WorldWideScience

Sample records for model successfully describes

  1. Model describes subsea control dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    A mathematical model of the hydraulic control systems for subsea completions and their umbilicals has been developed and applied successfully to Jabiru and Challis field production projects in the Timor Sea. The model overcomes the limitations of conventional linear steady state models and yields for the hydraulic system an accurate description of its dynamic response, including the valve shut-in times and the pressure transients. Results of numerical simulations based on the model are in good agreement with measurements of the dynamic response of the tree valves and umbilicals made during land testing.

  2. Successful modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Cinna

    Tichelaar and Ruff [1989] propose to “estimate model variance in complicated geophysical problems,” including the determination of focal depth in earthquakes, by means of unconventional statistical methods such as bootstrapping. They are successful insofar as they are able to duplicate the results from more conventional procedures.

  3. Frameworks for understanding and describing business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Roslender, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides in a chronological fashion an introduction to six frameworks that one can apply to describing, understanding and also potentially innovating business models. These six frameworks have been chosen carefully as they represent six very different perspectives on business models ...... Maps (2001) • Intellectual Capital Statements (2003) • Chesbrough’s framework for Open Business Models (2006) • Business Model Canvas (2008)...

  4. Modeling Approaches for Describing Microbial Population Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita

    in a computational (CFD) fluid dynamic model. The anaerobic Growth of a budding yeast population in a continuously run microbioreactor was used as example. The proposed integrated model describes the fluid flow, the local cell size and cell cycle position distributions, as well as the local concentrations of glucose...

  5. Biofilm carrier migration model describes reactor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Joshua P; Johnson, Bruce R; Takács, Imre; Daigger, Glen T; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Brockmann, Doris; Kovács, Róbert; Calhoun, Jason M; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Derlon, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    The accuracy of a biofilm reactor model depends on the extent to which physical system conditions (particularly bulk-liquid hydrodynamics and their influence on biofilm dynamics) deviate from the ideal conditions upon which the model is based. It follows that an improved capacity to model a biofilm reactor does not necessarily rely on an improved biofilm model, but does rely on an improved mathematical description of the biofilm reactor and its components. Existing biofilm reactor models typically include a one-dimensional biofilm model, a process (biokinetic and stoichiometric) model, and a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) mass balance that [when organizing CFSTRs in series] creates a pseudo two-dimensional (2-D) model of bulk-liquid hydrodynamics approaching plug flow. In such a biofilm reactor model, the user-defined biofilm area is specified for each CFSTR; thereby, X carrier does not exit the boundaries of the CFSTR to which they are assigned or exchange boundaries with other CFSTRs in the series. The error introduced by this pseudo 2-D biofilm reactor modeling approach may adversely affect model results and limit model-user capacity to accurately calibrate a model. This paper presents a new sub-model that describes the migration of X carrier and associated biofilms, and evaluates the impact that X carrier migration and axial dispersion has on simulated system performance. Relevance of the new biofilm reactor model to engineering situations is discussed by applying it to known biofilm reactor types and operational conditions.

  6. An autocatalytic kinetic model for describing microbial growth during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro E D

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical modelling of the behaviour of microbial growth is widely desired in order to control, predict and design food and bioproduct processing, stability and safety. This work develops and proposes a new semi-empirical mathematical model, based on an autocatalytic kinetic, to describe the microbial growth through its biomass concentration. The proposed model was successfully validated using 15 microbial growth patterns, covering the three most important types of microorganisms in food and biotechnological processing (bacteria, yeasts and moulds). Its main advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as the interpretation of its parameters. It is shown that the new model can be used to describe the behaviour of microbial growth.

  7. Inhomogeneous Markov Models for Describing Driving Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Emil Banning; Møller, Jan K.; Morales, Juan Miguel

    2017-01-01

    . Specifically, an inhomogeneous Markov model that captures the diurnal variation in the use of a vehicle is presented. The model is defined by the time-varying probabilities of starting and ending a trip, and is justified due to the uncertainty associated with the use of the vehicle. The model is fitted to data...... collected from the actual utilization of a vehicle. Inhomogeneous Markov models imply a large number of parameters. The number of parameters in the proposed model is reduced using B-splines....

