most untrained primary care residents are not proficient in CBE. Standardized VS3PM CBE training improves the ability to detect and describe a small mass in a silicone breast model. Better CBE training for residents may improve the early detection of breast cancer. PMID:18058184

  1. Khoa Trinh Huan Luyen Giu Tre Ban Ngay Tai Gia (Family Day Care Training Curriculum--Vietnamese).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train, in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses and licensing requirements for family day care, licensing…

  2. Interactive training model of TRIZ for mechanical engineers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Runhua; Zhang, Huangao

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is a process of taking an original idea and converting it into a business value, in which the engineers face some inventive problems which can be solved hardly by experience. TRIZ, as a new theory for companies in China, provides both conceptual and procedural knowledge for finding and solving inventive problems. Because the government plays a leading role in the diffusion of TRIZ, too many companies from different industries are waiting to be trained, but the quantity of the trainers mastering TRIZ is incompatible with that requirement. In this context, to improve the training effect, an interactive training model of TRIZ for the mechanical engineers in China is developed and the implementation in the form of training classes is carried out. The training process is divided into 6 phases as follows: selecting engineers, training stage-1, finding problems, training stage-2, finding solutions and summing up. The government, TRIZ institutions and companies to join the programs interact during the process. The government initiates and monitors a project in form of a training class of TRIZ and selects companies to join the programs. Each selected companies choose a few engineers to join the class and supervises the training result. The TRIZ institutions design the training courses and carry out training curriculum. With the beginning of the class, an effective communication channel is established by means of interview, discussion face to face, E-mail, QQ and so on. After two years training practices, the results show that innovative abilities of the engineers to join and pass the final examinations increased distinctly, and most of companies joined the training class have taken congnizance of the power of TRIZ for product innovation. This research proposes an interactive training model of TRIZ for mechanical engineers in China to expedite the knowledge diffusion of TRIZ.

  3. Orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 intern curriculum improves initial orthopedic in-training examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig S; Nyland, John; Broome, Brandon

    2012-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of an educational curriculum designed for orthopedic surgery postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) interns to improve initial Orthopedic In-Training Examination (OITE) performance. A retrospective cohort study was performed that evaluated the PGY-1 intern OITE performance of one residency training program (n = 55) during 7-year periods before (1996-2002) and after structured curriculum implementation (2003-2009). Linear regression analysis revealed insignificant changes in median PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank during the precurriculum period (R = 0.08, P = 0.53). Postcurriculum period comparisons revealed significantly improving PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank (R = 0.46, P = 0.048). Pre- and postcurriculum median US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step I scores did not display statistically significant differences (218.2 ± 6.6 vs 229.1 ± 13.8, Mann-Whitney U test, z = -1.5, P = 0.10). Spearman rho correlations revealed a moderate relation (r = 0.61) between postcurriculum PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank and USMLE Step I score, but not during the precurriculum period. A moderate relation (r = 0.50) also was observed between postcurriculum USMLE Step I score and average OITE percentile rank during the 5-year residency program, but not during the precurriculum period. PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank improved significantly with the addition of a specially designed educational curriculum. The stronger USMLE Step I score and PGY-1 intern OITE percentile rank relation observed during the postcurriculum period suggests that interns who participated in the educational curriculum were better prepared to translate general medical and patient care knowledge into orthopedic surgery knowledge.

  4. Integration of Hands-On Team Training into Existing Curriculum Improves Both Technical and Nontechnical Skills in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Robert C; Owei, Lily; Rao, Raghavendra; Riddle, Elijah W; Brooks, Ari D; Dempsey, Daniel T; Morris, Jon B; Neylan, Christopher J; Williams, Noel N; Dumon, Kristoffel R

    2017-05-26

    Nontechnical skills are an essential component of surgical education and a major competency assessed by the ACGME milestones project. However, the optimal way to integrate nontechnical skills training into existing curricula and then objectively evaluate the outcome is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect laparoscopic team-based task training would have on the nontechnical skills needed for laparoscopic surgery. 9 PGY-1 residents underwent an established training curriculum for teaching the knowledge and technical skills involved in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Initial training involved a didactic session, expert-led practice on a porcine model in a simulated operating room and laparoscopic skills practice on a virtual reality trainer. Residents then performed a laparoscopic cholecystectomy on the same porcine model as a preintervention test. Three to four months following this, residents were subjected to specific nontechnical skills training involving 2 simple team-based laparoscopic tasks. They then practiced a further 4 to 6 hours on the virtual reality trainer. A repeat postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomy was then performed 3 to 4 months after nontechnical skills training. Both the preintervention and postintervention laparoscopic cholecystectomies were audiovisually recorded and then evaluated by 2 independent surgeons in a blinded fashion. Technical skills were assessed using objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) and a technique specific rating scale (TRS) that we developed for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Nontechnical skills were assessed using nontechnical skills for surgeons (NOTSS). Residents also completed a survey at the beginning and end of the training. Tertiary care, university based teaching institution. A total of 9 general surgery residents at the intern level. The mean OSATS score improved from 13.7 ± 1.24 to 26.7 ± 0.31 (p skills training for laparoscopic cholecystectomy that was

  5. Mental models and user training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Zupanič

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the functions of the reference service is user training which means teaching users how to use the library and it's information sorces (nowadays mainly computerized systems. While the scientific understanding of teaching/learning process is shifting, changes also affect the methods of user training in libraries.Human-computer interaction (HCI is an interdisciplinary and a very active research area which studies how humans use computers - their mental and behavioral characteristics. The application of psychological theories to HCI are especially great on three areas: psychological (mental, conceptual models, individual differences, and error behavior.The mental models theory is powerful tool for understanding the ways in which users interact with an information system. Claims, based on this theory can affect the methods (conceptualization of user training and the overall design of information systems.

  6. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgical Simulation Training Curriculum: Transfer Reliability and Maintenance of Skill Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John C; Belmont, Philip J; Lanzi, Joseph; Martin, Kevin; Bader, Julia; Owens, Brett; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical education is evolving as work hour constraints limit the exposure of residents to the operating room. Potential consequences may include erosion of resident education and decreased quality of patient care. Surgical simulation training has become a focus of study in an effort to counter these challenges. Previous studies have validated the use of arthroscopic surgical simulation programs both in vitro and in vivo. However, no study has examined if the gains made by residents after a simulation program are retained after a period away from training. In all, 17 orthopedic surgery residents were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. All subjects were oriented to the arthroscopic simulator, a 14-point anatomic checklist, and Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). The experimental group received 1 hour of simulation training whereas the control group had no additional training. All subjects performed a recorded, diagnostic arthroscopy intraoperatively. These videos were scored by 2 blinded, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons and outcome measures were compared within and between the groups. After 1 year in which neither group had exposure to surgical simulation training, all residents were retested intraoperatively and scored in the exact same fashion. Individual surgical case logs were reviewed and surgical case volume was documented. There was no difference between the 2 groups after initial simulation testing and there was no correlation between case volume and initial scores. After training, the simulation group improved as compared with baseline in mean ASSET (p = 0.023) and mean time to completion (p = 0.01). After 1 year, there was no difference between the groups in any outcome measurements. Although individual technical skills can be cultivated with surgical simulation training, these advancements can be lost without continued education. It is imperative that residency programs implement a simulation curriculum and

  7. Voices of innovation: building a model for curriculum transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janet M; Resnick, Jerelyn; Boni, Mary Sharon; Bradley, Patricia; Grady, Janet L; Ruland, Judith P; Stuever, Nancy L

    2013-05-07

    Innovation in nursing education curriculum is critically needed to meet the demands of nursing leadership and practice while facing the complexities of today's health care environment. International nursing organizations, the Institute of Medicine, and; our health care practice partners have called for curriculum reform to ensure the quality and safety of patient care. While innovation is occurring in schools of nursing, little is being researched or disseminated. The purposes of this qualitative study were to (a) describe what innovative curricula were being implemented, (b) identify challenges faced by the faculty, and (c) explore how the curricula were evaluated. Interviews were conducted with 15 exemplar schools from a variety of nursing programs throughout the United States. Exemplar innovative curricula were identified, and a model for approaching innovation was developed based on the findings related to conceptualizing, designing, delivering, evaluating, and supporting the curriculum. The results suggest implications for nursing education, research, and practice.

  8. Graduate public health training in healthcare of refugee asylum seekers and clinical human rights: evaluation of an innovative curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin

    2016-04-01

    An innovative curriculum was developed to equip public health students with appropriate attitude and skills to address healthcare of asylum seekers. Implemented in 2005 the curriculum included: (1) didactic sessions covering epidemiology and health sequelae of torture, asylum laws, and approaches to identify survivors' healthcare needs; (2) panel discussions with survivors and advocates; and (3) participating in medico-legal process of asylum seeking. Complementary mixed methods evaluations included pre- and post-curriculum questionnaires, formal curriculum evaluations, final papers and oral presentations. 125 students participated. Students showed improved knowledge regrading sequelae of abuse and survivors' healthcare needs (P rights careers. As an advocacy and cultural competency training in public health practice addressing healthcare of refugees domestically, this curriculum was well received and effective, and will also help students better serve other similar populations. Population case-based domestic opportunities to teach global health and health and human rights should be effectively utilized to develop a well-equipped global health corps.

  9. Dental Hygiene Curriculum Model for Transition to Future Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paarmann, Carlene S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The establishment of the baccalaureate degree as the minimum entry level for dental hygiene practice centers around three main concerns: changes in health care delivery, awarding of a degree commensurate with students' educational background, and the credibility of dental hygiene as a profession. A curriculum model is discussed. (MLW)

  10. Cesar Chavez--Grade Seven Model Curriculum and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    In this California state curriculum model for grade 7, "World History and Geography: Medieval Society," students study the life, work, and philosophy of Cesar Chavez. They learn about the ideas and philosophies that have withstood the test of time and emerged in Chavez's work and actions. Students examine Chavez's ancestral heritage link to early…

  11. Cesar Chavez--Grade Six Model Curriculum and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    In this California state curriculum model for grade 6, "World History and Geography: Ancient Civilization," students learn that religious ideas have inspired and influenced the lives and actions of men and women, including Cesar Chavez. They see how his unselfishness, compassion for others, tolerance, and nonviolence have roots reaching back…

  12. An Alumni Oriented Approach to Sport Management Curriculum Design Using Performance Ratings and a Regression Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, David; Parkhouse, Bonnie L.

    1982-01-01

    An alumni-based model is proposed as an alternative to sports management curriculum design procedures. The model relies on the assessment of curriculum by sport management alumni and uses performance ratings of employers and measures of satisfaction by alumni in a regression model to identify curriculum leading to increased work performance and…

  13. [Curriculum design of the Master's in Public Health program via the inservice education system. The Working Group of the Innovation Program in Health Systems and Professional Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This article presents the curriculum design process experience of the School of Public Health of Mexico's In-Service Master of Public Health Program, offered through the distance education model. The Program was created as a response to the Mexican health system's human resources training needs, with the purpose of contributing to the health services decentralization process, the strengthening of managerial skills of local health district managers, and to the professionalization of public health. The Program's design and development are based on a distance education system as an alternative to the traditional training models. The distance education model offers the possibility to train human resources on their job, to link permanently theory and practice, and to improve, in the short-term, the professional performance of students. The curriculum design process included the analysis of the student's training needs based on their professional profile, the type of plan of study that could take into account those training needs, and of the advisers and tutor's required profile, educational background, and job experience. The different disciplines were grouped around the knowledge objects, and not around independent courses. The health planning process was taken as a central axis and conductive line for integrating the thematic contents. The Master's plan of study was conformed by four stages: health diagnosis, formulation of the organized social response, implementation, and evaluation.

  14. Nephrology training curriculum and implications for optimal kidney care in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okel, Julius; Okpechi, Ike G; Qarni, Bilal; Olanrewaju, Timothy; Courtney, Mark J; Luyckx, Valerie; Naicker, Sarala; Bello, Aminu K

    An effective workforce is essential for delivery of high-quality chronic disease care. Low-income nations are challenged by a dearth and/or maldistribution of an essential workforce required for all chronic disease care including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nephrology education and training in developed countries have grown at pace with the technological advancement in the practice of medicine in order to meet the standards required of kidney health professionals towards high-quality, patient-centered medical care. The standards designed by institutions and/or professional societies, such as Royal Colleges and Medical Councils in high-income nations with well-developed health systems and infrastructures, are often not easily translatable to issues critical to nephrology practice in low-income nations. Little or no guidance is provided on common nephrological issues of regional nature or pertaining to ethnic minorities and disadvantaged groups living in those countries. There is an emergent need for a training curriculum that meets the needs and peculiarities of the developing nations, and this needs to leverage on the existing and well-validated systems of training across the globe. We evaluated nephrology training programs across 25 upper-middle and high-income nations to identify best practices and opportunities for adoption in low-income nations. We reviewed training guidelines from major professional societies on content and process of training. There are similarities and differences in structure, content, and process of training programs across countries, and there are clearly adoptable concepts/frameworks for application in low-income nations. We provide recommendations and a strategic plan for the future focus of nephrology training in the developing world to align with current trends in technological advancement and development as well as the need for emphasis on prevention of CKD. The essential competencies (patient- and population--based) required of a

  15. An Integrated Competency-Based Training Model for theological training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Mwangi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between theological training and practical ministry with the purpose of addressing the fundamental problems that hinder theological training from becoming relevant. There exists a general concern about the way theological schools are preparing men and women for church ministry, with the church leadership feeling like graduates are not up to the task of ministering despite the theological training. The research has established that there is a relationship between theological training and practice of ministry and that practical ministry can only be improved through enhancing theological training. Ultimately the article establishes the need for a competent training programme modelled after the New Testament Discipleship Model approach. This model integrates knowledge, being and practical training. The article tries to outline a model of training (i.e. the Integrated Competency-Based Training Model that will seek to address many of the inadequacies in the training of church ministers with the aim of making theological training translate into the practice of ministry.

  16. Psychopharmacology Curriculum Field Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Benjamin, Sheldon; Beresin, Eugene; Goldberg, David A.; Jibson, Michael D.; Thrall, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Objective: As part of an effort to improve psychopharmacology training in psychiatric residency programs, a committee of residency training directors and associate directors adapted an introductory schizophrenia presentation from the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology's Model Psychopharmacology Curriculum to develop a multimodal,…

  17. CERN Technical Training 2006: Office Software Curriculum Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Office Software Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme currently offers comprehensive training in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Access, Outlook), MS Project, Frontpage, Dreamweaver, Indesign, LaTeX, and CERN EDMS. There are some places available on the following Microsoft Office 2003 course sessions, currently scheduled until December 2007: EXCEL 2003 - niveau 2 : ECDL - 16-17 October (2 days, session in French) WORD 2003 (Short Course II) - HowTo... Mail merge - 2 November (morning, bilingual session) WORD 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Work with master document - 2 November (afternoon, bilingual session) OUTLOOK 2003 (Short Course III) - Meetings and Delegation - 3 November (morning, bilingual session) EXCEL 2003 (Short Course IV) - HowTo... Link cells, worksheets and workbooks - 3 November (afternoon, bilingual session) EXCEL 2003 - Level 1: ECDL - 13-14 November (2 days, session in English) ACCESS 2003 - Level 2: ECDL - 5-6 December (2 days, session in English) The abo...

  18. Definition of curriculum and approach: study of a training course for teachers of non-formal education in NGOs

    OpenAIRE

    Deivis Perez

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a research aimed to analyze the approach and the definition of guiding curriculum of teacher training for work in the non-formal education in non-governmental organizations (NGOs). We opted for a qualitative approach and case study of Te- acher Training Course for NGOs, developed by Ong São Paulo-SP. The research instruments were: analysis of documents of the cou- rse, interviews with trainers and coordinator and literature review. In this course, curriculum is defined a...

  19. Utilizing doctors' attitudes toward staff training to inform a chiropractic technology curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, Catherine A; Martel, Stacie S

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine attitudes of doctors of chiropractic regarding the importance of staff training in specific skill areas to inform the curriculum management process of a chiropractic technology program. A survey was distributed to registrants of a chiropractic homecoming event. On a 5-point Likert scale, respondents were asked to rate the degree of importance that staff members be trained in specific skills. Descriptive statistics were derived, and a 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test differences between groups based on years in practice and level of staff training. Doctors place a high level of importance on oral communication skills and low importance on nutrition and physical examinations. Comparing groups based on years in practice revealed differences in the areas of passive physiotherapies (F = 3.61, p = .015), legal issues/regulations (F = 3.01, p = .032), occupational safety and health regulation (F = 4.27, p = .006), and marketing (F = 2.67, p = .049). Comparing groups based on level of staff training revealed differences in the areas of occupational safety and health regulations (F = 4.56, p = .005) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (F = 4.91, p = .003). With regard to their assistants, doctors of chiropractic tend to place high importance on office skills requiring effective communication and place less importance on clinical skills such as physical examinations and physiotherapy.

  20. Curriculum inventory: Modeling, sharing and comparing medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Albright, Susan; Smothers, Valerie; Cameron, Terri; Willett, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Abstract descriptions of how curricula are structured and run. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory Standard provides a technical syntax through which a wide range of different curricula can be expressed and subsequently compared and analyzed. This standard has the potential to shift curriculum mapping and reporting from a somewhat disjointed and institution-specific undertaking to something that is shared among multiple medical schools and across whole medical education systems. Given the current explosion of different models of curricula (time-free, competency-based, socially accountable, distributed, accelerated, etc.), the ability to consider this diversity using a common model has particular value in medical education management and scholarship. This article describes the development and structure of the Curriculum Inventory Standard as a way of standardizing the modeling of different curricula for audit, evaluation and research purposes. It also considers the strengths and limitations of the current standard and the implications for a medical education world in which this level of commonality, precision, and accountability for curricular practice is the norm rather than the exception.

  1. Definition of curriculum and approach: study of a training course for teachers of non-formal education in NGOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivis Perez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a research aimed to analyze the approach and the definition of guiding curriculum of teacher training for work in the non-formal education in non-governmental organizations(NGOs. We opted for a qualitative approach and case study of Teacher Training Course for NGOs, developed by Ong São Paulo-SP. The research instruments were: analysis of documents of the course, interviews with trainers and coordinator and literature review. In this course, curriculum is defined as a path to be followed by students and instructors and the coordinator of the subjects studied. We adopted the so-called Integrated Curriculum, in which teaching occurs by the study of problem situations and integrators of learning projects. At the end, we suggest improving the course and following that information, it is hoped, one will support the production of further comparative research.

  2. Interkulturelle Kompetenz in der Facharztausbildung von Psychiatern in Deutschland: Ergebnisse einer Umfrage [Intercultural competence in the psychiatric training curriculum in Germany: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machleidt, Wielant

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: This study was carried out to assess the situation of and the demand for specific training in transcultural psychiatry as part of the residency program in Germany. Method: A semistructured questionnaire with 30 questions (28 structured, 2 open was developed, for which the “Local Survey of Realities in Transcultural Psychiatry” of the (APA served as a model and was modified accordingly. This questionnaire was sent out to all directors of psychiatric training institutions in Germany (N = 450. The directors of official psychiatric training institutions are authorized for residency training by the state medical associations. The responses were not anonymous. Results: The return rate was 25.5% (N = 114. In 71.7% of the training institutions (81 out of 113 valid cases, specific training in transcultural psychiatry occurred only rarely or not at all. 83.3% of the directors of psychiatric training institutions (70 out of 84 valid cases reported a demand for training in transcultural psychiatry in their training institutions; in 94.5% of the cases, the directors of psychiatric training institutions (69 out of 73 valid cases reported a need for transcultural issues as part of the official curriculum of the psychiatric residency program in Germany. The most frequently reported aspects were teaching of general cultural competence and of culture-specific issues in mental disorders. Implications: Cultural aspects currently are not a mandatory part of the official training curriculum of the psychiatric residency training in Germany. With respect to the reported need for training in cultural issues of mental disorders, the implementation of transcultural psychiatry within the official curriculum of the psychiatric residency training in Germany should be discussed. [german] Zielsetzung: Ziel der vorliegenden Studie ist die Erhebung des Status quo der Weiterbildungssituation in transkultureller Psychiatrie für den Facharzt in

  3. Adjusting the Passing Scores for Gearing up for Safety: Production Agriculture Safety Training for Youth Curriculum Test Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, William Brian; French, Brian F.; Field, William E.; Tormoehlen, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    Minimum passing scores for the Gearing Up for Safety: Production Agriculture Safety Training for Youth curriculum (Gearing Up for Safety) were set in 2006 with widely used and established procedures by efforts of subject matter experts (French, Breidenbach et al., 2007; French, Field, and Tormoehlen, 2006, 2007). While providing a research-based…

  4. The White Mountain Apache Child Protection Service Training Curriculum. Nohwii Chaghashe Baa da gontzaa (Protect Our Apache Children).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Santin, Edwin, Comp.

    This curriculum manual provides 8 days of training for child protective services (CPS) personnel (social workers and administrators) working in the White Mountain Apache tribal community. Each of the first seven units in the manual contains a brief description of contents, course objectives, time required, key concepts, possible discussion topics,…

  5. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    he Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20 October 2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2 November 2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans : 18.20 December 2006 (3 days) All the above sessions will be given in English, at the CERN Training Centre....

  6. Incorporating nanoscale science and technology into secondary school curriculum: Views of nano-trained science teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Laherto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing societal significance of nanoscience and nanotechnology (NST entails needs for addressing these topics in school curricula. This study lays groundwork for responding to those needs in Finland. The purpose was to analyse the appropriateness of NST for secondary school curriculum contents. First, a week-long in-service teacher training course was arranged on content knowledge of NST. After attending the course, 23 experienced science teachers were surveyed regarding their views on the educational significance of these issues, and on prospects for including them into the curriculum. A questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. Qualitative content analysis of the responses revealed that the respondents considered NST as desirable contents for secondary school, but arranging instruction is problematic. The teachers emphasised the educational significance of many applications, scientific principles and ethical issues related to NST. The outcomes are discussed with reference to recent studies on teachers’ barriers and educational concerns regarding NST.

  7. Quark Model in the Quantum Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussar, P. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses in detail the totally symmetric three-quark karyonic wave functions. The two-body mesonic states are also discussed. A brief review of the experimental efforts to identify the quark model multiplets is given. (Author/SK)

  8. Quark Model in the Quantum Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussar, P. E.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses in detail the totally symmetric three-quark karyonic wave functions. The two-body mesonic states are also discussed. A brief review of the experimental efforts to identify the quark model multiplets is given. (Author/SK)

  9. Research on artistic gymnastics training guidance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lin; Sun, Xianzhong

    2017-04-01

    Rhythmic gymnastics training guidance model, taking into consideration the features of artistic gymnastics training, is put forward to help gymnasts identify their deficiencies and unskilled technical movements and improve their training effects. The model is built on the foundation of both physical quality indicator model and artistic gymnastics training indicator model. Physical quality indicator model composed of bodily factor, flexibility-strength factor and speed-dexterity factor delivers an objective evaluation with reference to basic sport testing data. Training indicator model, based on physical fitness indicator, helps analyze the technical movements, through which the impact from each bodily factor on technical movements is revealed. AG training guidance model, in further combination with actual training data and in comparison with the data shown in the training indicator model, helps identify the problems in trainings, and thus improve the training effect. These three models when in combined use and in comparison with historical model data can check and verify the improvement in training effect over a certain period of time.

  10. Examining the Effectiveness of a Train-the-Trainer Model: Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    The train-the-trainer (TTT) model, which has also been called pyramidal training, triadic training, and helper model training, focuses on initially training a person or people who, in turn, train other people at their home agency. The TTT model has promise of being both efficient and cost-effective. The TTT model may be especially useful in…

  11. Are future medical oncologists sufficiently trained to communicate about palliative care? The medical oncology curriculum in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlait, M; Van Belle, S; Leys, M

    2017-10-01

    Palliative care is considered an integral part of oncology and communicating this with patients is an unavoidable task for oncologists. This contribution investigated to what extent communication skills for communicating palliative care with patients are trained in the formal academic training program in medical oncology in Flanders, Belgium. The programme is based on the recommendations for a Global Core Curriculum in Medical Oncology, developed by The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) together with the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO). For this qualitative study, data were collected using document analysis from the ESMO/ASCO recommendations and the documents of the Flanders' medical oncology programme complemented with interviews with Flemish medical oncology trainees. Few recommendations for training communication skills to communicate about palliative care were found in the ASMO/ASCO recommendations and even less in the Flanders' programme documents. Trainees are mainly exposed to palliative care communication during the clinical practice of their training. Only very few lectures or seminars are devoted to palliative care and even less on communication about palliative care. They reported several barriers to communicate about palliative care. This study revealed promising developments for the training of Flemish medical oncologists to discuss palliative care. However, there is still a need for more theoretical training on palliative care complemented with communication skills trainings. Communication training in general needs to be fully integrated as a core skill within the medical curriculum at large and should be promoted as lifelong learning and competency development.

  12. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits G to L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits G through L. Among the information included in the exhibits is the evaluation reports of the commission on accreditation, the detailed curriculum, and the accredited program's scope, sequence, and course…

  13. Competency-based (CanMEDS) residency training programme in radiology: systematic design procedure, curriculum and success factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jippes, Erik [University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Postgraduate School of Medicine, Wenckebach Institute, Hanzeplein 1, Postbus 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Engelen, Jo M.L. van [University of Groningen, Product Development and Strategy, Faculty Economics and Business, Groningen (Netherlands); Brand, Paul L.P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, UMCG Postgraduate School of Medicine, Hanzeplein 1, Postbus 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Amalia Children' s Clinic, Isala Klinieken Zwolle, Zwolle (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Hanzeplein 1, Postbus 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Based on the CanMEDS framework and the European Training Charter for Clinical Radiology a new radiology curriculum was designed in the Netherlands. Both the development process and the resulting new curriculum are presented in this paper. The new curriculum was developed according to four systematic design principles: discursiveness, hierarchical decomposition, systematic variation and satisficing (satisficing is different from satisfying; in this context, satisficing means searching for an acceptable solution instead of searching for an optimal solution). The new curriculum is organ based with integration of radiological diagnostic techniques, comprises a uniform national common trunk followed by a 2-year subspecialisation, is competency outcome based with appropriate assessment tools and techniques, and is based on regional collaboration among radiology departments. The application of the systematic design principles proved successful in producing a new curriculum approved by all authorities. The principles led to a structured, yet flexible, development process in which creative solutions could be generated and adopters (programme directors, supervisors and residents) were highly involved. Further research is needed to empirically test the components of the new curriculum. (orig.)

  14. Integrating neuroscience in the training of psychiatrists: a patient-centered didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David A; Rohrbaugh, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The authors describe the development and implementation of a new adult psychiatry residency didactic curriculum based on adult learning principles and an integrative, patient-centered approach that includes a progressive 4-year neuroscience curriculum. The authors describe the process of conducting a needs assessment, engaging stakeholders and developing guiding principles for the new curriculum. The curriculum was evaluated using qualitative measures, a resident survey, course evaluations, and a pilot version of a specialized assessment tool. Feedback from the resident survey and from course evaluations was positive, and residents indicated interest in receiving additional training in neuroscience. Residents self-reported not incorporating neuroscience into formulation and treatment planning as often as other perspectives. They also reported that neuroscience was reinforced less by clinical faculty than other perspectives. Performance on the curriculum assessment corroborated that clinical application of neuroscience may benefit from additional reinforcement. Residents responded well to the design and content of the new didactic curriculum. The neuroscience component appears to have achieved its primary objective of enhancing attitudes to the field. Continued work including enhancing the culture of neuroscience at the clinical sites may be required to achieve broader behavioral goals.

  15. One or two trainees per workplace in a structured multimodality training curriculum for laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Jede, Felix; Minassian, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    different approaches for optimal training outcome. However, no standards currently exist for the number of trainees assigned per workplace. Methods. This is a monocentric, open, three-arm randomized controlled trial. The participants are laparoscopically-naive medical students from Heidelberg University...... individual factors that might exert influence on training outcome. Discussion. This study aims to assess whether workplaces in laparoscopy training courses for beginners should be used by one trainee or two trainees simultaneously, by measuring the impact on operative performance and learning curves....... Possible factors of influence, such as the role of observing the training partner, exchange of thoughts, active reflection, model learning, motivation, pauses, and sympathy will be explored in the data analysis. This study will help optimize the efficiency of laparoscopy training courses. Trial...

  16. Molecular pathology curriculum for medical laboratory scientists: A report of the association for molecular pathology training and education committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sara; Bennett, Katie M; Deignan, Joshua L; Hendrix, Ericka C; Orton, Susan M; Verma, Shalini; Schutzbank, Ted E

    2014-05-01

    Molecular diagnostics is a rapidly growing specialty in the clinical laboratory assessment of pathology. Educational programs in medical laboratory science and specialized programs in molecular diagnostics must address the training of clinical scientists in molecular diagnostics, but the educational curriculum for this field is not well defined. Moreover, our understanding of underlying genetic contributions to specific diseases and the technologies used in molecular diagnostics laboratories change rapidly, challenging providers of training programs in molecular diagnostics to keep their curriculum current and relevant. In this article, we provide curriculum recommendations to molecular diagnostics training providers at both the baccalaureate and master's level of education. We base our recommendations on several factors. First, we considered National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences guidelines for accreditation of molecular diagnostics programs, because educational programs in clinical laboratory science should obtain its accreditation. Second, the guidelines of several of the best known certifying agencies for clinical laboratory scientists were incorporated into our recommendations. Finally, we relied on feedback from current employers of molecular diagnostics scientists, regarding the skills and knowledge that they believe are essential for clinical scientists who will be performing molecular testing in their laboratories. We have compiled these data into recommendations for a molecular diagnostics curriculum at both the baccalaureate and master's level of education. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals, and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programs in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training program. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists.

  18. COMPETENCY ICT IN INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING:DESCRIPTIVE STUDY FOR DECISION-MAKING IN THE CURRICULUM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sandoval Rubilar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of a research study, which was carried out in a regional public state university from southern Chile, in order to find out knowledge and use of ICT that Initial Teacher Training Program students have. Specifically, the study intends to look for answers related to computer literacy, type of access and use of ICT and, at the same time, promotes reflection on how the curriculum should prepare future teachers in order to guarantee learning and competencies in this area. Using a transversal descriptive quantitative methodology, a validated questionnaire (Cronbach Alpha 0.89 was answered by a sample of 150 students belonging to cohort 2009. We conclude that teacher training students have an easy access to ICT resources and, therefore, they are native subjects who show a high computer literacy degree. However, they do not use specific programs related to education nor do they know how they can take advantage of that ICT knowledge in the teaching learning process within the classroom in their future professional career.

  19. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October 2006-March 2007)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the Oracle, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, currently scheduled until March 2007: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 October - 1 November 2006 (3 days) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) Oracle Database Server Administration: 23-29 November 2007 (5 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 18-20 December 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 15-16 January 2007 (2 days) C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (St...

  20. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (August-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: PERL 5 - Introduction: 31.8-1.9.2006 (2 days) C++ for Particle Physicists: 16-20.10.2006 (6 half days, the popular course given by Paul Kunz) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19.10.2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20.10.2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30.10-1.11.2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2.11.2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16.11.2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7.12.2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15.12.2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBea...

  1. Bases Para Organizar Capacitacion en Servicio de Profesionales en Curriculum (Bases for Organizing In-Service Training for Curriculum Specialists).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of curricular issues in the educational undertaking. The curriculum, which in all its definitions contains as a common denominator the organization of educational opportunities that schools provide for their pupils, demands and needs some specific type of professional educators. Such professionals…

  2. A stepwise model for simulation-based curriculum development for clinical skills, a modification of the six-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Nehal N; Satava, Richard M; Alnassar, Sami A; Kern, David E

    2016-01-01

    Despite the rapid growth in the use of simulation in health professions education, courses vary considerably in quality. Many do not integrate efficiently into an overall school/program curriculum or conform to academic accreditation requirements. Moreover, some of the guidelines for simulation design are specialty specific. We designed a model that integrates best practices for effective simulation-based training and a modification of Kern et al.'s 6-step approach for curriculum development. We invited international simulation and health professions education experts to complete a questionnaire evaluating the model. We reviewed comments and suggested modifications from respondents and reached consensus on a revised version of the model. We recruited 17 simulation and education experts. They expressed a consensus on the seven proposed curricular steps: problem identification and general needs assessment, targeted needs assessment, goals and objectives, educational strategies, individual assessment/feedback, program evaluation, and implementation. We received several suggestions for descriptors that applied the steps to simulation, leading to some revisions in the model. We have developed a model that integrates principles of curriculum development and simulation design that is applicable across specialties. Its use could lead to high-quality simulation courses that integrate efficiently into an overall curriculum.

  3. A model for teaching raptor medicine in the veterinary curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degernes, Laurel A; Osborne, Julie A Nettifee

    2006-01-01

    Injured or sick wild avian species, especially raptors (birds of prey, including hawks, owls, falcons, and eagles), can present different challenges to veterinary students and veterinarians who are trained in companion avian medicine (e.g., parrot medicine). Proper capture and restraint, feeding, housing, and certain diagnostic and treatment techniques involving raptors require different skills, knowledge, and resources than working with parrots. We developed an innovative raptor medicine program that enables students to acquire proficiency in safe capture, restraint, and examination techniques and in common diagnostic and treatment procedures. A self-assessment survey was developed to determine students' confidence and proficiency in 10 procedures taught in the lab. Groups were compared by class status (Year 1 vs. Year 2 and 3) and level of prior raptor experience (non-experienced or experienced). In surveys conducted before and after teaching two sets of raptor training labs, students rated themselves significantly more proficient in all 10 diagnostic and treatment procedures after completing the two raptor laboratories. The greatest improvements were observed in technical skill procedures such as fluid administration, intramuscular injections, cloacal swabs, venipuncture, and bandaging. Our approach to incorporating elective wildlife learning experiences into the veterinary curriculum may be replicable in other veterinary schools, with or without a wildlife rehabilitation program.

