WorldWideScience

Sample records for model successfully reproduces

  1. Reproducibility of LCA models of crude oil production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam R

    2014-11-04

    Scientific models are ideally reproducible, with results that converge despite varying methods. In practice, divergence between models often remains due to varied assumptions, incompleteness, or simply because of avoidable flaws. We examine LCA greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions models to test the reproducibility of their estimates for well-to-refinery inlet gate (WTR) GHG emissions. We use the Oil Production Greenhouse gas Emissions Estimator (OPGEE), an open source engineering-based life cycle assessment (LCA) model, as the reference model for this analysis. We study seven previous studies based on six models. We examine the reproducibility of prior results by successive experiments that align model assumptions and boundaries. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) between results varies between ∼1 and 8 g CO2 eq/MJ LHV when model inputs are not aligned. After model alignment, RMSE generally decreases only slightly. The proprietary nature of some of the models hinders explanations for divergence between the results. Because verification of the results of LCA GHG emissions is often not possible by direct measurement, we recommend the development of open source models for use in energy policy. Such practice will lead to iterative scientific review, improvement of models, and more reliable understanding of emissions.

  2. Using a 1-D model to reproduce diurnal SST signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    of measurement. A generally preferred approach to bridge the gap between in situ and remotely obtained measurements is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. This ESA supported study focuses on the implementation of the 1 dimensional General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), in order to resolve...... profiles, along with the selection of the coefficients for the 2-band parametrisation of light’s penetration in the water column, hold a key role in the agreement of the modelled output with observations. To improve the surface heat budget and the distribution of heat, the code was modified to include...... Institution Upper Ocean Processes Group archive. The successful implementation of the new parametrisations is verified while the model reproduces the diurnal signals seen from in situ measurements. Special focus is given to testing and validation of different set-ups using campaign data from the Atlantic...

  3. Towards reproducible descriptions of neuronal network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilen Nordlie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in science depends on the effective exchange of ideas among scientists. New ideas can be assessed and criticized in a meaningful manner only if they are formulated precisely. This applies to simulation studies as well as to experiments and theories. But after more than 50 years of neuronal network simulations, we still lack a clear and common understanding of the role of computational models in neuroscience as well as established practices for describing network models in publications. This hinders the critical evaluation of network models as well as their re-use. We analyze here 14 research papers proposing neuronal network models of different complexity and find widely varying approaches to model descriptions, with regard to both the means of description and the ordering and placement of material. We further observe great variation in the graphical representation of networks and the notation used in equations. Based on our observations, we propose a good model description practice, composed of guidelines for the organization of publications, a checklist for model descriptions, templates for tables presenting model structure, and guidelines for diagrams of networks. The main purpose of this good practice is to trigger a debate about the communication of neuronal network models in a manner comprehensible to humans, as opposed to machine-readable model description languages. We believe that the good model description practice proposed here, together with a number of other recent initiatives on data-, model-, and software-sharing, may lead to a deeper and more fruitful exchange of ideas among computational neuroscientists in years to come. We further hope that work on standardized ways of describing--and thinking about--complex neuronal networks will lead the scientific community to a clearer understanding of high-level concepts in network dynamics, and will thus lead to deeper insights into the function of the brain.

  4. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA a

  5. Reproducibility Issues : Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laman, Jon D; Kooistra, Susanne M; Clausen, Björn E; Clausen, Björn E.; Laman, Jon D.

    2017-01-01

    In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite

  6. Modeling and evaluating repeatability and reproducibility of ordinal classifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Mast; W.N. van Wieringen

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that currently available methods for the assessment of the repeatability and reproducibility of ordinal classifications are not satisfactory. The paper aims to study whether we can modify a class of models from Item Response Theory, well established for the study of the reliability

  7. Reproducibility Issues: Avoiding Pitfalls in Animal Inflammation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Jon D; Kooistra, Susanne M; Clausen, Björn E

    2017-01-01

    In light of an enhanced awareness of ethical questions and ever increasing costs when working with animals in biomedical research, there is a dedicated and sometimes fierce debate concerning the (lack of) reproducibility of animal models and their relevance for human inflammatory diseases. Despite evident advancements in searching for alternatives, that is, replacing, reducing, and refining animal experiments-the three R's of Russel and Burch (1959)-understanding the complex interactions of the cells of the immune system, the nervous system and the affected tissue/organ during inflammation critically relies on in vivo models. Consequently, scientific advancement and ultimately novel therapeutic interventions depend on improving the reproducibility of animal inflammation models. As a prelude to the remaining hands-on protocols described in this volume, here, we summarize potential pitfalls of preclinical animal research and provide resources and background reading on how to avoid them.

  8. Assessment of Modeling Capability for Reproducing Storm Impacts on TEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Rastaetter, L.; Bilitza, D.; Codrescu, M.; Coster, A. J.; Emery, B. A.; Foerster, M.; Foster, B.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Huba, J. D.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Mannucci, A. J.; Namgaladze, A. A.; Pi, X.; Prokhorov, B. E.; Ridley, A. J.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm, the energy transfer from solar wind to magnetosphere-ionosphere system adversely affects the communication and navigation systems. Quantifying storm impacts on TEC (Total Electron Content) and assessment of modeling capability of reproducing storm impacts on TEC are of importance to specifying and forecasting space weather. In order to quantify storm impacts on TEC, we considered several parameters: TEC changes compared to quiet time (the day before storm), TEC difference between 24-hour intervals, and maximum increase/decrease during the storm. We investigated the spatial and temporal variations of the parameters during the 2006 AGU storm event (14-15 Dec. 2006) using ground-based GPS TEC measurements in the selected 5 degree eight longitude sectors. The latitudinal variations were also studied in two longitude sectors among the eight sectors where data coverage is relatively better. We obtained modeled TEC from various ionosphere/thermosphere (IT) models. The parameters from the models were compared with each other and with the observed values. We quantified performance of the models in reproducing the TEC variations during the storm using skill scores. This study has been supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Model outputs and observational data used for the study will be permanently posted at the CCMC website (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) for the space science communities to use.

  9. Reproducibility and Transparency in Ocean-Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, N.; Adcroft, A.; Hallberg, R.; Griffies, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility is a cornerstone of the scientific method. Within geophysical modeling and simulation achieving reproducibility can be difficult, especially given the complexity of numerical codes, enormous and disparate data sets, and variety of supercomputing technology. We have made progress on this problem in the context of a large project - the development of new ocean and sea ice models, MOM6 and SIS2. Here we present useful techniques and experience.We use version control not only for code but the entire experiment working directory, including configuration (run-time parameters, component versions), input data and checksums on experiment output. This allows us to document when the solutions to experiments change, whether due to code updates or changes in input data. To avoid distributing large input datasets we provide the tools for generating these from the sources, rather than provide raw input data.Bugs can be a source of non-determinism and hence irreproducibility, e.g. reading from or branching on uninitialized memory. To expose these we routinely run system tests, using a memory debugger, multiple compilers and different machines. Additional confidence in the code comes from specialised tests, for example automated dimensional analysis and domain transformations. This has entailed adopting a code style where we deliberately restrict what a compiler can do when re-arranging mathematical expressions.In the spirit of open science, all development is in the public domain. This leads to a positive feedback, where increased transparency and reproducibility makes using the model easier for external collaborators, who in turn provide valuable contributions. To facilitate users installing and running the model we provide (version controlled) digital notebooks that illustrate and record analysis of output. This has the dual role of providing a gross, platform-independent, testing capability and a means to documents model output and analysis.

  10. Venusian Polar Vortex reproduced by a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Takagi, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Unlike the polar vortices observed in the Earth, Mars and Titan atmospheres, the observed Venus polar vortex is warmer than the mid-latitudes at cloud-top levels (~65 km). This warm polar vortex is zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band located at ~60 degree latitude, which is a unique feature called 'cold collar' in the Venus atmosphere [e.g. Taylor et al. 1980; Piccioni et al. 2007]. Although these structures have been observed in numerous previous observations, the formation mechanism is still unknown. In addition, an axi-asymmetric feature is always seen in the warm polar vortex. It changes temporally and sometimes shows a hot polar dipole or S-shaped structure as shown by a lot of infrared measurements [e.g. Garate-Lopez et al. 2013; 2015]. However, its vertical structure has not been investigated. To solve these problems, we performed a numerical simulation of the Venus atmospheric circulation using a general circulation model named AFES for Venus [Sugimoto et al. 2014] and reproduced these puzzling features.And then, the reproduced structures of the atmosphere and the axi-asymmetirc feature are compared with some previous observational results.In addition, the quasi-periodical zonal-mean zonal wind fluctuation is also seen in the Venus polar vortex reproduced in our model. This might be able to explain some observational results [e.g. Luz et al. 2007] and implies that the polar vacillation might also occur in the Venus atmosphere, which is silimar to the Earth's polar atmosphere. We will also show some initial results about this point in this presentation.

  11. Voxel-level reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Katelyn M.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in tissue mechanical properties, measured non-invasively by elastography methods, have been shown to be an important diagnostic tool, particularly for cancer. Tissue elasticity information, tracked over the course of therapy, may be an important prognostic indicator of tumor response to treatment. While many elastography techniques exist, this work reports on the use of a novel form of elastography that uses image texture to reconstruct elastic property distributions in tissue (i.e., a modality independent elastography (MIE) method) within the context of a pre-clinical breast cancer system.1,2 The elasticity results have previously shown good correlation with independent mechanical testing.1 Furthermore, MIE has been successfully utilized to localize and characterize lesions in both phantom experiments and simulation experiments with clinical data.2,3 However, the reproducibility of this method has not been characterized in previous work. The goal of this study is to evaluate voxel-level reproducibility of MIE in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. Bland-Altman analysis of co-registered repeat MIE scans in this preliminary study showed a reproducibility index of 24.7% (scaled to a percent of maximum stiffness) at the voxel level. As opposed to many reports in the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) literature that speak to reproducibility measures of the bulk organ, these results establish MIE reproducibility at the voxel level; i.e., the reproducibility of locally-defined mechanical property measurements throughout the tumor volume.

  12. Research Spotlight: Improved model reproduces the 2003 European heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-04-01

    In August 2003, record-breaking temperatures raged across much of Europe. In France, maximum temperatures of 37°C (99°F) persisted for 9 days straight, the longest such stretch since 1873. About 40,000 deaths (14,000 in France alone) were attributed to the extreme heat and low humidity. Various climate conditions must come into alignment to produce extreme weather like the 2003 heat wave, and despite a concerted effort, forecasting models have so far been unable to accurately reproduce the event—including the modern European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ensemble modeling system for seasonal forecasts, which went into operation in 2007. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2010GL046455, 2011)

  13. Reproducibility of UAV-based photogrammetric surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Niels; Smith, Mike; Cammeraat, Erik; Keesstra, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion, rapid geomorphological change and vegetation degradation are major threats to the human and natural environment in many regions. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry are invaluable tools for the collection of highly detailed aerial imagery and subsequent low cost production of 3D landscapes for an assessment of landscape change. Despite the widespread use of UAVs for image acquisition in monitoring applications, the reproducibility of UAV data products has not been explored in detail. This paper investigates this reproducibility by comparing the surface models and orthophotos derived from different UAV flights that vary in flight direction and altitude. The study area is located near Lorca, Murcia, SE Spain, which is a semi-arid medium-relief locale. The area is comprised of terraced agricultural fields that have been abandoned for about 40 years and have suffered subsequent damage through piping and gully erosion. In this work we focused upon variation in cell size, vertical and horizontal accuracy, and horizontal positioning of recognizable landscape features. The results suggest that flight altitude has a significant impact on reconstructed point density and related cell size, whilst flight direction affects the spatial distribution of vertical accuracy. The horizontal positioning of landscape features is relatively consistent between the different flights. We conclude that UAV data products are suitable for monitoring campaigns for land cover purposes or geomorphological mapping, but special care is required when used for monitoring changes in elevation.

  14. A reproducible nonlethal animal model for studying cyanide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, J; Marino, M T; von Bredow, J D; Kaminskis, A; Brewer, T

    2000-12-01

    Previous studies using bolus intravenous injections of sodium cyanide have been used to model the sudden exposure to high concentrations of cyanide that could occur on the battlefield. This study was designed to develop a model that would simulate the type of exposure to cyanide gas that could happen during actual low-level continuous types of exposure and then compare it with the bolus model. Cardiovascular and respiratory recordings taken from anesthetized dogs have been used previously to characterize the lethal effects of cyanide. The intravenous, bolus injection of 2.5 mg/kg sodium cyanide provides a model in which a greater than lethal concentration is attained. In contrast, our model uses a slow, intravenous infusion of cyanide to titrate each animal to its own inherent end point, which coincides with the amount of cyanide needed to induce death through respiratory arrest. In this model, therapeutic intervention can be used to restore respiration and allow for the complete recovery of the animals. After recovery, the same animal can be given a second infusion of cyanide, followed again by treatment and recovery, providing a reproducible end point. This end point can then be expressed as the total amount of cyanide per body weight (mg/kg) required to kill. In this study, the average dose of sodium cyanide among 12 animals was 1.21 mg/kg, which is approximately half the cyanide used in the bolus model. Thus, titration to respiratory arrest followed by resuscitation provides a repetitive-use animal model that can be used to test the efficacy of various forms of pretreatment and/or therapy without the loss of a single animal.

  15. Models of Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Wu Renbao made national celebrity for his commitment to achieving common prosperity among his co-villagers in Huaxi Village, Jiangsu Province.Wu's recipe for success was to take advantage of collective strength by encouraging mutual assistance between villages and households.

  16. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  17. Establishment of reproducible osteosarcoma rat model using orthotopic implantation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhe; Sun, Honghui; Fan, Qingyu; Long, Hua; Yang, Tongtao; Ma, Bao'an

    2009-05-01

    negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. It may be a useful tool in the investigation of antiangiogenic and anticancer therapeutics. Ultrasound was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  18. New model for datasets citation and extraction reproducibility in VAMDC

    CERN Document Server

    Zwölf, Carlo Maria; Dubernet, Marie-Lise

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a new paradigm for the identification of datasets extracted from the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) e-science infrastructure. Such identification includes information on the origin and version of the datasets, references associated to individual data in the datasets, as well as timestamps linked to the extraction procedure. This paradigm is described through the modifications of the language used to exchange data within the VAMDC and through the services that will implement those modifications. This new paradigm should enforce traceability of datasets, favour reproducibility of datasets extraction, and facilitate the systematic citation of the authors having originally measured and/or calculated the extracted atomic and molecular data.

  19. New model for datasets citation and extraction reproducibility in VAMDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwölf, Carlo Maria; Moreau, Nicolas; Dubernet, Marie-Lise

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a new paradigm for the identification of datasets extracted from the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) e-science infrastructure. Such identification includes information on the origin and version of the datasets, references associated to individual data in the datasets, as well as timestamps linked to the extraction procedure. This paradigm is described through the modifications of the language used to exchange data within the VAMDC and through the services that will implement those modifications. This new paradigm should enforce traceability of datasets, favor reproducibility of datasets extraction, and facilitate the systematic citation of the authors having originally measured and/or calculated the extracted atomic and molecular data.

  20. Can a regional climate model reproduce observed extreme temperatures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Craigmile

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Using output from a regional Swedish climate model and observations from the Swedish synoptic observational network, we compare seasonal minimum temperatures from model output and observations using marginal extreme value modeling techniques. We make seasonal comparisons using generalized extreme value models and empirically estimate the shift in the distribution as a function of the regional climate model values, using the Doksum shift function. Spatial and temporal comparisons over south central Sweden are made by building hierarchical Bayesian generalized extreme value models for the observed minima and regional climate model output. Generally speaking the regional model is surprisingly well calibrated for minimum temperatures. We do detect a problem in the regional model to produce minimum temperatures close to 0◦C. The seasonal spatial effects are quite similar between data and regional model. The observations indicate relatively strong warming, especially in the northern region. This signal is present in the regional model, but is not as strong.

  1. A model project for reproducible papers: critical temperature for the Ising model on a square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Dolfi, M; Hehn, A; Imriška, J; Pakrouski, K; Rønnow, T F; Troyer, M; Zintchenko, I; Chirigati, F; Freire, J; Shasha, D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple, yet typical simulation in statistical physics, consisting of large scale Monte Carlo simulations followed by an involved statistical analysis of the results. The purpose is to provide an example publication to explore tools for writing reproducible papers. The simulation estimates the critical temperature where the Ising model on the square lattice becomes magnetic to be Tc /J = 2.26934(6) using a finite size scaling analysis of the crossing points of Binder cumulants. We provide a virtual machine which can be used to reproduce all figures and results.

  2. A structured model of video reproduces primary visual cortical organisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Berkes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The visual system must learn to infer the presence of objects and features in the world from the images it encounters, and as such it must, either implicitly or explicitly, model the way these elements interact to create the image. Do the response properties of cells in the mammalian visual system reflect this constraint? To address this question, we constructed a probabilistic model in which the identity and attributes of simple visual elements were represented explicitly and learnt the parameters of this model from unparsed, natural video sequences. After learning, the behaviour and grouping of variables in the probabilistic model corresponded closely to functional and anatomical properties of simple and complex cells in the primary visual cortex (V1. In particular, feature identity variables were activated in a way that resembled the activity of complex cells, while feature attribute variables responded much like simple cells. Furthermore, the grouping of the attributes within the model closely parallelled the reported anatomical grouping of simple cells in cat V1. Thus, this generative model makes explicit an interpretation of complex and simple cells as elements in the segmentation of a visual scene into basic independent features, along with a parametrisation of their moment-by-moment appearances. We speculate that such a segmentation may form the initial stage of a hierarchical system that progressively separates the identity and appearance of more articulated visual elements, culminating in view-invariant object recognition.

  3. Reproducing Phenomenology of Peroxidation Kinetics via Model Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslanov, Anatole D.; Bashylau, Anton V.

    2010-06-01

    We studied mathematical modeling of lipid peroxidation using a biochemical model system of iron (II)-ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation of rat hepatocyte mitochondrial fractions. We found that antioxidants extracted from plants demonstrate a high intensity of peroxidation inhibition. We simplified the system of differential equations that describes the kinetics of the mathematical model to a first order equation, which can be solved analytically. Moreover, we endeavor to algorithmically and heuristically recreate the processes and construct an environment that closely resembles the corresponding natural system. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to theoretically predict both the kinetics of oxidation and the intensity of inhibition without resorting to analytical and biochemical research, which is important for cost-effective discovery and development of medical agents with antioxidant action from the medicinal plants.

  4. Reproducible Infection Model for Clostridium perfringens in Broiler Chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to establish an infection and disease model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens. Previous experiments had failed to induce disease and only a transient colonization with challenge strains had been obtained. In the present study, two series of experiments w...

  5. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  6. Hydrological Modeling Reproducibility Through Data Management and Adaptors for Model Interoperability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of a lack of centralized planning and no widely-adopted standards among hydrological modeling research groups, research communities, and the data management teams meant to support research, there is chaos when it comes to data formats, spatio-temporal resolutions, ontologies, and data availability. All this makes true scientific reproducibility and collaborative integrated modeling impossible without some glue to piece it all together. Our Virtual Watershed Integrated Modeling System provides the tools and modeling framework hydrologists need to accelerate and fortify new scientific investigations by tracking provenance and providing adaptors for integrated, collaborative hydrologic modeling and data management. Under global warming trends where water resources are under increasing stress, reproducible hydrological modeling will be increasingly important to improve transparency and understanding of the scientific facts revealed through modeling. The Virtual Watershed Data Engine is capable of ingesting a wide variety of heterogeneous model inputs, outputs, model configurations, and metadata. We will demonstrate one example, starting from real-time raw weather station data packaged with station metadata. Our integrated modeling system will then create gridded input data via geostatistical methods along with error and uncertainty estimates. These gridded data are then used as input to hydrological models, all of which are available as web services wherever feasible. Models may be integrated in a data-centric way where the outputs too are tracked and used as inputs to "downstream" models. This work is part of an ongoing collaborative Tri-state (New Mexico, Nevada, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR Project, WC-WAVE, comprised of researchers from multiple universities in each of the three states. The tools produced and presented here have been developed collaboratively alongside watershed scientists to address specific modeling problems with an eye on the bigger picture of

  7. Successful Succession in Family Businesses : Individual Level Factors and Succession Planning Models.

    OpenAIRE

    Aleem, Majid; Islam, Md. Shariful

    2009-01-01

    Individual level factors related to the successor have a central role to play in the succession process of the business. When these factors are viewed in relation to succession planning models, these factors have a direct relation to the succession models in terms of success or failure of the succession process. The major contributing factor to the success or failure of the succession process is that of the leadership provided to the organization by the predecessor. These leadership qualities...

  8. Accuracy and reproducibility of measurements on plaster models and digital models created using an intraoral scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camardella, Leonardo Tavares; Breuning, Hero; de Vasconcellos Vilella, Oswaldo

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements made on digital models created using an intraoral color scanner compared to measurements on dental plaster models. This study included impressions of 28 volunteers. Alginate impressions were used to make plaster models, and each volunteers' dentition was scanned with a TRIOS Color intraoral scanner. Two examiners performed measurements on the plaster models using a digital caliper and measured the digital models using Ortho Analyzer software. The examiners measured 52 distances, including tooth diameter and height, overjet, overbite, intercanine and intermolar distances, and the sagittal relationship. The paired t test was used to assess intra-examiner performance and measurement accuracy of the two examiners for both plaster and digital models. The level of clinically relevant differences between the measurements according to the threshold used was evaluated and a formula was applied to calculate the chance of finding clinically relevant errors on measurements on plaster and digital models. For several parameters, statistically significant differences were found between the measurements on the two different models. However, most of these discrepancies were not considered clinically significant. The measurement of the crown height of upper central incisors had the highest measurement error for both examiners. Based on the interexaminer performance, reproducibility of the measurements was poor for some of the parameters. Overall, our findings showed that most of the measurements on digital models created using the TRIOS Color scanner and measured with Ortho Analyzer software had a clinically acceptable accuracy compared to the same measurements made with a caliper on plaster models, but the measuring method can affect the reproducibility of the measurements.

  9. Demography-based adaptive network model reproduces the spatial organization of human linguistic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A.; Manrubia, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of human linguistic groups presents a number of interesting and nontrivial patterns. The distributions of the number of speakers per language and the area each group covers follow log-normal distributions, while population and area fulfill an allometric relationship. The topology of networks of spatial contacts between different linguistic groups has been recently characterized, showing atypical properties of the degree distribution and clustering, among others. Human demography, spatial conflicts, and the construction of networks of contacts between linguistic groups are mutually dependent processes. Here we introduce an adaptive network model that takes all of them into account and successfully reproduces, using only four model parameters, not only those features of linguistic groups already described in the literature, but also correlations between demographic and topological properties uncovered in this work. Besides their relevance when modeling and understanding processes related to human biogeography, our adaptive network model admits a number of generalizations that broaden its scope and make it suitable to represent interactions between agents based on population dynamics and competition for space.

  10. Bitwise identical compiling setup: prospective for reproducibility and reliability of earth system modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility and reliability are fundamental principles of scientific research. A compiling setup that includes a specific compiler version and compiler flags is essential technical supports for Earth system modeling. With the fast development of computer software and hardware, compiling setup has to be updated frequently, which challenges the reproducibility and reliability of Earth system modeling. The existing results of a simulation using an original compiling setup may be irreproducible by a newer compiling setup because trivial round-off errors introduced by the change of compiling setup can potentially trigger significant changes in simulation results. Regarding the reliability, a compiler with millions of lines of codes may have bugs that are easily overlooked due to the uncertainties or unknowns in Earth system modeling. To address these challenges, this study shows that different compiling setups can achieve exactly the same (bitwise identical results in Earth system modeling, and a set of bitwise identical compiling setups of a model can be used across different compiler versions and different compiler flags. As a result, the original results can be more easily reproduced; for example, the original results with an older compiler version can be reproduced exactly with a newer compiler version. Moreover, this study shows that new test cases can be generated based on the differences of bitwise identical compiling setups between different models, which can help detect software bugs or risks in the codes of models and compilers and finally improve the reliability of Earth system modeling.

  11. Accuracy and reproducibility of dental replica models reconstructed by different rapid prototyping techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazeveld, Aletta; Huddleston Slater, James J. R.; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Rapid prototyping is a fast-developing technique that might play a significant role in the eventual replacement of plaster dental models. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of physical dental models reconstructed from digital data by several rapid

  12. Assessing the relative effectiveness of statistical downscaling and distribution mapping in reproducing rainfall statistics based on climate model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langousis, Andreas; Mamalakis, Antonios; Deidda, Roberto; Marrocu, Marino

    2016-01-01

    To improve the level skill of climate models (CMs) in reproducing the statistics of daily rainfall at a basin level, two types of statistical approaches have been suggested. One is statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs based on historical series of precipitation. The other, usually referred to as statistical rainfall downscaling, is the use of stochastic models to conditionally simulate rainfall series, based on large-scale atmospheric forcing from CMs. While promising, the latter approach attracted reduced attention in recent years, since the developed downscaling schemes involved complex weather identification procedures, while demonstrating limited success in reproducing several statistical features of rainfall. In a recent effort, Langousis and Kaleris () developed a statistical framework for simulation of daily rainfall intensities conditional on upper-air variables, which is simpler to implement and more accurately reproduces several statistical properties of actual rainfall records. Here we study the relative performance of: (a) direct statistical correction of CM rainfall outputs using nonparametric distribution mapping, and (b) the statistical downscaling scheme of Langousis and Kaleris (), in reproducing the historical rainfall statistics, including rainfall extremes, at a regional level. This is done for an intermediate-sized catchment in Italy, i.e., the Flumendosa catchment, using rainfall and atmospheric data from four CMs of the ENSEMBLES project. The obtained results are promising, since the proposed downscaling scheme is more accurate and robust in reproducing a number of historical rainfall statistics, independent of the CM used and the characteristics of the calibration period. This is particularly the case for yearly rainfall maxima.

  13. A standardised and reproducible model of intra-abdominal infection and abscess formation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosscha, K; Nieuwenhuijs, VB; Gooszen, AW; van Duijvenbode-Beumer, H; Visser, MR; Verweij, Willem; Akkermans, LMA

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To develop a standardised and reproducible model of intra-abdominal infection and abscess formation in rats. Design: Experimental study. Setting: University hospital, The Netherlands. Subjects: 36 adult male Wistar rats. Interventions: In 32 rats, peritonitis was produced using two differ

  14. A force-based model to reproduce stop-and-go waves in pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Stop-and-go waves in single-file movement are a phenomenon that is ob- served empirically in pedestrian dynamics. It manifests itself by the co-existence of two phases: moving and stopping pedestrians. We show analytically based on a simplified one-dimensional scenario that under some conditions the system can have instable homogeneous solutions. Hence, oscillations in the trajectories and in- stabilities emerge during simulations. To our knowledge there exists no force-based model which is collision- and oscillation-free and meanwhile can reproduce phase separation. We develop a new force-based model for pedestrian dynamics able to reproduce qualitatively the phenomenon of phase separation. We investigate analytically the stability condition of the model and define regimes of parameter values where phase separation can be observed. We show by means of simulations that the predefined conditions lead in fact to the expected behavior and validate our model with respect to empirical findings.

  15. Using the mouse to model human disease: increasing validity and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica J. Justice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that use the mouse as a model for disease have recently come under scrutiny because of the repeated failure of data, particularly derived from preclinical studies, to be replicated or translated to humans. The usefulness of mouse models has been questioned because of irreproducibility and poor recapitulation of human conditions. Newer studies, however, point to bias in reporting results and improper data analysis as key factors that limit reproducibility and validity of preclinical mouse research. Inaccurate and incomplete descriptions of experimental conditions also contribute. Here, we provide guidance on best practice in mouse experimentation, focusing on appropriate selection and validation of the model, sources of variation and their influence on phenotypic outcomes, minimum requirements for control sets, and the importance of rigorous statistics. Our goal is to raise the standards in mouse disease modeling to enhance reproducibility, reliability and clinical translation of findings.

  16. Anatomical Reproducibility of a Head Model Molded by a Three-dimensional Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kosuke; Nemoto, Masaaki; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Okonogi, Shinichi; Nomoto, Jun; Harada, Naoyuki; Sugo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Chikao

    2015-01-01

    We prepared rapid prototyping models of heads with unruptured cerebral aneurysm based on image data of computed tomography angiography (CTA) using a three-dimensional (3D) printer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical reproducibility and accuracy of these models by comparison with the CTA images on a monitor. The subjects were 22 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysm who underwent preoperative CTA. Reproducibility of the microsurgical anatomy of skull bone and arteries, the length and thickness of the main arteries, and the size of cerebral aneurysm were compared between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model. The microsurgical anatomy and arteries were favorably reproduced, apart from a few minute regions, in the rapid prototyping models. No significant difference was noted in the measured lengths of the main arteries between the CTA image and rapid prototyping model, but errors were noted in their thickness (p 3D printer. It was concluded that these models are useful tools for neurosurgical simulation. The thickness of the main arteries and size of cerebral aneurysm should be comprehensively judged including other neuroimaging in consideration of errors.

  17. A novel, recovery, and reproducible minimally invasive cardiopulmonary bypass model with lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ling-ke; CHENG Wei; LIU Dong-hai; ZHANG Jing; ZHU Yao-bin; QIAO Chen-hui; ZHANG Yan-bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has been shown to be associated with a systemic inflammatory response leading to postoperative organ dysfunction.Elucidating the underlying mechanisms and developing protective strategies for the pathophysiological consequences of CPB have been hampered due to the absence of a satisfactory recovery animal model.The purpose of this study was to establish a good rat model of CPB to study the pathophysiology of potential complications.Methods Twenty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 450-560 g were randomly divided into a CPB group (n=10)and a control group (n=10).All rats were anaesthetized and mechanically ventilated.The carotid artery and jugular vein were cannulated.The blood was drained from the dght atrium via the right jugular and transferred by a miniaturized roller pump to a hollow fiber oxygenator and back to the rat via the left carotid artery.Priming consisted of 8 ml of homologous blood and 8 ml of colloid.The surface of the hollow fiber oxygenator was 0.075 m2.CPB was conducted for 60 minutes at a flow rate of 100-120 ml.kg-1.min-1 in the CPB group.Oxygen flow/perfusion flow was 0.8 to 1.0,and the mean arterial pressure remained 60-80 mmHg.Blood gas analysis,hemodynamic investigations,and lung histology were subsequently examined.Results All CPB rats recovered from the operative process without incident.Normal cardiac function after successful weaning was confirmed by electrocardiography and blood pressure measurements.Mean arterial pressure remained stable.The results of blood gas analysis at different times were within the normal range.Levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were higher in the lung tissue in the CPB group (P <0.005).Histological examination revealed marked increases in interstitial congestion,edema,and inflammation in the CPB group.Conclusion This novel,recovery,and reproducible minimally invasive CPB model may open the field for various studies on the pathophysiological process of CPB and systemic

  18. Cellular automaton model in the fundamental diagram approach reproducing the synchronized outflow of wide moving jams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Jun-fang, E-mail: tianhustbjtu@hotmail.com [MOE Key Laboratory for Urban Transportation Complex Systems Theory and Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yuan, Zhen-zhou; Jia, Bin; Fan, Hong-qiang; Wang, Tao [MOE Key Laboratory for Urban Transportation Complex Systems Theory and Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2012-09-10

    Velocity effect and critical velocity are incorporated into the average space gap cellular automaton model [J.F. Tian, et al., Phys. A 391 (2012) 3129], which was able to reproduce many spatiotemporal dynamics reported by the three-phase theory except the synchronized outflow of wide moving jams. The physics of traffic breakdown has been explained. Various congested patterns induced by the on-ramp are reproduced. It is shown that the occurrence of synchronized outflow, free outflow of wide moving jams is closely related with drivers time delay in acceleration at the downstream jam front and the critical velocity, respectively. -- Highlights: ► Velocity effect is added into average space gap cellular automaton model. ► The physics of traffic breakdown has been explained. ► The probabilistic nature of traffic breakdown is simulated. ► Various congested patterns induced by the on-ramp are reproduced. ► The occurrence of synchronized outflow of jams depends on drivers time delay.

  19. Hidden-variable models for the spin singlet: I. Non-local theories reproducing quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A non-local hidden variable model reproducing the quantum mechanical probabilities for a spin singlet is presented. The non-locality is concentrated in the distribution of the hidden variables. The model otherwise satisfies both the hypothesis of outcome independence, made in the derivation of Bell inequality, and of compliance with Malus's law, made in the derivation of Leggett inequality. It is shown through the prescription of a protocol that the non-locality can be exploited to send information instantaneously provided that the hidden variables can be measured, even though they cannot be controlled.

  20. Who Is Your Successful Aging Role Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopp, Daniela S; Jung, Seojung; Damarin, Amanda K; Mirpuri, Sheena; Spini, Dario

    2017-03-01

    Having a role model of successful aging may contribute to views on aging. This article investigated the nature and correlates of young, middle-aged, and older adults' successful aging role models. One hundred and fifty-one individuals aged 18-99 were asked whether they had a role model of successful aging and if so, the reasons for their choice. Open-ended answers were coded for recurring themes. Views on aging and attitudes toward own aging were assessed with questionnaires. Eighty-five percent of participants indicated at least one role model. Most mentioned role models from their family, including parents and grandparents. Role models were gender matched. Most frequent reasons for model choices were health, activities, and social resources. Participants with family role models had less negative views on aging. Mediation analyses confirmed that family role models were associated with more reasons for role model choice, which in turn was associated with less negative views on aging. Furthermore, the effect of reasons on attitudes toward own aging was mediated by negative views on aging. Young, middle-aged, and older adults have role models for successful aging. Links between role model features and views on aging suggest that role models may be useful in promoting successful aging.

  1. On some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss some problems which arise, when the matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension and their zero Kaluza-Klein modes are supposed to exactly reproduce the Standard Model fields and their interactions.

  2. Reproducibility blues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulverer, Bernd

    2015-11-12

    Research findings advance science only if they are significant, reliable and reproducible. Scientists and journals must publish robust data in a way that renders it optimally reproducible. Reproducibility has to be incentivized and supported by the research infrastructure but without dampening innovation.

  3. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  4. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  5. Current reinforcement model reproduces center-in-center vein trajectory of Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Schenz, Daniel; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Ueda, Kei-Ichi; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-06-01

    Vein networks span the whole body of the amoeboid organism in the plasmodial slime mould Physarum polycephalum, and the network topology is rearranged within an hour in response to spatio-temporal variations of the environment. It has been reported that this tube morphogenesis is capable of solving mazes, and a mathematical model, named the 'current reinforcement rule', was proposed based on the adaptability of the veins. Although it is known that this model works well for reproducing some key characters of the organism's maze-solving behaviour, one important issue is still open: In the real organism, the thick veins tend to trace the shortest possible route by cutting the corners at the turn of corridors, following a center-in-center trajectory, but it has not yet been examined whether this feature also appears in the mathematical model, using corridors of finite width. In this report, we confirm that the mathematical model reproduces the center-in-center trajectory of veins around corners observed in the maze-solving experiment. © 2017 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  6. [Amniocentesis trainer: development of a cheap and reproducible new training model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, M; Cordier, A-G; Laher, G; Benachi, A; Mandelbrot, L

    2012-11-01

    Amniocentesis is the most common invasive procedure for prenatal diagnosis. It is essential to master this sampling technique prior to performing more complex ultrasound-guided interventions (cordocentesis, drain insertion). Training is a challenge because of the risks associated with the procedure, as well as the impact on the patient's anxiety. An amniocentesis simulator allows for safe training and repeats interventions, thus accelerating the learning curve, and also allows for periodic evaluation of proficiency. We present here a new, simple, and cost-effective amniotrainer model that reproduces real life conditions, using chicken breast and condoms filled with water.

  7. MODEL OF TRAINING OF SUCCESS IN LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Александровна Лежнева

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the importance of the development of motive to succeed in adolescence. It is determined the value of the motive to achieve success in the further development of the teenager: a motive to achieve effective internal forces mobilized for the implementation of successful operation ensures the active involvement of teenagers in social and interpersonal relationships. As the primary means of motive development success is considered training. The author provides a definition of "training for success in life," creates a model of training for success in life, and describes its units (targeted, informative, technological, productive, reveals the successful development of the technology life strategy used during the training (self-presentation, targets, incentives, subject-orientation. The author pays attention to the need for a future psychologist to develop teenagers’ motive to achieve success through the mastery of competence in constructing a model of training for success in life, and its implementation in the course of professional activities. The main means of training students of psychology to the use of training success in life identified the additional educational programs and psychological section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-9-77

  8. Extreme Rainfall Events Over Southern Africa: Assessment of a Climate Model to Reproduce Daily Extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.; Kniveton, D.; Layberry, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is increasingly accepted that any possible climate change will not only have an influence on mean climate but may also significantly alter climatic variability. This issue is of particular importance for environmentally vulnerable regions such as southern Africa. The subcontinent is considered especially vulnerable extreme events, due to a number of factors including extensive poverty, disease and political instability. Rainfall variability and the identification of rainfall extremes is a function of scale, so high spatial and temporal resolution data are preferred to identify extreme events and accurately predict future variability. The majority of previous climate model verification studies have compared model output with observational data at monthly timescales. In this research, the assessment of a state-of-the-art climate model to simulate climate at daily timescales is carried out using satellite derived rainfall data from the Microwave Infra-Red Algorithm (MIRA). This dataset covers the period from 1993-2002 and the whole of southern Africa at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degree longitude/latitude. Once the model's ability to reproduce extremes has been assessed, idealised regions of SST anomalies are used to force the model, with the overall aim of investigating the ways in which SST anomalies influence rainfall extremes over southern Africa. In this paper, results from sensitivity testing of the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre's climate model's domain size are firstly presented. Then simulations of current climate from the model, operating in both regional and global mode, are compared to the MIRA dataset at daily timescales. Thirdly, the ability of the model to reproduce daily rainfall extremes will be assessed, again by a comparison with extremes from the MIRA dataset. Finally, the results from the idealised SST experiments are briefly presented, suggesting associations between rainfall extremes and both local and remote SST anomalies.

  9. A novel highly reproducible and lethal nonhuman primate model for orthopox virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Kramski

    Full Text Available The intentional re-introduction of Variola virus (VARV, the agent of smallpox, into the human population is of great concern due its bio-terroristic potential. Moreover, zoonotic infections with Cowpox (CPXV and Monkeypox virus (MPXV cause severe diseases in humans. Smallpox vaccines presently available can have severe adverse effects that are no longer acceptable. The efficacy and safety of new vaccines and antiviral drugs for use in humans can only be demonstrated in animal models. The existing nonhuman primate models, using VARV and MPXV, need very high viral doses that have to be applied intravenously or intratracheally to induce a lethal infection in macaques. To overcome these drawbacks, the infectivity and pathogenicity of a particular CPXV was evaluated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus.A CPXV named calpox virus was isolated from a lethal orthopox virus (OPV outbreak in New World monkeys. We demonstrated that marmosets infected with calpox virus, not only via the intravenous but also the intranasal route, reproducibly develop symptoms resembling smallpox in humans. Infected animals died within 1-3 days after onset of symptoms, even when very low infectious viral doses of 5x10(2 pfu were applied intranasally. Infectious virus was demonstrated in blood, saliva and all organs analyzed.We present the first characterization of a new OPV infection model inducing a disease in common marmosets comparable to smallpox in humans. Intranasal virus inoculation mimicking the natural route of smallpox infection led to reproducible infection. In vivo titration resulted in an MID(50 (minimal monkey infectious dose 50% of 8.3x10(2 pfu of calpox virus which is approximately 10,000-fold lower than MPXV and VARV doses applied in the macaque models. Therefore, the calpox virus/marmoset model is a suitable nonhuman primate model for the validation of vaccines and antiviral drugs. Furthermore, this model can help study mechanisms of OPV pathogenesis.

  10. Digital versus plaster study models: how accurate and reproducible are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizadeh, Neilufar; Moles, David R; O'Neill, Julian; Noar, Joseph H

    2012-09-01

    To compare measurements of occlusal relationships and arch dimensions taken from digital study models with those taken from plaster models. Laboratory study The Orthodontic Department, Kettering General Hospital, Kettering, UK Methods and materials: One hundred and twelve sets of study models with a range of malocclusions and various degrees of crowding were selected. Occlusal features were measured manually with digital callipers on the plaster models. The same measurements were performed on digital images of the study models. Each method was carried out twice in order to check for intra-operator variability. The repeatability and reproducibility of the methods was assessed. Statistically significant differences between the two methods were found. In 8 of the 16 occlusal features measured, the plaster measurements were more repeatable. However, those differences were not of sufficient magnitude to have clinical relevance. In addition there were statistically significant systematic differences for 12 of the 16 occlusal features, with the plaster measurements being greater for 11 of these, indicating the digital model scans were not a true 11 representation of the plaster models. The repeatability of digital models compared with plaster models is satisfactory for clinical applications, although this study demonstrated some systematic differences. Digital study models can therefore be considered for use as an adjunct to clinical assessment of the occlusion, but as yet may not supersede current methods for scientific purposes.

  11. On the reproducibility of spatiotemporal traffic dynamics with microscopic traffic models

    CERN Document Server

    Knorr, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Traffic flow is a very prominent example of a driven non-equilibrium system. A characteristic phenomenon of traffic dynamics is the spontaneous and abrupt drop of the average velocity on a stretch of road leading to congestion. Such a traffic breakdown corresponds to a boundary-induced phase transition from free flow to congested traffic. In this paper, we study the ability of selected microscopic traffic models to reproduce a traffic breakdown, and we investigate its spatiotemporal dynamics. For our analysis, we use empirical traffic data from stationary loop detectors on a German Autobahn showing a spontaneous breakdown. We then present several methods to assess the results and compare the models with each other. In addition, we will also discuss some important modeling aspects and their impact on the resulting spatiotemporal pattern. The investigation of different downstream boundary conditions, for example, shows that the physical origin of the traffic breakdown may be artificially induced by the setup of...

  12. On the reproducibility of spatiotemporal traffic dynamics with microscopic traffic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Traffic flow is a very prominent example of a driven non-equilibrium system. A characteristic phenomenon of traffic dynamics is the spontaneous and abrupt drop of the average velocity on a stretch of road leading to congestion. Such a traffic breakdown corresponds to a boundary-induced phase transition from free flow to congested traffic. In this paper, we study the ability of selected microscopic traffic models to reproduce a traffic breakdown, and we investigate its spatiotemporal dynamics. For our analysis, we use empirical traffic data from stationary loop detectors on a German Autobahn showing a spontaneous breakdown. We then present several methods to assess the results and compare the models with each other. In addition, we will also discuss some important modeling aspects and their impact on the resulting spatiotemporal pattern. The investigation of different downstream boundary conditions, for example, shows that the physical origin of the traffic breakdown may be artificially induced by the setup of the boundaries.

  13. Reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements obtained from Cecile3 digital models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Watanabe-Kanno

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements in digital models compared to plaster models. Fifteen pairs of plaster models were obtained from orthodontic patients with permanent dentition before treatment. These were digitized to be evaluated with the program Cécile3 v2.554.2 beta. Two examiners measured three times the mesiodistal width of all the teeth present, intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar distances, overjet and overbite. The plaster models were measured using a digital vernier. The t-Student test for paired samples and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used for statistical analysis. The ICC of the digital models were 0.84 ± 0.15 (intra-examiner and 0.80 ± 0.19 (inter-examiner. The average mean difference of the digital models was 0.23 ± 0.14 and 0.24 ± 0.11 for each examiner, respectively. When the two types of measurements were compared, the values obtained from the digital models were lower than those obtained from the plaster models (p < 0.05, although the differences were considered clinically insignificant (differences < 0.1 mm. The Cécile digital models are a clinically acceptable alternative for use in Orthodontics.

  14. Quantitative Evaluation of Ionosphere Models for Reproducing Regional TEC During Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, J. S.; Kuznetsova, M.; Rastaetter, L.; Bilitza, D.; Codrescu, M.; Coster, A. J.; Emery, B.; Foster, B.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Huba, J.; Mitchell, C. N.; Ridley, A. J.; Fedrizzi, M.; Scherliess, L.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.; Zhu, L.

    2015-12-01

    TEC (Total Electron Content) is one of the key parameters in description of the ionospheric variability that has influence on the accuracy of navigation and communication systems. To assess current TEC modeling capability of ionospheric models during geomagnetic storms and to establish a baseline against which future improvement can be compared, we quantified the ionospheric models' performance by comparing modeled vertical TEC values with ground-based GPS TEC measurements and Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS) TEC. The comparison focused on North America and Europe sectors during selected two storm events: 2006 AGU storm (14-15 Dec. 2006) and 2013 March storm (17-19 Mar. 2013). The ionospheric models used for this study range from empirical to physics-based, and physics-based data assimilation models. We investigated spatial and temporal variations of TEC during the storms. In addition, we considered several parameters to quantify storm impacts on TEC: TEC changes compared to quiet time, rate of TEC change, and maximum increase/decrease during the storms. In this presentation, we focus on preliminary results of the comparison of the models performance in reproducing the storm-time TEC variations using the parameters and skill scores. This study has been supported by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Model outputs and observational data used for the study will be permanently posted at the CCMC website (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov) for the space science communities to use.

  15. Assessment of the reliability of reproducing two-dimensional resistivity models using an image processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Kehinde S; Nawawi, Mohd Nm; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Sabri, Ali Idriss Aboubakar; Adiat, Kola Abdulnafiu

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to combine the results of geophysical images obtained from three commonly used electrode configurations using an image processing technique in order to assess their capabilities to reproduce two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity models. All the inverse resistivity models were processed using the PCI Geomatica software package commonly used for remote sensing data sets. Preprocessing of the 2-D inverse models was carried out to facilitate further processing and statistical analyses. Four Raster layers were created, three of these layers were used for the input images and the fourth layer was used as the output of the combined images. The data sets were merged using basic statistical approach. Interpreted results show that all images resolved and reconstructed the essential features of the models. An assessment of the accuracy of the images for the four geologic models was performed using four criteria: the mean absolute error and mean percentage absolute error, resistivity values of the reconstructed blocks and their displacements from the true models. Generally, the blocks of the images of maximum approach give the least estimated errors. Also, the displacement of the reconstructed blocks from the true blocks is the least and the reconstructed resistivities of the blocks are closer to the true blocks than any other combined used. Thus, it is corroborated that when inverse resistivity models are combined, most reliable and detailed information about the geologic models is obtained than using individual data sets.

  16. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nilsson, Börje; Nordebo, Sven

    2012-05-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 [22] played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favour of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favour of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient g(2) (0), is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models g(2)(0) >= 1. In TSD the coefficient g(2)(0) decreases as 1/ɛ2d, where ɛd > 0 is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient g(2) (0) essentially less than 1. The TSD-prediction can be tested experimentally in new Grangier type experiments presenting a detailed monitoring of dependence of the coefficient g(2)(0) on the detection threshold. Structurally our model has some similarity with the prequantum model of Grossing et al. Subquantum stochasticity is composed of the two counterparts: a stationary process in the space of internal degrees of freedom and the random walk type motion describing the temporal dynamics.

  17. Accuracy and reproducibility of linear measurements of resin, plaster, digital and printed study-models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Waleed K; Ariffin, Emy; Sherriff, Martyn; Bister, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements of on-screen three-dimensional (3D) digital surface models captured by a 3Shape R700™ laser-scanner, with measurements made using a digital caliper on acrylic, plaster models or model replicas. Four sets of typodont models were used. Acrylic models, alginate impressions, plaster models and physical replicas were measured. The 3Shape R700™ laser-scanning device with 3Shape™ software was used for scans and measurements. Linear measurements were recorded for selected landmarks, on each of the physical models and on the 3D digital surface models on ten separate occasions by a single examiner. Comparing measurements taken on the physical models the mean difference of the measurements was 0.32 mm (SD 0.15 mm). For the different methods (physical versus digital) the mean difference was 0.112 mm (SD 0.15 mm). None of the values showed a statistically significant difference (p plaster and acrylic models. The comparison of measurements on the physical models showed no significant difference. The 3Shape R700™ is a reliable device for capturing surface details of models in a digital format. When comparing measurements taken manually and digitally there was no statistically significant difference. The Objet Eden 250™ 3D prints proved to be as accurate as the original acrylic, plaster, or alginate impressions as was shown by the accuracy of the measurements taken. This confirms that using virtual study models can be a reliable method, replacing traditional plaster models.

  18. Reproducibility of VPCT parameters in the normal pancreas: comparison of two different kinetic calculation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Schulze, Maximilian; Horger, Thomas; Oelker, Aenne; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius

    2015-09-01

    To assess the reproducibility of volume computed tomographic perfusion (VPCT) measurements in normal pancreatic tissue using two different kinetic perfusion calculation models at three different time points. Institutional ethical board approval was obtained for retrospective analysis of pancreas perfusion data sets generated by our prospective study for liver response monitoring to local therapy in patients experiencing unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, which was approved by the institutional review board. VPCT of the entire pancreas was performed in 41 patients (mean age, 64.8 years) using 26 consecutive volume measurements and intravenous injection of 50 mL of iodinated contrast at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. Blood volume(BV) and blood flow (BF) were calculated using two mathematical methods: maximum slope + Patlak analysis versus deconvolution method. Pancreas perfusion was calculated using two volume of interests. Median interval between the first and the second VPCT was 2 days and between the second and the third VPCT 82 days. Variability was assessed with within-patient coefficients of variation (CVs) and Bland-Altman analyses. Interobserver agreement for all perfusion parameters was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). BF and BV values varied widely by method of analysis as did within-patient CVs for BF and BV at the second versus the first VPCT by 22.4%/50.4% (method 1) and 24.6%/24.0% (method 2) measured in the pancreatic head and 18.4%/62.6% (method 1) and 23.8%/28.1% (method 2) measured in the pancreatic corpus and at the third versus the first VPCT by 21.7%/61.8% (method 1) and 25.7%/34.5% (method 2) measured also in the pancreatic head and 19.1%/66.1% (method 1) and 22.0%/31.8% (method 2) measured in the pancreatic corpus, respectively. Interobserver agreement measured with ICC shows fair-to-good reproducibility. VPCT performed with the presented examinational protocol is reproducible and can be used for monitoring

  19. An Effective and Reproducible Model of Ventricular Fibrillation in Crossbred Yorkshire Swine (Sus scrofa) for Use in Physiologic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgert, James M; Johnson, Arthur D; Garcia-Blanco, Jose C; Craig, W John; O'Sullivan, Joseph C

    2015-10-01

    Transcutaneous electrical induction (TCEI) has been used to induce ventricular fibrillation (VF) in laboratory swine for physiologic and resuscitation research. Many studies do not describe the method of TCEI in detail, thus making replication by future investigators difficult. Here we describe a detailed method of electrically inducing VF that was used successfully in a prospective, experimental resuscitation study. Specifically, an electrical current was passed through the heart to induce VF in crossbred Yorkshire swine (n = 30); the current was generated by using two 22-gauge spinal needles, with one placed above and one below the heart, and three 9V batteries connected in series. VF developed in 28 of the 30 pigs (93%) within 10 s of beginning the procedure. In the remaining 2 swine, VF was induced successfully after medial redirection of the superior parasternal needle. The TCEI method is simple, reproducible, and cost-effective. TCEI may be especially valuable to researchers with limited access to funding, sophisticated equipment, or colleagues experienced in interventional cardiology techniques. The TCEI method might be most appropriate for pharmacologic studies requiring VF, VF resulting from the R-on-T phenomenon (as in prolonged QT syndrome), and VF arising from other ectopic or reentrant causes. However, the TCEI method does not accurately model the most common cause of VF, acute coronary occlusive disease. Researchers must consider the limitations of TCEI that may affect internal and external validity of collected data, when designing experiments using this model of VF.

  20. Classical signal model reproducing quantum probabilities for single and coincidence detections

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Nordebo, Sven

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple classical (random) signal model reproducing Born's rule. The crucial point of our approach is that the presence of detector's threshold and calibration procedure have to be treated not as simply experimental technicalities, but as the basic counterparts of the theoretical model. We call this approach threshold signal detection model (TSD). The experiment on coincidence detection which was done by Grangier in 1986 \\cite{Grangier} played a crucial role in rejection of (semi-)classical field models in favor of quantum mechanics (QM): impossibility to resolve the wave-particle duality in favor of a purely wave model. QM predicts that the relative probability of coincidence detection, the coefficient $g^{(2)}(0),$ is zero (for one photon states), but in (semi-)classical models $g^{(2)}(0)\\geq 1.$ In TSD the coefficient $g^{(2)}(0)$ decreases as $1/{\\cal E}_d^2,$ where ${\\cal E}_d>0$ is the detection threshold. Hence, by increasing this threshold an experimenter can make the coefficient $g^{(2)}...

  1. An analytical nonlinear model for laminate multiferroic composites reproducing the DC magnetic bias dependent magnetoelectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lizhi; Wan, Yongping; Li, Faxin

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we propose an analytical nonlinear model for laminate multiferroic composites in which the magnetic-field-induced strain in magnetostrictive phase is described by a standard square law taking the stress effect into account, whereas the ferroelectric phase retains a linear piezoelectric response. Furthermore, differing from previous models which assume uniform deformation, we take into account the stress attenuation and adopt non-uniform deformation along the layer thickness in both piezoelectric and magnetostrictive phases. Analysis of this model on L-T and L-L modes of sandwiched Terfenol-D/lead zirconate titanate/Terfenol-D composites can well reproduce the observed dc magnetic field (H(dc)) dependent magnetoelectric coefficients, which reach their maximum with the H(dc) all at about 500 Oe. The model also suggests that stress attenuation along the layer thickness in practical composites should be taken into account. Furthermore, the model also indicates that a high volume fraction of magnetostrictive phase is required to get giant magnetoelectric coupling, coinciding with existing models.