  8. Using Metaphorical Models for Describing Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felzmann, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    To date, there has only been little conceptual change research regarding conceptions about glaciers. This study used the theoretical background of embodied cognition to reconstruct different metaphorical concepts with respect to the structure of a glacier. Applying the Model of Educational Reconstruction, the conceptions of students and scientists regarding glaciers were analysed. Students' conceptions were the result of teaching experiments whereby students received instruction about glaciers and ice ages and were then interviewed about their understandings. Scientists' conceptions were based on analyses of textbooks. Accordingly, four conceptual metaphors regarding the concept of a glacier were reconstructed: a glacier is a body of ice; a glacier is a container; a glacier is a reflexive body and a glacier is a flow. Students and scientists differ with respect to in which context they apply each conceptual metaphor. It was observed, however, that students vacillate among the various conceptual metaphors as they solve tasks. While the subject context of the task activates a specific conceptual metaphor, within the discussion about the solution, the students were able to adapt their conception by changing the conceptual metaphor. Educational strategies for teaching students about glaciers require specific language to activate the appropriate conceptual metaphors and explicit reflection regarding the various conceptual metaphors.

  9. Using the MWC model to describe heterotropic interactions in hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Olga

    2017-01-01

    Hemoglobin is a classical model allosteric protein. Research on hemoglobin parallels the development of key cooperativity and allostery concepts, such as the ‘all-or-none’ Hill formalism, the stepwise Adair binding formulation and the concerted Monod-Wymann-Changuex (MWC) allosteric model. While it is clear that the MWC model adequately describes the cooperative binding of oxygen to hemoglobin, rationalizing the effects of H+, CO2 or organophosphate ligands on hemoglobin-oxygen saturation using the same model remains controversial. According to the MWC model, allosteric ligands exert their effect on protein function by modulating the quaternary conformational transition of the protein. However, data fitting analysis of hemoglobin oxygen saturation curves in the presence or absence of inhibitory ligands persistently revealed effects on both relative oxygen affinity (c) and conformational changes (L), elementary MWC parameters. The recent realization that data fitting analysis using the traditional MWC model equation may not provide reliable estimates for L and c thus calls for a re-examination of previous data using alternative fitting strategies. In the current manuscript, we present two simple strategies for obtaining reliable estimates for MWC mechanistic parameters of hemoglobin steady-state saturation curves in cases of both evolutionary and physiological variations. Our results suggest that the simple MWC model provides a reasonable description that can also account for heterotropic interactions in hemoglobin. The results, moreover, offer a general roadmap for successful data fitting analysis using the MWC model. PMID:28793329

  10. HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaugh, J E

    2011-11-22

    pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where explosives were subjected to a gradual rise in pressure and did not exhibit reaction. More recent models do distinguish between slow pressure rises and shocks, and have had some success in the describing the response of explosives to single and multiple shocks, and the increase of shock sensitivity with porosity, at least over a limited range. The original formulation is appropriate for sustained shocks, but further work is ongoing to describe the response to short pulses. The HERMES model combines features from these prior models. It describes burning and explosion in damaged reactant, and also will develop a detonation if the gradual rise in pressure from burning steepens into a strong-enough shock. The shock strength needed for detonation in a fixed run distance decreases with increasing porosity.

  11. Improving models for describing phosphorus cycling in agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mobility of phosphorus in the environment is controlled to a large extent by its sorption to soil. Therefore, an important component of all P loss models is how the model describes the biogeochemical processes governing P sorption and desorption to soils. The most common approach to modeling P c...

  12. Dynamic modelling of pectin extraction describing yield and functional characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Marianne; Cognet, T.; Santacoloma, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    A dynamic model of pectin extraction is proposed that describes pectin yield, degree of esterification and intrinsic viscosity. The dynamic model is one dimensional in the peel geometry and includes mass transport of pectin by diffusion and reaction kinetics of hydrolysis, degradation and de......-esterification. The model takes into account the effects of the process conditions such as temperature and acid concentration on extraction kinetics. It is shown that the model describes pectin bulk solution concentration, degree of esterification and intrinsic viscosity in pilot scale extractions from lime peel...... at different temperatures (60 °C, 70 °C, 80 °C) and pH (1.5, 2.3, 3.1) values....