  4. Training Psychiatry Residents in Quality Improvement: An Integrated, Year-Long Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Weinberg, Michael; Cabaniss, Deborah L.; Kistler; Susan C.; Isaacs, Abby J.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Essock, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe a curriculum for psychiatry residents in Quality Improvement (QI) methodology. Methods: All PGY3 residents (N=12) participated in a QI curriculum that included a year-long group project. Knowledge and attitudes were assessed before and after the curriculum, using a modified Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment…

  5. The Development of a Competency-based Curriculum System in Corporate Training Institutions -with Y Company’s professional training curriculum system for safety management positions as the example%基于岗位胜任能力的企业培训机构课程体系构建--以Y企业安全管理岗位专业培训课程体系为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢景山; 李庆萍

    2014-01-01

    以Y企业安全管理岗位专业培训课程体系为例,分析了基于岗位胜任能力模型的企业培训课程体系的建设路径和方法。Y企业建立了安全管理岗位胜任能力模型,分析了不同层级安全管理人员的知识和技能,通过划分职位层、确认能力要素、提炼典型行为、开发课程、形成课程库、建成课程体系等6个步骤,建立了适合Y企业发展需要的课程体系。%Taking Y Company’s professional training curriculum system for management positions as the example, the paper analyses the ways and methods of developing competency-based training curriculum systems in enterprises. Y Company has developed a competency model for its safety management positions. It made an analysis of the knowledge and skills of different levels of safety managers, and succeeded in building a curriculum system that is appropriate for the company’s development through 6 steps: defining different position levels, identifying competency elements, deifning typical behaviors, developing curriculum, building a curriculum library and ifnally completing the curriculum system.

  6. The Infant Parent Training Institute: A Developmental Model for Training Infant Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, Judith; Epstein, Ann; Sklan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Parent Training Institute (IPTI) at Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Boston offers integrated clinical and theoretical infant mental health training. The curriculum reflects the belief that nurturing and reflective relationships promote optimal learning and growth. A specialty in infant mental health requires knowledge…

  7. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin-Ragaven Laurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28% completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%. Twenty-two respondents (48% implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66 to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation

  8. Humanism and professionalism education for pediatric hematology-oncology fellows: A model for pediatric subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Atlas, Mark; Adams, Denise; Aygun, Banu; Barfield, Ray; Eisenman, Kristen; Fulbright, Joy; Garvey, Katharine; Kersun, Leslie; Nageswara Rao, Amulya; Reilly, Anne; Sharma, Mukta; Shereck, Evan; Wang, Michael; Watt, Tanya; Leavey, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Humanism and professionalism are virtues intrinsic to the practice of medicine, for which we lack a standard, evidence-based approach for teaching and evaluation. Pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) fellowship training brings new and significant stressors, making it an attractive setting for innovation in humanism and professionalism training. We electronically surveyed a national sample of PHO fellows to identify fellows' educational needs in humanism and professionalism. Next, we developed a case-based, faculty-facilitated discussion curriculum to teach this content within pilot fellowship programs. We assessed whether fellowships would decide to offer the curriculum, feasibility of administering the curriculum, and satisfaction of fellow and faculty participants. Surveys were completed by 187 fellows (35%). A minority (29%) reported that their training program offers a formal curriculum in humanism and/or professionalism. A majority desires more formal teaching on balancing clinical practice and research (85%), coping with death/dying (85%), bereavement (78%), balancing work and personal life (75%), navigating challenging relationships with patients (74%), and depression/burn out (71%). These six topics were condensed into four case-based modules, which proved feasible to deliver at all pilot sites. Ten fellowship programs agreed to administer the novel curriculum. The majority (90%) of responding fellows and faculty reported the sessions touched on issues important for training, stimulated reflective communication, and were valuable. Pediatric hematology-oncology fellows identify numerous gaps in their training related to humanism and professionalism. This curriculum offers an opportunity to systematically address these educational needs and can serve as a model for wider implementation. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:335-340. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  10. A proposed monitoring and evaluation curriculum based on a model that institutionalises monitoring and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambidima Wotela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: African politicians, bureaucrats and technocrats have thrown their weight in support of monitoring and evaluation (M&E. This weight has compelled training institutions to add M&E to their offerings. Most often at the end of these training programmes, attendees know what they have learnt but seem not to internalise it and, worse, they hardly ever put their newly acquired knowledge into practice. This allegation has led to what we term ‘monitoring and evaluation training hopping’ where participants move from one training to another hoping that they will eventually fully comprehend the skill and apply it to their work. This rarely happens and as such participants often blame themselves and yet the problem is with the training institutions that are teaching the middle-third tier (how to monitor and evaluate as well as the bottom-third tier (data and information management. However, the top-third tier that links M&E to ‘the what’ and ‘the how’ as well as ‘the why’ in the development intervention and public policy landscape is missing.Objectives: To propose a M&E curriculum that institutionalises M&E within implementation and management of development interventions.Method: We use systems thinking to derive the key themes of our discussion and then apply summative thematic content analysis to interrogate M&E and related literature. Firstly, we present and describe a model that situates M&E within development and public policy. This model ‘idealises or realises’ an institutionalised M&E by systematically linking the contextual as well as key terms prominent in established descriptions of M&E. Secondly, we briefly describe M&E from a systems thinking approach by pointing out its components, processes, established facts, as well as issues and debates. Lastly, we use this model and the systems thinking description of M&E to propose an institutionalised M&E curriculum.Results: Our results show that for an explicit

  11. Towards an Integrated Approach to Cabin Service English Curriculum Design: A Case Study of China Southern Airlines' Cabin Service English Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoqin, Liu; Wenzhong, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    This paper has reviewed the history of EOP (training) development and then illustrated the curriculum design of cabin service English training from the three perspectives of ESP, CLIL and Business Discourse. It takes the cabin crew English training of China Southern Airlines (CZ) as the case and puts forward an operational framework composed of…

  12. A Replicable, Zero-Based Model for Marketing Curriculum Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, Norm; Metcalf, Lynn E.; Tietje, Brian C.

    2007-01-01

    As university curriculums inevitably change, their evolution typically occurs through a series of minor incremental adjustments to individual courses that cause the curriculum to lose strategic consistency and focus. This article demonstrates a zero-based approach to marketing curriculum innovation. The authors describe forces of change that led…

  13. NOTES ON THE APPLICATION OF THE THEORY AND PRAXIS TRAINING CURRICULUM FOR COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE OF PEACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Belandria Cerdeira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to present theoretical considerations on the application of the Theory and Praxis Training Curriculum for Communication and Culture of Peace. The theoretical study is descriptive and documentary. In the first stage were analyzed and discussed theoretical material related to the category of analysis. In a second stage developed a series of notes and reflective-critical comments, which point to consider hybrid forms of theories when designing curricular training in Communication and Culture of Peace. In conclusion, we feel the need to open the Multidisciplinary discussion on the subject, where the curriculum, the humanistic, existential communicational and bring new ways of learning, being, doing, living together, but above all to communicate, in order to take a step to build a communicative culture.

  14. Understanding the curriculum the light of training guiding health in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Bibiana Arantes; Costa, Nilce Maria da Silva

    2016-06-01

    To analyze Pedagogical Projects Courses (PPCs) from the healthcare field in light of the National Curriculum Standards (NCS) policies on healthcare training. Exploratory descriptive study of qualitative approach, in which were carried out analyzes of PPPs of Nursing, Pharmacy, Medicine, Nutrition and Dentistry of a federal university in the Midwest region of Brazil. As technical analysis of documentary sources, adopted the content analysis in the thematic mode. The analysis of PPC showed the general aspects of PPC as the course features the historical percursso and construction, professional skills and competences required for professional performance and the guiding principles of formation characterized by technical, professional practice, articulation theory/ practice, interdisciplinarity and ethical / social training. PPC presented is consistent with the proposals set out in DCN and carry training policies in health in Brazil, providing adequate training for health professionals, the demands of the population and the National Health System. Analisar os Projetos Pedagógicos de Cursos (PPC) da área da saúde à luz das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais (DCN) e das políticas indutoras de formação em saúde do Brasil. Pesquisa descritiva exploratória de abordagem qualitativa, na qual foram realizadas análises dos PPC dos cursos de Enfermagem, Farmácia, Medicina, Nutrição e Odontologia de uma instituição federal de ensino superior da região Centro-Oeste do Brasil. Como técnica de análises das fontes documentais, adotou-se a análise de conteúdo, na modalidade temática. As análises dos PPC evidenciaram os aspectos gerais dos PPC como as características do curso, o percursso histórico e sua construção, habilidades e competências profissionais requeridas para o desempenho profissional e os princípios norteadores da formação caracterizados pela técnica, prática profissional, articulação teoria/prática, interdisciplinaridade e formação

  15. Language Learning Strategies and Its Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes and reviews the literature regarding language learning strategies and it's training model, pointing out the significance of language learning strategies to EFL learners and an applicable and effective language learning strategies training model, which is beneficial both to EFL learners and instructors, is badly needed.

  16. Translation Training in the Jordanian Context: Curriculum Evaluation in Translator Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Anjad

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at drawing a clear picture of translator training in Jordan through the evaluation of translation programs at the Master's level. The framework of the Context, Input, Process, and Product components of the CIPP evaluation model developed by Daniel Stufflebeam in 1971 was used to evaluate the three translation Master's programs at…

  17. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 7: Industrial Maintenance Technology, of a 15-Volume Set of Skill Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    This document is intended to help education and training institutions deliver the Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) curriculum to a variety of individuals and organizations. MAST consists of industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for 15 occupational specialty areas within the U.S. machine tool and metals-related…

  18. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 11: Computer-Aided Manufacturing & Advanced CNC, of a 15-Volume Set of Skill Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    This document is intended to help education and training institutions deliver the Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) curriculum to a variety of individuals and organizations. MAST consists of industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for 15 occupational specialty areas within the U.S. machine tool and metals-related…

  19. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 13: Laser Machining, of a 15-Volume Set of Skill Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    This document is intended to help education and training institutions deliver the Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) curriculum to a variety of individuals and organizations. MAST consists of industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for 15 occupational specialty areas within the U.S. machine tool and metals-related…

  20. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 14: Automated Equipment Technician (CIM), of a 15-Volume Set of Skill Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    This document is intended to help education and training institutions deliver the Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) curriculum to a variety of individuals and organizations. MAST consists of industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for 15 occupational specialty areas within the U.S. machine tool and metals-related…

  1. A general technique to train language models on language models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhof, MJ

    2005-01-01

    We show that under certain conditions, a language model can be trained oil the basis of a second language model. The main instance of the technique trains a finite automaton on the basis of a probabilistic context-free grammar, such that the Kullback-Leibler distance between grammar and trained auto

  2. The curriculum for the teaching of history: between training, the prescribed and the practiced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavo Pereira Soares

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the relations between the curriculum of the initial formation for history teaching and the school curriculum for the teaching of this discipline. It has been assumed that the initial formation have decisive influence in the analyses that the undergraduates and entrants in the mastership makes about the school curriculum, and that such analyses no it restricts unto prescript. Initially, we present our considerations about the trajectory of current curriculum requirements for the teaching of history. After that, we raise data about as the initial formation curriculum is incorporated by undergraduates who act in public schools, and in that measure such formation interferes in the analysis and intervention that they makes in school curriculum. The data presented are tied to pedagogic and didactic interventions executed for undergraduates of the PIBID – Purse Institucional Program of the Introduction to teaching. Its possible verify that the undergraduates in action in the schools get identify how their theoretical formation enables the analyse and the intervention in the curriculum practice of the schools. The analysis of the school curriculum enables a distanced and qualitative reading of the initial formation, it allows the proposition of changes in both curriculum structures.

  3. A model for communication skills assessment across the undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Elizabeth A; Hinrichs, Margaret M; Lown, Beth A

    2006-08-01

    Physicians' interpersonal and communication skills have a significant impact on patient care and correlate with improved healthcare outcomes. Some studies suggest, however, that communication skills decline during the four years of medical school. Regulatory and other medical organizations, recognizing the importance of interpersonal and communication skills in the practice of medicine, now require competence in communication skills. Two challenges exist: to select a framework of interpersonal and communication skills to teach across undergraduate medical education, and to develop and implement a uniform model for the assessment of these skills. The authors describe a process and model for developing and institutionalizing the assessment of communication skills across the undergraduate curriculum. Consensus was built regarding communication skill competencies by working with course leaders and examination directors, a uniform framework of competencies was selected to both teach and assess communication skills, and the framework was implemented across the Harvard Medical School undergraduate curriculum. The authors adapted an assessment framework based on the Bayer-Fetzer Kalamazoo Consensus Statement adapted a patient and added and satisfaction tool to bring patients' perspectives into the assessment of the learners. The core communication competencies and evaluation instruments were implemented in school-wide courses and assessment exercises including the first-year Patient-Doctor I Clinical Assessment, second-year Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE), third-year Patient-Doctor III Clinical Assessment, fourth-year Comprehensive Clinical Practice Examination and the Core Medicine Clerkships. Faculty were offered workshops and interactive web-based teaching to become familiar with the framework, and students used the framework with repeated opportunities for faculty feedback on these skills. A model is offered for educational leaders and others who are involved

  4. Merging curriculum design with chemical epistemology: A case of teaching and learning chemistry through modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel

    The central problem underlying this dissertation is the design of learning environments that enable the teaching and learning of chemistry through modeling. Significant role of models in chemistry knowledge is highlighted with a shift in emphasis from conceptual to epistemological accounts of models. Research context is the design and implementation of student centered Acids & Bases Curriculum, developed as part of Project SEPIA. Qualitative study focused on 3 curriculum activities conducted in one 7th grade class of 19 students in an urban, public middle school in eastern United States. Questions guiding the study were: (a) How can learning environments be designed to promote growth of chemistry knowledge through modeling? (b) What epistemological criteria facilitate learning of growth of chemistry knowledge through modeling? Curriculum materials, and verbal data from whole class conversations and student group interviews were analyzed. Group interviews consisted of same 4 students, selected randomly before curriculum implementation, and were conducted following each activity to investigate students' developing understandings of models. Theoretical categories concerning definition, properties and kinds of models as well as educational and chemical models informed curriculum design, and were redefined as codes in the analysis of verbal data. Results indicate more diversity of codes in student than teacher talk across all activities. Teacher concentrated on educational and chemical models. A significant finding is that model properties such as 'compositionality' and 'projectability' were not present in teacher talk as expected by curriculum design. Students did make reference to model properties. Another finding is that students demonstrate an understanding of models characterized by the seventeenth century Lemery model of acids and bases. Two students' developing understandings of models across curriculum implementation suggest that curriculum bears some change in

  5. Let’s Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra M. Vinci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n=34 and focus group (n=20 interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n=22 informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children.

  6. A Model for the Development of a CDIO Based Curriculum in Electrical Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik; Kjærgaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    at the Technical University of Denmark and this gives a strong direct impact of the university environment on the resulting curriculum in electrical engineering. The resulting Bachelor of Engineering curriculum is presented and it is discussed how it complies with the model for curriculum development. The main...... environment, the university environment, and the teachers and students. Each of them and their influence on the curriculum is described and the sources of information about the influencers are discussed. The CDIO syllabus has been defined as part of the basis for the Bachelor of Engineering programs...

  7. A Better Model for Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobele, H. Kenneth; Buchanan, Peter J.

    1976-01-01

    Greater precision in appraising training needs, greater clarity in defining training objectives, and an emphasis on a practical, skills-oriented approach to management development can result from using Henry Mintzberg's model which describes managerial work in terms of 6 job characteristics and 10 interpersonal, informational, or decisional roles.…

  8. Development of a subspecialty cardiology curriculum for paediatric registrars in Malawi: Implementation of a long-distance hybrid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Laura; Kennedy, Neil; Greene, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Malawi has a high burden of paediatric cardiac disease but a limited number of health providers familiar with these chronic diseases. Given the rising number of Malawian postgraduate paediatric trainees at the University of Malawi College of Medicine, we sought to remedy this lack of basic cardiology training with a long-distance, module-based curriculum that could be utilised independently, as needed, with on-site teaching. We also wished to evaluate the initial modules for utility and improvement in knowledge and confidence in each topic. After an initial site visit to determine curriculum needs, online modules with interactive evaluations and quizzes were developed by a paediatric cardiologist in the United States, in collaboration with paediatric registrar training directors in Malawi. This online interactive curriculum was followed by several site visits to Malawi, by the United States-based paediatric cardiologist, to provide bedside teaching, case-based discussions and hands-on skill training in cardiac ultrasound and electrocardiogram interpretation. Evaluation of the curriculum model included post-module quizzes on cardiac topics as well as registrar self-assessments regarding confidence in content areas. The average post-module quiz score was 93.6%. Repeat testing with the same questions four months later yielded an average score of 78%, with a range from 60 to 100%. Pre- and post-module registrar self-assessment regarding confidence in content areas showed a substantial gain in knowledge and confidence mean. In their qualitative feedback, registrars noted that the modules were helpful in studying for their certifying examinations, and all four of the registrars sitting Part I of their Malawian and South African paediatric certifying examinations passed. Our innovative hybrid approach, combining online educational modules with in-person teaching visits, is a useful approach in expanding paediatric cardiology subspecialty education in Malawi.

  9. One or two trainees per workplace in a structured multimodality training curriculum for laparoscopic surgery? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial - DRKS00004675.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Felix; Jede, Felix; Minassian, Andreas; Gondan, Matthias; Hendrie, Jonathan D; Gehrig, Tobias; Linke, Georg R; Kadmon, Martina; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat P

    2014-04-23

    Laparoscopy training courses have been established in many centers worldwide to ensure adequate skill learning before performing operations on patients. Different training modalities and their combinations have been compared regarding training effects. Multimodality training combines different approaches for optimal training outcome. However, no standards currently exist for the number of trainees assigned per workplace. This is a monocentric, open, three-arm randomized controlled trial. The participants are laparoscopically-naive medical students from Heidelberg University. After a standardized introduction to laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) with online learning modules, the participants perform a baseline test for basic skills and LC performance on a virtual reality (VR) trainer. A total of 100 students will be randomized into three study arms, in a 2:2:1 ratio. The intervention groups participate individually (Group 1) or in pairs (Group 2) in a standardized and structured multimodality training curriculum. Basic skills are trained on the box and VR trainers. Procedural skills and LC modules are trained on the VR trainer. The control group (Group C) does not receive training between tests. A post-test is performed to reassess basic skills and LC performance on the VR trainer. The performance of a cadaveric porcine LC is then measured as the primary outcome using standardized and validated ratings by blinded experts with the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills. The Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Surgical skills score and the time taken for completion are used as secondary outcome measures as well as the improvement of skills and VR LC performance between baseline and post-test. Cognitive tests and questionnaires are used to identify individual factors that might exert influence on training outcome. This study aims to assess whether workplaces in laparoscopy training courses for beginners should be used by one trainee or two trainees

  10. Arctic Climate Connections Curriculum: A Model for Bringing Authentic Data into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Anne U.; Kirk, Karin; Morrison, Deb; Lynds, Susan; Sullivan, Susan Buhr; Grachev, Andrey; Persson, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Science education can build a bridge between research carried out by scientists and relevant learning opportunities for students. The Broader Impact requirements for scientists by funding agencies facilitate this connection. We propose and test a model curriculum development process in which scientists, curriculum developers, and classroom…

  11. Empirical Test of the Know, See, Plan, Do Model for Curriculum Design in Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Beth Ann; Allen, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    This research assesses the Know, See, Plan, portions of the Know, See, Plan, Do (KSPD) model for curriculum design in leadership education. There were 3 graduate student groups, each taught using 1 of 3 different curriculum designs (KSPD and 2 control groups). Based on a pretest, post-test design, students' performance was measured to assess their…

  12. Towards a Multi-Stakeholder-Driven Model for Excellence in Higher Education Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. H.; Bushney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stakeholder-driven model for excellence in higher education curriculum development has been developed. It is based on the assumption that current efforts to curriculum development take place within a framework of limited stakeholder consultation. A total of 18 multiple stakeholders are identified, including learners, alumni, government,…

  13. Towards a Multi-Stakeholder-Driven Model for Excellence in Higher Education Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. H.; Bushney, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stakeholder-driven model for excellence in higher education curriculum development has been developed. It is based on the assumption that current efforts to curriculum development take place within a framework of limited stakeholder consultation. A total of 18 multiple stakeholders are identified, including learners, alumni, government,…

  14. A project-centered undergraduate geoscience curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, P.; Brown, L.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Superior State University, a comprehensive rural public university with approximately 10% Native-Americans enrolled, located in Michigan's eastern Upper Peninsula, U.S.A., has redesigned it's undergraduate geology major by developing an entire curriculum around a project-centered integration of geoscience sub-disciplines. Our model, adapted from modern educational theory, advocates sub-discipline integration by implementing problem-based learning through coursework that develops students' intellectual skills and engages them in using complex reasoning in real-world contexts. Students in this new curriculum will actively discover how to learn about a new geologic province, what questions to ask in approaching problems, where and how to find answers, and how to apply knowledge to solving problems. To accomplish our goals, we redesigned our pedagogy for all courses by creating active learning environments including cooperative learning, jigsaw methodologies, debates, investigation oriented laboratories, use of case studies, writing and communication intensive exercises, and research experiences. Fundamental sub-discipline concepts were identified by our national survey and are presented in the context of sequentially ordered problems that reflect increasing geological complexity. All courses above first year incorporate significant field experience. Our lower division courses include a two semester sequence of physical and historical geology in which physical processes are discussed in the context of their historical extension and one semester of structure/tectonics and mineralogy/petrology. The lower division culminates with a three week introductory field geology course. Our upper division courses include hydrologic systems, environmental systems, geochemical systems, tectonic systems, geophysical systems, clastic systems, carbonate systems, two seminar courses, and advanced field geology. The two field courses, offered in different geologic provinces, provide

  15. A training model for laparoscopic urethrovesical anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun; Lin, Tianxin; Zhang, Caixia; Guo, Zhenghui; Xu, Kewei; Dong, Wen; Han, Jinli; Huang, Hai; Yin, Xinbao; Huang, Jian

    2008-07-01

    To create and evaluate the effectiveness of an in vitro training model for laparoscopic urethrovesical anastomosis. Chicken posterior trunks and porcine colons were used to construct the training model, which was later compared with the chicken skin model. The posterior trunk of a chicken was used to simulate a human pelvis, and a 3-mm cloacal stump was used to simulate a human urethral stump. A 15-cm segment of porcine colon with a 1-cm orifice was used to simulate a human bladder or neobladder. An imitation urethrovesical anastomosis was performed with laparoscopic instruments in a laparoscopic training box. The simulated urethral stump and bladder neck were anastomosed with six interrupted stitches. Forty urologic residents were randomized into two groups. The residents in group A (n = 20) practiced using this model for 8 hours, while those in group B (n = 20) practiced using the chicken skin model for 8 hours. The residents' skills were assessed using the porcine model before and after training. All residents accomplished the training course and both assessments. There was no significant difference between the groups in anastomosis time (122.65 +/- 19.98 minutes v 120.70 +/- 17.30 minutes, P > 0.05) and quality (3.80 +/- 1.24 v 3.75 +/- 1.16, P > 0.05) before training. After the training sessions, both groups improved in anastomosis time and quality. Compared with residents in group B, residents in group A required less time (63.55 +/- 11.08 minutes v 76.55 +/- 12.46 minutes, P model more accurately resembles the structure and characteristic of the human pelvis, urethral stump, and bladder (neobladder). In addition, all the materials needed for this model are inexpensive and easily obtained. Therefore, it is an effective, convenient training model for laparoscopic urethrovesical anastomosis.

  16. A novel flight surgeon training model at a joint military and civilian surgical residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoucy, Erik S; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Galante, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Graduating military preliminary interns are often required to fill flight surgeon billets. General surgery preliminary interns get experience evaluating surgical and trauma patients, but receive very little training in primary care and flight medicine. At a joint military and civilian training program, we developed a supplemental curriculum to help transition our interns into flight medicine. From 2013 to 2016, we developed a lecture series focused on aerospace medicine, primary care, and specialty topics including dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and women's health. During the 2016 iteration attended by 10 interns, pre- and post-participation 10-item Likert scale surveys were administered. Questions focused on perceived preparedness for primary care role and overall enthusiasm for flight medicine. Open-ended surveys from 2013 to 2016 were also used to gauge the effect of the curriculum. The composite number of agreement responses (indicating increased comfort with presented material) increased 63% after course completion. Disagreement responses and neutral responses decreased 78% and 30%, respectively. Open-ended surveys from 14 participants showed an overall positive impression of the curriculum with all indicating it aided their transition to flight medicine. Survey responses indicate an overall perceived benefit from participation in the curriculum with more confidence in primary care topics and improved transition to a flight medicine tour. This model for supplemental aerospace medicine and primary care didactics should be integrated into any residency program responsible for training military preliminary interns who may serve as flight surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit was designed to help engineering educators develop and teach energy management courses. Montana State University and Oklahoma State University courses are embodied in the model curriculum given. The curricula offered at many other universities throughout the United States are also presented. The kit was designed specifically to train engineering students to be good energy managers. Courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level are presented.

  18. Modelling of Train Noise in Underground Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J.

    1996-08-01

    TNS, a computer model for predicting the temporal and spatial distribution of train noise in underground stations, is developed. The train is regarded as a series of sections, and the train noise distribution in a station is calculated by inputting the sound attenuation from a train section source in the underground system (i.e., the station and tunnel). This input can be obtained by physical scale modelling. The prediction by TNS in an underground station in London shows good agreement with site measurements. A series of computations in the station demonstrates that: (1) the overall level of the train noise in the area near the end walls is slightly less than the other areas; (2) some conventional architectural acoustic treatments in the station are effective when a train is still in the tunnel but not as helpful when the train is already in the station; and (3) train noise has a significant effect on the speech intelligibility of public address systems as measured by the Speech Transmission Index (STI).

  19. Training models in laparoscopy: a systematic review comparing their effectiveness in learning surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, W; Van De Putte, D; Van Renterghem, K; Van Nieuwenhove, Y; Ceelen, W; Pattyn, P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients in the operating room, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review. We searched Pubmed, CENTRAL, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials and randomised cross-over studies comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included. The reference list of identified trials was searched for further relevant studies. Fifty-eight trials evaluating several training forms and involving 1591 participants were included (four studies with a low risk of bias). Training (virtual reality (VR) or video trainer (VT)) versus no training improves surgical skills in the majority of trials. Both VR and VT are as effective in most studies. VR training is superior to traditional laparoscopic training in the operating room. Outcome results for VR robotic simulations versus robot training show no clear difference in effectiveness for either model. Only one trial included human cadavers and observed better results versus VR for one out of four scores. Contrasting results are observed when robotic technology is compared with manual laparoscopy. VR training and VT training are valid teaching models. Practicing on these models similarly improves surgical skills. A combination of both methods is recommended in a surgical curriculum. VR training is superior to unstructured traditional training in the operating room. The reciprocal effectiveness of the other models to learn surgical skills has not yet been established.

  20. Reforming the 4th-Year Curriculum as a Springboard to Graduate Medical Training: One School's Experiences and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackett, Andrew; Daroowalla, Feroza; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Chandran, Latha

    2016-01-01

    Concerns regarding the quality of training in the 4th year of medical school and preparation of graduates to enter residency education persist and are borne out in the literature. We reviewed the published literature regarding Year 4 concerns as well as institutional efforts to improve the 4th-year curriculum from several schools. Based on input from key stakeholders, we established 4 goals for our Year 4 curriculum reform: (a) standardize the curricular structure, (b) allow flexibility and individualization, (c) improve the preparation for residency, and (d) improve student satisfaction. After the reform, we evaluated the outcomes using results from the Association of American Medical Colleges Questionnaire, student focus groups, and program director surveys. This article describes the context, process, and outcomes of the reform of the Year 4 curriculum at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. We were able to achieve all four stated goals for the reform. The significant components of the change included a flexible adaptable curriculum based on individual needs and preferences, standardized learning objectives across the year, standardized competency-based evaluations regardless of discipline, reinforcement of clinical skills, and training for the transition to the workplace as an intern. The reform resulted in increased student satisfaction, increased elective time, and increased preparedness for residency training as perceived by the graduates. The Program Director survey showed significant changes in ability to perform a medical history and exam, management of common medical conditions and emergencies, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills, working and communication with the healthcare team, and overall professionalism in meeting obligations inherent in the practice of medicine. Lessons learned from our 4th-year reform process are discussed. Listening to the needs of the stakeholders was an important step in ensuring buy-in, having an institutional

  1. Designing a Curriculum Model for the Teaching of the Bible in UK Jewish Secondary Schools: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Eli

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process of designing a curriculum model for Bible teaching in UK Jewish secondary schools. This model was designed over the period 2008-2010 by a team of curriculum specialists from the Jewish Curriculum Partnership UK in collaboration with a group of teachers from Jewish secondary schools. The paper first outlines the…

  2. Risk communication as a core public health competence in infectious disease management: Development of the ECDC training curriculum and programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Petra; Abraham, Thomas; Sarkar, Satyajit; Wysocki, Piotr; Cecconi, Sabrina; Apfel, Franklin; Nurm, Ülla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication has been identified as a core competence for guiding public health responses to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (2005) call for all countries to build capacity and a comprehensive understanding of health risks before a public health emergency to allow systematic and coherent communication, response and management. Research studies indicate that while outbreak and crisis communication concepts and tools have long been on the agenda of public health officials, there is still a need to clarify and integrate risk communication concepts into more standardised practices and improve risk communication and health, particularly among disadvantaged populations. To address these challenges, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) convened a group of risk communication experts to review and integrate existing approaches and emerging concepts in the development of a training curriculum. This curriculum articulates a new approach in risk communication moving beyond information conveyance to knowledge- and relationship-building. In a pilot training this approach was reflected both in the topics addressed and in the methods applied. This article introduces the new conceptual approach to risk communication capacity building that emerged from this process, presents the pilot training approach developed, and shares the results of the course evaluation.

  3. Curriculum information models in health professions education in Australia: an innovative approach to efficient curriculum design, development, and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in attention to the overall accountability of higher education in Australia, and this is expected to continue. Increased accountability has led to the need for more explicitly documented curricula. The curricula from ten health-related disciplines developed over the last five years in Australia were the basis of this study. Curriculum information modeling is an approach that allows for the dynamic nature of curricula since elements and their linkages can be moved about and reconnected into meaningful patterns. In addition, the models give disciplines and institutions the ability to effectively monitor curricula and draw comparisons in a more unified manner. Curriculum information models are an efficient innovation in the design and management of curricula in higher education and particularly in the health care disciplines. They rest on the principles of reusable elements and linkages independent of content that were first used in the design, construction, and maintenance of buildings. The translation of this approach to the higher education sector provides a higher level of interoperability of resources and a clearer pathway for content design within a curriculum.

  4. Developing a Process Model for Student Reformation of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Ettore P.; Garrett, Philip R.

    This paper presents a working framework for a controlled change of instructional practices within a community college. A methodology for the training of students and faculty in the evaluation of curriculum and instruction is presented: (1) establish a positive rationale for evaluation within a context of meaningful philosophy; (2) determine a…

  5. Efficacy of a Standardized Computer-Based Training Curriculum to Teach Echocardiographic Identification of Rheumatic Heart Disease to Nonexpert Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Andrea; Nascimento, Bruno R; Diamantino, Adriana C; Pereira, Gabriel T R; Lopes, Eduardo L V; Miri, Cassio O; Bruno, Kaciane K O; Chequer, Graziela; Ferreira, Camila G; Lafeta, Luciana C X; Richards, Hedda; Perlman, Lindsay; Webb, Catherine L; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Sable, Craig; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P

    2016-06-01

    The ability to integrate echocardiographic for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) into RHD prevention programs is limited because of lack of financial and expert human resources in endemic areas. Task shifting to nonexperts is promising; but investigations into workforce composition and training schemes are needed. The objective of this study was to test nonexperts' ability to interpret RHD screening echocardiograms after a brief, standardized, computer-based training course. Six nonexperts completed a 3-week curriculum on image interpretation. Participant performance was tested in a school-screening environment in comparison to the reference approach (cardiologists, standard portable echocardiography machines, and 2012 World Heart Federation criteria). All participants successfully completed the curriculum, and feedback was universally positive. Screening was performed in 1,381 children (5 to 18 years, 60% female), with 397 (47 borderline RHD, 6 definite RHD, 336 normal, and 8 other) referred for handheld echo. Overall sensitivity of the simplified approach was 83% (95% CI 76% to 89%), with an overall specificity of 85% (95% CI 82% to 87%). The most common reasons for false-negative screens (n = 16) were missed mitral regurgitation (MR; 44%) and MR ≤1.5 cm (29%). The most common reasons for false-positive screens (n = 179) included identification of erroneous color jets (25%), incorrect MR measurement (24%), and appropriate application of simplified guidelines (39.4%). In conclusion, a short, independent computer-based curriculum can be successfully used to train a heterogeneous group of nonexperts to interpret RHD screening echocardiograms. This approach helps address prohibitive financial and workforce barriers to widespread RHD screening.