  2. Assessment of a climate model to reproduce rainfall variability and extremes over Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. J. R.; Kniveton, D. R.; Layberry, R.

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly accepted that any possible climate change will not only have an influence on mean climate but may also significantly alter climatic variability. A change in the distribution and magnitude of extreme rainfall events (associated with changing variability), such as droughts or flooding, may have a far greater impact on human and natural systems than a changing mean. This issue is of particular importance for environmentally vulnerable regions such as southern Africa. The sub-continent is considered especially vulnerable to and ill-equipped (in terms of adaptation) for extreme events, due to a number of factors including extensive poverty, famine, disease and political instability. Rainfall variability and the identification of rainfall extremes is a function of scale, so high spatial and temporal resolution data are preferred to identify extreme events and accurately predict future variability. The majority of previous climate model verification studies have compared model output with observational data at monthly timescales. In this research, the assessment of ability of a state of the art climate model to simulate climate at daily timescales is carried out using satellite-derived rainfall data from the Microwave Infrared Rainfall Algorithm (MIRA). This dataset covers the period from 1993 to 2002 and the whole of southern Africa at a spatial resolution of 0.1° longitude/latitude. This paper concentrates primarily on the ability of the model to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of present-day rainfall variability over southern Africa and is not intended to discuss possible future changes in climate as these have been documented elsewhere. Simulations of current climate from the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre's climate model, in both regional and global mode, are firstly compared to the MIRA dataset at daily timescales. Secondly, the ability of the model to reproduce daily rainfall extremes is assessed, again by a comparison with

  3. Models that include supercoiling of topological domains reproduce several known features of interphase chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Dorier, Julien; Burnier, Yannis; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the structure of interphase chromosomes is essential to elucidate regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. During recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing expanded the power of chromosome conformation capture (3C) methods that provide information about reciprocal spatial proximity of chromosomal loci. Since 2012, it is known that entire chromatin in interphase chromosomes is organized into regions with strongly increased frequency of internal contacts. These regions, with the average size of ∼1 Mb, were named topological domains. More recent studies demonstrated presence of unconstrained supercoiling in interphase chromosomes. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we show here that by including supercoiling into models of topological domains one can reproduce and thus provide possible explanations of several experimentally observed characteristics of interphase chromosomes, such as their complex contact maps.

  4. Successful and unsuccessful psychopaths: a neurobiological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in psychopathy research, surprisingly little is known about the etiology of non-incarcerated, successful psychopaths. This review provides an analysis of current knowledge on the similarities and differences between successful and unsuccessful psychopaths derived from five population sources: community samples, individuals from employment agencies, college students, industrial psychopaths, and serial killers. An initial neurobiological model of successful and unsuccessful psychopathy is outlined. It is hypothesized that successful psychopaths have intact or enhanced neurobiological functioning that underlies their normal or even superior cognitive functioning, which in turn helps them to achieve their goals using more covert and nonviolent methods. In contrast, in unsuccessful, caught psychopaths, brain structural and functional impairments together with autonomic nervous system dysfunction are hypothesized to underlie cognitive and emotional deficits and more overt violent offending.

  5. Improving Localization Accuracy: Successive Measurements Error Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah Abu Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle self-localization is an essential requirement for many of the safety applications envisioned for vehicular networks. The mathematical models used in current vehicular localization schemes focus on modeling the localization error itself, and overlook the potential correlation between successive localization measurement errors. In this paper, we first investigate the existence of correlation between successive positioning measurements, and then incorporate this correlation into the modeling positioning error. We use the Yule Walker equations to determine the degree of correlation between a vehicle’s future position and its past positions, and then propose a -order Gauss–Markov model to predict the future position of a vehicle from its past  positions. We investigate the existence of correlation for two datasets representing the mobility traces of two vehicles over a period of time. We prove the existence of correlation between successive measurements in the two datasets, and show that the time correlation between measurements can have a value up to four minutes. Through simulations, we validate the robustness of our model and show that it is possible to use the first-order Gauss–Markov model, which has the least complexity, and still maintain an accurate estimation of a vehicle’s future location over time using only its current position. Our model can assist in providing better modeling of positioning errors and can be used as a prediction tool to improve the performance of classical localization algorithms such as the Kalman filter.

  6. A novel, stable and reproducible acute lung injury model induced by oleic acid in immature piglet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yao-bin; LING Feng; ZHANG Yan-bo; LIU Ai-jun; LIU Dong-hai; QIAO Chen-hui; WANG Qiang; LIU Ying-long

    2011-01-01

    Background Young children are susceptible to pulmonary injury,and acute lung injury (ALl) often results in a high mortality and financial costs in pediatric patients.A good ALl model will help us to gain a better understanding of the real pathophysiological picture and to evaluate novel treatment approaches to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) more accurately and liberally.This study aimed to establish a hemodynamically stable and reproducible model with ALl in piglet induced by oleic acid.Methods Six Chinese mini-piglets were used to establish ALl models by oleic acid.Hemodynamic and pulmonary function data were measured.Histopathological assessment was performed.Results Mean blood pressure,heart rate (HR),cardiac output (CO),central venous pressure (CVP) and left atrial pressure (LAP) were sharply decreased after oleic acid given,while the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) was increased in comparison with baseline (P <0.05).pH,arterial partial pressure of O2 (PaO2),PaO2/inspired O2 fraction (FiO2) and lung compliance decreased,while PaCO2 and airway pressure increased in comparison with baseline (P <0.05).The lung histology showed severe inflammation,hyaline membranes,intra-alveolar and interstitial hemorrhage.Conclusion This experiment established a stable model which allows for a diversity of studies on early lung injury.

  7. Exploring predictive and reproducible modeling with the single-subject FIAC dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Pereira, Francisco; Lee, Wayne; Strother, Stephen; Mitchell, Tom

    2006-05-01

    Predictive modeling of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to expand the amount of information extracted and to enhance our understanding of brain systems by predicting brain states, rather than emphasizing the standard spatial mapping. Based on the block datasets of Functional Imaging Analysis Contest (FIAC) Subject 3, we demonstrate the potential and pitfalls of predictive modeling in fMRI analysis by investigating the performance of five models (linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, linear support vector machine, Gaussian naive Bayes, and a variant) as a function of preprocessing steps and feature selection methods. We found that: (1) independent of the model, temporal detrending and feature selection assisted in building a more accurate predictive model; (2) the linear support vector machine and logistic regression often performed better than either of the Gaussian naive Bayes models in terms of the optimal prediction accuracy; and (3) the optimal prediction accuracy obtained in a feature space using principal components was typically lower than that obtained in a voxel space, given the same model and same preprocessing. We show that due to the existence of artifacts from different sources, high prediction accuracy alone does not guarantee that a classifier is learning a pattern of brain activity that might be usefully visualized, although cross-validation methods do provide fairly unbiased estimates of true prediction accuracy. The trade-off between the prediction accuracy and the reproducibility of the spatial pattern should be carefully considered in predictive modeling of fMRI. We suggest that unless the experimental goal is brain-state classification of new scans on well-defined spatial features, prediction alone should not be used as an optimization procedure in fMRI data analysis.

  8. Efficient and Reproducible Myogenic Differentiation from Human iPS Cells: Prospects for Modeling Miyoshi Myopathy In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akihito; Woltjen, Knut; Miyake, Katsuya; Hotta, Akitsu; Ikeya, Makoto; Yamamoto, Takuya; Nishino, Tokiko; Shoji, Emi; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Manabe, Yasuko; Fujii, Nobuharu; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Era, Takumi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Kimura, En; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has enabled the production of in vitro, patient-specific cell models of human disease. In vitro recreation of disease pathology from patient-derived hiPSCs depends on efficient differentiation protocols producing relevant adult cell types. However, myogenic differentiation of hiPSCs has faced obstacles, namely, low efficiency and/or poor reproducibility. Here, we report the rapid, efficient, and reproducible differentiation of hiPSCs into mature myocytes. We demonstrated that inducible expression of myogenic differentiation1 (MYOD1) in immature hiPSCs for at least 5 days drives cells along the myogenic lineage, with efficiencies reaching 70–90%. Myogenic differentiation driven by MYOD1 occurred even in immature, almost completely undifferentiated hiPSCs, without mesodermal transition. Myocytes induced in this manner reach maturity within 2 weeks of differentiation as assessed by marker gene expression and functional properties, including in vitro and in vivo cell fusion and twitching in response to electrical stimulation. Miyoshi Myopathy (MM) is a congenital distal myopathy caused by defective muscle membrane repair due to mutations in DYSFERLIN. Using our induced differentiation technique, we successfully recreated the pathological condition of MM in vitro, demonstrating defective membrane repair in hiPSC-derived myotubes from an MM patient and phenotypic rescue by expression of full-length DYSFERLIN (DYSF). These findings not only facilitate the pathological investigation of MM, but could potentially be applied in modeling of other human muscular diseases by using patient-derived hiPSCs. PMID:23626698

  9. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  10. Can a global model reproduce observed trends in summertime surface ozone levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Koumoutsaris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying trends in surface ozone concentrations are critical for assessing pollution control strategies. Here we use observations and results from a global chemical transport model to examine the trends (1991–2005 in daily maximum 8-hour average concentrations in summertime surface ozone at rural sites in Europe and the United States. We find a decrease in observed ozone concentrations at the high end of the probability distribution at many of the sites in both regions. The model attributes these trends to a decrease in local anthropogenic ozone precursors, although simulated decreasing trends are overestimated in comparison with observed ones. The low end of observed distribution show small upward trends over Europe and the western US and downward trends in Eastern US. The model cannot reproduce these observed trends, especially over Europe and the western US. In particular, simulated changes between the low and high end of the distributions in these two regions are not significant. Sensitivity simulations indicate that emissions from far away source regions do not affect significantly ozone trends at both ends of the distribution. This is in contrast with previously available results, which indicated that increasing ozone trends at the low percentiles may reflect an increase in ozone background associated with increasing remote sources of ozone precursors. Possible reasons for discrepancies between observed and simulated trends are discussed.

  11. Animal models that best reproduce the clinical manifestations of human intoxication with organophosphorus compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Edna F R; Aracava, Yasco; DeTolla, Louis J; Beecham, E Jeffrey; Basinger, G William; Wakayama, Edgar J; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2014-08-01

    The translational capacity of data generated in preclinical toxicological studies is contingent upon several factors, including the appropriateness of the animal model. The primary objectives of this article are: 1) to analyze the natural history of acute and delayed signs and symptoms that develop following an acute exposure of humans to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, with an emphasis on nerve agents; 2) to identify animal models of the clinical manifestations of human exposure to OPs; and 3) to review the mechanisms that contribute to the immediate and delayed OP neurotoxicity. As discussed in this study, clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP compounds can be faithfully reproduced in rodents and nonhuman primates. These manifestations include an acute cholinergic crisis in addition to signs of neurotoxicity that develop long after the OP exposure, particularly chronic neurologic deficits consisting of anxiety-related behavior and cognitive deficits, structural brain damage, and increased slow electroencephalographic frequencies. Because guinea pigs and nonhuman primates, like humans, have low levels of circulating carboxylesterases-the enzymes that metabolize and inactivate OP compounds-they stand out as appropriate animal models for studies of OP intoxication. These are critical points for the development of safe and effective therapeutic interventions against OP poisoning because approval of such therapies by the Food and Drug Administration is likely to rely on the Animal Efficacy Rule, which allows exclusive use of animal data as evidence of the effectiveness of a drug against pathologic conditions that cannot be ethically or feasibly tested in humans.

  12. A Semi-Analytic dynamical friction model that reproduces core stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Petts, James A; Read, Justin I

    2015-01-01

    We present a new semi-analytic model for dynamical friction based on Chandrasekhar's formalism. The key novelty is the introduction of physically motivated, radially varying, maximum and minimum impact parameters. With these, our model gives an excellent match to full N-body simulations for isotropic background density distributions, both cuspy and shallow, without any fine-tuning of the model parameters. In particular, we are able to reproduce the dramatic core-stalling effect that occurs in shallow/constant density cores, for the first time. This gives us new physical insight into the core-stalling phenomenon. We show that core stalling occurs in the limit in which the product of the Coulomb logarithm and the local fraction of stars with velocity lower than the infalling body tends to zero. For cuspy backgrounds, this occurs when the infalling mass approaches the enclosed background mass. For cored backgrounds, it occurs at larger distances from the centre, due to a combination of a rapidly increasing minim...

  13. Stochastic model of financial markets reproducing scaling and memory in volatility return intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontis, V.; Havlin, S.; Kononovicius, A.; Podobnik, B.; Stanley, H. E.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the volatility return intervals in the NYSE and FOREX markets. We explain previous empirical findings using a model based on the interacting agent hypothesis instead of the widely-used efficient market hypothesis. We derive macroscopic equations based on the microscopic herding interactions of agents and find that they are able to reproduce various stylized facts of different markets and different assets with the same set of model parameters. We show that the power-law properties and the scaling of return intervals and other financial variables have a similar origin and could be a result of a general class of non-linear stochastic differential equations derived from a master equation of an agent system that is coupled by herding interactions. Specifically, we find that this approach enables us to recover the volatility return interval statistics as well as volatility probability and spectral densities for the NYSE and FOREX markets, for different assets, and for different time-scales. We find also that the historical S&P500 monthly series exhibits the same volatility return interval properties recovered by our proposed model. Our statistical results suggest that human herding is so strong that it persists even when other evolving fluctuations perturbate the financial system.

  14. Reproducibility of summertime diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility of diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models in their historical runs were evaluated, in comparison with station data (NCDC-9813) and satellite data (GSMaP-V5). We first calculated diurnal cycles by averaging precipitation at each local solar time (LST) in June-July-August during 1981-2000 over the continent of northern Eurasia (0-180E, 45-90N). Then we examined occurrence time of maximum precipitation and a contribution of diurnally varying precipitation to the total precipitation.The contribution of diurnal precipitation was about 21% in both NCDC-9813 and GSMaP-V5. The maximum precipitation occurred at 18LST in NCDC-9813 but 16LST in GSMaP-V5, indicating some uncertainties even in the observational datasets. The diurnal contribution of the CMIP5 models varied largely from 11% to 62%, and their timing of the precipitation maximum ranged from 11LST to 20LST. Interestingly, the contribution and the timing had strong negative correlation of -0.65. The models with larger diurnal precipitation showed precipitation maximum earlier around noon. Next, we compared sensitivity of precipitation to surface temperature and tropospheric humidity between 5 models with large diurnal precipitation (LDMs) and 5 models with small diurnal precipitation (SDMs). Precipitation in LDMs showed high sensitivity to surface temperature, indicating its close relationship with local instability. On the other hand, synoptic disturbances were more active in SDMs with a dominant role of the large scale condensation, and precipitation in SDMs was more related with tropospheric moisture. Therefore, the relative importance of the local instability and the synoptic disturbances was suggested to be an important factor in determining the contribution and timing of the diurnal precipitation. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

  15. Commentary on the integration of model sharing and reproducibility analysis to scholarly publishing workflow in computational biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent M; Halloran, Jason P; Modenese, Luca; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Thelen, Darryl G; Umberger, Brian R; Erdemir, Ahmet; Guess, Trent M; Halloran, Jason P; Modenese, Luca; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Thelen, Darryl G; Umberger, Brian R; Umberger, Brian R; Erdemir, Ahmet; Thelen, Darryl G; Guess, Trent M; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Modenese, Luca; Halloran, Jason P

    2016-10-01

    The overall goal of this paper is to demonstrate that dissemination of models and analyses for assessing the reproducibility of simulation results can be incorporated in the scientific review process in biomechanics. As part of a special issue on model sharing and reproducibility in the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, two manuscripts on computational biomechanics were submitted: Rajagopal et al., IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 2016 and Schmitz and Piovesan, IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 2016. Models used in these studies were shared with the scientific reviewers and the public. In addition to the standard review of the manuscripts, the reviewers downloaded the models and performed simulations that reproduced results reported in the studies. There was general agreement between simulation results of the authors and those of the reviewers. Discrepancies were resolved during the necessary revisions. The manuscripts and instructions for download and simulation were updated in response to the reviewers' feedback; changes that may otherwise have been missed if explicit model sharing and simulation reproducibility analysis was not conducted in the review process. Increased burden on the authors and the reviewers, to facilitate model sharing and to repeat simulations, were noted. When the authors of computational biomechanics studies provide access to models and data, the scientific reviewers can download and thoroughly explore the model, perform simulations, and evaluate simulation reproducibility beyond the traditional manuscript-only review process. Model sharing and reproducibility analysis in scholarly publishing will result in a more rigorous review process, which will enhance the quality of modeling and simulation studies and inform future users of computational models.

  16. Fast bootstrapping and permutation testing for assessing reproducibility and interpretability of multivariate fMRI decoding models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R Conroy

    Full Text Available Multivariate decoding models are increasingly being applied to functional magnetic imaging (fMRI data to interpret the distributed neural activity in the human brain. These models are typically formulated to optimize an objective function that maximizes decoding accuracy. For decoding models trained on full-brain data, this can result in multiple models that yield the same classification accuracy, though some may be more reproducible than others--i.e. small changes to the training set may result in very different voxels being selected. This issue of reproducibility can be partially controlled by regularizing the decoding model. Regularization, along with the cross-validation used to estimate decoding accuracy, typically requires retraining many (often on the order of thousands of related decoding models. In this paper we describe an approach that uses a combination of bootstrapping and permutation testing to construct both a measure of cross-validated prediction accuracy and model reproducibility of the learned brain maps. This requires re-training our classification method on many re-sampled versions of the fMRI data. Given the size of fMRI datasets, this is normally a time-consuming process. Our approach leverages an algorithm called fast simultaneous training of generalized linear models (FaSTGLZ to create a family of classifiers in the space of accuracy vs. reproducibility. The convex hull of this family of classifiers can be used to identify a subset of Pareto optimal classifiers, with a single-optimal classifier selectable based on the relative cost of accuracy vs. reproducibility. We demonstrate our approach using full-brain analysis of elastic-net classifiers trained to discriminate stimulus type in an auditory and visual oddball event-related fMRI design. Our approach and results argue for a computational approach to fMRI decoding models in which the value of the interpretation of the decoding model ultimately depends upon optimizing a

  17. Rainfall variability and extremes over southern Africa: Assessment of a climate model to reproduce daily extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. J. R.; Kniveton, D. R.; Layberry, R.

    2009-04-01

    It is increasingly accepted that that any possible climate change will not only have an influence on mean climate but may also significantly alter climatic variability. A change in the distribution and magnitude of extreme rainfall events (associated with changing variability), such as droughts or flooding, may have a far greater impact on human and natural systems than a changing mean. This issue is of particular importance for environmentally vulnerable regions such as southern Africa. The subcontinent is considered especially vulnerable to and ill-equipped (in terms of adaptation) for extreme events, due to a number of factors including extensive poverty, famine, disease and political instability. Rainfall variability and the identification of rainfall extremes is a function of scale, so high spatial and temporal resolution data are preferred to identify extreme events and accurately predict future variability. The majority of previous climate model verification studies have compared model output with observational data at monthly timescales. In this research, the assessment of ability of a state of the art climate model to simulate climate at daily timescales is carried out using satellite derived rainfall data from the Microwave Infra-Red Algorithm (MIRA). This dataset covers the period from 1993-2002 and the whole of southern Africa at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degree longitude/latitude. The ability of a climate model to simulate current climate provides some indication of how much confidence can be applied to its future predictions. In this paper, simulations of current climate from the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre's climate model, in both regional and global mode, are firstly compared to the MIRA dataset at daily timescales. This concentrates primarily on the ability of the model to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of rainfall variability over southern Africa. Secondly, the ability of the model to reproduce daily rainfall extremes will

  18. Can a coupled meteorology-chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xing

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability of a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, i.e., WRF-CMAQ, in reproducing the historical trend in AOD and clear-sky short-wave radiation (SWR over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21 year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990–2010. Six satellite retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-terra and -aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both TOA and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling and decreased surface SWR (downwelling in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling and increased surface SWR (downwelling in eastern US, Europe and northern Atlantic for the period of 2000–2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and north Indian Ocean. Estimates of aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE at TOA are comparable with those derived by measurements. Compared to GCMs, the model exhibits better estimates of surface- aerosol direct radiative efficiency (Eτ. However, surface-DRE tends to be underestimated due to the underestimated AOD in land and dust regions. Further investigation of TOA-Eτ estimations as well as the dust module used for estimates of windblown-dust emissions is needed.

  19. Composite model to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of methane hydrate bearing soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate bearing sediments (MHBS) are naturally-occurring materials containing different components in the pores that may suffer phase changes under relative small temperature and pressure variations for conditions typically prevailing a few hundreds of meters below sea level. Their modelling needs to account for heat and mass balance equations of the different components, and several strategies already exist to combine them (e.g., Rutqvist & Moridis, 2009; Sánchez et al. 2014). These equations have to be completed by restrictions and constitutive laws reproducing the phenomenology of heat and fluid flows, phase change conditions and mechanical response. While the formulation of the non-mechanical laws generally includes explicitly the mass fraction of methane in each phase, which allows for a natural update of parameters during phase changes, mechanical laws are, in most cases, stated for the whole solid skeleton (Uchida et al., 2012; Soga et al. 2006). In this paper, a mechanical model is proposed to cope with the response of MHBS. It is based on a composite approach that allows defining the thermo-hydro-mechanical response of mineral skeleton and solid hydrates independently. The global stress-strain-temperature response of the solid phase (grains + hydrate) is then obtained by combining both responses according to energy principle following the work by Pinyol et al. (2007). In this way, dissociation of MH can be assessed on the basis of the stress state and temperature prevailing locally within the hydrate component. Besides, its structuring effect is naturally accounted for by the model according to patterns of MH inclusions within soil pores. This paper describes the fundamental hypothesis behind the model and its formulation. Its performance is assessed by comparison with laboratory data presented in the literature. An analysis of MHBS response to several stress-temperature paths representing potential field cases is finally presented. References

  20. A novel porcine model of ataxia telangiectasia reproduces neurological features and motor deficits of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraldi, Rosanna; Chan, Chun-Hung; Rogers, Christopher S; Kovács, Attila D; Meyerholz, David K; Trantzas, Constantin; Lambertz, Allyn M; Darbro, Benjamin W; Weber, Krystal L; White, Katherine A M; Rheeden, Richard V; Kruer, Michael C; Dacken, Brian A; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Rohret, Judy A; Struzynski, Jason T; Rohret, Frank A; Weimer, Jill M; Pearce, David A

    2015-11-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a progressive multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the AT-mutated (ATM) gene. AT is a neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration in children leading to motor impairment. The disease progresses with other clinical manifestations including oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immune disorders, increased susceptibly to cancer and respiratory infections. Although genetic investigations and physiological models have established the linkage of ATM with AT onset, the mechanisms linking ATM to neurodegeneration remain undetermined, hindering therapeutic development. Several murine models of AT have been successfully generated showing some of the clinical manifestations of the disease, however they do not fully recapitulate the hallmark neurological phenotype, thus highlighting the need for a more suitable animal model. We engineered a novel porcine model of AT to better phenocopy the disease and bridge the gap between human and current animal models. The initial characterization of AT pigs revealed early cerebellar lesions including loss of Purkinje cells (PCs) and altered cytoarchitecture suggesting a developmental etiology for AT and could advocate for early therapies for AT patients. In addition, similar to patients, AT pigs show growth retardation and develop motor deficit phenotypes. By using the porcine system to model human AT, we established the first animal model showing PC loss and motor features of the human disease. The novel AT pig provides new opportunities to unmask functions and roles of ATM in AT disease and in physiological conditions.

  1. Can a stepwise steady flow computational fluid dynamics model reproduce unsteady particulate matter separation for common unit operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati, Subbu-Srikanth; Sansalone, John J

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is emerging as a model for resolving the fate of particulate matter (PM) by unit operations subject to rainfall-runoff loadings. However, compared to steady flow CFD models, there are greater computational requirements for unsteady hydrodynamics and PM loading models. Therefore this study examines if integrating a stepwise steady flow CFD model can reproduce PM separation by common unit operations loaded by unsteady flow and PM loadings, thereby reducing computational effort. Utilizing monitored unit operation data from unsteady events as a metric, this study compares the two CFD modeling approaches for a hydrodynamic separator (HS), a primary clarifier (PC) tank, and a volumetric clarifying filtration system (VCF). Results indicate that while unsteady CFD models reproduce PM separation of each unit operation, stepwise steady CFD models result in significant deviation for HS and PC models as compared to monitored data; overestimating the physical size requirements of each unit required to reproduce monitored PM separation results. In contrast, the stepwise steady flow approach reproduces PM separation by the VCF, a combined gravitational sedimentation and media filtration unit operation that provides attenuation of turbulent energy and flow velocity.

  2. Developing a Successful Open Source Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Lopez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Training programs for open source software provide a tangible, and sellable, product. A successful training program not only builds revenue, it also adds to the overall body of knowledge available for the open source project. By gathering best practices and taking advantage of the collective expertise within a community, it may be possible for a business to partner with an open source project to build a curriculum that promotes the project and supports the needs of the company's training customers. This article describes the initial approach used by Canonical, the commercial sponsor of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, to engage the community in the creation of its training offerings. We then discuss alternate curriculum creation models and some of the conditions that are necessary for successful collaboration between creators of existing documentation and commercial training providers.

  3. Failure of rotation and notable success of age spread to reproduce the CMDs of star clusters NGC 1831, NGC 1868 and NGC 2249

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhongmu; Zhang, Liyun

    2015-01-01

    We study the high-quality CMDs of three star clusters, NGC 1831, NGC 1868 and NGC 2249 in detail, via the two most likely causes (stellar rotation and age spread) for CMDs with extended main-sequence turn-offs. The results show evident failure of stellar rotation (including resolved and unresolved binary stars) to interpret the CMDs of three star clusters, and the unexpected success of age spread. In particular, the special structures of turn-off and red clump parts cannot be generated by stellar rotation, but age spread perfectly reproduces the observed features. This suggests that these three clusters contain multiple populations of stars, rather than a single population of rotating stars and binaries. The thick subgiant branch of NGC 1831 gives the strongest support to this. The results demonstrate that stellar rotation cannot save the widely accepted view (simple population) of star clusters, and an extended star formation history is needed for explaining the observed CMDs. In addition, this work shows th...

  4. Assessing reproducibility by the within-subject coefficient of variation with random effects models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, H; Shih, W J

    1996-12-01

    In this paper we consider the use of within-subject coefficient of variation (WCV) for assessing the reproducibility or reliability of a measurement. Application to assessing reproducibility of biochemical markers for measuring bone turnover is described and the comparison with intraclass correlation is discussed. Both maximum likelihood and moment confidence intervals of WCV are obtained through their corresponding asymptotic distributions. Normal and log-normal cases are considered. In general, WCV is preferred when the measurement scale bears intrinsic meaning and is not subject to arbitrary shifting. The intraclass correlation may be preferred when a fixed population of subjects can be well identified.

  5. Reproducible long-term disc degeneration in a large animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, R.J.W.; Helder, M.N.; Kroeze, R.J.; Bank, R.A.; Smit, T.H.; Wuisman, P.I.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Twelve goats were chemically degenerated and the development of the degenerative signs was followed for 26 weeks to evaluate the progression of the induced degeneration. The results were also compared with a previous study to determine the reproducibility. OBJECTIVES. The purpose of th

  6. Reproducing the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition: Factor Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2016-01-01

    One of the ways to increase the reproducibility of research is for authors to provide a sufficient description of the data analytic procedures so that others can replicate the results. The publishers of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth Edition (WISC-V) do not follow these guidelines when reporting their confirmatory factor…

  7. Assessment of the potential forecasting skill of a global hydrological model in reproducing the occurrence of monthly flow extremes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candogan Yossef, N.A.N.N.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Kwadijk, J.C.J.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    As an initial step in assessing the prospect of using global hydrological models (GHMs) for hydrological forecasting, this study investigates the skill of the GHM PCRGLOBWB in reproducing the occurrence of past extremes in monthly discharge on a global scale. Global terrestrial hydrology from 1958

  8. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  9. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  10. Reproducibility of scratch assays is affected by the initial degree of confluence: Experiments, modelling and model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wang; Shah, Esha T; Penington, Catherine J; McCue, Scott W; Chopin, Lisa K; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Scratch assays are difficult to reproduce. Here we identify a previously overlooked source of variability which could partially explain this difficulty. We analyse a suite of scratch assays in which we vary the initial degree of confluence (initial cell density). Our results indicate that the rate of re-colonisation is very sensitive to the initial density. To quantify the relative roles of cell migration and proliferation, we calibrate the solution of the Fisher-Kolmogorov model to cell density profiles to provide estimates of the cell diffusivity, D, and the cell proliferation rate, λ. This procedure indicates that the estimates of D and λ are very sensitive to the initial density. This dependence suggests that the Fisher-Kolmogorov model does not accurately represent the details of the collective cell spreading process, since this model assumes that D and λ are constants that ought to be independent of the initial density. Since higher initial cell density leads to enhanced spreading, we also calibrate the solution of the Porous-Fisher model to the data as this model assumes that the cell flux is an increasing function of the cell density. Estimates of D and λ associated with the Porous-Fisher model are less sensitive to the initial density, suggesting that the Porous-Fisher model provides a better description of the experiments.

  11. Some problems with reproducing the Standard Model fields and interactions in five-dimensional warped brane world models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Mikhail N.; Volobuev, Igor P.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we examine, from the purely theoretical point of view and in a model-independent way, the case, when matter, gauge and Higgs fields are allowed to propagate in the bulk of five-dimensional brane world models with compact extra dimension, and the Standard Model fields and their interactions are supposed to be reproduced by the corresponding zero Kaluza-Klein modes. An unexpected result is that in order to avoid possible pathological behavior in the fermion sector, it is necessary to impose constraints on the fermion field Lagrangian. In the case when the fermion zero modes are supposed to be localized at one of the branes, these constraints imply an additional relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric. Moreover, this relation between the vacuum profile of the Higgs field and the form of the background metric results in the exact reproduction of the gauge boson and fermion sectors of the Standard Model by the corresponding zero mode four-dimensional effective theory in all the physically relevant cases, allowed by the absence of pathologies. Meanwhile, deviations from these conditions can lead either back to pathological behavior in the fermion sector or to a variance between the resulting zero mode four-dimensional effective theory and the Standard Model, which, depending on the model at hand, may, in principle, result in constraints putting the theory out of the reach of the present day experiments.

  12. Elusive reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Gio Batta

    2014-08-01

    Reproducibility remains a mirage for many biomedical studies because inherent experimental uncertainties generate idiosyncratic outcomes. The authentication and error rates of primary empirical data are often elusive, while multifactorial confounders beset experimental setups. Substantive methodological remedies are difficult to conceive, signifying that many biomedical studies yield more or less plausible results, depending on the attending uncertainties. Real life applications of those results remain problematic, with important exceptions for counterfactual field validations of strong experimental signals, notably for some vaccines and drugs, and for certain safety and occupational measures. It is argued that industrial, commercial and public policies and regulations could not ethically rely on unreliable biomedical results; rather, they should be rationally grounded on transparent cost-benefit tradeoffs.

  13. Impact of soil parameter and physical process on reproducibility of hydrological processes by land surface model in semiarid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, S.; Yorozu, K.; Asanuma, J.; Kondo, M.; Saito, K.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface model (LSM) takes part in the land-atmosphere interaction on the earth system model for the climate change research. In this study, we evaluated the impact of soil parameters and physical process on reproducibility of hydrological process by LSM Minimal Advanced Treatments of Surface Interaction and RunOff (MATSIRO; Takata et al, 2003, GPC) forced by the meteorological data observed at grassland in semiarid climate in China and Mongolia. The testing of MATSIRO was carried out offline mode over the semiarid grassland sites at Tongyu (44.42 deg. N, 122.87 deg. E, altitude: 184m) in China, Kherlen Bayan Ulaan (KBU; 47.21 deg. N, 108.74 deg. E, altitude: 1235m) and Arvaikheer (46.23 N, 102.82E, altitude: 1,813m) in Mongolia. Although all sites locate semiarid grassland, the climate condition is different among sites, which the annual air temperature and precipitation are 5.7 deg. C and 388mm (Tongyu), 1.2 deg.C and 180mm (KBU), and 0.4 deg. C and 245mm(Arvaikheer). We can evaluate the effect of climate condition on the model performance. Three kinds of experiments have been carried out, which was run with the default parameters (CTL), the observed parameters (OBS) for soil physics and hydrology, and vegetation, and refined MATSIRO with the effect of ice in thermal parameters and unfrozen water below the freezing with same parameters as OBS run (OBSr). The validation data has been provided by CEOP(http://www.ceop.net/) , RAISE(http://raise.suiri.tsukuba.ac.jp/), GAME-AAN (Miyazaki et al., 2004, JGR) for Tongyu, KBU, and Arvaikheer, respectively. The reproducibility of the net radiation, the soil temperature (Ts), and latent heat flux (LE) were well reproduced by OBS and OBSr run. The change of soil physical and hydraulic parameter affected the reproducibility of soil temperature (Ts) and soil moisture (SM) as well as energy flux component especially for the sensible heat flux (H) and soil heat flux (G). The reason for the great improvement on the

  14. Expanding on Successful Concepts, Models, and Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Tan, Yu-Mei; Edwards, Stephen W.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Anderson, Kim A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kile, Molly L.; L. Massey Simonich, Staci; Stone, David; Tanguay, Robert L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Harper, Stacey L.; Williams, David E.

    2016-09-06

    In her letter to the editor1 regarding our recent Feature Article “Completing the Link between Exposure Science and Toxicology for Improved Environmental Health Decision Making: The Aggregate Exposure Pathway Framework” 2, Dr. von Göetz expressed several concerns about terminology, and the perception that we propose the replacement of successful approaches and models for exposure assessment with a concept. We are glad to have the opportunity to address these issues here. If the goal of the AEP framework was to replace existing exposure models or databases for organizing exposure data with a concept, we would share Dr. von Göetz concerns. Instead, the outcome we promote is broader use of an organizational framework for exposure science. The framework would support improved generation, organization, and interpretation of data as well as modeling and prediction, not replacement of models. The field of toxicology has seen the benefits of wide use of one or more organizational frameworks (e.g., mode and mechanism of action, adverse outcome pathway). These frameworks influence how experiments are designed, data are collected, curated, stored and interpreted and ultimately how data are used in risk assessment. Exposure science is poised to similarly benefit from broader use of a parallel organizational framework, which Dr. von Göetz correctly points out, is currently used in the exposure modeling community. In our view, the concepts used so effectively in the exposure modeling community, expanded upon in the AEP framework, could see wider adoption by the field as a whole. The value of such a framework was recognized by the National Academy of Sciences.3 Replacement of models, databases, or any application with the AEP framework was not proposed in our article. The positive role broader more consistent use of such a framework might have in enabling and advancing “general activities such as data acquisition, organization…,” and exposure modeling was discussed

  15. How well do CMIP5 climate models reproduce explosive cyclones in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, C.; Zwiers, F. W.

    2016-02-01

    Extratropical explosive cyclones are rapidly intensifying low pressure systems with severe wind speeds and heavy precipitation, affecting livelihoods and infrastructure primarily in coastal and marine environments. This study evaluates how well the most recent generation of climate models reproduces extratropical explosive cyclones in the Northern Hemisphere for the period 1980-2005. An objective-feature tracking algorithm is used to identify and track cyclones from 25 climate models and three reanalysis products. Model biases are compared to biases in the sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, the polar jet stream, the Eady growth rate, and model resolution. Most models accurately reproduce the spatial distribution of explosive cyclones when compared to reanalysis data ( R = 0.94), with high frequencies along the Kuroshio Current and the Gulf Stream. Three quarters of the models however significantly underpredict explosive cyclone frequencies, by a third on average and by two thirds in the worst case. This frequency bias is significantly correlated with jet stream speed in the inter-model spread ( R ≥ 0.51), which in the Atlantic is correlated with a negative meridional SST gradient ( R = -0.56). The importance of the jet stream versus other variables considered in this study also applies to the interannual variability of explosive cyclone frequency. Furthermore, models with fewer explosive cyclones tend to underpredict the corresponding deepening rates ( R ≥ 0.88). A follow-up study will assess the impacts of climate change on explosive cyclones, and evaluate how model biases presented in this study affect the projections.

  16. A novel, comprehensive, and reproducible porcine model for determining the timing of bruises in forensic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Kristiane; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2016-01-01

    that resulted in bruises were inflicted on the back. In addition, 2 control pigs were included in the study. The pigs were euthanized consecutively from 1 to 10 h after the infliction of bruises. Following gross evaluation, skin, and muscle tissues were sampled for histology. Results Grossly, the bruises...... appeared uniform and identical to the tramline bruises seen in humans and pigs subjected to blunt trauma. Histologically, the number of neutrophils in the subcutis, the number of macrophages in the muscle tissue, and the localization of neutrophils and macrophages in muscle tissue showed a time...... in order to identify gross and histological parameters that may be useful in determining the age of a bruise. Methods The mechanical device was able to apply a single reproducible stroke with a plastic tube that was equivalent to being struck by a man. In each of 10 anesthetized pigs, four strokes...

  17. Assessment of the performance of numerical modeling in reproducing a replenishment of sediments in a water-worked channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juez, C.; Battisacco, E.; Schleiss, A. J.; Franca, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The artificial replenishment of sediment is used as a method to re-establish sediment continuity downstream of a dam. However, the impact of this technique on the hydraulics conditions, and resulting bed morphology, is yet to be understood. Several numerical tools have been developed during last years for modeling sediment transport and morphology evolution which can be used for this application. These models range from 1D to 3D approaches: the first being over simplistic for the simulation of such a complex geometry; the latter requires often a prohibitive computational effort. However, 2D models are computationally efficient and in these cases may already provide sufficiently accurate predictions of the morphology evolution caused by the sediment replenishment in a river. Here, the 2D shallow water equations in combination with the Exner equation are solved by means of a weak-coupled strategy. The classical friction approach considered for reproducing the bed channel roughness has been modified to take into account the morphological effect of replenishment which provokes a channel bed fining. Computational outcomes are compared with four sets of experimental data obtained from several replenishment configurations studied in the laboratory. The experiments differ in terms of placement volume and configuration. A set of analysis parameters is proposed for the experimental-numerical comparison, with particular attention to the spreading, covered surface and travel distance of placed replenishment grains. The numerical tool is reliable in reproducing the overall tendency shown by the experimental data. The effect of fining roughness is better reproduced with the approach herein proposed. However, it is also highlighted that the sediment clusters found in the experiment are not well numerically reproduced in the regions of the channel with a limited number of sediment grains.

  18. Whole-body skeletal imaging in mice utilizing microPET: optimization of reproducibility and applications in animal models of bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Frank [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich (Germany); Lee, Yu-Po; Lieberman, Jay R. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Loening, Andreas M.; Chatziioannou, Arion [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Freedland, Stephen J.; Belldegrun, Arie S. [Department of Urology, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Leahy, Richard [University of Southern California School of Bioengineering, Los Angeles, California (United States); Sawyers, Charles L. [Department of Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California School of Medicine, 700 Westwood Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA-Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Biomathematics, University of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The aims were to optimize reproducibility and establish [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion bone scanning in mice, using a dedicated small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner (microPET) and to correlate functional findings with anatomical imaging using computed tomography (microCAT). Optimal tracer uptake time for [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion was determined by performing dynamic microPET scans. Quantitative reproducibility was measured using region of interest (ROI)-based counts normalized to (a) the injected dose, (b) integral of the heart time-activity curve, or (c) ROI over the whole skeleton. Bone lesions were repetitively imaged. Functional images were correlated with X-ray and microCAT. The plateau of [{sup 18}F]fluoride uptake occurs 60 min after injection. The highest reproducibility was achieved by normalizing to an ROI over the whole skeleton, with a mean percent coefficient of variation [(SD/mean) x 100] of <15%-20%. Benign and malignant bone lesions were successfully repetitively imaged. Preliminary correlation of microPET with microCAT demonstrated the high sensitivity of microPET and the ability of microCAT to detect small osteolytic lesions. Whole-body [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion bone imaging using microPET is reproducible and can be used to serially monitor normal and pathological changes to the mouse skeleton. Morphological imaging with microCAT is useful to display correlative changes in anatomy. Detailed in vivo studies of the murine skeleton in various small animal models of bone diseases should now be possible. (orig.)

  19. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  20. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  1. Cellular automaton model with dynamical 2D speed-gap relation reproduces empirical and experimental features of traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Junfang; Ma, Shoufeng; Zhu, Chenqiang; Jiang, Rui; Ding, YaoXian

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton traffic flow model based on the brake light model, which takes into account that the desired time gap of vehicles is remarkably larger than one second. Although the hypothetical steady state of vehicles in the deterministic limit corresponds to a unique relationship between speeds and gaps in the proposed model, the traffic states of vehicles dynamically span a two-dimensional region in the plane of speed versus gap, due to the various randomizations. It is shown that the model is able to well reproduce (i) the free flow, synchronized flow, jam as well as the transitions among the three phases; (ii) the evolution features of disturbances and the spatiotemporal patterns in a car-following platoon; (iii) the empirical time series of traffic speed obtained from NGSIM data. Therefore, we argue that a model can potentially reproduce the empirical and experimental features of traffic flow, provided that the traffic states are able to dynamically span a 2D speed-gap...

  2. An exact arithmetic toolbox for a consistent and reproducible structural analysis of metabolic network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Trigg, Jason; Regev, Aviv; Berger, Bonnie

    2014-10-07

    Constraint-based models are currently the only methodology that allows the study of metabolism at the whole-genome scale. Flux balance analysis is commonly used to analyse constraint-based models. Curiously, the results of this analysis vary with the software being run, a situation that we show can be remedied by using exact rather than floating-point arithmetic. Here we introduce MONGOOSE, a toolbox for analysing the structure of constraint-based metabolic models in exact arithmetic. We apply MONGOOSE to the analysis of 98 existing metabolic network models and find that the biomass reaction is surprisingly blocked (unable to sustain non-zero flux) in nearly half of them. We propose a principled approach for unblocking these reactions and extend it to the problems of identifying essential and synthetic lethal reactions and minimal media. Our structural insights enable a systematic study of constraint-based metabolic models, yielding a deeper understanding of their possibilities and limitations.

  3. Can a global model reproduce observed trends in summertime surface ozone levels?

    OpenAIRE

    S. Koumoutsaris; I. Bey

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying trends in surface ozone concentrations are critical for assessing pollution control strategies. Here we use observations and results from a global chemical transport model to examine the trends (1991–2005) in daily maximum 8-hour average concentrations in summertime surface ozone at rural sites in Europe and the United States. We find a decrease in observed ozone concentrations at the high end of the probability distribution at many of the sites in both regions. The model attribut...

  4. Validation of EURO-CORDEX regional climate models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Busuioc, Aristita

    2016-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX is the European branch of the international CORDEX initiative that aims to provide improved regional climate change projections for Europe. The main objective of this paper is to document the performance of the individual models in reproducing the variability of precipitation extremes in Romania. Here three EURO-CORDEX regional climate models (RCMs) ensemble (scenario RCP4.5) are analysed and inter-compared: DMI-HIRHAM5, KNMI-RACMO2.2 and MPI-REMO. Compared to previous studies, when the RCM validation regarding the Romanian climate has mainly been made on mean state and at station scale, a more quantitative approach of precipitation extremes is proposed. In this respect, to have a more reliable comparison with observation, a high resolution daily precipitation gridded data set was used as observational reference (CLIMHYDEX project). The comparison between the RCM outputs and observed grid point values has been made by calculating three extremes precipitation indices, recommended by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection Indices (ETCCDI), for the 1976-2005 period: R10MM, annual count of days when precipitation ≥10mm; RX5DAY, annual maximum 5-day precipitation and R95P%, precipitation fraction of annual total precipitation due to daily precipitation > 95th percentile. The RCMs capability to reproduce the mean state for these variables, as well as the main modes of their spatial variability (given by the first three EOF patterns), are analysed. The investigation confirms the ability of RCMs to simulate the main features of the precipitation extreme variability over Romania, but some deficiencies in reproducing of their regional characteristics were found (for example, overestimation of the mea state, especially over the extra Carpathian regions). This work has been realised within the research project "Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania" (CLIMHYDEX), code PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, financed by the Romanian

  5. Augmenting a Large-Scale Hydrology Model to Reproduce Groundwater Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampoulis, D.; Reager, J. T., II; Andreadis, K.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    To understand the influence of groundwater on terrestrial ecosystems and society, global assessment of groundwater temporal fluctuations is required. A water table was initialized in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model in a semi-realistic approach to account for groundwater variability. Global water table depth data derived from observations at nearly 2 million well sites compiled from government archives and published literature, as well as groundwater model simulations, were used to create a new soil layer of varying depth for each model grid cell. The new 4-layer version of VIC, hereafter named VIC-4L, was run with and without assimilating NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations. The results were compared with simulations using the original VIC version (named VIC-3L) with GRACE assimilation, while all runs were compared with well data.

  6. Energy and nutrient deposition and excretion in the reproducing sow: model development and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A V; Strathe, A B; Theil, Peter Kappel;

    2014-01-01

    Air and nutrient emissions from swine operations raise environmental concerns. During the reproduction phase, sows consume and excrete large quantities of nutrients. The objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model to describe energy and nutrient partitioning and predict manure...... excretion and composition and methane emissions on a daily basis. The model was structured to contain gestation and lactation modules, which can be run separately or sequentially, with outputs from the gestation module used as inputs to the lactation module. In the gestating module, energy and protein...... production, and maternal growth with body tissue losses constrained within biological limits. Global sensitivity analysis showed that nonlinearity in the parameters was small. The model outputs considered were the total protein and fat deposition, average urinary and fecal N excretion, average methane...

  7. An exponent tunable network model for reproducing density driven superlinear relation

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Yuhao; Xu, Lida; Gao, Zi-You

    2014-01-01

    Previous works have shown the universality of allometric scalings under density and total value at city level, but our understanding about the size effects of regions on them is still poor. Here, we revisit the scaling relations between gross domestic production (GDP) and population (POP) under total and density value. We first reveal that the superlinear scaling is a general feature under density value crossing different regions. The scaling exponent $\\beta$ under density value falls into the range $(1.0, 2.0]$, which unexpectedly goes beyond the range observed by Pan et al. (Nat. Commun. vol. 4, p. 1961 (2013)). To deal with the wider range, we propose a network model based on 2D lattice space with the spatial correlation factor $\\alpha$ as parameter. Numerical experiments prove that the generated scaling exponent $\\beta$ in our model is fully tunable by the spatial correlation factor $\\alpha$. We conjecture that our model provides a general platform for extensive urban and regional studies.

  8. A simple branching model that reproduces language family and language population distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, Veit; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2009-07-01

    Human history leaves fingerprints in human languages. Little is known about language evolution and its study is of great importance. Here we construct a simple stochastic model and compare its results to statistical data of real languages. The model is based on the recent finding that language changes occur independently of the population size. We find agreement with the data additionally assuming that languages may be distinguished by having at least one among a finite, small number of different features. This finite set is also used in order to define the distance between two languages, similarly to linguistics tradition since Swadesh.

  9. An exact arithmetic toolbox for a consistent and reproducible structural analysis of metabolic network models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Trigg, Jason; Regev, Aviv; Berger, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    .... Flux balance analysis is commonly used to analyse constraint-based models. Curiously, the results of this analysis vary with the software being run, a situation that we show can be remedied by using exact rather than floating-point arithmetic...

  10. Reproducible infection model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Friis-Holm, Lotte Bjerrum; Heuer, Ole Eske

    2008-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to establish an infection and disease model for Clostridium perfringens in broiler chickens. Previous experiments had failed to induce disease and only a transient colonization with challenge strains had been obtained. In the present study, two series of experiments w...

  11. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J. Rapp, MD

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model.

  12. Accuracy and reproducibility of dental measurements on tomographic digital models: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jamille B; Christovam, Ilana O; Alencar, David S; da Motta, Andréa F J; Mattos, Claudia T; Cury-Saramago, Adriana

    2017-04-26

    The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of dental measurements obtained from digital study models generated from CBCT compared with those acquired from plaster models. The electronic databases Cochrane Library, Medline (via PubMed), Scopus, VHL, Web of Science, and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe were screened to identify articles from 1998 until February 2016. The inclusion criteria were: prospective and retrospective clinical trials in humans; validation and/or comparison articles of dental study models obtained from CBCT and plaster models; and articles that used dental linear measurements as an assessment tool. The methodological quality of the studies was carried out by Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2) tool. A meta-analysis was performed to validate all comparative measurements. The databases search identified a total of 3160 items and 554 duplicates were excluded. After reading titles and abstracts, 12 articles were selected. Five articles were included after reading in full. The methodological quality obtained through QUADAS-2 was poor to moderate. In the meta-analysis, there were statistical differences between the mesiodistal widths of mandibular incisors, maxillary canines and premolars, and overall Bolton analysis. Therefore, the measurements considered accurate were maxillary and mandibular crowding, intermolar width and mesiodistal width of maxillary incisors, mandibular canines and premolars, in both arches for molars. Digital models obtained from CBCT were not accurate for all measures assessed. The differences were clinically acceptable for all dental linear measurements, except for maxillary arch perimeter. Digital models are reproducible for all measurements when intraexaminer assessment is considered and need improvement in interexaminer evaluation.

  13. Financial modeling: Rx for financial success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, D

    2001-01-01

    In an era of managed care, cost cutting and finding ways to increase revenue are key goals in the survival of group practices. Many practices find that they have to boost their revenue by a certain amount (for example, 20-30% within the next three years) to maintain viability in the health care marketplace. Understanding how to generate that revenue and influence short-term and long-term financial outcomes is a far trickier process. This article details how practice administrators can influence a practice's bottom line through a three-step process: (1) identify the components of the practice's financial performance and drivers of performance results, (2) diagnose the practice's current financial situation, and (3) pinpoint benchmarks and targets for success.

  14. Validation and reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Jared A.; Kim, Dong K.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Clinical observations have long suggested that cancer progression is accompanied by extracellular matrix remodeling and concomitant increases in mechanical stiffness. Due to the strong association of mechanics and tumor progression, there has been considerable interest in incorporating methodologies to diagnose cancer through the use of mechanical stiffness imaging biomarkers, resulting in commercially available US and MR elastography products. Extension of this approach towards monitoring longitudinal changes in mechanical properties along a course of cancer therapy may provide means for assessing early response to therapy; therefore a systematic study of the elasticity biomarker in characterizing cancer for therapeutic monitoring is needed. The elastography method we employ, modality independent elastography (MIE), can be described as a model-based inverse image-analysis method that reconstructs elasticity images using two acquired image volumes in a pre/post state of compression. In this work, we present preliminary data towards validation and reproducibility assessment of our elasticity biomarker in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. The goal of this study is to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of MIE and therefore the magnitude of changes required to determine statistical differences during therapy. Our preliminary results suggest that the MIE method can accurately and robustly assess mechanical properties in a pre-clinical system and provide considerable enthusiasm for the extension of this technique towards monitoring therapy-induced changes to breast cancer tissue architecture.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Models of Complex Clinical Scenarios; Strategies to Improve Relevance and Reproducibility of Joint Replacement Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Joan E; Swider, Pascal; Goreham-Voss, Curtis; Soballe, Kjeld

    2016-02-01

    This research review aims to focus attention on the effect of specific surgical and host factors on implant fixation, and the importance of accounting for them in experimental and numerical models. These factors affect (a) eventual clinical applicability and (b) reproducibility of findings across research groups. Proper function and longevity for orthopedic joint replacement implants relies on secure fixation to the surrounding bone. Technology and surgical technique has improved over the last 50 years, and robust ingrowth and decades of implant survival is now routinely achieved for healthy patients and first-time (primary) implantation. Second-time (revision) implantation presents with bone loss with interfacial bone gaps in areas vital for secure mechanical fixation. Patients with medical comorbidities such as infection, smoking, congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and diabetes have a diminished healing response, poorer implant fixation, and greater revision risk. It is these more difficult clinical scenarios that require research to evaluate more advanced treatment approaches. Such treatments can include osteogenic or antimicrobial implant coatings, allo- or autogenous cellular or tissue-based approaches, local and systemic drug delivery, surgical approaches. Regarding implant-related approaches, most experimental and numerical models do not generally impose conditions that represent mechanical instability at the implant interface, or recalcitrant healing. Many treatments will work well in forgiving settings, but fail in complex human settings with disease, bone loss, or previous surgery. Ethical considerations mandate that we justify and limit the number of animals tested, which restricts experimental permutations of treatments. Numerical models provide flexibility to evaluate multiple parameters and combinations, but generally need to employ simplifying assumptions. The objectives of this paper are to (a) to highlight the importance of mechanical

  16. Evaluation of Nitinol staples for the Lapidus arthrodesis in a reproducible biomechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Alexander Russell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While the Lapidus procedure is a widely accepted technique for treatment of hallux valgus, the optimal fixation method to maintain joint stability remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of new Shape Memory Alloy staples arranged in different configurations in a repeatable 1st Tarsometatarsal arthrodesis model. Ten sawbones models of the whole foot (n=5 per group were reconstructed using a single dorsal staple or two staples in a delta configuration. Each construct was mechanically tested in dorsal four-point bending, medial four-point bending, dorsal three-point bending and plantar cantilever bending with the staples activated at 37°C. The peak load, stiffness and plantar gapping were determined for each test. Pressure sensors were used to measure the contact force and area of the joint footprint in each group. There was a significant (p < 0.05 increase in peak load in the two staple constructs compared to the single staple constructs for all testing modalities. Stiffness also increased significantly in all tests except dorsal four-point bending. Pressure sensor readings showed a significantly higher contact force at time zero and contact area following loading in the two staple constructs (p < 0.05. Both groups completely recovered any plantar gapping following unloading and restored their initial contact footprint. The biomechanical integrity and repeatability of the models was demonstrated with no construct failures due to hardware or model breakdown. Shape memory alloy staples provide fixation with the ability to dynamically apply and maintain compression across a simulated arthrodesis following a range of loading conditions.