  13. Double sigmoidal models describing the growth of coffee berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Jesus Fernandes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to verify if the growth pattern of coffee berries, considering fresh mass accumulation over time, is double sigmoid and to select the most suitable nonlinear model to describe such behavior. Data used consisted of fourteen longitudinal observations of average fresh mass of coffee berries obtained in an experiment with the cultivar Obatã IAC 1669-20. The fits provided by the Logistic and Gompertz models were compared in their single and double versions. Parameters were estimated using the least squares method using the Gauss-Newton algorithm implemented in the nls function of the R software. It can be concluded that the growth pattern of the coffee fruit, in fresh mass accumulation, is double sigmoid. The double Gompertz and double Logistic models were adequate to describe such a growth curve, with a superiority of the double Logistic model.

  14. A Model Describing Stable Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  15. A model describing stable coherent synchrotron radiation in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.; Byrd, J.M.; Loftsdottir, A.; Venturini, M.; Abo-Bakr, M.; Feikes, J.; Holldack, K.; Kuske, P.; Wuestefeld, G.; Huebers, H.-W.; Warnock, R.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model describing high power stable broadband coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency region in an electron storage ring. The model includes distortion of bunch shape from the synchrotron radiation (SR), which enhances higher frequency coherent emission, and limits to stable emission due to an instability excited by the SR wakefield. It gives a quantitative explanation of several features of the recent observations of CSR at the BESSY II storage ring. We also use this model to optimize the performance of a source for stable CSR emission

  16. Digital clocks: simple Boolean models can quantitatively describe circadian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozgur E; Watterson, Steven; Parton, Andrew; Binns, Nigel; Millar, Andrew J; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-09-07

    The gene networks that comprise the circadian clock modulate biological function across a range of scales, from gene expression to performance and adaptive behaviour. The clock functions by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external 24-h day-night cycle, enabling organisms to optimally time biochemical processes relative to dawn and dusk. In recent years, computational models based on differential equations have become useful tools for dissecting and quantifying the complex regulatory relationships underlying the clock's oscillatory dynamics. However, optimizing the large parameter sets characteristic of these models places intense demands on both computational and experimental resources, limiting the scope of in silico studies. Here, we develop an approach based on Boolean logic that dramatically reduces the parametrization, making the state and parameter spaces finite and tractable. We introduce efficient methods for fitting Boolean models to molecular data, successfully demonstrating their application to synthetic time courses generated by a number of established clock models, as well as experimental expression levels measured using luciferase imaging. Our results indicate that despite their relative simplicity, logic models can (i) simulate circadian oscillations with the correct, experimentally observed phase relationships among genes and (ii) flexibly entrain to light stimuli, reproducing the complex responses to variations in daylength generated by more detailed differential equation formulations. Our work also demonstrates that logic models have sufficient predictive power to identify optimal regulatory structures from experimental data. By presenting the first Boolean models of circadian circuits together with general techniques for their optimization, we hope to establish a new framework for the systematic modelling of more complex clocks, as well as other circuits with different qualitative dynamics. In particular, we anticipate

  17. Digital clocks: simple Boolean models can quantitatively describe circadian systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozgur E.; Watterson, Steven; Parton, Andrew; Binns, Nigel; Millar, Andrew J.; Ghazal, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The gene networks that comprise the circadian clock modulate biological function across a range of scales, from gene expression to performance and adaptive behaviour. The clock functions by generating endogenous rhythms that can be entrained to the external 24-h day–night cycle, enabling organisms to optimally time biochemical processes relative to dawn and dusk. In recent years, computational models based on differential equations have become useful tools for dissecting and quantifying the complex regulatory relationships underlying the clock's oscillatory dynamics. However, optimizing the large parameter sets characteristic of these models places intense demands on both computational and experimental resources, limiting the scope of in silico studies. Here, we develop an approach based on Boolean logic that dramatically reduces the parametrization, making the state and parameter spaces finite and tractable. We introduce efficient methods for fitting Boolean models to molecular data, successfully demonstrating their application to synthetic time courses generated by a number of established clock models, as well as experimental expression levels measured using luciferase imaging. Our results indicate that despite their relative simplicity, logic models can (i) simulate circadian oscillations with the correct, experimentally observed phase relationships among genes and (ii) flexibly entrain to light stimuli, reproducing the complex responses to variations in daylength generated by more detailed differential equation formulations. Our work also demonstrates that logic models have sufficient predictive power to identify optimal regulatory structures from experimental data. By presenting the first Boolean models of circadian circuits together with general techniques for their optimization, we hope to establish a new framework for the systematic modelling of more complex clocks, as well as other circuits with different qualitative dynamics. In particular, we