  6. MODEL OF TRAINING OF SUCCESS IN LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Александровна Лежнева

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the importance of the development of motive to succeed in adolescence. It is determined the value of the motive to achieve success in the further development of the teenager: a motive to achieve effective internal forces mobilized for the implementation of successful operation ensures the active involvement of teenagers in social and interpersonal relationships. As the primary means of motive development success is considered training. The author provides a definition of "training for success in life," creates a model of training for success in life, and describes its units (targeted, informative, technological, productive, reveals the successful development of the technology life strategy used during the training (self-presentation, targets, incentives, subject-orientation. The author pays attention to the need for a future psychologist to develop teenagers’ motive to achieve success through the mastery of competence in constructing a model of training for success in life, and its implementation in the course of professional activities. The main means of training students of psychology to the use of training success in life identified the additional educational programs and psychological section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-9-77

  7. A Model for Technovocational School-Based Curriculum Planning and Evaluation under the Framework of Total Quality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yen-Zen

    In the current climate of rapid technological advance and social value change, many have suggested that schools should use a school-based approach to curriculum planning. How to design such a curriculum in order to train graduates suited for employment has become an important issue. Many domestic and international enterprises have successfully…

  8. Evaluation of a computer-guided curriculum using animation, visual images, and voice cues to train patients for peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Judith; Davis, Diane J

    2014-01-01

    Training patients to perform peritoneal dialysis (PD) at home is key to good patient outcomes. Currently, no validated curriculum based on education concepts is available in the public domain, and training is not standardized. Few nurses are prepared to be effective trainers. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of PD training using a new cycler designed with animation, visual images, and voice cues and provided by a qualified PD nurse with a standardized script to guide the trainer. ♢ The study recruited 40 participants, including individuals naive to dialysis and current automated PD (APD) patients. Participants with visual, hearing, or touch impairments were purposely included to reflect the disabilities common to the general APD population. The participants encompassed a range of self-reported computer and technical experience and education levels. Experienced training nurses trained each participant, one on one, for 4 - 8 hours during a single day; the nurses followed the standardized script as the participants progressed through the cycler training curriculum. The pace of training was adjusted to meet individual abilities and needs. Participants were evaluated by the training nurse at the end of the training session for their proficiency in meeting the learning objectives. ♢ All 40 participants completed the 1-day training and successfully met all task objectives by the end of the day. Participant ages ranged from 23 to 73 years (mean: 53.8 ± 11 years), with the women (50 ± 12 years) being significantly younger than the men (57 ± 9 years, p = 0.05). Among the participants, 90% had visual impairments; 40%, hearing impairments; and 45%, touch impairments. Twenty-nine participants (73%) had multiple impairments. Median training time was 7 ± 0.13 hours, with a range of 5 - 8.25 hours. We found no correlation between the number of hours needed for successful training and age (r = 0.30). Training time did not differ

  9. Models of innovative corporate training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning

    2000-01-01

    and change is particularly evident in various sectors of economic activity where there is a need for improving environmental considerations in the future while at the same time remaining competitive. Some, notably large, enterprises in the manufacturing industry realised their environmental responsibility...... new practises that will put less pressure on the environment while at the same time earning money will require innovative approaches, which in turn will translate into new and/or further developed competencies and skills to ensure a successful implementation of such activities. The role of education......Education and training is generally recognised as one the most critical elements during major changes and/or transitions in corporations. Addressing the question of how to respond to the challenges of implementing environmentally more sustainable practises in industry is no exception. Implementing...

  10. Job Aiding/Training Decision Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    I[ -, . 1’, oo Ii AL-CR-i1992-0004 AD-A256 947lEE = IIEI ifl ll 1l I JOB AIDING/TRAINING DECISION PROCESS MODEL A R M John P. Zenyuh DTIC S Phillip C...March 1990 - April 1990 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS C - F33615-86-C-0545 Job Aiding/Training Decision Process Model PE - 62205F PR - 1121 6...Components to Process Model Decision and Selection Points ........... 32 13. Summary of Subject Recommendations for Aiding Approaches

  11. Training evaluation models: Theory and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone, V.; MORVILLO, A

    2002-01-01

    This chapter has the following aims: 1. Compare the various conceptual models for evaluation, identifying their strengths and weaknesses; 2. Define an evaluation model consistent with the aims and constraints of the fit project; 3. Describe, in critical fashion, operative tools for evaluating training which are reliable, flexible and analytical.

  12. Development of a disaster preparedness curriculum for medical students: a pilot study of incorporating local events into training opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Katherine A; Bachmann, Daniel J; Greer, Marek; Way, David P; Kman, Nicholas E

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary disasters, like the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa, have piqued the interest of medical students in disaster preparedness. The topic is also a requirement of undergraduate medical education.(1) Yet current literature suggests that disaster preparedness education is lacking. Our objective was to pilot a curriculum to augment medical students' disaster preparedness education by marshalling local resources to provide practical hands-on experiences. This pilot curriculum consisted of lectures; simulations; asynchronous learning materials; a large-scale, regional disaster exercise; and preparation for and participation in a real-time mass gathering. Outcomes were measured by student performance on written tests and evaluations of each activity. Academic Health Center with associated medical school. Fifty-two medical students participated in at least one of the six activities during this voluntary pilot program. Premedical students and residents (n=57) participated in some activities. Forty-one medical students took either the pretest or the post-test over the curriculum. Only eight students took both. A paired t test comparing pretest to post-test scores using imputed missing data (t=-11.72, df=40, p≤0.001) was consistent with an analysis using only complete data (t=-2.35, df=7, p=0.05), implying that student scores improved significantly over time. Evaluations indicated a student preference for hands-on over didactic or independent learning activities. This pilot curriculum was designed to capitalize on practical hands-on training opportunities for our medical students, including participation in a disaster exercise and a mass-gathering event. These opportunities provided effective and engaging disaster preparedness education.

  13. A Sustainable Model for Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such…

  14. A Sustainable Model for Training Teachers to Use Pivotal Response Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such…

  15. Simulator-based Transesophageal Echocardiographic Training with Motion Analysis A Curriculum-based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matyal, Robina; Mitchell, John D.; Hess, Philip E.; Chaudary, Bilal; Bose, Ruma; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Wong, Vanessa; Mahmood, Feroze

    Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a complex endeavor involving both motor and cognitive skills. Current training requires extended time in the clinical setting. Application of an integrated approach for TEE training including simulation could facilitate acquisition of skills and

  16. Simulator-based Transesophageal Echocardiographic Training with Motion Analysis A Curriculum-based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matyal, Robina; Mitchell, John D.; Hess, Philip E.; Chaudary, Bilal; Bose, Ruma; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Wong, Vanessa; Mahmood, Feroze

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a complex endeavor involving both motor and cognitive skills. Current training requires extended time in the clinical setting. Application of an integrated approach for TEE training including simulation could facilitate acquisition of skills and

  17. 77 FR 38655 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement: Training Curriculum Development for Probation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ...-based instructional delivery strategies, and be based on NIC's Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP.... The curriculum should promote the use of evidence-based practices in planning and implementation... agency leadership, motivation, communication, decision-making, strategic planning, and managing daily...

  18. Mechanical Engineering at RWTH Aachen University: Professional Curriculum Development and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Klaus; Bornefeld, Gero; Brall, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    This paper offers a multi-perspective view on engineering education at RWTH Aachen University: curriculum design, examples of newly developed teaching methods for engineering curricula, and teaching competencies and teacher qualification. It is based on the theories of student-centred learning, project learning, social skills, etc., but the paper…

  19. Environmental Education in Serbian Primary Schools: Challenges and Changes in Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišic, Jelena; Maksic, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    The protection of human health and the preservation of the environment are topics that form an integral part of the primary school curriculum in Serbia. However, research studies have shown that students do not have enough knowledge to contribute to the development of a healthy lifestyle and environmental awareness. The latest changes in school…

  20. The Impact of a Course on Bullying within the Pre-Service Teacher Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Juan Luis; Garcia-Berben, Ana; Fernandez-Cabezas, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Although bullying is a phenomenon which directly affects teachers, they receive little preparation in how to handle it. One way to correct this situation is to include specific content about bullying within their initial university curriculum. We present a study that shows how a specific course on bullying affects trainee teachers'…

  1. Mechanical Engineering at RWTH Aachen University: Professional Curriculum Development and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Klaus; Bornefeld, Gero; Brall, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    This paper offers a multi-perspective view on engineering education at RWTH Aachen University: curriculum design, examples of newly developed teaching methods for engineering curricula, and teaching competencies and teacher qualification. It is based on the theories of student-centred learning, project learning, social skills, etc., but the paper…

  2. Environmental Education in Serbian Primary Schools: Challenges and Changes in Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanišic, Jelena; Maksic, Slavica

    2014-01-01

    The protection of human health and the preservation of the environment are topics that form an integral part of the primary school curriculum in Serbia. However, research studies have shown that students do not have enough knowledge to contribute to the development of a healthy lifestyle and environmental awareness. The latest changes in school…

  3. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  4. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  5. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevin, Lotte; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2008-01-01

    Laparoscopic box model trainers have been used in training curricula for a long time, however data on their impact on skills acquisition is still limited. Our aim was to validate a low cost box model trainer as a tool for the training of skills relevant to laparoscopic surgery. Randomised, controlled trial (Canadian Task Force Classification I). University Hospital. Sixteen gynaecologic residents with limited laparoscopic experience were randomised to a group that received a structured box model training curriculum, and a control group. Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using the VR system. Trainees who used the box model trainer showed significant improvement compared to the control group. Box model trainers are valid tools for laparoscopic skills training and should be implemented in the comprehensive training curricula in gynaecology.

  6. A model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Philip James

    This dissertation focused on the development of a model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in the State of Florida. The curriculum was developed using grounded theory research method, including a component of data collected from an on-line survey administered to 106 professional educators and marine biologists. The results of the data collection and analysis showed a definitive necessity for teacher preparedness, multidisciplinary content, and inquiry-based science instruction. Further, three important factors emerged: (a) collaborative grouping increases achievement; (b) field excursions significantly impact student motivation; (c) standardized testing influences curriculum development. The curriculum is organized as an 11-day unit, with detailed lesson plans presented in standard curricular format and with all components correlated to the Florida State Educational Standards. The curriculum incorporates teacher preparation, multimedia presentations, computer-assisted instruction, scientific art appreciation, and replication as well as assessment factors. The curriculum addresses topics of ichthyology, marine animal identification, environmental conservation and protection, marine animal anatomy, water safety, environmental stewardship, and responsible angling techniques. The components of the curriculum were discussed with reference to the literature on which it was based and recommendations for future research were addressed.

  7. Sialendoscopy Training: Presentation of a Realistic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoto, Gabriela Robaskewicz; Stamm, Aldo Cassol; Lyra, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several surgical training simulators have been created for residents and young surgeons to gain experience with surgical procedures. Laboratory training is fundamental for acquiring familiarity with the techniques of surgery and skill in handing instruments. Objective The aim of this study is to present a novel simulator for training sialendoscopy. Method This realistic simulator was built with a synthetic thermo-retractile, thermo-sensible rubber which, when combined with different polymers, produces more than 30 different formulas. These formulas present textures, consistencies, and mechanical resistance are similar to many human tissues. Results The authors present a training model to practice sialendoscopy. All aspects of the procedure are simulated: month opening, dilatation of papillae, insert of the scope, visualization of stones, extraction of these stones with grasping or baskets, and finally, stone fragmentation with holmium laser. Conclusion This anatomical model for sialendoscopy training should be considerably useful to abbreviate the learning curve during the qualification of young surgeons while minimizing the consequences of technical errors.

  8. Development of a Human Behavior and Performance Training Curriculum for ISS Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderArk, Steve; Tomi, Leena; Vassin, Alexander; Inoue, Natsuhiko; Bessone, Lorendana; OConnor, Sharon; Mukai, Chiaki; Coffee, Emily; Sipes, Walter; Salnitskiy, Vyecheslav; Ren, Victor; Spychalski, Annette

    2007-01-01

    The paper will describe the DACUM process and summarize the core competencies that were agreed upon, internationally, as important for ISS astronauts. The paper will further discuss the ongoing work being completed by the subgroup, Human Behaviour and Performance Training Working Group, including defining the competencies and behavioural markers. Finally, an overview of remaining work will be provided, including determining which competencies require formal training and which require no formal training, developing training objectives, sequencing the training, and establishing how to assess training effectiveness. DISCUSSION: Designing a common set of goals for behavioural training has been the desire of the SHBP WG since its inception in 1998. This group, along with training specialists and astronauts, are making great strides toward defining these competencies. The road ahead will be exceedingly challenging as training objectives are defined and a training flow is proposed to the MCOP; with proposed ISS crews increasing to six people in the near future, such enhanced behavioural training may be all the more essential for mission success.

  9. Exemplary Training Models in Industrial Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Michael J., Comp.

    Prepared by Canadian, Chinese Taipei, and Thai educational agencies and based on surveys of Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation member nations, this report provides descriptions of 52 exemplary industrial technology training models in Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, the Philippines, the People's Republic…

  10. Improved discriminative training for generative model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ya-hui; GUO Jun; LIU Gang

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a model combination method to enhance the discriminability of the generative model. Generative and discriminative models have different optimization objectives and have their own advantages and drawbacks. The method proposed in this article intends to strike a balance between the two models mentioned above. It extracts the discriminative parameter from the generative model and generates a new model based on a multi-model combination. The weight for combining is determined by the ratio of the inter-variance to the intra-variance of the classes. The higher the ratio is, the greater the weight is, and the more discriminative the model will be. Experiments on speech recognition demonstrate that the performance of the new model outperforms the model trained with the traditional generative method.

  11. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Education Area, we renewed the programme, content and methodology, teaching the course under the name of "Initial Teacher Training Course within the framework of the European Higher Education Area". Continuous Training means learning throughout one's life as an Engineering teacher. They are actions designed to update and improve teaching staff, and are systematically offered on the current issues of: Teaching Strategies, training for research, training for personal development, classroom innovations, etc. They are activities aimed at conceptual change, changing the way of teaching and bringing teaching staff up-to-date. At the same time, the Institution is at the disposal of all teaching staff as a meeting point to discuss issues in common, attend conferences, department meetings, etc. In this Congress we present a justification of both training models and their design together with some results obtained on: training needs, participation, how it is developing and to what extent students are profiting from it.

  12. PLA-Based Curriculum: Humanistic Model of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova-Gonci, Viktoria; Tobol, Amy Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The authors believe that there is no inherent academic validity or lack of thereof in the notion of prior learning assessment (PLA)-based curriculum. If mishandled, it can become the tool for carrying out diploma mill practices. Conversely, if implemented and facilitated appropriately, PLA-based curricula can offer humanistic educational values…

  13. Homology Modeling and Molecular Docking for the Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougal, Owen M.; Cornia, Nic; Sambasivarao, S. V.; Remm, Andrew; Mallory, Chris; Oxford, Julia Thom; Maupin, C. Mark; Andersen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    DockoMatic 2.0 is a powerful open source software program (downloadable from sourceforge.net) that allows users to utilize a readily accessible computational tool to explore biomolecules and their interactions. This manuscript describes a practical tutorial for use in the undergraduate curriculum that introduces students to macromolecular…

  14. Training and Certification for Domestic Violence Service Providers: The Need for a National Standard Curriculum and Training Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Carla Smith; Lent, Kimberly

    2014-04-01

    Domestic violence (DV) continues to constitute an enormous public health problem in the United States. Knowledge and understanding of the complexities involved in DV has grown significantly in recent years revealing a need for providers who have broad training in a variety of legal, safety, developmental, and clinical issues that face families impacted by DV. This paper reviews current approaches to training and the ability of such methods to adequately prepare providers. There are no national standards for providers at any level from DV advocates to batterer interventionists, to clinicians with the required hours of training in most states at an alarmingly low level. Few states require cross training for those working as victim advocates or batterer interventionists. The systems that currently provide segregated and limited training create silos of service that are less effective. A proposed set of standards and training guidelines are proposed for DV advocates, batterer interventionists, and clinicians along with a discussion of the implications of such standards for the field.

  15. Residents’ perceptions of an integrated longitudinal curriculum: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Lubitz

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This study suggests that an integrated longitudinalized family medicine block training model has the potential to support the principles of a longitudinal integrated competency-based curriculum to effectively prepare residents for family medicine practice.

  16. Software engineering and Ada (Trademark) training: An implementation model for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Sue; Freedman, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The choice of Ada for software engineering for projects such as the Space Station has resulted in government and industrial groups considering training programs that help workers become familiar with both a software culture and the intricacies of a new computer language. The questions of how much time it takes to learn software engineering with Ada, how much an organization should invest in such training, and how the training should be structured are considered. Software engineering is an emerging, dynamic discipline. It is defined by the author as the establishment and application of sound engineering environments, tools, methods, models, principles, and concepts combined with appropriate standards, guidelines, and practices to support computing which is correct, modifiable, reliable and safe, efficient, and understandable throughout the life cycle of the application. Neither the training programs needed, nor the content of such programs, have been well established. This study addresses the requirements for training for NASA personnel and recommends an implementation plan. A curriculum and a means of delivery are recommended. It is further suggested that a knowledgeable programmer may be able to learn Ada in 5 days, but that it takes 6 to 9 months to evolve into a software engineer who uses the language correctly and effectively. The curriculum and implementation plan can be adapted for each NASA Center according to the needs dictated by each project.

  17. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 44. Competency Curriculum for Dental Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    With direct or indirect supervision; using the required instruments and equipment, e.g., scalers , curettes, files, ultrasonic unit and prophylactic...the periodontium Dental materials and equipment, e.g., scalers , curettes, files, ultrasonic unit and prophylactic handpiece with polishing cups and...objectives, are the foundatioa of the curriculum. A complete module would be comprised of seven part ..: a cluster of related tasks; a performance

  18. Trauma Non-Technical Training (TNT-2): the development, piloting and multilevel assessment of a simulation-based, interprofessional curriculum for team-based trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumouras, Aristithes G; Keshet, Itay; Nathens, Avery B; Ahmed, Najma; Hicks, Christopher M

    2014-10-01

    Medical error is common during trauma resuscitations. Most errors are nontechnical, stemming from ineffective team leadership, nonstandardized communication among team members, lack of global situational awareness, poor use of resources and inappropriate triage and prioritization. We developed an interprofessional, simulation-based trauma team training curriculum for Canadian surgical trainees. Here we discuss its piloting and evaluation.

  19. Media-Smart Youth: Eat, Think, and Be Active! A Workshop Curriculum for Youth Ages 11 to 13. Guide for Training Program Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Eunice Kennedy

    2008-01-01

    The Media-Smart Youth: Eat, Think, and Be Active! program is an engaging curriculum that helps young people understand the complex media world around them so they can make thoughtful decisions about issues important to their health, specifically nutrition and physical activity. This training guide was developed in response to the requests of…

  20. Training State and Community Instructors in Use of NHTSA Curriculum Packages: Driver Improvement Analysis, Driver License Examiner-Supervisor and Traffic Record Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, V. E.; Tiryakioglu, Dona

    A series of five national instructor training institutes were planned for each of three emerging highway safety technician areas for which curriculum packages have been prepared (Driver Improvement Analysis, Driver License Examiner-Supervisor, and Traffic Record Analysis). Technical Education Research Centers and Dunlap & Associates…

  1. Praktikum Medizinische Recherche: Erfahrungen mit einer curricular integrierten Schulungsveranstaltung / Medical Information Retrieval Training: a practical training integrated into the curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner, Christiane

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available n June 2004 a course problem oriented learning (POL has been introduced at the medical faculty of the University Leipzig. The course on the topic „Infectology and Immunology“ takes place once a year and lasts for four weeks. It consists of a series of lectures and tutorials, in which small groups of students work on clinical case examples. Also part of the course are some practical training sessions. One of them is a 90 minutes practical training on searching for medical literature, which is organized by the medical library. In 2006 the practical training took place for the third time. The article tells about the development within the three years and the experiences that have been made.

  2. Fitting Neuron Models to Spike Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F. M.; Fontaine, Bertrand; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Magnusson, Anna K.; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly used to understand the function of neural circuits in systems neuroscience. These studies require models of individual neurons with realistic input–output properties. Recently, it was found that spiking models can accurately predict the precisely timed spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents, if properly fitted. This requires fitting techniques that are efficient and flexible enough to easily test different candidate models. We present a generic solution, based on the Brian simulator (a neural network simulator in Python), which allows the user to define and fit arbitrary neuron models to electrophysiological recordings. It relies on vectorization and parallel computing techniques to achieve efficiency. We demonstrate its use on neural recordings in the barrel cortex and in the auditory brainstem, and confirm that simple adaptive spiking models can accurately predict the response of cortical neurons. Finally, we show how a complex multicompartmental model can be reduced to a simple effective spiking model. PMID:21415925

  3. [FEES for neurogenic dysphagia: training curriculum of the German Society of Neurology and the German Stroke Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewas, R; Glahn, J; Helfer, C; Ickenstein, G; Keller, J; Lapa, S; Ledl, C; Lindner-Pfleghar, B; Nabavi, D; Prosiegel, M; Riecker, A; Stanschus, S; Warnecke, T; Busse, O

    2014-08-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia is one of the most frequent and prognostically relevant neurological deficits in a variety of disorders, such as stroke, parkinsonism and advanced neuromuscular diseases. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now probably the most frequently used tool for objective dysphagia assessment in Germany. It allows evaluation of the efficacy and safety of swallowing, determination of appropriate feeding strategies and assessment of the efficacy of different swallowing manoeuvres. The literature furthermore indicates that FEES is a safe and well-tolerated procedure. In spite of the huge demand for qualified dysphagia diagnostics in neurology, a systematic FEES education has yet not been established. The structured training curriculum presented in this article aims to close this gap and intends to enforce a robust and qualified FEES service. As management of neurogenic dysphagia is not confined to neurologists, this educational program is applicable to other clinicians and speech language therapists with expertise in dysphagia as well.

  4. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  5. Training Consumer Educators: A Curriculum and Program Handbook. A Report on the Experience of the Consumer Law Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Law School, NY. Consumer Law Training Center.

    Information is presented on the administration of consumer education programs to train teachers and community group leaders who will be teaching consumer education in their own communities. Suggestions and examples are based on experience in creating and teaching such a program in consumer law in New York City. The first three chapters give…

  6. Training Consumer Educators: A Curriculum and Program Handbook. A Report on the Experience of the Consumer Law Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Law School, NY. Consumer Law Training Center.

    Information is presented on the administration of consumer education programs to train teachers and community group leaders who will be teaching consumer education in their own communities. Suggestions and examples are based on experience in creating and teaching such a program in consumer law in New York City. The first three chapters give…

  7. A Tiered Mentoring Model of Exposing and Engaging Students with Research Throughout the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerard, J.; Hayes, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Incorporating research into undergraduate curricula has been linked to improved critical thinking, intellectual independence, and student retention, resulting in a graduating population more ready for the workforce or graduate school. We have designed a three-tier model of undergraduate chemistry courses that enable first-year students with no previous research experience to gain the skills needed to develop, fund and execute independent research projects by the close of their undergraduate studies. First-year students are provided with context through a broadly focused introductory class that exposes them to current faculty research activities, and also gives them direct experience with the research process through peer mentored research teams as they participate in faculty-directed projects. Mid-career undergraduate students receive exposure and support in two formats: illustrative examples from current faculty research are incorporated into lessons in core classes, and courses specially designed to foster research independence. This is done by providing content and process mentoring as students develop independent projects, write proposals, and build relationships with faculty and graduate students in research groups. Advanced undergraduates further develop their research independence performing student-designed projects with faculty collaboration that frequently result in tangible research products. Further, graduate students gain experience in mentoring though formal training, as well as through actively mentoring mid-career undergraduates. This novel, integrated approach enables faculty to directly incorporate their research into all levels of the undergraduate curriculum while fostering undergraduates in developing and executing independent projects and empowering mentoring relationships.

  8. The Effects of a Model-Based Physics Curriculum Program with a Physics First Approach: A Causal-Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin W.; Majerich, David M.; Clevenstine, Richard; Howanski, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a model-based introductory physics curriculum on conceptual learning in a Physics First (PF) Initiative. This is the first comparative study in physics education that applies the Rasch modeling approach to examine the effects of a model-based curriculum program combined with PF in the United…

  9. Competency in chaos: lifesaving performance of care providers utilizing a competency-based, multi-actor emergency preparedness training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A; Swartzentruber, Derrick A; Davis, Christopher Ashby; Maddux, P Tim; Schnellman, Jennifer; Wahlquist, Amy E

    2013-08-01

    Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) to care providers is important to the future success of disaster operations in the US. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure performance during a multi-patient simulated disaster. A 1-day (8-hour) EPT course for care providers was developed to enhance provider knowledge, skill, and comfort necessary to save lives during a simulated disaster. Nine learning objectives, 18 competencies, and 34 performance objectives were developed. During the 2-year demonstration of the curriculum, 24 fourth-year medical students and 17 Veterans Hospital Administration (VHA) providers were recruited and volunteered to take the course (two did not fully complete the research materials). An online pre-test, two post-tests, course assessment, didactic and small group content, and a 6-minute clinical casualty scenario were developed. During the scenario, trainees working in teams were confronted with three human simulators and 10 actor patients simultaneously. Unless appropriate performance objectives were met, the simulators "died" and the team was exposed to "anthrax." After the scenario, team members participated in a facilitator-led debriefing using digital video and then repeated the scenario. Trainees (N = 39) included 24 (62%) medical students; seven (18%) physicians; seven (18%) nurses; and one (3%) emergency manager. Forty-seven percent of the VHA providers reported greater than 16 annual hours of disaster training, while 15 (63%) of the medical students reported no annual disaster training. The mean (SD) score for the pre-test was 12.3 (3.8), or 51% correct, and after the training, the mean (SD) score was 18.5 (2.2), or 77% (P < .01). The overall rating for the course was 96 out of 100. Trainee self-assessment of "Overall Skill" increased from 63.3 out of 100 to 83.4 out of 100 and "Overall Knowledge" increased from 49.3 out of 100 to 78.7 out of 100 (P < .01). Of the 34

  10. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  11. A clinical application of the training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    This article offers a perspective and a summary of Jack Danielian's (2010) Horneyan training model, highlighting the benefits of a meta-psychological approach for analysts in training and seasoned practitioners alike. To help illustrate the complexity of Karen Horney's views of character structure and character pathology, this article presents a model that reflects the dynamic tensions at play within individuals with narcissistic issues. It suggests that therapeutic listening can be tracked and that thematic material unfolds in a somewhat predictable, sequential, yet altogether systemic manner. Listening is not just art or intuition, nor is it merely interpretation of content based on a theoretical framework. It represents a way of holding the dialectic tension between conscious and unconscious, syntonic and dystonic. If we can better track these dynamic tensions, we can better anticipate and hopefully avoid clinical ruptures through the acting out of negative transference.

  12. A sustainable model for training teachers to use pivotal response training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica

    2015-08-01

    The increase in the rate of autism diagnoses has created a growing demand for teachers who are trained to use effective interventions. The train-the-trainer model, which involves training supervisors to train others, may be ideal for providing cost-effective training and ongoing support to teachers. Although research supports interventions, such as pivotal response training, as evidence-based, dissemination to school environments has been problematic. This study assessed the benefits of using the train-the-trainer model to disseminate pivotal response training to school settings. A multiple-baseline design was conducted across three training groups, each consisting of one school staff member (trainer), three special education teachers, and six students. Trainers conducted the teacher-training workshop with high adherence to training protocol and met mastery criteria in their ability to implement pivotal response training, assess implementation of pivotal response training, and provide feedback to teachers. Six of the nine teachers mastered all components of pivotal response training. The remaining three teachers implemented 89% of the pivotal response training components correctly. The majority of trainers and teachers maintained their abilities at follow-up. These results support the use of the train-the-trainer model as an effective method of disseminating evidence-based practices in school settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine (SHARC-FM): Creating a national consensus on relevant and practical training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, David A; Scott, Ian; Sylvester, Michael; Tan, Amy; Horrey, Kathleen; Weston, W Wayne

    2017-04-01

    In 2006, leaders of undergraduate family medicine education programs faced a series of increasing curriculum mandates in the context of limited time and financial resources. Additionally, it became apparent that a hidden curriculum against family medicine as a career choice was active in medical schools. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine was developed by the Canadian Undergraduate Family Medicine Education Directors and supported by the College of Family Physicians of Canada as a national collaborative project to support medical student training in family medicine clerkship. Its key objective is to enable education leaders to meet their educational mandates, while at the same time countering the hidden curriculum and providing a route to scholarship. The Shared Canadian Curriculum in Family Medicine is an open-access, shared, national curriculum (www.sharcfm.ca). It contains 23 core clinical topics (determined through a modified Delphi process) with demonstrable objectives for each. It also includes low- and medium-fidelity virtual patient cases, point-of-care learning resources (clinical cards), and assessment tools, all aligned with the core topics. French translation of the resources is ongoing. The core topics, objectives, and educational resources have been adopted by medical schools across Canada, according to their needs. The lessons learned from mounting this multi-institutional collaborative project will help others develop their own collaborative curricula. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  14. A Needs Assessment Model for Establishing Personnel Training Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gable, Robert K.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The article presents the Special Education Needs Assessment Priorities model which establishes training priorities for both regular and special educators. The model consists of four stages: identification of competencies, development of discrepancies, setting training priorities, and resource allocation. (SB)

  15. Developing a Model for an Innovative Culinary Competency Curriculum and Examining Its Effects on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng-Lei I-Chen Monica; Horng, Jeou-Shyan; Teng, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The present study designs and develops an innovative culinary competency curriculum (ICCC) model comprising seven sections: innovative culture, aesthetics, techniques, service, product, management, and creativity. The model is formulated based on culinary concept, creativity, innovation, and competency theory. The four elements of curriculum…

  16. An Evaluation of High School Curricula Employing Using the Element-Based Curriculum Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Dolgun; Günay, Rafet

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the curricula that constitute the basis of education provision at high schools in Turkey from the perspective of the teachers involved. A descriptive survey model, a quantitative research method was employed in this study. An item-based curriculum evaluation model was employed as part of the…

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Training in the Curriculum: Time, Slow Learners, and Basic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    The article discusses ways that cognitive behavioral training (CBT) methods might facilitate acquisitions of basic skills in mildly handicapped students. Elements of the CBT approach are described and studies are reviewed regarding effective teaching, time, and technology. (CL)

  18. The role of curriculum in influencing students to select generalist training: A 21-year longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Stimmel, Barry; Serber, M.

    1999-01-01

    To determine if specific curricula or backgrounds influence selection of generalist careers, the curricular choices of graduates of Mount Sinai School of Medicine between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed based on admission category. Students were divided into three groups: Group 1, those who started their first year of training at the School of Medicine; Group 2, those accepted with advanced standing into their third year of training from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, a five-yea...

  19. Recommended curriculum for subspecialty training in transplant infectious disease on behalf of the American Society of Transplantation Infectious Diseases Community of Practice Educational Initiatives Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, R; Clauss, H; Danziger-Isakov, L; Davis, J; Doucette, K; van Duin, D; Fishman, J; Gunseren, F; Humar, A; Husain, S; Isada, C; Julian, K; Kaul, D; Kumar, D; Martin, S; Michaels, M; Morris, M; Silveira, F; Subramanian, A

    2010-06-01

    The American Society of Transplantation Infectious Diseases (ID) Community of Practice has established an education workgroup to identify core components of a curriculum for training specialists in transplant ID. Clinical, laboratory, and research training form the triad of components on which an additional year of ID training, dedicated to the care of solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, should be based. The recommended training environment would have access to adequate numbers of transplant patients, along with qualified faculty committed to teaching specialized fellows in this area. The learning objectives for both inpatient and outpatient clinical training are presented. The laboratory component requires trainees to attain expertize in utilizing and interpreting cutting-edge diagnostics used in transplant medicine. The research component may involve basic science, and translational or clinical research individualized to the trainee. Finally, suggestions for evaluation of both the fellows and the training program are provided.

  20. Interactive dedicated training curriculum improves accuracy in the interpretation of MR imaging of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akin, Oguz; Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Riedl, Christopher C. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Ishill, Nicole M.; Moskowitz, Chaya S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States)

    2010-04-15

    To assess the effect of interactive dedicated training on radiology fellows' accuracy in assessing prostate cancer on MRI. Eleven radiology fellows, blinded to clinical and pathological data, independently interpreted preoperative prostate MRI studies, scoring the likelihood of tumour in the peripheral and transition zones and extracapsular extension. Each fellow interpreted 15 studies before dedicated training (to supply baseline interpretation accuracy) and 200 studies (10/week) after attending didactic lectures. Expert radiologists led weekly interactive tutorials comparing fellows' interpretations to pathological tumour maps. To assess interpretation accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was conducted, using pathological findings as the reference standard. In identifying peripheral zone tumour, fellows' average area under the ROC curve (AUC) increased from 0.52 to 0.66 (after didactic lectures; p < 0.0001) and remained at 0.66 (end of training; p < 0.0001); in the transition zone, their average AUC increased from 0.49 to 0.64 (after didactic lectures; p = 0.01) and to 0.68 (end of training; p = 0.001). In detecting extracapsular extension, their average AUC increased from 0.50 to 0.67 (after didactic lectures; p = 0.003) and to 0.81 (end of training; p < 0.0001). Interactive dedicated training significantly improved accuracy in tumour localization and especially in detecting extracapsular extension on prostate MRI. (orig.)

  1. Preparedness for clinical: evaluation of the core elements of the Clinical Immersion curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbeck, Cynthia; Herrman, Judith; Wade, Gail; Hayes, Evelyn; Voelmeck, Wayne; Cowperthwait, Amy; Norris, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Immersion Model is an innovative baccalaureate nursing curriculum that has demonstrated successful outcomes over the past 10 years. For those intending to adopt the model, individual components in isolation may prove ineffective. This article describes three core components of the curriculum that form the foundation of preparation for the senior-year clinical immersion. Detailed student-centered outcomes evaluation of these critical components is shared. Results of a mixed-methods evaluation, including surveys and focus groups, are presented. Implications of this curricular evaluation and future directions are explored.

  2. A process: development of a model multiculturalism curriculum designed for mobility across geographic borders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frels, L; Scott, J; Schramm, M A

    1997-08-01

    The Council on Accreditation Project, Nurse Anesthesia Educational Requirements and Mobility Between North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Countries, has as one of its outcomes the development of a model curriculum that would minimize educational barriers for mobility of nurse anesthetists across NAFTA geographical borders with a focus on the blending of professional and technical expertise with issues of human diversity and/or cultural differences. The overall long-term outcome of the project is to test a process. The manuscript discusses the process used in year III of the project to integrate cultural concepts into a nurse anesthesia model curriculum.

  3. Development of a model animal welfare act curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeWoude, Sue

    2007-01-01

    Animal-welfare issues are often controversial and frequently have an emotional component. Veterinarians have extensive knowledge, experience, and scientific perspective and are arguably the professionals best suited to advise and develop recommendations on animal welfare. The development of an Animal Welfare Act (AWA) teaching module is a first step toward educating veterinary students about animal welfare. This article presents the current development status of this curriculum project, which is intended to be a valuable addition to the evolving veterinary education on animal welfare.