  17. Reproducibility of the heat/capsaicin skin sensitization model in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavallone LF

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laura F Cavallone,1 Karen Frey,1 Michael C Montana,1 Jeremy Joyal,1 Karen J Regina,1 Karin L Petersen,2 Robert W Gereau IV11Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University in St Louis, School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USAIntroduction: Heat/capsaicin skin sensitization is a well-characterized human experimental model to induce hyperalgesia and allodynia. Using this model, gabapentin, among other drugs, was shown to significantly reduce cutaneous hyperalgesia compared to placebo. Since the larger thermal probes used in the original studies to produce heat sensitization are now commercially unavailable, we decided to assess whether previous findings could be replicated with a currently available smaller probe (heated area 9 cm2 versus 12.5–15.7 cm2.Study design and methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, 15 adult healthy volunteers participated in two study sessions, scheduled 1 week apart (Part A. In both sessions, subjects were exposed to the heat/capsaicin cutaneous sensitization model. Areas of hypersensitivity to brush stroke and von Frey (VF filament stimulation were measured at baseline and after rekindling of skin sensitization. Another group of 15 volunteers was exposed to an identical schedule and set of sensitization procedures, but, in each session, received either gabapentin or placebo (Part B.Results: Unlike previous reports, a similar reduction of areas of hyperalgesia was observed in all groups/sessions. Fading of areas of hyperalgesia over time was observed in Part A. In Part B, there was no difference in area reduction after gabapentin compared to placebo.Conclusion: When using smaller thermal probes than originally proposed, modifications of other parameters of sensitization and/or rekindling process may be needed to allow the heat/capsaicin sensitization protocol to be used as initially intended. Standardization and validation of

  18. geoKepler Workflow Module for Computationally Scalable and Reproducible Geoprocessing and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, C.; Block, J.; Crawl, D.; Graham, J.; Gupta, A.; Nguyen, M.; de Callafon, R.; Smarr, L.; Altintas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NSF-funded WIFIRE project has developed an open-source, online geospatial workflow platform for unifying geoprocessing tools and models for for fire and other geospatially dependent modeling applications. It is a product of WIFIRE's objective to build an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. geoKepler includes a set of reusable GIS components, or actors, for the Kepler Scientific Workflow System (https://kepler-project.org). Actors exist for reading and writing GIS data in formats such as Shapefile, GeoJSON, KML, and using OGC web services such as WFS. The actors also allow for calling geoprocessing tools in other packages such as GDAL and GRASS. Kepler integrates functions from multiple platforms and file formats into one framework, thus enabling optimal GIS interoperability, model coupling, and scalability. Products of the GIS actors can be fed directly to models such as FARSITE and WRF. Kepler's ability to schedule and scale processes using Hadoop and Spark also makes geoprocessing ultimately extensible and computationally scalable. The reusable workflows in geoKepler can be made to run automatically when alerted by real-time environmental conditions. Here, we show breakthroughs in the speed of creating complex data for hazard assessments with this platform. We also demonstrate geoKepler workflows that use Data Assimilation to ingest real-time weather data into wildfire simulations, and for data mining techniques to gain insight into environmental conditions affecting fire behavior. Existing machine learning tools and libraries such as R and MLlib are being leveraged for this purpose in Kepler, as well as Kepler's Distributed Data Parallel (DDP) capability to provide a framework for scalable processing. geoKepler workflows can be executed via an iPython notebook as a part of a Jupyter hub at UC San Diego for sharing and reporting of the scientific analysis and results from

  19. The link between the Barents Sea and ENSO events reproduced by NEMO model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Stepanov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of observational data in the Barents Sea along a meridian at 33°30´ E between 70°30´ and 72°30´ N has reported a negative correlation between El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation (ENSO events and water temperature in the top 200 m: the temperature drops about 0.5 °C during warm ENSO events while during cold ENSO events the top 200 m layer of the Barents Sea is warmer. Results from 1 and 1/4-degree global NEMO models show a similar response for the whole Barents Sea. During the strong warm ENSO event in 1997–1998 an anticyclonic atmospheric circulation is settled over the Barents Sea instead of a usual cyclonic circulation. This change enhances heat loses in the Barents Sea, as well as substantially influencing the Barents Sea inflow from the North Atlantic, via changes in ocean currents. Under normal conditions along the Scandinavian peninsula there is a warm current entering the Barents sea from the North Atlantic, however after the 1997–1998 event this current is weakened.

    During 1997–1998 the model annual mean temperature in the Barents Sea is decreased by about 0.8 °C, also resulting in a higher sea ice volume. In contrast during the cold ENSO events in 1999–2000 and 2007–2008 the model shows a lower sea ice volume, and higher annual mean temperatures in the upper layer of the Barents Sea of about 0.7 °C.

    An analysis of model data shows that the Barents Sea inflow is the main source for the variability of Barents Sea heat content, and is forced by changing pressure and winds in the North Atlantic. However, surface heat-exchange with atmosphere can also play a dominant role in the Barents Sea annual heat balance, especially for the subsequent year after ENSO events.

  20. A computational model incorporating neural stem cell dynamics reproduces glioma incidence across the lifespan in the human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Bauer

    Full Text Available Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Demographically, the risk of occurrence increases until old age. Here we present a novel computational model to reproduce the probability of glioma incidence across the lifespan. Previous mathematical models explaining glioma incidence are framed in a rather abstract way, and do not directly relate to empirical findings. To decrease this gap between theory and experimental observations, we incorporate recent data on cellular and molecular factors underlying gliomagenesis. Since evidence implicates the adult neural stem cell as the likely cell-of-origin of glioma, we have incorporated empirically-determined estimates of neural stem cell number, cell division rate, mutation rate and oncogenic potential into our model. We demonstrate that our model yields results which match actual demographic data in the human population. In particular, this model accounts for the observed peak incidence of glioma at approximately 80 years of age, without the need to assert differential susceptibility throughout the population. Overall, our model supports the hypothesis that glioma is caused by randomly-occurring oncogenic mutations within the neural stem cell population. Based on this model, we assess the influence of the (experimentally indicated decrease in the number of neural stem cells and increase of cell division rate during aging. Our model provides multiple testable predictions, and suggests that different temporal sequences of oncogenic mutations can lead to tumorigenesis. Finally, we conclude that four or five oncogenic mutations are sufficient for the formation of glioma.

  1. Can a global model chemical mechanism reproduce NO, NO2, and O3 measurements above a tropical rainforest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. N. Hewitt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A cross-platform field campaign, OP3, was conducted in the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo between April and July of 2008. Among the suite of observations recorded, the campaign included measurements of NOx and O3–crucial outputs of any model chemistry mechanism. We describe the measurements of these species made from both the ground site and aircraft. We examine the output from the global model p-TOMCAT at two resolutions for this location during the April campaign period. The models exhibit reasonable ability in capturing the NOx diurnal cycle, but ozone is overestimated. We use a box model containing the same chemical mechanism to explore the weaknesses in the global model and the ability of the simplified global model chemical mechanism to capture the chemistry at the rainforest site. We achieve a good fit to the data for all three species (NO, NO2, and O3, though the model is much more sensitive to changes in the treatment of physical processes than to changes in the chemical mechanism. Indeed, without some parameterization of the nighttime boundary layer-free troposphere mixing, a time dependent box model will not reproduce the observations. The final simulation uses this mixing parameterization for NO and NO2 but not O3, as determined by the vertical structure of each species, and matches the measurements well.

  2. Can model observers be developed to reproduce radiologists' diagnostic performances? Our study says not so fast!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhun; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Reiser, Ingrid; Boone, John M.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine radiologists' diagnostic performances on different image reconstruction algorithms that could be used to optimize image-based model observers. We included a total of 102 pathology proven breast computed tomography (CT) cases (62 malignant). An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain 24 reconstructions with different image appearance for each image. Using quantitative image feature analysis, three IIRs and one clinical reconstruction of 50 lesions (25 malignant) were selected for a reader study. The reconstructions spanned a range of smooth-low noise to sharp-high noise image appearance. The trained classifiers' AUCs on the above reconstructions ranged from 0.61 (for smooth reconstruction) to 0.95 (for sharp reconstruction). Six experienced MQSA radiologists read 200 cases (50 lesions times 4 reconstructions) and provided the likelihood of malignancy of each lesion. Radiologists' diagnostic performances (AUC) ranged from 0.7 to 0.89. However, there was no agreement among the six radiologists on which image appearance was the best, in terms of radiologists' having the highest diagnostic performances. Specifically, two radiologists indicated sharper image appearance was diagnostically superior, another two radiologists indicated smoother image appearance was diagnostically superior, and another two radiologists indicated all image appearances were diagnostically similar to each other. Due to the poor agreement among radiologists on the diagnostic ranking of images, it may not be possible to develop a model observer for this particular imaging task.

  3. The ability of a GCM-forced hydrological model to reproduce global discharge variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Sperna Weiland

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Data from General Circulation Models (GCMs are often used to investigate hydrological impacts of climate change. However GCM data are known to have large biases, especially for precipitation. In this study the usefulness of GCM data for hydrological studies, with focus on discharge variability and extremes, was tested by using bias-corrected daily climate data of the 20CM3 control experiment from a selection of twelve GCMs as input to the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. Results of these runs were compared with discharge observations of the GRDC and discharges calculated from model runs based on two meteorological datasets constructed from the observation-based CRU TS2.1 and ERA-40 reanalysis. In the first dataset the CRU TS 2.1 monthly timeseries were downscaled to daily timeseries using the ERA-40 dataset (ERA6190. This dataset served as a best guess of the past climate and was used to analyze the performance of PCR-GLOBWB. The second dataset was created from the ERA-40 timeseries bias-corrected with the CRU TS 2.1 dataset using the same bias-correction method as applied to the GCM datasets (ERACLM. Through this dataset the influence of the bias-correction method was quantified. The bias-correction was limited to monthly mean values of precipitation, potential evaporation and temperature, as our focus was on the reproduction of inter- and intra-annual variability.

    After bias-correction the spread in discharge results of the GCM based runs decreased and results were similar to results of the ERA-40 based runs, especially for rivers with a strong seasonal pattern. Overall the bias-correction method resulted in a slight reduction of global runoff and the method performed less well in arid and mountainous regions. However, deviations between GCM results and GRDC statistics did decrease for Q, Q90 and IAV. After bias-correction consistency amongst

  4. Validation of the 3D Skin Comet assay using full thickness skin models: transferability and reproducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Reisinger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3D Skin Comet assay was developed to improve the in vitro prediction of the genotoxic potential of dermally applied chemicals. For this purpose, a classical read-out for genotoxicity (i.e. comet formation was combined with reconstructed 3D skin models as well-established test systems. Five laboratories (BASF, BfR (Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Henkel, Procter & Gamble and TNO Triskilion started to validate this assay using the Phenion® Full- Thickness (FT Skin Model and 8 coded chemicals with financial support by Cosmetics Europe and the German Ministry of Education & Research. There was an excellent overall predictivity of the expected genotoxicity (>90%. Four labs correctly identified all chemicals and the fifth correctly identified 80% of the chemicals. Background DNA damage was low and values for solvent (acetone and positive (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS controls were comparable among labs. Inclusion of the DNA-polymerase inhibitor, aphidicolin (APC, in the protocol improved the predictivity of the assay since it enabled robust detection of pro-mutagens e.g., 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene. Therefore, all negative findings are now confirmed by additional APC experiments to come to a final conclusion. Furthermore, MMC, which intercalates between DNA strands causing covalent binding, was detected with the standard protocol, in which it gave weak but statistically significant responses. Stronger responses, however, were obtained using a cross-linker specific protocol in which MMC reduced the migration of MMS-induced DNA damage. These data support the use of the Phenion® FT in the Comet assay: no false-positives and only one false-negative finding in a single lab. Testing will continue to obtain data for 30 chemicals. Once validated, the 3D Skin Comet assay is foreseen to be used as a follow-up test for positive results from the current in vitro genotoxicity test battery.

  5. Expanding on Successful Concepts, Models, and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    If the goal of the AEP framework was to replace existing exposure models or databases for organizing exposure data with a concept, we would share Dr. von Göetz concerns. Instead, the outcome we promote is broader use of an organizational framework for exposure science. The f...

  6. A Predictive Model for MSSW Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Angela Michele

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a hypothetical model for predicting both graduate GPA and graduation of University of Louisville Kent School of Social Work Master of Science in Social Work (MSSW) students entering the program during the 2001-2005 school years. The preexisting characteristics of demographics, academic preparedness and culture shock along with…

  7. PAMELA positron and electron spectra are reproduced by 3-dimensional cosmic-ray modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Maccione, Luca; Di Bernardo, Giuseppe; Evoli, Carmelo

    2013-01-01

    The PAMELA collaboration recently released the $e^+$ absolute spectrum between 1 and 300 GeV in addition to the positron fraction and $e^-$ spectrum previously measured in the same time period. We use the newly developed 3-dimensional upgrade of the DRAGON code and the charge dependent solar modulation HelioProp code to consistently describe those data. We obtain very good fits of all data sets if a $e^+$ + $e^-$ hard extra-component peaked at 1 TeV is added to a softer $e^-$ background and the secondary $e^\\pm$ produced by the spallation of cosmic ray proton and helium nuclei. All sources are assumed to follow a realistic spiral arm spatial distribution. Remarkably, PAMELA data do not display any need of charge asymmetric extra-component. Finally, plain diffusion, or low re-acceleration, propagation models which are tuned against nuclear data, nicely describe PAMELA lepton data with no need to introduce a low energy break in the proton and Helium spectra.

  8. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  9. LIFE DISTRIBUTION OF SERIES UNDER THE SUCCESSIVE DAMAGE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongqian; C. D. Lai; LI Guoying

    2003-01-01

    We analyse further the reliability behaviour of series and parallel systems in the successive damage model initiated by Downton. The results are compared with those obtained for other models with different bivariate distributions.

  10. Model of key success factors for Business Intelligence implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mesaros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New progressive technologies recorded growth in every area. Information-communication technologies facilitate the exchange of information and it facilitates management of everyday activities in enterprises. Specific modules (such as Business Intelligence facilitate decision-making. Several studies have demonstrated the positive impact of Business Intelligence to decision-making. The first step is to put in place the enterprise. The implementation process is influenced by many factors. This article discusses the issue of key success factors affecting to successful implementation of Business Intelligence. The article describes the key success factors for successful implementation and use of Business Intelligence based on multiple studies. The main objective of this study is to verify the effects and dependence of selected factors and proposes a model of key success factors for successful implementation of Business Intelligence. Key success factors and the proposed model are studied in Slovak enterprises.

  11. A Detailed Data-Driven Network Model of Prefrontal Cortex Reproduces Key Features of In Vivo Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Joachim; Hertäg, Loreen; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    The prefrontal cortex is centrally involved in a wide range of cognitive functions and their impairment in psychiatric disorders. Yet, the computational principles that govern the dynamics of prefrontal neural networks, and link their physiological, biochemical and anatomical properties to cognitive functions, are not well understood. Computational models can help to bridge the gap between these different levels of description, provided they are sufficiently constrained by experimental data and capable of predicting key properties of the intact cortex. Here, we present a detailed network model of the prefrontal cortex, based on a simple computationally efficient single neuron model (simpAdEx), with all parameters derived from in vitro electrophysiological and anatomical data. Without additional tuning, this model could be shown to quantitatively reproduce a wide range of measures from in vivo electrophysiological recordings, to a degree where simulated and experimentally observed activities were statistically indistinguishable. These measures include spike train statistics, membrane potential fluctuations, local field potentials, and the transmission of transient stimulus information across layers. We further demonstrate that model predictions are robust against moderate changes in key parameters, and that synaptic heterogeneity is a crucial ingredient to the quantitative reproduction of in vivo-like electrophysiological behavior. Thus, we have produced a physiologically highly valid, in a quantitative sense, yet computationally efficient PFC network model, which helped to identify key properties underlying spike time dynamics as observed in vivo, and can be harvested for in-depth investigation of the links between physiology and cognition.

  12. A Model of Successful School Leadership from the International Successful School Principalship Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gurr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Successful School Principalship Project (ISSPP has been actively conducting research about the work of successful principals since 2001. Findings from four project books and eight models derived from this project are synthesised into a model of successful school leadership. Building on Gurr, Drysdale and Mulford’s earlier model, the work of school leaders is described as engaging within the school context to influence student and school outcomes through interventions in teaching and learning, school capacity building, and the wider context. The qualities a leader brings to their role, a portfolio approach to using leadership ideas, constructing networks, collaborations and partnerships, and utilising accountability and evaluation for evidence-informed improvement, are important additional elements. The model is applicable to all in leadership roles in schools.

  13. The Road of ERP Success: A Framework Model for Successful ERP Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevenpri Candra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available To compete with nowadays business is to implement technology and align it into their business strategy. One of technology that commonly implement is Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP. This research will examined what are critical success factor of ERP and the impact of their business outcomes. A framework model for ERP Implementation success is constructs from several research or previous study in Implementation ERP. This study will extends in the research field of successful implementation ERP and implication factor for business practice to have more knowledge in term of implementation ERP and their business strategy. 

  14. The statistics of repeating patterns of cortical activity can be reproduced by a model network of stochastic binary neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxin, Alex; Hakim, Vincent; Brunel, Nicolas

    2008-10-15

    Calcium imaging of the spontaneous activity in cortical slices has revealed repeating spatiotemporal patterns of transitions between so-called down states and up states (Ikegaya et al., 2004). Here we fit a model network of stochastic binary neurons to data from these experiments, and in doing so reproduce the distributions of such patterns. We use two versions of this model: (1) an unconnected network in which neurons are activated as independent Poisson processes; and (2) a network with an interaction matrix, estimated from the data, representing effective interactions between the neurons. The unconnected model (model 1) is sufficient to account for the statistics of repeating patterns in 11 of the 15 datasets studied. Model 2, with interactions between neurons, is required to account for pattern statistics of the remaining four. Three of these four datasets are the ones that contain the largest number of transitions, suggesting that long datasets are in general necessary to render interactions statistically visible. We then study the topology of the matrix of interactions estimated for these four datasets. For three of the four datasets, we find sparse matrices with long-tailed degree distributions and an overrepresentation of certain network motifs. The remaining dataset exhibits a strongly interconnected, spatially localized subgroup of neurons. In all cases, we find that interactions between neurons facilitate the generation of long patterns that do not repeat exactly.

  15. Isokinetic eccentric exercise as a model to induce and reproduce pathophysiological alterations related to delayed onset muscle soreness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Kanstrup, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological alterations following unaccustomed eccentric exercise in an isokinetic dynamometer of the right m. quadriceps until exhaustion were studied, in order to create a model in which the physiological responses to physiotherapy could be measured. In experiment I (exp. I), seven selected...... parameters were measured bilaterally in 7 healthy subjects at day 0 as a control value. Then after a standardized bout of eccentric exercise the same parameters were measured daily for the following 7 d (test values). The measured parameters were: the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr...... (133Xenon washout technique). This was repeated in experiment II (exp. II) 6-12 months later in order to study reproducibility. In experiment III (exp. III), the normal fluctuations over 8 d of the seven parameters were measured, without intervention with eccentric exercise in 6 other subjects. All...

  16. A STUDY ON THE SUCCESSION MODEL OF FAMILY BUSINESSS

    OpenAIRE

    Hung-Jung Chang; Szu-Ju Lin

    2011-01-01

    Family business has to face issues such as ownership issue, governance structure issue and succession issue, etc. in enterprise development history. Among them, the succession issue is an important transition point in enterprise’s survival and development. It is thus thought of as one of the most important strategic and decision making issues in the enterprise. This article aims at investigating the succession model of Family business. First, reviews are done on the meaning of Family business...

  17. A short-term mouse model that reproduces the immunopathological features of rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singanayagam, Aran; Glanville, Nicholas; Walton, Ross P; Aniscenko, Julia; Pearson, Rebecca M; Pinkerton, James W; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M; Bartlett, Nathan W; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2015-08-01

    Viral exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), commonly caused by rhinovirus (RV) infections, are poorly controlled by current therapies. This is due to a lack of understanding of the underlying immunopathological mechanisms. Human studies have identified a number of key immune responses that are associated with RV-induced exacerbations including neutrophilic inflammation, expression of inflammatory cytokines and deficiencies in innate anti-viral interferon. Animal models of COPD exacerbation are required to determine the contribution of these responses to disease pathogenesis. We aimed to develop a short-term mouse model that reproduced the hallmark features of RV-induced exacerbation of COPD. Evaluation of complex protocols involving multiple dose elastase and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration combined with RV1B infection showed suppression rather than enhancement of inflammatory parameters compared with control mice infected with RV1B alone. Therefore, these approaches did not accurately model the enhanced inflammation associated with RV infection in patients with COPD compared with healthy subjects. In contrast, a single elastase treatment followed by RV infection led to heightened airway neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation, increased expression of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10)/IP-10 (interferon γ-induced protein 10) and CCL5 [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5]/RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), mucus hypersecretion and preliminary evidence for increased airway hyper-responsiveness compared with mice treated with elastase or RV infection alone. In summary, we have developed a new mouse model of RV-induced COPD exacerbation that mimics many of the inflammatory features of human disease. This model, in conjunction with human models of disease, will provide an essential tool for studying disease mechanisms and allow testing of novel therapies with potential to

  18. [Active ageing and success: A brief history of conceptual models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petretto, Donatella Rita; Pili, Roberto; Gaviano, Luca; Matos López, Cristina; Zuddas, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse and describe different conceptual models of successful ageing, active and healthy ageing developed in Europe and in America in the 20° century, starting from Rowe and Kahn's original model (1987, 1997). A narrative review was conducted on the literature on successful ageing. Our review included definition of successful ageing from European and American scholars. Models were found that aimed to describe indexes of active and healthy ageing, models devoted to describe processes involved in successful ageing, and additional views that emphasise subjective and objective perception of successful ageing. A description is also given of critiques on previous models and remedies according to Martin et al. (2014) and strategies for successful ageing according to Jeste and Depp (2014). The need is discussed for the enhancement of Rowe and Kahn's model and other models with a more inclusive, universal description of ageing, incorporating scientific evidence regarding active ageing. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bavel, Jay J; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J; Reinero, Diego A

    2016-06-07

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher's degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed "hidden moderators") between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility.

  20. Modesto Junior College's Student Success Plan: A Model for Student Success/PFE Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKuin, Kathleen

    This is a report on the student success model designed by Modesto Junior College (MJC) (California) in conjunction with the state-established Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program goals. The PFE program addresses goals of the community college's mission along with more direct emphasis on transfer programs, degrees and certificates awarded,…

  1. Modesto Junior College's Student Success Plan: A Model for Student Success/PFE Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKuin, Kathleen

    This is a report on the student success model designed by Modesto Junior College (MJC) (California) in conjunction with the state-established Partnership for Excellence (PFE) program goals. The PFE program addresses goals of the community college's mission along with more direct emphasis on transfer programs, degrees and certificates awarded,…

  2. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  3. Can CFMIP2 models reproduce the leading modes of cloud vertical structure in the CALIPSO-GOCCP observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Song

    2017-02-01

    Using principal component (PC) analysis, three leading modes of cloud vertical structure (CVS) are revealed by the GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (GOCCP), i.e. tropical high, subtropical anticyclonic and extratropical cyclonic cloud modes (THCM, SACM and ECCM, respectively). THCM mainly reflect the contrast between tropical high clouds and clouds in middle/high latitudes. SACM is closely associated with middle-high clouds in tropical convective cores, few-cloud regimes in subtropical anticyclonic clouds and stratocumulus over subtropical eastern oceans. ECCM mainly corresponds to clouds along extratropical cyclonic regions. Models of phase 2 of Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP2) well reproduce the THCM, but SACM and ECCM are generally poorly simulated compared to GOCCP. Standardized PCs corresponding to CVS modes are generally captured, whereas original PCs (OPCs) are consistently underestimated (overestimated) for THCM (SACM and ECCM) by CFMIP2 models. The effects of CVS modes on relative cloud radiative forcing (RSCRF/RLCRF) (RSCRF being calculated at the surface while RLCRF at the top of atmosphere) are studied in terms of principal component regression method. Results show that CFMIP2 models tend to overestimate (underestimated or simulate the opposite sign) RSCRF/RLCRF radiative effects (REs) of ECCM (THCM and SACM) in unit global mean OPC compared to observations. These RE biases may be attributed to two factors, one of which is underestimation (overestimation) of low/middle clouds (high clouds) (also known as stronger (weaker) REs in unit low/middle (high) clouds) in simulated global mean cloud profiles, the other is eigenvector biases in CVS modes (especially for SACM and ECCM). It is suggested that much more attention should be paid on improvement of CVS, especially cloud parameterization associated with particular physical processes (e.g. downwelling regimes with the Hadley circulation, extratropical storm tracks and others), which

  4. Establishing a Cloud Computing Success Model for Hospitals in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Woei Lian PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the critical quality-related factors that affect cloud computing success of hospitals in Taiwan. In this study, private cloud computing is the major research target. The chief information officers participated in a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that the integration of trust into the information systems success model will have acceptable explanatory power to understand cloud computing success in the hospital. Moreover, information quality and system quality directly affect cloud computing satisfaction, whereas service quality indirectly affects the satisfaction through trust. In other words, trust serves as the mediator between service quality and satisfaction. This cloud computing success model will help hospitals evaluate or achieve success after adopting private cloud computing health care services.

  5. A STUDY ON THE SUCCESSION MODEL OF FAMILY BUSINESSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jung Chang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Family business has to face issues such as ownership issue, governance structure issue and succession issue, etc. in enterprise development history. Among them, the succession issue is an important transition point in enterprise’s survival and development. It is thus thought of as one of the most important strategic and decision making issues in the enterprise. This article aims at investigating the succession model of Family business. First, reviews are done on the meaning of Family business. Next, reviews and comments are made on the related models of the succession of Family business. It can be seen from the research that the ways of succession of Family business can be divided into process point of view and psychological point of view. Finally, main conclusions of this article are summarized and perspectives are also made on the future researches.

  6. Establishing a Cloud Computing Success Model for Hospitals in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiunn-Woei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the critical quality-related factors that affect cloud computing success of hospitals in Taiwan. In this study, private cloud computing is the major research target. The chief information officers participated in a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that the integration of trust into the information systems success model will have acceptable explanatory power to understand cloud computing success in the hospital. Moreover, information quality and system quality directly affect cloud computing satisfaction, whereas service quality indirectly affects the satisfaction through trust. In other words, trust serves as the mediator between service quality and satisfaction. This cloud computing success model will help hospitals evaluate or achieve success after adopting private cloud computing health care services.

  7. A Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to explore accuracy and reproducibility in the measurement of hyperpolarized pyruvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher M.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hyperpolarized (HP) agents has the potential to probe in-vivo metabolism with sensitivity and specificity that was not previously possible. Biological conversion of HP agents specifically for cancer has been shown to correlate to presence of disease, stage and response to therapy. For such metabolic biomarkers derived from MRI of hyperpolarized agents to be clinically impactful, they need to be validated and well characterized. However, imaging of HP substrates is distinct from conventional MRI, due to the non-renewable nature of transient HP magnetization. Moreover, due to current practical limitations in generation and evolution of hyperpolarized agents, it is not feasible to fully experimentally characterize measurement and processing strategies. In this work we use a custom Bloch-McConnell simulator with pharmacokinetic modeling to characterize the performance of specific magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences over a range of biological conditions. We performed numerical simulations to evaluate the effect of sequence parameters over a range of chemical conversion rates. Each simulation was analyzed repeatedly with the addition of noise in order to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of measurements. Results indicate that under both closed and perfused conditions, acquisition parameters can affect measurements in a tissue dependent manner, suggesting that great care needs to be taken when designing studies involving hyperpolarized agents. More modeling studies will be needed to determine what effect sequence parameters have on more advanced acquisitions and processing methods.

  8. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  9. An update on the rotenone models of Parkinson's disease: their ability to reproduce the features of clinical disease and model gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michaela E; Bobrovskaya, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by two major neuropathological hallmarks: the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and the presence of Lewy bodies in the surviving SN neurons, as well as other regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. Animal models have been invaluable tools for investigating the underlying mechanisms of the pathogenesis of PD and testing new potential symptomatic, neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies. However, the usefulness of these models is dependent on how precisely they replicate the features of clinical PD with some studies now employing combined gene-environment models to replicate more of the affected pathways. The rotenone model of PD has become of great interest following the seminal paper by the Greenamyre group in 2000 (Betarbet et al., 2000). This paper reported for the first time that systemic rotenone was able to reproduce the two pathological hallmarks of PD as well as certain parkinsonian motor deficits. Since 2000, many research groups have actively used the rotenone model worldwide. This paper will review rotenone models, focusing upon their ability to reproduce the two pathological hallmarks of PD, motor deficits, extranigral pathology and non-motor symptoms. We will also summarize the recent advances in neuroprotective therapies, focusing on those that investigated non-motor symptoms and review rotenone models used in combination with PD genetic models to investigate gene-environment interactions.

  10. QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: a case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-08-01

    The crucial importance of the three central OECD principles for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model validation is highlighted in a case study of tropospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by OH, applied to two CADASTER chemical classes (PBDEs and (benzo-)triazoles). The application of any QSAR model to chemicals without experimental data largely depends on model reproducibility by the user. The reproducibility of an unambiguous algorithm (OECD Principle 2) is guaranteed by redeveloping MLR models based on both updated version of DRAGON software for molecular descriptors calculation and some freely available online descriptors. The Genetic Algorithm has confirmed its ability to always select the most informative descriptors independently on the input pool of variables. The ability of the GA-selected descriptors to model chemicals not used in model development is verified by three different splittings (random by response, K-ANN and K-means clustering), thus ensuring the external predictivity of the new models, independently of the training/prediction set composition (OECD Principle 5). The relevance of checking the structural applicability domain becomes very evident on comparing the predictions for CADASTER chemicals, using the new models proposed herein, with those obtained by EPI Suite. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A rat model of post-traumatic stress disorder reproduces the hippocampal deficits seen in the human syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal eGoswami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress, the causes and pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD remain poorly understood, partly because of ethical limitations inherent to human studies. One approach to circumvent this obstacle is to study PTSD in a valid animal model of the human syndrome. In one such model, extreme and long-lasting behavioral manifestations of anxiety develop in a subset of Lewis rats after exposure to an intense predatory threat that mimics the type of life-and-death situation known to precipitate PTSD in humans. This study aimed to assess whether the hippocampus-associated deficits observed in the human syndrome are reproduced in this rodent model. Prior to predatory threat, different groups of rats were each tested on one of three object recognition memory tasks that varied in the types of contextual clues (i.e. that require the hippocampus or not the rats could use to identify novel items. After task completion, the rats were subjected to predatory threat and, one week later, tested on the elevated plus maze. Based on their exploratory behavior in the plus maze, rats were then classified as resilient or PTSD-like and their performance on the pre-threat object recognition tasks compared. The performance of PTSD-like rats was inferior to that of resilient rats but only when subjects relied on an allocentric frame of reference to identify novel items, a process thought to be critically dependent on the hippocampus. Therefore, these results suggest that even prior to trauma, PTSD-like rats show a deficit in hippocampal-dependent functions, as reported in twin studies of human PTSD.

  12. Reproducing the organic matter model of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia and testing the ecotoxicity of functionalized charcoal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Rodrigues Linhares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to obtain organic compounds similar to the ones found in the organic matter of anthropogenic dark earth of Amazonia (ADE using a chemical functionalization procedure on activated charcoal, as well as to determine their ecotoxicity. Based on the study of the organic matter from ADE, an organic model was proposed and an attempt to reproduce it was described. Activated charcoal was oxidized with the use of sodium hypochlorite at different concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance was performed to verify if the spectra of the obtained products were similar to the ones of humic acids from ADE. The similarity between spectra indicated that the obtained products were polycondensed aromatic structures with carboxyl groups: a soil amendment that can contribute to soil fertility and to its sustainable use. An ecotoxicological test with Daphnia similis was performed on the more soluble fraction (fulvic acids of the produced soil amendment. Aryl chloride was formed during the synthesis of the organic compounds from activated charcoal functionalization and partially removed through a purification process. However, it is probable that some aryl chloride remained in the final product, since the ecotoxicological test indicated that the chemical functionalized soil amendment is moderately toxic.

  13. Enhancement of accuracy and reproducibility of parametric modeling for estimating abnormal intra-QRS potentials in signal-averaged electrocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    This work analyzes and attempts to enhance the accuracy and reproducibility of parametric modeling in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain for the estimation of abnormal intra-QRS potentials (AIQP) in signal-averaged electrocardiograms. One hundred sets of white noise with a flat frequency response were introduced to simulate the unpredictable, broadband AIQP when quantitatively analyzing estimation error. Further, a high-frequency AIQP parameter was defined to minimize estimation error caused by the overlap between normal QRS and AIQP in low-frequency DCT coefficients. Seventy-two patients from Taiwan were recruited for the study, comprising 30 patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 42 without VT. Analytical results showed that VT patients had a significant decrease in the estimated AIQP. The global diagnostic performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of AIQP rose from 73.0% to 84.2% in lead Y, and from 58.3% to 79.1% in lead Z, when the high-frequency range fell from 100% to 80%. The combination of AIQP and ventricular late potentials further enhanced performance to 92.9% (specificity=90.5%, sensitivity=90%). Therefore, the significantly reduced AIQP in VT patients, possibly also including dominant unpredictable potentials within the normal QRS complex, may be new promising evidence of ventricular arrhythmias.

  14. Models Predicting Success of Infertility Treatment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinara, Alireza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammad, Kazem; Shahnazari, Parisa; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertile couples are faced with problems that affect their marital life. Infertility treatment is expensive and time consuming and occasionally isn’t simply possible. Prediction models for infertility treatment have been proposed and prediction of treatment success is a new field in infertility treatment. Because prediction of treatment success is a new need for infertile couples, this paper reviewed previous studies for catching a general concept in applicability of the models. Methods: This study was conducted as a systematic review at Avicenna Research Institute in 2015. Six data bases were searched based on WHO definitions and MESH key words. Papers about prediction models in infertility were evaluated. Results: Eighty one papers were eligible for the study. Papers covered years after 1986 and studies were designed retrospectively and prospectively. IVF prediction models have more shares in papers. Most common predictors were age, duration of infertility, ovarian and tubal problems. Conclusion: Prediction model can be clinically applied if the model can be statistically evaluated and has a good validation for treatment success. To achieve better results, the physician and the couples’ needs estimation for treatment success rate were based on history, the examination and clinical tests. Models must be checked for theoretical approach and appropriate validation. The privileges for applying the prediction models are the decrease in the cost and time, avoiding painful treatment of patients, assessment of treatment approach for physicians and decision making for health managers. The selection of the approach for designing and using these models is inevitable. PMID:27141461

  15. A model of succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Sally; Procter, Nicholas; Deuter, Kate

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews current literature on succession planning for mental health nurse practitioners (NPs) and discusses a model of succession planning that is underpinned by principals of leadership development, workforce participation and client engagement. The paper identifies succession planning as a means of managing a present and future workforce, while simultaneously addressing individual and organizational learning and practice development needs. A discussion of the processes attendant upon sustainable succession planning - collegial support, career planning and development, information exchange, capacity building, and mentoring is framed within the potential interrelationships between existing NP, developing NP and service directors and/or team managers. Done effectively and in partnership with wider clinical services, succession planning has the potential to build NP leadership development and leadership transition more broadly within mental health services.

  16. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  17. Assessment of an ensemble of ocean-atmosphere coupled and uncoupled regional climate models to reproduce the climatology of Mediterranean cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaounas, Emmanouil; Kelemen, Fanni Dora; Wernli, Heini; Gaertner, Miguel Angel; Reale, Marco; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Lionello, Piero; Calmanti, Sandro; Podrascanin, Zorica; Somot, Samuel; Akhtar, Naveed; Romera, Raquel; Conte, Dario

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to assess the skill of regional climate models (RCMs) at reproducing the climatology of Mediterranean cyclones. Seven RCMs are considered, five of which were also coupled with an oceanic model. All simulations were forced at the lateral boundaries by the ERA-Interim reanalysis for a common 20-year period (1989-2008). Six different cyclone tracking methods have been applied to all twelve RCM simulations and to the ERA-Interim reanalysis in order to assess the RCMs from the perspective of different cyclone definitions. All RCMs reproduce the main areas of high cyclone occurrence in the region south of the Alps, in the Adriatic, Ionian and Aegean Seas, as well as in the areas close to Cyprus and to Atlas mountains. The RCMs tend to underestimate intense cyclone occurrences over the Mediterranean Sea and reproduce 24-40 % of these systems, as identified in the reanalysis. The use of grid nudging in one of the RCMs is shown to be beneficial, reproducing about 60 % of the intense cyclones and keeping a better track of the seasonal cycle of intense cyclogenesis. Finally, the most intense cyclones tend to be similarly reproduced in coupled and uncoupled model simulations, suggesting that modeling atmosphere-ocean coupled processes has only a weak impact on the climatology and intensity of Mediterranean cyclones.

  18. A computational model for histone mark propagation reproduces the distribution of heterochromatin in different human cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, Veit; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly compact and dynamic nuclear structure that consists of DNA and associated proteins. The main organizational unit is the nucleosome, which consists of a histone octamer with DNA wrapped around it. Histone proteins are implicated in the regulation of eukaryote genes and they carry numerous reversible post-translational modifications that control DNA-protein interactions and the recruitment of chromatin binding proteins. Heterochromatin, the transcriptionally inactive part of the genome, is densely packed and contains histone H3 that is methylated at Lys 9 (H3K9me). The propagation of H3K9me in nucleosomes along the DNA in chromatin is antagonizing by methylation of H3 Lysine 4 (H3K4me) and acetylations of several lysines, which is related to euchromatin and active genes. We show that the related histone modifications form antagonized domains on a coarse scale. These histone marks are assumed to be initiated within distinct nucleation sites in the DNA and to propagate bi-directionally. We propose a simple computer model that simulates the distribution of heterochromatin in human chromosomes. The simulations are in agreement with previously reported experimental observations from two different human cell lines. We reproduced different types of barriers between heterochromatin and euchromatin providing a unified model for their function. The effect of changes in the nucleation site distribution and of propagation rates were studied. The former occurs mainly with the aim of (de-)activation of single genes or gene groups and the latter has the power of controlling the transcriptional programs of entire chromosomes. Generally, the regulatory program of gene transcription is controlled by the distribution of nucleation sites along the DNA string.

  19. Formulation of a Success Model in Pharmaceutical R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunju Rachel Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, pharmaceutical R&D has been demanded to increase productivity in terms of time efficiency and innovation as well. There have been discontinuous challenges coming up in this industry, such as globalized R&D competition, stricter regulation, lengthy process of clinical trials, and so on. Considering external changes, high competition, and discontinuities in the industry, it is a good time to redefine the concept of success in pharmaceutical R&D. Thus, this article attempts to formulate a new success model in pharmaceutical R&D, through contextualizing the industry’s success factors.

  20. Reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography compared with digital dental casts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, O. de; Rangel, F.A.; Fudalej, P.S.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Breuning, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility and accuracy of linear measurements on 2 types of dental models derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans: CBCT images, and Anatomodels (InVivoDental, San Jose, Calif); these were compared with digital models gene

  1. The Drivers of Success in Business Model Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savič

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing empirical literature on business models is still inconclusive about the key drivers of successful business model transformation. The paper explores this issue by using a single longitudinal case study design in combination with grounded theory approach on a medium-sized, high-tech and globally oriented company. Based on on-site visits, interviews and secondary documentation data analysis, the study identifies six generic drivers of successful business model transformation: transformational leadership, discovery driven decision-making, industry improvement – customer specific orientation, content-oriented communication, self-initiative collaborators, and phased separation strategy. The new drivers supplement our existing knowledge on how successful transformation takes place and add to existing drivers, while extensive discussion of their implications may help the managers to execute business transformations more effectively.

  2. Forest-succession models and their ecological and management implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, D.; Smith, T.M.; Weinstein, D.A.; Shugart, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Computer models of forest succession have been developed to an extent that allows their use as a tool for predicting forest ecosystem behavior over long periods of time. This paper outlines the use of one approach to forest succession modeling for a variety of problems including: (1) determining the effect of climate change on forests; (2) integrating information on wildlife habitat changes with the changes in forest structure associated with timber management; (3) assessing the potential effect of air pollutants on forest dynamics; and (4) determining the theoretical importance of disturbance on forest community diversity and function.

  3. Electronic Commerce Success Model: A Search for Multiple Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didi Achjari

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study attempts to develop and examine framework of e-commerce success. In order to obtain comprehensive and robust measures, the framework accomodates key factors that are identified in the literature concerning the success of electronic commerce. The structural model comprises of four exogenous variables (Internal Driver, Internal Impediment, External Driver and Exgternal Impediment and one endogenous variable (Electornic Commerce Success eith 24 observed variables. The study that was administered within large Australian companies using questionaire survey concluded that benefits for both internal organization and external parties from the use of e-commerce were the main factor tro predict perceived and/or expected success of electronic commerce.

  4. Randomised reproducing graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a model for a growing random graph based on simultaneous reproduction of the vertices. The model can be thought of as a generalisation of the reproducing graphs of Southwell and Cannings and Bonato et al to allow for a random element, and there are three parameters, $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and $\\gamma$, which are the probabilities of edges appearing between different types of vertices. We show that as the probabilities associated with the model vary there are a number of phase transitions, in particular concerning the degree sequence. If $(1+\\alpha)(1+\\gamma)1$ then the degree of a typical vertex grows to infinity, and the proportion of vertices having any fixed degree $d$ tends to zero. We also give some results on the number of edges and on the spectral gap.

  5. A Lotka-Volterra competition model with seasonal succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sze-Bi; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A complete classification for the global dynamics of a Lotka-Volterra two species competition model with seasonal succession is obtained via the stability analysis of equilibria and the theory of monotone dynamical systems. The effects of two death rates in the bad season and the proportion of the good season on the competition outcomes are also discussed. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  6. Student Success in College Composition through the Puente Project Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Barbara

    Much can be learned from California's Puente Project Model that would help students' success in classrooms as well as in college in general, and in their daily lives. Puente, which means "bridge" in Spanish, began in 1982 at Chabot College in northern California and is now in 38 colleges and 19 high schools statewide. Originally designed…

  7. The Need for Reproducibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-06-27

    The purpose of this presentation is to consider issues of reproducibility, specifically it determines whether bitwise reproducible computation is possible, if computational research in DOE improves its publication process, and if reproducible results can be achieved apart from the peer review process?

  8. Acquisition Integration Models: How Large Companies Successfully Integrate Startups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Carbone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A have been popular means for many companies to address the increasing pace and level of competition that they face. Large companies have pursued acquisitions to more quickly access technology, markets, and customers, and this approach has always been a viable exit strategy for startups. However, not all deals deliver the anticipated benefits, in large part due to poor integration of the acquired assets into the acquiring company. Integration can greatly impact the success of the acquisition and, indeed, the combined company’s overall market success. In this article, I explore the implementation of several integration models that have been put into place by a large company and extract principles that may assist negotiating parties with maximizing success. This perspective may also be of interest to smaller companies as they explore exit options while trying to ensure continued market success after acquisition. I assert that business success with acquisitions is dependent on an appropriate integration model, but that asset integration is not formulaic. Any integration effort must consider the specific market context and personnel involved.

  9. Exploring nursing e-learning systems success based on information system success model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Feng; Hwang, Hsin-Ginn

    2011-12-01

    E-learning is thought of as an innovative approach to enhance nurses' care service knowledge. Extensive research has provided rich information toward system development, courses design, and nurses' satisfaction with an e-learning system. However, a comprehensive view in understanding nursing e-learning system success is an important but less focused-on topic. The purpose of this research was to explore net benefits of nursing e-learning systems based on the updated DeLone and McLean's Information System Success Model. The study used a self-administered questionnaire to collected 208 valid nurses' responses from 21 of Taiwan's medium- and large-scale hospitals that have implemented nursing e-learning systems. The result confirms that the model is sufficient to explore the nurses' use of e-learning systems in terms of intention to use, user satisfaction, and net benefits. However, while the three exogenous quality factors (system quality, information quality, and service quality) were all found to be critical factors affecting user satisfaction, only information quality showed a direct effect on the intention to use. This study provides useful insights for evaluating nursing e-learning system qualities as well as an understanding of nurses' intentions and satisfaction related to performance benefits.

  10. SUCCESSFUL INNOVATIVE CLUSTERS IN ROMANIA – A POSSIBLE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana SCUTARU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study proposes the construction of a successful innovative cluster model which will help creating strategies and policies to support the Romanian economic growth and development in the medium and long term. One such architecture designed for supporting innovative clusters, including by attracting foreign capital within clusters order to increase their competitiveness, addresses some concrete measures both in terms of organizational system and management strategy as well as the funding system of clusters. The paper is also emphasizing the multiplicity of factors that are contributing to the creation, to the progressive development and to the success of clusters, the activities developed and the relationships established internationally, so as to ensure that the clusters remain on the market and have a good visibility at national and international levels, essentially contributing to the success of cluster.

  11. Development of a Three-Dimensional Hand Model Using Three-Dimensional Stereophotogrammetry: Assessment of Image Reproducibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge A Hoevenaren

    Full Text Available Using three-dimensional (3D stereophotogrammetry precise images and reconstructions of the human body can be produced. Over the last few years, this technique is mainly being developed in the field of maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, creating fusion images with computed tomography (CT data for precise planning and prediction of treatment outcome. Though, in hand surgery 3D stereophotogrammetry is not yet being used in clinical settings.A total of 34 three-dimensional hand photographs were analyzed to investigate the reproducibility. For every individual, 3D photographs were captured at two different time points (baseline T0 and one week later T1. Using two different registration methods, the reproducibility of the methods was analyzed. Furthermore, the differences between 3D photos of men and women were compared in a distance map as a first clinical pilot testing our registration method.The absolute mean registration error for the complete hand was 1.46 mm. This reduced to an error of 0.56 mm isolating the region to the palm of the hand. When comparing hands of both sexes, it was seen that the male hand was larger (broader base and longer fingers than the female hand.This study shows that 3D stereophotogrammetry can produce reproducible images of the hand without harmful side effects for the patient, so proving to be a reliable method for soft tissue analysis. Its potential use in everyday practice of hand surgery needs to be further explored.

  12. From Peer-Reviewed to Peer-Reproduced in Scholarly Publishing: The Complementary Roles of Data Models and Workflows in Bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Beltrán, Alejandra; Li, Peter; Zhao, Jun; Avila-Garcia, Maria Susana; Roos, Marco; Thompson, Mark; van der Horst, Eelke; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Luo, Ruibang; Lee, Tin-Lap; Lam, Tak-Wah; Edmunds, Scott C; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Rocca-Serra, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Reproducing the results from a scientific paper can be challenging due to the absence of data and the computational tools required for their analysis. In addition, details relating to the procedures used to obtain the published results can be difficult to discern due to the use of natural language when reporting how experiments have been performed. The Investigation/Study/Assay (ISA), Nanopublications (NP), and Research Objects (RO) models are conceptual data modelling frameworks that can structure such information from scientific papers. Computational workflow platforms can also be used to reproduce analyses of data in a principled manner. We assessed the extent by which ISA, NP, and RO models, together with the Galaxy workflow system, can capture the experimental processes and reproduce the findings of a previously published paper reporting on the development of SOAPdenovo2, a de novo genome assembler. Executable workflows were developed using Galaxy, which reproduced results that were consistent with the published findings. A structured representation of the information in the SOAPdenovo2 paper was produced by combining the use of ISA, NP, and RO models. By structuring the information in the published paper using these data and scientific workflow modelling frameworks, it was possible to explicitly declare elements of experimental design, variables, and findings. The models served as guides in the curation of scientific information and this led to the identification of inconsistencies in the original published paper, thereby allowing its authors to publish corrections in the form of an errata. SOAPdenovo2 scripts, data, and results are available through the GigaScience Database: http://dx.doi.org/10.5524/100044; the workflows are available from GigaGalaxy: http://galaxy.cbiit.cuhk.edu.hk; and the representations using the ISA, NP, and RO models are available through the SOAPdenovo2 case study website http://isa-tools.github.io/soapdenovo2/. philippe

  13. Modelling clinical systemic lupus erythematosus: similarities, differences and success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celhar, Teja; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie

    2016-12-24

    Mouse models of SLE have been indispensable tools to study disease pathogenesis, to identify genetic susceptibility loci and targets for drug development, and for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics. Recent insights into immunological mechanisms of disease progression have boosted a revival in SLE drug development. Despite promising results in mouse studies, many novel drugs have failed to meet clinical end points. This is probably because of the complexity of the disease, which is driven by polygenic predisposition and diverse environmental factors, resulting in a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Each mouse model recapitulates limited aspects of lupus, especially in terms of the mechanism underlying disease progression. The main mouse models have been fairly successful for the evaluation of broad-acting immunosuppressants. However, the advent of targeted therapeutics calls for a selection of the most appropriate model(s) for testing and, ultimately, identification of patients who will be most likely to respond.

  14. Modelling clinical systemic lupus erythematosus: similarities, differences and success stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celhar, Teja

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mouse models of SLE have been indispensable tools to study disease pathogenesis, to identify genetic susceptibility loci and targets for drug development, and for preclinical testing of novel therapeutics. Recent insights into immunological mechanisms of disease progression have boosted a revival in SLE drug development. Despite promising results in mouse studies, many novel drugs have failed to meet clinical end points. This is probably because of the complexity of the disease, which is driven by polygenic predisposition and diverse environmental factors, resulting in a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Each mouse model recapitulates limited aspects of lupus, especially in terms of the mechanism underlying disease progression. The main mouse models have been fairly successful for the evaluation of broad-acting immunosuppressants. However, the advent of targeted therapeutics calls for a selection of the most appropriate model(s) for testing and, ultimately, identification of patients who will be most likely to respond. PMID:28013204

  15. Dynamic Model of Markets of Successive Product Generations

    OpenAIRE

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic microeconomic model is presented that establishes the price and unit sales evolution of heterogeneous goods consisting of successive homogenous product generations. It suggests that for a fast growing supply the mean price of the generations are governed by a logistic decline towards a floor price. It is shown that generations of a heterogeneous good are in mutual competition. Their market shares are therefore governed by a Fisher-Pry law while the total unit sales are governed by t...

  16. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  17. A right to reproduce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Muireann

    2010-10-01

    How should we conceive of a right to reproduce? And, morally speaking, what might be said to justify such a right? These are just two questions of interest that are raised by the technologies of assisted reproduction. This paper analyses the possible legitimate grounds for a right to reproduce within the two main theories of rights; interest theory and choice theory.

  18. Magni Reproducibility Example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set.......An example of how to use the magni.reproducibility package for storing metadata along with results from a computational experiment. The example is based on simulating the Mandelbrot set....

  19. Long-term stability, reproducibility, and statistical sensitivity of a telemetry-instrumented dog model: A 27-month longitudinal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Ryan M; Ng, Khing Jow; Chi, Liguo; Jin, Xidong; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2015-01-01

    ICH guidelines, as well as best-practice and ethical considerations, provide strong rationale for use of telemetry-instrumented dog colonies for cardiovascular safety assessment. However, few studies have investigated the long-term stability of cardiovascular function at baseline, reproducibility in response to pharmacologic challenge, and maintenance of statistical sensitivity to define the usable life of the colony. These questions were addressed in 3 identical studies spanning 27months and were performed in the same colony of dogs. Telemetry-instrumented dogs (n=4) received a single dose of dl-sotalol (10mg/kg, p.o.), a β1 adrenergic and IKr blocker, or vehicle, in 3 separate studies spanning 27months. Systemic hemodynamics, cardiovascular function, and ECG parameters were monitored for 18h post-dose; plasma drug concentrations (Cp) were measured at 1, 3, 5, and 24h post-dose. Baseline hemodynamic/ECG values were consistent across the 27-month study with the exception of modest age-dependent decreases in heart rate and the corresponding QT-interval. dl-Sotalol elicited highly reproducible effects in each study. Reductions in heart rate after dl-sotalol treatment ranged between -22 and -32 beats/min, and slight differences in magnitude could be ascribed to variability in dl-sotalol Cp (range=3230-5087ng/mL); dl-sotalol also reduced LV-dP/dtmax 13-22%. dl-Sotalol increased the slope of the PR-RR relationship suggesting inhibition of AV-conduction. Increases in the heart-rate corrected QT-interval were not significantly different across the 3 studies and results of a power analysis demonstrated that the detection limit for QTc values was not diminished throughout the 27month period and across a range of power assumptions despite modest, age-dependent changes in heart rate. These results demonstrate the long-term stability of a telemetry dog colony as evidenced by a stability of baseline values, consistently reproducible response to pharmacologic challenge and no

  20. Measurement of cerebral blood flow by intravenous xenon-133 technique and a mobile system. Reproducibility using the Obrist model compared to total curve analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T; Holstein, P; Lassen, N A

    1986-01-01

    and side-to-side asymmetry. Data were analysed according to the Obrist model and the results compared with those obtained using a model correcting for the air passage artifact. Reproducibility was of the same order of magnitude as reported using stationary equipment. The side-to-side CBF asymmetry...... differences, but in low flow situations the artifact model yielded significantly more stable results. The present apparatus, equipped with 3-5 detectors covering each hemisphere, offers the opportunity of performing serial CBF measurements in situations not otherwise feasible....