  18. A model to describe the performance of the UASB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno; Moreno, Luis; Liu, Longcheng

    2014-04-01

    A dynamic model to describe the performance of the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor was developed. It includes dispersion, advection, and reaction terms, as well as the resistances through which the substrate passes before its biotransformation. The UASB reactor is viewed as several continuous stirred tank reactors connected in series. The good agreement between experimental and simulated results shows that the model is able to predict the performance of the UASB reactor (i.e. substrate concentration, biomass concentration, granule size, and height of the sludge bed).

  19. Parameterization effects in nonlinear models to describe growth curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tales Jesus Fernandes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Various parameterizations of nonlinear models are common in the literature.In addition to complicating the understanding of these models, these parameterizations affect the nonlinearity measures and subsequently the inferences about the parameters. Bates and Watts (1980 quantified model nonlinearity using the geometric concept of curvature. Here we aimed to evaluate the three most common parameterizations of the Logistic and Gompertz nonlinear models with a focus on their nonlinearity and how this might affect inferences, and to establish relations between the parameters under the various expressions of the models. All parameterizations were adjusted to the growth data from pequi fruit. The intrinsic and parametric curvature described by Bates and Watts were calculated for each parameter. The choice of parameterization affects the nonlinearity measures, thus influencing the reliability and inferences about the estimated parameters. The most used methodologies presented the highest distance from linearity, showing the importance of analyzing these measures in any growth curve study. We propose that the parameterization in which the estimate of B is the abscissa of the inflection point should be used because of the lower deviations from linearity and direct biological interpretation for all parameters.

  20. Experimental investigation of statistical models describing distribution of counts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salma, I.; Zemplen-Papp, E.

    1992-01-01

    The binomial, Poisson and modified Poisson models which are used for describing the statistical nature of the distribution of counts are compared theoretically, and conclusions for application are considered. The validity of the Poisson and the modified Poisson statistical distribution for observing k events in a short time interval is investigated experimentally for various measuring times. The experiments to measure the influence of the significant radioactive decay were performed with 89 Y m (T 1/2 =16.06 s), using a multichannel analyser (4096 channels) in the multiscaling mode. According to the results, Poisson statistics describe the counting experiment for short measuring times (up to T=0.5T 1/2 ) and its application is recommended. However, analysis of the data demonstrated, with confidence, that for long measurements (T≥T 1/2 ) Poisson distribution is not valid and the modified Poisson function is preferable. The practical implications in calculating uncertainties and in optimizing the measuring time are discussed. Differences between the standard deviations evaluated on the basis of the Poisson and binomial models are especially significant for experiments with long measuring time (T/T 1/2 ≥2) and/or large detection efficiency (ε>0.30). Optimization of the measuring time for paired observations yields the same solution for either the binomial or the Poisson distribution. (orig.)

  1. Inference of random walk models to describe leukocyte migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Phoebe J. M.; Sim, Aaron; Taylor, Harriet B.; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Magaret J.; Pereira, Bernard; Stumpf, Michael P. H.; Liepe, Juliane

    2015-12-01

    While the majority of cells in an organism are static and remain relatively immobile in their tissue, migrating cells occur commonly during developmental processes and are crucial for a functioning immune response. The mode of migration has been described in terms of various types of random walks. To understand the details of the migratory behaviour we rely on mathematical models and their calibration to experimental data. Here we propose an approximate Bayesian inference scheme to calibrate a class of random walk models characterized by a specific, parametric particle re-orientation mechanism to observed trajectory data. We elaborate the concept of transition matrices (TMs) to detect random walk patterns and determine a statistic to quantify these TM to make them applicable for inference schemes. We apply the developed pipeline to in vivo trajectory data of macrophages and neutrophils, extracted from zebrafish that had undergone tail transection. We find that macrophage and neutrophils exhibit very distinct biased persistent random walk patterns, where the strengths of the persistence and bias are spatio-temporally regulated. Furthermore, the movement of macrophages is far less persistent than that of neutrophils in response to wounding.