  4. The role of curriculum in influencing students to select generalist training: a 21-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimmel, B; Serber, M

    1999-03-01

    To determine if specific curricula or backgrounds influence selection of generalist careers, the curricular choices of graduates of Mount Sinai School of Medicine between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed based on admission category. Students were divided into three groups: Group 1, those who started their first year of training at the School of Medicine; Group 2, those accepted with advanced standing into their third year of training from the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, a five-year program developed to select and produce students likely to enter primary care fields; and Group 3, those accepted with advanced standing into the third year who spent the first two years at a foreign medical school. All three groups took the identical last two years of clinical training at the School of Medicine. These were no significant differences with respect to initial choice of generalist training programs among all three groups, with 46% of the total cohort selecting generalist training. Of those students who chose generalist programs, 58% in Group 1, 51% in Group 2, and 41% in Group 3 remained in these fields rather than progressing to fellowship training. This difference was significant only with respect to Group 3. However, when an analysis was performed among those students providing only primary care as compared to only specialty care, there were no significant differences. Analysis by gender revealed women to be more likely to select generalist fields and remain in these fields without taking specialty training (P students. The analysis indicated that, despite the diverse characteristics of students entering the third year at the School of Medicine, no one group produced a statistically greater proportion of generalists positions than any other, and academic performance while in medical school did not have a significant influence on whether a student entered a generalist field.

  5. Computer-based Training (CBT in der Humanmedizin [Computer-based training (CBT in an undergraduate medical curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolle, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Computer based training (CBT is based on chunking of the learning content and follows a highly structured instructional design. The question is addressed whether verbally expressible knowledge can be acquired by CBT in a learning content example in human medicine. Methods: 43 students of human medicine (31 females, 12 males studied a CBT learning object on general tumour pathology comprising 32 frames for three times and wrote short essays on the topic. The main goal was to assess the increase of the frequency of terms and concepts of general tumour pathology between the essays as determined by content analysis.Results: Frequency analysis showed 28 +- 25 hits in the first, 40 +- 19 hits in the second and – after two weeks intermission – 35 +- 17 hits in the third essay, with the increase being highly significant (p < 0.01 The hits in the essay correlated significantly with the performance in the CBT learning object. In the qualitative feedback, positive remarks prevailed (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Computer based training does not simply drill the performance in predefined frames, but facilitates the achievement of knowledge which can be verbally expressed. Performance of the individual student in the CBT learning objects is significantly correlated to the quality of the short essay on the same topic.[german] Zielsetzung: Computer-based Training (CBT als tutorielles e-Learning-Konzept beruht auf einer Zerlegung des Lernstoffs in kleine Einheiten (Chunking und einem stark strukturierten instruktionalen Prozess. Die Studie befasst sich mit der Frage, ob auf diese Art aktiv explizites (sprachlich ausdrückbares Wissen zu einem humanmedizinischen Thema erworben werden kann. Methodik: 43 Studierende der Humanmedizin (31 Frauen, 12 Männer machten ein CBT-Lernobjekt zur Allgemeinen Tumorpathologie mit 32 Frames 3 mal durch und erstellten Kurzessays. Hauptzielgröße war die Differenz der inhaltlichen Frequenzanalyse

  6. Combining the Old and the New: Designing a Curriculum Based on the Taba Model and the Global Scale of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Belgin; Unver, Meral Melek; Alan, Bülent; Saglam, Sercan

    2017-01-01

    This paper explains the process of designing a curriculum based on the Taba Model and the Global Scale of English (GSE) in an intensive language education program. The Taba Model emphasizing the involvement of the teachers and the learners in the curriculum development process was combined with the GSE, a psychometric tool measuring language…

  7. International Federation for Emergency Medicine Model curriculum for medical student education in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-09-01

    The curriculum is designed with a focus on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any medical school should be delivering to its students during their undergraduate years of training. It is designed, not to be prescriptive, but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership in advancing physician education in basic emergency medicine content. The content would be relevant, not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems, but also for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within current educational structures. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership.

  8. Long-Term Impact of the Farm Financial Analysis Training Curriculum on FSA Borrowers in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Kenneth L.; Douglass, Mark B.; Hanson, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The Farm Financial Analysis Training (FFAT) course covers fundamental skills and concepts in liquidity, profitability, solvency, and efficiency. The research reported here identifies and measures the impacts of FFAT on participants including: 1) perceived gains in knowledge, 2) changes in management behavior, 3) changes in specific farm assets and…

  9. The Strategy to Align Road Safety Education to the Further Education and Training Band Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Lianne; van Dijk, Gerda; Fourie, David

    2016-01-01

    Road safety education is a complex phenomenon which should be viewed holistically if taken into account the interconnectedness of education, infrastructure and enforcement. Effective road safety education is specifically important for learners in the Further Education and Training (FET) band, as they are active contributors to a community. The…

  10. Developing an educational training module in forensic odontology: A proposal for dental curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shally Khanna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of methods have been introduced in scientific literature to study the lip print and palatal rugae; still there is a need for more descriptive and self-explanatory methods. Awareness regarding practical knowledge of cheiloscopy and palatoscopy is ambiguous among dental professionals. In the present work, an effort was made to introduce an educational training module for dental professionals with a view to improving the data recording and interpretation methods. A computer aided statistical method has also been suggested, i.e., systematic stage-wise filtering to test the uniqueness of lip and palatal rugae patterns. In this study, dental professionals were asked to match random lip and palatal rugae patterns before and after training. Proportions of accurate matching pre- and post-training were then compared. A systematic stage-wise filtering method was used to prove the uniqueness of lip prints and palatal rugae in large samples. It was observed that the educational training module helped to improve the ability of dental professionals in identifying individuals based on lip prints and palatal rugae. Application of systematic stage-wise filtering technique eased the process of checking the uniqueness of patterns.

  11. A Curriculum Framework for Geographical Information Science (GISc) Training at South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H.; van Niekerk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Geographical information science (GISc) is one of the fastest growing industries worldwide. Being a relatively new discipline, universities often provide training as part of geography, surveying, town planning, environmental and computer science programmes. This complicates professional accreditation assessments as the content, outcomes, extent…

  12. A Curriculum Framework for Geographical Information Science (GISc) Training at South African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H.; van Niekerk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Geographical information science (GISc) is one of the fastest growing industries worldwide. Being a relatively new discipline, universities often provide training as part of geography, surveying, town planning, environmental and computer science programmes. This complicates professional accreditation assessments as the content, outcomes, extent…

  13. Using entrustable professional activities to guide curriculum development in psychiatry training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyce Philip

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical activities that trainees can be trusted to perform with minimal or no supervision have been labelled as Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs. We sought to examine what activities could be entrusted to psychiatry trainees in their first year of specialist training. Methods We conducted an online survey of Fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists (RANZCP. Results The majority of respondents considered initiating patients with the common medications, discharging patient suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or following a crisis admission, conducting risk assessments and managing psychiatric emergencies were activities that trainees could be entrusted with by the end of the first stage of training. Conclusions Four activities were identified that trainees should be entrusted with by the end of their first year of training. Each of these activities comprises a set of competencies in each of the CanMEDS roles. When a trainee is unable to satisfactorily perform an EPA, deficits in the underpinning competencies can be a focus for remediation. Further EPAs are being identified in areas of more specialised practice for use within more advanced training.

  14. Long-Term Impact of the Farm Financial Analysis Training Curriculum on FSA Borrowers in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Kenneth L.; Douglass, Mark B.; Hanson, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The Farm Financial Analysis Training (FFAT) course covers fundamental skills and concepts in liquidity, profitability, solvency, and efficiency. The research reported here identifies and measures the impacts of FFAT on participants including: 1) perceived gains in knowledge, 2) changes in management behavior, 3) changes in specific farm assets and…

  15. Curriculum innovation in an accelerated BSN program: the ACE Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplee, Patricia D; Glasgow, Mary Ellen

    2008-01-01

    As the demand for registered nurses continues to rise, so too has the creation of accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs for second-degree students. This article describes an 11-month Accelerated Career Entry (ACE) Nursing Program's innovative curriculum design, which has a heavy emphasis on technology, professional socialization, and the use of a standardized patient experience as a form of summative evaluation. In addition, challenges of this program are presented. Since 2002, the ACE Program has graduated over 500 students with an average first-time NCLEX pass rate of 95-100%. Although the number of graduates from accelerated programs does not solve the severe nursing shortage, the contributions of these intelligent, assertive, pioneering graduates are important for health care.

  16. The Effects of Selected Death Education Curriculum Models on Death Anxiety and Death Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Don C.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of the effects of didactic and experiential death education curriculums show no decrease in death anxiety from mid- to posttesting for any treatment group. Anxiety was increased from pre- to mid-testing for some students. Results may be due to model deficiencies. Further research is suggested. (JAC)

  17. Open Learning and Formal Credentialing in Higher Education: Curriculum Models and Institutional Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reushle, Shirley, Ed.; Antonio, Amy, Ed.; Keppell, Mike, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of education is a multi-faceted system that must constantly integrate new strategies and procedures to ensure successful learning experiences. Enhancements in education provide learners with greater opportunities for growth and advancement. "Open Learning and Formal Credentialing in Higher Education: Curriculum Models and…

  18. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  19. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  20. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  1. A Sustainable Model for Integrating Current Topics in Machine Learning Research into the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiopoulos, M.; DeMara, R. F.; Gonzalez, A. J.; Wu, A. S.; Mollaghasemi, M.; Gelenbe, E.; Kysilka, M.; Secretan, J.; Sharma, C. A.; Alnsour, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated research and teaching model that has resulted from an NSF-funded effort to introduce results of current Machine Learning research into the engineering and computer science curriculum at the University of Central Florida (UCF). While in-depth exposure to current topics in Machine Learning has traditionally occurred…

  2. Discriminative training of self-structuring hidden control neural models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Hartmann, Uwe; Hunnerup, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new training algorithm for self-structuring hidden control neural (SHC) models. The SHC models were trained non-discriminatively for speech recognition applications. Better recognition performance can generally be achieved, if discriminative training is applied instead. Thus...

  3. The relationships between internal and external training load models during basketball training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Wen, Neal; Tucker, Patrick S; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2014-09-01

    The present investigation described and compared the internal and external training loads during basketball training. Eight semiprofessional male basketball players (mean ± SD, age: 26.3 ± 6.7 years; stature: 188.1 ± 6.2 cm; body mass: 92.0 ± 13.8 kg) were monitored across a 7-week period during the preparatory phase of the annual training plan. A total of 44 total sessions were monitored. Player session ratings of perceived exertion (sRPE), heart rate, and accelerometer data were collected across each training session. Internal training load was determined using the sRPE, training impulse (TRIMP), and summated-heart-rate-zones (SHRZ) training load models. External training load was calculated using an established accelerometer algorithm. Pearson product-moment correlations with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to determine the relationships between internal and external training load models. Significant moderate relationships were observed between external training load and the sRPE (r42 = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.23-0.69, p basketball settings. Basketball coaching and conditioning professionals should not assume a linear dose-response between accelerometer and internal training load models during training and are recommended to combine internal and external approaches when monitoring training load in players.

  4. Writings as modelling examples: Scaffolds for academic writing in a post-graduate curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Firssova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    The presented study investigated the effectiveness of learning from models in the context of post-graduate academic writing. Two questions were pursued: whether studying model writings supports mature students in writing in a new genre and whether integrating additional scaffolds in such models has added value. A quasi-experimental control group design study was realised in an on-going distance learning curriculum. Performance on a sequel of writing tasks in a new genre was compared both with...

  5. One or two trainees per workplace in a structured multimodality training curriculum for laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Jede, Felix; Minassian, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    different approaches for optimal training outcome. However, no standards currently exist for the number of trainees assigned per workplace. Methods. This is a monocentric, open, three-arm randomized controlled trial. The participants are laparoscopically-naive medical students from Heidelberg University....... After a standardized introduction to laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) with online learning modules, the participants perform a baseline test for basic skills and LC performance on a virtual reality (VR) trainer. A total of 100 students will be randomized into three study arms, in a 2:2:1 ratio...... training between tests. A post-test is performed to reassess basic skills and LC performance on the VR trainer. The performance of a cadaveric porcine LC is then measured as the primary outcome using standardized and validated ratings by blinded experts with the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical...

  6. An Improved Walk Model for Train Movement on Railway Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-Ping; MAO Bo-Hua; GAO Zi-You

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an improved walk model for simulating the train movement on railway network. In the proposed method, walkers represent trains. The improved walk model is a kind of the network-based simulation analysis model. Using some management rules for walker movement, walker can dynamically determine its departure and arrival times at stations. In order to test the proposed method, we simulate the train movement on a part of railway network. The numerical simulation and analytical results demonstrate that the improved model is an effective tool for simulating the train movement on railway network. Moreover, it can well capture the characteristic behaviors of train scheduling in railway traffic.

  7. [Clinical ecomomics: a pleading for complementing the medical curriculum and specialty training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porzsolt, F; Weiss, M; Hege-Scheuing, G; Fangerau, H

    2010-11-01

    Clinical economics requires an understanding of clinical relationships just like health economy requires an understanding of economic relationships. Hitherto we have ensured that economists can differentiate symptoms from diagnoses and diagnostics from screening at the interface between medicine and economy. However, we overlooked the fact that physicians should be able to understand the principles of marginal benefit and medical ethics, as well as the differences among efficacy, effectiveness, and benefit, to be able to make sound decisions. To make up for this neglected demand, we present our definition of clinical economics, identify the potential conflicts between medical professionalism and commercialized medicine, describe the importance - but also the limits - of scientific evidence, explain the difference between 'prioritization' and strict rationing, and attempt to justify the fact that the necessary changes in the provision of healthcare will probably only be achieved if we instill this new way of thinking in medical students during their medical education. Complementing the medical curriculum with clinical economics would achieve this goal. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Evaluation of an integrative model for professional development and research in a dental curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmyer, Marcia M; Mobley, Connie C; Davenport, William D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate a Research, Professional Development, and Critical Thinking Integrative Model developed for use in a dental curriculum. This article outlines strategies used in developing a competency-based pedagogical model designed to provide a tailored student learning environment with objective, measurable, and calibrated assessment outcomes. The theoretical model integrated elements of critical thinking, professionalism, and evidence-based dentistry across dental school disciplines; implementation was based on consensus of dental faculty and student representatives about course content, faculty allocation, and curriculum alignment. Changes introduced included the following: 1) conversion and integration of previously siloed course content taught in Years 1 and 2 to sequential two-year combined courses; 2) reduction of course and content redundancies; 3) delivery of courses by teams of faculty members in biomedical, behavioral, and clinical sciences; and 4) reduction of total curriculum credit/contact hours from 13.5 (201 contact hours) to 5.0 (60 contact hours), allowing the Curriculum Committee to accommodate additional courses. These changes resulted in improvement in student satisfaction.

  9. Pig model vs sheep model in undergraduate periodontal surgical training.

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Patryk Daniel; Tronsen, Eyvind; Bøen, Kim Reisæter

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to further develop the sheep model for periodontal surgical training to undergraduate students, and compare it to the more commonly used pig model. Method: Periodontal measurements as pocket depth and gingival width were measured on a total number of 10 sheep and 9 pigs, and a pre-established list of surgical procedures were performed on both types of specimen in different areas of the dentition; gingivectomy, modified access flap w...

  10. A structured and object oriented approach to training system modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Malysheva Elena Yuryevna; Bobrovsky Sergey Michailovich

    2015-01-01

    Structured Analysis and Object Oriented Analysis are widely adopted for system modelling. The article describes the examples of university training system modeling as examples of structured modeling and object-oriented modeling.

  11. Development of a surgical skills curriculum for the training and assessment of manual skills in orthopedic surgical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Eric A; Brooks, Adam G; Leasure, Jeremi; Camisa, William; van Warmerdam, Jennifer; Kondrashov, Dimitriy; Montgomery, William; McGann, William

    2015-01-01

    To develop and conduct a pilot study of a curriculum of 4 surrogate bone training modules to assess and track progress in basic orthopedic manual skills outside the operating room. Four training modules were developed with faculty and resident input. The modules include (1) cortical drilling, (2) drill trajectory, (3) oscillating saw, and (4) pedicle probing. Orthopedic resident's performance was evaluated. Validity and reliability results were calculated using standard analysis of variance and multivariate regression analysis accounting for postgraduate year (PGY) level, number of attempts, and specific outcome target results specific to the simulation module. St. Mary's Medical Center in San Francisco, CA. These modules were tested on 15 orthopedic surgery residents ranging from PGY 1 to PGY 5 experience. The cortical drilling module had a mean success rate of 56% ± 5%. There was a statistically significant difference in performance according to the diameter of the drill used from 33% ± 7% with large diameter to 70% ± 6% with small diameter. The drill trajectory module had a success rate of 85% ± 3% with a trend toward improvement across PGY level. The oscillating saw module had a mean success rate of 25% ± 5% (trajectory) and 84% ± 6% (depth). We observed a significant improvement in trajectory performance during the second attempt. The pedicle probing module had a success rate of 46% ± 10%. The results of this pilot study on a small number of residents are promising. The modules were inexpensive and easy to administer. Conclusions of statistical significance include (1) residents who could easily detect changes in surrogate bone thickness with a smaller diameter drill than with a larger diameter drill and (2) residents who significantly improved saw trajectory with an additional attempt at the module. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 30. Curriculum for General Hospital Corpsman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-31

    34sPt(11e UNCLASSIFIED .L*..u4iy CLASSiFiCATION oF THItS PA _( w Doe Ent.etd) currently designated Navy enlisted occupations, 20 Naval Enlisted Classi... EDUCAION AND TRAINING. APPfN-Y Cl,,jAUG ඒ N001 69 ’ -0 Ś UNCLASSIF EDUL NC 5 - IIl.IIIII -II-I fl25 IllU 1. I~ L.8 1.25 .4 .6__ MICRfl t n I UR l~ 3...ing therapy; giving chest physical therapy; suctioning nasal and oral pas - sages and trachea and giving tracheotomy care. 9. Precautionary measures

  13. Issues of Visitor Management at Heritage Sites and Implications for Training and Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Pedersen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The presentation offers observations related to heritage natural and cultural site visitor management interventions. Observations include the need for the more robust planning and management frameworks and processes that permit and guide discussion among the different constituencies; making the diverse values usually contained in the tourism and conservation dynamic explicit.   The presentation suggests processes that encourage, because of economic and social self-interest, essential links between heritage site management, local communities and the tourism industry.  It suggests training needs for implementing these frameworks and processes.

  14. A behavioural modelling approach to curriculum development and evaluation of health promotion for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M P; Maloney, W A

    1992-05-01

    This paper outlines the way in which two behavioural science models may be used in the processes of curriculum development and course evaluation. The models are the stress-coping paradigm associated with the work of Lazarus and the theory of self and identity developed from the work of Mead. It is suggested that a clear articulation of the underlying behavioural processes is fundamental in course design and appraisal.

  15. Changes of high school English teaching model under the directions of new English Curriculum Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽萍

    2014-01-01

    Communications around the world becomes common with the quickening of China’s reform and open door policies and widening of international communications, thus it is very pressing to modify the model of high school English class for students’concept of English use as a tool. This paper focuses on the change of English class teaching model in high schools under the direction of New English Curriculum Standard and its purposes and effects.

  16. Developing professional skills at tertiary level: A model to integrate competencies across the curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Carracedo, Fermín; Soler Cervera, Antonia; López Álvarez, David; Martín Escofet, Carme; Ageno Pulido, Alicia; Belanche Muñoz, Luis Antonio; Cabré Garcia, José M.; Cobo Valeri, Erik; Farré Cirera, Rafael; García Almiñana, Jordi; Marès Martí, Pere

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the European Higher Education Area, curriculum design needs to be based on the defined competencies of each degree programs, including both domain specific and professional competencies. In this educational context, developing students’ professional skills poses a new challenge we need to face. The present work proposes a model to globally develop professional skills in an Engineering degree program. Based on competency maps, this model allows careful analysis, revision and ...

  17. The Perceived long-term impact of the radiological curriculum innovation in the medical doctors training at Ghent University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V., E-mail: elena.kourdioukova@ugent.be [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Valcke, Martin [Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, H. Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital (UZG), MR/-1K12, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Objectives: How do students experience and perceive the innovative undergraduate radiology curriculum at Ghent University, and what explains differences in student perception? Methods: A survey was presented to the 2008 cohort of students enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum at Ghent University. The survey focused on their experiences and perceptions in relation to the innovative undergraduate radiology teaching. Results and conclusion: The present research results point at a favorable perception of the innovative radiology curriculum components. The study points - both during pre-clinical and clinical years - at the appreciation for curriculum components that combine traditional curriculum components (ex-cathedra lessons with syllabus) with distance learning components such as E-learning and E-testing. In clinical years - as expected - students switch to the application of knowledge and skills and therefore heavily appreciate practice linked curriculum components.

  18. Does box model training improve surgical dexterity and economy of movement during virtual reality laparoscopy? A randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clevin, L.; Grantcharov, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    . Performance before and after the training was assessed in a virtual reality laparoscopic trainer (LapSim and was based on objective parameters, registered by the computer system (time, error, and economy of motion scores). Group A showed significantly greater improvement in all performance parameters compared...... with the control group: economy of movement (p=0.001), time (p=0.001) and tissue damage (p=0.036), confirming the positive impact of box-trainer curriculum on laparoscopic skills acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: Structured laparoscopic skill training on a low cost box model trainer improves performance as assessed using...

  19. Declarative terrain modeling for military training games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Kraker, J.K.. de; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain mode

  20. Analysis of accessibility for buildings of a graduation school--an experiment in ergonomics training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acioly, A S G; Oliveira, M D; Freitas, V H F

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a description of a study experience developed in the Discipline of Supervised Internship of the Industrial Design Course of the Federal University of Paraíba. The study is based on focused on ergonomics analysis and accessibility as an object of study, access into and out of buildings of classrooms and laboratories of the same institution. Among the buildings selected, which encompass where the course is established, is a contemporary building and a renovated building of historical and artistic values for current use. The study is characterized by a description of the objects of study, analysis of the reference literature and recommendations for adjustments in the event of any inconsistency with the accessibility standards. The experience of this supervised training provided an opportunity to perform design activities to a group of students in applied ergonomics, as well as enabling contact with professional practice, adding the contact with the appropriate guidelines governing intervention in historic heritage buildings.

  1. A Model of the Antecedents of Training Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed Turab, Ghaneemah; Casimir, Gian

    2015-01-01

    Many organizations have invested heavily in training. However, only a small percentage of what is learnt from training is applied or transferred to the workplace. This study examines factors that influence training transfer. A conceptual model based on the Theory of Reasoned Action is hypothesized and tested. The sample consisted of 123 full-time…

  2. A Meta-Analytic Review of Behavior Modeling Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.; Chan, Daniel W. L.

    2005-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 117 studies evaluated the effects of behavior modeling training (BMT) on 6 training outcomes, across characteristics of training design. BMT effects were largest for learning outcomes, smaller for job behavior, and smaller still for results outcomes. Although BMT effects on declarative knowledge decayed over time, training…

  3. A pedagogical model for integrative training in conservation and sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Welch-Devine

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The benefits and challenges of interdisciplinary training are well documented, and several reviews have discussed the particular importance of interdisciplinary training for conservation scholars and practitioners. We discuss the progress within one university program to implement specific training models, elements, and tools designed to move beyond remaining barriers to graduate-level, interdisciplinary conservation education.

  4. Curriculum Design for Teacher Education Based on Training Teachers of“Five-Competence”%基于“五会型教师”培养的教师教育课程设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张传燧

    2014-01-01

    师范教育向教师教育的转变,标志着我国教师培养价值取向由伦理本位向能力本位的转变;基于能力本位的教师教育目标是培养“五会型教师”;为了保障培养目标的实现,必须设计与之相匹配和适应的教师教育课程体系。这个体系由培养实践能力、培养教育理念和培养教师素养等几大板块课程所组成。教师教育课程体系的实施应当做到:确立新的教师教育理念,制定多样化的课程实施方案,设计模块化的课程结构,实行必修与选修结合的选课制度,创新教师培养模式,提供相应的政策和制度保障。%Transformation from normal education to teacher education marks value orientation of teach-er training in China has changed from ethics-centered orientation to competence-centered orientation. Competence-centered teacher education aims at training “five-competence”teacher.In order to ensure the realization of the obj ective in teacher education,correspondent and appropriate teacher education curriculum system should be designed.This system consists of the following curriculums:practical competence training,educational conception developing and teacher quality improving.Implementa-tion of teacher education curriculum should abide by several points.Firstly,to combine obligatory courses and optional courses;secondly,to modularize different curriculums;thirdly,to explore and create teacher training model which includes integration theory with practice,cooperation of universi-ty,local government,primary and secondary schools;finally,to provide corresponding policy and system.

  5. Flow Formulation-based Model for the Curriculum-based Course Timetabling Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Niels-Christian Fink; Kristiansen, Simon; Sørensen, Matias;

    2015-01-01

    In this work we will present a new mixed integer programming formulation for the curriculum-based course timetabling problem. We show that the model contains an underlying network model by dividing the problem into two models and then connecting the two models back into one model using a maximum ow...... problem. This decreases the number of integer variables signicantly and improves the performance compared to the basic formulation. It also shows competitiveness with other approaches based on mixed integer programming from the literature and improves the currently best known lower bound on one data...

  6. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Linda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum. Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Results Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Conclusion Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  7. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Linda Orkin; Singh, Mamta; Bateman, Betzi L; Glover, Pamela Bligh

    2009-06-10

    Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. This course was developed and used at The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and its associated preceptorship sites in the greater Cleveland area. Leaders of a two-year elective continuity experience at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine used adult learning principles to develop four interactive online modules presenting basics of office practice, difficult patient interviews, common primary care diagnoses, and disease prevention. They can be viewed at (http://casemed.case.edu/cpcp/curriculum). Students completed surveys rating the content and technical performance of each module and completed a Generalist OSCE exam at the end of the course. Participating students rated all aspects of the course highly; particularly those related to charting and direct patient care. Additionally, they scored very well on the Generalist OSCE exam. Students found the web-based modules to be valuable and to enhance their clinical learning. The blended learning model is a useful tool in designing web-based curriculum for enhancing the clinical curriculum of medical students.

  8. Reform and Practice for Vocational Accounting Training Curriculum%高职会计综合实训课程改革与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周彦; 苗美华

    2012-01-01

    会计综合实训课程是高职会计类专业的一门专业核心课程,传统的课堂教学不能从根本上提升学生的职业技能。课程改革以实体企业为背景,以实际工作任务为引领,以会计工作过程中涉及的专业知识与技能为主线,编写出版了包含业务指导、业务原始单据、工作组织等系列特色教材,采用教学做一体化教学模式,手工与计算机并行运行,训练和提高了学生的职业岗位能力和职业综合能力。%Accounting comprehensive training course for higher vocational accounting class is a core curricu-lum. The traditional training skills can not fundamentally enhance students' occupation skills. Curriculum reform is in the context of business entities. The professional knowledge and skills involve in the accounting process as the main line to write the teaching material. The teaching material contains business guidance, business source docu- ments, work organization and so on. Curriculum reform uses the teaching to do integration teaching mode and the manual and computerization to run in parallel. Through curriculum reform, training and professional post ability im-proves the students'comprehensive ability and career.

  9. Elite Sports Training as Model for Future Internet Practices?

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    This paper reflects on the experience of using ethnographic and experimental research at a high-performance athletic training center as model for drawing conclusion about the future everyday use of ICT and Internet technologies. The research project has consisted of field studies of training session and everyday life at an elite training center where athletes live and train as well as experimental design processes where new internet and media technologies has been explored within elite sports...

  10. Problems in network model curriculum and corresponding solutions%网络示范课程建设中存在的问题及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑磊琦; 肖文雅

    2013-01-01

    对新乡医学院建设有自身特色的网络示范课程进行调研,通过问卷调查与分析,认为网络示范课程以学生学习为中心,进行“三层次教学设计”,满足学生自学和辅助课堂教学,对于学分制、弹性学制的实施和学生的个性化培养有重要意义.对存在的问题提出具体的建议,为今后加强网络示范课程的建设和应用提供参考.%This article surveys the characteristic of network model curriculum of Xinxiang Medical College. By qustionnaires we discovery that the network model curriculum of students' learning centre has three-level teaching design, it meets the students' self-learning and assistant classroom teaching and has important sense for implementation of credit system and flexible schooling and personalized training for students. It puts forword concrete proposals for the existing problems to provide a reference for the future to strengthen the construction and application of the network model curriculum.

  11. Energy-optimal control model for train movements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ke-Ping; Gao Zi-You; Mao Bao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new cellular automaton (CA) model for train movement simulations under mixed traffic conditions. A kind of control strategy is employed for trains to reduce energy consumption. In the proposed CA model, the driver controls the train movements by using some updated rules. In order to obtain a good insight into the evolution behaviours of the rail traffic flow, we investigate the space-time diagram of the rail traffic flow and the trajectories of the train movements. The numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CA model can well describe the dynamic behaviours of the train movements. Some complex phenomena of train movements can be reproduced, such as the train delay propagations, etc.

  12. Modeling and simulation for train control system using cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; KePing; GAO; ZiYou; YANG; LiXing

    2007-01-01

    Train control system plays a key role in railway traffic. Its function is to manage and control the train movement on railway networks. In our previous works, based on the cellular automata (CA) model, we proposed several models and algorithms for simulating the train movement under different control system conditions. However, these models are only suitable for some simple traffic conditions. Some basic factors, which are important for train movement, are not considered. In this paper, we extend these models and algorithms and give a unified formula. Using the proposed method, we analyze and discuss the space-time diagram of railway traffic flow and the trajectories of the train movement. The numerical simulation and analytical results demonstrate that the unified CA model is an effective tool for simulating the train control system.

  13. Designing a curriculum for communication skills training from a theory and evidence-based perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Richard L; De Haes, Hanneke C J M

    2013-10-01

    Because quality health care delivery requires effective clinician-patient communication, successful training of health professionals requires communication skill curricula of the highest quality. Two approaches for developing medical communication curricula are a consensus approach and a theory driven approach. We propose a theory-driven, communication function framework for identifying important communication skills, one that is focused on the key goals and outcomes that need to be accomplished in clinical encounters. We discuss 7 communication functions important to medical encounters and the types of skills needed to accomplish each. The functional approach has important pedagogical implications including the importance of distinguishing the performance of a behavior (capacity) from the outcome of that behavior in context (effectiveness) and the recognition that what counts as effective communication depends on perspective (e.g., observer, patient). Consensus and theory-driven approaches to medical communication curricula are not necessarily contradictory and can be integrated to further enhance ongoing development and improvements in medical communication education. A functional approach should resonate with practicing clinicians and continuing education initiatives in that it is embraces the notion that competent communication is situation-specific as clinicians creatively use communicative skills to accomplish the key goals of the encounter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A community needs responsive management training model: Re-envisioning management training for pastors of the International Assemblies of God Church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malesela J. Masenya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organisations (NGO�s play an important role in helping satisfy society�s many needs. Churches, for example, are called upon to address critical challenges facing the South African society such as discrepancies in life chances, unemployment and corruption. It largely depends on the management skills of leaders of such organisations to succeed in their endeavour to meet community needs. In order to improve these skills, this study sought to redefine the initial training of student pastors, including their management training, at the colleges of the International Assemblies of God Church (IAG. A qualitative research approach was followed. Two focus group interviews and seven individual interviews were conducted. Interviews included members of the national and provincial executive committees of the IAG, serving pastors, directors of training colleges, pastor trainees in their final year of study, and a newly graduated student. The findings of the study support the importance of formal management training for pastors before being employed in the service of the IAG. This Church has moved away from accepting ministers for service based on their faith and profession of a call to ministry only. The investigation revealed shortcomings in the initial training programmes of pastors; for example, the emphasis on theological courses at the expense of courses that are responsive to community needs and management training issues. Leaders with the competency to respond to community needs are required. The implementation of a transformational management framework, which includes community responsive courses, is recommended as a way to effectively train church leaders.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Although this article is written within the framework of Educational Management, it touches on other fields like Practical Theology and Curriculum Development. It reflects on the perceived need to include management training in

  15. A Critical Information Literacy Model: Library Leadership within the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Troy

    2011-01-01

    It is a time for a new model for teaching students to find, evaluate, and use information by drawing on critical pedagogy theory in the education literature. This critical information literacy model views the information world as a dynamic place where authors create knowledge for many reasons; it seeks to understand students as information users,…

  16. Integrating molecular diagnostics into histopathology training: the Belfast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, C; James, J; Maxwell, P; McQuaid, S; Ervine, A; Catherwood, M; Loughrey, M B; McGibben, D; Somerville, J; McManus, D T; Gray, M; Herron, B; Salto-Tellez, M

    2014-07-01

    Molecular medicine is transforming modern clinical practice, from diagnostics to therapeutics. Discoveries in research are being incorporated into the clinical setting with increasing rapidity. This transformation is also deeply changing the way we practise pathology. The great advances in cell and molecular biology which have accelerated our understanding of the pathogenesis of solid tumours have been embraced with variable degrees of enthusiasm by diverse medical professional specialties. While histopathologists have not been prompt to adopt molecular diagnostics to date, the need to incorporate molecular pathology into the training of future histopathologists is imperative. Our goal is to create, within an existing 5-year histopathology training curriculum, the structure for formal substantial teaching of molecular diagnostics. This specialist training has two main goals: (1) to equip future practising histopathologists with basic knowledge of molecular diagnostics and (2) to create the option for those interested in a subspecialty experience in tissue molecular diagnostics to pursue this training. It is our belief that this training will help to maintain in future the role of the pathologist at the centre of patient care as the integrator of clinical, morphological and molecular information.

  17. Excised Abdominoplasty Material as a Systematic Plastic Surgical Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Erol Demirseren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving a level of technical skill and confidence in surgical operations is the main goal of plastic surgical training. Operating rooms were accepted as the practical teaching venues of the traditional apprenticeship model. However, increased patient population, time, and ethical and legal considerations made preoperation room practical work a must for plastic surgical training. There are several plastic surgical teaching models and simulators which are very useful in preoperation room practical training and the evaluation of plastic surgery residents. The full thickness skin with its vascular network excised in abdominoplasty procedures is an easily obtainable real human tissue which could be used as a training model in plastic surgery.