  1. Entrepreneurial Women in Radiology: Role Models of Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yoshimi; Meltzer, Carolyn C; DeStigter, Kristen K; Destounis, Stamatia; Pawley, Barbara K; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Radiology is undeniably male dominated. Alongside surgery and orthopedic surgery, academic radiology ranks near the bottom in having the lowest proportion of full-time female faculty members. Despite many efforts to recruit talented women, the pipeline entering the radiologic disciplines continues to flow at a trickle. One factor is the relative lack of role models for female medical students. Entrepreneurial women in radiology can lead the field with their innovation and creativity, courage, and commitment. In this article, the authors highlight two entrepreneurial female radiologists who shared their success stories at the American Association for Women Radiologists' session at the 2015 ACR annual meeting. Their successes underscore the potential for such women to serve as role models to female medical students and even college undergraduates. Despite the gender gap in radiology, the field has yielded some exceptional women who can take on challenges, overcome barriers and assume risks, create strategies and processes to operationalize their visions, secure funding, and expand their enterprises to make sustainable impacts both at home and abroad. As we move toward more patient- and family-centered care models and become increasingly visible to diverse populations, there is no better time for female leaders in radiology to inspire the next generation to join our essential and rewarding specialty. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving student success using predictive models and data visualisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Ayad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to educate a competitive workforce is a global problem. In the US, for example, despite billions of dollars spent to improve the educational system, approximately 35% of students never finish high school. The drop rate among some demographic groups is as high as 50–60%. At the college level in the US only 30% of students graduate from 2-year colleges in 3 years or less and approximately 50% graduate from 4-year colleges in 5 years or less. A basic challenge in delivering global education, therefore, is improving student success. By student success we mean improving retention, completion and graduation rates. In this paper we describe a Student Success System (S3 that provides a holistic, analytical view of student academic progress.1 The core of S3 is a flexible predictive modelling engine that uses machine intelligence and statistical techniques to identify at-risk students pre-emptively. S3 also provides a set of advanced data visualisations for reaching diagnostic insights and a case management tool for managing interventions. S3's open modular architecture will also allow integration and plug-ins with both open and proprietary software. Powered by learning analytics, S3 is intended as an end-to-end solution for identifying at-risk students, understanding why they are at risk, designing interventions to mitigate that risk and finally closing the feedback look by tracking the efficacy of the applied intervention.

  3. Preparing for success: Readiness models for rural telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennett P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Readiness is an integral and preliminary step in the successful implementation of telehealth services into existing health systems within rural communities. Methods and Materials: This paper details and critiques published international peer-reviewed studies that have focused on assessing telehealth readiness for rural and remote health. Background specific to readiness and change theories is provided, followed by a critique of identified telehealth readiness models, including a commentary on their readiness assessment tools. Results: Four current readiness models resulted from the search process. The four models varied across settings, such as rural outpatient practices, hospice programs, rural communities, as well as government agencies, national associations, and organizations. All models provided frameworks for readiness tools. Two specifically provided a mechanism by which communities could be categorized by their level of telehealth readiness. Discussion: Common themes across models included: an appreciation of practice context, strong leadership, and a perceived need to improve practice. Broad dissemination of these telehealth readiness models and tools is necessary to promote awareness and assessment of readiness. This will significantly aid organizations to facilitate the implementation of telehealth.

  4. Habitat fragmentation and reproductive success: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tortorec, Eric; Helle, Samuli; Käyhkö, Niina; Suorsa, Petri; Huhta, Esa; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2013-09-01

    1. There is great interest on the effects of habitat fragmentation, whereby habitat is lost and the spatial configuration of remaining habitat patches is altered, on individual breeding performance. However, we still lack consensus of how this important process affects reproductive success, and whether its effects are mainly due to reduced fecundity or nestling survival. 2. The main reason for this may be the way that habitat fragmentation has been previously modelled. Studies have treated habitat loss and altered spatial configuration as two independent processes instead of as one hierarchical and interdependent process, and therefore have not been able to consider the relative direct and indirect effects of habitat loss and altered spatial configuration. 3. We investigated how habitat (i.e. old forest) fragmentation, caused by intense forest harvesting at the territory and landscape scales, is associated with the number of fledged offspring of an area-sensitive passerine, the Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris). We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine the complex hierarchical associations between habitat loss and altered spatial configuration on the number of fledged offspring, by controlling for individual condition and weather conditions during incubation. 4. Against generally held expectations, treecreeper reproductive success did not show a significant association with habitat fragmentation measured at the territory scale. Instead, our analyses suggested that an increasing amount of habitat at the landscape scale caused a significant increase in nest predation rates, leading to reduced reproductive success. This effect operated directly on nest predation rates, instead of acting indirectly through altered spatial configuration. 5. Because habitat amount and configuration are inherently strongly collinear, particularly when multiple scales are considered, our study demonstrates the usefulness of a SEM approach for hierarchical partitioning

  5. Towards Reproducibility in Computational Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    The ability to reproduce published scientific findings is a foundational principle of scientific research. Independent observation helps to verify the legitimacy of individual findings; build upon sound observations so that we can evolve hypotheses (and models) of how catchments function; and move them from specific circumstances to more general theory. The rise of computational research has brought increased focus on the issue of reproducibility across the broader scientific literature. This is because publications based on computational research typically do not contain sufficient information to enable the results to be reproduced, and therefore verified. Given the rise of computational analysis in hydrology over the past 30 years, to what extent is reproducibility, or a lack thereof, a problem in hydrology? Whilst much hydrological code is accessible, the actual code and workflow that produced and therefore documents the provenance of published scientific findings, is rarely available. We argue that in order to advance and make more robust the process of hypothesis testing and knowledge creation within the computational hydrological community, we need to build on from existing open data initiatives and adopt common standards and infrastructures to: first make code re-useable and easy to find through consistent use of metadata; second, publish well documented workflows that combine re-useable code together with data to enable published scientific findings to be reproduced; finally, use unique persistent identifiers (e.g. DOIs) to reference re-useable and reproducible code, thereby clearly showing the provenance of published scientific findings. Whilst extra effort is require to make work reproducible, there are benefits to both the individual and the broader community in doing so, which will improve the credibility of the science in the face of the need for societies to adapt to changing hydrological environments.

  6. Latino Definitions of Success: A Cultural Model of Intercultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    The present study sought to examine Latino intercultural competence via two separate methodologies. Phase 1 entailed discovering and generating themes regarding the features of intercultural competence based on semistructured interviews of 15 Latino adults. Phase 2 included conducting a cultural consensus analysis from the quantitative responses of 46 Latino adults to determine the cultural model of intercultural competence. The major results indicated that the participants, despite variations in socioeconomic and generational statuses, shared a common knowledge base regarding the competencies needed for Latinos to successfully navigate different cultures. Overall, the cultural model of Latino intercultural competence includes a set of skills that integrates traditional cultural values along with attributes of self-efficacy. The findings are discussed within a competence-based conceptualization of cultural adaptation and potential advancements in acculturation research.

  7. Successes and shortcomings of polio eradication: a transmission modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bryan T; Eisenberg, Joseph N S; Henry, Christopher J; Gomes, M Gabriela M; Ionides, Edward L; Koopman, James S

    2013-06-01

    Polio eradication is on the cusp of success, with only a few regions still maintaining transmission. Improving our understanding of why some regions have been successful and others have not will help with both global eradication of polio and development of more effective vaccination strategies for other pathogens. To examine the past 25 years of eradication efforts, we constructed a transmission model for wild poliovirus that incorporates waning immunity (which affects both infection risk and transmissibility of any resulting infection), age-mediated vaccination rates, and transmission of oral polio vaccine. The model produces results consistent with the 4 country categories defined by the Global Polio Eradication Program: elimination with no subsequent outbreaks; elimination with subsequent transient outbreaks; elimination with subsequent outbreaks and transmission detected for more than 12 months; and endemic polio transmission. Analysis of waning immunity rates and oral polio vaccine transmissibility reveals that higher waning immunity rates make eradication more difficult because of increasing numbers of infectious adults, and that higher oral polio vaccine transmission rates make eradication easier as adults become reimmunized. Given these dynamic properties, attention should be given to intervention strategies that complement childhood vaccination. For example, improvement in sanitation can reduce the reproduction number in problematic regions, and adult vaccination can lower adult transmission.

  8. Development of Groundwater Modeling Capacity in Mongolia: Keys to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. T.; Valder, J. F.; Carter, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Ulaanbaatar, the capital city of Mongolia, is totally dependent on groundwater for its municipal and industrial water supply. Water is drawn from a network of shallow wells in an alluvial aquifer along the Tuul River. Evidence, however, suggests that current water use and especially the projected water demand from a rapidly growing urban population, is not sustainable from existing water sources. In response, the Mongolia Ministry of Environment and the Mongolian Fresh Water Institute requested technical assistance on groundwater modeling through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Scientists from the USGS-SD Water Science Center provided a workshop to Mongolian water experts on basic principles of groundwater modeling using MODFLOW. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together representatives from the Government of Mongolia, local universities, technical experts, and other key stakeholders to build in-country capacity in hydrogeology and groundwater modeling. A preliminary steady-state groundwater flow model was developed to simulate groundwater conditions in the Tuul River Basin and for use in water use decision-making. The model consisted of 2 layers, 226 rows, and 260 columns with uniform 500 meter grid spacing. The upper model layer represented the alluvial aquifer and the lower layer represented the underlying bedrock, which includes areas characterized by permafrost. Estimated groundwater withdrawal was 180 m3/day, and estimated recharge was 114 mm/yr. The model will be modified and updated by Mongolian scientists as more data are available. Ultimately the model will be used to assist managers in developing a sustainable water supply, for current use and changing climate scenarios. A key to success was developing in-country technical capacity and partnerships with the Mongolian University of Science and Technology, Mongolian Freshwater Institute, a non-profit organization, UNESCO, and the government of Mongolia.

  9. Reproducible Research in Speech Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandaacute;lmandaacute;n Abari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Reproducible research is the minimum standard of scientific claims in cases when independent replication proves to be difficult. With the special combination of available software tools, we provide a reproducibility recipe for the experimental research conducted in some fields of speech sciences. We have based our model on the triad of the R environment, the EMU-format speech database, and the executable publication. We present the use of three typesetting systems (LaTeX, Markdown, Org, with the help of a mini research.

  10. Reproducibility in Seismic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Verdejo O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of exploration seismology, there is interest at national level of integrating reproducibility in applied, educational and research activities related to seismic processing and imaging. This reproducibility implies the description and organization of the elements involved in numerical experiments. Thus, a researcher, teacher or student can study, verify, repeat, and modify them independently. In this work, we document and adapt reproducibility in seismic processing and imaging to spread this concept and its benefits, and to encourage the use of open source software in this area within our academic and professional environment. We present an enhanced seismic imaging example, of interest in both academic and professional environments, using Mexican seismic data. As a result of this research, we prove that it is possible to assimilate, adapt and transfer technology at low cost, using open source software and following a reproducible research scheme.

  11. Three-dimensional surgical modelling with an open-source software protocol: study of precision and reproducibility in mandibular reconstruction with the fibula free flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganry, L; Quilichini, J; Bandini, C M; Leyder, P; Hersant, B; Meningaud, J P

    2017-08-01

    Very few surgical teams currently use totally independent and free solutions to perform three-dimensional (3D) surgical modelling for osseous free flaps in reconstructive surgery. This study assessed the precision and technical reproducibility of a 3D surgical modelling protocol using free open-source software in mandibular reconstruction with fibula free flaps and surgical guides. Precision was assessed through comparisons of the 3D surgical guide to the sterilized 3D-printed guide, determining accuracy to the millimetre level. Reproducibility was assessed in three surgical cases by volumetric comparison to the millimetre level. For the 3D surgical modelling, a difference of less than 0.1mm was observed. Almost no deformations (modelling was between 0.1mm and 0.4mm, and the average precision of the complete reconstructed mandible was less than 1mm. The open-source software protocol demonstrated high accuracy without complications. However, the precision of the surgical case depends on the surgeon's 3D surgical modelling. Therefore, surgeons need training on the use of this protocol before applying it to surgical cases; this constitutes a limitation. Further studies should address the transfer of expertise. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cocaine addiction related reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network functional connectivity: a group ICA study with different model orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2013-08-26

    Model order selection in group independent component analysis (ICA) has a significant effect on the obtained components. This study investigated the reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity related with cocaine addiction through different model order settings in group ICA. Resting-state fMRI data from 24 cocaine addicts and 24 healthy controls were temporally concatenated and processed by group ICA using model orders of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50, respectively. For each model order, the group ICA approach was repeated 100 times using the ICASSO toolbox and after clustering the obtained components, centrotype-based anterior and posterior DMN components were selected for further analysis. Individual DMN components were obtained through back-reconstruction and converted to z-score maps. A whole brain mixed effects factorial ANOVA was performed to explore the differences in resting-state DMN functional connectivity between cocaine addicts and healthy controls. The hippocampus, which showed decreased functional connectivity in cocaine addicts for all the tested model orders, might be considered as a reproducible abnormal region in DMN associated with cocaine addiction. This finding suggests that using group ICA to examine the functional connectivity of the hippocampus in the resting-state DMN may provide an additional insight potentially relevant for cocaine-related diagnoses and treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial-temporal reproducibility assessment of global seasonal forecasting system version 5 model for Dam Inflow forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S.; Suh, A. S.; Soohee, H.

    2016-12-01

    The GloSea5(Global Seasonal forecasting system version 5) is provided and operated by the KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration). GloSea5 provides Forecast(FCST) and Hindcast(HCST) data and its horizontal resolution is about 60km (0.83° x 0.56°) in the mid-latitudes. In order to use this data in watershed-scale water management, GloSea5 needs spatial-temporal downscaling. As such, statistical downscaling was used to correct for systematic biases of variables and to improve data reliability. HCST data is provided in ensemble format, and the highest statistical correlation(R2 = 0.60, RMSE = 88.92, NSE = 0.57) of ensemble precipitation was reported for the Yongdam Dam watershed on the #6 grid. Additionally, the original GloSea5(600.1mm) showed the greatest difference(-26.5%) compared to observations(816.1mm) during the summer flood season. However, downscaled GloSea5 was shown to have only a ?3.1% error rate. Most of the underestimated results corresponded to precipitation levels during the flood season and the downscaled GloSea5 showed important results of restoration in precipitation levels. Per the analysis results of spatial autocorrelation using seasonal Moran's I, the spatial distribution was shown to be statistically significant. These results can improve the uncertainty of original GloSea5 and substantiate its spatial-temporal accuracy and validity. The spatial-temporal reproducibility assessment will play a very important role as basic data for watershed-scale water management.

  14. The Proximal Medial Sural Nerve Biopsy Model: A Standardised and Reproducible Baseline Clinical Model for the Translational Evaluation of Bioengineered Nerve Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous nerve transplantation (ANT is the clinical gold standard for the reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects. A large number of bioengineered nerve guides have been tested under laboratory conditions as an alternative to the ANT. The step from experimental studies to the implementation of the device in the clinical setting is often substantial and the outcome is unpredictable. This is mainly linked to the heterogeneity of clinical peripheral nerve injuries, which is very different from standardized animal studies. In search of a reproducible human model for the implantation of bioengineered nerve guides, we propose the reconstruction of sural nerve defects after routine nerve biopsy as a first or baseline study. Our concept uses the medial sural nerve of patients undergoing diagnostic nerve biopsy (≥2 cm. The biopsy-induced nerve gap was immediately reconstructed by implantation of the novel microstructured nerve guide, Neuromaix, as part of an ongoing first-in-human study. Here we present (i a detailed list of inclusion and exclusion criteria, (ii a detailed description of the surgical procedure, and (iii a follow-up concept with multimodal sensory evaluation techniques. The proximal medial sural nerve biopsy model can serve as a preliminarynature of the injuries or baseline nerve lesion model. In a subsequent step, newly developed nerve guides could be tested in more unpredictable and challenging clinical peripheral nerve lesions (e.g., following trauma which have reduced comparability due to the different nature of the injuries (e.g., site of injury and length of nerve gap.

  15. Successes and Challenges Porting Weather and Climate Models to GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govett, M. W.; Middlecoff, J.; Henderson, T. B.; Rosinski, J.; Madden, P.

    2011-12-01

    NOAA ESRL has had significant success parallelizing and running the Non-Hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM) dynamical core on GPUs. A key ingredient in the success was the development of our Fortran-to-CUDA compiler (called F2C-ACC) to convert the model code. Compiler directives, inserted by the user, define regions of code to be run on the GPU, identify where fine-grain parallelism can be exploited, and manage data transfers between CPU and GPU. In 2009, we demonstrated that our compiler, with limited analysis capabilities, was able to produce code that ran the NIM 25x faster on a single GPU than a similar generation CPU. As F2C-ACC matured, fewer hand-translations were required until the GPU parallelization of NIM became fully automatic. The usefulness of F2C-ACC as a language translation tool will diminish as commercial compilers from CAPS, PGI and Cray mature; however, porting codes to GPUs will continue to require significant user involvement due to limited tools to support parallelization. Code inspection and analysis is currently very challenging and requires heavy user involvement to parallelize, debug, and achieve respectable speedup on GPUs. Users must inspect their code to locate fine grain parallelism, determine performance bottlenecks, manage data transfers, identify data dependencies, place inter-GPU communications, and manage a myriad of other issues in porting CPU-based codes to GPU architectures. This talk will describe the F2C-ACC compiler, discuss code porting challenges, and describe further development of the analysis capabilities of F2C-ACC to improve GPU parallelization of Fortran-based, Numerical Weather Prediction codes.

  16. A Successive Selection Method for finite element model updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Baiyong; Zhang, Weijie; Lu, Qiuhai; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Finite Element (FE) model can be updated effectively and efficiently by using the Response Surface Method (RSM). However, it often involves performance trade-offs such as high computational cost for better accuracy or loss of efficiency for lots of design parameter updates. This paper proposes a Successive Selection Method (SSM), which is based on the linear Response Surface (RS) function and orthogonal design. SSM rewrites the linear RS function into a number of linear equations to adjust the Design of Experiment (DOE) after every FE calculation. SSM aims to interpret the implicit information provided by the FE analysis, to locate the Design of Experiment (DOE) points more quickly and accurately, and thereby to alleviate the computational burden. This paper introduces the SSM and its application, describes the solution steps of point selection for DOE in detail, and analyzes SSM's high efficiency and accuracy in the FE model updating. A numerical example of a simply supported beam and a practical example of a vehicle brake disc show that the SSM can provide higher speed and precision in FE model updating for engineering problems than traditional RSM.

  17. Can four-zero-texture mass matrix model reproduce the quark and lepton mixing angles and CP violating phases?

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuda, K; Matsuda, Koichi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    We reconsider an universal mass matrix model which has a seesaw-invariant structure with four-zero texture common to all quarks and leptons. The CKM quark and MNS lepton mixing matrices of the model are analyzed analytically.We show that the model can be consistent with all the experimental data of neutrino oscillation and quark mixings by tuning free parameters of the model. It is also shown that the model predicts a relatively large value for (1,3) element of the MNS lepton mixing matrix, |(U_{MNS})_{13}|^2 \\simeq 2.6 \\times 10^{-2}. Using the seesaw mechanism, we also discuss the conditions for the components of the Dirac and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices which lead to the neutrino mass matrix consistent with the experimental data.

  18. Characteristics of successful opinion leaders in a bounded confidence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuwei; Glass, David H.; McCartney, Mark

    2016-05-01

    This paper analyses the impact of competing opinion leaders on attracting followers in a social group based on a bounded confidence model in terms of four characteristics: reputation, stubbornness, appeal and extremeness. In the model, reputation differs among leaders and normal agents based on the weights assigned to them, stubbornness of leaders is reflected by their confidence towards normal agents, appeal of the leaders is represented by the confidence of followers towards them, and extremeness is captured by the opinion values of leaders. Simulations show that increasing reputation, stubbornness or extremeness makes it more difficult for the group to achieve consensus, but increasing the appeal will make it easier. The results demonstrate that successful opinion leaders should generally be less stubborn, have greater appeal and be less extreme in order to attract more followers in a competing environment. Furthermore, the number of followers can be very sensitive to small changes in these characteristics. On the other hand, reputation has a more complicated impact: higher reputation helps the leader to attract more followers when the group bound of confidence is high, but can hinder the leader from attracting followers when the group bound of confidence is low.

  19. Business Models for Successfully Maintaining Games for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Moderator Tom; Isaac, Participants Fikry; Ashford, Chris; Goldman, Ron; Lenihan, David J; Poole, Brent; Buday, Richard; van Rijswijk, Jurriaan

    2013-04-01

    Videogames for health provide innovative, exciting, and possibly highly effective new media for helping players change their behaviors or otherwise benefit their health. Getting the right videogames into the hands of players who can benefit most in a way that pays for the continued innovation and creation of such games is a current challenge. Entertainment videogame companies, which create games primarily to enhance players' enjoyment, have used the general business marketplace (e.g., online stores, walk-in stores, app stores) to deliver their products directly to consumers and earn enough capital to invest in making new products. No one believes, however, that enough kids or adults would use the general business marketplace to purchase games for health in sufficient volume to provide the down payment for the innovation and creation of new games for health. A successful business model is critical to the financial future of games for health. We asked members of our Editorial Board who are in health-related companies (Fikry Isaac, MD, MPH), in several game development companies (Chris Ashford, Ron Goldman, David J. Lenihan, Brent Poole, and Richard Buday, FAIA), and the head of the Games for Health Europe Foundation (Jurriaan van Rijswijk, MSc) to address questions in a roundtable about the current and possible future business models for games for health.

  20. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event‐scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R.; Hicks, D. M.; Brasington, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics‐based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth‐averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high‐flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high‐resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach‐scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers. PMID:27708477

  1. Assessment of a numerical model to reproduce event-scale erosion and deposition distributions in a braided river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R D; Measures, R; Hicks, D M; Brasington, J

    2016-08-01

    Numerical morphological modeling of braided rivers, using a physics-based approach, is increasingly used as a technique to explore controls on river pattern and, from an applied perspective, to simulate the impact of channel modifications. This paper assesses a depth-averaged nonuniform sediment model (Delft3D) to predict the morphodynamics of a 2.5 km long reach of the braided Rees River, New Zealand, during a single high-flow event. Evaluation of model performance primarily focused upon using high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Difference, derived from a fusion of terrestrial laser scanning and optical empirical bathymetric mapping, to compare observed and predicted patterns of erosion and deposition and reach-scale sediment budgets. For the calibrated model, this was supplemented with planform metrics (e.g., braiding intensity). Extensive sensitivity analysis of model functions and parameters was executed, including consideration of numerical scheme for bed load component calculations, hydraulics, bed composition, bed load transport and bed slope effects, bank erosion, and frequency of calculations. Total predicted volumes of erosion and deposition corresponded well to those observed. The difference between predicted and observed volumes of erosion was less than the factor of two that characterizes the accuracy of the Gaeuman et al. bed load transport formula. Grain size distributions were best represented using two φ intervals. For unsteady flows, results were sensitive to the morphological time scale factor. The approach of comparing observed and predicted morphological sediment budgets shows the value of using natural experiment data sets for model testing. Sensitivity results are transferable to guide Delft3D applications to other rivers.

  2. Attempting to train a digital human model to reproduce human subject reach capabilities in an ejection seat aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zehner, G.F.; Hudson, J.A.; Oudenhuijzen, A.

    2006-01-01

    From 1997 through 2002, the Air Force Research Lab and TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Business Unit Human Factors) were involved in a series of tests to quantify the accuracy of five Human Modeling Systems (HMSs) in determining accommodation limits of ejection seat aircraft. The results of these

  3. How well can a convection-permitting climate model reproduce decadal statistics of precipitation, temperature and cloud characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Erwan; Van Weverberg, Kwinten; Demuzere, Matthias; Devis, Annemarie; Saeed, Sajjad; Stengel, Martin; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-11-01

    Convection-permitting climate model are promising tools for improved representation of extremes, but the number of regions for which these models have been evaluated are still rather limited to make robust conclusions. In addition, an integrated interpretation of near-surface characteristics (typically temperature and precipitation) together with cloud properties is limited. The objective of this paper is to comprehensively evaluate the performance of a `state-of-the-art' regional convection-permitting climate model for a mid-latitude coastal region with little orographic forcing. For this purpose, an 11-year integration with the COSMO-CLM model at Convection-Permitting Scale (CPS) using a grid spacing of 2.8 km was compared with in-situ and satellite-based observations of precipitation, temperature, cloud properties and radiation (both at the surface and the top of the atmosphere). CPS clearly improves the representation of precipitation, in especially the diurnal cycle, intensity and spatial distribution of hourly precipitation. Improvements in the representation of temperature are less obvious. In fact the CPS integration overestimates both low and high temperature extremes. The underlying cause for the overestimation of high temperature extremes was attributed to deficiencies in the cloud properties: The modelled cloud fraction is only 46 % whereas a cloud fraction of 65 % was observed. Surprisingly, the effect of this deficiency was less pronounced at the radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere due to a compensating error, in particular an overestimation of the reflectivity of clouds when they are present. Overall, a better representation of convective precipitation and a very good representation of the daily cycle in different cloud types were demonstrated. However, to overcome remaining deficiencies, additional efforts are necessary to improve cloud characteristics in CPS. This will be a challenging task due to compensating deficiencies that currently

  4. Development of an Electronic Portfolio System Success Model: An Information Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Igor; Mu, Enrique; Divjak, Blazenka

    2013-01-01

    This research has two main goals: to develop an instrument for assessing Electronic Portfolio (ePortfolio) success and to build a corresponding ePortfolio success model using DeLone and McLean's information systems success model as the theoretical framework. For this purpose, we developed an ePortfolio success measurement instrument and structural…

  5. A two-stage unsupervised learning algorithm reproduces multisensory enhancement in a neural network model of the corticotectal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasio, Thomas J; Patton, Paul E

    2003-07-30

    Multisensory enhancement (MSE) is the augmentation of the response to sensory stimulation of one modality by stimulation of a different modality. It has been described for multisensory neurons in the deep superior colliculus (DSC) of mammals, which function to detect, and direct orienting movements toward, the sources of stimulation (targets). MSE would seem to improve the ability of DSC neurons to detect targets, but many mammalian DSC neurons are unimodal. MSE requires descending input to DSC from certain regions of parietal cortex. Paradoxically, the descending projections necessary for MSE originate from unimodal cortical neurons. MSE, and the puzzling findings associated with it, can be simulated using a model of the corticotectal system. In the model, a network of DSC units receives primary sensory input that can be augmented by modulatory cortical input. Connection weights from primary and modulatory inputs are trained in stages one (Hebb) and two (Hebb-anti-Hebb), respectively, of an unsupervised two-stage algorithm. Two-stage training causes DSC units to extract information concerning simulated targets from their inputs. It also causes the DSC to develop a mixture of unimodal and multisensory units. The percentage of DSC multisensory units is determined by the proportion of cross-modal targets and by primary input ambiguity. Multisensory DSC units develop MSE, which depends on unimodal modulatory connections. Removal of the modulatory influence greatly reduces MSE but has little effect on DSC unit responses to stimuli of a single modality. The correspondence between model and data suggests that two-stage training captures important features of self-organization in the real corticotectal system.

  6. A method to isolate bacterial communities and characterize ecosystems from food products: Validation and utilization in as a reproducible chicken meat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, Amélie; Remenant, Benoit; Prévost, Hervé; Zagorec, Monique

    2017-04-17

    Influenced by production and storage processes and by seasonal changes the diversity of meat products microbiota can be very variable. Because microbiotas influence meat quality and safety, characterizing and understanding their dynamics during processing and storage is important for proposing innovative and efficient storage conditions. Challenge tests are usually performed using meat from the same batch, inoculated at high levels with one or few strains. Such experiments do not reflect the true microbial situation, and the global ecosystem is not taken into account. Our purpose was to constitute live stocks of chicken meat microbiotas to create standard and reproducible ecosystems. We searched for the best method to collect contaminating bacterial communities from chicken cuts to store as frozen aliquots. We tested several methods to extract DNA of these stored communities for subsequent PCR amplification. We determined the best moment to collect bacteria in sufficient amounts during the product shelf life. Results showed that the rinsing method associated to the use of Mobio DNA extraction kit was the most reliable method to collect bacteria and obtain DNA for subsequent PCR amplification. Then, 23 different chicken meat microbiotas were collected using this procedure. Microbiota aliquots were stored at -80°C without important loss of viability. Their characterization by cultural methods confirmed the large variability (richness and abundance) of bacterial communities present on chicken cuts. Four of these bacterial communities were used to estimate their ability to regrow on meat matrices. Challenge tests performed on sterile matrices showed that these microbiotas were successfully inoculated and could overgrow the natural microbiota of chicken meat. They can therefore be used for performing reproducible challenge tests mimicking a true meat ecosystem and enabling the possibility to test the influence of various processing or storage conditions on complex meat

  7. A first attempt to reproduce basaltic soil chronosequences using a process-based soil profile model: implications for our understanding of soil evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Gloor, M.; Lloyd, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soils are complex systems which hold a wealth of information on both current and past conditions and many biogeochemical processes. The ability to model soil forming processes and predict soil properties will enable us to quantify such conditions and contribute to our understanding of long-term biogeochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle and plant nutrient cycles. However, attempts to confront such soil model predictions with data are rare, although increasingly more data from chronosquence studies is becoming available for such a purpose. Here we present initial results of an attempt to reproduce soil properties with a process-based soil evolution model similar to the model of Kirkby (1985, J. Soil Science). We specifically focus on the basaltic soils in both Hawaii and north Queensland, Australia. These soils are formed on a series of volcanic lava flows which provide sequences of different aged soils all with a relatively uniform parent material. These soil chronosequences provide a snapshot of a soil profile during different stages of development. Steep rainfall gradients in these regions also provide a system which allows us to test the model's ability to reproduce soil properties under differing climates. The mechanistic, soil evolution model presented here includes the major processes of soil formation such as i) mineral weathering, ii) percolation of rainfall through the soil, iii) leaching of solutes out of the soil profile iv) surface erosion and v) vegetation and biotic interactions. The model consists of a vertical profile and assumes simple geometry with a constantly sloping surface. The timescales of interest are on the order of tens to hundreds of thousand years. The specific properties the model predicts are, soil depth, the proportion of original elemental oxides remaining in each soil layer, pH of the soil solution, organic carbon distribution and CO2 production and concentration. The presentation will focus on a brief introduction of the

  8. Decadal Variability Shown by the Arctic Ocean Hydrochemical Data and Reproduced by an Ice-Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ikeda; R. Colony; H. Yamaguchi; T. Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    The Arctic is experiencing a significant warming trend as well as a decadal oscillation. The atmospheric circulation represented by the Polar Vortex and the sea ice cover show decadal variabilities, while it has been difficult to reveal the decadal oscillation from the ocean interior. The recent distribution of Russian hydrochemical data collected from the Arctic Basin provides useful information on ocean interior variabilities. Silicate is used to provide the most valuable data for showing the boundary between the silicate-rich Pacific Water and the opposite Atlantic Water. Here, it is assumed that the silicate distribution receives minor influence from seasonal biological productivity and Siberian Rivers outflow. It shows a clear maximum around 100m depth in the Canada Basin, along with a vertical gradient below 100 m, which provides information on the vertical motion of the upper boundary of the Atlantic Water at a decadal time scale. The boundary shifts upward (downward), as realized by the silicate reduction (increase) at a fixed depth, responding to a more intense (weaker) Polar Vortex or a positive (negative) phase of the Arctic Oscillation. A coupled ice-ocean model is employed to reconstruct this decadal oscillation.

  9. Agent-based modeling of host-pathogen systems: The successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy L; Beauchemin, Catherine A A; Perelson, Alan S

    2009-04-29

    Agent-based models have been employed to describe numerous processes in immunology. Simulations based on these types of models have been used to enhance our understanding of immunology and disease pathology. We review various agent-based models relevant to host-pathogen systems and discuss their contributions to our understanding of biological processes. We then point out some limitations and challenges of agent-based models and encourage efforts towards reproducibility and model validation.

  10. Social Media Success for Academic Knowledge Sharing in Indonesia (Conceptual Model Development)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assegaff, Setiawan

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate how success is the social media as a tool for knowledge sharing among scholars in Indonesia. To evaluate the success of social media we develop a model base on Delone and McLeane IS Success Model. In this article, we would like discuss the process of developing the research model. In developing the model, we conduct literature review from knowledge management, social media and IS Success Model area from previous study. This study resulted in the social success model for academic knowledge sharing in Indonesia.

  11. Africa's Great Green Wall Initiative: a model for restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrahmouni, Nora; Sacande, Moctar

    2014-05-01

    The Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative was launched to address the increasing challenges of land degradation, desertification and drought, climate change, food insecurity and poverty in more than 20 countries. Restoration of agro-sylvo-pastoral landscapes and degraded lands is one of the priority interventions initiated, enabling the springing up of green nests of life. When complete, the Great Green Wall of Africa will reverse the seemingly unstoppable desertification and address the development of its drylands' inhabitant rural communities. Today's planting of modest seedlings will grow into vast mosaics of forest and agroforestry landscapes and grasslands, which will provide essential ecosystem goods and services, restore lost livelihoods and create new wealth. The ambition of reforestation efforts within this initiative - the like of which the world has never seen before - sounds like an impossible dream. However, learning from past mistakes and capitalising on current advancement in science and technology, it is a reality that is taking root. Following a successful restoration model that RBG Kew experts have devised, we are helping to mobilise, train and support communities in four border regions in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In collaboration with FAO, the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership is using its unique expertise to ensure that seeds of environmentally well-adapted and economically useful local species are collected and planted in communal gardens and village agroforestry systems managed by the communities themselves. In our first year, an estimated total of 162,000 seedlings and 61 kg of seeds from 40 useful native species, including grasses for livestock, have been planted to cover 237 ha of farmer-managed land in 19 villages. The keen interest it has created has indicated that these figures will rise five-fold in the second year. These green bricks are the foundations of the living wall that will eventually reach across the

  12. Reproducibility of haemodynamical simulations in a subject-specific stented aneurysm model--a report on the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, A G; Augsburger, L; Cebral, J R; Ohta, M; Rüfenacht, D A; Balossino, R; Benndorf, G; Hose, D R; Marzo, A; Metcalfe, R; Mortier, P; Mut, F; Reymond, P; Socci, L; Verhegghe, B; Frangi, A F

    2008-07-19

    This paper presents the results of the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge (VISC) 2007, an international initiative whose aim was to establish the reproducibility of state-of-the-art haemodynamical simulation techniques in subject-specific stented models of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). IAs are pathological dilatations of the cerebral artery walls, which are associated with high mortality and morbidity rates due to subarachnoid haemorrhage following rupture. The deployment of a stent as flow diverter has recently been indicated as a promising treatment option, which has the potential to protect the aneurysm by reducing the action of haemodynamical forces and facilitating aneurysm thrombosis. The direct assessment of changes in aneurysm haemodynamics after stent deployment is hampered by limitations in existing imaging techniques and currently requires resorting to numerical simulations. Numerical simulations also have the potential to assist in the personalized selection of an optimal stent design prior to intervention. However, from the current literature it is difficult to assess the level of technological advancement and the reproducibility of haemodynamical predictions in stented patient-specific models. The VISC 2007 initiative engaged in the development of a multicentre-controlled benchmark to analyse differences induced by diverse grid generation and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technologies. The challenge also represented an opportunity to provide a survey of available technologies currently adopted by international teams from both academic and industrial institutions for constructing computational models of stented aneurysms. The results demonstrate the ability of current strategies in consistently quantifying the performance of three commercial intracranial stents, and contribute to reinforce the confidence in haemodynamical simulation, thus taking a step forward towards the introduction of simulation tools to support diagnostics and

  13. Accuracy and reproducibility of voxel based superimposition of cone beam computed tomography models on the anterior cranial base and the zygomatic arches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M Nada

    Full Text Available Superimposition of serial Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT scans has become a valuable tool for three dimensional (3D assessment of treatment effects and stability. Voxel based image registration is a newly developed semi-automated technique for superimposition and comparison of two CBCT scans. The accuracy and reproducibility of CBCT superimposition on the anterior cranial base or the zygomatic arches using voxel based image registration was tested in this study. 16 pairs of 3D CBCT models were constructed from pre and post treatment CBCT scans of 16 adult dysgnathic patients. Each pair was registered on the anterior cranial base three times and on the left zygomatic arch twice. Following each superimposition, the mean absolute distances between the 2 models were calculated at 4 regions: anterior cranial base, forehead, left and right zygomatic arches. The mean distances between the models ranged from 0.2 to 0.37 mm (SD 0.08-0.16 for the anterior cranial base registration and from 0.2 to 0.45 mm (SD 0.09-0.27 for the zygomatic arch registration. The mean differences between the two registration zones ranged between 0.12 to 0.19 mm at the 4 regions. Voxel based image registration on both zones could be considered as an accurate and a reproducible method for CBCT superimposition. The left zygomatic arch could be used as a stable structure for the superimposition of smaller field of view CBCT scans where the anterior cranial base is not visible.

  14. An Australian Model of Successful School Leadership: Moving from Success to Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Lawrie; Goode, Helen; Gurr, David

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to demonstrate how the principal was instrumental in turning around an underperforming school by using a leadership style that modelled appropriate behaviour, and which was consultative, conciliatory, inspirational and empathetic, through having a clearly articulated whole-child-focused educational philosophy, by building…

  15. Adaptation and Validation of QUick, Easy, New, CHEap, and Reproducible (QUENCHER) Antioxidant Capacity Assays in Model Products Obtained from Residual Wine Pomace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino-García, Raquel; García-Lomillo, Javier; Rivero-Pérez, María D; González-SanJosé, María L; Muñiz, Pilar

    2015-08-12

    Evaluation of the total antioxidant capacity of solid matrices without extraction steps is a very interesting alternative for food researchers and also for food industries. These methodologies have been denominated QUENCHER from QUick, Easy, New, CHEap, and Reproducible assays. To demonstrate and highlight the validity of QUENCHER (Q) methods, values of Q-method validation were showed for the first time, and they were tested with products of well-known different chemical properties. Furthermore, new QUENCHER assays to measure scavenging capacity against superoxide, hydroxyl, and lipid peroxyl radicals were developed. Calibration models showed good linearity (R(2) > 0.995), proportionality and precision (CV antioxidant capacity values significantly different from those obtained with water. The dilution of samples with powdered cellulose was discouraged because possible interferences with some of the matrices analyzed may take place.

  16. Reproducible ion-current-based approach for 24-plex comparison of the tissue proteomes of hibernating versus normal myocardium in swine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Young, Rebeccah; Page, Brian J; Shen, Xiaomeng; Tata, Nazneen; Li, Jun; Duan, Xiaotao; Fallavollita, James A; Canty, John M

    2014-05-02

    Hibernating myocardium is an adaptive response to repetitive myocardial ischemia that is clinically common, but the mechanism of adaptation is poorly understood. Here we compared the proteomes of hibernating versus normal myocardium in a porcine model with 24 biological replicates. Using the ion-current-based proteomic strategy optimized in this study to expand upon previous proteomic work, we identified differentially expressed proteins in new molecular pathways of cardiovascular interest. The methodological strategy includes efficient extraction with detergent cocktail; precipitation/digestion procedure with high, quantitative peptide recovery; reproducible nano-LC/MS analysis on a long, heated column packed with small particles; and quantification based on ion-current peak areas. Under the optimized conditions, high efficiency and reproducibility were achieved for each step, which enabled a reliable comparison of 24 the myocardial samples. To achieve confident discovery of differentially regulated proteins in hibernating myocardium, we used highly stringent criteria to define "quantifiable proteins". These included the filtering criteria of low peptide FDR and S/N > 10 for peptide ion currents, and each protein was quantified independently from ≥2 distinct peptides. For a broad methodological validation, the quantitative results were compared with a parallel, well-validated 2D-DIGE analysis of the same model. Excellent agreement between the two orthogonal methods was observed (R = 0.74), and the ion-current-based method quantified almost one order of magnitude more proteins. In hibernating myocardium, 225 significantly altered proteins were discovered with a low false-discovery rate (∼3%). These proteins are involved in biological processes including metabolism, apoptosis, stress response, contraction, cytoskeleton, transcription, and translation. This provides compelling evidence that hibernating myocardium adapts to chronic ischemia. The major metabolic

  17. Compliant bipedal model with the center of pressure excursion associated with oscillatory behavior of the center of mass reproduces the human gait dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Keun; Park, Sukyung

    2014-01-03

    Although the compliant bipedal model could reproduce qualitative ground reaction force (GRF) of human walking, the model with a fixed pivot showed overestimations in stance leg rotation and the ratio of horizontal to vertical GRF. The human walking data showed a continuous forward progression of the center of pressure (CoP) during the stance phase and the suspension of the CoP near the forefoot before the onset of step transition. To better describe human gait dynamics with a minimal expense of model complexity, we proposed a compliant bipedal model with the accelerated pivot which associated the CoP excursion with the oscillatory behavior of the center of mass (CoM) with the existing simulation parameter and leg stiffness. Owing to the pivot acceleration defined to emulate human CoP profile, the arrival of the CoP at the limit of the stance foot over the single stance duration initiated the step-to-step transition. The proposed model showed an improved match of walking data. As the forward motion of CoM during single stance was partly accounted by forward pivot translation, the previously overestimated rotation of the stance leg was reduced and the corresponding horizontal GRF became closer to human data. The walking solutions of the model ranged over higher speed ranges (~1.7 m/s) than those of the fixed pivoted compliant bipedal model (~1.5m/s) and exhibited other gait parameters, such as touchdown angle, step length and step frequency, comparable to the experimental observations. The good matches between the model and experimental GRF data imply that the continuous pivot acceleration associated with CoM oscillatory behavior could serve as a useful framework of bipedal model.

  18. Reproducible research in palaeomagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurcock, Pontus; Florindo, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The reproducibility of research findings is attracting increasing attention across all scientific disciplines. In palaeomagnetism as elsewhere, computer-based analysis techniques are becoming more commonplace, complex, and diverse. Analyses can often be difficult to reproduce from scratch, both for the original researchers and for others seeking to build on the work. We present a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program designed to make reproducibility easier. Part of the problem is the divide between interactive and scripted (batch) analysis programs. An interactive desktop program with a graphical interface is a powerful tool for exploring data and iteratively refining analyses, but usually cannot operate without human interaction. This makes it impossible to re-run an analysis automatically, or to integrate it into a larger automated scientific workflow - for example, a script to generate figures and tables for a paper. In some cases the parameters of the analysis process itself are not saved explicitly, making it hard to repeat or improve the analysis even with human interaction. Conversely, non-interactive batch tools can be controlled by pre-written scripts and configuration files, allowing an analysis to be 'replayed' automatically from the raw data. However, this advantage comes at the expense of exploratory capability: iteratively improving an analysis entails a time-consuming cycle of editing scripts, running them, and viewing the output. Batch tools also tend to require more computer expertise from their users. PuffinPlot is a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program which aims to bridge this gap. First released in 2012, it offers both an interactive, user-friendly desktop interface and a batch scripting interface, both making use of the same core library of palaeomagnetic functions. We present new improvements to the program that help to integrate the interactive and batch approaches, allowing an analysis to be interactively explored and refined

  19. Can a Dusty Warm Absorber Model Reproduce the Soft X-ray Spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766?

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Kaastra, J S; Brinkman, A C; Page, M J; Behar, E; Paerels, F B S; Kinkhabwala, A; Liedahl, D A; Den Herder, J W A

    2003-01-01

    XMM-Newton RGS spectra of MCG-6-30-15 and Mrk 766 exhibit complex discrete structure, which was interpreted in a paper by Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001) as evidence for the existence of relativistically broadened Lyman alpha emission from carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, produced in the inner-most regions of an accretion disk around a Kerr black hole. This suggestion was subsequently criticized in a paper by Lee et al. (2001), who argued that for MCG-6-30-15, the Chandra HETG spectrum, which is partially overlapping the RGS in spectral coverage, is adequately fit by a dusty warm absorber model, with no relativistic line emission. We present a reanalysis of the original RGS data sets in terms of the Lee et al. (2001) model, and demonstrate that spectral models consisting of a smooth continuum with ionized and dust absorption alone cannot reproduce the RGS spectra of both objects. The original relativistic line model with warm absorption proposed by Branduardi-Raymont et al. (2001) provides a superior fit to the...

  20. Current status of the ability of the GEMS/MACC models to reproduce the tropospheric CO vertical distribution as measured by MOZAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Elguindi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of CO taken from the MOZAIC aircraft database are used to globally evaluate the performance of the GEMS/MACC models, including the ECMWF-Integrated Forecasting System (IFS model coupled to the CTM MOZART-3 with 4DVAR data assimilation for the year 2004. This study provides a unique opportunity to compare the performance of three offline CTMs (MOZART-3, MOCAGE and TM5 driven by the same meteorology as well as one coupled atmosphere/CTM model run with data assimilation, enabling us to assess the potential gain brought by the combination of online transport and the 4DVAR chemical satellite data assimilation.

    First we present a global analysis of observed CO seasonal averages and interannual variability for the years 2002–2007. Results show that despite the intense boreal forest fires that occurred during the summer in Alaska and Canada, the year 2004 had comparably lower tropospheric CO concentrations. Next we present a validation of CO estimates produced by the MACC models for 2004, including an assessment of their ability to transport pollutants originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires. In general, all the models tend to underestimate CO. The coupled model and the CTMs perform best in Europe and the US where biases range from 0 to -25% in the free troposphere and from 0 to -50% in the surface and boundary layers (BL. Using the 4DVAR technique to assimilate MOPITT V4 CO significantly reduces biases by up to 50% in most regions. However none of the models, even the IFS-MOZART-3 coupled model with assimilation, are able to reproduce well the CO plumes originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires at downwind locations in the eastern US and Europe. Sensitivity tests reveal that deficiencies in the fire emissions inventory and injection height play a role.

  1. The business of emergency medicine: a model for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, John; Hall, Peter; Carr, Janet

    2004-02-01

    Today's EPOs and their physicians face an array of daunting challenges. Falling reimbursement, rising malpractice costs. ED and hospital crowding,and demands for improving ED efficiency and patient satisfaction all contribute to the challenging and sometimes threatening environment of EM practice. The EP involved in a busy and often hectic ED shift may feel unduly and unnecessarily distracted when required to continuously acknowledge and address the business aspect of the practice. Nevertheless,regardless of the size and structure, fiscal viability ultimately determines the EPO's ability to continue to offer access to care. This article contends that a comprehensive business strategy drives superior financial performance and supports the organization's mission. The business strategy must identify financial and non-financial determinants of the EPO's success and provide a mechanism for understanding how the organization's resources are converted to value for customers. The section offers a framework for developing this strategy, for identifying possible gaps or deficiencies, and for measuring and monitoring progress in achieving strategic objectives and ultimately, the EPO's mission. The importance of the mission and the dynamic EM environment require that the strategy development process be more than an annual exercise for the leadership of the organization. Though key leaders in any size EPO--set the course for the organization, the entire organization must be aware and understand the strategy before they commit themselves and adopt actions and behaviors that promote it. The model presented here provides a graphic display that lends itself well to consistent communication of a comprehensive strategy in a concise way throughout the organization.Furthermore, the balance of the model, across four perspectives, recognizes the value of balanced organizational objectives and lends itself well to the creation of a measurement system that supports cause and effect

  2. Opening Reproducible Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüst, Daniel; Konkol, Markus; Pebesma, Edzer; Kray, Christian; Klötgen, Stephanie; Schutzeichel, Marc; Lorenz, Jörg; Przibytzin, Holger; Kussmann, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Open access is not only a form of publishing such that research papers become available to the large public free of charge, it also refers to a trend in science that the act of doing research becomes more open and transparent. When science transforms to open access we not only mean access to papers, research data being collected, or data being generated, but also access to the data used and the procedures carried out in the research paper. Increasingly, scientific results are generated by numerical manipulation of data that were already collected, and may involve simulation experiments that are completely carried out computationally. Reproducibility of research findings, the ability to repeat experimental procedures and confirm previously found results, is at the heart of the scientific method (Pebesma, Nüst and Bivand, 2012). As opposed to the collection of experimental data in labs or nature, computational experiments lend themselves very well for reproduction. Some of the reasons why scientists do not publish data and computational procedures that allow reproduction will be hard to change, e.g. privacy concerns in the data, fear for embarrassment or of losing a competitive advantage. Others reasons however involve technical aspects, and include the lack of standard procedures to publish such information and the lack of benefits after publishing them. We aim to resolve these two technical aspects. We propose a system that supports the evolution of scientific publications from static papers into dynamic, executable research documents. The DFG-funded experimental project Opening Reproducible Research (ORR) aims for the main aspects of open access, by improving the exchange of, by facilitating productive access to, and by simplifying reuse of research results that are published over the Internet. Central to the project is a new form for creating and providing research results, the executable research compendium (ERC), which not only enables third parties to

  3. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G. S.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolík, O.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We present dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in ~15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. The highest-energy electrons (E > 300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L ~ 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  4. Modelling the rate of secondary succession after farmland abandonment in a Mediterranean mountain area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beguería, S.; Pueyo, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Secondary succession after farmland abandonment has become a common process in north Mediterranean countries, especially in mountain areas. In this paper a methodology is tested which combines Markov chains and logistic multivariate regression to model secondary succession after farmland abandonment

  5. Current status of the ability of the GEMS/MACC models to reproduce the tropospheric CO vertical distribution as measured by MOZAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Elguindi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of CO taken from the MOZAIC aircraft database are used to present (1 a global analysis of CO seasonal averages and interannual variability for the years 2002–2007 and (2 a global validation of CO estimates produced by the MACC models for 2004, including an assessment of their ability to transport pollutants originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires. Seasonal averages and interannual variability from several MOZAIC sites representing different regions of the world show that CO concentrations are highest and most variable during the winter season. The inter-regional variability is significant with concentrations increasing eastward from Europe to Japan. The impact of the intense boreal fires, particularly in Russia, during the fall of 2002 on the Northern Hemisphere CO concentrations throughout the troposphere is well represented by the MOZAIC data.

    A global validation of the GEMS/MACC GRG models which include three stand-alone CTMs (MOZART, MOCAGE and TM5 and the coupled ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS/MOZART model with and without MOPITT CO data assimilation show that the models have a tendency to underestimate CO. The models perform best in Europe and the US where biases range from 0 to –25% in the free troposphere and from 0 to –50% in the surface and boundary layers (BL. The biases are largest in the winter and during the daytime when emissions are highest, indicating that current inventories are too low. Data assimilation is shown to reduce biases by up to 25% in some regions. The models are not able to reproduce well the CO plumes originating from the Alaskan/Canadian wildfires at downwind locations in the eastern US and Europe, not even with assimilation. Sensitivity tests reveal that this is mainly due to deficiencies in the fire emissions inventory and injection height.

  6. Reproducible research in vadose zone sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant portion of present-day soil and Earth science research is computational, involving complex data analysis pipelines, advanced mathematical and statistical models, and sophisticated computer codes. Opportunities for scientific progress are greatly diminished if reproducing and building o...

  7. Determinants of Business Success – Theoretical Model and Empirical Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozielski Robert

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Market knowledge, market orientation, learning competencies, and a business performance were the key issues of the research project conducted in the 2006 study. The main findings identified significant relationships between the independent variables (market knowledge, market orientation, learning competencies and the dependent variables (business success. A partial correlation analysis indicated that a business success primarily relies on organisational learning competencies. Organisational learning competencies, to a large extent (almost 60%, may be explained by the level of corporate market knowledge and market orientation. The aim of the paper is to evaluate to what extent the relationships between the variables are still valid. The research was based on primary and secondary data sources. The major field of the research was carried out in the form of quantitative studies. The results of the 2014 study are consistent with the previous (2006 results.

  8. A nurse manager succession planning model with associated empirical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titzer, Jennifer L; Shirey, Maria R; Hauck, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions of leadership and management competency after a formal nurse manager succession planning program were evaluated. A lack of strategic workforce planning and development of a leadership pipeline contributes to a predicted nurse manager shortage. To meet the anticipated needs for future leadership, evidence-based action is critical. A quasi-experimental mixed-methods, 1-group pretest/posttest research design was used. Nurses working in an acute care hospital were recruited for the study and selected using an objective evaluative process. Participant perceptions regarding their leadership and management competencies significantly increased after the leadership program. Program evaluations confirmed that participants found the program beneficial. One year after program completion, 100% of the program participants have been retained at the organization and 73% had transitioned to leadership roles. Succession planning and leadership development serve as beneficial and strategic mechanisms for identifying and developing high-potential individuals for leadership positions, contributing toward the future nursing leadership pipeline.

  9. The Quantum Atomic Model "Electronium": A Successful Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the quantum atomic model Electronium. Outlines the Bremen teaching approach in which this model is used, and analyzes the learning of two students as they progress through the teaching unit. (Author/MM)

  10. Concepts, Challenges and Successes in Modeling Thermodynamics of Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Cannon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the chemical reactions involved in metabolism is a daunting task. Ideally, the modeling of metabolism would use kinetic simulations, but these simulations require knowledge of the thousands of rate constants involved in the reactions. The measurement of rate constants is very labor intensive, and hence rate constants for most enzymatic reactions are not available. Consequently, flux-based approaches have been the methods of choice because they do not require the use of the rate constants of the law of mass action. However, this convenience also limits the predictive power of flux-based approaches in that the law of mass action is not used directly, making it very difficult to predict metabolite levels or energy requirements of pathways.An alternative to both of these approaches is to model metabolism using simulations of states rather than simulations of reactions, in which the state is defined as the set of all metabolite counts or concentrations. While kinetic simulations model reactions based on the likelihood of the reaction derived from the law of mass action, states are modeled based on likelihood ratios of mass action. Both approaches provide information on the energy requirements of metabolic reactions and pathways. However, modeling states rather than reactions has the advantage that the parameters needed to model states (chemical potentials are much easier to determine than the parameters needed to model reactions (rate constants. Herein we discuss recent results, assumptions and issues in using simulations of state to model metabolism.