  2. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean

    2004-01-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricite de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  3. Using multistage models to describe radiation-induced leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Kleinerman, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Armitage-Doll model of carcinogenesis is fitted to data on leukaemia mortality among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors with the DS86 dosimetry and on leukaemia incidence in the International Radiation Study of Cervical Cancer patients. Two different forms of model are fitted: the first postulates up to two radiation-affected stages and the second additionally allows for the presence at birth of a non-trivial population of cells which have already accumulated the first of the mutations leading to malignancy. Among models of the first form, a model with two adjacent radiation-affected stages appears to fit the data better than other models of the first form, including both models with two affected stages in any order and models with only one affected stage. The best fitting model predicts a linear-quadratic dose-response and reductions of relative risk with increasing time after exposure and age at exposure, in agreement with what has previously been observed in the Japanese and cervical cancer data. However, on the whole it does not provide an adequate fit to either dataset. The second form of model appears to provide a rather better fit, but the optimal models have biologically implausible parameters (the number of initiated cells at birth is negative) so that this model must also be regarded as providing an unsatisfactory description of the data. (author)

  4. Exponet taper-shape models to describe tree trunks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Carlos Lima de Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated exponent taper-shape models and other types applied in Brazil. Data from 270 sample trees scaled-hybrid Eucalyptus urophylla and Eucalyptus grandis were used as a studying case with 18 taper types models: simple (2, biomathematics (4, segmented (2 and exponent-form (10. It was adopted the analysis of the residual distribution and statistics: multiple linear correlation, residual standard error, percentage of no significant parcels in a completely randomized split plot and average error Dunnett, both at the level of 5% significance level. It was concluded that models of taper-shape exponents, in general, are superior to other types, the segmented model of Clark et al. is superior to Max and Burkhart biomathematics and the model developed in this paper, is better than the other biomathematics evaluated.

  5. Shell-model representation to describe α emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delion, D. S.; Liotta, R. J.

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that the standard shell-model representation is inadequate to explain cluster decay processes due to a deficient asymptotic behavior of the corresponding single-particle wave functions. A new representation is proposed which is derived from a mean field consisting of the standard Woods-Saxon plus spin-orbit potential of the shell model, with an additional attractive pocket potential of a Gaussian form localized on the nuclear surface. The eigenvectors of this new mean field provide a representation which retains all the benefits of the standard shell model while at the same time reproducing well the experimental absolute α-decay widths from heavy nuclei.

  6. Simple Model for Describing and Estimating Wind Turbine Dynamic Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    a method that can be characterised as the blade element momentum method plus a dynamic equation for the induction factor. This method then needs calculations along the blade for a number of sections including numerical solution of equations. This is numerical demanding. The simplest models amounts...... model suggested here places itself in between the most complex and the most simple both in accuracy, numerical demands and physical appeal. The suggested models behavior is demonstrated by simulation and the usefulness for extended Kalman filtering is assessed both via simulated data and real full scale...

  7. Using hybrid neural models to describe supercritical fluid extraction processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FONSECA A. P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of a hybrid neural model (HNM technique as applied to modeling supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE curves obtained from two Brazilian vegetable matrices. The serial HNM employed uses a neural network to estimate parameters of a phenomenological model. A small set of SCFE data for each vegetable was used to generate a semi-empirical extended data set, large enough for efficient network training, using three different approaches. Afterwards, other sets of experimental data, not used during the training procedure, were used to validate each approach. The HNM correlates well withthe experimental data, and it is shown that the predictions accomplished with this technique may be promising for SCFE purposes.

  8. Models for describing the thermal characteristics of building components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez, M.J.; Madsen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Outdoor testing of buildings and building components under real weather conditions provides useful information about their dynamic performance. Such knowledge is needed to properly characterize the heat transfer dynamics and provides useful information for implementing energy saving strategies...... of these approaches may therefore be very useful for selecting a suitable approach for each particular case. This paper presents an overview of models that can be applied for modelling the thermal characteristics of buildings and building components using data from outdoor testing. The choice of approach depends...