  18. Cyber Enabled Collaborative Environment for Data and Modeling Driven Curriculum Modules for Hydrology and Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, V.; Ruddell, B. L.; Manduca, C. A.; Fox, S.; Kirk, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    With the access to emerging datasets and computational tools, there is a need to bring these capabilities into hydrology and geoscience classrooms. However, developing curriculum modules using data and models to augment classroom teaching is hindered by steep technology learning curve, rapid technology turnover, and lack of an organized community cyberinfrastructure (CI) for the dissemination, publication, and sharing of the latest tools and curriculum material for hydrology and geoscience education. The objective of this project is to overcome some of these limitations by developing a cyber enabled collaborative environment for publishing, sharing and adoption of data and modeling driven curriculum modules in hydrology and geoscience classroom. The CI is based on Carleton College's Science Education Resource Center (SERC) Content Management System. Building on its existing community authoring capabilities the system is being extended to allow assembly of new teaching activities by drawing on a collection of interchangeable building blocks; each of which represents a step in the modeling process. This poster presentation will describe the structure of the CI, the type and description of the modules that are under development, and the approach that will be used in assessing students' learning from using modules.

  19. Current Scientific Evidence for a Polarized Cardiovascular Endurance Training Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydren, Jay R; Cohen, Bruce S

    2015-12-01

    Recent publications have provided new scientific evidence for a modern aerobic or cardiovascular endurance exercise prescription that optimizes the periodization cycle and maximizes potential endurance performance gains in highly trained individuals. The traditional threshold, high volume, and high-intensity training models have displayed limited improvement in actual race pace in (highly) trained individuals while frequently resulting in overreaching or overtraining (physical injury and psychological burnout). A review of evidence for replacing these models with the proven polarized training model seems warranted. This review provides a short history of the training models, summarizes 5 key studies, and provides example training programs for both the pre- and in-season periods. A polarized training program is characterized by an undulating nonlinear periodization model with nearly all the training time spent at a "light" (≤13) and "very hard" (≥17) pace with very limited time at "hard" (14-16) or race pace (6-20 Rating of Perceived Exertion [RPE] scale). To accomplish this, the polarization training model has specific high-intensity workouts separated by one or more long slow distance workouts, with the exercise intensity remaining below ventilatory threshold (VT) 1 and/or blood lactate of less than 2 mM (A.K.A. below race pace). Effect sizes for increasing aerobic endurance performance for the polarized training model are consistently superior to that of the threshold training model. Performing a polarized training program may be best accomplished by: going easy on long slow distance workouts, avoiding "race pace" and getting after it during interval workouts.

  20. A "Resident-as-Teacher" Curriculum Using a Flipped Classroom Approach: Can a Model Designed for Efficiency Also Be Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Binny D; Schumacher, Heidi K; Reese, Kristen; Bhansali, Priti; Kern, Jeremy R; Simmens, Samuel J; Blatt, Benjamin; Greenberg, Larrie W

    2017-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires training that enhances resident teaching skills. Despite this requirement, many residency training programs struggle to implement effective resident-as-teacher (RAT) curricula, particularly within the context of the 80-hour resident workweek. In 2013, the authors developed and evaluated an intensive one-day RAT curriculum using a flipped classroom approach. Twenty-nine second-year residents participated in daylong RAT sessions. The curriculum included four 1-hour workshops focusing on adult learning principles, giving feedback, teaching a skill, and orienting a learner. Each workshop, preceded by independent reading, featured peer co-teaching, application, and feedback. The authors evaluated the curriculum using pre- and postworkshop objective structured teaching examinations (OSTEs) and attitudinal and self-efficacy teaching questionnaires. Residents demonstrated statistically significant improvements in performance between pre- and postworkshop OSTEs on each of three core skills: giving feedback (P = .005), orienting a learner (P classroom approach is an efficient and effective method for training residents to improve teaching skills, especially in an era of work hour restrictions. They have committed to the continuation of this curriculum and are planning to include assessment of its long-term effects on resident behavior change and educational outcomes.

  1. A Contingency Model Approach to Leadership Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csoka, Louis S.; Fiedler, Fred E.

    Two studies were specifically designed to test the effect which leadership training and experience would have on the performance of relationship-motivated and task-motivated leaders. In the first study it was predicted that task-relevant training and experience would make the situation more favorable in the task-structure dimension. Subjects were…

  2. Cognitive model supported tactical training simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, W.A. van; Bosch, K. van den

    2005-01-01

    Simulation-based tactical training can be made more effective by using cognitive software agents to play key roles (e.g. team mate, adversaries, instructor). Due to the dynamic and complex nature of military tactics, it is hard to create agents that behave realistically and support the training lead

  3. Training tactical decision making using cognitive models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, K. van den; Doesburg, W.A. van

    2005-01-01

    Simulation-based tactical training can be made more effective by using cognitive software agents to play key roles (e.g. team mates, adversaries). For successful use in training, agents should show tactically representative behavior that support trainees in achieving the learning objectives. For a t

  4. The Yellow Brick Road: a values based curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Christopher

    2012-05-01

    Within the United Kingdom, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) requires that nurses and midwives are of 'good character' at the point of registration. This paper sets out how good character has been conceptualised within one U.K. higher education institution and presents a model of "values based enquiry" which aims to develop the 'character' of students. The paper presents three qualities ("the heart", "the nerve" and "the brain") which represent 'good character' and which are believed to underpin values based Nursing or Midwifery practice. The development of these qualities is argued to be reliant upon helping students to develop intrinsic professional values of care and compassion. The role of these character qualities in nursing practice and education is outlined, as are the ways in which they have led to the development of a model for values based enquiry. This model represents a vision of the nature of professional education which may be shared by staff and students, whilst offering a model for learning and teaching based upon recognised educational principles. An argument is advanced that the adoption of a values based enquiry model may develop and nurture the habits of mind which are necessary for the development of 'good character'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Southwest University's No-Fee Teacher-Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shijian; Yang, Shuhan; Li, Linyuan

    2013-01-01

    The training model for Southwest University's no-fee teacher education program has taken shape over several years. Based on a review of the documentation and interviews with administrators and no-fee preservice students from different specialties, this article analyzes Southwest University's no-fee teacher-training model in terms of three main…

  6. Evaluating a Training Using the "Four Levels Model"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensma, Herman; Groeneveld, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: to present a training evaluation based on the "four levels model"; to demonstrate the value of experimental designs in evaluation studies; and to take a first step in the development of an evidence-based training program. Design/methodology/approach: The Kirkpatrick four levels model was used to…

  7. Developing a Curriculum for Information and Communications Technology Use in Global Health Research and Training: A Qualitative Study Among Chinese Health Sciences Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhenyu; Yang, Li; Yang, Lan; Huang, Kaiyong; Yu, Hongping; He, Huimin; Wang, Jiaji; Cai, Le; Wang, Jie; Fu, Hua; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H; Xiao, Jian; Abdullah, Abu S

    2017-06-12

    Rapid development of information and communications technology (ICT) during the last decade has transformed biomedical and population-based research and has become an essential part of many types of research and educational programs. However, access to these ICT resources and the capacity to use them in global health research are often lacking in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) institutions. The aim of our study was to assess the practical issues (ie, perceptions and learning needs) of ICT use among health sciences graduate students at 6 major medical universities of southern China. Ten focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted from December 2015 to March 2016, involving 74 health sciences graduate students studying at 6 major medical universities in southern China. The sampling method was opportunistic, accounting for the graduate program enrolled and the academic year. All FGDs were audio recorded and thematic content analysis was performed. Researchers had different views and arguments about the use of ICT which are summarized under six themes: (1) ICT use in routine research, (2) ICT-related training experiences, (3) understanding about the pros and cons of Web-based training, (4) attitudes toward the design of ICT training curriculum, (5) potential challenges to promoting ICT courses, and (6) related marketing strategies for ICT training curriculum. Many graduate students used ICT on a daily basis in their research to stay up-to-date on current development in their area of research or study or practice. The participants were very willing to participate in ICT courses that were relevant to their academic majors and would count credits. Suggestion for an ICT curriculum included (1) both organized training course or short lecture series, depending on the background and specialty of the students, (2) a mixture of lecture and Web-based activities, and (3) inclusion of topics that are career focused. The findings of this study suggest that a need exists

  8. Development of a death education curriculum model for the general public using DACUM method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Ahn, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Chong-Hyung; Lee, Moo-Sik; Kim, Moon-Joon; Arma, Park; Hwang, Hye-Jeong; Song, Hyeon-Dong; Shim, Moon-Sook; Kim, Kwang-Hwan

    2016-05-18

    In order to analyze tasks of the death education curriculum for the public, DACUM method was used. A committee for DACUM was gathered and a survey was conducted on professors of health care, humanities and social sciences for an interdisciplinary study. In the survey used to verify the model for death education for the public, a compilation based on difficulty and importance factor shows that the 27 tasks including the psychological changes in terminally ill or suicidal patients, healing of stress, acceptance and understanding of death and suicide prevention were identified as needing to be included in the curriculum. The data thus concluded will have to be reviewed when they are applied to actual education to revise the education program to make it more appropriate.

  9. A Model Aerospace Curriculum: August Martin High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Mervin K., Jr.

    This document presents an operational model of a thematic aerospace education school--the August Martin High School (New York). Part 1 briefly describes the nature of aviation/aerospace education and the background of the school. This background information includes how the school was formed, rationale for an aerospace thematic school, research…

  10. Paediatric laparoscopic orchidopexy as a novel mentorship: Training model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although Laparoscopy is becoming a standard procedure in management of pediatric urology disorders, but its widespread use still limited. This can be attributed mainly to difficulty in acquiring such specialized technique, especially by post graduate practicing urologist. Thus, we herein evaluate the impact of condensed laparoscopic training programme in children hospital with the aim to analyze the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic orchidopexy in training basic laparoscopic skills. The aim of this study was to review experience as a mentor in training laparoscopic skills through condensed training programme based on high volume low risk procedure of pediatric laparoscopic orchidopexy. Materials and Methods: In order to implement a condensed laparoscopic curriculum in a short period of time while maintaining utmost patient safety, laparoscopic orchidopexy was used as the technique of choice. The course was conducted over a period of 5 days starting from 1 st November 2010 in a tertiary pediatric surgical center under guidance of an expert mentor. A total of 30 testicular units in 27 pediatric patients of different age group diagnosed with impalpable undescended testis underwent laparoscopic intervention. The course was conducted in three stages with the aim to deliver laparoscopic skills to trainee. In stage one out of eight cases operated by mentor with assistance of trainee six were operated on day 1 and two cases were operated on second day. The trainee performed 12 cases of laparoscopy independently with assistance of mentor in stage two which was carried out on day 2, 3 and 4. Finally all 7 cases including two second stage laparoscopic orchidopexy procedures were carried out independently by trainee under observer ship of mentor in stage three during day 4 and 5 of training programme. The feasibility and efficacy of laparoscopic orchidopexy in training laparoscopic skills through condensed training programme was assessed

  11. National assessment of business-of-medicine training and its implications for the development of a business-of-medicine curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anit T; Bohmer, Richard M J; Barbour, J Robert; Fried, Marvin P

    2005-01-01

    The objectives were, first, to determine the current state of business training in otolaryngology residency programs in the United States and, second, to lay the groundwork for development of a business-of-medicine (BOM) curriculum. Cross-sectional survey. A survey concerning methodology and topics for management training of residents was mailed to the chairpersons or program directors of the 102 otolaryngology residency programs. A similar survey was sent to 576 otolaryngology graduates (classes of 2000, 2001, and 2002). An interactive BOM curriculum on CD-ROM was developed based on the results. The response rate among program directors was 74.5% (76 of 102), and among the otolaryngology graduates, 38.2% (220 of 575). Seventy-five percent of graduates rated their BOM training as poor or fair. Only 8% rated their BOM training as excellent. Twenty percent of the graduates responded to having a BOM course during residency. Recent graduates reported that a BOM course can best be taught through lectures and apprenticeship/mentoring, whereas program directors reported that a BOM course can best be taught through lectures and outside consultants. Graduates reported that coding compliance was the topic most neglected in residency, whereas program directors reported that coding compliance was the main topic covered in the business training. Both groups agreed that department attending physicians have the most impact on a resident's business training. Program directors reported that correct coding, planning one's entry into medical practice, risk management, and reimbursement issues are the most important topics for residents to learn, whereas recent graduates stated that the most important topics should be correct coding, office management, risk management, and reimbursement. The present study reflects a perceived necessity for improvement of BOM training in otolaryngology residency programs. Based on this finding, the outcome measures from the survey, and the authors' own

  12. Towards a Model of Integrated English Language Curriculum for Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwara, M. O.; Shiundu, J. O.; Indoshi, F. C.

    2009-01-01

    Design of the Integrated English Language Curriculum has been blamed for falling standards of students' competence in the subject. Teacher input in the curriculum design has rarely been considered in the centralized curriculum development approach used in Kenya. However, it is now recognized that teacher input is critical if curriculum is to be…

  13. 高中特色課程的開發與實施:以論證課程為例 Developing and Implementing Argumentation Training Curriculum as a High School-Based Feature Curriculum in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    洪逸文 Yi-Wen Hung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available 論證教學,不僅是近年來科學教育發展的一個重要趨勢,更是幫助學生面對未來多變社會的一種關鍵能力,因為許多研究都指出論證訓練可增進學生的高層次思考與溝通表達能力。本研究的目的在於發展一套適用於臺灣高中教學現場之論證課程,採用了TAP模式作為課程的論證架構。本研究採行動研究來呈現課程發展的歷程,發現課程具有幾個特色:本土性的日常生活議題、提供各式的課程鷹架與三階段的課程模組化。本研究主要利用探究式教學法進行論證教學,從課程實施的成效發現,探究式教學法與論證課程能有效提升學生論證能力及論證品質,更能強化學生對知識結構的理解與提升學生的批判性思考能力。 Argumentation is an important trend in science education worldwide. Moreover, it is also a key competence helping students to face the changing world in the future, for there are a lot of studies indicating that argumentation would help students foster higher thinking skills, such as reflection and critical thinking. This research was to develop an argumentation-training curriculum for Taiwan high schools and demonstrated the course of development and implementation through the action research made by a high school earth science teacher. We adopted Toulmin Argumentation Pattern (TAP as a framework in this curriculum. There were several characteristics in this curriculum, including issues from local environment, scaffolding strategies for teaching and learning and three-step modules in curriculum design. The research teacher adopted inquiry teaching through the whole curriculum. The results showed students’ argumentation ability had been improved. Besides, students’ understandings toward knowledge building and their critical thinking skills were also improved.

  14. Virtual Laparoscopic Training System Based on VCH Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiangzhou; Xu, Lang; He, Longjun; Guan, Songluan; Ming, Xing; Liu, Qian

    2017-04-01

    Laparoscopy has been widely used to perform abdominal surgeries, as it is advantageous in that the patients experience lower post-surgical trauma, shorter convalescence, and less pain as compared to traditional surgery. Laparoscopic surgeries require precision; therefore, it is imperative to train surgeons to reduce the risk of operation. Laparoscopic simulators offer a highly realistic surgical environment by using virtual reality technology, and it can improve the training efficiency of laparoscopic surgery. This paper presents a virtual Laparoscopic surgery system. The proposed system utilizes the Visible Chinese Human (VCH) to construct the virtual models and simulates real-time deformation with both improved special mass-spring model and morph target animation. Meanwhile, an external device that integrates two five-degrees-of-freedom (5-DOF) manipulators was designed and made to interact with the virtual system. In addition, the proposed system provides a modular tool based on Unity3D to define the functions and features of instruments and organs, which could help users to build surgical training scenarios quickly. The proposed virtual laparoscopic training system offers two kinds of training mode, skills training and surgery training. In the skills training mode, the surgeons are mainly trained for basic operations, such as laparoscopic camera, needle, grasp, electric coagulation, and suturing. In the surgery-training mode, the surgeons can practice cholecystectomy and removal of hepatic cysts by guided or non-guided teaching.

  15. The Applicant Based Training Model Setting Conditions for Recruiting Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    the recruiting districts there are functions performed that help guide and support the billet holders at the RSSs and RSs in the performance of their...one can use to evaluate and prioritize training requirements for key members of RSSs and RS. The following paragraphs offer general conclusions and...training model validates training for recruiters. Due to the geographical dispersion of the RSSs , distance learning initiatives could help support this type

  16. Preliminary development of the Active Colonoscopy Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available JungHun Choi1, Kale Ravindra1, Randolph Robert1, David Drozek21Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA; 2College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USAAbstract: Formal colonoscopy training requires a significant amount of time and effort. In particular, it requires actual patients for a realistic learning experience. The quality of colonoscopy training varies, and includes didactic courses and procedures proctored by skilled surgeons. A colonoscopy training model is occasionally used as part of the training method, but the effects are minute due to both the simple and tedious training procedures. To enhance the educational effect of the colonoscopy training model, the Active Colonoscopy Training Model (ACTM has been developed. ACTM is an interactive colonoscopy training device which can create the environment of a real colonoscopy procedure as closely as possible. It comprises a configurable rubber colon, a human torso, sensors, a display, and the control part. The ACTM provides audio and visual interaction to the trainee by monitoring important factors, such as forces caused by the distal tip and the shaft of the colonoscope and the pressure to open up the lumen and the localization of the distal tip. On the computer screen, the trainee can easily monitor the status of the colonoscopy, which includes the localization of the distal tip, maximum forces, pressure inside the colon, and surgery time. The forces between the rubber colon and the constraints inside the ACTM are measured and the real time display shows the results to the trainee. The pressure sensors will check the pressure at different parts of the colon. The real-time localized distal tip gives the colonoscopy trainee easier and more confident operation without introducing an additional device in the colonoscope. With the current need for colonoscopists and physicians, the ACTM can play an essential role resolving the problems of the current

  17. The effects of problem-based learning about modern concepts of education and classroom discipline models in education of students of the Teachers’ Training Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The paper elaborates the necessity of including the contents related to theoretical approaches to classroom discipline, research results on this topic and prevention models of classroom discipline in the curriculum of university education of future class teachers. Learning about the features of modern concepts of education and their understanding should precede learning about modern classroom discipline models in education of students of the Teachers’ Training Faculty. The selection of ...

  18. Research on Physical Education Curriculum Based on the Training Applied Talents in Higher Vocational Colleges%基于应用型人才培养的高职院校体育课程研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王吉全

    2014-01-01

    为探索高职院校体育课程与应用型人才培养的关系,促进高校体育课程与应用型人才培养的结合,运用文献资料、逻辑分析等研究方法对当前高职院校体育课程创新与应用型人才培养进行了分析。研究结果显示:创新思想贯穿于整个体育课程、教师思想贯穿于课程全过程、打造积极的课程创新环境等是促进体育课程创新与应用型人才培养的有效措施。%To explore vocational colleges sports curriculum and the relationship between the applied talent traing , promote the combination of colleges and universities sports curriculum and applied talents training , using the methods of literature study and logic analysis , the current higher vocational colleges sports curriculum innovation and applied talents training were analyzed .The results show that the innovation thought throughout the sports curriculum, teacher thought throughout the course curriculum , creating a positive environment , such as curriculum innovation is an effective measures to promote the physical education curriculum innovation and cultivate applied talents.

  19. Entrepreneurship Education at Indian Industrial Training Institutes – A Case Study of the Prescribed, Adopted and Enacted Curriculum in and around Bangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Zenner

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, India is a growing economy that needs skilled labour, self-employed entrepreneurs and employees to tackle its economic and social challenges. On the other hand, India faces high unemployment rates, especially among young people. Graduates from industrial training institutes (ITIs in particular are often facing difficulties in pursuing self-employment. Entrepreneurship education is an essential element in preparing young people for self-employment. This paper analyses how and to what extent entrepreneurship education has been conceived and implemented in vocational schools in and around Bangalore to face these challenges. Methodologically the authors use a three-step approach following the theories of a `prescribed', `adopted' or `enacted' curriculum. Qualitative interviews are used for the analysis of the adopted and enacted curriculum. The authors conclude that whereas the prescribed curriculum includes several elements of entrepreneurship education and teacher's understanding is in line with the prescription, the understanding is seldom translated into input in the day-to-day teaching. The plausible reasons for this gap are discussed in this paper.

  20. Further Evaluation of a Brief, Intensive Teacher-Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Tetreault, Allison; Hovanetz, Alyson; Strobel, Margaret; Garro, Joanie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the outcomes of a model program that was designed to train current teachers of children with autism. Nine certified special education teachers participating in an intensive 5-day summer training program were taught a relatively large number of specific skills in two areas (preference assessment and…

  1. Stochastic modelling of train delays and delay propagation in stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, J.

    2006-01-01

    A trade-off exists between efficiently utilizing the capacity of railway networks and improving the reliability and punctuality of train operations. This dissertation presents a new analytical probability model based on blocking time theory which estimates the knock-on delays of trains caused by

  2. Traffic Modelling for Moving-Block Train Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Tao; LI Ke-Ping

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new cellular automaton (CA) model for train control system simulation.In the proposed CA model,the driver reactions to train movements are captured by some updated rules.The space-time diagram of traffic flow and the trajectory of train movement is used to obtain insight into the characteristic behavior of railway traffic flow.A number of simulation results demonstrate that the proposed CA model can be successfully used for the simulations of railway traffic.Not only the characteristic behavior of railway traffic flow can be reproduced,but also the simulation values of the minimum time headway are close to the theoretical values.

  3. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  4. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  5. On inclusive education in the training of science teachers: the texture of the curriculum in practice - doi: 10.4025/actascieduc.v33i2.14407

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Borges Vilela-Ribeiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The proposed curriculum, as embodiment of culture, of relations of power, politics and economy are manifested in the university through pedagogical projects of their courses - PPC. In this way, considering the relevance of the question in a time of democratizing access to education, it must be also considered how will or how is being performed the permanence of all people in university, and how the future science teachers are being prepared for the diversity. Thus, we analyzed the PPC of the licentiate courses in sciences (Biology, Physics, Mathematics, and Chemistry of a public institution of higher education in Jataí City, Goiás State, focusing on Inclusive Education and how it is being dealt in these training courses for teachers. In the documents of the examined courses, there was no reference to training for diversity, and no discipline or reference approaching this subject.

  6. A Comparative Study of Tyler Model and Doll’s Perspective on Curriculum%泰勒模式与多尔课程观的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈是琳

    2015-01-01

    Tyler Model is one of the most influential curriculum paradigms in modern curriculum studies. But it has been challenged by post-modernism represented by Doll’s curriculum paradigm since the 1970s. In spite of the criticisms towards Tyler Model, it should not be replaced completely by a post-modern one. Tyler Model and Doll’s perspective on curriculum are not contradictory but complementary. In the study of curriculum development, we should combine these two paradigms together.

  7. The Robust Learning Model with a Spiral Curriculum: Implications for the Educational Effectiveness of Online Master Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Yoram; Neumann, Edith; Lewis, Shelia

    2017-01-01

    This study integrated the Spiral Curriculum approach into the Robust Learning Model as part of a continuous improvement process that was designed to improve educational effectiveness and then assessed the differences between the initial and integrated models as well as the predictability of the first course in the integrated learning model on a…

  8. Model-based analysis and reasoning in science: The MARS curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Kalyani; Glaser, Robert

    Scientists and researchers in many disciplines frequently resort to modeling and model-based reasoning to concretize abstract ideas, to simplify and clarify complex phenomena, to predict trends, and to explain mechanisms and processes. National projects working to reform science education explicitly recommend the development of an appreciation for the centrality of models in the teaching and learning of science. This article describes a model-centered, computer-supported, semester-long science curriculum for middle-school students designed to encourage conceptual understanding and to foster the development of model-based reasoning skills. In the Model-based Analysis and Reasoning in Science (MARS) project, an attempt is made to create an environment conducive to fostering conceptual understanding and reasoning about scientific phenomena that involve balance of forces. Visual models that are dynamic and interactive are presented not only to concretize abstract ideas but also as reasoning tools that give students the leverage to solve problems in a variety of contexts. This model-centered curriculum focuses on a network of concepts important for understanding hydrostatics; that is, floating and sinking, as an exemplar for the general principle of balance of forces. How students understand these concepts and use models as a disciplinary resource to engage in chains of reasoning that integrate concepts into networks of relations is of special interest for study. How students use that understanding in new situations within the same explanatory system is also being studied. A major pedagogical question is how middle-school students can be taught to engage in model-based reasoning, a form of reasoning that scientists routinely use.

  9. Modeling cultural behavior for military virtual training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbusch, P.; Schram, J.; Bosch, K. van den

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers on mission in areas with unfamiliar cultures must be able to take into account the norms of the local culture when assessing a situation, and must be able to adapt their behavior accordingly. Innovative technologies provide opportunity to train the required skills in an interactive and real

  10. Modeling Cultural Behavior for Military Virtual Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, K. van den; Kerbusch, P.J.M.; Schram, J.

    2012-01-01

    Soldiers on mission in areas with unfamiliar cultures must be able to take into account the norms of the local culture when assessing a situation, and must be able to adapt their behavior accordingly. Innovative technologies provide opportunity to train the required skills in an interactive and real

  11. Alternative Models for Training Developers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Richard A.

    Three steps may be taken to minimize the difficulties involved in educational development: 1) a realistic expectation should be projected in regard to the prowess of development; 2) the "state-of-the-art" should receive continuous improvement; and 3) training programs to prepare fully professional developers should be established as rapidly as…

  12. Training Ethical Psychologists: An Acculturation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Michael C.; Handelsman, Mitchell M.; Knapp, Samuel

    This paper posits the thesis that socialization into the profession of psychology is a process of acculturation. Students enter training with their own value traditions but are required to learn new ones when they become psychologists. The assumptions of the framework are that this "professional acculturation" (a) takes place over time, (b)…

  13. Modeling the Optimization of Intermodal Train Schedules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Berliner; Crainic, Teodor Gabriel

    In order to see a shift in modal split in favour of trains as envisioned by the European Union it is necessary for intermodal transport solutions to compete with trucking. Assuming it is possible to compete on price it is necessary to achieve transit times in intermodal networks that are similar...

  14. Wind energy curriculum development at GWU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Stephen M [GWU

    2013-06-08

    A wind energy curriculum has been developed at the George Washington University, School of Engineering and Applied Science. Surveys of student interest and potential employers expectations were conducted. Wind industry desires a combination of mechanical engineering training with electrical engineering training. The curriculum topics and syllabus were tested in several graduate/undergraduate elective courses. The developed curriculum was then submitted for consideration.

  15. An animal model to train Lichtenstein inguinal hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Presch, I; Pommergaard, H C

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Inguinal hernia repair is a common surgical procedure, and the majority of operations worldwide are performed ad modum Lichtenstein (open tension-free mesh repair). Until now, no suitable surgical training model has been available for this procedure. We propose an experimental surgical...... training model for Lichtenstein's procedure on the male and female pig. METHODS: In the pig, an incision is made 1 cm cranially to the inguinal sulcus where a string of subcutaneous lymph nodes is located and extends toward the pubic tubercle. The spermatic cord is located in a narrow sulcus in the pig...... pigs, and a total of 55 surgeons have been educated to perform Lichtenstein's hernia repair in these animals. CONCLUSIONS: This new experimental surgical model for training Lichtenstein's hernia repair mimics the human inguinal anatomy enough to make it suitable as a training model. The operation...

  16. Training of Evaluators in the Third World: Implementation of the Action Training Model (ATM) in Kenya and Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, H. S.

    The Action Training Model (ATM) was developed for the delivery of evaluation training to development workers in Kenya and Botswana and implemented under the aegis of the German Foundation for International Development. Training of evaluators is a challenge in any context, but in the Third World environment, evaluation training offers special…

  17. A community initiative for developing data and modeling driven curriculum modules for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Merwade, V.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrology and geoscience education at the undergraduate and graduate levels may benefit greatly from a structured approach to pedagogy that utilizes modeling, authentic data, and simulation exercises to engage students in practice-like activities. Extensive evidence in the educational literature suggests that students retain more of their instruction, and attain higher levels of mastery over content, when interactive and practice-like activities are used to contextualize traditional lecture-based and theory-based instruction. However, it is also important that these activities carefully link the use of data and modeling to abstract theory, to promote transfer of knowledge to other contexts. While this type of data-based activity has been practiced in the hydrology classroom for decades, the hydrology community still lacks a set of standards and a mechanism for community-based development, publication, and review of this type of curriculum material. A community-based initiative is underway to develop a set curriculum materials to teach hydrology in the engineering and geoscience university classroom using outcomes-based, pedagogically rigorous modules that use authentic data and modeling experiences to complement traditional lecture-based instruction. A preliminary design for a community cyberinfrastructure for shared module development and publication, and for module topics and outcomes and ametadata and module interoperability standards, will be presented, along with the results of a series of community surveys and workshops informing this design.

  18. Effects of modelling examples in complex procedural skills training: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, Anne Sofie; Hilberg, Ole; van Gog, Tamara; Charles, Peder; Eika, Berit

    2013-09-01

    -test and a 43% higher score at the retention test. The present study shows, that integrating modelling examples into the curriculum of bronchoscopy simulation training optimises the role of the instructor and enhances novices' learning outcomes, presumably by optimising cognitive load during training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The theory of planned behaviour in medical education: a model for integrating professionalism training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Ray; Elder, William; Hustedde, Carol; Milam, Andrea; Joyce, Jennifer

    2008-08-01

    Teaching and evaluating professionalism remain important issues in medical education. However, two factors hinder attempts to integrate curricular elements addressing professionalism into medical school training: there is no common definition of medical professionalism used across medical education, and there is no commonly accepted theoretical model upon which to integrate professionalism into the curriculum. This paper proposes a definition of professionalism, examines this definition in the context of some of the previous definitions of professionalism and connects this definition to the attitudinal roots of professionalism. The problems described above bring uncertainty about the best content and methods with which to teach professionalism in medical education. Although various aspects of professionalism have been incorporated into medical school curricula, content, teaching and evaluation remain controversial. We suggest that intervening variables, which may augment or interfere with medical students' implementation of professionalism knowledge, skills and, therefore, attitudes, may go unaddressed. We offer a model based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), which describes the relationships of attitudes, social norms and perceived behavioural control with behaviour. It has been used to predict a wide range of behaviours, including doctor professional behaviours. Therefore, we propose an educational model that expands the TPB as an organisational framework that can integrate professionalism training into medical education. We conclude with a discussion about the implications of using this model to transform medical school curricula to develop positive professionalism attitudes, alter the professionalism social norms of the medical school and increase students' perceived control over their behaviours.

  20. 食品检验综合技能实训课程的开发与实践%Food Inspection Comprehensive Skills Training Curriculum Development and Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李殿鑫; 廖明星

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve contradictions between the traditional vocational education teaching system and the enterprises demand on the food inspection comprehensive skill training course,a implement plan is working process-oriented curriculum development of the food inspection comprehensive skill training course,which includes reconstruction on the side of teaching by introducing requirements from enterprise or industry into curriculum design,such as content re-arrangement,resources reorganization,organization form,etc.,and the revision of the teaching goal based on the food enterprise inspection work process guidance and level propulsion.New course system is becoming dominant at pointing to goal realization with course capability,process simulated workplace and materials application in the curriculum teaching.The new model better accomplish the aim of personnel training vocational education through task-driven and level propulsion teaching practice under food industry inspect work scene,such as,student can complete the majority of the inspection project at corresponding post through a simple guide after graduation,the time of adapting to new enterprise post reduced from 1 years to 2 weeks.%为解决传统职业教育下食品检验综合技能实训课程教学实施体系与企业需求的突出矛盾,依据食品企业检验工作过程导向,将企业、行业用人要求引入课程设计,修订了该课程的教学目标,并在内容编排、教学资源重组、教学实施的组织等全新再造,新的课程体系在课程能力化、教学职场化、教材实践化均指向课程目标的实现,情景化任务式层次推进教学实践更好地完成人才培养目标,学生毕业后在企业中适应工作岗位的时间由1年缩短至2周,岗位上绝大多数项目检验只需要简单地引导即可完成相应的工作任务.

  1. Joint Curriculum Development of the Training Program for Five-Year, Rural-Oriented, Tuition-Waived Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiang-Xin; Niu, Li; Xia, Xiu-Long; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    To alleviate the shortage of competent undergraduate-level medical professionals in the central and western rural regions of China, from 2010 to 2012, the Chinese government mandated 100 medical colleges to recruit 30,000 rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMS) for the township and village hospitals. But no educational curriculum is…

  2. The Impact of Overseas Training on Curriculum Innovation and Change in English Language Education in Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daguo; Edwards, Viv

    2013-01-01

    This article assesses the impact of a UK-based professional development programme on curriculum innovation and change in English Language Education (ELE) in Western China. Based on interviews, focus group discussions and observation of a total of 48 English teachers who had participated in an overseas professional development programme influenced…

  3. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Training Requirements Analysis Model (TRAMOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The training requirements analysis model (TRAMOD) described in this report represents an important portion of the larger effort called the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study. TRAMOD is the second of three models that comprise an LCC impact modeling system for use in the early stages of system development. As…

  4. The Development of a National Curriculum Guide for Persian: Themes, Genres, Standards-based Goals, and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Mills

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wang (2009 has challenged foreign language scholars to “engage in rigorous discussions to develop language-specific examples and performance indicators to guide program development and decision-making for less commonly taught language (LCTL instructors” (p. 284. The 2011-2012 STARTALK programs in Persian aimed to encourage such rigorous discussion through the development of a National Curriculum Guide in Persian. Persian professionals explored current theories in second language acquisition, examined curricular resources and models, and shared successful teaching materials. This article describes the rationale, procedures, and outcomes of a series of faculty development events that aimed to create a model for curriculum development for the LCTLs and, perhaps, also for other language programs in the context of higher education. The final curriculum guide produced by the program participants includes overarching themes and genres, Standards-based goals, strategies for authentic assessment, and model unit plans.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Stress: An Approach to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    Stress is an integral element of the operational conditions experienced by combat medics. The effects of stress can compromise the performance of combat medics who must reach and treat their comrades under often threatening circumstances. Examples of these effects include tunnel vision, loss of motor control, and diminished hearing, which can result in an inability to perceive further danger, satisfactorily treat the casualty, and communicate with others. While many training programs strive to recreate this stress to aid in the experiential learning process, stress inducement may not always be feasible or desired. In addition, live simulations are not always a practical, convenient, and repeatable method of training. Instead, presenting situational training on a personal computer is proposed as an effective training platform in which the effects of stress can be addressed in a different way. We explore the cognitive and motor effects of stress, as well as the benefits of training for mitigating these effects in real life. While many training applications focus on inducing stress in order to "condition" the stress response, the author explores the possibilities of modeling stress to produce a similar effect. Can presenting modeled effects of stress help prepare or inoculate soldiers for stressful situations in which they must perform at a high level? This paper investigates feasibility of modeling stress and describes the preliminary design considerations of a combat medic training system that utilizes this method of battlefield preparation.