  11. Simulating historical landscape dynamics using the landscape fire succession model LANDSUM version 4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Lisa M. Holsinger; Sarah D. Pratt

    2006-01-01

    The range and variation of historical landscape dynamics could provide a useful reference for designing fuel treatments on today's landscapes. Simulation modeling is a vehicle that can be used to estimate the range of conditions experienced on historical landscapes. A landscape fire succession model called LANDSUMv4 (LANDscape SUccession Model version 4.0) is...

  12. A Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Ming; Stevens, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success, a theoretical stages-of-growth model, explains long-term success in IT outsourcing relationships. Research showed the IT outsourcing relationship life cycle consists of four distinct, sequential stages: contract, transition, support, and partnership. The model was…

  13. Successes and failures of the constituent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Our approach considers the model as a possible bridge between QCD and the experimental data and examines its predictions to see where these succeed and where they fail. We also attempt to improve the model by looking for additional simple assumptions which give better fits to the experimental data. But we avoid complicated models with too many ad hoc assumptions and too many free parameters; these can fit everything but teach us nothing. We define our constituent quark model by analogy with the constituent electron model of the atom and the constituent nucleon model of the nucleus. In the same way that an atom is assumed to consist only of constituent electrons and a central Coulomb field and a nucleus is assumed to consist only of constituent nucleons hadrons are assumed to consist only of their constituent valence quarks with no bag, no glue, no ocean, nor other constituents. Although these constituent models are oversimplified and neglect other constituents we push them as far as we can. Atomic physics has photons and vacuum polarization as well as constituent electrons, but the constituent model is adequate for calculating most features of the spectrum when finer details like the Lamb shift are neglected. 54 references.

  14. The Carerra Model: A Success in Pregnancy Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elling, Duane M.

    This document outlines the development, evaluation, and replication of the Carrera model for pregnancy prevention. The Carerra model helps teens avoid pregnancy by empowering them to develop and reach personal goals, and by providing them with information on sexual issues, including abstinence, contraception, and the consequences of sexual…

  15. Testing a Model of Teaching for Anxiety and Success for English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önem, Evrim; Ergenç, Iclal

    2013-01-01

    Much research has shown that there is a negative relationship between high levels of anxiety and success for English language teaching. This paper aimed to test a model of teaching for anxiety and success in English language teaching to affect anxiety and success levels at the same time in a control-experiment group with pre- and post-test study…

  16. A Model for Physician Leadership Development and Succession Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Isser; Feerasta, Nadia; Lash, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Although the presence of physicians in formal leadership positions has often been limited to roles of department chiefs, MAC chairs, etc., a growing number of organizations are recruiting physicians to other leadership positions (e.g., VP, CEO) where their involvement is being genuinely sought and valued. While physicians have traditionally risen to leadership positions based on clinical excellence or on a rotational basis, truly effective physician leadership that includes competencies such as strategic planning, budgeting, mentoring, network development, etc., is essential to support organizational goals, improve performance and overall efficiency as well as ensuring the quality of care. In this context, the authors have developed a physician leader development and succession planning matrix and supporting toolkit to assist hospitals in identifying and nurturing the next generation of physician leaders.

  17. Successful public-private partnerships: The NYPD shield model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadeo, Vincent; Iannone, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    This article will identify the challenges that post 9/11 law enforcement faces regarding privatepublic partnerships and describe in detail the NYPD Shield programme, created to combat those challenges. Recommendations made by the 911 Commission included the incorporation of the private sector into future homeland security strategies. One such strategy is NYPD Shield. This programme is a nationally recognized award-winning public-private partnership dedicated to providing counterterrorism training and information sharing with government agencies, non-government organizations, private businesses, and the community. Information is shared through several platforms that include a dedicated website, instruction of counterterrorism training curricula, e-mail alerts, intelligence assessments and the hosting of quarterly conferences. This article also details how the NYPD Shield is providing its successful template to other law enforcement agencies enabling them to initiate similar programmes in their respective jurisdictions, and in doing so joining a National Shield Network.

  18. Problematic healthcare insurance: a comparison with successful models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the experiences of problematic health insurance models in Canada, France, Germany, and Spain, based on news reports, facts, and data. Those nations were selected because they represent typical socialist economies with nationalized health insurance systems. Major findings are that (a) these health insurance systems are not cheap, (b) they sometimes contribute to governments' own financial deficits, (c) there are significant restrictions for access to private health care, (d) many services are not covered, and (e) the insurance plans create conflict as to what treatment options are offered. The author also provides a description of the current U.S. health care insurance model and compares it with the European socialist model. What comes subsequently is an examination of two ideal models of efficient health care insurance: the ones of Switzerland and the Netherlands. This analysis ends with a discussion section that provides implications for U.S. health care and offers suggestions for future research.

  19. Cross-Paradigm Simulation Modeling: Challenges and Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This paper addresses the broad topic area of cross-paradigm simulation modeling with a focus on the discrete-event, system dynamics and agent-based...used in simulation modeling are also discussed, and the implications of these mechanisms for each paradigm is explored....and definitions are presented. The difference between the process-oriented worldview and the event-oriented worldview within discrete-event simulation

  20. Successful Aging: A Psychosocial Resources Model for Very Old Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kevin Randall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Using data from the first two phases of the Georgia Centenarian Study, we proposed a latent factor structure for the Duke OARS domains: Economic Resources, Mental Health, Activities of Daily Living, Physical Health, and Social Resources. Methods. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on two waves of the Georgia Centenarian Study to test a latent variable measurement model of the five resources; nested model testing was employed to assess the final measurement model for equivalency of factor structure over time. Results. The specified measurement model fit the data well at Time 1. However, at Time 2, Social Resources only had one indicator load significantly and substantively. Supplemental analyses demonstrated that a model without Social Resources adequately fit the data. Factorial invariance over time was confirmed for the remaining four latent variables. Discussion. This study’s findings allow researchers and clinicians to reduce the number of OARS questions asked of participants. This has practical implications because increased difficulties with hearing, vision, and fatigue in older adults may require extended time or multiple interviewer sessions to complete the battery of OARS questions.

  1. [AIDS prevention in Germany - a successful model in crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbrock, R

    2007-04-01

    The rising number of new HIV infections in Germany, particularly among men who have sex with men, raises the question whether the previously successful prevention strategy should be revised. This strategy has been based on a New Public Health approach which arose from the specific historical context in Europe at the start of the epidemic. The hallmarks of this approach are: the active involvement of the target groups; the central role of non-governmental organizations; the combination of population level and targeted, context specific interventions; and an emphasis on social integration and voluntary participation in the work with target group members. Current challenges include: changes in risk perception (at least in part due to the availability of more effective treatments); a diversification of prevention behavioral strategies among target group members; the formation of new sexual subcultures and target groups; as well as changes in hard-to-reach populations such as immigrants and people of lower socioeconomic status. In order to meet these challenges the following measures are necessary: an increased investment in prevention research (with a particular focus on interventions specific to social contexts in which risk behavior is increasing); further development of the institutional infrastructure for prevention, including the full implementation of UNAIDS guidelines for national prevention strategies; and improving the prevention work of local AIDS service organizations and public health authorities through an increase in funding and the implementation of quality assurance measures based on participatory action research.

  2. Academic dropout or academic success: a model for prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel-Flom, P

    1986-09-01

    Why do some students who qualify for admission to optometry school become academic dropouts while others succeed? This question was addressed in a study which compared the admission records of 21 academic dropouts from three classes at the University of Houston College of Optometry (UHCO) with 269 retained students. Academic dropouts were found to have significantly lower preoptometry grades, lower Optometry College Admission Test (OCAT) scores, attended less competitive (i.e., less selective) undergraduate institutions, scored lower on the California Psychological Inventory (CPI), and were older than retained students. When these differentiating admission variables, excepting age, were applied to a new entering class, prediction of subsequent academic dismissal or serious academic difficulty was highly accurate. However, it was found that such prediction must take into account not only areas of weakness, i.e., academic and psychological factors which place a student at risk, but also areas of strength which give the student an advantage. For all students, regardless of age, sex, or ethnic origin, it was the ratio of "advantage" factors to "risk" factors which gave the most valid prediction of academic success or failure.

  3. Teaching Modeling with Partial Differential Equations: Several Successful Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Joseph; Trubatch, David; Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the introduction and teaching of partial differential equations (heat and wave equations) via modeling physical phenomena, using a new approach that encompasses constructing difference equations and implementing these in a spreadsheet, numerically solving the partial differential equations using the numerical differential equation…

  4. Successively refined models for crack tip plasticity in polymer blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, KGW; Seelig, T; van der Giessen, E

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a comparative study of different, partly complementary micromechanical models for crack tip plasticity in polymer-rubber blends. It is experimentally well established that interspersion of micron-scale rubber particles into a polymer matrix can lead to a significantly en

  5. e-Learning Success Model: An Information Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Post, Anita

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the observations made and experience gained from developing and delivering an online quantitative methods course for Business undergraduates. Inspired by issues and challenges experienced in developing the online course, a model is advanced to address the question of how to guide the design, development, and delivery of…

  6. Teaching Modeling with Partial Differential Equations: Several Successful Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Joseph; Trubatch, David; Winkel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the introduction and teaching of partial differential equations (heat and wave equations) via modeling physical phenomena, using a new approach that encompasses constructing difference equations and implementing these in a spreadsheet, numerically solving the partial differential equations using the numerical differential equation…

  7. A successful solar model using new solar composition data

    CERN Document Server

    Vagnozzi, Sunny; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    A resolution is proposed to the "solar abundance problem", that is, the discrepancy between helioseismological observations and the predictions of solar models, computed implementing state-of-the-art photospheric abundances. We reassess the problem considering a newly determined set of abundances, which indicate a lower limit to the metallicity of $Z_{\\odot} = 0.0196 \\pm 0.0014$, significantly higher than findings during the past decade. Such value for the metallicity is determined in situ, measuring the least fractionated solar winds over the poles of the Sun, rather than spectroscopically. We determine the response of helioseismological observables to the corresponding changes in elemental abundances. Our findings indicate that, taking inversion errors into account, good agreement between models and observations is achieved. The definitive test for these abundances will be measurements of the CNO neutrino fluxes by SNO$^+$ (which we expect to be $\\sim$ 30-50\\% higher than predictions using abundances based ...

  8. The Applicant Based Training Model Setting Conditions for Recruiting Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    the recruiting districts there are functions performed that help guide and support the billet holders at the RSSs and RSs in the performance of their...one can use to evaluate and prioritize training requirements for key members of RSSs and RS. The following paragraphs offer general conclusions and...training model validates training for recruiters. Due to the geographical dispersion of the RSSs , distance learning initiatives could help support this type

  9. Student Success: Approaches to Modeling Student Matriculation and Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jien-Jou

    2013-01-01

    Every year a group of graduates from high schools enter the engineering programs across this country with remarkable academic record. However, as reported in numerous studies, the number of students switching out of engineering majors continues to be an important issue. Previous studies have suggested various factors as predictors for student retention in engineering. To assist the engineering students with timely advising early in their program, an effective prediction model of matriculation...

  10. The secret to successful solute-transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konikow, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling subsurface solute transport is difficult—more so than modeling heads and flows. The classical governing equation does not always adequately represent what we see at the field scale. In such cases, commonly used numerical models are solving the wrong equation. Also, the transport equation is hyperbolic where advection is dominant, and parabolic where hydrodynamic dispersion is dominant. No single numerical method works well for all conditions, and for any given complex field problem, where seepage velocity is highly variable, no one method will be optimal everywhere. Although we normally expect a numerically accurate solution to the governing groundwater-flow equation, errors in concentrations from numerical dispersion and/or oscillations may be large in some cases. The accuracy and efficiency of the numerical solution to the solute-transport equation are more sensitive to the numerical method chosen than for typical groundwater-flow problems. However, numerical errors can be kept within acceptable limits if sufficient computational effort is expended. But impractically long

  11. Modeling Forest Succession among Ecological Land Units in Northern Minnesota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Host

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Field and modeling studies were used to quantify potential successional pathways among fine-scale ecological classification units within two geomorphic regions of north-central Minnesota. Soil and overstory data were collected on plots stratified across low-relief ground moraines and undulating sand dunes. Each geomorphic feature was sampled across gradients of topography or soil texture. Overstory conditions were sampled using five variable-radius point samples per plot; soil samples were analyzed for carbon and nitrogen content. Climatic, forest composition, and soil data were used to parameterize the sample plots for use with LINKAGES, a forest growth model that simulates changes in composition and soil characteristics over time. Forest composition and soil properties varied within and among geomorphic features. LINKAGES simulations were using "bare ground" and the current overstory as starting conditions. Northern hardwoods or pines dominated the late-successional communities of morainal and dune landforms, respectively. The morainal landforms were dominated by yellow birch and sugar maple; yellow birch reached its maximum abundance in intermediate landscape positions. On the dune sites, pine was most abundant in drier landscape positions, with white spruce increasing in abundance with increasing soil moisture and N content. The differences in measured soil properties and predicted late-successional composition indicate that ecological land units incorporate some of the key variables that govern forest composition and structure. They further show the value of ecological classification and modeling for developing forest management strategies that incorporate the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest ecosystems.

  12. Using the internet in middle schools: A model for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addessio, B.; Boorman, M.; Eker, P.; Fletcher, K.; Judd, B.; Trainor, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Corn, C.; Olsen, J.; Trottier, A. [Los Alamos Middle School, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a model for school networking using Los Alamos Middle School as a testbed. The project was a collaborative effort between the school and the Laboratory. The school secured administrative funding for hardware and software; and LANL provided the network architecture, installation, consulting, and training. The model is characterized by a computer classroom linked with two GatorBoxes and a UNIX-based workstation server. Six additional computers have also been networked from a teacher learning center and the library. The model support infrastructure includes: local school system administrators/lead teachers, introductory and intermediate hands-on teacher learning, teacher incentives for involvement and use, opportunities for student training and use, and ongoing LANL consulting. Formative evaluation data reveals that students and teachers alike are finding the Internet to be a tool that crosses disciplines, allowing them to obtain more, timely information and to communicate with others more effectively and efficiently. A lead teacher`s enthusiastic comments indicate some of the value gained: ``We have just scratched the surface. Each day someone seems to find something new and interesting on the Internet. The possibilities seem endless.``

  13. A model for successful research partnerships: a New Brunswick experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamlyn, Karen; Creelman, Helen; Fisher, Garfield

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of a partnership model used to conduct a research study entitled "Needs of patients with cancer and their family members in New Brunswick Health Region 3 (NBHR3)" (Tamlyn-Leaman, Creelman, & Fisher, 1997). This partial replication study carried out by the three authors between 1995 and 1997 was a needs assessment, adapted with permission from previous work by Fitch, Vachon, Greenberg, Saltmarche, and Franssen (1993). In order to conduct a comprehensive needs assessment with limited resources, a partnership between academic, public, and private sectors was established. An illustration of this partnership is presented in the model entitled "A Client-Centred Partnership Model." The operations of this partnership, including the strengths, the perceived benefits, lessons learned by each partner, the barriers, and the process for conflict resolution, are described. A summary of the cancer care initiatives undertaken by NBHR3, which were influenced directly or indirectly by the recommendations from this study, is included.

  14. The social networking application success model : An Empirical Study of Facebook and Twitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Carol; Davison, R.M.; Huang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Social networking applications (SNAs) are among the fastest growing web applications of recent years. In this paper, we propose a causal model to assess the success of SNAs, grounded on DeLone and McLean’s updated information systems (IS) success model. In addition to their original three dimensions

  15. The social networking application success model : An empirical study of Facebook and Twitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Carol; Davison, R.M.; Huang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Social networking applications (SNAs) are among the fastest growing web applications of recent years. In this paper, we propose a causal model to assess the success of SNAs, grounded on DeLone and McLean’s updated information systems (IS) success model. In addition to their original three dimensions

  16. Pathways to success: AIME’s educational mentoring model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Priestly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME is a structured educational mentoring program provided for Indigenous students to access throughout their high school experience. The program is designed to support students to complete high school and transition into university, further education and training or employment at the same rate as every Australian child, effectively closing the gap on educational outcomes. To better understand the impact of the program, AIME has developed a research partnership with a team of researchers from the University of Wollongong (UOW and the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS. Comprising researchers with experience in qualitative and quantitative approaches, this research has grown from a small UOW internally funded project, to a large national project. This collaborative research partnership has already spanned five years and has produced several theorised academic papers, based on both qualitative and quantitative research that describes the AIME program and its merits (Bodkin-Andrews et al. 2013; O’Shea et al. 2013; Kervin et al. 2014; O’Shea et al. 2014; Harwood et al. 2015. Findings from the research to date have reported the success of the AIME program in engaging Indigenous young people in education (Bodkin-Andrews et al. 2013 as well as described the novel ways that the AIME program reorients the focus on aspirations to one of ‘recognition of aspirations’ (Harwood et al. 2014. Further analysis continues to be conducted, including the outcomes of an AIME national survey in 2014 and a paper currently under review that explains the different pedagogy used in the AIME program (McMahon et al, under review. All research activities through this partnership are aligned with protocols for research with Indigenous Australians, as described by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. We work collaboratively to discuss, plan and develop research projects and we

  17. Safety and Reproducibility of a Clinical Trial System Using Induced Blood Stage Plasmodium vivax Infection and Its Potential as a Model to Evaluate Malaria Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Suzanne; Sekuloski, Silvana; Sikulu, Maggy; Hugo, Leon; Khoury, David; Cromer, Deborah; Davenport, Miles; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Ivinson, Karen; Ockenhouse, Christian; McCarthy, James

    2016-01-01

    Background Interventions to interrupt transmission of malaria from humans to mosquitoes represent an appealing approach to assist malaria elimination. A limitation has been the lack of systems to test the efficacy of such interventions before proceeding to efficacy trials in the field. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of induced blood stage malaria (IBSM) infection with Plasmodium vivax. In this study, we report further validation of the IBSM model, and its evaluation for assessment of transmission of P. vivax to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Methods Six healthy subjects (three cohorts, n = 2 per cohort) were infected with P. vivax by inoculation with parasitized erythrocytes. Parasite growth was monitored by quantitative PCR, and gametocytemia by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) for the mRNA pvs25. Parasite multiplication rate (PMR) and size of inoculum were calculated by linear regression. Mosquito transmission studies were undertaken by direct and membrane feeding assays over 3 days prior to commencement of antimalarial treatment, and midguts of blood fed mosquitoes dissected and checked for presence of oocysts after 7–9 days. Results The clinical course and parasitemia were consistent across cohorts, with all subjects developing mild to moderate symptoms of malaria. No serious adverse events were reported. Asymptomatic elevated liver function tests were detected in four of six subjects; these resolved without treatment. Direct feeding of mosquitoes was well tolerated. The estimated PMR was 9.9 fold per cycle. Low prevalence of mosquito infection was observed (1.8%; n = 32/1801) from both direct (4.5%; n = 20/411) and membrane (0.9%; n = 12/1360) feeds. Conclusion The P. vivax IBSM model proved safe and reliable. The clinical course and PMR were reproducible when compared with the previous study using this model. The IBSM model presented in this report shows promise as a system to test transmission-blocking interventions

  18. Spallation reactions. A successful interplay between modeling and applications

    CERN Document Server

    David, J -C

    2015-01-01

    The spallation reactions are a type of nuclear reaction which occur in space by interaction of the cosmic rays with interstellar bodies. The first spallation reactions induced with an accelerator took place in 1947 at the Berkeley cyclotron (University of California) with 200 MeV deuterons and 400 MeV alpha beams. They highlighted the multiple emission of neutrons and charged particles and the production of a large number of residual nuclei far different from the target nuclei. The same year R. Serber describes the reaction in two steps: a first and fast one with high-energy particle emission leading to an excited remnant nucleus, and a second one, much slower, the de-excitation of the remnant. In 2010 IAEA organized a worskhop to present the results of the most widely used spallation codes within a benchmark of spallation models. If one of the goals was to understand the deficiencies, if any, in each code, one remarkable outcome points out the overall high-quality level of some models and so the great improv...

  19. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, David J. [The George Washington University, Washington DC 20052 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) measurements are significantly, and increasingly reproducible. Practical control of the production of energy or materials by LENR has yet to be demonstrated. Minimization of costly inputs and maximization of desired outputs of LENR remain for future developments. The paper concludes by underlying that it is now clearly that demands for reproducible experiments in the early years of LENR experiments were premature. In fact, one can argue that irreproducibility should be expected for early experiments in a complex new field. As emphasized in the paper and as often happened in the history of science, experimental and theoretical progress can take even decades. It is likely to be many years before investments in LENR experiments will yield significant returns, even for successful research programs. However, it is clearly that a fundamental understanding of the anomalous effects observed in numerous experiments will significantly increase reproducibility, improve controllability, enable optimization of processes, and accelerate the economic viability of LENR.

  20. Successful Manipulation in Stable Marriage Model with Complete Preference Lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirotatsu; Matsui, Tomomi

    This paper deals with a strategic issue in the stable marriage model with complete preference lists (i.e., a preference list of an agent is a permutation of all the members of the opposite sex). Given complete preference lists of n men over n women, and a marriage µ, we consider the problem for finding preference lists of n women over n men such that the men-proposing deferred acceptance algorithm (Gale-Shapley algorithm) adopted to the lists produces µ. We show a simple necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a set of preference lists of women over men. Our condition directly gives an O(n2) time algorithm for finding a set of preference lists, if it exists.

  1. Osteolytica: An automated image analysis software package that rapidly measures cancer-induced osteolytic lesions in in vivo models with greater reproducibility compared to other commonly used methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H R; Karmakharm, T; Lawson, M A; Walker, R E; Harris, W; Fellows, C; Huggins, I D; Richmond, P; Chantry, A D

    2016-02-01

    Methods currently used to analyse osteolytic lesions caused by malignancies such as multiple myeloma and metastatic breast cancer vary from basic 2-D X-ray analysis to 2-D images of micro-CT datasets analysed with non-specialised image software such as ImageJ. However, these methods have significant limitations. They do not capture 3-D data, they are time-consuming and they often suffer from inter-user variability. We therefore sought to develop a rapid and reproducible method to analyse 3-D osteolytic lesions in mice with cancer-induced bone disease. To this end, we have developed Osteolytica, an image analysis software method featuring an easy to use, step-by-step interface to measure lytic bone lesions. Osteolytica utilises novel graphics card acceleration (parallel computing) and 3-D rendering to provide rapid reconstruction and analysis of osteolytic lesions. To evaluate the use of Osteolytica we analysed tibial micro-CT datasets from murine models of cancer-induced bone disease and compared the results to those obtained using a standard ImageJ analysis method. Firstly, to assess inter-user variability we deployed four independent researchers to analyse tibial datasets from the U266-NSG murine model of myeloma. Using ImageJ, inter-user variability between the bones was substantial (±19.6%), in contrast to using Osteolytica, which demonstrated minimal variability (±0.5%). Secondly, tibial datasets from U266-bearing NSG mice or BALB/c mice injected with the metastatic breast cancer cell line 4T1 were compared to tibial datasets from aged and sex-matched non-tumour control mice. Analyses by both Osteolytica and ImageJ showed significant increases in bone lesion area in tumour-bearing mice compared to control mice. These results confirm that Osteolytica performs as well as the current 2-D ImageJ osteolytic lesion analysis method. However, Osteolytica is advantageous in that it analyses over the entirety of the bone volume (as opposed to selected 2-D images), it

  2. A Diffusion Theory Model of Adoption and Substitution for Successive Generations of High-Technology Products

    OpenAIRE

    John A. Norton; Frank M. Bass

    1987-01-01

    This study deals with the dynamic sales behavior of successive generations of high-technology products. New technologies diffuse through a population of potential buyers over time. Therefore, diffusion theory models are related to this demand growth. Furthermore, successive generations of a technology compete with earlier ones, and that behavior is the subject of models of technological substitution. Building upon the Bass (Bass, F. M. 1969. A new-product growth model for consumer durables. M...

  3. Evaluation of guidewire path reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Noël, Peter B; Ionita, Ciprian N; Dmochowski, Jacek

    2008-05-01

    The number of minimally invasive vascular interventions is increasing. In these interventions, a variety of devices are directed to and placed at the site of intervention. The device used in almost all of these interventions is the guidewire, acting as a monorail for all devices which are delivered to the intervention site. However, even with the guidewire in place, clinicians still experience difficulties during the interventions. As a first step toward understanding these difficulties and facilitating guidewire and device guidance, we have investigated the reproducibility of the final paths of the guidewire in vessel phantom models on different factors: user, materials and geometry. Three vessel phantoms (vessel diameters approximately 4 mm) were constructed having tortuousity similar to the internal carotid artery from silicon tubing and encased in Sylgard elastomer. Several trained users repeatedly passed two guidewires of different flexibility through the phantoms under pulsatile flow conditions. After the guidewire had been placed, rotational c-arm image sequences were acquired (9 in. II mode, 0.185 mm pixel size), and the phantom and guidewire were reconstructed (512(3), 0.288 mm voxel size). The reconstructed volumes were aligned. The centerlines of the guidewire and the phantom vessel were then determined using region-growing techniques. Guidewire paths appear similar across users but not across materials. The average root mean square difference of the repeated placement was 0.17 +/- 0.02 mm (plastic-coated guidewire), 0.73 +/- 0.55 mm (steel guidewire) and 1.15 +/- 0.65 mm (steel versus plastic-coated). For a given guidewire, these results indicate that the guidewire path is relatively reproducible in shape and position.

  4. Accessibility and Reproducibility of Stable High-qmin Steady-State Scenarios by q-profile+βN Model Predictive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, E.; Wehner, W.; Holcomb, C. T.; Victor, B.; Ferron, J. R.; Luce, T. C.

    2016-10-01

    The capability of combined q-profile and βN control to enable access to and repeatability of steady-state scenarios for qmin > 1.4 discharges has been assessed in DIII-D experiments. To steer the plasma to the desired state, model predictive control (MPC) of both the q-profile and βN numerically solves successive optimization problems in real time over a receding time horizon by exploiting efficient quadratic programming techniques. A key advantage of this control approach is that it allows for explicit incorporation of state/input constraints to prevent the controller from driving the plasma outside of stability/performance limits and obtain, as closely as possible, steady state conditions. The enabler of this feedback-control approach is a control-oriented model capturing the dominant physics of the q-profile and βN responses to the available actuators. Experiments suggest that control-oriented model-based scenario planning in combination with MPC can play a crucial role in exploring stability limits of scenarios of interest. Supported by the US DOE under DE-SC0010661.

  5. Successful aging as a continuum of functional independence: lessons from physical disability models of aging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowry, K.A.; Vallejo, A.N.; Studenski, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Successful aging is a multidimensional construct that could be viewed as a continuum of achievement. Based on the disability model proposed by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, successful aging includes not only the presence or absence of disease, but also

  6. SUCCESS AND PROGRESS IN HIGHER-EDUCATION : A STRUCTURAL MODEL OF STUDYING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MINNAERT, A; JANSSEN, PJ

    1992-01-01

    In Belgium, the success rates of freshmen in higher education are relatively low. To understand this phenomenon a structural model for indiviaual differences in study success and progress is suggested. Starting from the theory that studying is the integration of thinking and learning on the basis of

  7. Successful aging as a continuum of functional independence: lessons from physical disability models of aging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowry, K.A.; Vallejo, A.N.; Studenski, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Successful aging is a multidimensional construct that could be viewed as a continuum of achievement. Based on the disability model proposed by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, successful aging includes not only the presence or absence of disease, but also a

  8. Implementation of "Learning from Success" Model on Learning Disabilities Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeev Greenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Students who have difficulties with studies lack study skills, demonstrate inconsistent achievements and are generally assigned to low-level study groups. In light of this situation, they tend to develop a poor self-image and low self-esteem. Therefore it is important to identify the coping skills that lead to success, which can serve as a model for the work of education systems. The purpose of this article is to describe learning from success model that involves the examination of events that can be translated into modes of action that promote future success. The research is innovative in its application of the model, which is commonly used among professionals, in work with high-school students. Approach: The research is qualitative, based on analysis of project presentations created by the students according to the learning from success model and discussions held after showing the presentations. The research examined the principles of action that led to the success of these students in national final exams, by means of reflection on their learning. Results: The results of the research indicate that use of the learning from success model highlights the importance of studying in small groups and learning from peers, which help students develop a sense of success and personal responsibility. Conclusion: The model can be applied with students in order to identify the principles of action that contribute to their success in final exams. In addition, during application of the model, the students develop a sense of success and personal responsibility for studying.

  9. An Analytic Model for the Success Rate of a Robotic Actuator System in Hitting Random Targets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradley, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    .... While simulations and measurements exist for the success rate of hitting targets by some systems, there is a dearth of analytic models which can give insight into, and guidance on optimization, of new robotic systems...

  10. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, J.; Nielsen, L.S.; Lueg, Rainer;

    2014-01-01

    Dalby, J., Nielsen, Lueg, R., L. S., Pedersen, L., Tomoni, A. C. 2014. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions. Journal of Enterprising Culture, 22(4): 379-498.......Dalby, J., Nielsen, Lueg, R., L. S., Pedersen, L., Tomoni, A. C. 2014. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions. Journal of Enterprising Culture, 22(4): 379-498....

  11. Modelling succession of key resource harvesting traits of mixotrophic plankton populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Chakraborty, Subhendu; Hansen, Per Juel;

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes make up the base of the ocean food web and exist as a continuum in trophic strategy from pure heterotrophy (phagotrophic zooplankton) to pure photoautotrophy (‘phytoplankton’), with a dominance of mixotrophic organisms combining both strategies. Here we formulate a trait...... in the spring and increased phagotrophy during the summer, reflecting general seasonal succession patterns of temperate waters. Our trait-based model presents a simple and general approach for the inclusion of mixotrophy, succession and evolution in ecosystem models....

  12. Production process reproducibility and product quality consistency of transient gene expression in HEK293 cells with anti-PD1 antibody as the model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Han, Lei; Zong, Huifang; Chen, Junsheng; Zhang, Baohong; Zhu, Jianwei

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of reproducibility and consistency of process and product quality is one of the most crucial issues in using transient gene expression (TGE) technology for biopharmaceutical development. In this study, we challenged the production consistency of TGE by expressing nine batches of recombinant IgG antibody in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to evaluate reproducibility including viable cell density, viability, apoptotic status, and antibody yield in cell culture supernatant. Product quality including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability was assessed as well. In addition, major glycan forms of antibody from different batches of production were compared to demonstrate glycosylation consistency. Glycan compositions of the antibody harvested at different time periods were also measured to illustrate N-glycan distribution over the culture time. From the results, it has been demonstrated that different TGE batches are reproducible from lot to lot in overall cell growth, product yield, and product qualities including isoelectric point, binding affinity, secondary structure, and thermal stability. Furthermore, major N-glycan compositions are consistent among different TGE batches and conserved during cell culture time.

  13. Modelling the attack success of planktonic predators: patterns and mechanisms of prey size selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caparroy, P.; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Visser, Andre

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of the attack success of planktonic predators (fish larvae and carnivorous copepods) is proposed. Based on a geometric representation of attack events, the model considers how the escape reaction characteristics (speed and direction) of copepod prey affect their probability...... of being captured. By combining the attack success model with previously published hydrodynamic models of predator and prey perception, we examine how predator foraging behaviour and prey perceptive ability affect the size spectra of encountered and captured copepod prey. We examine food size spectra of (i...... also acts in modifying the prey escape direction. The model demonstrates that the reorientation of the prey escape path towards the centre of the feeding current's flow field results in increased attack success of the predator. Finally, the model examines how variability in the kinetics of approach...

  14. The Social Networking Application Success Model: An Empirical Study of Facebook and Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol X. J. Ou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Social networking applications (SNAs are among the fastest growing web applications of recent years. In this paper, we propose a causal model to assess the success of SNAs, grounded on DeLone and McLean’s updated information systems (IS success model. In addition to their original three dimensions of quality, i.e., system quality, information quality and service quality, we propose that a fourth dimension - networking quality - contributes to SNA success. We empirically examined the proposed research model with a survey of 168 Facebook and 149 Twitter users. The data validates the significant role of networking quality in determining the focal SNA’s success. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  15. Hyperbolic L2-modules with Reproducing Kernels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David EELPODE; Frank SOMMEN

    2006-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, the Dirac operator on the Klein model for the hyperbolic space is considered. A function space containing L2-functions on the sphere Sm-1 in (R)m, which are boundary values of solutions for this operator, is defined, and it is proved that this gives rise to a Hilbert module with a reproducing kernel.

  16. Assessing eGovernment Systems Success: A Validation of the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Shun; Liao, Yi-Wen

    2008-01-01

    With the proliferation of the Internet and World Wide Web applications, people are increasingly interacting with government to citizen (G2C) eGovernment systems. It is therefore important to measure the success of G2C eGovernment systems from the citizen's perspective. While general information systems (IS) success models have received much…

  17. Translational PK/PD modeling to increase probability of success in drug discovery and early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavé, Thierry; Caruso, Antonello; Parrott, Neil; Walz, Antje

    In this review we present ways in which translational PK/PD modeling can address opportunities to enhance probability of success in drug discovery and early development. This is achieved by impacting efficacy and safety-driven attrition rates, through increased focus on the quantitative understanding and modeling of translational PK/PD. Application of the proposed principles early in the discovery and development phases is anticipated to bolster confidence of successfully evaluating proof of mechanism in humans and ultimately improve Phase II success. The present review is centered on the application of predictive modeling and simulation approaches during drug discovery and early development, and more specifically of mechanism-based PK/PD modeling. Case studies are presented, focused on the relevance of M&S contributions to real-world questions and the impact on decision making.

  18. Perception of successive brief objects as a function of stimulus onset asynchrony: model experiments based on two-stage synchronization of neuronal oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Talis; Kirt, Toomas

    2013-12-01

    Recently we introduced a new version of the perceptual retouch model incorporating two interactive binding operations-binding features for objects and binding the bound feature-objects with a large scale oscillatory system that acts as a mediary for the perceptual information to reach consciousness-level representation. The relative level of synchronized firing of the neurons representing the features of an object obtained after the second-stage synchronizing modulation is used as the equivalent of conscious perception of the corresponding object. Here, this model is used for simulating interaction of two successive featured objects as a function of stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). Model output reproduces typical results of mutual masking-with shortest and longest SOAs first and second object correct perception rate is comparable while with intermediate SOAs second object dominates over the first one. Additionally, with shortest SOAs misbinding of features to form illusory objects is simulated by the model.

  19. Successive inverse polynomial interpolation to optimize Smagorinsky's model for large-eddy simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Meyers, Johan

    2006-01-01

    We propose the successive inverse polynomial interpolation method to optimize model parameters in subgrid parameterization for large-eddy simulation. This approach is illustrated for the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model used in homogeneous decaying turbulence. The optimal Smagorinsky parameter is re

  20. Successive inverse polynomial interpolation to optimize Smagorinsky's model for large-eddy simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Meyers, Johan

    We propose the successive inverse polynomial interpolation method to optimize model parameters in subgrid parameterization for large-eddy simulation. This approach is illustrated for the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model used in homogeneous decaying turbulence. The optimal Smagorinsky parameter is

  1. Modeling Success: Using Preenrollment Data to Identify Academically At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.; Compton, Jonathan; Wohlgemuth, Darin; Forbes, Greg; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Improving student success and degree completion is one of the core principles of strategic enrollment management. To address this principle, institutional data were used to develop a statistical model to identify academically at-risk students. The model employs multiple linear regression techniques to predict students at risk of earning below a…

  2. [Innovative health care models in Germany - success factors, barriers and transferability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Beate S; Leiferman, Mareike; Wilke, Dennis; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Erler, Antje

    2016-10-01

    Safeguarding country-wide health care in Germany requires innovative ideas: a shortage of skilled staff among medical professionals and in long-term care on the one hand contrasts with an increasing number of multi-morbid elderly patients on the other hand. In the "Innovative Health Care Models" project sponsored by the Robert Bosch Foundation a nationwide status review and systematization of innovative approaches to health care was conducted, along with an analysis of the factors that promote or hinder the implementation of a health care model, and a study of the conditions that must be satisfied if successful concepts are to be transferred to other regions. After identifying innovative and successfully implemented health care models, data on success factors and barriers for implementation as well as data on conditions of their transferability to other regions were collected during structured telephone interviews and entered into a specifically developed database. Content analysis was used to qualitatively evaluate the interviews. Interviews with 65 representatives of successfully implemented models with differing organizational structures and priorities were conducted and evaluated. Success factors and barriers were most obvious in the fields of leadership, readiness to participate, relational aspects, personality traits, cooperation and communication, resources and organizational and structural factors. Various regionally linked health care concepts already exist throughout Germany. The barriers, success factors and conditions influencing the transferability of a model to other regions are largely independent of the type of organization. The success of a model is determined by adequate personal and financial resources, sound organizational structures and external support from political and funding bodies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Comprehensive Model of Annual Plankton Succession Based on the Whole-Plankton Time Series Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Baptiste Romagnan; Louis Legendre; Lionel Guidi; Jean-Louis Jamet; Dominique Jamet; Laure Mousseau; Maria-Luiza Pedrotti; Marc Picheral; Gabriel Gorsky; Christian Sardet; Lars Stemmann

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phy-toplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankt...

  4. A spatial simulation model for forest succession in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y.; Wu, Y.; Bartell, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    A Markov-chain transition model (FORSUM) and Monte Carlo simulations were used to simulate the succession patterns and predict a long-term impact of flood on the forest structure and growth in the floodplain of the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois River. Model variables, probabilities, functions, and parameters were derived from the analysis of two comprehensive field surveys conducted in this floodplain. This modeling approach describes the establishment, growth, competition, and death of individual trees for modeled species on a 10,000-ha landscape with spatial resolution of 1 ha. The succession characteristics of each Monte Carlo simulation are summed up to describe forest development and dynamics on a landscape level. FORSUM simulated the impacts of flood intensity and frequency on species composition and dynamics in the Upper Mississippi River floodplain ecosystem. The model provides a useful tool for testing hypotheses about forest succession and enables ecologists and managers to evaluate the impacts of flood disturbances and ecosystem restoration on forest succession. The simulation results suggest that the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method is an efficient tool to help organize the existing data and knowledge of forest succession into a system of quantitative predictions for the Upper Mississippi River floodplain ecosystem. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  5. A rill erosion-vegetation modeling approach for the evaluation of slope reclamation success in water-limited environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Diaz Sierra, Ruben; Nicolau, Jose M.; Zavala, Miguel A.

    2013-04-01

    Slope reclamation from surface mining and road construction usually shows important constraints in water-limited environments. Soil erosion is perceived as a critical process, especially when rill formation occurs, as rills can condition the spatial distribution and availability of soil moisture for plant growth, hence affecting vegetation development. On the other hand, encouraging early vegetation establishment is essential to reduce the risk of degradation in these man-made systems. This work describes a modeling approach focused on stability analysis of water-limited reclaimed slopes, where interactive relationships between rill erosion and vegetation regulate ecosystem stability. Our framework reproduces two main groups of trends along the temporal evolution of reclaimed slopes: successful trends, characterized by widespread vegetation development and the effective control of rill erosion processes; and gullying trends, characterized by the progressive loss of vegetation and a sharp logistic increase in erosion rates. Furthermore, this analytical approach allows the determination of threshold values for both vegetation cover and rill erosion that drive the system's stability, facilitating the identification of critical situations that require specific human intervention (e.g. revegetation or, in very problematic cases, revegetation combined with rill network destruction) to ensure the long-term sustainability of the restored ecosystem. We apply our threshold analysis framework in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed slopes derived form surface coal mining (the Teruel coalfield in central-east Spain), obtaining a good field-based performance. Therefore, we believe that this model is a valuable contribution for the management of water-limited reclaimed systems, as it can play an important role in decision-making during ecosystem restoration and provides a tool for the assessment of restoration success in severely disturbed landscapes.

  6. A Partial Test and Development of Delone and Mclean's Model of IS Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Seddon

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available DeLone and McLean's (1992 comprehensive review of different information system success measures concludes with a model of interrelationships between six IS Success constructs. This paper critically examines the meaning of four of these constructs and the evidence of relationships between them. It then provides results from empirical tests of these relationships. Tests are conducted using both conventional ordinary least squares regression path analysis and structural equation modeling - with substantially similar results. The empirical results provide substantial support for the "up stream" two thirds of DeLone and McLean's model. Three factors. System Quality, Information Quality, and Usefulness, are found to explain 75% of the variance in the overall User Satisfaction measure. The empirical results also provide substantial support for the use of usefulness as an IS success measure, and of the hitherto-unreported importance of "Importance of the task" in user perceptions of IS usefulness.

  7. Open Source Software Success Model for Iran: End-User Satisfaction Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Niknafs

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The open source software development is notable option for software companies. Recent years, many advantages of this software type are cause of move to that in Iran. National security and international restrictions problems and also software and services costs and more other problems intensified importance of use of this software. Users and their viewpoints are the critical success factor in the software plans. But there is not an appropriate model for open source software case in Iran. This research tried to develop a measuring open source software success model for Iran. By use of data gathered from open source users and online survey the model was tested. The results showed that components by positive effect on open source success were user satisfaction, open source community services quality, open source quality, copyright and security.

  8. Theoretical Model of User Acceptance: In the View of Measuring Success in Web Personalization

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Mohd Afandi Md; Nayak, Richi

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper attempts to develop a theoretical acceptance model for measuring Web personalization success. Key factors impacting Web personalization acceptance are identified from a detailed literature review. The final model is then cast in a structural equation modeling (SEM) framework comprising nineteen manifest variables, which are grouped into three focal behaviors of Web users. These variables could provide a framework for better understanding of numerous factors ...

  9. Understanding a Father-Daughter Succession Case: Applying the 5+5+5 Bernelli Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leann Mischel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Research on father-daughter succession in family businesses has only recently begun to get some traction. Still, examples of these situations often elude researchers. Futhermore, there has not been adequate attention paid to how children are raised in family businesses and how they learn to be entrepreneurial. Approach: This study outlines a father-daughter succession case in this unique American setting-the Appalachian Mountains of West Virginia. West Virginia offers an opportunity to examine family businesses embedded in the Appalachian culture-one where much of the popular and scholarly literature contend that deficiencies have contributed to, or reinforced, economic poverty and backwardness. These ideals are now being challenged and this case offers evidence of reversal. We also use the Bernelli 5+5+5 Model as a lens through which to examine the daughter’s entrepreneurial growth in this case. Results: The Bernelli 5+5+5 Model allowed us to structure the daughter’s experiences and better understand how she got to be such a successful successor. Conclusion/Recommendations: We recommend that the Bernelli 5+5+5 Model be used as a framework to view succession in family businesses. The Model also serves as a lens through which to view and better understand how children raised in family businesses become more successful entrepreneurs as adults.

  10. Three-feature model to reproduce the topology of citation networks and the effects from authors' visibility on their h-index

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1016/j.joi.2012.02.005

    2013-01-01

    Various factors are believed to govern the selection of references in citation networks, but a precise, quantitative determination of their importance has remained elusive. In this paper, we show that three factors can account for the referencing pattern of citation networks for two topics, namely "graphenes" and "complex networks", thus allowing one to reproduce the topological features of the networks built with papers being the nodes and the edges established by citations. The most relevant factor was content similarity, while the other two - in-degree (i.e. citation counts) and {age of publication} had varying importance depending on the topic studied. This dependence indicates that additional factors could play a role. Indeed, by intuition one should expect the reputation (or visibility) of authors and/or institutions to affect the referencing pattern, and this is only indirectly considered via the in-degree that should correlate with such reputation. Because information on reputation is not readily avai...

  11. Models for Measuring E-Learning Success in Universities: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana DOROBAT (SCORTA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that in the Internet era the higher education institutions (HEIs must innovate the services they offer by integrating ICT (Information and Communication Technology in the learning process. According to the theoreticians and practitioners insights in the matter, the e-learning systems offer many advantages and compensate the weaknesses of the traditional learning methods. In consequence, it emerged the need for developing a model that measures the success of the e-learning systems. This paper presents results of the research conducted in order to develop a comprehensive model for measuring e-learning system success in universi-ties.

  12. Critical success factors model developing for sustainable Kaizen implementation in manufactur-ing industry in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haftu Hailu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify critical success factors and model developing for sustaining kaizen implementation. Peacock shoe is one of the manufacturing industries in Ethiopia facing challenges on sustaining. The methodology followed is factor analysis and empirically testing hypothesis. A database was designed using SPSS version 20. The survey was validated using statistical validation using the Cronbach alpha index; the result is 0.908. The KMO index value was obtained for the 32 items and had a value of 0.642 with Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square 4503.007, degree of freedom 496 and significance value 0.000. A factor analysis by principal components and varimax rotation was applied for finding the critical success factors. Finding designates that 32 items were merged into eight critical success factors. All the eight factors together explain for 76.941 % of the variance. Multiple regression model analysis has indicated that some of the critical success factors had relationship with success indicators. Due to constraint of time, the researcher focused only at peacock shoe manufacturing industry. Other limitation also includes the absence of any local research that shows the critical success factors at the moment.

  13. Experienced Practitioners’ Beliefs Utilized to Create a Successful Massage Therapist Conceptual Model: a Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Anne B.; Munk, Niki

    2017-01-01

    Background The massage therapy profession in the United States has grown exponentially, with 35% of the profession’s practitioners in practice for three years or less. Investigating personal and social factors with regard to the massage therapy profession could help to identify constructs needed to be successful in the field. Purpose This data-gathering exercise explores massage therapists’ perceptions on what makes a successful massage therapist that will provide guidance for future research. Success is defined as supporting oneself and practice solely through massage therapy and related, revenue-generating field activity. Participants and Setting Ten successful massage therapy practitioners from around the United States who have a minimum of five years of experience. Research Design Semistructured qualitative interviews were used in an analytic induction framework; index cards with preidentified concepts printed on them were utilized to enhance conversation. An iterative process of interview coding and analysis was used to determine themes and subthemes. Results Based on the participants input, the categories in which therapists needed to be successful were organized into four main themes: effectively establish therapeutic relationships, develop massage therapy business acumen, seek valuable learning environments and opportunities, and cultivate strong social ties and networks. The four themes operate within specific contexts (e.g., regulation and licensing requirements in the therapists’ state), which may also influence the success of the massage therapist. Conclusions The model needs to be tested to explore which constructs explain variability in success and attrition rate. Limitations and future research implications are discussed. PMID:28690704

  14. Information System Success Model for Customer Relationship Management System in Health Promotion Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. Methods The evaluation areas of the CRM system includes three areas: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Results Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. Conclusions This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems. PMID:23882416

  15. Information system success model for customer relationship management system in health promotion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae; Choi, In Young

    2013-06-01

    Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. THE EVALUATION AREAS OF THE CRM SYSTEM INCLUDES THREE AREAS: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems.

  16. Reproducible Bioinformatics Research for Biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter describes the current Big Data problem in Bioinformatics and the resulting issues with performing reproducible computational research. The core of the chapter provides guidelines and summaries of current tools/techniques that a noncomputational researcher would need to learn to pe...

  17. Evaluation of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian Maria

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted with the goal of quantifying auditory attributes which underlie listener preference for multichannel reproduced sound. Short musical excerpts were presented in mono, stereo and several multichannel formats to a panel of forty selected listeners. Scaling of auditory attributes...

  18. [Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, H-J; Schmidt, O; Ritsche, A

    2014-11-01

    Reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement is limited by various factors. The main factors affecting reproducibility include the characteristics of the measurement method and of the subject and the examiner. This article presents the results of a study on this topic, focusing on the reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes. The results of previous studies are not all presented in the same way by the respective authors and cannot be fully standardized without consulting the original scientific data. To the extent that they are comparable, the results of our study largely correspond largely with those of previous investigations: During repeated subjective refraction measurement, 95% of the deviation from the mean value was approximately ±0.2 D to ±0.65 D for the spherical equivalent and cylindrical power. The reproducibility of subjective refraction measurement in healthy eyes is limited, even under ideal conditions. Correct assessment of refraction results is only feasible after identifying individual variability. Several measurements are required. Refraction cannot be measured without a tolerance range. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under supplemental).

  19. Reproducible research in computational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Roger D

    2011-12-02

    Computational science has led to exciting new developments, but the nature of the work has exposed limitations in our ability to evaluate published findings. Reproducibility has the potential to serve as a minimum standard for judging scientific claims when full independent replication of a study is not possible.

  20. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The study, "A Model for Success: CART's Linked Learning Program Increases College Enrollment" examined whether students who enrolled in courses at a high school that combined academics and technical education had higher college enrollment rates than students who did not. The research described in this report does not meet What Works…

  1. A Model-Based Approach for Visualizing the Dimensional Structure of Ordered Successive Categories Preference Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSarbo, Wayne S.; Park, Joonwook; Scott, Crystal J.

    2008-01-01

    A cyclical conditional maximum likelihood estimation procedure is developed for the multidimensional unfolding of two- or three-way dominance data (e.g., preference, choice, consideration) measured on ordered successive category rating scales. The technical description of the proposed model and estimation procedure are discussed, as well as the…

  2. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Fostering Resiliency in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Joy; Steen, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a group counseling intervention used to develop and foster resiliency in middle school students by implementing the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model. The authors aimed to discover what impact this group counseling intervention, which focused on resiliency characteristics, would have on students'…

  3. The Groningen Active Living Model, an example of successful recruitment of sedentary and underactive older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Martin; de Jong, Johan; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Many physical activity interventions do not reach those people who would benefit the most from them. The Groningen Active Living Model (GALM) was successful in recruiting sedentary and underactive older adults. Method. In the fall of 2000 older adults in three municipalities in the Nether

  4. The Success of a Policy Model: Irrigation Management Transfer in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rap, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Mexican policy of Irrigation Management Transfer has been widely propagated as a success and has become a model for other countries seeking to improve the performance of their irrigation systems while also cutting public expenditures. This article analyses the process of policy-making that has g

  5. Creating a Successful Training Program for Frontline Staff: The University of Minnesota's Integrated Student Services Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Heather L.; Otto, Carrie L.

    2011-01-01

    Successfully preparing frontline counseling staff in an integrated student services model is a challenge--one that management staff in One Stop Student Services at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities (UMTC) have been fine-tuning for almost ten years. The effort has required collaboration across units in a series of trial and error attempts…

  6. An exploratory analysis of the model for understanding success in quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Heather C; Froehle, Craig M; Cassedy, Amy; Provost, Lloyd P; Margolis, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Experience suggests that differences in context produce variability in the effectiveness of quality improvement (QI) interventions. However, little is known about which contextual factors affect success or how they exert influence. Using the Model for Understanding Success in Quality (MUSIQ), we perform exploratory quantitative tests of the role of context in QI success. We used a cross-sectional design to survey individuals participating in QI projects in three settings: a pediatric hospital, hospitals affiliated with a state QI collaborative, and organizations sponsoring participants in an improvement advisor training program. Individuals participating in QI projects completed a questionnaire assessing contextual factors included in MUSIQ and measures of perceived success. Path analysis was used to test the direct, indirect, and total effects of context variables on QI success as hypothesized in MUSIQ. In the 74 projects studied, most contextual factors in MUSIQ were found to be significantly related to at least one QI project performance outcome. Contextual factors exhibiting significant effects on two measures of perceived QI success included resource availability, QI team leadership, team QI skills, microsystem motivation, microsystem QI culture, and microsystem QI capability. There was weaker evidence for effects of senior leader project sponsors, organizational QI culture, QI team decision-making, and microsystem QI leadership. These initial tests add to the validity of MUSIQ as a tool for identifying which contextual factors affect improvement success and understanding how they exert influence. Using MUSIQ, managers and QI practitioners can begin to identify aspects of context that must be addressed before or during the execution of QI projects and plan strategies to modify context for increased success. Additional work by QI researchers to improve the theory, refine measurement approaches, and validate MUSIQ as a predictive tool in a wider range of QI

  7. Incorporating the user perspective into a proposed model for assessing success of SHS implementations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Holtorf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern energy can contribute to development in multiple ways while approximately 20% of world's populations do not yet have access to electricity. Solar Home Systems (SHSs consists of a PV module, a charge controller and a battery supply in the range of 100 Wh/d in Sunbelt countries. The question addressed in this paper is how SHS users approach success of their systems and how these user's views can be integrated in to an existing model of success. Information was obtained on the user's approach to their SHSs by participatory observation, interviews with users and by self-observation undertaken by the lead author while residing under SHS electricity supply conditions. It was found that success of SHSs from the users' point of view is related to the ability of these systems to reduce the burdens of supplying energy services to homesteads. SHSs can alleviate some energy supply burdens, and they can improve living conditions by enabling communication on multiple levels and by addressing convenience and safety concerns. However, SHSs do not contribute to the energy services which are indispensable for survival, nor to the thermal energy services required and desired in dwellings of Sunbelt countries. The elements of three of the four components of our previously proposed model of success have been verified and found to be appropriate, namely the user's self-set goals, their importance and SHSs' success factors. The locally appropriate, and scientifically satisfactory, measurement of the level of achievement of self-set goals, the fourth component of our model of success, remains an interesting area for future research.