  9. Constitutive model describing dilatancy and cracking in brittle rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, W.C.; Gupta, Y.M.

    1982-01-01

    A micromechanical constitutive model, based on the responses of sliding cracks and elliptic cracks, is used to simulate the inelastic deformation of brittle rock. In addition to the usual incremental equations, the model has the following features: (1) activation equation that include the effects of friction and relate the far-field stresses of sliding and elliptic crack openings and lengths, (2) a stress intensity analysis of the sliding cracks that determines how much the cracks may grow, and (3) expressions for the crack strains that are constructed directly from the amount of crack sliding, opening, growth and the number of sliding and elliptic cracks in a given region. Numerical simulations of uniaxial and triaxial loading experiments on westerly granite were compared with experimental data to determine the validity of the constitutive model. These comparisons show that most of the uniaxial stress data and the loading portion of the triaxial data can be simulated quantitatively. The unloading portion of the triaxial data cannot be simulated properly, suggesting that a nonfrictional mechanism, not included in our model, may dominate the response in this region

  10. LCM 3.0: A Language for describing Conceptual Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Remco; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    1993-01-01

    The syntax of the conceptual model specification language LCM is defined. LCM uses equational logic to specify data types and order-sorted dynamic logic to specify objects with identity and mutable state. LCM specifies database transactions as finite sets of atomic object transitions.

  11. Surface-complexation modelling for describing adsorption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-08

    Jun 8, 2013 ... Adsorption of dissolved phosphate onto synthetic hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was measured in the laboratory as a function of pH, ionic strength, and phosphate relative concentration. Experimental data were used to constrain optimal values of surface complexation reactions using a geochemical modeling ...

  12. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribut......Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM......(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full...

  13. A general modeling framework for describing spatially structured population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Christine; Fryxell, John; Bieri, Joanna; Federico, Paula; Earl, Julia; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady; Flockhart, Tyler; Nicol, Sam; Diffendorfer, James E.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Erickson, Richard A.; Norris, D. Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Variation in movement across time and space fundamentally shapes the abundance and distribution of populations. Although a variety of approaches model structured population dynamics, they are limited to specific types of spatially structured populations and lack a unifying framework. Here, we propose a unified network-based framework sufficiently novel in its flexibility to capture a wide variety of spatiotemporal processes including metapopulations and a range of migratory patterns. It can accommodate different kinds of age structures, forms of population growth, dispersal, nomadism and migration, and alternative life-history strategies. Our objective was to link three general elements common to all spatially structured populations (space, time and movement) under a single mathematical framework. To do this, we adopt a network modeling approach. The spatial structure of a population is represented by a weighted and directed network. Each node and each edge has a set of attributes which vary through time. The dynamics of our network-based population is modeled with discrete time steps. Using both theoretical and real-world examples, we show how common elements recur across species with disparate movement strategies and how they can be combined under a unified mathematical framework. We illustrate how metapopulations, various migratory patterns, and nomadism can be represented with this modeling approach. We also apply our network-based framework to four organisms spanning a wide range of life histories, movement patterns, and carrying capacities. General computer code to implement our framework is provided, which can be applied to almost any spatially structured population. This framework contributes to our theoretical understanding of population dynamics and has practical management applications, including understanding the impact of perturbations on population size, distribution, and movement patterns. By working within a common framework, there is less chance

  14. A general modeling framework for describing spatially structured population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Christine; Fryxell, John M; Bieri, Joanna A; Federico, Paula; Earl, Julia E; Wiederholt, Ruscena; Mattsson, Brady J; Flockhart, D T Tyler; Nicol, Sam; Diffendorfer, Jay E; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Erickson, Richard A; Norris, D Ryan