  6. Application of ‘Iceberg Model ’ in the Curriculum System Constructing of Vocational Colleges%“冰山模型”在高职课程体系构建中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶红; 李存园

    2014-01-01

    Curriculum system is the key to protect and enhance the quality of education. The “iceberg model” basic theory is applied to vocational tourism management curriculum system construction, and it can help to change the disciplinary system for the training of student-led curriculum model and recessive quality. Using the basic theory of “iceberg model” to exporting the higher education curriculum system, constructing the curriculum system of the specific ability, general ability, and cross-professional ability, professional core competencies corresponding with platform courses, orientation courses, expanding courses and public courses consisting of a complete curriculum. In the course of teaching staff, curriculum such as the practice of teaching and learning condition, to ensure smooth implementation of the curriculum system. In the course of teaching methods emphasis on the construction process, the order and proportion, teaching staff, curriculum, such as the practice of teaching and learning conditions, to ensure smooth implementation of the curriculum system.%课程体系是保障和提升教育质量的关键。将“冰山模型”基本理论应用于高职旅游管理课程体系的构建,有利于改变学科体系为主导的课程模式和学生隐性素质的培养。以“冰山模型”基本理论为基础构建与职业特定能力、行业通用能力、跨行业职业能力、职业核心能力相对应的平台课程、方向课程、拓展课程和公共课程组成的完整课程体系,在课程建设过程中重视教学方式、课程的顺序和比例、师资队伍建设、实践教学条件等,能够确保课程体系的顺利实施。

  7. Central Florida Film Production Technology Training Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Community Coll., Orlando, FL.

    The Central Florida Film Production Technology Training program provided training to prepare persons for employment in the motion picture industry. Students were trained in stagecraft, sound, set construction, camera/editing, and post production. The project also developed a curriculum model that could be used for establishing an Associate in…

  8. Managing Highway Maintenance--Training Guide and Catalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Clyde A.

    A model curriculum is reported for training personnel who are responsible for managing highway maintenance field operations. The training is organized and sequenced by five broad areas--management problems, management by objective, work planning, work control and management systems. In each area, one or more training units are provided for each of…

  9. 产学研下创新型研究生人才培养课程体系探索%Exploration of the Curriculum System for Innovative Postgraduate Training under Industry-University-Research Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡顺仁; 赵红

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum system is an important link in postgraduate training, especially for cultivating innovative talents under the industry-university-research cooperation . This paper discussed the necessity of personnel training under industry-university-research cooperation, analyzed five key factors for innovative curriculum system settings, including training target, course characteristics and influencing factors, curriculum function, optimization and adjustment of curriculum structure, implementation and evaluation of curriculum system.%课程体系是研究生人才培养的一个重要环节,对产学研下培养创新型人才尤为重要。本文从产学研人才培养必要性出发,分析了创新型课程体系的设置需要从培养目标、课程特点及影响因素、课程功能、优化调整课程体系结构、课程体系实施与评价机制五个关键因素。

  10. Development of Curriculum for ""Information"" Teacher Training Based upon Information Science and Technology Education : Comparative Study on Existent Teacher Training Curricula

    OpenAIRE

    山本, 透; 上田, 邦夫

    2003-01-01

    The rapid progress of advanced information technology is going to change the situation and environment which surround information education. A new government-guidelines-for-teaching for high schools was notified on March 29, 1999, and a subject of information was newly established. Furthermore, the contents of the curriculum in connection with the subject of information license were clarified in July, 2000. While it has been indefinite what subject course is needed from a viewpoint of ""infor...

  11. Analysis of different training models for handball goalkeepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Muñoz Moreno

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the goalkeeper for the team performance is critical, however, publications on specific preparation are few in number, with no clear lines of work. The present study aims to analyze the different methodologies used in the specific training handball goalkeeper, by setting what the different training models as well as deepen the potential applications of each.For this purpose, it was conducted an extensive literature review, categorizing each document based on the performance factor on which prioritizes: physical-technical, perceptual and tactical. The analysis of results found that there were no other models than those categorized, being more numerous publications falling under physical and technical training, followed by the perceptive and very few exist on tactical training. In light of the results seems essential to conduct a specific training program for goalkeeper, taking into account the most relevant variables for optimal performance. No single factor seems more relevant to any stage of training, it being necessary to deepen it.Keywords: specific training, perception, decision making, tactical

  12. Modeling initiation trains based on HMX and TATB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. C.; Maisey, M.

    2017-01-01

    There will always be a requirement to reduce the size of initiation trains. However, as the size is reduced the performance characteristics can be compromised. A detailed science-based understanding of the processes (ignition and growth to detonation) which determine the performance characteristics is required to enable compact and robust initiation trains to be designed. To assess the use of numerical models in the design of initiation trains a modeling study has been undertaken, with the aim of understanding the initiation of TATB and HMX charges by a confined, surface mounted detonator. The effect of detonator diameter and detonator confinement on the formation of dead zones in the acceptor explosives has been studied. The size of dead zones can be reduced by increasing the diameter of the detonator and by increasing the impedance of the confinement. The implications for the design of initiation trains are discussed.

  13. Training Effectiveness at PT XYZ Using Kirkpatrick Model and Return on Investment of Training (ROI-Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Jonny

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of Kirkpatrick model and Return on Investment of Training at PT XYZ. Observation was applied to this research. The result has shown several facts such as trainee’s feedback score was 4.62 above 4.10 as required by the company in terms of reaction, the average final exam score was 3.66 above 3.00 as required by the company in terms of learning, the trainees’ superiors’ feedback score was 3.53 above 3.00 as required by the company and Return on Investment of Training (ROI-Training was 58.88% above 15% as required by the company. With these results, the company can conclude that the program is effective in nurturing its supervisory leaders.

  14. Adapting a community of practice model to design an innovative ethics curriculum in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Sudeshni; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    The focus of healthcare ethics within the framework of ethical principles and philosophical foundations has always, in recent times, been the community, namely, the healthcare provider, the patient or, in research, the study participant. An initiative is thus described whereby a community of practice (CoP) model was developed around health ethics in health research, education and clinical care. The ethics curriculum was redesigned to include several components that are integrated and all embracing, namely, health research ethics, healthcare ethics, health personnel education in ethics and global and public health ethics. A CoP is a group who share a common interest and a desire to learn from and contribute to the community with their variety of experiences. The CoP is dynamic and organic, generating knowledge that can be translated into effective healthcare delivery and ethical research. It requires the collaboration and social presence of active participants such as community members, healthcare professionals and educators, ethicists and policy makers to benefit the community by developing approaches that adapt to and resonate with the community and its healthcare needs. Philosophical principles constitute the foundation or underpinning of this innovative curriculum. Recommendations are presented that will continue to guide the consolidation and sustainability of the CoP.

  15. Adopsi Model Competency Based Training dalam Kewirausahaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Santra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is improving the teaching method in entrepreneurship subject. This research adopted the competency based training (CBT into the entrepreneurship. The major task in this research is formulated and designed the entrepreneurship competency. Entrepreneurship competency indicated by Personal, Strategic and Situational and Business competence. All of entrepreneurship competences are described into sub topic of competence. After designing and formulating the game and simulation the research continuing to implement the competency based training in the real class. The time consumed to implementing the CBT one semester, starting on September 2006 to early February 2007. The lesson learnt from the implementation period, the CBT could improve the student competence in Personal, Situational Strategic and Business. The three of the competencies are important for the success entrepreneur. It is a sign of application of “Kurikulum Berbasis Kompetensi”. There are many evidences to describe the achievement of the CBT in entrepreneurship subject. Firstly, physically achievement, that all of the student’s business plan could became the real business. The evidences are presented by picture of the student’s real business. Secondly theoretically achievement, that the Personal, Situational Strategic and Business competence statistically have significant relation with Business Plan even Real Business quality. The effect of the Personal, Situational Strategic and Business competence to Business Plan quality is 84.4%. and, to the Real Business quality 77.2%. The statistic’s evidence suggests that the redesign of the entrepreneurship subject is the right way. The content of the entrepreneur competence (Personal, Situational and Strategic and Business competence have impact to the student to conduct and running for own business.

  16. Alcohol education and training in pre-registration nursing: a national survey to determine curriculum content in the United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Aisha S; Webster, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol-related harm impacts significantly on the health of the population. Nurses are often among the first health professionals that many patients with alcohol-related problems come into contact with and have been identified as playing a key role but may be ill-prepared to respond. Future nurses need to have the skills, knowledge and clinical confidence to respond to patients suffering from alcohol-related harm. A pre-registration curriculum that ensures a nursing workforce fit for practice in responding to alcohol-related harm is necessary. To determine the level of alcohol education and training content in the pre-registration curriculum for nursing in the United Kingdom (UK). To establish whether there are variations in the pre-registration curriculum content across the UK. A descriptive study. All 68 UK Higher Education Institutions offering a total of 111 pre-registration courses for nurses were invited to participate in the study. Twenty nine completed questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 26%. The largest number of identified responders were from England (n=15), with 3 from Scotland and 1 each from Wales and Northern Ireland. Nine Universities chose not to identify themselves. An online semi-structured questionnaire survey was used to collect the study data. Teaching of alcohol and alcohol related harm was mainly delivered during the second year of a pre-registration nursing programme provided mainly to adult and mental health students. Overall, the majority of alcohol related content that is provided within the responding pre-registration nursing courses relates to biophysiology, aetiology, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the need for a greater and more relevant focus of alcohol education to pre-registration nursing students of all fields of practice incorporating an integrated approach across all years of study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Training Internal Medicine Residents in Social Medicine and Research-Based Health Advocacy: A Novel, In-Depth Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Gaurab; Pels, Richard J; Stark, Rachel L; Jain, Priyank; Bor, David H; McCormick, Danny

    2017-04-01

    Health disparities are pervasive worldwide. Physicians have a unique vantage point from which they can observe the ways social, economic, and political factors impact health outcomes and can be effective advocates for enhanced health outcomes and health equity. However, social medicine and health advocacy curricula are uncommon in postgraduate medical education. In academic year (AY) 2012, the Cambridge Health Alliance internal medicine residency program transformed an elective into a required social medicine and research-based health advocacy curriculum. The course has three major innovations: it has a yearlong longitudinal curriculum, it is required for all residents, and all residents complete a group research-based health advocacy project within the curricular year. The authors describe the structure, content, and goals of this curriculum. Over the last four years (AYs 2012-2015), residents (17/32; 53%) have rated the overall quality of the course highly (mean = 5.2, where 6 = outstanding; standard deviation = 0.64). In each year since the new course has been implemented, all scholarly work from the course has been presented at conferences by 31 resident presenters and/or coauthors. The course seems to enhance the residency program's capacity to recruit high-caliber residents and faculty members. The authors are collecting qualitative and quantitative data on the impact of the course. They will use their findings to advocate for a national health advocacy competency framework. Recommendations about how to initiate or further develop social medicine and health advocacy curricula are offered.

  18. A review of the constructs, curriculum and training data from a workforce development program for recovery support specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Beth C; McGuffin, Beverly A

    2007-01-01

    The theoretical underpinnings, training content and initial training data of a workforce development program are described. The program was designed for people with psychiatric and/or substance use disorders, and provides skills to improve their employability in the behavioral health system. Trainees rated their knowledge, skills and attitudes as improved after training. Supervisor ratings of participants after three months of employment are consistent with the participant's self-ratings.

  19. Evaluation of Model-Based Training for Vertical Guidance Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feary, Michael; Palmer, Everett; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Alkin, Marty; McCrobie, Dan; Kelley, Jerry; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper will summarize the results of a study which introduces a structured, model based approach to learning how the automated vertical guidance system works on a modern commercial air transport. The study proposes a framework to provide accurate and complete information in an attempt to eliminate confusion about 'what the system is doing'. This study will examine a structured methodology for organizing the ideas on which the system was designed, communicating this information through the training material, and displaying it in the airplane. Previous research on model-based, computer aided instructional technology has shown reductions in the amount of time to a specified level of competence. The lessons learned from the development of these technologies are well suited for use with the design methodology which was used to develop the vertical guidance logic for a large commercial air transport. The design methodology presents the model from which to derive the training material, and the content of information to be displayed to the operator. The study consists of a 2 X 2 factorial experiment which will compare a new method of training vertical guidance logic and a new type of display. The format of the material used to derive both the training and the display will be provided by the Operational Procedure Methodology. The training condition will compare current training material to the new structured format. The display condition will involve a change of the content of the information displayed into pieces that agree with the concepts with which the system was designed.

  20. Improving the Medical Curriculum in Predoctoral Dental Education: Recommendations From the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Committee on Predoctoral Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Matthew J; Bennett, Jeffrey D; DeLuke, Dean M; Evans, Erik W; Hudson, John W; Nattestad, Anders; Ness, Gregory M; Yeung, Allison

    2017-02-01

    Dental procedures are often performed on patients who present with some level of medical fragility. In many dental schools, the exercise of taking a medical history is all too often a transcription of information to the dental chart, with little emphasis on the presurgical risk assessment and the development of a treatment plan appropriate to the medical status of the dental patient. Changes in dentistry, driven by an increasingly medically complex population of dental patients, combined with treatment advances rooted in the biomedical sciences necessitate the adaptation of our dental education to include a stronger background in systemic health. Many predoctoral educators in the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) have expressed concern about the medical preparedness of our dental students; therefore, the AAOMS and its Committee on Predoctoral Education and Training have provided recommendations for improving the medical curriculum in predoctoral dental education, including a strengthening of training in clinical medicine and biomedical sciences, with specific recommendations for improved training of our dental students and dental faculty. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Teacher Training by Means of a School-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore how a school-based training model (SBTM) could help to address the shortage of teachers. This model also allows, among other aspects, for poor and disadvantaged students to study while they gain experience. This article reports on the results of the SBTM implemented by a South African university, whereby…

  2. Tax Policy in a Model of Search with Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; de Mooij, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a model of search on the labour market with training. The model reveals how the tax system can restore the social optimum if the Hosios condition is not satisfied in the private equilibrium. Furthermore, the effects are explored of a second-best reform from average to marginal ta

  3. Modelling expected train passenger delays on large scale railway networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2006-01-01

    Forecasts of regularity for railway systems have traditionally – if at all – been computed for trains, not for passengers. Relatively recently it has become possible to model and evaluate the actual passenger delays by a passenger regularity model for the operation already carried out. First...

  4. Simulating disturbances and modelling expected train passenger delays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2006-01-01

    Forecasts of regularity for railway systems have traditionally – if at all – been computed for trains, not for passengers. It has only relatively recently become possible to model and evaluate the actual passenger delays. This paper describes how it is possible to use a passenger regularity model...

  5. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) for neurogenic dysphagia: training curriculum of the German Society of Neurology and the German stroke society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewas, Rainer; Glahn, Jörg; Helfer, Christine; Ickenstein, Guntram; Keller, Jochen; Ledl, Christian; Lindner-Pfleghar, Beate; G Nabavi, Darius; Prosiegel, Mario; Riecker, Axel; Lapa, Sriramya; Stanschus, Sönke; Warnecke, Tobias; Busse, Otto

    2016-02-25

    Neurogenic dysphagia is one of the most frequent and prognostically relevant neurological deficits in a variety of disorders, such as stroke, parkinsonism and advanced neuromuscular diseases. Flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now probably the most frequently used tool for objective dysphagia assessment in Germany. It allows evaluation of the efficacy and safety of swallowing, determination of appropriate feeding strategies and assessment of the efficacy of different swallowing manoeuvres. The literature furthermore indicates that FEES is a safe and well-tolerated procedure. In spite of the huge demand for qualified dysphagia diagnostics in neurology, a systematic FEES education has not yet been established. The structured training curriculum presented in this article aims to close this gap and intends to enforce a robust and qualified FEES service. As management of neurogenic dysphagia is not confined to neurologists, this educational programme is applicable to other clinicians and speech-language therapists with expertise in dysphagia as well. The systematic education in carrying out FEES across a variety of different professions proposed by this curriculum will help to spread this instrumental approach and to improve dysphagia management.

  6. Wise teachers train better DNN acoustic models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryan Price; Ken-ichi Iso; Koichi Shinoda

    2016-01-01

    .... Neural network acoustic models that can utilize speaker-adaptive features, have deep and wide layers, or more computationally expensive architectures, for example, often obtain best recognition...

  7. OPTIMAL TRAINING POLICY FOR PROMOTION - STOCHASTIC MODELS OF MANPOWER SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.S. Yadavalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the optimal planning of manpower training programmes in a manpower system with two grades is discussed. The planning of manpower training within a given organization involves a trade-off between training costs and expected return. These planning problems are examined through models that reflect the random nature of manpower movement in two grades. To be specific, the system consists of two grades, grade 1 and grade 2. Any number of persons in grade 2 can be sent for training and after the completion of training, they will stay in grade 2 and will be given promotion as and when vacancies arise in grade 1. Vacancies arise in grade 1 only by wastage. A person in grade 1 can leave the system with probability p. Vacancies are filled with persons in grade 2 who have completed the training. It is assumed that there is a perfect passing rate and that the sizes of both grades are fixed. Assuming that the planning horizon is finite and is T, the underlying stochastic process is identified as a finite state Markov chain and using dynamic programming, a policy is evolved to determine how many persons should be sent for training at any time k so as to minimize the total expected cost for the entire planning period T.

  8. Integrating professionalism into the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Helen; van Mook, Walther; Fewtrell, Ray; Wass, Val

    2012-01-01

    Professional values and behaviours are intrinsic to all medical practice yet remain one of the most difficult subjects to integrate explicitly into a curriculum. Professionalism in the twenty-first century raises challenges not only for the adaptation of the medical training programme to changing societal values but also for ensuring that trainees gain the skills for self-directed continuous development and future revalidation. This article is an introduction to the AMEE Guide in Medical Education No 61: Integrating Professionalism into the Curriculum ( www.amee.org ), which is based on the extensive contemporary available literature. An evidence-based approach has been taken throughout the Guide as it focuses on instilling professionalism positively into both undergraduate and postgraduate training. It takes a structured, stepwise approach and sequentially addresses: (i) agreeing an institutional definition, (ii) structuring the curriculum to integrate learning across all years, (iii) suggesting learning models, (iv) harnessing the impact of the formal, informal and hidden curricula and (v) assessing the learning of the trainee. A few well-evaluated case studies for both teaching and assessment have been selected to illustrate the recommendations.

  9. A Suggested In-Service Training Model Based on Turkish Preschool Teachers' Conceptions for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadayi, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, teacher professionalization has been upgrading and the status, training and working conditions of teachers have received a great deal of interest for sustainable education. It is recognized that if teachers are equipped with adequate professional knowledge and personal practical knowledge, they will become active curriculum planners at…

  10. Models of Professional and Paraprofessional Training in Refugee Mental Health. Task VI--Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, George; Bamford, Pauline

    Pursuant to the mission of the University of Minnesota's Mental Health Technical Assistance Center for the state refugee assistance programs, this report presents models of culturally sensitive training for professional and paraprofessional personnel who provide mental health service to refugees. After an introduction which places this report in…

  11. Health Policy in Physician Assistant Education: Teaching Considerations and a Model Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Vasco Deon; Cawley, James F; Kayingo, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Recognition is growing within the medical academic community that future clinicians will need the tools to understand and influence health policy decisions. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, future clinicians will need not only clinical competence for successful practice but also an understanding of how health systems function. Although the fourth edition of the Accreditation Standards for Physician Assistant Education contains provisions and stipulations for the teaching of health topics in general and health policy specifically, physician assistant (PA) educators retain little consensus regarding either learning objectives or specific rubrics for teaching these important concepts. In this article, we discuss approaches for teaching health policy, delineate useful educational resources for PA faculty, and propose a model curriculum.

  12. Stochastic models for spike trains of single neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Sampath, G

    1977-01-01

    1 Some basic neurophysiology 4 The neuron 1. 1 4 1. 1. 1 The axon 7 1. 1. 2 The synapse 9 12 1. 1. 3 The soma 1. 1. 4 The dendrites 13 13 1. 2 Types of neurons 2 Signals in the nervous system 14 2. 1 Action potentials as point events - point processes in the nervous system 15 18 2. 2 Spontaneous activi~ in neurons 3 Stochastic modelling of single neuron spike trains 19 3. 1 Characteristics of a neuron spike train 19 3. 2 The mathematical neuron 23 4 Superposition models 26 4. 1 superposition of renewal processes 26 4. 2 Superposition of stationary point processe- limiting behaviour 34 4. 2. 1 Palm functions 35 4. 2. 2 Asymptotic behaviour of n stationary point processes superposed 36 4. 3 Superposition models of neuron spike trains 37 4. 3. 1 Model 4. 1 39 4. 3. 2 Model 4. 2 - A superposition model with 40 two input channels 40 4. 3. 3 Model 4. 3 4. 4 Discussion 41 43 5 Deletion models 5. 1 Deletion models with 1nd~endent interaction of excitatory and inhibitory sequences 44 VI 5. 1. 1 Model 5. 1 The basic de...

  13. Gelatin model for training ultrasound-guided puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Campos Moraes Amato

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is indispensable that members of the medical profession receive the technical training needed to enable them to rapidly obtain effective vascular access. Training procedures should be used judiciously to familiarize students with the technique. However, existing models are expensive or ineffective, and models need to be developed that are similar to what will be encountered in real patients.OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate creation and application of a gelatin model for training ultrasound-guided puncture.METHOS: The model was made using a mixture of colorless gelatin and water in a transparent plastic receptacle with two pairs of orifices of different diameters, through which two plastic tubes were inserted, to simulate blood vessels.RESULTS: The model was a close approximation to the real medical procedure in several aspects, since gelatin has a similar consistency to human tissues, providing a more faithful reproduction of the tactile sensation at the moment when the needle reaches the interior of a vessel and its contents are aspirated.CONCLUSIONS: The method proposed here can be used to easily construct a low-cost model using everyday materials that is suitable for large-scale training of ultrasound-guided puncture.

  14. Train Control System Formalization Modeling oriented Movement Authority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chinese Train Control System-3(CTCS-3 was integrated via various control system devices, assurance of CTCS-3 system transmission probability relied on empirical judgment, it is necessary to form its formalization to support integration for system stability of the whole CTCS-3. Movement Authority(MA acts on the whole information process of CTCS-3 to control train, its process properties can be as the reflection of CTCS probability. Aiming at that,  paper selected MA as the objective, proposed MA-oriented CTCS-3 formalization modeling. Paper designed generation and transmission algorithms of MA, formed MA computation models for application functions. Based on computation models, paper constructed MA hierarchical Colored Petri Nets(CPN models, and completed MA timed CPN model, the report and experimental result demonstrate that the model proposed is effective and can reflect CTCS-3 system properties accurately. 

  15. Modeling of movements in sports training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashuba V.A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate data are expounded about methodical approaches at the modeling of technique of motor actions in sport. Practical material is presented on questions of design and perfection of technique of motor actions on the example of different types of sport. The model of technique of running step is offered on a line in short-track. A cross-correlation analysis between resulting speed of general centre-of-mass body of sportsmen and biomechanics descriptions exposed six important indexes. These indexes are plugged in a statistical model at run on a line. It is set that on the initial stages of preparation of sportsmen it is necessary to take into account the biokinematics and biodynamic structure of technique of motive actions.

  16. AISIM (Automated Interactive Simulation Modeling System) VAX Version Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    AD-Ri6t 436 AISIM (RUTOMATED INTERACTIVE SIMULATION MODELING 1/2 SYSTEM) VAX VERSION TRAI (U) HUGHES AIRCRAFT CO FULLERTON CA GROUND SYSTEMS GROUP S...Continue on reverse if necessary and Identify by block number) THIS DOCUMENT IS THE TRAINING MANUAL FOR THE AUTOMATED INTERACTIVE SIMULATION MODELING SYSTEM...form. Page 85 . . . . . . . . APPENDIX B SIMULATION REPORT FOR WORKING EXAMPLE Pa jPage.8 7AD-Ai6i 46 ISIM (AUTOMATED INTERACTIVE SIMULATION MODELING 2

  17. Teacher collaborative curriculum design in technical vocational colleges: a strategy for maintaining curriculum consistency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, N.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Pieters, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) curriculum requires continuous renewal and constant involvement of stakeholders in the redesign process. Due to a lack of curriculum design expertise, TVET institutions in developing contexts encounter challenges maintaining and advancing the

  18. Teacher collaborative curriculum design in technical vocational colleges: a strategy for maintaining curriculum consistency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, N.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Pieters, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) curriculum requires continuous renewal and constant involvement of stakeholders in the redesign process. Due to a lack of curriculum design expertise, TVET institutions in developing contexts encounter challenges maintaining and advancing the qu

  19. Emerging Models of Teacher Training in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, changes have occurred that have had a fundamental impact on Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in England. There has been a move from a model dominated by the higher education institutions (HEIs) to a school-HEI "partnership." High stakes inspections have been given a greater role by the government and this has led to…

  20. Emerging Models of Teacher Training in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, changes have occurred that have had a fundamental impact on Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in England. There has been a move from a model dominated by the higher education institutions (HEIs) to a school-HEI "partnership." High stakes inspections have been given a greater role by the government and this has led to…

  1. Modeling of power train by applying the virtual prototype concept; Kaso genkei ni yoru power train no model ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, S.; Harada, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Komori, S. [Mazda Motor Corp., Hiroshima (Japan); Sumida, S. [U-Shin Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes the simulation of power train that includes the model developed by applying the virtual prototype concept. By this concept, subsystem models which consist of functional model and mechanism models are integrated into a total system model. This peculiarity in architecture of model, which is called the hierarchical structure, enables us to model a system of large scale with many units, systems and parts easily. Two kinds of computer simulations are performed. One is engine revolution fluctuation by accessory load input, and the other is changing gears by automatic transmission. They are verified to have sufficient accuracy. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Estimation model of training support system for Finite Element Analysis and implementation of training scenario as knowledge patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Murayama

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an arrangement method of FEA modeling knowledge by using a design pattern methodology, and deals with an estimation method of FEA training scenario. The prototype support system and its training knowledge can be arranged and classified in several patterns, while the mechanics of a beam structure has been picked up as an example of training subject. Essential evaluation problems were prepared for checking the synthetic achievement and the effectivity of training support system onto any beginners of the code called MARC/MENTAT has been investigated. Through the simulation with the prototype training support system, an evaluation model as the synthetic achievement test for any training scenario was shown with the degree vector. Observing the reusability of training programs, the compression rate of iterated common operations was estimated for the prototype training support system.

  3. Core curriculum for the heart rhythm specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Jose L; Arribas, Fernando; Botto, Giovanni Luca; Huikuri, Heikki; Kraemer, Lars I; Linde, Cecilia; Morgan, John M; Schalij, Martin; Simantirakis, Emmanuel; Wolpert, Christian; Villard, Marie-Christine; Poirey, Julie; Karaim-Fanchon, Svya; Deront, Keren

    2009-08-01

    Heart rhythm (HR) management is rapidly developing as a subspecialty within cardiology and it is imperative to promote and ensure sufficient and homogeneous training and qualification among professionals in Europe. This encouraged the European Society of Cardiology, through the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), to organize a European Core Curriculum for the HR specialist through the following: definition of the scope of the HR speciality (Syllabus), development of minimum standards and objectives for training in HR management (Curriculum), development of a model to certify HR professionals and teaching units (Accreditation), and development of a Registry for European HR accredited professionals and teaching units and their activity (Registries). The duration of the training period should be of a minimum of 2 years following general cardiology training. During this period, the trainee must develop the required knowledge, practical skills, behaviours, and attitudes to manage HR patients. The trainee must be involved in a minimum number of different procedures and achieve specified levels of competence. The training centre should be integrated within a full-service cardiology department. Assessment of the trainee and the training programmes should include reports by the training programme supervisor and the national society HR organizations, a logbook of procedures, written examinations, and assessment of professionalism. The EHRA presently requires the trainee to pass the EHRA accreditation exams (invasive EP and cardiac pacing and ICDs). Continuous learning and practice are required to maintain standards and practice because substantial changes may occur in clinical practice or the health-care environment.

  4. Models and Materials: Bridging Art and Science in the Secondary Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, D.; Cavazos, L.

    2006-12-01

    Creating and sustaining student engagement in science is one challenge facing secondary teachers. The visual arts provide an alternative means of communicating scientific concepts to students who may not respond to traditional formats or identify themselves as interested in science. We have initiated a three-year teacher professional development program at U C Santa Barbara focused on bridging art and science in secondary curricula, to engage students underrepresented in science majors, including girls, English language learners and non-traditional learners. The three-year format provides the teams of teachers with the time and resources necessary to create innovative learning experiences for students that will enhance their understanding of both art and science content. Models and Materials brings together ten secondary art and science teachers from six Santa Barbara County schools. Of the five participating science teachers, three teach Earth Science and two teach Life Science. Art and science teachers from each school are teamed and challenged with the task of creating integrated curriculum projects that bring visual art concepts to the science classroom and science concepts to the art classroom. Models and Materials were selected as unifying themes; understanding the concept of models, their development and limitations, is a prominent goal in the California State Science and Art Standards. Similarly, the relationship between composition, structure and properties of materials is important to both art and science learning. The program began with a 2-week institute designed to highlight the natural links between art and science through presentations and activities by both artists and scientists, to inspire teachers to develop new ways to present models in their classrooms, and for the teacher teams to brainstorm ideas for curriculum projects. During the current school year, teachers will begin to integrate science and art and the themes of modeling and materials

  5. Does a PBL-based medical curriculum predispose training in specific career paths? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigarides, Jordan; Wingfield, Laura R; Kulendran, Myutan

    2017-01-07

    North American medical schools have used problem-based learning (PBL) structured medical education for more than 60 years. However, it has only recently been introduced in other medical schools outside of North America. Since its inception, there has been the debate on whether the PBL learning process predisposes students to select certain career paths. To review available evidence to determine the predisposition of specific career paths when undertaking a PBL-based medical curriculum. The career path trajectory was determined as measured by official Matching Programs, self-reported questionnaires and surveys, and formally defined career development milestones. A systematic literature review was performed. PubMed, Medline, Cochrane and ERIC databases were analysed in addition to reference lists for appropriate inclusion. Eleven studies fitting the inclusion criteria were identified. The majority of studies showed that PBL did not predispose a student to a career in a specific speciality (n = 7 out of 11 studies, 64%). However, three studies reported a significantly increased number of PBL graduates working in primary care compared to those from a non-PBL curriculum. PBL has been shown not to predispose medical students to a career in General Practice or any other speciality. Furthermore, a greater number of similar studies are required before a definitive conclusion can be made in the future.

  6. Forces Mobilization Model (FORCEMOB): Unclassified Training Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    industrial output occur 6. Models the use of emergency investment to redress shortfalls; computes investment demand iv Table 1. FORCEMOB Input...use of emergency investment to redress shortfalls and compute emergency investment demand  This section will give a high level overview of how...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data

  7. Curriculum Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five teachers with reputations for artistry in curriculum planning were interviewed about their "curriculum animation" plans or how they ensured their curriculum was brought to life. Their statements indicated that much of their planning is informal and intuitive, and that the criteria they use for their curriculum includes: (1) it is…

  8. The Development of e-tutorial on Implementation National Curriculum 2013 for Mathematics Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roza, Yenita; Satria, Gita; Nur Siregar, Syarifah

    2017-06-01

    Curriculum 2013 is the new national Curriculum in Indonesia that is targeted to be used in all Indonesian schools in 2019. At this time the teacher training continues but the number and locations of teachers very diffuse and time constraints to be an obstacle for the government to be able to conduct training for teachers. This research resulted in the e-tutorial which is designed for mathematics teachers in studying the process of Curriculum implementation. This product will assist the government in accelerating the preparation of teachers in implementation of Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial contains the dynamics of Curriculum development, learning model, learning assessment, lesson plan, curriculum stages of implementation and government regulation that is relevant to the implementation of Curriculum 2013. The product development started with a needs analysis through discussions with mathematics teachers about their difficulties in the implementation of the Curriculum 2013. This e-tutorial was developed using Application of Adobe Director 11. This paper discusses the results of need analysis, process development and results of product revisions made based on input from teachers during the FGD. From the discussion, it can be concluded that this e-tutorial easily understood by teachers and help them to understand the implementation of Curriculum 2013

  9. ESP跨学科外语人才培养教学实践研究——以“水产英语”课程为例%On ESP Teaching of Training Interdisciplinary Foreign Language Talents from the Perspective of "Fishery English" Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明秋

    2012-01-01

    专门用途英语研究范畴是以专业+英语教学培养跨学科型外语人才的教学实践,旨在帮助培养学生的"自主"学习选择能力。本文通过ESP课程教学研究模式分析并以"水产英语"课程作为案例探索"水产英语"ESP教学定位与课程设计建构、编写合适的ESP课程教材、ESP课程教学方法、ESP课程师资建设等内容,以期拓展新的教学领域提高ESP教学质量,改进跨学科性的外语人才培养。%ESP (English for Specific Purposes), which aims at cultivating students' self-selected learning ability, is based on professional curriculum plus English to train interdisciplinary foreign language talents. This paper first deals with the aspects of ESP curriculum teaching model analysis, then carries out a case study of an ESP "Fishery English" curriculum to explore teaching design and plan, teaching materials, teaching methods and teaching staff with a purpose to expand the new areas of ESP teaching quality and to improve the interdisciplinary study of training foreign language talents.

  10. [European curriculum for further education in radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl-Wagner, B

    2014-11-01

    The European training curriculum for radiology of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) aims to harmonize training in radiology in Europe. Levels I and II constitute the centerpiece of the curriculum. The ESR recommends a 5-year training period in radiology with 3 years of level I and 2 years of level II training. The undergraduate (U) level curriculum is conceived as a basis for teaching radiology in medical schools and consists of a modality-oriented U1 level and an organ-based U2 level. Level III curricula provide contents for subspecialty and fellowship training after board certification in radiology. The curricular contents of all parts of the European Training Curriculum are divided into the sections knowledge, skills as well as competences and attitudes. The European training curriculum is meant to be a recommendation and a basis for the development of national curricula, but is not meant to replace existing national regulations.