  8. Accuracy and reproducibility of patient-specific hemodynamic models of stented intracranial aneurysms: report on the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cito, S; Geers, A J; Arroyo, M P; Palero, V R; Pallarés, J; Vernet, A; Blasco, J; San Román, L; Fu, W; Qiao, A; Janiga, G; Miura, Y; Ohta, M; Mendina, M; Usera, G; Frangi, A F

    2015-01-01

    Validation studies are prerequisites for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to be accepted as part of clinical decision-making. This paper reports on the 2011 edition of the Virtual Intracranial Stenting Challenge. The challenge aimed to assess the reproducibility with which research groups can simulate the velocity field in an intracranial aneurysm, both untreated and treated with five different configurations of high-porosity stents. Particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were obtained to validate the untreated velocity field. Six participants, totaling three CFD solvers, were provided with surface meshes of the vascular geometry and the deployed stent geometries, and flow rate boundary conditions for all inlets and outlets. As output, they were invited to submit an abstract to the 8th International Interdisciplinary Cerebrovascular Symposium 2011 (ICS'11), outlining their methods and giving their interpretation of the performance of each stent configuration. After the challenge, all CFD solutions were collected and analyzed. To quantitatively analyze the data, we calculated the root-mean-square error (RMSE) over uniformly distributed nodes on a plane slicing the main flow jet along its axis and normalized it with the maximum velocity on the slice of the untreated case (NRMSE). Good agreement was found between CFD and PIV with a NRMSE of 7.28%. Excellent agreement was found between CFD solutions, both untreated and treated. The maximum difference between any two groups (along a line perpendicular to the main flow jet) was 4.0 mm/s, i.e. 4.1% of the maximum velocity of the untreated case, and the average NRMSE was 0.47% (range 0.28-1.03%). In conclusion, given geometry and flow rates, research groups can accurately simulate the velocity field inside an intracranial aneurysm-as assessed by comparison with in vitro measurements-and find excellent agreement on the hemodynamic effect of different stent configurations.

  9. A Primary Human Critical Success Factors Model for the ERP System Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenko Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Many researchers have investigated various Critical success factors (CSFs and the different causes of ERP implementation project failures. Despite a detailed literature preview, we were unable to find an appropriate research with a comprehensive overview of the true causes behind CSFs, observed from a human factors perspective. The objective of this research was therefore to develop and evaluate the Primary human factors (PHFs model and to confirm the significant impact of PHFs on traditional CSFs and on the project success.

  10. Reproducibility of NIF hohlraum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Casey, D. T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B. L.; Doeppner, T.; Divol, L.; Grim, G. P.; Hoover, M.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P. A.; Moore, A. S.; Pino, J. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy of experimentally ``tuning'' the implosion in a NIF hohlraum ignition target towards increasing hot-spot pressure, areal density of compressed fuel, and neutron yield relies on a level of experimental reproducibility. We examine the reproducibility of experimental measurements for a collection of 15 identical NIF hohlraum experiments. The measurements include incident laser power, backscattered optical power, x-ray measurements, hot-electron fraction and energy, and target characteristics. We use exact statistics to set 1-sigma confidence levels on the variations in each of the measurements. Of particular interest is the backscatter and laser-induced hot-spot locations on the hohlraum wall. Hohlraum implosion designs typically include variability specifications [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. We describe our findings and compare with the specifications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  11. Modeling succession of key resource-harvesting traits of mixotrophic plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berge, Terje; Chakraborty, Subhendu; Hansen, Per Juel

    2017-01-01

    -based model for mixotrophy with three key resource-harvesting traits: photosynthesis, phagotrophy and inorganic nutrient uptake, which predicts the trophic strategy of species throughout the seasonal cycle. Assuming that simple carbohydrates from photosynthesis fuel respiration, and feeding primarily provides...... in the spring and increased phagotrophy during the summer, reflecting general seasonal succession patterns of temperate waters. Our trait-based model presents a simple and general approach for the inclusion of mixotrophy, succession and evolution in ecosystem models.The ISME Journal advance online publication......Unicellular eukaryotes make up the base of the ocean food web and exist as a continuum in trophic strategy from pure heterotrophy (phagotrophic zooplankton) to pure photoautotrophy (‘phytoplankton’), with a dominance of mixotrophic organisms combining both strategies. Here we formulate a trait...

  12. An investigation of potential success factors for an introductory model-driven programming course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the course design of a CS1 model-driven programming course we study potential indicators of success for such a course. We explain our specific interpretation of objects-first. Of eight potential indicators of success, we have found only two to be significant at a 95% confidence...... on the success factors for objects-first programming......., the impact of our findings on teaching, limits of what to conclude from the available data, and the variety of the notion "objects-first". Because of the variety of interpretations of "objects-first", the present research is necessary as a supplement to earlier research in order to make generalizable results...

  13. Providing a Model for Successful Implementation of Customer Relationship Management (Case Study: Zahedan Industrial City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin-Reza Kamalian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a model for Successful Implementation of Customer Relationship Management (CRM for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in Zahedan industrial city. Having extensive theoretical study, the factors influencing the success of customer relationship management were identified. Using a standard questionnaire with reliability of 96.2 percent (Cronbach's alpha coefficient, existing and desired situations of these factors were compared by experts' point of view. Research population consists of industrialists and professionals in Zahedan industrial city. Because of small population size, data obtained by the entire population; i.e. 54 companies. This applied study is in descriptive-analytical type. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software. Results indicated that all factors affecting the success of implementing customer relationship management, except technology, are used in these companies.

  14. When Should Nintendo Launch its Wii? Insights From a Bivariate Successive Generation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Franses, Philip Hans; Hernández-Mireles, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNovember 2006 most likely marks the launch of Sony’s PS3, the successor to PS2. Later, Nintendo is expected to launch the Wii, the successor to the GameCube. We answer the question in the title by analyzing the diffusion of the earlier generations of these consoles, and by using a new model that extends the successive-generations model of Norton and Bass (1987) by introducing two market players. Based on interviews with consumers and with retailers, we calibrate part of this model...

  15. CASE OF SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF METHOD FOR 3D VISUALIZATION AND MODELING IN THORACIC ONCOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shchadenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The application of method of 3D-visualization and modeling in thoracic oncology is described.Materials and methods. The block diagram of system of 3D-visualization and modeling consisting of six stages is shown. The reconstructions of anatomic computer 3D-models of rib cage and tumor were performed for the patient with cancer (plasma cell myeloma. The tumor size and its topographic anatomy relatively to neighboring organs, bones and soft tissues were identified. Results.The obtained data had been used to plan surgical intervention, which was successfully conducted at Thoracic surgery department ofTomskRegionalClinicalHospital. 

  16. Project Sugar: a recruitment model for successful African-American participation in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruill, Ida

    2004-12-01

    Attempts to increase the number of African-Americans participating in clinical trials, regardless of age, have been hampered by a lack of published data regarding successful recruitment and retention strategies. Successful strategies can be used as a guide for future researchers in the design of studies to recruit African-Americans, regardless of age, into clinical as well as qualitative studies to promote health among this vulnerable population. The goal of the primary study was to recruit 400 families with 2 or more family members affected with diabetes, totaling 800 participants. Project Sugar utilized the coordinated research principals known as CPR (Community, Plan, Reward) to recruit 615 African-American families totalling 1,230 people known as the Sea Island people (Gullahs) in the first five years of the study. The intention of the study was to identify markers for diabetes among these Sea Island natives who tended to be genetically homogenous. In so doing, specific strategies were identified as serendipitous findings for this study. Nonetheless, these serendipitous findings were thought to be so integral to success in the recruitment of African-Americans, mainly because of their success among this fairly close-knit, historically isolated, and significantly genetically homogenous Sea Islanders (Gullah). In recognizing the success of this model, an alternate aim was examined to devise rigorous scientific strategies to promote methods for recruitment of African-Americans into clinical trials aimed at reducing health disparities among this vulnerable population. This projects success can be attributed to the involvement of a local citizen advisory committee and rewards in the form of services, benefits, and incentives to the community. Findings from this alternative aim, which was scientifically built on the CPR model, suggest that when services are provided to the community, coupled with the use of local community advisory committees, the possibilities of

  17. Joint simulation of carbon and tree diversity dynamics in an Amazonian forest succession using TROLL, an individual-based forest dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchaux, Isabelle; Chave, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Amazonian forests are critical for biogeochemical cycles and provide also key ecosystem services. One approach for modelling forest vegetation dynamics is to parameterize species using field-measured plant traits in individual-based forest growth simulators, a method that has been successfully implemented in temperate forests. Here we extend this approach to the tropics. We parameterized the forest dynamics simulator TROLL over a hundred species and simulated the first decades of an ecological succession with tree species encountered in the coastal zone of French Guiana. The model reproduced well the empirically measured values of gross and net primary productivities (GPP and NPP, obtained from eddy-flux measurements) as well as canopy structure (obtained from aerial LiDAR scanning). Modelled species trajectories compared well with empirically measured ones at a clear-cut site for the past four decades. Modelled carbon accumulation curves show that forests are not mature even after 100 years of regeneration. Finally, we discuss how plant hydrology and responses to drought can be integrated into this modelling scheme using data from leaf water potential at wilting point.

  18. Group Dynamics in Top Management Teams: Groupthink, Vigilance, and Alternative Models of Organizational Failure and Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson; Owens; Tetlock; Fan; Martorana

    1998-02-01

    This study explored the heuristic value of Janis' (1982) groupthink and vigilant decision making models as explanations of failure and success in top management team decision making using the Organizational Group Dynamics Q-sort (GDQ). Top management teams of seven Fortune 500 companies were examined at two historical junctures-one when the team was successful (defined as satisfying strategic constituencies) and one when the team was unsuccessful. Results strongly supported the notion that a group' decision making process is systematically related to the outcomes experienced by the team. Ideal-type Q-sorts organized around Janis' analysis of groupthink and vigilance were substantially correlated with Q-sorts of failing and successful groups, respectively. The fit was, however, far from perfect. Ideal-type Q-sorts derived from other frameworks correlated better with the failure-success classification than did the Janis-derived ideal types. Successful groups showed some indicators of groupthink (e.g., risk-taking, cohesion, and strong, opinionated leaders), whereas unsuccessful groups showed signs of vigilance (e.g., internal debate to the point of factionalism). The results illustrate the usefulness of the GDQ for developing and empirically testing theory in organizational behavior from historical cases. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  19. Shortening the learning curve in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery: a reproducible polymer tumor model for the trans-sphenoidal trans-tubercular approach to retro-infundibular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhouma, Moncef; Baidya, Nishanta B; Ismaïl, Abdelhay A; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery attracts an increasing number of young neurosurgeons. This recent technique requires specific technical skills for the approaches to non-pituitary tumors (expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery). Actual residents' busy schedules carry the risk of compromising their laboratory training by limiting significantly the dedicated time for dissections. To enhance and shorten the learning curve in expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery, we propose a reproducible model based on the implantation of a polymer via an intracranial route to provide a pathological retro-infundibular expansive lesion accessible to a virgin expanded endoscopic endonasal route, avoiding the ethically-debatable need to hundreds of pituitary cases in live patients before acquiring the desired skills. A polymer-based tumor model was implanted in 6 embalmed human heads via a microsurgical right fronto-temporal approach through the carotido-oculomotor cistern to mimic a retro-infundibular tumor. The tumor's position was verified by CT-scan. An endoscopic endonasal trans-sphenoidal trans-tubercular trans-planum approach was then carried out on a virgin route under neuronavigation tracking. Dissection of the tumor model from displaced surrounding neurovascular structures reproduced live surgery's sensations and challenges. Post-implantation CT-scan allowed the pre-removal assessment of the tumor insertion, its relationships as well as naso-sphenoidal anatomy in preparation of the endoscopic approach. Training on easily reproducible retro-infundibular approaches in a context of pathological distorted anatomy provides a unique opportunity to avoid the need for repetitive live surgeries to acquire skills for this kind of rare tumors, and may shorten the learning curve for endoscopic endonasal surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Validation of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebowale I

    2017-01-01

    This study is an adaptation of the widely used DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of hospital information systems in a developing country. A survey research design was adopted in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 442 health information management personnel in five Nigerian teaching hospitals. A structural equation modeling technique was used to validate the model's constructs. It was revealed that system quality significantly influenced use (β = 0.53, p 0.05), but it significantly influenced perceived net benefits (β = 0.21, p 0.05). The study validates the DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of a hospital information system in a developing country. Importantly, system quality and use were found to be important measures of hospital information system success. It is, therefore, imperative that hospital information systems are designed in such ways that are easy to use, flexible, and functional to serve their purpose.

  1. Validation of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study is an adaptation of the widely used DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of hospital information systems in a developing country. Methods A survey research design was adopted in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 442 health information management personnel in five Nigerian teaching hospitals. A structural equation modeling technique was used to validate the model's constructs. Results It was revealed that system quality significantly influenced use (β = 0.53, p 0.05), but it significantly influenced perceived net benefits (β = 0.21, p 0.05). Conclusions The study validates the DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of a hospital information system in a developing country. Importantly, system quality and use were found to be important measures of hospital information system success. It is, therefore, imperative that hospital information systems are designed in such ways that are easy to use, flexible, and functional to serve their purpose. PMID:28261532

  2. Modelled three-dimensional suction accuracy predicts prey capture success in three species of centrarchid fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Emily A.; Higham, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Prey capture is critical for survival, and differences in correctly positioning and timing a strike (accuracy) are likely related to variation in capture success. However, an ability to quantify accuracy under natural conditions, particularly for fishes, is lacking. We developed a predictive model of suction hydrodynamics and applied it to natural behaviours using three-dimensional kinematics of three centrarchid fishes capturing evasive and non-evasive prey. A spheroid ingested volume of water (IVW) with dimensions predicted by peak gape and ram speed was verified with known hydrodynamics for two species. Differences in capture success occurred primarily with evasive prey (64–96% success). Micropterus salmoides had the greatest ram and gape when capturing evasive prey, resulting in the largest and most elongate IVW. Accuracy predicted capture success, although other factors may also be important. The lower accuracy previously observed in M. salmoides was not replicated, but this is likely due to more natural conditions in our study. Additionally, we discuss the role of modulation and integrated behaviours in shaping the IVW and determining accuracy. With our model, accuracy is a more accessible performance measure for suction-feeding fishes, which can be used to explore macroevolutionary patterns of prey capture evolution. PMID:24718455

  3. Characterization and optimization of experimental variables within a reproducible bladder encrustation model and in vitro evaluation of the efficacy of urease inhibitors for the prevention of medical device-related encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David S; Djokic, Jasmina; Gorman, Sean P

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a reproducible, cost-effective in vitro encrustation model and, furthermore, describes the effects of components of the artificial urine and the presence of agents that modify the action of urease on encrustation on commercially available ureteral stents. The encrustation model involved the use of small-volume reactors (700 mL) containing artificial urine and employing an orbital incubator (at 37 degrees C) to ensure controlled stirring. The artificial urine contained sources of calcium and magnesium (both as chlorides), albumin and urease. Alteration of the ratio (% w/w) of calcium salt to magnesium salt affected the mass of encrustation, with the greatest encrustation noted whenever magnesium was excluded from the artificial urine. Increasing the concentration of albumin, designed to mimic the presence of protein in urine, significantly decreased the mass of both calcium and magnesium encrustation until a plateau was observed. Finally, exclusion of urease from the artificial urine significantly reduced encrustation due to the indirect effects of this enzyme on pH. Inclusion of the urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid, or urease substrates (methylurea or ethylurea) into the artificial medium markedly reduced encrustation on ureteral stents. In conclusion, this study has described the design of a reproducible, cost-effective in vitro encrustation model. Encrustation was markedly reduced on biomaterials by the inclusion of agents that modify the action of urease. These agents may, therefore, offer a novel clinical approach to the control of encrustation on urological medical devices.

  4. Social Dancing for Successful Ageing: Models for Health, Happiness and Social Inclusion amongst Senior Citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Skinner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article presents findings from a qualitative study of social dancing for successful ageing amongst senior citizens in three locales: in Blackpool (GB, around Belfast (NI, and in Sacramento (US. Findings also attest to the social, psychological and health benefits of social dancing amongst senior citizens. They also articulate three different social dancing models: social dance as tea dance (Sacramento, social dance as practice dance (Blackpool, social dance as motility (Belfast and environs.

  5. Models for Measuring E-Learning Success in Universities: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Iuliana DOROBAT

    2014-01-01

    It is obvious that in the Internet era the higher education institutions (HEIs) must innovate the services they offer by integrating ICT (Information and Communication Technology) in the learning process. According to the theoreticians and practitioners insights in the matter, the e-learning systems offer many advantages and compensate the weaknesses of the traditional learning methods. In consequence, it emerged the need for developing a model that measures the success of the e-learning syst...

  6. How well do environmental archives of atmospheric mercury deposition in the Arctic reproduce rates and trends depicted by atmospheric models and measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsite, M E; Outridge, P M; Christensen, J H; Dastoor, A; Muir, D; Travnikov, O; Wilson, S

    2013-05-01

    This review compares the reconstruction of atmospheric Hg deposition rates and historical trends over recent decades in the Arctic, inferred from Hg profiles in natural archives such as lake and marine sediments, peat bogs and glacial firn (permanent snowpack), against those predicted by three state-of-the-art atmospheric models based on global Hg emission inventories from 1990 onwards. Model veracity was first tested against atmospheric Hg measurements. Most of the natural archive and atmospheric data came from the Canadian-Greenland sectors of the Arctic, whereas spatial coverage was poor in other regions. In general, for the Canadian-Greenland Arctic, models provided good agreement with atmospheric gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) concentrations and trends measured instrumentally. However, there are few instrumented deposition data with which to test the model estimates of Hg deposition, and these data suggest models over-estimated deposition fluxes under Arctic conditions. Reconstructed GEM data from glacial firn on Greenland Summit showed the best agreement with the known decline in global Hg emissions after about 1980, and were corroborated by archived aerosol filter data from Resolute, Nunavut. The relatively stable or slowly declining firn and model GEM trends after 1990 were also corroborated by real-time instrument measurements at Alert, Nunavut, after 1995. However, Hg fluxes and trends in northern Canadian lake sediments and a southern Greenland peat bog did not exhibit good agreement with model predictions of atmospheric deposition since 1990, the Greenland firn GEM record, direct GEM measurements, or trends in global emissions since 1980. Various explanations are proposed to account for these discrepancies between atmosphere and archives, including problems with the accuracy of archive chronologies, climate-driven changes in Hg transfer rates from air to catchments, waters and subsequently into sediments, and post-depositional diagenesis in peat bogs

  7. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m•min−1 cutting speed and 0...... a built–up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognise systematic error distorting the performance test....

  8. Reproducibility of a reaming test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilny, Lukas; Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The reproducibility of a reaming test was analysed to document its applicability as a performance test for cutting fluids. Reaming tests were carried out on a drilling machine using HSS reamers. Workpiece material was an austenitic stainless steel, machined using 4.75 m∙min-1 cutting speed and 0...... a built-up edge occurrence hindering a robust evaluation of cutting fluid performance, if the data evaluation is based on surface finish only. Measurements of hole geometry provide documentation to recognize systematic error distorting the performance test....

  9. An Analytic Model for the Success Rate of a Robotic Actuator System in Hitting Random Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Stuart

    2015-11-20

    Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of applications such as precision agriculture, medicine, and the military. These systems have common features which often includes an action by an "actuator" interacting with a target. While simulations and measurements exist for the success rate of hitting targets by some systems, there is a dearth of analytic models which can give insight into, and guidance on optimization, of new robotic systems. The present paper develops a simple model for estimation of the success rate for hitting random targets from a moving platform. The model has two main dimensionless parameters: the ratio of actuator spacing to target diameter; and the ratio of platform distance moved (between actuator "firings") to the target diameter. It is found that regions of parameter space having specified high success are described by simple equations, providing guidance on design. The role of a "cost function" is introduced which, when minimized, provides optimization of design, operating, and risk mitigation costs.

  10. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Legendre, Louis; Guidi, Lionel; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Jamet, Dominique; Mousseau, Laure; Pedrotti, Maria-Luiza; Picheral, Marc; Gorsky, Gabriel; Sardet, Christian; Stemmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available). Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche) weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model) characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  11. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Romagnan

    Full Text Available Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes and larger (i.e. macroplankton organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available. Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  12. An Analytic Model for the Success Rate of a Robotic Actuator System in Hitting Random Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Bradley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous robotic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of applications such as precision agriculture, medicine, and the military. These systems have common features which often includes an action by an “actuator” interacting with a target. While simulations and measurements exist for the success rate of hitting targets by some systems, there is a dearth of analytic models which can give insight into, and guidance on optimization, of new robotic systems. The present paper develops a simple model for estimation of the success rate for hitting random targets from a moving platform. The model has two main dimensionless parameters: the ratio of actuator spacing to target diameter; and the ratio of platform distance moved (between actuator “firings” to the target diameter. It is found that regions of parameter space having specified high success are described by simple equations, providing guidance on design. The role of a “cost function” is introduced which, when minimized, provides optimization of design, operating, and risk mitigation costs.

  13. Theoretical Modeling and Computer Simulations for the Origins and Evolution of Reproducing Molecular Systems and Complex Systems with Many Interactive Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2000-01-01

    Our research effort has produced nine publications in peer-reviewed journals listed at the end of this report. The work reported here are in the following areas: (1) genetic network modeling; (2) autocatalytic model of pre-biotic evolution; (3) theoretical and computational studies of strongly correlated electron systems; (4) reducing thermal oscillations in atomic force microscope; (5) transcription termination mechanism in prokaryotic cells; and (6) the low glutamine usage in thennophiles obtained by studying completely sequenced genomes. We discuss the main accomplishments of these publications.

  14. Comprehensive benefit of flood resources utilization through dynamic successive fuzzy evaluation model: A case study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Taking the flood resources utilization in Baicheng, Jilin during 2002–2007 as the research background, and based on the entropy weight and multi-level & multi-objective fuzzy optimization theory, this research established a multi-level & semi-constructive index system and dynamic successive evaluation model for comprehensive benefit evaluation of regional flood resources utilization. With the year 2002 as the base year, the analyzing results showed that there existed a close positive correlation between flood utilization volume and its benefits, comprehensive evaluation value and its comparison increment. Within the six successive evaluation years, the comprehensive benefit of 2003 was the best, in which the benefit evaluation increment reached 82.8% whereas the year of 2004 was the worst, in which the increment was only 18.2%. Thus the sustainability and correctness of the evaluation were verified by six years successive evaluation and increment comparison. The analyzing results showed that the economic benefits, ecological benefits and social benefits of flood utilization were remarkable, and that the comprehensive benefit could be improved by increasing flood utilization capacity, which would promote the regional sustainable development as well. The established dynamic successive evaluation provides a stable theoretical basis and technical support for further flood utilization.

  15. A Blueprint for Success: A Model for Developing Engineering Education in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rose Nova King

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the emergence and development of the ‘Centre for Engineering and Design Education’ (CEDE at Loughborough University, UK, and provides a blueprint for success. With ample evidence that such a Centre can prove to be a highly effective support mechanism for discipline-specific academics and can develop and maintain valuable national and international networks and collaborations along with considerable esteem for the host university. The CEDE is unique in the UK and has achieved considerable success and recognition within the local engineering education community and beyond for the past 16 years. Here we discuss the historical background of the Centre’s development, the context in which it operates, and its effective management and operation strategy. The success it has enjoyed is described through examples, with much evidence of the generation of a significant amount of external funding; the development of high quality learning spaces; learning technology systems, open source software and improvements in curriculum design; a strong record of research and publication on the pedagogy of engineering; strong links with industry and employers; and a wealth of connections and know-how built up over the years. This paper provides the institutions with a model blueprint for success in developing engineering education.

  16. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  17. Spatial patterns of breeding success of grizzly bears derived from hierarchical multistate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jason T; Wheatley, Matthew; Mackenzie, Darryl

    2014-10-01

    Conservation programs often manage populations indirectly through the landscapes in which they live. Empirically, linking reproductive success with landscape structure and anthropogenic change is a first step in understanding and managing the spatial mechanisms that affect reproduction, but this link is not sufficiently informed by data. Hierarchical multistate occupancy models can forge these links by estimating spatial patterns of reproductive success across landscapes. To illustrate, we surveyed the occurrence of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Canadian Rocky Mountains Alberta, Canada. We deployed camera traps for 6 weeks at 54 surveys sites in different types of land cover. We used hierarchical multistate occupancy models to estimate probability of detection, grizzly bear occupancy, and probability of reproductive success at each site. Grizzly bear occupancy varied among cover types and was greater in herbaceous alpine ecotones than in low-elevation wetlands or mid-elevation conifer forests. The conditional probability of reproductive success given grizzly bear occupancy was 30% (SE = 0.14). Grizzly bears with cubs had a higher probability of detection than grizzly bears without cubs, but sites were correctly classified as being occupied by breeding females 49% of the time based on raw data and thus would have been underestimated by half. Repeated surveys and multistate modeling reduced the probability of misclassifying sites occupied by breeders as unoccupied to grizzly bear occupancy varied across the landscape. Those patches with highest probabilities of breeding occupancy-herbaceous alpine ecotones-were small and highly dispersed and are projected to shrink as treelines advance due to climate warming. Understanding spatial correlates in breeding distribution is a key requirement for species conservation in the face of climate change and can help identify priorities for landscape management and protection.

  18. Simulation of the hydrodynamic conditions of the eye to better reproduce the drug release from hydrogel contact lenses: experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, A F R; Valente, A; Pereira, J M C; Pereira, J C F; Filipe, H P; Mata, J L G; Colaço, R; Saramago, B; Serro, A P

    2016-12-01

    Currently, most in vitro drug release studies for ophthalmic applications are carried out in static sink conditions. Although this procedure is simple and useful to make comparative studies, it does not describe adequately the drug release kinetics in the eye, considering the small tear volume and flow rates found in vivo. In this work, a microfluidic cell was designed and used to mimic the continuous, volumetric flow rate of tear fluid and its low volume. The suitable operation of the cell, in terms of uniformity and symmetry of flux, was proved using a numerical model based in the Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. The release profile of a model system (a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-based hydrogel (HEMA/PVP) for soft contact lenses (SCLs) loaded with diclofenac) obtained with the microfluidic cell was compared with that obtained in static conditions, showing that the kinetics of release in dynamic conditions is slower. The application of the numerical model demonstrated that the designed cell can be used to simulate the drug release in the whole range of the human eye tear film volume and allowed to estimate the drug concentration in the volume of liquid in direct contact with the hydrogel. The knowledge of this concentration, which is significantly different from that measured in the experimental tests during the first hours of release, is critical to predict the toxicity of the drug release system and its in vivo efficacy. In conclusion, the use of the microfluidic cell in conjunction with the numerical model shall be a valuable tool to design and optimize new therapeutic drug-loaded SCLs.

  19. Large barrier, highly uniform and reproducible Ni-Si/4H-SiC forward Schottky diode characteristics: testing the limits of Tung's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Sabih U.; Sudarshan, Tangali S.; Rana, Tawhid A.; Song, Haizheng; Chandrashekhar, M. V. S.

    2014-07-01

    We report highly ideal (n < 1.1), uniform nickel silicide (Ni-Si)/SiC Schottky barrier (1.60-1.67 eV with a standard deviation <2.8%) diodes, fabricated on 4H-SiC epitaxial layers grown by chemical vapour deposition. The barrier height was constant over a wide epilayer doping range of 1014-1016 cm-3, apart from a slight decrease consistent with image force lowering. This remarkable uniformity was achieved by careful optimization of the annealing of the Schottky interface to minimize non-idealities that could lead to inhomogeneity. Tung's barrier inhomogeneity model was used to quantify the level of inhomogeneity in the optimized annealed diodes. The estimated ‘bulk’ barrier height (1.75 eV) was consistent with the Shockley-Mott limit for the Ni-Si/4H-SiC interface, implying an unpinned Fermi level. But the model was not useful to explain the poor ideality in unoptimized, as-deposited Schottky contacts (n = 1.6 - 2.5). We show analytically and numerically that only idealities n < 1.21 can be explained using Tung's model, irrespective of material system, indicating that the barrier height inhomogeneity is not the only cause of poor ideality in Schottky diodes. For explaining this highly non-ideal behaviour, other factors (e.g. interface traps, morphological defects, extrinsic impurities, etc) need to be considered.

  20. PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.

  1. Poor reproducibility of allergic rhinitis SNP associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nilsson

    Full Text Available Replication of reported associations is crucial to the investigation of complex disease. More than 100 SNPs have previously been reported as associated with allergic rhinitis (AR, but few of these have been replicated successfully. To investigate the general reproducibility of reported AR-associations in candidate gene studies, one Swedish (352 AR-cases, 709 controls and one Singapore Chinese population (948 AR-cases, 580 controls were analyzed using 49 AR-associated SNPs. The overall pattern of P-values indicated that very few of the investigated SNPs were associated with AR. Given published odds ratios (ORs most SNPs showed high power to detect an association, but no correlations were found between the ORs of the two study populations or with published ORs. None of the association signals were in common to the two genome-wide association studies published in AR, indicating that the associations represent false positives or have much lower effect-sizes than reported.

  2. Successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis with flavour coupling effects in realistic unified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Stephen F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton,Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-02

    In realistic unified models involving so-called SO(10)-inspired patterns of Dirac and heavy right-handed (RH) neutrino masses, the lightest right-handed neutrino N{sub 1} is too light to yield successful thermal leptogenesis, barring highly fine tuned solutions, while the second heaviest right-handed neutrino N{sub 2} is typically in the correct mass range. We show that flavour coupling effects in the Boltzmann equations may be crucial to the success of such N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis, by helping to ensure that the flavour asymmetries produced at the N{sub 2} scale survive N{sub 1} washout. To illustrate these effects we focus on N{sub 2} dominated leptogenesis in an existing model, the A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam, where the neutrino Dirac mass matrix may be equal to an up-type quark mass matrix and has a particular constrained structure. The numerical results, supported by analytical insight, show that in order to achieve successful N{sub 2} leptogenesis, consistent with neutrino phenomenology, requires a “flavour swap scenario” together with a less hierarchical pattern of RH neutrino masses than naively expected, at the expense of some mild fine-tuning. In the considered A to Z model neutrino masses are predicted to be normal ordered, with an atmospheric neutrino mixing angle well into the second octant and the Dirac phase δ≃20{sup ∘}, a set of predictions that will be tested in the next years in neutrino oscillation experiments. Flavour coupling effects may be relevant for other SO(10)-inspired unified models where N{sub 2} leptogenesis is necessary.

  3. SNP CHARACTERISTICS PREDICT REPLICATION SUCCESS IN ASSOCIATION STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlov, Ivan P.; Moore, Jason H.; Peng, Bo; Jin, Jennifer L.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Successful independent replication is the most direct approach for distinguishing real genotype-disease associations from false discoveries in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Selecting SNPs for replication has been primarily based on p-values from the discovery stage, although additional characteristics of SNPs may be used to improve replication success. We used disease-associated SNPs from more than 2,000 published GWASs to identify predictors of SNP reproducibility. SNP reproducibility was defined as a proportion of successful replications among all replication attempts. The study reporting association for the first time was considered to be discovery and all consequent studies targeting the same phenotype replications. We found that −Log(P), where P is a p-value from the discovery study, is the strongest predictor of the SNP reproducibility. Other significant predictors include type of the SNP (e.g. missense vs intronic SNPs) and minor allele frequency. Features of the genes linked to the disease-associated SNP also predict SNP reproducibility. Based on empirically defined rules, we developed a reproducibility score (RS) to predict SNP reproducibility independently of −Log(P). We used data from two lung cancer GWAS studies as well as recently reported disease-associated SNPs to validate RS. Minus Log(P) outperforms RS when the very top SNPs are selected, while RS works better with relaxed selection criteria. In conclusion, we propose an empirical model to predict SNP reproducibility, which can be used to select SNPs for validation and prioritization. PMID:25273843

  4. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  5. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  6. Novel Causality in Consumer’s Online Behavior: Ecommerce Success Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Khatoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Online shopping (e-Shopping has grown at a rapid pace with the advancement in modern web technologies, there are then socio and technical aspects (factors in the mentioned e-shopping. The following research paper highlights some mandatory socio-technical factors affecting consumer’s behavior in online shopping environment. In this work a comprehensive conceptual model is put forward based on proposed reform DeLone and McLean Success Model for Information Systems. This model is used for the assessment of the success of eCommerce web portals. Approximately thirteen different hypotheses are proposed on the bases of this methodology which represent the cause and effect relationship among the various variables affecting consumer’s online buying behavior. Further this work is simulated in iThink technology to show prominently that consumer’s satisfaction and trust directly affects productivity of the organization. For development organizations the proposed methodology is valuable because it will facilitate in building the eCommerce websites, web portals whereas retailers can improve the productivity of their organization by accomplishing this.

  7. A decision support model to determine the critical success factors of asset management services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooste, Johannes Lodewyk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Business-to-business services relating to physical asset management play an increasingly important role in industry. This is in the context of the current pressures that organisations experience in realising optimal value from their assets. Complying with asset management standards such as ISO 55000 contributes towards the importance of these services. This paper summarises the findings from a study identifying the critical success factors for asset management services, and presents a decision support model that provides the asset management community with access to these factors for decision-making and for improving asset management services.

  8. A domestic model for successful implementation of enterprise resource planning (ERP systems in Iranian manufacturing enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rahmani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the human-behavioral dimension of technology acceptance in enterprises. It is evident that accepting a technology depends on the underlying circumstances of the environment. We have approached this issue from two different angles of social and technological architecture. The research tries to explore proper enterprise architecture for ERP system acceptance. Social Architecture (SA is defined as the set of circumstances that makes people behave in a particular way. So behavior of persons (employees of an enterprise can be a function of SA. Hence acceptance of a system can be dictated by SA and manipulating SA can result in desirable success for a technology system. We have achieved various variables of social architecture and have examined their relevance to system acceptance and success in related enterprises (research domain beside technological architecture variables. The results have indicated that a special form of social and technological architecture can lead to success for ERP system in the enterprises of the research domain. This gave us a model of architecture.

  9. Modelling the interactions among factors that influence successful computerisation of small business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Fogarty

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Small businesses face many problems if they are to survive the first five years of operation. The increasing complexity of information needed to run a business in the 21st Century has added another obstacle to what is already a tough course. Sooner or later, survivors are faced with the prospect of investing in computer based information systems (CBIS. Properly handled, the investment will improve the competitiveness of the company. Badly handled, the investment will handicap the company and perhaps even lead to its closure. Using survey methodology, the present study collected information from 171 small businesses that had purchased computer systems with a view to finding out what factors contribute to successful implementation of CBIS. The variables studied included background characteristics of the organization, background characteristics of the Chief Executive Officer, decision making processes, and a range of variables relating to the performance of the system itself. The outcome variable was user satisfaction. We developed and tested a CBIS implementation success model based on these variables. Results showed that although the performance of the system was the immediate determinant of satisfaction, the background variables had both direct and indirect (mediated effects on satisfaction. These findings emphasise the importance of going beyond the immediate surrounds of a computing environment if one wishes to explain the factors that influence CBIS success in small businesses.

  10. Building Consensus on Community Standards for Reproducible Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Nielsen, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    As geochemists, the traditional model by which standard methods for generating, presenting, and using data have been generated relied on input from the community, the results of seminal studies, a variety of authoritative bodies, and has required a great deal of time. The rate of technological and related policy change has accelerated to the point that this historical model does not satisfy the needs of the community, publishers, or funders. The development of a new mechanism for building consensus raises a number of questions: Which aspects of our data are the focus of reproducibility standards? Who sets the standards? How do we subdivide the development of the consensus? We propose an open, transparent, and inclusive approach to the development of data and reproducibility standards that is organized around specific sub-disciplines and driven by the community of practitioners in those sub-disciplines. It should involve editors, program managers, and representatives of domain data facilities as well as professional societies, but avoid any single group to be the final authority. A successful example of this model is the Editors Roundtable, a cross section of editors, funders, and data facility managers that discussed and agreed on leading practices for the reporting of geochemical data in publications, including accessibility and format of the data, data quality information, and metadata and identifiers for samples (Goldstein et al., 2014). We argue that development of data and reproducibility standards needs to heavily rely on representatives from the community of practitioners to set priorities and provide perspective. Groups of editors, practicing scientists, and other stakeholders would be assigned the task of reviewing existing practices and recommending changes as deemed necessary. They would weigh the costs and benefits of changing the standards for that community, propose appropriate tools to facilitate those changes, work through the professional societies

  11. Collaborative Testing as a Model for Addressing Equity in Student Success in STEM Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileonardo, C.; James, B. R.

    2016-12-01

    Introductory Earth science classes at two-year colleges play a critical role as "gateway courses" for underrepresented student populations into undergraduate STEM programs. Students entering college underprepared in math and science typically receive their only exposure to science at the undergraduate level in introductory courses in the Earth and space sciences. In many colleges a huge disparity exists in these classes between success rates amongst students from groups traditionally represented in the STEM fields and those from underrepresented populations. Closing the equity gap in success in these courses is a major focus of many pilot projects nationally. This concern has also led to the adoption of new teaching and learning practices, based on research in learning, in introductory Earth science pedagogy. Models of teaching practices including greater engagement, active learning approaches, and collaborative learning structures seem to help with student achievement in introductory courses. But, whereas these practices might increase overall student success they have not proven to close the equity gap in achievement. De Anza a two-year college in the San Francisco bay area has a long history in the geology department of incorporating and testing teaching practices developed out of research in learning. Collaborative learning has infused every aspect of our learning approaches in the Earth sciences, including laboratory, fieldwork, and test preparation. Though these approaches seemed to have educational benefit the huge equity gap department-wide persisted between targeted and non-targeted populations. Three years ago collaborative testing models were introduced into our geology and meteorology classes. The mechanism included methods for directly comparing collaborative to individual testing. The net result was that targeted populations including African Americans, Latinos, and Filipinos increased steadily at around 3.5% per year from 66% to 73%. The overall

  12. Empirical Succession Mapping and Data Assimilation to Constrain Demographic Processes in an Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R.; Andrews, T.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Shifts in ecological communities in response to environmental change have implications for biodiversity, ecosystem function, and feedbacks to global climate change. Community composition is fundamentally the product of demography, but demographic processes are simplified or missing altogether in many ecosystem, Earth system, and species distribution models. This limitation arises in part because demographic data are noisy and difficult to synthesize. As a consequence, demographic processes are challenging to formulate in models in the first place, and to verify and constrain with data thereafter. Here, we used a novel analysis of the USFS Forest Inventory Analysis to improve the representation of demography in an ecosystem model. First, we created an Empirical Succession Mapping (ESM) based on ~1 million individual tree observations from the eastern U.S. to identify broad demographic patterns related to forest succession and disturbance. We used results from this analysis to guide reformulation of the Ecosystem Demography model (ED), an existing forest simulator with explicit tree demography. Results from the ESM reveal a coherent, cyclic pattern of change in temperate forest tree size and density over the eastern U.S. The ESM captures key ecological processes including succession, self-thinning, and gap-filling, and quantifies the typical trajectory of these processes as a function of tree size and stand density. Recruitment is most rapid in early-successional stands with low density and mean diameter, but slows as stand density increases; mean diameter increases until thinning promotes recruitment of small-diameter trees. Strikingly, the upper bound of size-density space that emerges in the ESM conforms closely to the self-thinning power law often observed in ecology. The ED model obeys this same overall size-density boundary, but overestimates plot-level growth, mortality, and fecundity rates, leading to unrealistic emergent demographic patterns. In particular

  13. Rethinking motor learning and savings in adaptation paradigms: model-free memory for successful actions combines with internal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Vincent S; Haith, Adrian; Mazzoni, Pietro; Krakauer, John W

    2011-05-26

    Although motor learning is likely to involve multiple processes, phenomena observed in error-based motor learning paradigms tend to be conceptualized in terms of only a single process: adaptation, which occurs through updating an internal model. Here we argue that fundamental phenomena like movement direction biases, savings (faster relearning), and interference do not relate to adaptation but instead are attributable to two additional learning processes that can be characterized as model-free: use-dependent plasticity and operant reinforcement. Although usually "hidden" behind adaptation, we demonstrate, with modified visuomotor rotation paradigms, that these distinct model-based and model-free processes combine to learn an error-based motor task. (1) Adaptation of an internal model channels movements toward successful error reduction in visual space. (2) Repetition of the newly adapted movement induces directional biases toward the repeated movement. (3) Operant reinforcement through association of the adapted movement with successful error reduction is responsible for savings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Designing for sustained adoption: A model of developing educational innovations for successful propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Raina; Henderson, Charles; Cole, Renée; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; Friedrichsen, Debra; Stanford, Courtney

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The physics education research community has produced a wealth of knowledge about effective teaching and learning of college level physics. Based on this knowledge, many research-proven instructional strategies and teaching materials have been developed and are currently available to instructors. Unfortunately, these intensive research and development activities have failed to influence the teaching practices of many physics instructors. This paper describes interim results of a larger study to develop a model of designing materials for successful propagation. The larger study includes three phases, the first two of which are reported here. The goal of the first phase was to characterize typical propagation practices of education developers, using data from a survey of 1284 National Science Foundation (NSF) principal investigators and focus group data from eight disciplinary groups of NSF program directors. The goal of the second phase was to develop an understanding of successful practice by studying three instructional strategies that have been well propagated. The result of the first two phases is a tentative model of designing for successful propagation, which will be further validated in the third phase through purposeful sampling of additional well-propagated instructional strategies along with typical education development projects. We found that interaction with potential adopters was one of the key missing ingredients in typical education development activities. Education developers often develop a polished product before getting feedback, rely on mass-market communication channels for dissemination, and do not plan for supporting adopters during implementation. The tentative model resulting from this study identifies three key propagation activities: interactive development, interactive dissemination, and support of adopters. Interactive development

  15. Performance analysis of successive over relaxation method for solving glioma growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abida; Faye, Ibrahima; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumor is one of the prevalent cancers in the world that lead to death. In light of the present information of the properties of gliomas, mathematical models have been developed by scientists to quantify the proliferation and invasion dynamics of glioma. In this study, one-dimensional glioma growth model is considered, and finite difference method is used to discretize the problem. Then, two stationary methods, namely Gauss-Seidel (GS) and Successive Over Relaxation (SOR) are used to solve the governing algebraic system. The performance of the methods are evaluated in terms of number of iteration and computational time. On the basis of performance analysis, SOR method is shown to be more superior compared to GS method.

  16. Models of Success for the Romanian Economic Organizations: New Characteristics of the National Competitive Advantage Mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian-Gelu LUPU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current period of uncertainty and economic stagnation, the national economies are trying to redefine and identify again the sources of the competitive advantage. The neo-Keynesian models are once more facing the liberal models, the austerity strategies are facing the investment strategies, the partisans of each of these opinions appreciating the opportunity of their own proposal. The results of the study come to align many of the specialists’ efforts, to contribute to identifying the optimum way of combining the resources, the mix of measures that can provide the lasting competitive advantage of the national economy, and, finally, to identify the component elements of the “Romanian diamond” of generating success and increasing external attractiveness.

  17. Validation of a Prediction Model for Vaginal Birth after Cesarean Delivery Reveals Unexpected Success in a Diverse American Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykin, Melanie Mai; Mularz, Amanda J.; Lee, Lydia K.; Valderramos, Stephanie Gaw

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the validity of a prediction model for success of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) in an ethnically diverse population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women admitted at a single academic institution for a trial of labor after cesarean from May 2007 to January 2015. Individual predicted success rates were calculated using the Maternal–Fetal Medicine Units Network prediction model. Participants were stratified into three probability-of-success groups: low (65%). The actual versus predicted success rates were compared. Results In total, 568 women met inclusion criteria. Successful VBAC occurred in 402 (71%), compared with a predicted success rate of 66% (p = 0.016). Actual VBAC success rates were higher than predicted by the model in the low (57 vs. 29%; p < 0.001) and moderate (61 vs. 52%; p = 0.003) groups. In the high probability group, the observed and predicted VBAC rates were the same (79%). Conclusion When the predicted success rate was above 65%, the model was highly accurate. In contrast, for women with predicted success rates <35%, actual VBAC rates were nearly twofold higher in our population, suggesting that they should not be discouraged by a low prediction score.

  18. Validation of a Prediction Model for Vaginal Birth after Cesarean Delivery Reveals Unexpected Success in a Diverse American Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykin, Melanie Mai; Mularz, Amanda J; Lee, Lydia K; Valderramos, Stephanie Gaw

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the validity of a prediction model for success of vaginal birth after cesarean delivery (VBAC) in an ethnically diverse population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of women admitted at a single academic institution for a trial of labor after cesarean from May 2007 to January 2015. Individual predicted success rates were calculated using the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network prediction model. Participants were stratified into three probability-of-success groups: low (65%). The actual versus predicted success rates were compared. Results In total, 568 women met inclusion criteria. Successful VBAC occurred in 402 (71%), compared with a predicted success rate of 66% (p = 0.016). Actual VBAC success rates were higher than predicted by the model in the low (57 vs. 29%; p success rate was above 65%, the model was highly accurate. In contrast, for women with predicted success rates <35%, actual VBAC rates were nearly twofold higher in our population, suggesting that they should not be discouraged by a low prediction score.

  19. Triple Diagonal modeling: A mechanism to focus productivity improvement for business success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, L.O. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Villareal, L.D. [Army Depot, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Triple Diagonal (M) modeling is a technique to help quickly diagnose an organization`s existing production system and to identify significant improvement opportunities in executing, controlling, and planning operations. TD modeling is derived from ICAM Definition Language (IDEF 0)-also known as Structured Analysis and Design Technique. It has been used successfully at several Department of Defense remanufacturing facilities trying to accomplish significant production system modernization. TD has several advantages over other modeling techniques. First, it quickly does ``As-ls`` analysis and then moves on to identify improvements. Second, creating one large diagram makes it easier to share the TD model throughout an organization, rather than the many linked 8 1/2 {times} 11`` drawings used in traditional decomposition approaches. Third, it acts as a communication mechanism to share understanding about improvement opportunities that may cross existing functional/organizational boundaries. Finally, TD acts as a vehicle to build a consensus on a prioritized list of improvement efforts that ``hangs togethers as an agenda for systemic changes in the production system and the improved integration of support functions.

  20. Hierarchical Bayesian Markov switching models with application to predicting spawning success of shovelnose sturgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holan, S.H.; Davis, G.M.; Wildhaber, M.L.; DeLonay, A.J.; Papoulias, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    The timing of spawning in fish is tightly linked to environmental factors; however, these factors are not very well understood for many species. Specifically, little information is available to guide recruitment efforts for endangered species such as the sturgeon. Therefore, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model for predicting the success of spawning of the shovelnose sturgeon which uses both biological and behavioural (longitudinal) data. In particular, we use data that were produced from a tracking study that was conducted in the Lower Missouri River. The data that were produced from this study consist of biological variables associated with readiness to spawn along with longitudinal behavioural data collected by using telemetry and archival data storage tags. These high frequency data are complex both biologically and in the underlying behavioural process. To accommodate such complexity we developed a hierarchical linear regression model that uses an eigenvalue predictor, derived from the transition probability matrix of a two-state Markov switching model with generalized auto-regressive conditional heteroscedastic dynamics. Finally, to minimize the computational burden that is associated with estimation of this model, a parallel computing approach is proposed. ?? Journal compilation 2009 Royal Statistical Society.

  1. Learning the Inverse Dynamics of Robotic Manipulators in Structured Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-An; Huang, Han-Pang; Hsu, Huan-Kun; Lai, Wei-Zh; Cheng, Chih-Chun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the modeling of inverse dynamics without prior kinematic information for holonomic rigid-body robots. Despite success in compensating robot dynamics and friction, general inverse dynamics models are nontrivial. Rigid-body models are restrictive or inefficient; learning-based models are generalizable yet require large training data. The structured kernels address the dilemma by embedding the robot dynamics in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The proposed kernels autonomously converge to rigid-body models but require fewer samples; with a semi-parametric framework that incorporates additional parametric basis for friction, the structured kernels can efficiently model general rigid-body robots. We tested the proposed scheme in simulations and experiments; the models that consider the structure of function space are more accurate.

  2. A workflow for reproducing mean benthic gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Emery, Hollie E.; Maguire, Timothy J.

    2016-08-01

    Long-term data sets provide unique opportunities to examine temporal variability of key ecosystem processes. The need for such data sets is becoming increasingly important as we try to quantify the impact of human activities across various scales and in some cases, as we try to determine the success of management interventions. Unfortunately, long-term benthic flux data sets for coastal ecosystems are rare and curating them is a challenge. If we wish to make our data available to others now and into the future, however, then we need to provide mechanisms that allow others to understand our methods, access the data, reproduce the results, and see updates as they become available. Here we use techniques, learned through the EarthCube Ontosoft Geoscience Paper of the Future project, to develop best practices to allow us to share a long-term data set of directly measured net sediment N2 fluxes and sediment oxygen demand at two sites in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (USA). This technical report describes the process we used, the challenges we faced, and the steps we will take in the future to ensure transparency and reproducibility. By developing these data and software sharing tools we hope to help disseminate well-curated data with provenance as well as products from these data, so that the community can better assess how this temperate estuary has changed over time. We also hope to provide a data sharing model for others to follow so that long-term estuarine data are more easily shared and not lost over time.

  3. On The Reproducibility of Seasonal Land-surface Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T J

    2004-10-22

    The sensitivity of the continental seasonal climate to initial conditions is estimated from an ensemble of decadal simulations of an atmospheric general circulation model with the same specifications of radiative forcings and monthly ocean boundary conditions, but with different initial states of atmosphere and land. As measures of the ''reproducibility'' of continental climate for different initial conditions, spatio-temporal correlations are computed across paired realizations of eleven model land-surface variables in which the seasonal cycle is either included or excluded--the former case being pertinent to climate simulation, and the latter to seasonal anomaly prediction. It is found that the land-surface variables which include the seasonal cycle are impacted only marginally by changes in initial conditions; moreover, their seasonal climatologies exhibit high spatial reproducibility. In contrast, the reproducibility of a seasonal land-surface anomaly is generally low, although it is substantially higher in the Tropics; its spatial reproducibility also markedly fluctuates in tandem with warm and cold phases of the El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, the overall degree of reproducibility depends strongly on the particular land-surface anomaly considered. It is also shown that the predictability of a land-surface anomaly implied by its reproducibility statistics is consistent with what is inferred from more conventional predictability metrics. Implications of these results for climate model intercomparison projects and for operational forecasts of seasonal continental climate also are elaborated.

  4. Diabetes reversal via gene transfer: building on successes in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerace D

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dario Gerace,1,* Rosetta Martiniello-Wilks,1,2,* Ann M Simpson1 1School of Medical and Molecular Biosciences, Centre for Health Technologies, 2Translational Cancer Research Group, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D is caused by the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. People with T1D manage their hyperglycemia using daily insulin injections; however, this does not prevent the development of long-term diabetic complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and various macrovascular disorders. Currently, the only "cure" for T1D is pancreas transplantation or islet-cell transplantation; however, this is hampered by the limited number of donors and the requirement for life-long immunosuppression. As a result, the need for alternative therapies is vital. One of the strategies employed to correct T1D is the use of gene transfer to generate the production of an “artificial” β-cell that is capable of secreting insulin in response to fluctuating glucose concentrations that normally occurs in people without T1D. The treatment of many diseases using cell and gene therapy is generating significant attention in the T1D research community; however, for a cell therapy to enter clinical trials, success and safety must first be shown in an appropriate animal model. Animal models have been used in diabetes research for over a century, have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetes, and have led to the discovery of useful drugs for the treatment of the disease. Currently, the nonobese diabetic mouse is the animal model of choice for the study of T1D as it most closely reflects disease development in humans. The aim of this review is to evaluate the success of cell and gene therapy to reverse T1D in animal models for future clinical application. Keywords: β-cell transcription factors, animal

  5. Modeling community succession and assembly: A novel method for network evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling community succession and assembly is in some sense a method for network evolution, as done by Barabasi and Albert (1999. It is also one of the methods to create a sample networkfrom the statistic network I proposed earlier. I think that the mechanism of network evolution supposed by Barabasi and Albert is most likely applicable to the natural phenomena with emergency property. For natural phenomena without emergency property, the present study indicated that a scale-free network may be produced through a new mechanism, i.e., whether the connection of a taxon x occurs, dependent on the type and property of taxon y (in particular, the degree of its direct correlation with x to be connected but not necessarily the existing number of connections of taxon y, as proposed in present study.

  6. Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise.

  7. Italian industrial districts: A model of success or a weak productive system?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Schilirò

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution focuses on two issues. The first one concerns the characteristics of industrial districts and the increasing weight of these districts in the Italian system of production. The second issue is about the competitiveness of the Italian industrial districts, if they represent a model of success or rather a weak system of production. Thus, the transformation of the industrial districts is examined and the strengths and weaknesses are highlighted. One argument that comes out of this investigation is that industrial districts are strongly influenced by institutions, territory, and also by the social and cultural environment. The second argument regards the competitiveness of this Italian industrial development model, based on SMEs, which is founded on the specialization of productions, on innovation and internationalization. The paper argues that this model, which represents the ``Made in Italy'', is still a strong and dynamic system which has shown good performances and it represents a paradigm of lasting competitiveness, even if it is restrained by many external chronic constraints.

  8. Using a micro-level model to generate a macro-level model of productive successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jessica K M; Sarkisian, Natalia; Williamson, John B

    2015-02-01

    Aging successfully entails good physical and cognitive health, as well as ongoing participation in social and productive activity. This study hones in on participation in productive activity, a factor that makes an important contribution to successful aging. One conceptual model of productive activity in later life specifies the antecedents and consequences of productivity. This study draws on that micro-level model to develop a corresponding macro-level model and assesses its utility for examining the predictors of and explaining the relationships between one form of productivity (labor force participation rates) and one aspect of well-being (average life expectancy) among males and females. Random effects regression models and path analysis were used to analyze cross-national longitudinal data for 24 high-income Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries at seven time points (1980-2010; 168 observations total). OECD countries with higher labor force participation rates among older workers have higher life expectancies. Labor force participation mediates the effects of gross domestic product per capita on male and female life expectancy, and it mediates the effect of self-employment rate for men, but it acts as a suppressor with regard to the effect of public spending on male and female life expectancy. A well-known micro-level model of productive activity can be fruitfully adapted to account for macro-level cross-national variation in productivity and well-being. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A review of successful aging models: Proposing proactive coping as an important additional strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, C.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Successful aging is an important concept, and one that has been the subject of much research. During the last 15 years, the emphasis of this research has shifted from formulating criteria for successful aging to describing the processes involved in successful aging. The main purpose of the present a

  10. A review of successful aging models: proposing proactive coping as an important additional strategy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, C.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Successful aging is an important concept, and one that has been the subject of much research. During the last 15 years, the emphasis of this research has shifted from formulating criteria for successful aging to describing the processes involved in successful aging. The main purpose of the present a

  11. Evaluation of multichannel reproduced sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choisel, Sylvain; Wickelmaier, Florian Maria

    2007-01-01

    , as well as overall preference, was based on consistency tests of binary paired-comparison judgments and on modeling the choice frequencies using probabilistic choice models. As a result, the preferences of non-expert listeners could be measured reliably at a ratio scale level. Principal components derived...... from the quantified attributes predict overall preference well. The findings allow for some generalizations within musical program genres regarding the perception of and preference for certain spatial reproduction modes, but for limited generalizations across selections from different musical genres....

  12. Theory of reproducing kernels and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Saburou

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a large extension of the general theory of reproducing kernels published by N. Aronszajn in 1950, with many concrete applications. In Chapter 1, many concrete reproducing kernels are first introduced with detailed information. Chapter 2 presents a general and global theory of reproducing kernels with basic applications in a self-contained way. Many fundamental operations among reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces are dealt with. Chapter 2 is the heart of this book. Chapter 3 is devoted to the Tikhonov regularization using the theory of reproducing kernels with applications to numerical and practical solutions of bounded linear operator equations. In Chapter 4, the numerical real inversion formulas of the Laplace transform are presented by applying the Tikhonov regularization, where the reproducing kernels play a key role in the results. Chapter 5 deals with ordinary differential equations; Chapter 6 includes many concrete results for various fundamental partial differential equations. In Chapt...

  13. Filters, reproducing kernel, and adaptive meshfree method

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y.; Chen, J.-S.; Lu, H.

    Reproducing kernel, with its intrinsic feature of moving averaging, can be utilized as a low-pass filter with scale decomposition capability. The discrete convolution of two nth order reproducing kernels with arbitrary support size in each kernel results in a filtered reproducing kernel function that has the same reproducing order. This property is utilized to separate the numerical solution into an unfiltered lower order portion and a filtered higher order portion. As such, the corresponding high-pass filter of this reproducing kernel filter can be used to identify the locations of high gradient, and consequently serves as an operator for error indication in meshfree analysis. In conjunction with the naturally conforming property of the reproducing kernel approximation, a meshfree adaptivity method is also proposed.

  14. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  15. Identifying critical success factors (CSFs) of implementing building information modeling (BIM) in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Mazri; Ali, Wan Nur Athirah Wan; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as existing from the earliest concept to demolition and it involves creating and using an intelligent 3D model to inform and communicate project decisions. This research aims to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. A literature review was done to explore previous BIM studies on definitions and history of BIM, construction issues, application of BIM in construction projects as well as benefits of BIM. A series of interviews with multidisciplinary Malaysian construction experts will be conducted purposely for data collection process guided by the research design and methodology approach of this study. The analysis of qualitative data from the process will be combined with criteria identified in the literature review in order to identify the CSFs. Finally, the CSFs of BIM implementation will be validated by further Malaysian industrialists during a workshop. The validated CSFs can be used as a term of reference for both Malaysian practitioners and academics towards measuring BIM effectiveness level in their organizations.

  16. Analysis of behavioral intention on ABC system adoption: Model of information systems technology and success acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiq Nensi Veni Indipenrian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of individual behavioral change on the adoption of activity- based costing (ABC system and its usage, using Unified Theory of Accep-tance and Use of Technology (UTAUT and Information System Success Model. The sample involves 78 respondents who have positions as financial manager, controller manager, accounting manager, and production manager in mid-sized manufacturing companies in East java. The data were collected by survey method. This study used a Partial Least Square (PLS as the data analysis method. It was found that not all of the main UTAUT models were supported, because performance expectancy and effort expectancy have no effect on behavioral intention and use behavior to adopt ABC system. Whereas, social factors, information quality and facilitating conditions had a positive effect on behavioral intention and use behavior to adopt ABC system. The different results of this study with several previous studies are probably caused by the differences in the context of system, culture and characteristics of the sample. The implication of this study is not only to propose a theoretical framework for researches in future, but also useful for companies to optimize the use of ABC system that should be supported by top level and mid-level management and the readiness of the individu-als to accept the adoption of the ABC system.

  17. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  18. Examination of reproducibility in microbiological degredation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Spliid, Henrik; Holst, Helle

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that certain microbiological degradation experiments have a limited reproducibility. Nine identical batch experiments were carried out on 3 different days to examine reproducibility. A pure culture, isolated from soil, grew with toluene as the only carbon and energy sou....... The limited reproducibility may be caused by variability in the preculture, or more precisely, variations in the physiological state of the bacteria in the precultures just before used as inoculum....

  19. Cell models lead to understanding of multi-cellular morphogenesis consisting of successive self-construction of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisao; Nagai, Tatsuzo

    2015-03-01

    Morphogenesis of multi-cellular organisms occurs through cell behaviours within a cell aggregate. Cell behaviours have been described using cell models involving equations of motion for cells. Cells in cell models construct shapes of the cell aggregate by themselves. Here, a history of cell models, the cell centre model and the vertex cell model, which we have constructed, are described. Furthermore, the application of these cell models is explained in detail. These cell models have been applied to transformation of cell aggregates to become spherical, formation of mammalian blastocysts and cell intercalation in elongating tissues. These are all elemental processes of morphogenesis and take place in succession during the whole developmental process. A chain of successive elemental processes leads to morphogenesis. Finally, we highlight that cell models are indispensable to understand the process whereby genes direct biological shapes.

  20. Incumbent Decisions about Succession Transitions in Family Firms: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Boyd

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the family business literature, succession research has focused on the family member as they enter the leadership role or on the different issues that affect the succession process. Although researchers have acknowledged that succession in family businesses is “punctuated” by decision making events, less attention has been given to understanding how incumbents make decisions about ownership and management transitions. In an effort to continue to understand the succession process it is important to understand how incumbents make decisions about the type of transitions they intend to engage in (i.e., intra-family succession, out of family succession, or no succession. Building on the theory of planned behavior and the socioemotional wealth framework (SEW, this manuscript presents a conceptual framework to understand the factors that influence succession transitions and the role that contextual factors can play in this decision-making process. We present theory driven propositions and discuss the implications for understanding and evaluation of the succession process.

  1. Successive Generations in a Rat Model Respond Differently to a Constant Obesogenic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alice H; Raubenheimer, David; Green, Mark P; Cupido, Cinda L; Gluckman, Peter D; Vickers, Mark H

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that if a mother experiences a transitory perturbation to her environment during pregnancy or lactation, there are transgenerational consequences often involving a disordered metabolic phenotype in first generation offspring with recovery across subsequent generations. In contrast, little is known about the nature of the transgenerational response of offspring when a mother experiences a perturbation that is not transitory but instead persists across generations. Our study, using a rat model, subjected the parental generation to a change in environment and concomitant shift from a grain-based to obesogenic diets to generate an adipose phenotype in first generation offspring emulating a common scenario in human urbanisation and migration. We then investigated whether the obese phenotype was stable across generations when maintained in the transitioned environment, and whether dietary macronutrient balance affected the response. We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance. The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations. This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

  2. A successful experimental model for intimal hyperplasia prevention using a resveratrol-delivering balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolva, Valerio; Mazzola, Silvia; Zerbi, Pietro; Casana, Renato; Albertini, Mariangela; Calvillo, Laura; Selmin, Francesca; Cilurzo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Restenosis due to intimal hyperplasia is a major clinical problem that compromises the success of angioplasty and endovascular surgery. Resveratrol (RSV) has demonstrated a beneficial effect on restenosis from angioplasty. Unfortunately, the physicochemical characteristics of RSV reduce the practicality of its immediate clinical application. This work proposes an experimental model aiming to setup an intravessel, elutable, RSV-containing compound. A 140 μg/mL RSV sterile injectable solution with a suitable viscosity for intravascular administration by drug-delivery catheter (RSV-c) was prepared. This solution was locally administered in the common iliac artery of adult male New Zealand White rabbits using a dedicated device (Genie; Acrostak, Geneva, Switzerland) after the induction of intimal hyperplasia by traumatic angioplasty. The RSV concentrations in the wall artery were determined, and the thickness of the harvested iliac arteries was measured over a 1-month period. The Genie catheter was applied in rabbit vessels, and the local delivery resulted in an effective reduction in restenosis after plain angioplasty. Notably, RSV-c forced into the artery wall by balloon expansion might accumulate in the interstitial areas or within cells, avoiding the washout of solutions. Magnification micrographs showed intimal proliferation was significantly inhibited when RSV-c was applied. Moreover, no adverse events were documented in in vitro or in vivo studies. RSV can be advantageously administered in the arterial walls by a drug-delivery catheter to reduce the risk of restenosis. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The cardiovascular perfusionist as a model for the successful technologist in high stress situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, P J; Mook, W J

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the psychological profiles of highly stressed medical technologists. One hundred and four individuals representing a cross-section of the United States who function as operators of heart-lung machines during open heart surgery (perfusionists) were studied using both internal and external models based on the works of Eric Berne and Karen Horney. Daily exposure to life and death responsibilities combined with the constant pressures of maintaining current technical skills can make the profession selected for this study representative of high technology professions that require a great deal of coping. Results of this study indicate that there is a balanced psychological profile in successful technologists functioning in long-term, high-stressed occupations. Female perfusionists appear to be more aggressive and critical than their male counterparts. This is seen as an attempt by female perfusionists to compensate for what has historically been a male dominanted, highly technical and high-stressed occupation. Generalizations for candidate selections to high stressed occupations could be made as well as projections of foundations for possible progressive disillusionment (burn out).

  4. Successive Generations in a Rat Model Respond Differently to a Constant Obesogenic Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice H Tait

    Full Text Available Research has shown that if a mother experiences a transitory perturbation to her environment during pregnancy or lactation, there are transgenerational consequences often involving a disordered metabolic phenotype in first generation offspring with recovery across subsequent generations. In contrast, little is known about the nature of the transgenerational response of offspring when a mother experiences a perturbation that is not transitory but instead persists across generations. Our study, using a rat model, subjected the parental generation to a change in environment and concomitant shift from a grain-based to obesogenic diets to generate an adipose phenotype in first generation offspring emulating a common scenario in human urbanisation and migration. We then investigated whether the obese phenotype was stable across generations when maintained in the transitioned environment, and whether dietary macronutrient balance affected the response. We found that second and third generation offspring had a reduced body fat to lean mass ratio and a reduced appetite relative to first generation offspring, irrespective of dietary macronutrient balance. The trajectory of this response is suggestive of a reduction in chronic disease risk across generations. This is one of the first studies, to our knowledge, to investigate the transgenerational response following parental transition to a persistent obesogenic environment, and to demonstrate that successive generations respond differently to this constant environment.

  5. Successful intervention models for obesity prevention: the role of healthy life styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Martínez Vizcaíno

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Children obesity is considered a serious public health problem around the world. In Spain, the prevalence of overweight/obesity is reaching alarming figures, exceeding 35% of the children. Several hypotheses suggest that the energy balance model does not fit very well when analyzing the causes of the current obesity epidemic and, although genetics seems to explain up to 30% of the likelihood to become obese in infancy, has been suggested that genetics might be influenced by environment factors including vigorous physical activity (PA. Some recent systematic reviews indicate that there is enough evidence about the effectiveness of interventions to prevent obesity in children 6-12 years old; however, the heterogeneity of the effect, and the potential selection, information and publication biases that undermine the validity of these studies, thus their results should be interpreted with caution. In Spain, an extracurricular PA program of leisure-time (MOVI has evidenced some effectiveness on reducing the adiposity and on improving the lipid profile in schoolchildren. To overcome some weakness of MOVI program, a second edition of this study was designed. The objectives of this review are twofold: 1 to analyze latest data of the obesity epidemic in Spain; and 2 to describe the main features of MOVI-2 program, and overall of the successful interventions to prevent children obesity.

  6. Alberta Healthy Living Program--a model for successful integration of chronic disease management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrin, Louise; Britten, Judith; Davachi, Shahnaz; Knight, Holly

    2013-08-01

    The most common presentation of chronic disease is multimorbidity. Disease management strategies are similar across most chronic diseases. Given the prevalence of multimorbidity and the commonality in approaches, fragmented single disease management must be replaced with integrated care of the whole person. The Alberta Healthy Living Program, a community-based chronic disease management program, supports adults with, or at risk for, chronic disease to improve their health and well being. Participants gain confidence and skills in how to manage their chronic disease(s) by learning to understand their health condition, make healthy eating choices, exercise safely and cope emotionally. The program includes 3 service pillars: disease-specific and general health patient education, disease-spanning supervised exercise and Better Choices, Better Health(TM) self-management workshops. Services are delivered in the community by an interprofessional team and can be tailored to target specific diverse and vulnerable populations, such as Aboriginal, ethno-cultural and francophone groups and those experiencing homelessness. Programs may be offered as a partnership between Alberta Health Services, primary care and community organizations. Common standards reduce provincial variation in care, yet maintain sufficient flexibility to meet local and diverse needs and achieve equity in care. The model has been implemented successfully in 108 communities across Alberta. This approach is associated with reduced acute care utilization and improved clinical indicators, and achieves efficiencies through an integrated, disease-spanning patient-centred approach. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Is Russia successful in attracting foreign direct investment? Evidence based on gravity model estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariev Oleg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it is to answer the question of whether Russia is successful in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI. Second, it is to identify partner countries that “overinvest” and “underinvest” in the Russian economy. We do this by calculating potential FDI inflows to Russia and comparing them with actual values. This research is associated with the empirical estimation of factors explaining FDI flows between countries. The methodological foundation used for the research is the gravity model of foreign direct investment. In discussing the pros and cons of different econometric methods of the estimation gravity equation, we conclude that the Poisson pseudo maximum likelihood method with instrumental variables (IV PPML is one of the best options in our case. Using a database covering about 70% of FDI flows for the period of 2001-2011, we discover the following factors that explain the variance of bilateral FDI flows in the world economy: GDP value of investing country, GDP value of recipient country, distance between countries, remoteness of investor country, remoteness of recipient country, level of institutions development in host country, wage level in host country, membership of two countries in a regional economic union, common official language, common border and colonial relationships between countries in the past. The potential values of FDI inflows are calculated using coefficients of regressors from the econometric model. We discover that the Russian economy performs very well in attracting FDI: the actual FDI inflows exceed potential values by 1.72 times. Large developed countries (France, Germany, UK, Italy overinvest in the Russian economy, while smaller and less developed countries (Czech Republic, Belarus, Denmark, Ukraine underinvest in Russia. Countries of Southeast Asia (China, South Korea, Japan also underinvest in the Russian economy.

  8. Reproducing Kernel Particle Method for Non-Linear Fracture Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Zhongqing; Zhou Benkuan; Chen Dapeng

    2006-01-01

    To study the non-linear fracture, a non-linear constitutive model for piezoelectric ceramics was proposed, in which the polarization switching and saturation were taken into account. Based on the model, the non-linear fracture analysis was implemented using reproducing kernel particle method (RKPM). Using local J-integral as a fracture criterion, a relation curve of fracture loads against electric fields was obtained. Qualitatively, the curve is in agreement with the experimental observations reported in literature. The reproducing equation, the shape function of RKPM, and the transformation method to impose essential boundary conditions for meshless methods were also introduced. The computation was implemented using object-oriented programming method.

  9. Successive smoothing algorithm for constructing the semiempirical model developed at ONERA to predict unsteady aerodynamic forces. [aeroelasticity in helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petot, D.; Loiseau, H.

    1982-01-01

    Unsteady aerodynamic methods adopted for the study of aeroelasticity in helicopters are considered with focus on the development of a semiempirical model of unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on an oscillating profile at high incidence. The successive smoothing algorithm described leads to the model's coefficients in a very satisfactory manner.

  10. Reproducibility principles, problems, practices, and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Maasen, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Featuring peer-reviewed contributions from noted experts in their fields of research, Reproducibility: Principles, Problems, Practices, and Prospects presents state-of-the-art approaches to reproducibility, the gold standard sound science, from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives. Including comprehensive coverage for implementing and reflecting the norm of reproducibility in various pertinent fields of research, the book focuses on how the reproducibility of results is applied, how it may be limited, and how such limitations can be understood or even controlled in the natural sciences, computational sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and studies of science and technology. The book presents many chapters devoted to a variety of methods and techniques, as well as their epistemic and ontological underpinnings, which have been developed to safeguard reproducible research and curtail deficits and failures. The book also investigates the political, historical, and social practices that underlie repro...

  11. Explorations in statistics: statistical facets of reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This eleventh installment of Explorations in Statistics explores statistical facets of reproducibility. If we obtain an experimental result that is scientifically meaningful and statistically unusual, we would like to know that our result reflects a general biological phenomenon that another researcher could reproduce if (s)he repeated our experiment. But more often than not, we may learn this researcher cannot replicate our result. The National Institutes of Health and the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology have created training modules and outlined strategies to help improve the reproducibility of research. These particular approaches are necessary, but they are not sufficient. The principles of hypothesis testing and estimation are inherent to the notion of reproducibility in science. If we want to improve the reproducibility of our research, then we need to rethink how we apply fundamental concepts of statistics to our science.

  12. The importance of a precise definition, comprehensive model, and critical discussion of successful aging at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to advance understanding of the concept of successful aging at work to guide rigorous future research and effective practice. Drawing on the gerontology and life-span developmental literatures, I recently proposed a definition and theoretical framework of successful aging at work that

  13. Occupational skin diseases: a successful model for multidisciplinary networking in preventive medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John, Swen Malte

    2008-10-01

    outpatient dermatological and educational intervention seminars (secondary individual prevention, SIP are offered to affected employees. We recently demonstrated the sustainability of the SIP approach in hairdressing for periods of up to 10 years.For those cases of OD, in which the abovementioned outpatient prevention measures are not sufficiently successful, specific interdisciplinary inpatient prevention measures have been developed (tertiary individual prevention, or TIP. TIP represents the ultima ratio within the hierarchical prevention concept of the Osnabrück Model. TIP comprises 2–3 weeks of inpatient dermatological diagnostics and treatment as well as intensive health-related pedagogic and psychological counseling. Subsequent to this, 3 consecutive weeks of outpatient treatment are given by a local dermatologist. Each patient remains on sick-leave for a total of 6 weeks to allow full barrier recovery. A total of 764 out of 1164 (66% TIP patients treated in our university, followed-up regularly by a local dermatologist for up to 1 year, were successful in remaining in their respective (risk- professions as assessed by questionnaire 1 year after discharge.Recently obtained SIP and TIP data reveal that there are reliable, evidence-based options for multidisciplinary prevention and patient management of OD, using a combined approach by a network of clinics, practices and statutory social insurance bodies. A multicentre study, which aims to further standardize TIP and evaluate sustainability of prevention in more depth (3-year dermatological follow-up of 1000 OD patients is currently being conducted in Germany.

  14. A prognostic model to predict the success of artificial insemination in dairy cows based on readily available data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, C J; Steeneveld, W; Vernooij, J C M; Huijps, K; Nielen, M; Hogeveen, H

    2016-08-01

    A prognosis of the likelihood of insemination success is valuable information for the decision to start inseminating a cow. This decision is important for the reproduction management of dairy farms. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic model for the likelihood of successful first insemination. The parameters considered for the model are readily available on farm at the time a farmer makes breeding decisions. In the first step, variables are selected for the prognostic model that have prognostic value for the likelihood of a successful first insemination. In the second step, farm effects on the likelihood of a successful insemination are quantified and the prognostic model is cross-validated. Logistic regression with a random effect for farm was used to develop the prognostic model. Insemination and test-day milk production data from 2,000 commercial Dutch dairy farms were obtained, and 190,541 first inseminations from this data set were used for model selection. The following variables were used in the selection process: parity, days in milk, days to peak production, production level relative to herd mates, milk yield, breed of the cow, insemination season and calving season, log of the ratio of fat to protein content, and body condition score at insemination. Variables were selected in a forward selection and backward elimination, based on the Akaike information criterion. The variables that contributed most to the model were random farm effect, relative production factor, and milk yield at insemination. The parameters were estimated in a bootstrap analysis and a cross-validation was conducted within this bootstrap analysis. The parameter estimates for body condition score at insemination varied most, indicating that this effect varied most among Dutch dairy farms. The cross-validation showed that the prognosis of insemination success closely resembled the mean insemination success observed in the data set. Insemination success depends on

  15. Maximum Potential Score (MPS: An operating model for a successful customer-focused strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One of marketers’ chief objectives is to achieve customer loyalty, which is a key factor for profitable growth. Therefore, they need to develop a strategy that attracts and maintains customers, giving them adequate motives, both tangible (prices and promotions and intangible (personalized service and treatment, to satisfy a customer and make him loyal to the company. Finding a way to accurately measure satisfaction and customer loyalty is very important. With regard to typical Relationship Marketing measures, we can consider listening to customers, which can help to achieve a competitive sustainable advantage. Customer satisfaction surveys are essential tools for listening to customers. Short questionnaires have gained considerable acceptance among marketers as a means to achieve a customer satisfaction measure. Our research provides an indication of the benefits of a short questionnaire (one/three questions. We find that the number of questions survey is significantly related to the participation in the survey (Net Promoter Score or NPS. We also prove that a the three question survey is more likely to have more participants than a traditional survey (Maximum Potential Score or MPS . Our main goal is to analyse one method as a potential predictor of customer loyalty. Using surveys, we attempt to empirically establish the causal factors in determining the satisfaction of customers. This paper describes a maximum potential operating model that captures with a three questions survey, important elements for a successful customer-focused strategy. MPS may give us lower participation rates than NPS but important information that helps to convert unhappy customers or just satisfied customers, into loyal customers.

  16. Learning Reproducibility with a Yearly Networking Contest

    KAUST Repository

    Canini, Marco

    2017-08-10

    Better reproducibility of networking research results is currently a major goal that the academic community is striving towards. This position paper makes the case that improving the extent and pervasiveness of reproducible research can be greatly fostered by organizing a yearly international contest. We argue that holding a contest undertaken by a plurality of students will have benefits that are two-fold. First, it will promote hands-on learning of skills that are helpful in producing artifacts at the replicable-research level. Second, it will advance the best practices regarding environments, testbeds, and tools that will aid the tasks of reproducibility evaluation committees by and large.

  17. Thou Shalt Be Reproducible! A Technology Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mair

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article elaborates on reproducibility in psychology from a technological viewpoint. Modernopen source computational environments are shown and explained that foster reproducibilitythroughout the whole research life cycle, and to which emerging psychology researchers shouldbe sensitized, are shown and explained. First, data archiving platforms that make datasets publiclyavailable are presented. Second, R is advocated as the data-analytic lingua franca in psychologyfor achieving reproducible statistical analysis. Third, dynamic report generation environments forwriting reproducible manuscripts that integrate text, data analysis, and statistical outputs such asfigures and tables in a single document are described. Supplementary materials are provided inorder to get the reader started with these technologies.

  18. The Economics of Reproducibility in Preclinical Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard P Freedman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low reproducibility rates within life science research undermine cumulative knowledge production and contribute to both delays and costs of therapeutic drug development. An analysis of past studies indicates that the cumulative (total prevalence of irreproducible preclinical research exceeds 50%, resulting in approximately US$28,000,000,000 (US$28B/year spent on preclinical research that is not reproducible-in the United States alone. We outline a framework for solutions and a plan for long-term improvements in reproducibility rates that will help to accelerate the discovery of life-saving therapies and cures.

  19. The organizational structure and group the following criteria in assessing the success of the model construction companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Dušan D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization - an organizational structure presents a schedule of all the potential companies covering all human and material resources in the enterprise, which ensure the realization of business goals in function of their success. Defining the process, the use of SWOT analysis and evaluation of success using appropriate models condition and promote the role of the organization in a construction company. This article is an excerpt from the research within relevant doctoral dissertation [5] and displays the result of the evaluation of business performance of construction companies applying AHP model.

  20. Channel Flow Model of Extrusion of the Higher Himalaya- Successes & Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2009-04-01

    During laminar ‘channel flow'/‘Plane Poiseuille flow' of an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid through a very long parallel horizontal static walls of a channel due to a pressure gradient, a parabolic velocity profile is produced. The sense of ductile shearing across the middle of the channel is opposite. Grujic et al. (1996) and Beaumont et al. (2001) applied this flow mechanism to explain the extrusion of the Higher Himalaya (HH). In their sequel, the Dalhousie school of modelers kept enumerating this extrusion model. Successes of the channel flow extrusion model are that it explains (1) extensional top-to-NE sense of ductile shearing in the South Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) simultaneous to the top-to-SW sense of compressional shearing in the remainder of the HH; (2) fluid activity below the southern part of the Tibetan plateau; and (3) inverted metamorphism in the HH. However, limitations of this extrusion model are as follows. (1) A previous top-to-SW sense of compressional shearing in the STDS is not taken care by the model alone. (2) The thickness of the STDS in reality is thinner than the remainder of the HH. In the model, on the other hand, their thicknesses should be the same. (3) Presence of a second strand of the STDS inside the HH that is absent in some sections of the mountain chain remained unexplained in the model. (4) The ductile shear fabric of more commonly sigmoid-, and less commonly parallelogram- and lenticular geometries are found inside the HH. However, had the channel flow been the extrusion mechanism and rocks deformed as a Newtonian fluid, parabolic shear fabrics are expected. Additionally, can the genesis of the intrafolial folds inside the two strands of the STDS (e.g. Mukherjee, 2007) be explained by the channel flow mechanism? (5) Regions and their spatial extents with different senses of ductile shearing would change if the rocks deformed Non-Newtonically. The exact geometry of the velocity profile will depend on the

  1. Effect of sample aliquot size on the limit of detection and reproducibility of clinical assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guorong; Kobayashi, Lori; Nazarenko, Irina

    2007-11-01

    Nucleic acid amplification technologies significantly improved the limit of detection (LOD) for diagnostic assays. The ability of these assays to amplify fewer than 10 target copies of DNA or RNA imposes new requirements on the preparation of clinical samples. We report a statistical method to determine how large of an aliquot is necessary to reproducibly provide a detectable number of cells. We determined the success probability (p) based on aliquot size and sample volume. The binomial distribution, based on p and the concentration of cells in sample, was used to calculate the probability of getting no target objects in an aliquot and to determine the minimum number of objects per aliquot necessary to generate a reproducible clinical assay. The described method was applied to find a minimum aliquot volume required for a set LOD, false-negative rate (FNR), and %CV. For example, to keep FNR FNRs are 47.2% and 44.9%. This probability model is a useful tool to predict the impact of aliquot volume on the LOD and reproducibility of clinical assays. Even for samples for which pathogens are homogeneously distributed, it is theoretically impossible to collect a single pathogen consistently if the concentration of pathogen is below a certain limit.

  2. ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN BINUS UNIVERSITY USING DELONE AND MCLEAN INFORMATION SYSTEM SUCCESS MODEL AND COBIT FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Muliadi Kerta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of implementation of information system in an organization will supportthe organization in the process of achieving goals. Successful information system will support theorganization's day-to-day operations, so that problem can be resolved more quickly and easily. Theinformation system which has been developed and implemented is also necessary to measure thematurity level. Therefore, it can determine whether the implementation of information systemsmade in accordance with the goals of the organization. Measuring the success of informationsystems used the DeLone and McLean IS success model. To measure the maturity level ofinformation systems used COBIT (Control Objectives for Information and related Technologyframeworks that provides best practices for IT governance and control. The results of this analysiswill assist and support the IT team in order to develop and build information systems that better fitthe needs and goals of the organization.

  3. Reproducibility Experiment of OSL and TL Dosimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Reproducibility is an important property of personal dosimeter. It not only can indicate the stability of dosimeter, appraise the precision and accuracy of measured value, but also can evaluate the

  4. Reproducible statistical analysis with multiple languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenth, Russell; Højsgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the system for making reproducible statistical analyses. differs from other systems for reproducible analysis in several ways. The two main differences are: (1) Several statistics programs can be in used in the same document. (2) Documents can be prepared using OpenOffice or ......This paper describes the system for making reproducible statistical analyses. differs from other systems for reproducible analysis in several ways. The two main differences are: (1) Several statistics programs can be in used in the same document. (2) Documents can be prepared using Open......Office or \\LaTeX. The main part of this paper is an example showing how to use and together in an OpenOffice text document. The paper also contains some practical considerations on the use of literate programming in statistics....

  5. Reproducibility of AMPLICOR enterovirus PCR test results.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The reproducibility of AMPLICOR enterovirus PCR test results was determined with clinical samples of cerebrospinal fluid, serum, urine, and throat and rectal swabs. Among 608 samples from which duplicate aliquots were run simultaneously, only seven pairs gave discordant results. Among 104 samples from which duplicate aliquots were run in separate assays, no discordance was seen. Overall, the reproducibility of test kit results was 99% (705 of 712).

  6. Relevant principal factors affecting the reproducibility of insect primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Norichika; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2017-06-01

    The primary culture of insect cells often suffers from problems with poor reproducibility in the quality of the final cell preparations. The cellular composition of the explants (cell number and cell types), surgical methods (surgical duration and surgical isolation), and physiological and genetic differences between donors may be critical factors affecting the reproducibility of culture. However, little is known about where biological variation (interindividual differences between donors) ends and technical variation (variance in replication of culture conditions) begins. In this study, we cultured larval fat bodies from the Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Allomyrina dichotoma, and evaluated, using linear mixed models, the effect of interindividual variation between donors on the reproducibility of the culture. We also performed transcriptome analysis of the hemocyte-like cells mainly seen in the cultures using RNA sequencing and ultrastructural analyses of hemocytes using a transmission electron microscope, revealing that the cultured cells have many characteristics of insect hemocytes.

  7. A conceptual model of individual competency components as one of the predictors of success in mergers and acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Kovač

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing challenge of how to balance “soft” human factors with “hard” financial factors in mergers and acquisitions (M&A to be successful is not new. However, the real challenge lies in the question of how, and with which yardstick, to measure and compare the human factor in both the acquiring and the acquired companies in all phases of M&A. In this study, a model for measuring and comparing the human factor with competencies is presented. The model enables the measuring of soft factors with quantitative criteria. A tripartite individual competency components construct is conceived: cognitive, affective and conative, to which the personal value system is added. The model discussed is based on empirical findings and the cases of two companies and literature. The model enables companies to compare differences in competencies and thus to plan activities how to overcome those differences and achieve a higher success rate in M&A.

  8. The Success for All Model of School Reform: Early Findings from the Investing in Innovation (i3) Scale-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, Janet C.; Balu, Rekha; DeLaurentis, Micah; Rappaport, Shelley; Smith, Thomas J.; Zhu, Pei

    2013-01-01

    First implemented in 1987, Success for All (SFA) is one of the best-known and most thoroughly evaluated school reform models. It combines three basic elements: (1) Reading instruction that emphasizes phonics for beginning readers and comprehension for students at all levels, and that is characterized by a highly structured curriculum, an emphasis…

  9. Modelling cheetah relocation success in southern Africa using an iterative Bayesian network development cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnson, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Relocation is one of the strategies used by conservationists to deal with problem cheetahs in southern Africa. The success of a relocation event and the factors that influence it within the broader context of long-term viability of wild cheetah...

  10. Organizing for Student Success: The University College Model. The First Year Experience Monograph Series No. 53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenbeck, Scott E.; Jackson, Barbara; Smith, Maggy; Ward, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Organizing for Student Success draws on data from more than 50 institutions to provide insight into how university colleges are organized, the initiatives they house, and the practices in place to ensure their effectiveness. Twenty case studies from 15 different campuses offer an in-depth understanding of institutional practice. Ultimately,…

  11. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  12. Modeling management information systems’ success: a study in the domain of further education and training

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available and Training (FET) sector to meet this need for capacity development in critical, scarce and intermediate skills. Management information systems (MIS) are pivotal in the efficient and effective running of FET colleges. Therefore, the evaluation of MIS success...

  13. An Empirical Test of a Comprehensive Model for Predicting Successful Information Systems Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    among the issues related to IS implementation success. A study by Albert Lederer and Aubrey Mendelow concentrates on just that issue. Specifically, they...Wiley & Sons, 1987. 26. Lederer, Albert L. and Aubrey L. Mendelow . "Information Systems Planning: Top Management Takes Control, Business Horizons, 31

  14. Creating a Successful Citizen Science Model to Detect and Report Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Waitt, Damon

    2011-01-01

    The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the…

  15. Sharing Responsibility for College Success: A Model Partnership Moves Students to Diplomas and Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Joel

    2014-01-01

    In order to prepare the large number of postsecondary-educated youth our economy demands, high schools and higher education must break through the boundaries that have traditionally separated them and assume joint responsibility for student success. This brief describes an unusual school district partnership with colleges that has achieved…

  16. A Model of Career Success: A Longitudinal Study of Emergency Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachulicz, Sarah; Schmitt, Neal; Kuljanin, Goran

    2008-01-01

    Objective and subjective career success were hypothesized to mediate the relationships between sociodemographic variables, human capital indices, individual difference variables, and organizational sponsorship as inputs and a retirement decision and intentions to leave either the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) or medicine as output…

  17. Knowledge Management: Review of the Critical Success Factors and Development of a Conceptual Classification Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Zand, F.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management is a critical issue in today's business world. Knowledge is considered as one of the most strategic resources of the firm and sources of competitive advantage. This research provides a comprehensive review of the literature on the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) and identifies e

  18. Southern Living and Southern Voices: Models of Regional Magazine Success and Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, John W.

    This paper examines the phenomenon of magazine success and failure as demonstrated by two regional magazines, "Southern Living" and "Southern Voices." The former, a combination of articles about food, travel, sports, and other positive aspects of southern life, was quickly accepted by its readers and advertisers and began…

  19. Creating a Successful Citizen Science Model to Detect and Report Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Waitt, Damon

    2011-01-01

    The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the…

  20. Reproducibility in Data-Scarce Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, P. T.

    2016-12-01

    Among the usual requirements for reproducibility are large volumes of data and computationally intensive methods. Many fields within earth sciences, however, do not meet these requirements. Data are scarce and data-intensive methods are not well established. How can science be reproducible under these conditions? What changes, both infrastructural and cultural, are needed to advance reproducibility? This paper presents findings from a long-term social scientific case study of an emergent and data scarce field, the deep subseafloor biosphere. This field studies interactions between microbial communities living in the seafloor and the physical environments they inhabit. Factors such as these make reproducibility seem a distant goal for this community: - The relative newness of the field. Serious study began in the late 1990s; - The highly multidisciplinary nature of the field. Researchers come from a range of physical and life science backgrounds; - Data scarcity. Domain researchers produce much of these data in their own onshore laboratories by analyzing cores from international ocean drilling expeditions. Allocation of cores is negotiated between researchers from many fields. These factors interact in multiple ways to inhibit reproducibility: - Incentive structures emphasize producing new data and new knowledge rather than reanalysing extant data; - Only a few steps of laboratory analyses can be reproduced - such as analysis of DNA sequences, but not extraction of DNA from cores -, due to scarcity of cores; - Methodological heterogeneity is a consequence of multidisciplinarity, as researchers bring different techniques from diverse fields. - Few standards for data collection or analysis are available at this early stage of the field; - While datasets from multiple biological and physical phenomena can be integrated into a single workflow, curation tends to be divergent. Each type of dataset may be subject to different disparate policies and contributed to different

  1. Data Science Innovations That Streamline Development, Documentation, Reproducibility, and Dissemination of Models in Computational Thermodynamics: An Application of Image Processing Techniques for Rapid Computation, Parameterization and Modeling of Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiorso, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Computational thermodynamics (CT) represents a collection of numerical techniques that are used to calculate quantitative results from thermodynamic theory. In the Earth sciences, CT is most often applied to estimate the equilibrium properties of solutions, to calculate phase equilibria from models of the thermodynamic properties of materials, and to approximate irreversible reaction pathways by modeling these as a series of local equilibrium steps. The thermodynamic models that underlie CT calculations relate the energy of a phase to temperature, pressure and composition. These relationships are not intuitive and they are seldom well constrained by experimental data; often, intuition must be applied to generate a robust model that satisfies the expectations of use. As a consequence of this situation, the models and databases the support CT applications in geochemistry and petrology are tedious to maintain as new data and observations arise. What is required to make the process more streamlined and responsive is a computational framework that permits the rapid generation of observable outcomes from the underlying data/model collections, and importantly, the ability to update and re-parameterize the constitutive models through direct manipulation of those outcomes. CT procedures that take models/data to the experiential reference frame of phase equilibria involve function minimization, gradient evaluation, the calculation of implicit lines, curves and surfaces, contour extraction, and other related geometrical measures. All these procedures are the mainstay of image processing analysis. Since the commercial escalation of video game technology, open source image processing libraries have emerged (e.g., VTK) that permit real time manipulation and analysis of images. These tools find immediate application to CT calculations of phase equilibria by permitting rapid calculation and real time feedback between model outcome and the underlying model parameters.

  2. The Effects of Educative Software, Based on the Arcs Motivation Model on Student's Academic Success and Permanence in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümmü ÇETİN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, education based on ARCS Motivation Model design principles and traditional education were compared in terms of student success and the continuance of learning. To this end, an educative software suitable to the design principles of ARCS Motivation Model for Microsoft Excels' "statistical functions" theme was prepared.With a pretest of the experimental and control group, the equivalence of the groups were determined. In the control group the laboratory study was performed with the traditional method and in the experimental group ,education was given with the prepared educative software. At the end of the education, a final exam to both groups and a continuance exam after completion of the education program were performed. The findings after the analysis reflect, that the performed education, based on the according to ARCS Motivation Model designed software, compared to the laboratory study with traditional methods, relatively increases the grade of academic success much significantly.

  3. Keep warm and get success: the role of postischemic temperature in the mouse middle cerebral artery occlusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Xu, Lili; Xu, Xiaohui; Fan, Xinying; Xie, Yi; Yang, Lian; Lan, Wenya; Zhu, Juehua; Xu, Gelin; Dai, Jianwu; Jiang, Yongjun; Liu, Xinfeng

    2014-02-01

    Intraluminal suture middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model is the most frequently used model for ischemic stroke. However, the success rate of this model is variable among different research studies. This study aimed to investigate the effect of postischemic temperature on the success rate. A total of 100 C57BL/6 mice were randomized into two groups: control group (n=50), body temperature was allowed to self-regulate after MCAO; temperature-controlled group (n=50), mice were kept warm in an incubator for 12 h after MCAO. The body temperature of animals was measured before, during, and for 12 h after MCAO. Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were measured at 24 h after MCAO. There was significant difference (Pmodels, infarct volume was significantly (Pmodel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reproducibility of psychophysics and electroencephalography during offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, M; Piasco, A; Nissen, T D; Graversen, C; Gazerani, P; Lucas, M-F; Dahan, A; Drewes, A M; Brock, C

    2014-07-01

    Offset analgesia (OA) is a pain-inhibiting mechanism, defined as a disproportionately large decrease in pain perception in response to a discrete decrease in noxious stimulus intensity. Hence, the aims were (1) to investigate whether psychophysics and electroencephalography (EEG) can be assessed simultaneously during OA and (2) to assess whether OA is reproducible within the same day as well as between different days. Two separate studies investigated OA: Study I (13 healthy volunteers; seven men; 25.5 ± 0.65 years) aimed at determining the feasibility of recording psychophysics and EEG simultaneously during OA. Study II (18 healthy volunteers; 12 men; 34 ± 3.15 years) assessed reproducibility of OA in terms of psychophysics and EEG. Subjects were presented to a 30-s OA heat stimulus paradigm on the volar forearm and psychophysics, and EEG recordings were obtained throughout the procedure. Reproducibility was assessed within the same day and between different days, using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Additionally, the reproducible psychophysical parameters were correlated to relevant EEG frequency bands. Simultaneous recording of psychophysics and EEG affects the frequency distribution in terms of alpha suppression. Reproducibility was proven for the psychophysics and EEG frequency bands both within the same day (all ICCs > 0.62) and between different days (all ICCs > 0.66, except for the delta band). Correlations between psychophysics and EEG were found in the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and gamma (32-80 Hz) bands (all p < 0.01). OA is a robust and reproducible model for experimental pain research, making it suitable for future research. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  5. The highly successful safe remediation of the Fernald waste pits undertaken under the privatization model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Mark; Lojek, Dave; Murphy, Con

    2003-02-23

    Remediation of eight waste pits at the Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald site, located northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio, involves excavating approximately one million tonnes in-situ of low-level waste which were placed in pits during Fernald's production era. This unique project, one of the largest in the history of CERCLA/Superfund, includes uranium and thorium contaminated waste, soils and sludges. These wet soils and sludges are thermally dried in a processing facility to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) transportation and disposal facility waste acceptance criteria, loaded into railcars and shipped to the Envirocare waste disposal facility at Clive, Utah. This project is now approximately 60% complete with more than 415,000 tonnes (460,000 tons) of waste material safely shipped in 74 unit trains to Envirocare. Work is scheduled to be completed in early 2005. Success to date demonstrates that a major DOE site remediation project can be safely and successfully executed in partnership with private industry, utilizing proven commercial best practices, existing site labor resources and support of local stakeholders. In 1997 under the DOE's privatization initiative, Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald) solicited the services of the remediation industry to design, engineer, procure, construct, own and operate a facility that would undertake the remediation of the waste pits. The resulting procurement was awarded to IT Corporation, currently Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. (Shaw). The contractor was required to finance the procurement and construction of its facilities and infrastructure. The contract was performance-based and payment would be made on the successful loadout of the waste from the facility on a per-ton basis meeting the Envirocare waste acceptance criteria. This paper details the performance to date, the challenges encountered, and the seamless partnering between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Fluor Fernald

  6. Reproducing Kernel for D2(Ω, ρ) and Metric Induced by Reproducing Kernel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhen Gang

    2009-01-01

    An important property of the reproducing kernel of D2(Ω, ρ) is obtained and the reproducing kernels for D2(Ω, ρ) are calculated when Ω = Bn × Bn and ρ are some special functions. A reproducing kernel is used to construct a semi-positive definite matrix and a distance function defined on Ω×Ω. An inequality is obtained about the distance function and the pseudodistance induced by the matrix.

  7. Reproducibility of surface roughness in reaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Pavel; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    concentration of the oil in water-based cutting fluid (or when using a straight mineral oil) results in surface profiles that are more reproducible at higher cutting speed. Moreover, it can be seen that three cutting fluids (two water-based cutting fluids with different oil concentration and a straight mineral......An investigation on the reproducibility of surface roughness in reaming was performed to document the applicability of this approach for testing cutting fluids. Austenitic stainless steel was used as a workpiece material and HSS reamers as cutting tools. Reproducibility of the results was evaluated...... oil) used in connection with a low cutting speed result in "identical" surface profiles. Biggest uncertainty contributors were due to the process repeatability and repeatability around the hole circumference. This was however only in the case of high cutting speeds and low degree of oil concentration...

  8. Successful virtual screening for a submicromolar antagonist of the neurokinin-1 receptor based on a ligand-supported homology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2004-10-21

    The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor belongs to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which represents one of the most relevant target families in small-molecule drug design. In this paper, we describe a homology modeling of the NK1 receptor based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of rhodopsin and the successful virtual screening based on this protein model. The NK1 receptor model has been generated using our new MOBILE (modeling binding sites including ligand information explicitly) approach. Starting with preliminary homology models, it generates improved models of the protein binding pocket together with bound ligands. Ligand information is used as an integral part in the homology modeling process. For the construction of the NK1 receptor, antagonist CP-96345 was used to restrain the modeling. The quality of the obtained model was validated by probing its ability to accommodate additional known NK1 antagonists from structurally diverse classes. On the basis of the generated model and on the analysis of known NK1 antagonists, a pharmacophore model was deduced, which subsequently guided the 2D and 3D database search with UNITY. As a following step, the remaining hits were docked into the modeled binding pocket of the NK1 receptor. Finally, seven compounds were selected for biochemical testing, from which one showed affinity in the submicromolar range. Our results suggest that ligand-supported homology models of GPCRs may be used as effective platforms for structure-based drug design.

  9. Implementing a new model for on-the-job training: critical success factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zolingen, S.J.; Streumer, Jan; van der Klink, Marcel; de Jong, Rolinda

    2000-01-01

    Post Offices Inc. in The Netherlands has developed and implemented a new instruction model for the training of desk employees. The quality of the new instruction model was assessed by means of the evaluation model of Jacobs and Jones for on-the-job training. It is concluded that the implementation

  10. Impulsivity, perceived self-regulatory success in dieting, and body mass in children and adolescents: A moderated mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian; Hofmann, Johannes; Weghuber, Daniel; Blechert, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Impulsivity has been suggested to contribute to overeating and obesity. However, findings are inconsistent and it appears that only specific facets of impulsivity are related to eating-related variables and to body mass. In the current study, relationships between self-reported impulsivity, perceived self-regulatory success in dieting, and objectively measured body mass were examined in N = 122 children and adolescents. Scores on attentional and motor impulsivity interactively predicted perceived self-regulatory success in dieting, but not body mass: Higher attentional impulsivity was associated with lower perceived self-regulatory success at high levels of motor impulsivity, but not at low levels of motor impulsivity. A moderated mediation model revealed an indirect effect of attentional and motor impulsivity on body mass, which was mediated by perceived self-regulatory success in dieting. Thus, results show that only specific facets of impulsivity are relevant in eating- and weight-regulation and interact with each other in the prediction of these variables. These facets of impulsivity, however, are not directly related to higher body mass, but indirectly via lower success in eating-related self-regulation in children and adolescents.

  11. Reproducibility of operator processing for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui Shen; DeNardo, Gerald L.; DeNardo, Sally J.; Aina, Yuan; DeNardo, Diane A.; Lamborn, Kathleen R

    1997-01-01

    Reproducibility of operator processing for radiation dose and biological half-life was assessed for radioimmunotherapy. Mean coefficient of variation for intra-operator consecutive processing and for inter-operator processing was less than 15% for all tissues. The mean coefficient of variation for intra-operator processing over 2 wk or inter-operator processing comparing an experienced and less experienced operator was generally greater, and particularly so for tumors. Satisfactory reproducibility was achievable using visual determination of regions of interests after 80 h of training.

  12. Archiving Reproducible Research with R and Dataverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reproducible research and data archiving are increasingly important issues in research involving statistical analyses of quantitative data. This article introduces the dvn package, which allows R users to publicly archive datasets, analysis files, codebooks, and associated metadata in Dataverse...... Network online repositories, an open-source data archiving project sponsored by Harvard University. In this article I review the importance of data archiving in the context of reproducible research, introduce the Dataverse Network, explain the implementation of the dvn package, and provide example code...... for archiving and releasing data using the package....

  13. Archiving Reproducible Research with R and Dataverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reproducible research and data archiving are increasingly important issues in research involving statistical analyses of quantitative data. This article introduces the dvn package, which allows R users to publicly archive datasets, analysis files, codebooks, and associated metadata in Dataverse...... Network online repositories, an open-source data archiving project sponsored by Harvard University. In this article I review the importance of data archiving in the context of reproducible research, introduce the Dataverse Network, explain the implementation of the dvn package, and provide example code...

  14. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Developing a Mathematical Model for Scheduling and Determining Success Probability of Research Projects Considering Complex-Fuzzy Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Norouzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In project management context, time management is one of the most important factors affecting project success. This paper proposes a new method to solve research project scheduling problems (RPSP containing Fuzzy Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique (FGERT networks. Through the deliverables of this method, a proper estimation of project completion time (PCT and success probability can be achieved. So algorithms were developed to cover all features of the problem based on three main parameters “duration, occurrence probability, and success probability.” These developed algorithms were known as PR-FGERT (Parallel and Reversible-Fuzzy GERT networks. The main provided framework includes simplifying the network of project and taking regular steps to determine PCT and success probability. Simplifications include (1 equivalent making of parallel and series branches in fuzzy network considering the concepts of probabilistic nodes, (2 equivalent making of delay or reversible-to-itself branches and impact of changing the parameters of time and probability based on removing related branches, (3 equivalent making of simple and complex loops, and (4 an algorithm that was provided to resolve no-loop fuzzy network, after equivalent making. Finally, the performance of models was compared with existing methods. The results showed proper and real performance of models in comparison with existing methods.

  16. National Culture and Business Model Change - A Framework for Successful Expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenskov, Lea Houmark; Lueg, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework to analyse how a company’s business model needs to be adjusted if it is expanded into another cultural context. For this, we use the example of changes in the business model of a Danish ITcompany opening a new office in the U.S. Using a single case study......, we integrate the concepts of business models (Osterwalder and Pigneur, 2005) and national culture (Hofstede, 1980). Our findings explain why and how adjustments in the business model are necessary regarding the company’s communication, team composition, and customer involvement in projects....... As to implications, we construct a matrix combining business models and national culture that other multinational companies can use to achieve better understanding of their business model in different national contexts....

  17. Measurement of Liver Iron Concentration by MRI Is Reproducible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Alústiza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The objectives were (i construction of a phantom to reproduce the behavior of iron overload in the liver by MRI and (ii assessment of the variability of a previously validated method to quantify liver iron concentration between different MRI devices using the phantom and patients. Materials and Methods. A phantom reproducing the liver/muscle ratios of two patients with intermediate and high iron overload. Nine patients with different levels of iron overload were studied in 4 multivendor devices and 8 of them were studied twice in the machine where the model was developed. The phantom was analysed in the same equipment and 14 times in the reference machine. Results. FeCl3 solutions containing 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, and 1.2 mg Fe/mL were chosen to generate the phantom. The average of the intramachine variability for patients was 10% and for the intermachines 8%. For the phantom the intramachine coefficient of variation was always below 0.1 and the average of intermachine variability was 10% for moderate and 5% for high iron overload. Conclusion. The phantom reproduces the behavior of patients with moderate or high iron overload. The proposed method of calculating liver iron concentration is reproducible in several different 1.5 T systems.

  18. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Rep

  19. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298811855; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407629971; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available.