  11. Development of a laparoscopic training model using a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, André Takashi; Galvão, Lucas Nascimento; Pessoa, Thyago Cezar Prado; Rocha, Camylla Rodrigues de Oliveira; Monteiro, Andrew Moraes; Fonteles, Mauro José Pantoja; Brito, Marcus Vinicius Henriques; Yasojima, Edson Yuzur

    2017-01-01

    to develop a model of training in video-surgery, of low cost and that uses a smartphone as an image-generating source. We developed a 38cm high, 40cm wide, 40cm long hexagonal-shaped training box, with a front opening of 12x8 cm for coupling the smartphone. The internal illumination is made with LED lamps and for the support of the smartphone, we used a selfie stick, fixed in the upper part of the box, that allows control of height, distance, angulation, and the coupling of devices with different formats. We selected 20 undergraduate students without previous training in video-surgery, who performed four exercises in the box, with assessment of the time and amount of errors in the execution of the tasks. Each student completed the training for three consecutive weeks. We collected the data in spreadsheets for later analysis. Nineteen students completed the training program, with significant improvement in the times and in the number of errors. the developed model was feasible and promoted the acquisition of skills in this group of students. In addition, it presents low cost, is portable and uses common equipment, such as smartphones.

  12. 对华东师范大学运动训练专业课程安排的思考%The thinking of the sports training curriculum arrangement of East China Normal University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱禾丰

    2015-01-01

    随着社会的进步和科学的飞速发展,运动训练专业作为培养高层次教练员、运动员人才的高等教育,肩负起了重大的历史责任。但是从运动训练的专业设置、学科模式来看,尚处于一个需要不断完善和发展的过程中。运动训练专业主要以培养那些从事竞技运动训练、教学、科研等方面工作的高级专业人才为主,有关的课程设置相对其他体育师范、人文类专业也应更具专业性和针对性。但从最近几年运动训练专业的开展情况来看,还是暴露出许多问题。因此,本文通过文献资料法、数理统计法等研究方法,找出华东师范大学运动训练专业课程设置中存在的问题,探讨运动训练专业的培养目标,为构建合理的课程方案提供理论依据。%As the fast progress of the society and science, sports training as higher education has the gravely historic responsibility to cultivate high-level coaches and athletes responsibility. But seeing from the sports training of professional courses and curriculums, it is still in the process of developing and perfecting. And sports training courses mainly train those engaged in competitive sports training, teaching and scientific research, and other aspects of senior professionals working mainly about curriculum, relative to other sports normal, humanities courses should also be more professional and pertinence. But in recent years the development of sports training appears a lot of problems. Therefore, this article is by means of the literature material method, mathematical statistics method, fingering out the problem of the East China normal university sports training curriculum, discusses the final training objective of the sports training curriculum for constructing reasonable curriculum program provides theory basis.

  13. Effect of a training model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Maas, N.E.; Bachet, I.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preclinical use of a training model in local anesthesia teaching on the subsequent clinical administration of a local anesthetic. Sixty-five dental students gave their first injection to a fellow dental student: twenty-two students after previous experience

  14. Effect of a training model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Maas, N.E.; Bachet, I.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preclinical use of a training model in local anesthesia teaching on the subsequent clinical administration of a local anesthetic. Sixty-five dental students gave their first injection to a fellow dental student: twenty-two students after previous experience

  15. Interactive Training Model: Enhancing Beginning Counseling Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladino, Derrick A.; Minton, Casey A. Barrio; Kern, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    The authors propose the Interactive Training Model (ITM), a full classroom role play experience, as a method for helping student counselors develop essential interviewing and counseling skills and self-awareness as required by the 2009 Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs "Standards." This pre-post,…

  16. Gettysburg: An Analysis of the Training Value of Commercial Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    for training such as limited trainnag timeoi a lack of cora - puter support. The models were evaluated solely for their strengths 0:nd we.-kdesses as...feet was taller , steeper, and the more heavily wooded of the two hills. Little Round Top, at 670 feet, was about one-half mile northeast of Big Round

  17. The Two-Step Student Teaching Model: Training for Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Donna

    This model of student teaching preparation was developed in collaboration with public schools to focus on systematic experience in teaching and training for accountability in the classroom. In the two-semester plan, students begin with teacher orientation and planning days, serve as teacher aides, attend various methods courses, teach several…

  18. [Anaesthesiology as a compulsory subject in the new German medical school curriculum. Evaluation of a curricular model at the University Hospital Aachen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, S K; Sopka, S; Fries, M; Skorning, M H; Kuhlen, R; Rossaint, R

    2007-06-01

    Since October 2003 new regulations for qualifications to practice medicine in Germany now require compulsory courses in anaesthesiology. Therefore, existing curricular activities had to be changed from facultative courses for a small number of interested students to compulsory activities for all students. Previous data of the department of anaesthesiology at the University Hospital Aachen (Germany) were collected and taken into consideration for the development of a new curriculum: The result was a course consisting of a tutorial with integrated "basic skill training", practical training in the operating theatre and a simulation-based session, in addition to two series of lectures. An evaluation by the students was carried out using EvaLuna as a tool for web-based on-line evaluation and faculty members had to fill out a standardized questionnaire. The different parts of the curriculum received the highest scores of all courses in the undergraduate medical school curriculum. Best results were achieved by the anaesthesia-simulation session followed by the tutorial and the practical training. The feedback of faculty members as well as the results of students' evaluation approved the developed concept of integrating anaesthesia-relevant issues into the formal medical school curriculum. Nevertheless, the on-line evaluation system EvaLuna provided additional suggestions for future improvements in the newly created curriculum.

  19. Recovery Act: Develop a Modular Curriculum for Training University Students in Industry Standard CO{sub 2} Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trentham, R. C.; Stoudt, E. L.

    2013-05-31

    CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery, Sequestration, & Monitoring Measuring & Verification are topics that are not typically covered in Geoscience, Land Management, and Petroleum Engineering curriculum. Students are not typically exposed to the level of training that would prepare them for CO{sub 2} reservoir and aquifer sequestration related projects when they begin assignments in industry. As a result, industry training, schools & conferences are essential training venues for new & experienced personnel working on CO{sub 2} projects for the first time. This project collected and/or generated industry level CO{sub 2} training to create modules which faculties can utilize as presentations, projects, field trips and site visits for undergrad and grad students and prepare them to "hit the ground running" & be contributing participants in CO{sub 2} projects with minimal additional training. In order to create the modules, UTPB/CEED utilized a variety of sources. Data & presentations from industry CO{sub 2} Flooding Schools & Conferences, Carbon Management Workshops, UTPB Classes, and other venues was tailored to provide introductory reservoir & aquifer training, state-of-the-art methodologies, field seminars and road logs, site visits, and case studies for students. After discussions with faculty at UTPB, Sul Ross, Midland College, other universities, and petroleum industry professionals, it was decided to base the module sets on a series of road logs from Midland to, and through, a number of Permian Basin CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, CO{sub 2} Carbon Capture and Storage (CCUS) projects and outcrop equivalents of the formations where CO{sub 2} is being utilized or will be utilized, in EOR projects in the Permian Basin. Although road logs to and through these projects exist, none of them included CO{sub 2} specific information. Over 1400 miles of road logs were created, or revised specifically to highlight CO{sub 2} EOR projects. After testing a number of

  20. 基于翻译课程改革的人才培养新模式%On the New Training Mode of C-E Translation Talents Based upon the Reform of English Translation Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    綦连胜

    2014-01-01

    With CAESPO permanently settling in Nanning, it has brought a rare opportunity for Guangxi development, on the other hand, it also has put forward higher requirements for the training model C-E translation. In order to speed up the training of translation, the curriculum design, classroom teaching models and translation teaching methods of translation should be re-formed correspondly to adapt the development of time. The originality of the paper lies in the construction of the following three teaching models with specific needs respectively:autonomous teaching, task-based cooperative inquiry teaching model, the inter-active teaching mode.%中国一东盟博览会永久落户南宁,给广西的发展带来难得的机遇,对翻译人才的培养也提出了更高的要求。这就要求高校革新翻译课程设置,创新翻译课堂教学模式。签于此,该文提出以下三种翻译课堂教学模式:以学生为主体的自主式翻译课堂教学模式、以教学任务为中心的任务合作探究型翻译课堂教学模式、师生互动的启发式翻译课堂教学模式。每一种翻译课堂教学模式都有其特定的内涵与要求。

  1. Model of knowledge management in mobile systems used for training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick CARRETO ARELLANO

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the development of a Knowledge Management Model (MAC applied to the training process in mobile devices for ease of use and access of different types of users to relevant information (anywhere and anytime. The MAC permit to manage knowledge, so that helps in the process of collection, classification and search of information according to a profile and academic needs as well as services related to the transformation of data and information for knowledge generation. The MAC aims to provide users, tools for skills development and allow the development of the training process with the use of limited capacity device with Internet connection.

  2. Communication Skills Training in Pediatric Oncology: Moving Beyond Role Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraco, Angela M; Brand, Sarah R; Mack, Jennifer W; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Block, Susan D; Wolfe, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    Communication is central to pediatric oncology care. Pediatric oncologists disclose life-threatening diagnoses, explain complicated treatment options, and endeavor to give honest prognoses, to maintain hope, to describe treatment complications, and to support families in difficult circumstances ranging from loss of function and fertility to treatment-related or disease-related death. However, parents, patients, and providers report substantial communication deficits. Poor communication outcomes may stem, in part, from insufficient communication skills training, overreliance on role modeling, and failure to utilize best practices. This review summarizes evidence for existing methods to enhance communication skills and calls for revitalizing communication skills training within pediatric oncology.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of Virtual Clay Pigeon shooter Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yanxia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As a popular sports event, clay pigeon uses real guns and bullets as its tools. To improve the training effect, reduce its cost and danger, the development of a real-time interactive and perceptive virtual training system by using simulation technology becomes urgent. This system uses Visual C++、Vega、Creator as its development platform to conduct modeling and simulation of clay pigeon’s and grapeshot ‘s flying path and the collision effect of the two objects.  

  4. 14 CFR 121.913 - Qualification curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification curriculum. 121.913 Section 121.913 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Qualification curriculum. Each qualification curriculum must contain training, evaluation, and certification...

  5. The Construction and Application of Curriculum Performance Appraisal Model in Colleges%高校课程绩效评估模型的构建与运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    况志华

    2012-01-01

    构建高校课程绩效评估机制对于高校课程建设具有重要实践指导意义。该文在剖析高校课程绩效影响因子的基础上,提出了高校课程绩效评估的一般模型,并对该模型的运用以及课程绩效管理实践提出了若干对策建议。%It has important guiding significance to construct curriculum performance appraisal mechanism in colleges for curriculum constructions.This thesis first analyses the influence factors of curriculum performance appraisal in colleges.It then introduces a general model of curriculum performance appraisal;third,several countermeasures and suggestions are put forward concerning applications to the curriculum performance appraisal model.

  6. Differences Training for the Glass Cockpit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Earl L.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This study followed two groups of pilots from a major US air carrier as they went through a transition to advanced technology aircraft. Specifically, these were pilots were no previous automation experience undergoing Differences training from the 737-100/200 aircraft to the 737-300/500 aircraft. Each were given a different curriculum and data were collected on the efficacy of each training model and the pilots' attitudes toward automation. Results of the analyses performed and guidelines for training are included.

  7. Research enrichment: evaluation of structured research in the curriculum for dental medicine students as part of the vertical and horizontal integration of biomedical training and discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Tanis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research programs within medical and dental schools are important vehicles for biomedical and clinical discovery, serving as effective teaching and learning tools by providing situations in which predoctoral students develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. Although research programs at many medical and dental schools are well-established, they may not be well integrated into the predoctoral curriculum to effectively support the learning objectives for their students. Methods A series of structured seminars, incorporating faculty research, was designed for first-year dental students at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Dental Medicine to reinforce and support the concepts and skills taught in concurrent courses. A structured research enrichment period was also created to facilitate student engagement in active research using faculty and student curricular release time. Course evaluations and surveys were administered to gauge student perceptions of the curricular integration of research, the impact of these seminars on recruitment to the research program, and overall levels of student satisfaction with research enrichment. Results The analysis of course surveys revealed that students perceived the research-containing seminars effectively illustrated concepts, were logically sequenced, and were well-integrated into their curriculum. In addition, analysis of surveys revealed that the Integration Seminar courses motivated students to engage in research enrichment. Finally, this analysis provided evidence that students were very satisfied with their overall learning experience during research enrichment. Conclusion Curricular integration is one method of improving the teaching and learning of complicated and inter-related concepts, providing an opportunity to incorporate research training and objectives into traditionally separate didactic courses. Despite the benefits of curricular integration, finding

  8. AgMIP Training in Multiple Crop Models and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Kenneth J.; Porter, Cheryl H.; Hargreaves, John; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Thornburn, Peter; Mutter, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) has the goal of using multiple crop models to evaluate climate impacts on agricultural production and food security in developed and developing countries. There are several major limitations that must be overcome to achieve this goal, including the need to train AgMIP regional research team (RRT) crop modelers to use models other than the ones they are currently familiar with, plus the need to harmonize and interconvert the disparate input file formats used for the various models. Two activities were followed to address these shortcomings among AgMIP RRTs to enable them to use multiple models to evaluate climate impacts on crop production and food security. We designed and conducted courses in which participants trained on two different sets of crop models, with emphasis on the model of least experience. In a second activity, the AgMIP IT group created templates for inputting data on soils, management, weather, and crops into AgMIP harmonized databases, and developed translation tools for converting the harmonized data into files that are ready for multiple crop model simulations. The strategies for creating and conducting the multi-model course and developing entry and translation tools are reviewed in this chapter.

  9. 77 FR 16562 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Curriculum Development for MET, ECCP, and ICMS Training...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ...'' which concerns the development of blended learning materials for ECCP training. Two separate awards will... adequate length to deliver the program content, but are encouraged to consider blended learning strategies...-criminal attitudes, values and beliefs; criminal associates; temperament and personality factors; family...

  10. Understanding L2 Speaking Problems: Implications for ESL Curriculum Development in a Teacher Training Institution in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the result of a study that aimed to identify the problems with oral English skills of ESL (English as a second language) students at a tertiary teacher training institution in Hong Kong. The study, by way of semi-structured interview, addresses the gap in our understanding of the difficulties ESL students encountered in their…

  11. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  12. Nachhaltigkeit einer verbesserten studentischen Evaluation im operativen Fachgebiet des Reformstudiengangs HeiCuMed [Sustainability of an improved student evaluation of the undergraduate surgical training in the reform curriculum HeiCuMed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Martina

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: HeiCuMed (Heidelberger Curriculum Medicinale represents a reform curriculum which had the aim to resolve known problems of the traditional curriculum. The new clinical curriculum was implemented in October 2001. The comparative student evaluation of the undergraduate surgical training before and after the implementation of HeiCuMed shows a significantly higher rating of the surgical training in the reform curriculum. The present study aims at complementing the evaluation data collected during the surgical training by interviewing students from the traditional program and students from HeiCuMed in their final year of undergraduate training. Results: The interview data show that the introduction of new didactic strategies, the aligned contents in the different surgical fields, which were also matched with contents from internal medicine, as well as the case-based interactive teaching were responsible for the improved evaluation of students in HeiCuMed. The tutor continuity which is achieved by releasing the responsible tutor from clinical and operative duties for a period of 1-2 weeks, seems an important factor for the success. HeiCuMed students experienced the relation of the training to their future profession significantly stronger than students from the traditional curriculum and thus felt a stronger subjective learning success. Conclusion: In summary, the surgical training in HeiCuMed is highly effective from the point of view of the students, both in their realtime as well as in their retrospective judgement. [german] Zielsetzung: HeiCuMed (Heidelberger Curriculum Medicinale steht für ein Reformcurriculum, das sich zum Ziel gesetzt hat, Lösungsansätze für apparente Probleme des traditionellen Curriculums in die Curriculumsplanung zu integrieren. Im Oktober 2001 wurde das neue klinische Curriculum implementiert. Eine wesentliche Qualitätssicherungsmaßnahme im Block Operative Medizin war die Weiterführung der zuvor

  13. A Needs Assessment for a Longitudinal Emergency Medicine Intern Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappell, Eric; Ahn, James

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A key task of emergency medicine (EM) training programs is to develop a consistent knowledge of core content in recruits with heterogeneous training backgrounds. The traditional model for delivering core content is lecture-based weekly conference; however, a growing body of literature finds this format less effective and less appealing than alternatives. We sought to address this challenge by conducting a needs assessment for a longitudinal intern curriculum for millennial learners. Methods We surveyed all residents from the six EM programs in the greater Chicago area regarding the concept, format, and scope of a longitudinal intern curriculum. Results We received 153 responses from the 300 residents surveyed (51% response rate). The majority of respondents (80%; 82% of interns) agreed or strongly agreed that a dedicated intern curriculum would add value to residency education. The most positively rated teaching method was simulation sessions (91% positive responses), followed by dedicated weekly conference time (75% positive responses) and dedicated asynchronous resources (71% positive responses). Less than half of respondents (47%; 26% of interns) supported use of textbook readings in the curriculum. Conclusion There is strong learner interest in a longitudinal intern curriculum. This needs assessment can serve to inform the development of a universal intern curriculum targeting the millennial generation. PMID:28116005

  14. A Needs Assessment for a Longitudinal Emergency Medicine Intern Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shappell, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A key task of emergency medicine (EM training programs is to develop a consistent knowledge of core content in recruits with heterogeneous training backgrounds. The traditional model for delivering core content is lecture-based weekly conference; however, a growing body of literature finds this format less effective and less appealing than alternatives. We sought to address this challenge by conducting a needs assessment for a longitudinal intern curriculum for millennial learners. We surveyed all residents from the six EM programs in the greater Chicago area regarding the concept, format, and scope of a longitudinal intern curriculum. We received 153 responses from the 300 residents surveyed (51% response rate. The majority of respondents (80%; 82% of interns agreed or strongly agreed that a dedicated intern curriculum would add value to residency education. The most positively rated teaching method was simulation sessions (91% positive responses, followed by dedicated weekly conference time (75% positive responses and dedicated asynchronous resources (71% positive responses. Less than half of respondents (47%; 26% of interns supported use of textbook readings in the curriculum. There is strong learner interest in a longitudinal intern curriculum. This needs assessment can serve to inform the development of a universal intern curriculum targeting the millennial generation. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(131-34.

  15. A Needs Assessment for a Longitudinal Emergency Medicine Intern Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappell, Eric; Ahn, James

    2017-01-01

    A key task of emergency medicine (EM) training programs is to develop a consistent knowledge of core content in recruits with heterogeneous training backgrounds. The traditional model for delivering core content is lecture-based weekly conference; however, a growing body of literature finds this format less effective and less appealing than alternatives. We sought to address this challenge by conducting a needs assessment for a longitudinal intern curriculum for millennial learners. We surveyed all residents from the six EM programs in the greater Chicago area regarding the concept, format, and scope of a longitudinal intern curriculum. We received 153 responses from the 300 residents surveyed (51% response rate). The majority of respondents (80%; 82% of interns) agreed or strongly agreed that a dedicated intern curriculum would add value to residency education. The most positively rated teaching method was simulation sessions (91% positive responses), followed by dedicated weekly conference time (75% positive responses) and dedicated asynchronous resources (71% positive responses). Less than half of respondents (47%; 26% of interns) supported use of textbook readings in the curriculum. There is strong learner interest in a longitudinal intern curriculum. This needs assessment can serve to inform the development of a universal intern curriculum targeting the millennial generation.

  16. A framework for revising preservice curriculum for nonphysician clinicians: The mozambique experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistadt, Fernanda; Branigan, Erin; Pupp, Chris; Stefanutto, Marzio; Bambo, Carlos; Alexandre, Maria; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Ballweg, Ruth; Dgedge, Martinho; O'Malley, Gabrielle; de Oliveira, Justine Strand

    2014-01-01

    Mozambique, with approximately 0.4 physicians and 4.1 nurses per 10,000 people, has one of the lowest ratios of health care providers to population in the world. To rapidly scale up health care coverage, the Mozambique Ministry of Health has pushed for greater investment in training nonphysician clinicians, Tιcnicos de Medicina (TM). Based on identified gaps in TM clinical performance, the Ministry of Health requested technical assistance from the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) to revise the two-and-a-half-year preservice curriculum. A six-step process was used to revise the curriculum: (i) Conducting a task analysis, (ii) defining a new curriculum approach and selecting an integrated model of subject and competency-based education, (iii) revising and restructuring the 30-month course schedule to emphasize clinical skills, (iv) developing a detailed syllabus for each course, (v) developing content for each lesson, and (vi) evaluating implementation and integrating feedback for ongoing improvement. In May 2010, the Mozambique Minister of Health approved the revised curriculum, which is currently being implemented in 10 training institutions around the country. Key lessons learned: (i) Detailed assessment of training institutions' strengths and weaknesses should inform curriculum revision. (ii) Establishing a Technical Working Group with respected and motivated clinicians is key to promoting local buy-in and ownership. (iii) Providing ready-to-use didactic material helps to address some challenges commonly found in resource-limited settings. (iv) Comprehensive curriculum revision is an important first step toward improving the quality of training provided to health care providers in developing countries. Other aspects of implementation at training institutions and health care facilities must also be addressed to ensure that providers are adequately trained and equipped to provide quality health care services. This approach to

  17. Medical imaging education in biomedical engineering curriculum: courseware development and application through a hybrid teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weizhao; Li, Xiping; Chen, Hairong; Manns, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Medical Imaging is a key training component in Biomedical Engineering programs. Medical imaging education is interdisciplinary training, involving physics, mathematics, chemistry, electrical engineering, computer engineering, and applications in biology and medicine. Seeking an efficient teaching method for instructors and an effective learning environment for students has long been a goal for medical imaging education. By the support of NSF grants, we developed the medical imaging teaching software (MITS) and associated dynamic assessment tracking system (DATS). The MITS/DATS system has been applied to junior and senior medical imaging classes through a hybrid teaching model. The results show that student's learning gain improved, particularly in concept understanding and simulation project completion. The results also indicate disparities in subjective perception between junior and senior classes. Three institutions are collaborating to expand the courseware system and plan to apply it to different class settings.

  18. Models for Train Passenger Forecasting of Java and Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartono

    2017-04-01

    People tend to take public transportation to avoid high traffic, especially in Java. In Jakarta, the number of railway passengers is over than the capacity of the train at peak time. This is an opportunity as well as a challenge. If it is managed well then the company can get high profit. Otherwise, it may lead to disaster. This article discusses models for the train passengers, hence, finding the reasonable models to make a prediction overtimes. The Box-Jenkins method is occupied to develop a basic model. Then, this model is compared to models obtained using exponential smoothing method and regression method. The result shows that Holt-Winters model is better to predict for one-month, three-month, and six-month ahead for the passenger in Java. In addition, SARIMA(1,1,0)(2,0,0) is more accurate for nine-month and twelve-month oversee. On the other hand, for Sumatra passenger forecasting, SARIMA(1,1,1)(0,0,2) gives a better approximation for one-month ahead, and ARIMA model is best for three-month ahead prediction. The rest, Trend Seasonal and Liner Model has the least of RMSE to forecast for six-month, nine-month, and twelve-month ahead.

  19. DANCE CURRICULUM MODEL FOR HIGH SCHOOLS IN PALACES STUDENTS IN ROMANIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Popa Daniela; Neamtu Mircea

    2015-01-01

      The research undertaken was intended to achieve a high school dance curriculum educational Palaces pupils for contribute to the knowledge, skills and abilities to the all practitioners participating in these programs...

  20. A Model to Predict Student Failure in the First Year of the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard J.A. Baars

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: The earliest moment with the highest specificity to predict student failure in the first-year curriculum seems to be at 6 months. However, additional factors are needed to improve this prediction or to bring forward the predictive moment.

  1. A Model for Adapting. Bloom's Taxonomy to a Preschool Curriculum for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Donald B.; Leonard, Judith

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a rationale for the use of B. Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives in the development of preschool curriculum units for the gifted and talented which translates taxonomical objectives into activities. (BB)

  2. Discrete channel modelling based on genetic algorithm and simulated annealing for training hidden Markov model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhi-Jin; Zheng Shi-Lian; Xu Chun-Yun; Kong Xian-Zheng

    2007-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been used to model burst error sources of wireless channels. This paper proposes a hybrid method of using genetic algorithm (GA) and simulated annealing (SA) to train HMM for discrete channel modelling. The proposed method is compared with pure GA, and experimental results show that the HMMs trained by the hybrid method can better describe the error sequences due to SA's ability of facilitating hill-climbing at the later stage of the search. The burst error statistics of the HMMs trained by the proposed method and the corresponding error sequences are also presented to validate the proposed method.

  3. Writing your curriculum vitae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, S

    2001-09-01

    Your curriculum vitae (CV) is your gateway to shortlisting. A good CV takes a long time to prepare. It should not only record your training but, more importantly, should reflect your 'physicianly' qualities, management skills and knowledge of health-care systems.

  4. Basic models modeling resistance training: an update for basic scientists interested in study skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewa, Jason; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; da Silva Teixeira, Tamiris; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, Xia; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Lodetti, Alice; Cardozo, Mayara Quadros; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-09-01

    Human muscle hypertrophy brought about by voluntary exercise in laboratorial conditions is the most common way to study resistance exercise training, especially because of its reliability, stimulus control and easy application to resistance training exercise sessions at fitness centers. However, because of the complexity of blood factors and organs involved, invasive data is difficult to obtain in human exercise training studies due to the integration of several organs, including adipose tissue, liver, brain and skeletal muscle. In contrast, studying skeletal muscle remodeling in animal models are easier to perform as the organs can be easily obtained after euthanasia; however, not all models of resistance training in animals displays a robust capacity to hypertrophy the desired muscle. Moreover, some models of resistance training rely on voluntary effort, which complicates the results observed when animal models are employed since voluntary capacity is something theoretically impossible to measure in rodents. With this information in mind, we will review the modalities used to simulate resistance training in animals in order to present to investigators the benefits and risks of different animal models capable to provoke skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Our second objective is to help investigators analyze and select the experimental resistance training model that best promotes the research question and desired endpoints.

  5. Simulating train movement in railway traffic using a car-following model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ke-Ping; Guan Li-Jia

    2009-01-01

    Based on a car-following model, in this paper, we propose a new traffic model for simulating train movement in railway traffic. In the proposed model, some realistic characteristics of train movement are considered, such as the distance headway and the safety stopping distance. Using the proposed traffic model, we analyse the space-time diagram of traffic flow, the trajectory of train movement, etc. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed model can be successfully used for simulating the train movement. Some complex phenomena can be reproduced, such as the complex acceleration and deceleration of trains and the propagation of train delay.

  6. 档案袋评定与高师视唱练耳课程评价的改革%Portfolio Assessment and Assessment Reform of Sight Singing and Ear Training Curriculum in Higher Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德君; 李迅

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to put forward some thoughts to reform the curriculum assessment system of sight singing and ear training practices in higher education.Based on the portfolio assessment theory,the research subsequently investigates the existing teaching assessment system of sight singing and ear training curriculum in China's higher education.%本文在档案袋评定方式的理论综述的基础上,结合我国高师视唱练耳课程教学评价现状进行探讨,对视唱练耳课程评定方式实践方面提出了一些改革思路。

  7. The Role of Process Evaluation in the Training of Facilitators for an Adolescent Health Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helitzer, Deborah; Yoon, Soo-Jin; Wallerstein, Nina; Dow y Garcia-Velarde, Lily

    2000-01-01

    Describes the process evaluation of facilitator training for a risk-reduction program that trained college students and community volunteers to teach middle school students. Examination of facilitator characteristics and training, curriculum implementation, and use of the model to promote critical thinking found that most facilitators considered…

  8. Learning probabilistic models of connectivity from multiple spike train data

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal circuits or cell assemblies carry out brain function through complex coordinated firing patterns [1]. Inferring topology of neuronal circuits from simultaneously recorded spike train data is a challenging problem in neuroscience. In this work we present a new class of dynamic Bayesian networks to infer polysynaptic excitatory connectivity between spiking cortical neurons [2]. The emphasis on excitatory networks allows us to learn connectivity models by exploiting fast data mining alg...

  9. Research on the Business English training model within MBA program

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Yankovskaya; Olga Neklyudova

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a brief summary of the research on the Business English training model within MBA program students. This study is devoted to the problem of developing a professional foreign language communicative competency of MBA program participants. A particular feature of additional MBA qualification is its international status which presupposes that its graduates (mid-level and top managers) should realize their professional tasks in a foreign language. The analysis of literary ...

  10. A New Model for Training in Periodontal Examinations Using Manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heym, Richard; Krause, Sebastian; Hennessen, Till; Pitchika, Vinay; Ern, Christina; Hickel, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test models for training dental students in periodontal examinations using manikins that had distinct anatomical designs but were indistinguishable in external appearance. After four models were tested for inter- and intra-examiner reliability by two experienced dentists, 26 additional models were produced. The models were tested by 35 dental students at a dental school in Germany in 2014. The testing involved completing a periodontal examination that included probing depths, gingival recessions, and furcation involvements. The primary purpose of the study was to determine whether the models could be used as a tool for periodontal examination training by the students. Levels of agreement (students and dentists) and Kappa statistics (dentists) were calculated using absolute (±0 mm) and tolerable difference (±1 mm). Over the span of two weeks, the dentists' reliability with preset values for probing depths, gingival recessions, and furcation involvements ranged from 0.29 to 0.38, 0.52 to 0.61, and 0.54 to 0.57, respectively, under absolute difference and from 0.86 to 0.90, 0.96 to 0.99, and 0.62 to 0.73, respectively, under tolerable difference. The students' proportions of agreement for probing depths and gingival recessions under absolute vs. tolerable difference were 34.8% vs. 79.9% and 71.9% vs. 94.4%, respectively. The students frequently scored values higher than the preset values, overestimated furcation involvements, and failed to differentiate the levels of furcations. The models used did not pose any systematic or technical difficulties in the pilot study. Students were unable to measure furcation involvements with acceptable agreement. Thus, these models could be used for student periodontal examination training.

  11. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  12. A Cyber Enabled Collaborative Environment for Creating, Sharing and Using Data and Modeling Driven Curriculum Modules for Hydrology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merwade, V.; Ruddell, B. L.; Fox, S.; Iverson, E. A. R.

    2014-12-01

    With the access to emerging datasets and computational tools, there is a need to bring these capabilities into hydrology classrooms. However, developing curriculum modules using data and models to augment classroom teaching is hindered by a steep technology learning curve, rapid technology turnover, and lack of an organized community cyberinfrastructure (CI) for the dissemination, publication, and sharing of the latest tools and curriculum material for hydrology and geoscience education. The objective of this project is to overcome some of these limitations by developing a cyber enabled collaborative environment for publishing, sharing and adoption of data and modeling driven curriculum modules in hydrology and geosciences classroom. The CI is based on Carleton College's Science Education Resource Center (SERC) Content Management System. Building on its existing community authoring capabilities the system is being extended to allow assembly of new teaching activities by drawing on a collection of interchangeable building blocks; each of which represents a step in the modeling process. Currently the system hosts more than 30 modules or steps, which can be combined to create multiple learning units. Two specific units: Unit Hydrograph and Rational Method, have been used in undergraduate hydrology class-rooms at Purdue University and Arizona State University. The structure of the CI and the lessons learned from its implementation, including preliminary results from student assessments of learning will be presented.

  13. Music training and inhibitory control: a multidimensional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Sylvain; Farzan, Faranak

    2015-03-01

    Training programs aimed to improve cognitive skills have either yielded mixed results or remain to be validated. The limited benefits of such regimens are largely attributable to weak understanding of (1) how (and which) interventions provide the most cognitive improvements; and (2) how brain networks and neural mechanisms that underlie specific cognitive abilities can be modified selectively. Studies indicate that music training leads to robust and long-lasting benefits to behavior. Importantly, behavioral advantages conferred by music extend beyond perceptual abilities to even nonauditory functions, such as inhibitory control (IC) and its neural correlates. Alternative forms of arts engagement or brain training do not appear to yield such enhancements, which suggests that music uniquely taps into brain networks subserving a variety of auditory as well as domain-general mechanisms such as IC. To account for such widespread benefits of music training, we propose a framework of transfer effects characterized by three dimensions: level of processing, nature of the transfer, and involvement of executive functions. We suggest that transfer of skills is mediated through modulation of general cognitive processes, in particular IC. We believe that this model offers a viable framework to test the extent and limitations of music-related changes.

  14. 基于业务过程的语言培训课程设计%Design of Language Training Curriculum that is based on Business and Work Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚知鹏

    2015-01-01

    The new era and situation have set forth new requirements for corporate English training. The paper offers several recommendations from the perspective of curriculum design for SINOPEC’s English training in the new era:the curriculum framework design should be based on SINOPEC’s overseas business profile and function of language, the course design should be based on overseas work processes which should be further properly ordered and exemplified, and in the curriculum design process special attention should be paid to development of learning transfer ability and training of complete work process thinking.%本文从课程设计角度为新时期中国石化英语培训提出了若干建议:课程框架设计应基于中国石化海外业务情况和语言使用功能,课程内容设计应基于海外业务工作过程并将其合理序化和例化,同时在课程设计过程中应注意学习迁移能力的培养和完整工作过程思维的训练。

  15. A Review of Models for Cost and Training Effectiveness Analysis (CTEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Curriculum Review 1. CSS Review Board 2. Final CSS and GFM Review Board 3. Review and Analysis A. Lesson Treatment 5. Script 6. Storyboard 7...Post Individual Trial Analysis 8. Final Storyboard Review 9. Group Trial Analysis 10. Final Audio Review 11. Final Art Review 12. Answer Print...weapons system training effectiveness analysis, White Sands, New Mexico : November 1977. , TRADOC Systems Analysis Activity (TRASANA). Technical

  16. FLS and FES: comprehensive models of training and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Melina C; Dunkin, Brian J; Marks, Jeffrey M; Fried, Gerald M

    2010-06-01

    The Fundamentals of Laparoscopic surgery (FLS) is a validated program for the teaching and evaluation of the basic knowledge and skills required to perform laparoscopic surgery. The educational component includes didactic, Web-based material and a simple, affordable physical simulator with specific tasks and a recommended curriculum. FLS certification requires passing a written multiple-choice examination and a proctored manual skills examination in the FLS simulator. The metrics for the FLS program have been rigorously validated to meet the highest educational standards, and certification is now a requirement for the American Board of Surgery. This article summarizes the validation process and the FLS-related research that has been done to date. The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery is a program modeled after FLS with a similar mission for flexible endoscopy. It is currently in the final stages of development and will be launched in April 2010. The program also includes learning and assessment components, and is undergoing the same meticulous validation process as FLS. These programs serve as models for the creation of simulation-based tools to teach skills and assess competence with the intention of optimizing patient safety and the quality of surgical education.