  20. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D. Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Della Penna, Nicolas; den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernandez-Castilla, Belen; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Gloeckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O. -Y.; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jaekel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knezevic, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniel; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarevic, Ljiljana B.; LeBel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, M.; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; Mackinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Moeschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Mueller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michele B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima-Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schmidt, Kathleen; Schlegelmilch, Rene; Seibel, Larissa; Scholz, Sabine; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L. M.; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valasek, Milan; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; van Bork, Riet; van de Ven, Mathijs; van den Bergh, Don; van der Hulst, Marije; van Dooren, Roel; van Doorn, Johnny; van Renswoude, Daan R.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverria, Alejandro Vasquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  1. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, Joanna E.; Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahník, Štěpán; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Brüning, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Christopherson, Cody D.; Cillessen, Linda; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Conn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Penna, Nicolás Delia; Den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernández-Castilla, Belén; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Glöckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O Y; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jäkel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knežević, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniël; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarević, Ljiljana B.; Le Bel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, Melissa; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; MacKinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Möschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Müller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michèle B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schlegelmilch, René; Schmidt, Kathleen; Scholz, Sabine; Seibel, Larissa; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L M; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; Te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valášek, Milan; Van't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; Van Assen, Marcel; Van Bork, Riet; Van De Ven, Mathijs; Van Den Bergh, Don; Van Der Hulst, Marije; Van Dooren, Roel; Van Doorn, Johnny; Van Renswoude, Daan R.; Van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverría, Alejandro Vásquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Rep

  2. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Alexander A.; Anderson, Joanna E.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Attridge, Peter R.; Attwood, Angela; Axt, Jordan; Babel, Molly; Bahnik, Stepan; Baranski, Erica; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bartmess, Elizabeth; Beer, Jennifer; Bell, Raoul; Bentley, Heather; Beyan, Leah; Binion, Grace; Borsboom, Denny; Bosch, Annick; Bosco, Frank A.; Bowman, Sara D.; Brandt, Mark J.; Braswell, Erin; Brohmer, Hilmar; Brown, Benjamin T.; Brown, Kristina; Bruening, Jovita; Calhoun-Sauls, Ann; Chagnon, Elizabeth; Callahan, Shannon P.; Chandler, Jesse; Chartier, Christopher R.; Cheung, Felix; Cillessen, Linda; Christopherson, Cody D.; Clay, Russ; Cleary, Hayley; Cloud, Mark D.; Cohn, Michael; Cohoon, Johanna; Columbus, Simon; Cordes, Andreas; Costantini, Giulio; Alvarez, Leslie D. Cramblet; Cremata, Ed; Crusius, Jan; DeCoster, Jamie; DeGaetano, Michelle A.; Della Penna, Nicolas; den Bezemer, Bobby; Deserno, Marie K.; Devitt, Olivia; Dewitte, Laura; Dobolyi, David G.; Dodson, Geneva T.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Donohue, Ryan; Dore, Rebecca A.; Dorrough, Angela; Dreber, Anna; Dugas, Michelle; Dunn, Elizabeth W.; Easey, Kayleigh; Eboigbe, Sylvia; Eggleston, Casey; Embley, Jo; Epskamp, Sacha; Errington, Timothy M.; Estel, Vivien; Farach, Frank J.; Feather, Jenelle; Fedor, Anna; Fernandez-Castilla, Belen; Fiedler, Susann; Field, James G.; Fitneva, Stanka A.; Flagan, Taru; Forest, Amanda L.; Forsell, Eskil; Foster, Joshua D.; Frank, Michael C.; Frazier, Rebecca S.; Fuchs, Heather; Gable, Philip; Galak, Jeff; Galliani, Elisa Maria; Gampa, Anup; Garcia, Sara; Gazarian, Douglas; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Gloeckner, Andreas; Goellner, Lars; Goh, Jin X.; Goldberg, Rebecca; Goodbourn, Patrick T.; Gordon-McKeon, Shauna; Gorges, Bryan; Gorges, Jessie; Goss, Justin; Graham, Jesse; Grange, James A.; Gray, Jeremy; Hartgerink, Chris; Hartshorne, Joshua; Hasselman, Fred; Hayes, Timothy; Heikensten, Emma; Henninger, Felix; Hodsoll, John; Holubar, Taylor; Hoogendoorn, Gea; Humphries, Denise J.; Hung, Cathy O. -Y.; Immelman, Nathali; Irsik, Vanessa C.; Jahn, Georg; Jaekel, Frank; Jekel, Marc; Johannesson, Magnus; Johnson, Larissa G.; Johnson, David J.; Johnson, Kate M.; Johnston, William J.; Jonas, Kai; Joy-Gaba, Jennifer A.; Kappes, Heather Barry; Kelso, Kim; Kidwell, Mallory C.; Kim, Seung Kyung; Kirkhart, Matthew; Kleinberg, Bennett; Knezevic, Goran; Kolorz, Franziska Maria; Kossakowski, Jolanda J.; Krause, Robert Wilhelm; Krijnen, Job; Kuhlmann, Tim; Kunkels, Yoram K.; Kyc, Megan M.; Lai, Calvin K.; Laique, Aamir; Lakens, Daniel; Lane, Kristin A.; Lassetter, Bethany; Lazarevic, Ljiljana B.; LeBel, Etienne P.; Lee, Key Jung; Lee, Minha; Lemm, Kristi; Levitan, Carmel A.; Lewis, M.; Lin, Lin; Lin, Stephanie; Lippold, Matthias; Loureiro, Darren; Luteijn, Ilse; Mackinnon, Sean; Mainard, Heather N.; Marigold, Denise C.; Martin, Daniel P.; Martinez, Tylar; Masicampo, E. J.; Matacotta, Josh; Mathur, Maya; May, Michael; Mechin, Nicole; Mehta, Pranjal; Meixner, Johannes; Melinger, Alissa; Miller, Jeremy K.; Miller, Mallorie; Moore, Katherine; Moeschl, Marcus; Motyl, Matt; Mueller, Stephanie M.; Munafo, Marcus; Neijenhuijs, Koen I.; Nervi, Taylor; Nicolas, Gandalf; Nilsonne, Gustav; Nosek, Brian A.; Nuijten, Michele B.; Olsson, Catherine; Osborne, Colleen; Ostkamp, Lutz; Pavel, Misha; Penton-Voak, Ian S.; Perna, Olivia; Pernet, Cyril; Perugini, Marco; Pipitone, R. Nathan; Pitts, Michael; Plessow, Franziska; Prenoveau, Jason M.; Rahal, Rima-Maria; Ratliff, Kate A.; Reinhard, David; Renkewitz, Frank; Ricker, Ashley A.; Rigney, Anastasia; Rivers, Andrew M.; Roebke, Mark; Rutchick, Abraham M.; Ryan, Robert S.; Sahin, Onur; Saide, Anondah; Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Santos, David; Saxe, Rebecca; Schmidt, Kathleen; Schlegelmilch, Rene; Seibel, Larissa; Scholz, Sabine; Selterman, Dylan Faulkner; Shaki, Samuel; Simpson, William B.; Sinclair, H. Colleen; Skorinko, Jeanine L. M.; Slowik, Agnieszka; Snyder, Joel S.; Soderberg, Courtney; Sonnleitner, Carina; Spencer, Nick; Spies, Jeffrey R.; Steegen, Sara; Stieger, Stefan; Strohminger, Nina; Sullivan, Gavin B.; Talhelm, Thomas; Tapia, Megan; te Dorsthorst, Anniek; Thomae, Manuela; Thomas, Sarah L.; Tio, Pia; Traets, Frits; Tsang, Steve; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Turchan, Paul; Valasek, Milan; van 't Veer, Anna E.; Van Aert, Robbie; van Assen, M.A.L.M.; van Bork, Riet; van de Ven, Mathijs; van den Bergh, Don; van der Hulst, Marije; van Dooren, Roel; van Doorn, Johnny; van Renswoude, Daan R.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Vanpaemel, Wolf; Echeverria, Alejandro Vasquez; Vazquez, Melissa; Velez, Natalia; Vermue, Marieke; Verschoor, Mark; Vianello, Michelangelo; Voracek, Martin; Vuu, Gina; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Weerdmeester, Joanneke; Welsh, Ashlee; Westgate, Erin C.; Wissink, Joeri; Wood, Michael; Woods, Andy; Wright, Emily; Wu, Sining; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Zuni, Kellylynn

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. Scientific claims should not gain credence because of the status or authority of their originator but by the replicability of their supporting evidence. Even research

  3. Modeling the Relations Between Flow Regime Components, Species Traits, and Spawning Success of Fishes in Warmwater Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Scott W.; Peterson, James T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Irwin, Elise

    2010-08-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management.

  4. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  5. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  6. The Multiple Menu Model: A Successful Marriage for Integrating Content and Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzulli, Joseph S.

    1997-01-01

    The Multiple Menu Model is a practical set of planning guides that teachers can use to design indepth curriculum units. This model differs from traditional approaches by balancing content and process, involving students as inquirers, and exploring knowledge's structure and interconnectedness. Components include menus for knowledge, instructional…

  7. Sales Training for Army Recruiter Success: Modeling the Sales Strategies and Skills of Excellent Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    strategies used by excellent Army recruiters. Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) was used as the protocol for modeling performance and acquiring...Behavioral and Social Sciences 3001 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22333-5600 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK ARE* 4 WORK UNIT...Modeling ’Expert knowledge,, Neurolinguistics Knowledge engineering; Recruiting Sales, &’ Sales cycle Sales skills Sales strategies 20

  8. Successful therapies for Alzheimer’s disease: Why so many in animal models and none in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eFranco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peering into the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD the outsider realizes that many of the therapeutic strategies tested (in animal models have been successful. One also may notice that there is a deficit in translational research, i.e. to take a successful drug in mice and translate it to the patient. Efforts are still focused on novel projects to expand the therapeutic arsenal to cure mice. Scientific reasons behind so many successful strategies are not obvious. This article aims to review the current approaches to combat AD, and to open a debate on common mechanisms of cognitive enhancement and neuroprotection. In short, either the rodent models are not good and should be discontinued, or we should extract only the most useful information from those models. An example of a question that may be debated for the advancement in AD therapy is: In addition to reducing amyloid and tau pathologies, would it be necessary to boost synaptic strength and cognition? The debate would provide helpful information that could turn around the current negative output in generating effective drugs for patients. Furthermore, discovery of biomarkers in human body fluids, and a clear distinction between cognitive enhancers and disease modifying strategies, should be instrumental for advancing in anti-AD drug discovery.

  9. A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE: REPRODUCIBILITY AND VALIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the Quantification de L'Activite Physique en Altitude chez les Enfants (QAPACE supervised self-administered questionnaire reproducibility and validity on the estimation of the mean daily energy expenditure (DEE on Bogotá's schoolchildren. The comprehension was assessed on 324 students, whereas the reproducibility was studied on a different random sample of 162 who were exposed twice to it. Reproducibility was assessed using both the Bland-Altman plot and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. The validity was studied in a sample of 18 girls and 18 boys randomly selected, which completed the test - re-test study. The DEE derived from the questionnaire was compared with the laboratory measurement results of the peak oxygen uptake (Peak VO2 from ergo-spirometry and Leger Test. The reproducibility ICC was 0.96 (95% C.I. 0.95-0.97; by age categories 8-10, 0.94 (0.89-0. 97; 11-13, 0.98 (0.96- 0.99; 14-16, 0.95 (0.91-0.98. The ICC between mean TEE as estimated by the questionnaire and the direct and indirect Peak VO2 was 0.76 (0.66 (p<0.01; by age categories, 8-10, 11-13, and 14-16 were 0.89 (0.87, 0.76 (0.78 and 0.88 (0.80 respectively. The QAPACE questionnaire is reproducible and valid for estimating PA and showed a high correlation with the Peak VO2 uptake

  10. ITK: Enabling Reproducible Research and Open Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Michael McCormick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility verification is essential to the practice of the scientific method. Researchers report their findings, which are strengthened as other independent groups in the scientific community share similar outcomes. In the many scientific fields where software has become a fundamental tool for capturing and analyzing data, this requirement of reproducibility implies that reliable and comprehensive software platforms and tools should be made available to the scientific community. The tools will empower them and the public to verify, through practice, the reproducibility of observations that are reported in the scientific literature.Medical image analysis is one of the fields in which the use of computational resources, both software and hardware, are an essential platform for performing experimental work. In this arena, the introduction of the Insight Toolkit (ITK in 1999 has transformed the field and facilitates its progress by accelerating the rate at which algorithmic implementations are developed, tested, disseminated and improved. By building on the efficiency and quality of open source methodologies, ITK has provided the medical image community with an effective platform on which to build a daily workflow that incorporates the true scientific practices of reproducibility verification.This article describes the multiple tools, methodologies, and practices that the ITK community has adopted, refined, and followed during the past decade, in order to become one of the research communities with the most modern reproducibility verification infrastructure. For example, 207 contributors have created over 2400 unit tests that provide over 84% code line test coverage. The Insight Journal, an open publication journal associated with the toolkit, has seen over 360,000 publication downloads. The median normalized closeness centrality, a measure of knowledge flow, resulting from the distributed peer code review system was high, 0.46.

  11. Reproducing entanglement through local classical resources with no communication

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It gives rise to peculiar correlations which cannot be reproduced by a large class of alternative theories, the so-called hidden-variable models, that use parameters in addition to the wave-function. This incompatibility was quantified through the celebrated Bell inequalities, and more recently through new inequalities due to Leggett. Experiments confirm the predictions of quantum mechanics. However, this does not imply that quantum mechanics is the ultimate theory, unsusceptible of improvement, nor that quantum mechanics is essentially non-local. The theories ruled out by Bell and Leggett inequalities are required to satisfy some hypotheses, none of which is implied by locality alone. By dropping one or more hypotheses, it is possible not only to violate said inequalities, but to reproduce the quantum mechanical predictions altogether. So far, the models proposed were only mathematical constructs. In this paper we provide a classical r...

  12. Marital Success from the Perspective of Kozielecki’s Transgression Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakowicz Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouses exhibit two kinds of behaviours: protective and transgressive. Protective acts are those aiming to overcome current problems, leading to preserving some balance. Transgressive acts are deliberately overstepping everyday marital reality and doing new things in new ways. They lead to changing the relation with the hope of improving it, but also create the risk of deterioration. The more transgressive behaviours spouses exhibit, the more chances they have to get to know each other and experience the joy of being part of a union. Transgressive tendencies stem from a network personality structure and consist of five psychons: cognitive, instrumental, motivational, emotional, and personal. The success of a marriage is the effect of a specific form of transgressive behaviours in marriage exhibited by both spouses, which is recognizing difficulties as they appear, finding their sources, and taking steps together to overcome them.

  13. When Quality Beats Quantity: Decision Theory, Drug Discovery, and the Reproducibility Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannell, Jack W; Bosley, Jim

    2016-01-01

    A striking contrast runs through the last 60 years of biopharmaceutical discovery, research, and development. Huge scientific and technological gains should have increased the quality of academic science and raised industrial R&D efficiency. However, academia faces a "reproducibility crisis"; inflation-adjusted industrial R&D costs per novel drug increased nearly 100 fold between 1950 and 2010; and drugs are more likely to fail in clinical development today than in the 1970s. The contrast is explicable only if powerful headwinds reversed the gains and/or if many "gains" have proved illusory. However, discussions of reproducibility and R&D productivity rarely address this point explicitly. The main objectives of the primary research in this paper are: (a) to provide quantitatively and historically plausible explanations of the contrast; and (b) identify factors to which R&D efficiency is sensitive. We present a quantitative decision-theoretic model of the R&D process. The model represents therapeutic candidates (e.g., putative drug targets, molecules in a screening library, etc.) within a "measurement space", with candidates' positions determined by their performance on a variety of assays (e.g., binding affinity, toxicity, in vivo efficacy, etc.) whose results correlate to a greater or lesser degree. We apply decision rules to segment the space, and assess the probability of correct R&D decisions. We find that when searching for rare positives (e.g., candidates that will successfully complete clinical development), changes in the predictive validity of screening and disease models that many people working in drug discovery would regard as small and/or unknowable (i.e., an 0.1 absolute change in correlation coefficient between model output and clinical outcomes in man) can offset large (e.g., 10 fold, even 100 fold) changes in models' brute-force efficiency. We also show how validity and reproducibility correlate across a population of simulated screening and

  14. When Quality Beats Quantity: Decision Theory, Drug Discovery, and the Reproducibility Crisis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack W Scannell

    Full Text Available A striking contrast runs through the last 60 years of biopharmaceutical discovery, research, and development. Huge scientific and technological gains should have increased the quality of academic science and raised industrial R&D efficiency. However, academia faces a "reproducibility crisis"; inflation-adjusted industrial R&D costs per novel drug increased nearly 100 fold between 1950 and 2010; and drugs are more likely to fail in clinical development today than in the 1970s. The contrast is explicable only if powerful headwinds reversed the gains and/or if many "gains" have proved illusory. However, discussions of reproducibility and R&D productivity rarely address this point explicitly. The main objectives of the primary research in this paper are: (a to provide quantitatively and historically plausible explanations of the contrast; and (b identify factors to which R&D efficiency is sensitive. We present a quantitative decision-theoretic model of the R&D process. The model represents therapeutic candidates (e.g., putative drug targets, molecules in a screening library, etc. within a "measurement space", with candidates' positions determined by their performance on a variety of assays (e.g., binding affinity, toxicity, in vivo efficacy, etc. whose results correlate to a greater or lesser degree. We apply decision rules to segment the space, and assess the probability of correct R&D decisions. We find that when searching for rare positives (e.g., candidates that will successfully complete clinical development, changes in the predictive validity of screening and disease models that many people working in drug discovery would regard as small and/or unknowable (i.e., an 0.1 absolute change in correlation coefficient between model output and clinical outcomes in man can offset large (e.g., 10 fold, even 100 fold changes in models' brute-force efficiency. We also show how validity and reproducibility correlate across a population of simulated

  15. THE IMPACT OF ARCS MOTIVATION MODEL ON MOTIVATION AND SUCCESS LEVEL OF PRIMARY 4TH GRADE STUDENTS IN SOCIAL STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa TAHİROĞLU

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect the impact of a teaching-learning process, structured taking the components of ARCS Motivation Model into consideration, on the motivation and success level of primary grade 4 students in social studies. In scope of the study, grouped pretest-posttest testing model is used. The experimental group consists of 32, and the control group 30 students. In order to collect research data, the “Grade 4 and 5 Social Studies Motivation Scale” and “Social Studies Ac...

  16. Modeling and Simulation for Enterprise Decision-Making: Successful Projects and Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramadan, Noha; Ajami, Racha; Mohamed, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making in enterprises holds different possibilities for profits and risks. Due to the complexity of decision making processes, modeling and simulation tools are being used to facilitate them and minimize the risk of making wrong decisions in the various business process phases....... In this paper, we highlight the role of modeling and simulation in enhancing decision-making processes in enterprises. In addition, we show some techniques that helped enterprises in reaching effective and efficient decisions by adopting modeling and simulation tools....

  17. Canadian Model of Military Leadership as a Successful Mixture of Civilian and Military Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Malinowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The origins of military leadership are rooted in ancient times and its embodiment are great chieftains and commanders. However, since the moment when in organisation and management sciences the civil theories of leadership started to emerge, the military forces have incorporated their solutions to structure the assumptions of new, coherent and effective models of military leadership. A good example of such solutions is the Canadian model of military leadership, competently merging the civil theories with experience and needs of the military environment. This solution may be a perfect example of effective application of leadership theory to modify the existing national model of military leadership and construct a more efficient one.

  18. Modeling and Simulation for Enterprise Decision-Making: Successful Projects and Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramadan, Noha; Ajami, Racha; Mohamed, Nader

    Decision-making in enterprises holds different possibilities for profits and risks. Due to the complexity of decision making processes, modeling and simulation tools are being used to facilitate them and minimize the risk of making wrong decisions in the various business process phases....... In this paper, we highlight the role of modeling and simulation in enhancing decision-making processes in enterprises. In addition, we show some techniques that helped enterprises in reaching effective and efficient decisions by adopting modeling and simulation tools....

  19. Software Reuse Success Strategy Model: An Empirical Study of Factors Involved in the Success of Software Reuse in Information System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kiet T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between information technology (IT) governance and software reuse success. Software reuse has been mostly an IT problem but rarely a business one. Studies in software reuse are abundant; however, to date, none has a deep appreciation of IT governance. This study demonstrated that IT governance had a positive…

  20. Software Reuse Success Strategy Model: An Empirical Study of Factors Involved in the Success of Software Reuse in Information System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kiet T.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between information technology (IT) governance and software reuse success. Software reuse has been mostly an IT problem but rarely a business one. Studies in software reuse are abundant; however, to date, none has a deep appreciation of IT governance. This study demonstrated that IT governance had a positive…

  1. Why technical trading may be successful? A lesson from the agent-based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anatoly B.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown using a simple agent-based market dynamics model that if the technical traders are able to affect the market liquidity, their concerted actions can move the market price in the direction favorable to their strategy.

  2. Modelling biogeochemical-stratigraphic dynamics of clinoform successions over geological timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Jens Jakob Fosselius; Bjerrum, Christian J.

    An understanding of the processes-dynamics governing the development of submarine fine grained clinoforms relies often on correlation of proxies (grain-size trends, spectral gamma, microfossils, TOC, d13C etc.) to more proximal settings where relative sea-level changes are more easily detected...... are investigated with our novel dynamic biogeochemical-stratigraphic model which explicitly calculates sediment and biogeochemical tracer erosion and deposition over multi-kilo-years. In the model organic and uranium enrichment in the distal clinoform develops as a transgressive nature. As a result part...... the dynamic biogeochemical-stratigraphic models to our global carbon-nutrient cycle model will permit investigation of how marine productivity indicators and d13C can be use to refine the interpretations of submarine clinoform development and as correlation tools....

  3. Application of Innovative Models in Teaching Methods For Nature and Society Studies and Students' Success

    OpenAIRE

    Stavreva Veselinovska, Snezana; Koleva Gudeva, Liljana

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the issue of shaping and applying innovative models in the teaching subject Teaching methods for nature and society studies in the conditions existing in our schools. Most teachers show the need for a modern methodical transformation of program contents for teaching nature and society studies and the display of models of educational organization of classes. Therefore the theoretical part of the work is directed toward consideration of innovative approaches in Teaching me...

  4. Stimulating seedling growth in early stages of secondary forest succession: a modeling approach to guide tree liberation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke van Kuijk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Excessive growth of non-woody plants and shrubs on degraded lands can strongly hamper tree growth and thus secondary forest succession. A common method to accelerate succession, called liberation, involves opening up the vegetation canopy around young target trees. This can increase growth of target trees by reducing competition for light with neighboring plants. However, liberation has not always the desired effect, likely due to differences in light requirement between tree species. Here we present a 3D-model, which calculates photosynthetic rate of individual trees in a vegetation stand. It enables us to examine how stature, crown structure and physiological traits of target trees and characteristics of the surrounding vegetation together determine effects of light on tree growth. The model was applied to a liberation experiment conducted with three pioneer species in a young secondary forest in Vietnam. Species responded differently to the treatment depending on their height, crown structure and their shade-tolerance level. Model simulations revealed practical thresholds over which the tree growth response is heavily influenced by the height and density of surrounding vegetation and gap radius. There were strong correlations between calculated photosynthetic rates and observed growth: the model was well able to predict growth of trees in young forests and the effects of liberation there upon. Thus our model serves as a useful tool to analyze light competition between young trees and surrounding vegetation and may help assess the potential effect of tree liberation.

  5. Development of a successful antitumor therapeutic model combining in vivo dendritic cell vaccination with tumor irradiation and intratumoral GM-CSF delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, Gregory; Nuttin, Lise; Gras, Alain; Maetens, Julie; Mievis, Stephane; Schoore, Marylène; Velu, Thierry; Tenenbaum, Liliane; Préat, Véronique; Bruyns, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Vaccination of dendritic cells (DC) combined with GM-CSF secreting tumor cells has shown good therapeutic efficacy in several tumor models. Nevertheless, the engineering of GM-CSF secreting tumor cell line could represent a tedious step limiting its application for treatment in patients. We therefore developed in rats, an "all in vivo" strategy of combined vaccination using an in vivo local irradiation of the tumor as a source of tumor antigens for DC vaccines and an exogenous source of GM-CSF. We report here that supplying recombinant mGM-CSF by local injections or surgical implantation of osmotic pumps did not allow reproducing the therapeutic efficacy observed with in vitro prepared combined vaccines. To bypass this limitation possibly due to the short half-life of recombinant GM-CSF, we have generated adeno-associated virus coding for mGM-CSF and tested their efficacy to transduce tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo vaccines combining local irradiation and AAV2/1-mGM-CSF vectors showed high therapeutic efficacy allowing to cure 60% of the rats with pre-implanted tumors, as previously observed with in vitro prepared vaccines. Same efficacy has been observed with a second generation of vaccines combining DC, local tumor irradiation, and the controlled supply of recombinant mGM-CSF in poloxamer 407, a biocompatible thermoreversible hydrogel. By generating a successful "all in vivo" vaccination protocol combining tumor radiotherapy with DC vaccines and a straightforward supply of GM-CSF, we have developed a therapeutic strategy easily translatable to clinic that could become accessible to a much bigger number of cancer patients.

  6. A Group of Asthma Patients\\\\\\' Treatment Related Thoughts Based on Health Belief Model and Perception of Medication Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Cimen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study is a descriptive study which aims to determine the attitude and perceptions of asthma patients about their health and their opinion regarding the success of treatment. Method: The study is carried out without any sampling. The participants are 74 patients who were admitted in a public pulmonary disease clinic between April and June 2010. A revised version of Health Belief Model scale for asthma treatment and another scale, which was developed to determine the opinion and observations of patients regarding the success of treatment, are used for data collection. In addition to descriptive statistics, regression analysis, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests are used in the data analysis. Findings: The mean score of attitudes and perceptions of asthma patients, which is defined with the Health Belief Model and which can affect their responsiveness to treatment, is found out 3,37(±0,38 and the attitude and perceptions of patients are positive. The mean value for success treatment is 2,35(±0,49. Since the treatment is deemed to be more successful as it gets closer to 1 hence it can be said that the opinion of asthma patients regarding the success of treatment is positive. In the study, it is found out that the participants have a high admission rate to hospitals and that there is no significant difference for socio-demographic characteristics in the positive attitude development and in their belief in the efficiency of the treatment that they are receiving, of which both are components of health belief model concept. The findings from regression analysis indicate that the duration of the asthma sickness and the number of people living in the household not only affect the perceptions and attitudes of patients that are investigated by health belief model, but also the effectiveness of the treatment and the number of admissions to the Emergency Room in the last 6 months. Conclusion: In order to prevent long-term complications

  7. A new model to simulate climate-change impacts on forest succession for local land management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yospin, Gabriel I; Bridgham, Scott D; Neilson, Ronald P; Bolte, John P; Bachelet, Dominique M; Gould, Peter J; Harrington, Constance A; Kertis, Jane A; Evers, Cody; Johnson, Bart R

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new climate-sensitive vegetation state-and-transition simulation model (CV-STSM) to simulate future vegetation at a fine spatial grain commensurate with the scales of human land-use decisions, and under the joint influences of changing climate, site productivity, and disturbance. CV-STSM integrates outputs from four different modeling systems. Successional changes in tree species composition and stand structure were represented as transition probabilities and organized into a state-and-transition simulation model. States were characterized based on assessments of both current vegetation and of projected future vegetation from a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM). State definitions included sufficient detail to support the integration of CV-STSM with an agent-based model of land-use decisions and a mechanistic model of fire behavior and spread. Transition probabilities were parameterized using output from a stand biometric model run across a wide range of site productivities. Biogeographic and biogeochemical projections from the DGVM were used to adjust the transition probabilities to account for the impacts of climate change on site productivity and potential vegetation type. We conducted experimental simulations in the Willamette Valley, Oregon, USA. Our simulation landscape incorporated detailed new assessments of critically imperiled Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) savanna and prairie habitats among the suite of existing and future vegetation types. The experimental design fully crossed four future climate scenarios with three disturbance scenarios. CV-STSM showed strong interactions between climate and disturbance scenarios. All disturbance scenarios increased the abundance of oak savanna habitat, but an interaction between the most intense disturbance and climate-change scenarios also increased the abundance of subtropical tree species. Even so, subtropical tree species were far less abundant at the end of simulations in CV-STSM than in

  8. Reply to the comment of S. Rayne on "QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: A case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Kovarich, Simona; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2013-07-30

    We appreciate the interest of Dr. Rayne on our article and we completely agree that the dataset of (benzo-)triazoles, which were screened by the hydroxyl radical reaction quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model, was not only composed of benzo-triazoles but also included some simpler triazoles (without the condensed benzene ring), such as the chemicals listed by Dr. Rayne, as well as some related heterocycles (also few not aromatic). We want to clarify that in this article (as well as in other articles in which the same dataset was screened), for conciseness, the abbreviations (B)TAZs and BTAZs were used as general (and certainly too simplified) notations meaning an extended dataset of benzo-triazoles, triazoles, and related compounds. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Succession change of microorganisms on plant waste decomposition in simulation modelling field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Julia; Perminova, Evgenia; Khabibullina, Fluza; Kovaleva, Vera; Lapteva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Plant waste decomposition processes are closely associated with living activity of soil microbiota in aboveground ecosystems. Functional activity of microorganisms and soil invertebrates determines plant material transformation rate whereby changes in plant material chemical composition during destruction - succession change of soil biota. The purpose of the work was revealing the mechanism of microorganisms succession change during plant waste decomposition in middle-taiga green-moss spruce forests and coniferous-deciduous secondary stands formed after earlier cut bilberry spruce forests. The study materials were undisturbed bilberry spruce forest (Sample Plot 1 - SP1) and coniferous-deciduous secondary stands which were formed after tree cutting activities of 2001-2002 (SP2) and 1969 and 1970 (SP3). Plant material decomposition intensity was determined in microcosms isolated into kapron bags with cell size of 1 mm. At SP1 and SP2, test material was living mosses and at SP3 - fallen birch and aspen leaves. Every test material was exposed for 2 years. Destruction rate was calculated as a weight loss for a particular time period. Composition of micromycetes which participated in plant material decomposition was assessed by the method of inoculation of soil extract to Getchinson's medium and acidified Czapek's medium (pH=4.5). Microbe number and biomass was analyzed by the method of luminescent microscopy. Chemical analysis of plant material was done in the certified Ecoanalytical Laboratory of the Institute of Biology Komi SC UrD RAS. Finally, plant material destruction intensity was similar for study plots and comprised 40-44 % weight loss for 2 years. The strongest differences in plant material decomposition rate between undisturbed spruce forests and secondary after-cut stands were observed at first stages of destruction process. In the first exposition year, mineralizing processes were most active in undisturbed spruce forest. Decomposition rate in cuts at that

  10. Successful micronucleus testing with the EPI/001 3D reconstructed epidermis model: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, E; Molinari, J; Remoué, N; Sá-Rocha, V M; Barrichello, C; Hurtado, S P

    2012-03-18

    Currently, the cosmetics industry relies on the results of in vitro genotoxicity tests to assess the safety of chemicals. Although the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) test for the detection of cells that have divided once is routinely used and currently accepted by regulatory agencies, it has some limitations. Reconstituted human epidermis (RHE) is widely used in safety assessments because its physiological properties resemble those of the skin, and because it allows testing of substances such as hydrophobic compounds. Thus, the micronucleus test is being adapted for application in RHE-reconstructed tissues. Here we investigated whether two different reconstructed epidermis models (EPI/001 from Straticell, and RHE/S/17 from Skinethic) are suitable for application of the micronucleus test. We found that acetone does not modify micronucleus frequency, cell viability, and model structure, compared with non-treated RHE. Treatment of the EPI/001 model with mitomycin C and vinblastine resulted in a dose-dependent increase of micronucleus frequency as well as a decrease of tissue viability and of binucleated cell rate, while no changes of the epidermal structure were observed. The number of binucleated cells obtained with the RHE/S/17 model was too small to permit micronucleus testing. These results indicate that the proliferative rate of the tissue used is a critical parameter in performing the micronucleus test on a 3D model.

  11. Baltes' SOC model of successful ageing as a potential framework for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, C; O'Neill, D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore approaches used to address some stroke rehabilitation interventions and to examine the potential use of one of the life-span theories called the Baltes' model of selective optimisation with compensation (SOC) as a potential framework. Some of the key considerations for a stroke rehabilitation intervention framework are highlighted including accommodating for the life management changes post stroke, alterations in self-regulation, acknowledge losses and focusing on a person-centred approach for transition from acute rehabilitation to the home or community setting. The Baltes' SOC model is then described in terms of these considerations for a stroke rehabilitation intervention framework. The Baltes' SOC model may offer further insights, including ageing considerations, for stroke rehabilitation approaches and interventions. It has potential to facilitate some of the necessary complexities of adjustment required in stroke rehabilitation. However, further development in terms of empirical support is required for using the model as a framework to structure stroke rehabilitation intervention. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a scarcity of theoretical frameworks that can facilitate and be inclusive for all the necessary complexities of adjustment, required in stroke rehabilitation. In addition to motor recovery post stroke, rehabilitation intervention frameworks should be goal orientated; address self-regulatory processes; be person-centred and use a common language for goal planning, setting and attainment. The Baltes' SOC model is one such framework that may address some of the considerations for stroke rehabilitation, including motor recovery and other life management aspects.

  12. Partnerships for success: A collaborative support model to enhance the first year student experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Einfalt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent discourse about engaging first year students calls for more collaboration in terms of adopting a holistic approach to course delivery and support. This paper discusses a collaborative support model operating at a regional Australian university since 2008. In particular, it describes a collaborative support initiative emerging from this model that is based on providing an informal consultative space where students can drop-in and gain assessment support for research, writing and content. A focus group, online surveys and interviews with co-ordinators were conducted to evaluate the impact of this initiative. Findings suggest that this collaborative support model impacts on the first year student experience by: raising awareness about academic skills and the processes for researching and writing; promoting peer learning opportunities; building confidence and providing suitable support for a diverse range of students.

  13. A Generic Quality Assurance Model (GQAM) for successful e-health implementation in rural hospitals in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruxwana, Nkqubela; Herselman, Marlien; Pottas, Dalenca

    2014-01-01

    Although e-health can potentially facilitate the management of scarce resources and improve the quality of healthcare services, implementation of e-health programs continues to fail or not fulfil expectations. A key contributor to the failure of e-health implementation in rural hospitals is poor quality management of projects. Based on a survey 35 participants from five rural hospitals in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, and using a qualitative case study research methodology, this article attempted to answer the question: does the adoption of quality assurance (QA) models add value and help to ensure success of information technology projects, especially in rural health settings? The study identified several weaknesses in the application of QA in these hospitals; however, findings also showed that the QA methods used, in spite of not being formally applied in a standardised manner, did nonetheless contribute to the success of some projects. The authors outline a generic quality assurance model (GQAM), developed to enhance the potential for successful acquisition of e-health solutions in rural hospitals, in order to improve the quality of care and service delivery in these hospitals.

  14. Breeding success of a marine central place forager in the context of climate change: A modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massardier-Galatà, Lauriane; Morinay, Jennifer; Bailleul, Frédéric; Wajnberg, Eric; Guinet, Christophe; Coquillard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In response to climate warming, a southward shift in productive frontal systems serving as the main foraging sites for many top predator species is likely to occur in Subantarctic areas. Central place foragers, such as seabirds and pinnipeds, are thus likely to cope with an increase in the distance between foraging locations and their land-based breeding colonies. Understanding how central place foragers should modify their foraging behavior in response to changes in prey accessibility appears crucial. A spatially explicit individual-based simulation model (Marine Central Place Forager Simulator (MarCPFS)), including bio-energetic components, was built to evaluate effects of possible changes in prey resources accessibility on individual performances and breeding success. The study was calibrated on a particular example: the Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella), which alternates between oceanic areas in which females feed and the land-based colony in which they suckle their young over a 120 days rearing period. Our model shows the importance of the distance covered to feed and prey aggregation which appeared to be key factors to which animals are highly sensitive. Memorization and learning abilities also appear to be essential breeding success traits. Females were found to be most successful for intermediate levels of prey aggregation and short distance to the resource, resulting in optimal female body length. Increased distance to resources due to climate warming should hinder pups' growth and survival while female body length should increase.

  15. Successful modeling of the environmental changes' influence on forests' vegetation over North Eurasia

    CERN Document Server

    Khabarova, O; Medvedeva, M

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of forests' vegetation in North Eurasia has been performed for 1982-2006 on the basis of remote sensing data. Four meteorological parameters and one parameter, characterizing geomagnetic field disturbance level, were used for this aim. It was found out that revealed formula is adequate both for coniferous evergreen and coniferous deciduous forests for accuracy to a coefficient. The most proper parameters' combination gives the correlation coefficients ~ 0.9 between modeling parameter and original data rows. These results could solve problems of climate-forests feedbacks' investigations and be useful for dendrological aims.

  16. Implementation of cancer clinical care pathways: a successful model of collaboration between payers and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Bruce A; Lang, James; Grzegorczyk, James; Stark, Donna; Rybarczyk, Thomas; Leyden, Thomas; Cooper, Joseph; Ruane, Thomas; Milligan, Scott; Stella, Philip; Scott, Jeffrey A

    2012-05-01

    Despite rising medical costs within the US health care system, quality and outcomes are not improving. Without significant policy reform, the cost-quality imbalance will reach unsustainable proportions in the foreseeable future. The rising cost of health care in part results from an expanding aging population with an increasing number of life-threatening diseases. This is further compounded by a growing arsenal of high-cost therapies. In no medical specialty is this more apparent than in the area of oncology. Numerous attempts to reduce costs have been attempted, often with limited benefit and brief duration. Because physicians directly or indirectly control or influence the majority of medical care costs, physician behavioral changes must occur to bend the health care cost curve in a sustainable fashion. Experts within academia, health policy, and business agree that a significant paradigm change in stakeholder collaboration will be necessary to accomplish behavioral change. Such a collaboration has been pioneered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Physician Resource Management, a highly specialized oncology health care consulting firm with developmental and ongoing technical, analytic, and consultative support from Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions, a division of Cardinal Health. We describe a successful statewide collaboration between payers and providers to create a cancer clinical care pathways program. We show that aligned stakeholder incentives can drive high levels of provider participation and compliance in the pathways that lead to physician behavioral changes. In addition, claims-based data can be collected, analyzed, and used to create and maintain such a program.

  17. Implementation of cancer clinical care pathways: s successful model of collaboration between payers and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Bruce A; Lang, James; Grzegorczyk, James; Stark, Donna; Rybarczyk, Thomas; Leyden, Thomas; Cooper, Joseph; Ruane, Thomas; Milligan, Scott; Stella, Phillip; Scott, Jeffrey A

    2012-05-01

    Despite rising medical costs within the US healthcare system, quality and outcomes are not improving. Without significant policy reform, the cost-quality imbalance will reach unsustainable proportions in the foreseeable future. The rising cost of healthcare in part results from an expanding aging population with an increasing number of life-threatening diseases. This is further compounded by a growing arsenal of high-cost therapies. In no medical specialty is this more apparent than in the area of oncology. Numerous attempts to reduce costs have been attempted, often with limited benefit and brief duration. Because physicians directly or indirectly control or influence the majority of medical care costs, physician behavioral changes must occur to bend the healthcare cost curve in a sustainable fashion. Experts within academia, health policy, and business agree that a significant paradigm change in stakeholder collaboration will be necessary to accomplish behavioral change. Such a collaboration has been pioneered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Physician Resource Management, a highly specialized oncology healthcare consulting firm with developmental and ongoing technical, analytic, and consultative support from Cardinal Health Specialty Solutions, a division of Cardinal Health. We describe a successful statewide collaboration between payers and providers to create a cancer clinical care pathways program. We show that aligned stakeholder incentives can drive high levels of provider participation and compliance in the pathways that lead to physician behavioral changes. In addition, claims-based data can be collected, analyzed, and used to create and maintain such a program.

  18. Successful model for cooperative student learning centers in physics and astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Ronald J.; Johnson, John A.

    2003-04-01

    We have established successful problem-based learning centers for introductory courses in physics [1] and astronomy [2] that fully implement the Seven Principles of Good Practice in Undergraduate Education [3] without increased demand on faculty time. Large percentages of students at our two institutions voluntarily utilize these learning venues. Course instructors guide self-forming groups of students to mastery of technical concepts and skills, building greater student self-confidence through direct interaction and feedback. The approach's immediacy helps students recognize ambiguities in their understanding, thereby increasing impact at teachable moments. Underperforming students are assisted along side students who wish to hone their skills. The format also facilitates racial and gender mixing within learning center camaraderie. Specific pedagogical and operational techniques for running learning centers will be presented. [1] http://www.umr.edu/ physics/plc [2] http://astron.berkeley.edu/talc.html [3] A.W. Chickering & Z.F. Gamson, Am. Assoc. Higher Ed. Bulletin, 1987, 39(7) 3-7.

  19. 科幻电影的成功模式%Model for Successful Science Fiction Movies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭冰蕾

    2011-01-01

    Whether you are a science fiction fan or not,you may once be attracted by the magic of science fiction movies.I,Robot and I'm legend,which had won both good box-office results and public praise,are such great sci-fi movies that can lead you into an adventurous world and shock you with unexpected plots.The similarities between I,Robot and I'm legend in usage of classical elements,selection of leading actor and theme expression show the reasons for the success of science fiction movies.无论你是否是个科幻迷,都可能曾被科幻电影的魔力吸引过.电影《我,机器人》和《我是传奇》就是这样充满魔力的电影.票房口碑双丰收的它们用离奇的故事情节带领观众踏上一段段惊险刺激的旅程.《我,机器人》和《我是传奇》在内容设置、角色选择和主题延伸上的杰出表现正是科幻电影成功的原因所在.

  20. Additive Manufacturing: Reproducibility of Metallic Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the properties of five different metals/alloys (Al-12Si, Cu-10Sn and 316L—face centered cubic structure, CoCrMo and commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti—hexagonal closed packed structure fabricated by selective laser melting. The room temperature tensile properties of Al-12Si samples show good consistency in results within the experimental errors. Similar reproducible results were observed for sliding wear and corrosion experiments. The other metal/alloy systems also show repeatable tensile properties, with the tensile curves overlapping until the yield point. The curves may then follow the same path or show a marginal deviation (~10 MPa until they reach the ultimate tensile strength and a negligible difference in ductility levels (of ~0.3% is observed between the samples. The results show that selective laser melting is a reliable fabrication method to produce metallic materials with consistent and reproducible properties.

  1. Reproducibility of scoring emphysema by HRCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinen, A.; Partanen, K.; Rytkoenen, H.; Vanninen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Erkinjuntti-Pekkanen, R. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    2002-04-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the reproducibility of three visual scoring methods of emphysema and compared these methods with pulmonary function tests (VC, DLCO, FEV1 and FEV%) among farmer's lung patients and farmers. Material and Methods: Three radiologists examined high-resolution CT images of farmer's lung patients and their matched controls (n=70) for chronic interstitial lung diseases. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver variability were assessed for three methods: severity, Sanders' (extent) and Sakai. Pulmonary function tests as spirometry and diffusing capacity were measured. Results: Intraobserver -values for all three methods were good (0.51-0.74). Interobserver varied from 0.35 to 0.72. The Sanders' and the severity methods correlated strongly with pulmonary function tests, especially DLCO and FEV1. Conclusion: The Sanders' method proved to be reliable in evaluating emphysema, in terms of good consistency of interpretation and good correlation with pulmonary function tests.

  2. Reproducibility of electroretinograms recorded with DTL electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, M; Lachapelle, P; Dumont, M

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the use of the DTL fiber electrode yields stable and reproducible electroretinographic recordings. To do so, luminance response function, derived from dark-adapted electroretinograms, was obtained from both eyes of 10 normal subjects at two recording sessions spaced by 7-14 days. The data thus generated was used to calculate Naka-Rushton Vmax and k parameters and values obtained at the two recording sessions were compared. Our results showed that there was no significant difference in the values of Vmax and k calculated from the data generated at the two recording sessions. The above clearly demonstrate that the use of the DTL fiber electrode does not jeopardize, in any way, the stability and reproducibility of ERG responses.

  3. Vegetation succession as affected by decreasing nitrogen deposition, soil characteristics and site management: A modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Dobben, van H.F.; Berendse, F.

    2009-01-01

    After many years of increasing nitrogen deposition, the deposition rates are now decreasing. A major question is whether this will result in the expected positive effects on plant species diversity. Long-term experiments that investigate the effects of decreasing deposition are not available. Model

  4. Mentoring and coaching: a model guiding professional nurses to executive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Renee; Wolf, Debra M; Sabatine, Janice M

    2012-11-01

    Although many nurses aspire to executive positions, they lack the knowledge, support, and guidance to handle the challenges. To succeed at the executive level, ongoing deliberate skill development coupled with support is crucial across a nurse's career trajectory. This article introduces a model emphasizing the importance of mentoring and/or coaching for the aspiring executive nurse leader.

  5. Peer-Mentored Research Development Meeting: A Model for Successful Peer Mentoring among Junior Level Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Aimee K.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Schmidt, Karen L.; Nolan, Beth A. D.; Thatcher, Dawn; Polk, Deborah E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This report describes a model for the development, process, and tracking methods of a Peer-mentored Research Development Meeting (PRDM), an interdisciplinary peer mentoring program. The program was initiated in 2004 by a group of postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty from the Schools of the Health Sciences at the University of…

  6. Complicating the Image of Model Minority Success: A Review of Southeast Asian American Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Bic; Lee, Stacey J.

    2007-01-01

    Similar to other Asian American students, Southeast Asian American students are often stereotyped by the popular press as hardworking and high-achieving model minorities. On the other hand, Southeast Asian American youth are also depicted as low-achieving high school dropouts involved in gangs. The realities of academic performance and persistence…

  7. Towards successful electronic commerce strategies : a hierarchy of three management models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizingh, Eelko K.R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Although only few managers deny the potential of the Internet, many are struggling with the question how their company can best exploit electronic commerce. Managers need tools that guide them in their quest for effective Web applications. In this paper, we present three models that provide

  8. Online revenue models in the media sector : an exploratory study on their success factors and adoption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienstra, Martin R.; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Boerrigter, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Especially for companies in the media sector such as publishers, the Internet has created new strategic and commercial opportunities. However, many companies in the media sector are struggling with how to adapt their business and revenue model for doing profitable business online. This exploratory s

  9. "Someone like Me Can Be Successful": Do College Students Need Same-Gender Role Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Penelope

    2006-01-01

    Two studies examined the extent to which matching on gender determines the impact of career role models on the self. Because women face negative stereotypes regarding their competence in the workplace, they may derive particular benefit from the example of an outstanding woman who illustrates the possibility of overcoming gender barriers to…

  10. The Contribution of Information to Business Success: A LISREL Model Analysis of Manufacturers in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Liwen Qiu

    1999-01-01

    Describes two studies in Shanghai, one on small and one on medium-sized businesses, that applied the linear structural relations (LISREL) model to determine the contribution of information to business development. Studies showed that information does contribute in a statistically significant way, although it is not as important as other factors…

  11. "Someone like Me Can Be Successful": Do College Students Need Same-Gender Role Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Penelope

    2006-01-01

    Two studies examined the extent to which matching on gender determines the impact of career role models on the self. Because women face negative stereotypes regarding their competence in the workplace, they may derive particular benefit from the example of an outstanding woman who illustrates the possibility of overcoming gender barriers to…

  12. Examining the Factors That Contribute to Successful Database Application Implementation Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nworji, Alexander O.

    2013-01-01

    Most organizations spend millions of dollars due to the impact of improperly implemented database application systems as evidenced by poor data quality problems. The purpose of this quantitative study was to use, and extend, the technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the impact of information quality and technical quality factors on database…

  13. OL-DEC-MDP Model for Multiagent Online Scheduling with a Time-Dependent Probability of Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the on-line multiagent scheduling problem, this paper considers the time-dependent probability of success and processing duration and proposes an OL-DEC-MDP (opportunity loss-decentralized Markov Decision Processes model to include opportunity loss into scheduling decision to improve overall performance. The success probability of job processing as well as the process duration is dependent on the time at which the processing is started. The probability of completing the assigned job by an agent would be higher when the process is started earlier, but the opportunity loss could also be high due to the longer engaging duration. As a result, OL-DEC-MDP model introduces a reward function considering the opportunity loss, which is estimated based on the prediction of the upcoming jobs by a sampling method on the job arrival. Heuristic strategies are introduced in computing the best starting time for an incoming job by each agent, and an incoming job will always be scheduled to the agent with the highest reward among all agents with their best starting policies. The simulation experiments show that the OL-DEC-MDP model will improve the overall scheduling performance compared with models not considering opportunity loss in heavy-loading environment.

  14. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Virtual Subjective Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    To establish the repeatability and reproducibility of a virtual refraction process using simulated retinal images. With simulation software, aberrated images corresponding with each step of the refraction process were calculated following the typical protocol of conventional subjective refraction. Fifty external examiners judged simulated retinal images until the best sphero-cylindrical refraction and the best visual acuity were achieved starting from the aberrometry data of three patients. Data analyses were performed to assess repeatability and reproducibility of the virtual refraction as a function of pupil size and aberrometric profile of different patients. SD values achieved in three components of refraction (M, J0, and J45) are lower than 0.25D in repeatability analysis. Regarding reproducibility, we found SD values lower than 0.25D in the most cases. When the results of virtual refraction with different pupil diameters (4 and 6 mm) were compared, the mean of differences (MoD) obtained were not clinically significant (less than 0.25D). Only one of the aberrometry profiles with high uncorrected astigmatism shows poor results for the M component in reproducibility and pupil size dependence analysis. In all cases, vision achieved was better than 0 logMAR. A comparison between the compensation obtained with virtual and conventional subjective refraction was made as an example of this application, showing good quality retinal images in both processes. The present study shows that virtual refraction has similar levels of precision as conventional subjective refraction. Moreover, virtual refraction has also shown that when high low order astigmatism is present, the refraction result is less precise and highly dependent on pupil size.

  15. Data Identifiers and Citations Enable Reproducible Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Modern science often involves data processing with tremendous volumes of data. Keeping track of that data has been a growing challenge for data center. Researchers who access and use that data don't always reference and cite their data sources adequately for consumers of their research to follow their methodology or reproduce their analyses or experiments. Recent research has led to recommendations for good identifiers and citations that can help address this problem. This paper will describe some of the best practices in data identifiers, reference and citation. Using a simplified example scenario based on a long term remote sensing satellite mission, it will explore issues in identifying dynamic data sets and the importance of good data citations for reproducibility. It will describe the difference between granule and collection level identifiers, using UUIDs and DOIs to illustrate some recommendations for developing identifiers and assigning them during data processing. As data processors create data products, the provenance of the input products and precise steps that led to their creation are recorded and published for users of the data to see. As researchers access the data from an archive, they can use the provenance to help understand the genesis of the data, which could have effects on their usage of the data. By citing the data on publishing their research, others can retrieve the precise data used in their research and reproduce the analyses and experiments to confirm the results. Describing the experiment to a sufficient extent to reproduce the research enforces a formal approach that lends credibility to the results, and ultimately, to the policies of decision makers depending on that research.

  16. Tissue Doppler imaging reproducibility during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, V; Nottin, S; Noltin, S; Doucende, G; Obert, P

    2008-05-01

    Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is an echocardiographic technique used during exercising to improve the accuracy of a cardiovascular diagnostic. The validity of TDI requires its reproducibility, which has never been challenged during moderate to maximal intensity exercising. The present study was specifically designed to assess the transmitral Doppler and pulsed TDI reproducibility in 19 healthy men, who had undergone two identical semi-supine maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. Systolic (S') and diastolic (E') tissue velocities at the septal and lateral walls as well as early transmitral velocities (E) were assessed during exercise up to maximal effort. The data were compared between the two tests at 40 %, 60 %, 80 % and 100 % of maximal aerobic power. Despite upper body movements and hyperventilation, good quality echocardiographic images were obtained in each case. Regardless of exercise intensity, no differences were noticed between the two tests for all measurements. The variation coefficients for Doppler variables ranged from 3 % to 9 % over the transition from rest to maximal exercise. The random measurement error was, on average, 5.8 cm/s for E' and 4.4 cm/s for S'. Overall, the reproducibility of TDI was acceptable. Tissue Doppler imaging can be used to accurately evaluate LV diastolic and/or systolic function for this range of exercise intensity.

  17. How to Write a Reproducible Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    The geosciences have undergone a computational revolution in recent decades, to the point where almost all modern research relies heavily on software and code. Despite this profound change in the research methods employed by geoscientists, the reporting of computational results has changed very little in academic journals. This lag has led to something of a reproducibility crisis, whereby it is impossible to replicate and verify most of today's published computational results. While it is tempting to decry the slow response of journals and funding agencies in the face of this crisis, there are very few examples of reproducible research upon which to base new communication standards. In an attempt to address this deficiency, this presentation will describe a procedure for reporting computational results that was employed in a recent Journal of Climate paper. The procedure was developed to be consistent with recommended computational best practices and seeks to minimize the time burden on authors, which has been identified as the most important barrier to publishing code. It should provide a starting point for geoscientists looking to publish reproducible research, and could be adopted by journals as a formal minimum communication standard.

  18. Tools and techniques for computational reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Stephen R; Frampton, Michael B

    2016-07-11

    When reporting research findings, scientists document the steps they followed so that others can verify and build upon the research. When those steps have been described in sufficient detail that others can retrace the steps and obtain similar results, the research is said to be reproducible. Computers play a vital role in many research disciplines and present both opportunities and challenges for reproducibility. Computers can be programmed to execute analysis tasks, and those programs can be repeated and shared with others. The deterministic nature of most computer programs means that the same analysis tasks, applied to the same data, will often produce the same outputs. However, in practice, computational findings often cannot be reproduced because of complexities in how software is packaged, installed, and executed-and because of limitations associated with how scientists document analysis steps. Many tools and techniques are available to help overcome these challenges; here we describe seven such strategies. With a broad scientific audience in mind, we describe the strengths and limitations of each approach, as well as the circumstances under which each might be applied. No single strategy is sufficient for every scenario; thus we emphasize that it is often useful to combine approaches.

  19. Determinants for a successful Sémont maneuver: an in-vitro study with a semicircular canal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Obrist

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of time between the movements/steps, angle of body movements as well as the angular velocity of the maneuvers in an in-vitro model of a semicircular canal (SCC to improve the efficacy of the Sémont maneuver in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV.Methods: Sémont maneuvers were performed on an in-vitro SCC model. Otoconia trajectories were captured by a video camera. The effects of time between the movements, angles of motion (0°, 10°, 20°, 30° below the horizontal line, different angular velocities (90, 135, 180°/s and otoconia size (36 and 50µm on the final position of the otoconia in the SCC were tested.Results: Without extension of the movements beyond the horizontal, the in-vitro experiments (with particles corresponding to 50 m diameter did not yield successful canalith repositioning. If the movements were extended by 20° beyond the horizontal position, Sémont maneuvers were successful with resting times of at least 16 s. For larger extension angles the required time decreased. However, for smaller particles (36 m the required time doubled. The angular maneuver velocity (tested between 90 and 180°/s did not have a major impact on the final position of the otoconia.Interpretation: The two primary determinants for success of the Sémont maneuver are the time between the movements and the extension of the movements beyond the horizontal. The time between the movements should be at least 45 s. Angles of 20° or more below horizontal line (so-called Sémont ++ should increase the success rate of SM.

  20. Andragogical Modeling and the Success of the "EMPACTS" project-based learning model in the STEM disciplines: A decade of growth and learner success in the 2Y College Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C. D.; Thomason, R.; Galloway, M.; Sorey, N.; Stidham, L.; Torgerson, M.

    2014-12-01

    EMPACTS (Educationally Managed Projects Advancing Curriculum, Technology/Teamwork and Service) is a project-based, adult learning modelthat is designed to enhance learning of course content through real-world application and problem solving self directed and collaborative learning use of technology service to the community EMPACTS students are self-directed in their learning, often working in teams to develop, implement, report and present final project results. EMPACTS faculty use community based projects to increase deeper learning of course content through "real-world" service experiences. Learners develop personal and interpersonal work and communication skills as they plan, execute and complete project goals together. Technology is used as a tool to solve problems and to publish the products of their learning experiences. Courses across a broad STEM curriculum integrate the EMPACTS project experience into the overall learning outcomes as part of the learning college mission of preparing 2Y graduates for future academic and/or workforce success. Since the program began in 2005, there have been over 200 completed projects/year. Student driven successes have led to the establishment of an EMPACTS Technology Corp, which is funded through scholarship and allows EMPACTS learners the opportunity to serve and learn from one another as "peer instructors." Engineering and 3D graphic design teams have written technology proposals and received funding for 3D printing replication projects, which have benefited the college as a whole through grant opportunities tied to these small scale successes. EMPACTS students engage in a variety of outreachprojects with area schools as they share the successes and joys of self directed, inquiry, project based learning. The EMPACTS Program has successfully trained faculty and students in the implementation of the model and conduct semester to semester and once a year workshops for college and K-12 faculty, who are interested in