  17. Learning, Behaviour and Reaction Framework: A Model for Training Raters to Improve Assessment Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Yang; Chang, Huiju; Hsu, Wen-Chin; Sheen, Gwo-Ji

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a training model for raters, with the goal to improve the intra- and inter-consistency of evaluation quality for higher education curricula. The model, termed the learning, behaviour and reaction (LBR) circular training model, is an interdisciplinary application from the business and organisational training domain. The…

  18. The Bohr Model and the Fifth Grade: A New Standards-Based Hands-On Physics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jeff; Springer, Russell; Goldberg, Bennett

    2004-03-01

    A semester-long, standards-based, hands-on physics curriculum appropriate for the fifth grade was developed. Previously available curricula were successful in using hands-on activities to teach basic fifth-grade physics skills and concepts, but did not attempt to foster understanding of the fundamental underlying physics. We expanded the role of inquiry-based instruction to expose students to the fundamental physics behind electricity, forces, energy, light and sound. Central to the course, the Bohr model of the atom was used as a key tool both to motivate exploration of these topics as well as to develop basic conceptual understanding of fundamental ideas in quantum and electromagnetic physics. The curriculum was designed to be compatible with both district and state-mandated standards in a high-stakes test environment. This work was supported by NSF grant DGE-0231909.

  19. Research of inverse mathematical model to high-speed trains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱涛; 肖守讷; 马卫华; 阳光武

    2014-01-01

    Operation safety and stability of the train mainly depend on the interaction between the wheel and rail. Knowledge of wheel/rail contact force is important for vehicle control systems that aim to enhance vehicle stability and passenger safety. Since wheel/rail contact forces of high-speed train are very difficult to measure directly, a new estimation process for wheel/rail contact forces was introduced in this work. Based on the state space equation, dynamic programming methods and the Bellman principle of optimality, the main theoretical derivation of the inversion mathematical model was given. The new method overcomes the weakness of large fluctuations which exist in current inverse techniques. High-speed vehicle was chosen as the research object, accelerations of axle box as input conditions, 10 degrees of freedom vertical vibration model and 17 degrees of freedom lateral vibration model were established, respectively. Under 250 km/h, the vertical and lateral wheel/rail forces were identified. From the time domain and frequency domain, the comparison of the results between inverse and SIMPACK models were given. The results show that the inverse mathematical model has high precision for inversing the wheel/rail contact forces of an operation high-speed vehicle.

  20. Model-Based Reasoning in Humans Becomes Automatic with Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Economides

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Model-based and model-free reinforcement learning (RL have been suggested as algorithmic realizations of goal-directed and habitual action strategies. Model-based RL is more flexible than model-free but requires sophisticated calculations using a learnt model of the world. This has led model-based RL to be identified with slow, deliberative processing, and model-free RL with fast, automatic processing. In support of this distinction, it has recently been shown that model-based reasoning is impaired by placing subjects under cognitive load--a hallmark of non-automaticity. Here, using the same task, we show that cognitive load does not impair model-based reasoning if subjects receive prior training on the task. This finding is replicated across two studies and a variety of analysis methods. Thus, task familiarity permits use of model-based reasoning in parallel with other cognitive demands. The ability to deploy model-based reasoning in an automatic, parallelizable fashion has widespread theoretical implications, particularly for the learning and execution of complex behaviors. It also suggests a range of important failure modes in psychiatric disorders.

  1. Training Post-9/11 Police Officers with a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training Model: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative holistic multiple-case study was to identify the optimal theoretical approach for a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training (CTRBT) model to train post-9/11 police officers to perform effectively in their counter-terrorism assignments. Post-9/11 police officers assigned to counter-terrorism duties are not trained…

  2. Training Post-9/11 Police Officers with a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training Model: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative holistic multiple-case study was to identify the optimal theoretical approach for a Counter-Terrorism Reality-Based Training (CTRBT) model to train post-9/11 police officers to perform effectively in their counter-terrorism assignments. Post-9/11 police officers assigned to counter-terrorism duties are not trained…

  3. 护士长管理实践培训课程的设置%Study on the curriculum arrangement of management practice training for head nurses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张含凤; 李秋洁; 吕冬梅

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨护士长管理实践培训课程的设置,系统地、科学地提高护士长的管理实践技能,为护士长的管理实践培训提供科学依据。方法采用德尔菲法就护士长对管理实践培训课程的需求程度、课时数、授课方式、评价方法进行2轮函询。结果护士长管理实践培训课程由计划职能、组织职能、领导职能、控制职能、人力资源管理、经营管理、科研技巧、职业技巧等8个一级指标和35个二级指标组成。其中,职业技巧课程需求程度最高,均数为4.55,经营管理课程的需求程度中等,均数为4.40,科研技巧的需求程度最低,均数为4.15。结论专家对护士长管理实践培训课程、课时数、授课方式、评价方法的协调程度较高,可为今后的护士长管理实践培训提供依据。%Objective To improve systematically and scientifically the management practice skills of head nurses and to provide the scientific basis for the head nurses ’ management practice training by exploring the curriculum arrangement of management practice training for head nurses .Methods The Delphi method was used to investigate head nurses’ demand level in the management practice training course , and the requirements on class hours, teaching methods, evaluation method for two rounds.Results The head nurse management practice training courses composed of 8 primary indicators and 35 secondary indicators, and the 8 primary indicators included planning functions , organizational functions, leading functions, control functions, human resources management, operating management, scientific research skills and professional skills .The demand for professional skills courses were ranked on the top (x=4.55), the demand for operating management courses were ranked in the middle (x=4.40), and the demand for scientific research skills courses were ranked at the bottom (x=4.15).Conclusions The higher degree of

  4. Outage Analysis of Train-to-Train Communication Model over Nakagami-m Channel in High-Speed Railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyu Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the end-to-end outage performance of high-speed-railway train-to-train communication model in high-speed railway over independent identical and nonidentical Nakagami-m channels. The train-to-train communication is inter-train communication without an aid of infrastructure (for base station. Source train uses trains on other rail tracks as relays to transmit signals to destination train on the same track. The mechanism of such communication among trains can be divided into three cases based on occurrence of possible-occurrence relay trains. We first present a new closed form for the sum of squared independent Nakagami-m variates and then derive an expression for the outage probability of the identical and non-identical Nakagami-m channels in three cases. In particular, the problem is improved by the proposed formulation that statistic for sum of squared Nakagami-m variates with identical m tends to be infinite. Numerical analysis indicates that the derived analytic results are reasonable and the outage performance is better over Nakagami-m channel in high-speed railway scenarios.

  5. 中小学教师生成性移动培训课程设计研究%The Study of K-12 Teacher Training Emergent Mobile Curriculum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁文鑫

    2016-01-01

    With the development of various mobile devices, teacher training via mobile devices has attracted more attentions. The advantages of teacher training via mobile devices were proposed, and the emergent teacher training curriculum design via mobile devices was also elaborated. The design template and process of training curriculum of How to cultivate Pupils’ literacy of solving problems in reading Picture Books was elaborated in details. According to the teachers’ feedback, the emergent training curriculum could enhance teachers’ learning.%随着各种移动设备的不断普及,通过移动终端开展教师培训最近几年也逐渐引起关注。该文探讨了移动终端在教师培训中体现的优越性,针对教师培训效果回归到工作现场后的衰减问题,提出了生成性移动培训课程的设计,并以《绘本教学中学生问题解决能力培养》这一培训课程为例,具体介绍了生成性移动培训课程的制作模板、制作过程。通过教师的实践反馈,发现生成性移动培训课程的设计与学习有助于提升教师培训的效果,减少教师回归到工作现场后培训效果的衰减。

  6. Emerging identities: A proposed model for an interactive science curriculum for First Nations students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sable, Trudy

    including language itself This identity is based on personal, cultural, historical and social factors that come to bear on each student's definition of who they are and what knowledge is pertinent to survival and well being. Five fundamental themes emerged from the interviews and field trips---fragile ontologies, multiple layers of identity (personal, cultural, pan-tribal, and societal), border crossings, the continuing and emerging aspects of culture, and beyond borders to a spiritual narrative---and became the foundation for a culturally interactive science education model of learning. The model assists educators through a visualization of layers of identity, porous borders and seeming paradoxes, and "narrative unity" beyond boundaries---all of which affect the learning of science. The content of a culturally interactive curriculum is drawn from the cultural heritage of the students, giving them an historical context with which to identify. Working with Mi'kmaw language and notational representation is shown to assist educators in cultural border crossing and creating cultural continuity for the students. Taken into the classroom, this interactive paradigm could be adapted to pedagogical methods as "speaking together" times, in which students explore the processes of doing science while appreciating their own cultural traditions. In so doing, educators can come to know the larger narrative that gives shape to student's identities and ways of relating to the world. Then it becomes possible for educators to recognize the boundaries that obstruct or open a path to meaningful learning experiences.

  7. SUSTAINABLE CURRICULUM IN TVET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Lasonen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In some European countries, students receive vocationally oriented education as early as at the age of 12. The students transfer to lower secondary school at the age of 10-13, with the youngest entrants found in Germany and Austria and the oldest ones, being at the age of 16, in the Nordic countries. The most thoroughly school-based vocational upper secondary education is provided in Finland, Sweden, Spain, Greece and Portugal. The highest proportion of vocational training delivered at the workplace is to be found in Austria (a little less than half and the Netherlands (a third, that of training combining the workplace and school in Denmark, Germany, France and the Netherlands. Curriculum denotes the formal specification of what is taught and learnt in educational or training establishments. Curricula are formally specified in such learning and teaching entities as units, courses, clusters, sequences and other specifications. Levels of curricula vary from national to student ones, and types of curricula differ from intended to learned syllabi. The traditions of curriculum vary according to national contexts and to historical periods. Curriculum development in TVET is approached from a broad technological knowledge, activity-oriented theories of learning and from the concept of vocation (Beruf. Ethics of sustainable development gives a global and future perspective to education and training. The first two chapters illustrate the global, regional and national policy context of curriculum in TVET followed by a historical discussion about a curriculum theory and didactics. Then the learning theories focus on work-based learning issues and an activity approach. Next the ethics and implementation of education for sustainable development is analysed. Finally a window to the future is opened by a national practice of workforce anticipation.

  8. MODELING AND DIAGNOSIS OF TRAINING PRODUCTIVITY OF SCIENTIFICPEDAGOGICAL PERSONNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyko V. I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the criteria for the effectiveness of the scientific and pedagogical workers of higher skill levels for the preparation of scientific and pedagogical staff. It is known that the preparation of the teaching staff (PhDs - one of the most important activities of higher education institutions; Moreover, when the state accreditation of higher education institutions compulsorily taken into account indicators that reflect the impact of training candidates. Also, of course, that the training of the teaching staff (PhDs - activities that require both high levels of research and pedagogical competence. This means that the results of scientific and teaching staff higher qualification levels for the preparation of the scientific staff - both indicators of research and pedagogical competence; own training of researchers - an area of "crossing" of scientific and pedagogical activity. Unfortunately, the increase in the number of scientific personnel being prepared does not always mean quality growth. Often trained scientific personnel (PhD not only do not approach the level of competence of its research (the results of research to the supervisor, and stopped to engage in scientific activities after defending his doctoral dissertation (or engaged at a low level. Therefore, the article authors consider it expedient to propose indicators that reflect not only the amount and timeliness of the research training (PhD thesis defense sometimes occur many years after graduate school, but also the productivity of this activity. From the point of view of the authors, the success of research training only can be considered productive when prepared by the scientific supervisor candidates of sciences are highly qualified scientific personnel, ie conduct high-level research, the results of which are recognized by the scientific community; the same is true of the scientific advice (highly qualified scientific workers - doctors. The practical significance

  9. Integrating critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry across a four-year dental curriculum: a model for independent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Handoo, Nidhi; Solow, Catherine M; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Introducing critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) content into an established dental curriculum can be a difficult and challenging process. Over the past three years, the University of Iowa College of Dentistry has developed and implemented a progressive four-year integrated critical thinking and EBD curriculum. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation process to make it available as a model for other dental schools contemplating introduction of critical thinking and EBD into their curricula. The newly designed curriculum built upon an existing problem-based learning foundation, which introduces critical thinking and the scientific literature in the D1 year, in order to expose students to the rationale and resources for practicing EBD in the D2 and D3 years and provide opportunities to practice critical thinking and apply the EBD five-step process in the D2, D3, and D4 years. All curricular content is online, and D3 and D4 EBD activities are integrated within existing clinical responsibilities. The curricular content, student resources, and student activities are described.

  10. Comprehensive Analysis of Chicken Vessels as Microvascular Anastomosis Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo Young; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Lee, Kyeong-Tae

    2017-01-01

    Background Nonliving chickens are commonly used as a microvascular anastomosis training model. However, previous studies have investigated only a few types of vessel, and no study has compared the characteristics of the various vessels. The present study evaluated the anatomic characteristics of various chicken vessels as a training model. Methods Eight vessels—the brachial artery, basilic vein, radial artery, ulnar artery, ischiatic artery and vein, cranial tibial artery, and common dorsal metatarsal artery—were evaluated in 26 fresh chickens and 30 chicken feet for external diameter (ED) and thicknesses of the tunica adventitia and media. The dissection time from skin incision to application of vessel clamps was also measured. Results The EDs of the vessels varied. The ischiatic vein had the largest ED of 2.69±0.33 mm, followed by the basilic vein (1.88±0.36 mm), ischiatic artery (1.68±0.24 mm), common dorsal metatarsal artery (1.23±0.23 mm), cranial tibial artery (1.18±0.19 mm), brachial artery (1.08±0.15 mm), ulnar artery (0.82±0.13 mm), and radial artery (0.56±0.12 mm), and the order of size was consistent across all subjects. Thicknesses of the tunica adventitia and media were also diverse, ranging from 74.09±19.91 µm to 158.66±40.25 µm (adventitia) and from 31.2±7.13 µm to 154.15±46.48 µm (media), respectively. Mean dissection time was <3 minutes for all vessels. Conclusions Our results suggest that nonliving chickens can provide various vessels with different anatomic characteristics, which can allow trainees the choice of an appropriate microvascular anastomosis training model depending on their purpose and skillfulness. PMID:28194342

  11. A Comprehensive Leadership Education Model To Train, Teach, and Develop Leadership in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, John C.; Rudd, Rick D.

    2002-01-01

    Meta-analysis of youth leadership development literature resulted in a conceptual model and curriculum framework. Model dimensions are leadership knowledge and information; leadership attitudes, will, and desire; decision making, reasoning, and critical thinking; oral and written communication; and intra/interpersonal relations. Dimensions have…

  12. A New Pedagogical Model for Adventure in the Curriculum: Part One-Advocating for the Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andy; Wainwright, Nalda

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years increasing attention has been given to models-based approaches to physical education as a way of promoting standards and particular types of learning through better alignment of teacher planning and delivery with pupil learning and achievement. However, little attention has been given to the specific contribution a…

  13. Testing a causal model for learning in a problem-based curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, M.M. van den; Dolmans, D.H.J.M.; Wolfhagen, H.A.P.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between elements that are important for the tutorial group process and the individual learning process in a problem-based curriculum. The variables under investigation were student-generated learning issues, individual learning process, reportin

  14. "Paideia Kyriou": Biblical and Patristic Models for an Integrated Christian Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Stephen Richard

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies corroborate the importance of an integrated or interdisciplinary curriculum for an effective education. However, contemporary proposals for the function of theology as the integrative center have been limited mainly to sectarian communities and remain a work in progress. Noting the fruitfulness of historical…

  15. Applying the Kirkpatrick Model: Evaluating an "Interaction for Learning Framework" Curriculum Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Whitsed, Craig; Girardi, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Global perspectives and interpersonal and intercultural communication competencies are viewed as a priority within higher education. For management educators, globalisation, student mobility and widening pathways present numerous challenges, but afford opportunities for curriculum innovation. The "Interaction for Learning Framework"…

  16. From World War to Woods Hole: The Use of Wartime Research Models for Curriculum Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, John L.

    2002-01-01

    Considers the curriculum reform movement of the 1950s as an experiment in applying innovative research and development techniques perfected by scientists during World War II, tracing the development of newer methods of scientific analysis and examining how they were imported from military research to the field of education by a select group of…

  17. A Curriculum Model for Teaching Telecommunications to Middle and Secondary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughenbaugh, Richard L.

    This curriculum guide is intended for use in teaching a unit on telecommunications to students with a basic understanding of computing. Introductory materials spell out the purpose of the unit--to provide an introduction to the sending and receiving of electronic information using a personal computer system and the telephone communications…

  18. A Model for Curriculum Intervention in the Desegregation-Integration Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, John W.

    The desegregation process has pinpointed areas of curriculum reform that are needed to help establish quality integrated educational experiences. A racial and ethnic mix is only a beginning. Institutional procedures have become established in schools which may prohibit the realization of the goal of integrated education. School systems should…

  19. Assessment of a Socio-constructivist Model for Teacher Training: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joia, Luiz Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Studied a socio-constructivist model for training teachers in Brazil, in the use of Informatics in education. Findings from a case study of the training of 29 teachers show the importance of care and coherence for knowledge creation in the socio-constructivist training model. (SLD)

  20. Reaction to the Major Contribution: Training for Skills Competency in Counseling Psychology--Integrating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Roberta L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors of the Major Contribution have developed a complex and elegant three-level training model on which they suggest advanced microskills may be built. Prior to the description of their model, they have built a case that current microskills training has proved foundationally important but insufficient to training needs. They then invite…

  1. The Impact of the Developmental Training Model on Staff Development in Air Force Child Development Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Candace Maria Edmonds

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to standardize training delivery and to individualize staff development based on observation and reflective practice, the Air Force implemented the Developmental Training Model (DTM) in its Child Development Programs. The goal of the Developmental Training Model is to enhance high quality programs through improvements in the training…

  2. Dental students’ perceptions of undergraduate clinical training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in an integrated curriculum in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Al-Dajani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim was to understand dental students’ experiences with oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS teaching, their confidence levels in performing routine dento-alveolar operations, and the relationship between the students’ confidence level and the number of teeth extracted during the clinical practice. Methods: The survey questionnaire was distributed to 32 students at Aljouf University College of Dentistry, Saudi Arabia during their fourth and fifth year in 2015. Respondents were asked to rate 19 items, which represent a student’s confidence in performing routine surgical interventions, using a four-point Likert scale (1=very little confidence, 4=very confident. A multivariate regression was computed between average confidence and the variables: weekly hours devoted to studying oral and maxillofacial surgery, college grade point average, and the total number of teeth extracted. Results: The response rate was 100%. Students revealed the highest level of confidence in giving local anesthesia (96.9%, understanding extraction indications (93.8%, and performing simple extractions (90.6%. Less confidence was shown with handling difficult extractions (50.0%, extracting molars with separation (50.0% or extracting third molars (56.3%. The average confidence in performing surgical procedures was 2.88 (SD=0.55, ranging from 1.79 to 3.89. A given student’s confidence increased with an increase in the total number of teeth extracted (P=0.003. Conclusion: It reveals a significant impact of undergraduate clinical training on students’ confidence in performing oral and maxillofacial surgery clinical procedures: The more clinical experience the students had, the more confidence they reported.

  3. The new formal competency-based curriculum and informal curriculum at Indiana University School of Medicine: overview and five-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzelman, Debra K; Cottingham, Ann H

    2007-04-01

    There is growing recognition in the medical community that being a good doctor requires more than strong scientific knowledge and excellent clinical skills. Many key qualities are essential to providing comprehensive care, including the abilities to communicate effectively with patients and colleagues, act in a professional manner, cultivate an awareness of one's own values and prejudices, and provide care with an understanding of the cultural and spiritual dimensions of patients' lives. To ensure that Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) graduates demonstrate this range of abilities, IUSM has undertaken a substantial transformation of both its formal curriculum and learning environment (informal curriculum). The authors provide an overview of IUSM's two-part initiative to develop and implement a competency-based formal curriculum that requires students to demonstrate proficiency in nine core competencies and to create simultaneously an informal curriculum that models and supports the moral, professional, and humane values expressed in the formal curriculum. The authors describe the institutional and curricular transformations that have enabled and furthered the new IUSM curricular goals: changes in education administration; education implementation, assessment, and curricular design; admissions procedures; performance tracking; and the development of an electronic infrastructure to facilitate the expanded curriculum. The authors address the cost of reform and the results of two progress reviews. Specific case examples illustrate the interweaving of the formal competency curriculum through the students' four years of training, as well as techniques that are being used to positively influence the IUSM informal curriculum.

  4. How does preclinical laboratory training impact physical examination skills during the first clinical year? A retrospective analysis of routinely collected objective structured clinical examination scores among the first two matriculating classes of a reformed curriculum in one Polish medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerszcz, Jolanta; Stalmach-Przygoda, Agata; Kuźma, Marcin; Jabłoński, Konrad; Cegielny, Tomasz; Skrzypek, Agnieszka; Wieczorek-Surdacka, Ewa; Kruszelnicka, Olga; Chmura, Kaja; Chyrchel, Bernadeta; Surdacki, Andrzej; Nowakowski, Michał

    2017-09-01

    As a result of a curriculum reform launched in 2012 at our institution, preclinical training was shortened to 2 years instead of the traditional 3 years, creating additional incentives to optimise teaching methods. In accordance with the new curriculum, a semester-long preclinical module of clinical skills (CS) laboratory training takes place in the second year of study, while an introductory clinical course (ie, brief introductory clerkships) is scheduled for the Fall semester of the third year. Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are carried out at the conclusion of both the preclinical module and the introductory clinical course. Our aim was to compare the scores at physical examination stations between the first and second matriculating classes of a newly reformed curriculum on preclinical second-year OSCEs and early clinical third-year OSCEs. Analysis of routinely collected data. One Polish medical school. Complete OSCE records for 462 second-year students and 445 third-year students. OSCE scores by matriculation year. In comparison to the first class of the newly reformed curriculum, significantly higher (ie, better) OSCE scores were observed for those students who matriculated in 2013, a year after implementing the reformed curriculum. This finding was consistent for both second-year and third-year cohorts. Additionally, the magnitude of the improvement in median third-year OSCE scores was proportional to the corresponding advancement in preceding second-year preclinical OSCE scores for each of two different sets of physical examination tasks. In contrast, no significant difference was noted between the academic years in the ability to interpret laboratory data or ECG - tasks which had not been included in the second-year preclinical training. Our results suggest the importance of preclinical training in a CS laboratory to improve students' competence in physical examination at the completion of introductory clinical clerkships during

  5. A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: the EU-EBM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppus, Sjors F P J; Emparanza, Jose I; Hadley, Julie; Kulier, Regina; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karin; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben W J; Khan, Khalid S

    2007-11-27

    Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone') and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice.

  6. A clinically integrated curriculum in Evidence-based Medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Andrea R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone' and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. Methods A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. Results We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. Conclusion The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice.

  7. The Conceptual Model of Future Teachers Training to Dual Education in VET (Vocational Education & Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholdasbekova, Saule; Nurzhanbayeva, Zhanat; Karatayev, Galymzhan; Akhmet, Laura Smatullaevna; Anarmetov, Bahitzhan

    2016-01-01

    In the article the author presents the theoretical understanding of research problems of training of the future teachers-organizers of the dual training system in vocational education & training (VET) in the conditions of the credit technology of education. The author's vision of way to solve the problem is discussed in the description of the…

  8. Transfer between training of part-tasks in complex skill training : Model development and supporting data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roessingh, J.J.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Koenderink, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the most common instruction-strategies for training complex skills is part-training. A complex task can often be divided into part-tasks. Part-training requires that certain part-tasks or combinations of part-tasks be practised in isolation in order to promote the transfer of skills that are

  9. Functional and Muscular Adaptations in an Experimental Model for Isometric Strength Training in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten Krüger; Gessner, Denise K; Michael Seimetz; Jasmin Banisch; Robert Ringseis; Klaus Eder; Norbert Weissmann; Mooren, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST) for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionall...

  10. 中国石化法律管理人员培训课程体系构建思路%The Development of Training Curriculum System for SINOPEC’s Legal Management Personnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李游; 王婧

    2014-01-01

    本文界定了中国石化法律管理人员的范围,分析了中国石化法律管理人员岗位素质能力,阐述了构建中国石化法律管理人员课程体系的指导思想、基本原则,最后搭建了法律人员课程体系。%The paper deifnes the scope of SINOPEC’s legal management personnel, examines the qualities and abilities that should be found in such employees, describes the guidelines and fundamental principles for the development of a curriculum system for these people, and ifnally constructs the training curriculum system.

  11. Porcine Model In The Laparoscopic Liver Surgery Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komorowski Andrzej L.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility to use live anesthetized pigs as a model for laparoscopic liver resection. During two days laparoscopy course two trainees were operating on two live animals performing exposure of the liver, Pringle manoeuver, division of liver ligaments, dissecting of the structures inside the hepatoduodenal ligament, dissection of the hepatic veins and left lateral liver sectionectomy. Exposure of the liver and Pringle manoeuver were performed correctly within 50 and 35 minutes. Left lateral sectionectomy has been performed correctly within 2 hours. The full dissection of the hepatoduodenal ligament and exposure of the hepatic veins were judged as insufficient by experienced laparoscopic tutors. There was one injury to the suprahepatic vena cava that was managed laparoscopically. The porcine model can be used as an advanced training for laparoscopic liver surgery.

  12. Comparative performance of high-fidelity training models for flexible ureteroscopy: Are all models effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We performed a comparative study of high-fidelity training models for flexible ureteroscopy (URS. Our objective was to determine whether high-fidelity non-virtual reality (VR models are as effective as the VR model in teaching flexible URS skills. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one trained urologists without clinical experience of flexible URS underwent dry lab simulation practice. After a warm-up period of 2 h, tasks were performed on a high-fidelity non-VR (Uro-scopic Trainer TM ; Endo-Urologie-Modell TM and a high-fidelity VR model (URO Mentor TM . The participants were divided equally into three batches with rotation on each of the three stations for 30 min. Performance of the trainees was evaluated by an expert ureteroscopist using pass rating and global rating score (GRS. The participants rated a face validity questionnaire at the end of each session. Results: The GRS improved statistically at evaluation performed after second rotation (P<0.001 for batches 1, 2 and 3. Pass ratings also improved significantly for all training models when the third and first rotations were compared (P<0.05. The batch that was trained on the VR-based model had more improvement on pass ratings on second rotation but could not achieve statistical significance. Most of the realistic domains were higher for a VR model as compared with the non-VR model, except the realism of the flexible endoscope. Conclusions: All the models used for training flexible URS were effective in increasing the GRS and pass ratings irrespective of the VR status.

  13. Framework Construction of MOOC Curriculum Model oriented by Computational Thinking%计算思维导向的MOOC课程模式框架构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔德宇; 徐久成; 孙全党; 孙林

    2015-01-01

    The MOOC is a new form of online education, and explore of its curriculum models is a hotspot in present education research. There exist some problems in current MOOC curriculum models, such as insufifciency theory back-up support, undeifned curriculum objectives, and poor model generalization. In view of these problems above, computational thinking was acted as orientation, the three elements, which are the model theme, function and structure setting as well as support system and applicable condition, were acted as cutting point. The current curriculum models were improved and innovated from five aspects including curriculum objectives, teacher roles, learning manners of student, organization and management modes.%针对目前MOOC课程模式中存在的理论支持不足、课程目标不明确、模式推广性较差等问题,以计算思维为指导,以课程模式的主题、功能、环境三个要素为切入点,依次从课程目标、教师角色、学生学习方式、组织机构、管理方式五个方面,对当前的MOOC课程模式进行改进和创新,构建基于计算思维的MOOC课程模式框架.

  14. Students’ perceptions of the Master in Secondary Teacher Education: Strengths and weaknesses of the new training model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª José HERNÁNDEZ AMORÓS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of a research process developed to know which the students’ perceptions about the program of Secondary Teachers Training are, during the academic course 2011/2012, when it has already been developed for three years. For that, we have reached some information from 227 students who have completed an anonymous open questionnaire. It has been used an evaluative methodology which is typical of qualitative paradigm. The information has been analyzed by AQUAD 6 software program (Huber, 2006, which has allowed the classification of the different codes in nine categories that help us to organize the information and reach some conclusions. These dimensions are: assessment time and teachers, teachers’ development through training, training difficulties, benefits of training, concept of education, interest in teaching, expectations of professional development, basic principles of educational work and suggestions for improvement. Results, therefore, are useful for doing several reformulations in curriculum and for enhance strengths of curriculum, identified by the students.

  15. Model Guided Design and Development Process for an Electronic Health Record Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ze; Marquard, Jenna; Henneman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Effective user training is important to ensure electronic health record (EHR) implementation success. Though many previous studies report best practice principles and success and failure stories, current EHR training is largely empirically-based and often lacks theoretical guidance. In addition, the process of training development is underemphasized and underreported. A white paper by the American Medical Informatics Association called for models of user training for clinical information system implementation; existing instructional development models from learning theory provide a basis to meet this call. We describe in this paper our experiences and lessons learned as we adapted several instructional development models to guide our development of EHR user training. Specifically, we focus on two key aspects of this training development: training content and training process.

  16. Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Edwards, Richard [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manually by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building energy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the Autotune research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the different kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of EnergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-effective calibration of building models.

  17. Enhanced Simulink Induction Motor Model for Education and Maintenance Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Pineda-Sanchez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The training of technicians in maintenance requires the use of signals produced by faulty machines in different operating conditions, which are difficult to obtain either from the industry or through destructive testing. Some tasks in electricity and control courses can also be complemented by an interactive induction machine model having a wider internal parameter configuration. This paper presents a new analytical model of induction machine under fault, which is able to simulate induction machines with rotor asymmetries and eccentricity in different load conditions, both stationary and transient states and yielding magnitudes such as currents, speed and torque. This model is faster computationally than the traditional method of simulating induction machine faults based on the Finite Element Method and also than other analytical models due to the rapid calculation of the inductances. The model is presented in Simulink by Matlab for the comprehension and interactivity with the students or lecturers and also to allow the easy combination of the effect of the fault with external influences, studying their consequences on a determined load or control system. An associated diagnosis tool is also presented.

  18. Improving education in primary care: development of an online curriculum using the blended learning model

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin Linda; Singh Mamta; Bateman Betzi L; Glover Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Standardizing the experiences of medical students in a community preceptorship where clinical sites vary by geography and discipline can be challenging. Computer-assisted learning is prevalent in medical education and can help standardize experiences, but often is not used to its fullest advantage. A blended learning curriculum combining web-based modules with face-to-face learning can ensure students obtain core curricular principles. Methods This course was developed and...

  19. Modeling the responses to resistance training in an animal experiment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Antony G; Py, Guillaume; Favier, François B; Sanchez, Anthony M J; Bonnieu, Anne; Busso, Thierry; Candau, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test whether systems models of training effects on performance in athletes can be used to explore the responses to resistance training in rats. 11 Wistar Han rats (277 ± 15 g) underwent 4 weeks of resistance training consisting in climbing a ladder with progressive loads. Training amount and performance were computed from total work and mean power during each training session. Three systems models relating performance to cumulated training bouts have been tested: (i) with a single component for adaptation to training, (ii) with two components to distinguish the adaptation and fatigue produced by exercise bouts, and (iii) with an additional component to account for training-related changes in exercise-induced fatigue. Model parameters were fitted using a mixed-effects modeling approach. The model with two components was found to be the most suitable to analyze the training responses (R(2) = 0.53; P experiment makes it possible to model the responses to resistance training. This modeling in rodents could be used in future studies in combination with biological tools for enhancing our understanding of the adaptive processes that occur during physical training.

  20. Urology residents training in laparoscopic surgery. Development of a virtual reality model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Baños, J L; Ballestero-Diego, R; Truan-Cacho, D; Aguilera-Tubet, C; Villanueva-Peña, A; Manuel-Palazuelos, J C

    2015-11-01

    The training and learning of residents in laparoscopic surgery has legal, financial and technological limitations. Simulation is an essential tool in the training of residents as a supplement to their training in laparoscopic surgery. The training should be structured in an appropriate environment, with previously established and clear objectives, taught by professionals with clinical and teaching experience in simulation. The training should be conducted with realistic models using animals and ex-vivo tissue from animals. It is essential to incorporate mechanisms to assess the objectives during the residents' training progress. We present the training model for laparoscopic surgery for urology residents at the University Hospital Valdecilla. The training is conducted at the Virtual Hospital Valdecilla, which is associated with the Center for Medical Simulation in Boston and is accredited by the American College of Surgeons. The model is designed in 3 blocks, basic for R1, intermediate for R2-3 and advanced for R4-5, with 9 training modules. The training is conducted in 4-hour sessions for 4 afternoons, for 3 weeks per year of residence. Residents therefore perform 240 hours of simulated laparoscopic training by the end of the course. For each module, we use structured objective assessments to measure each resident's training progress. Since 2003, 9 urology residents have been trained, in addition to the 5 who are currently in training. The model has undergone changes according to the needs expressed in the student feedback. The acquisition of skills in a virtual reality model has enabled the safe transfer of those skills to actual practice. A laparoscopic surgery training program designed in structured blocks and with progressive complexity provides appropriate training for transferring the skills acquired using this model to an actual scenario while maintaining patient safety. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.