    2018-01-01

    Variation in movement across time and space fundamentally shapes the abundance and distribution of populations. Although a variety of approaches model structured population dynamics, they are limited to specific types of spatially structured populations and lack a unifying framework. Here, we propose a unified network-based framework sufficiently novel in its flexibility to capture a wide variety of spatiotemporal processes including metapopulations and a range of migratory patterns. It can accommodate different kinds of age structures, forms of population growth, dispersal, nomadism and migration, and alternative life-history strategies. Our objective was to link three general elements common to all spatially structured populations (space, time and movement) under a single mathematical framework. To do this, we adopt a network modeling approach. The spatial structure of a population is represented by a weighted and directed network. Each node and each edge has a set of attributes which vary through time. The dynamics of our network-based population is modeled with discrete time steps. Using both theoretical and real-world examples, we show how common elements recur across species with disparate movement strategies and how they can be combined under a unified mathematical framework. We illustrate how metapopulations, various migratory patterns, and nomadism can be represented with this modeling approach. We also apply our network-based framework to four organisms spanning a wide range of life histories, movement patterns, and carrying capacities. General computer code to implement our framework is provided, which can be applied to almost any spatially structured population. This framework contributes to our theoretical understanding of population dynamics and has practical management applications, including understanding the impact of perturbations on population size, distribution, and movement patterns. By working within a common framework, there is less chance

  15. MODEL OF TRAINING OF SUCCESS IN LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Александровна Лежнева

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article explains the importance of the development of motive to succeed in adolescence. It is determined the value of the motive to achieve success in the further development of the teenager: a motive to achieve effective internal forces mobilized for the implementation of successful operation ensures the active involvement of teenagers in social and interpersonal relationships. As the primary means of motive development success is considered training. The author provides a definition of "training for success in life," creates a model of training for success in life, and describes its units (targeted, informative, technological, productive, reveals the successful development of the technology life strategy used during the training (self-presentation, targets, incentives, subject-orientation. The author pays attention to the need for a future psychologist to develop teenagers’ motive to achieve success through the mastery of competence in constructing a model of training for success in life, and its implementation in the course of professional activities. The main means of training students of psychology to the use of training success in life identified the additional educational programs and psychological section.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-9-77

  16. Analytical model describes ion conduction in fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Daniel; Tse, Steve; Witten, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Many fuel cell designs employ polyelectrolyte membranes, but little is known about how to tune the parameters (water level, morphology, etc.) to maximize ion conductivity. We came up with a simple model based on a random, discrete water distribution and ion confinement due to neighboring polymer. The results quantitatively agree with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and explain experimental observations. We find that when the ratio of water volume to polymer volume, Vw /Vp , is small, the predicted ion self-diffusion coefficient scales roughly as Dw T√{Vw /Vp } exp(- ⋯Vp /Vw) , where Dw T is the limiting value in pure water at temperature T . At high water levels the model also agrees with MD simulation, plateauing to Dw T . The model predicts a maximum conductivity at a water level higher than is typically used, and that it would be beneficial to increase water retention even at the expense of lower ion concentration. Also, membranes would conduct better if they phase-separated into water-rich and polymer-rich regions. US ARMY MURI #W911NF-10-1-0520.

  17. A model to describe Cr(VI) kinetics biosorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the effect of pH control on kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalks has been studied. A set of experiments were performed at a constant pH 3+/-0.1 which was assured by means of a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). In a second set of experiments the initial pH was adjusted to pH 3 and then pH was allowed to freely evolve during the sorption process. Both sets of experiments were carried out at different temperatures within the range 5-50 degrees C. Constant temperature was assured by water recirculation from a thermostatic bath. Results demonstrated that pH has high influence on kinetics only at the lowest temperatures studied. A model based on a complex reaction sequence which takes into account Cr(VI) sorption, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), sorption of the formed Cr(III) which includes the pH variation during the sorption process has been proposed to model Cr(VI) kinetics sorption onto grape stalk waste. Furthermore, the robustness of the model has been tested. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Biophysical Neural Model To Describe Spatial Visual Attention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugues, Etienne; Jose, Jorge V.

    2008-01-01

    Visual scenes have enormous spatial and temporal information that are transduced into neural spike trains. Psychophysical experiments indicate that only a small portion of a spatial image is consciously accessible. Electrophysiological experiments in behaving monkeys have revealed a number of modulations of the neural activity in special visual area known as V4, when the animal is paying attention directly towards a particular stimulus location. The nature of the attentional input to V4, however, remains unknown as well as to the mechanisms responsible for these modulations. We use a biophysical neural network model of V4 to address these issues. We first constrain our model to reproduce the experimental results obtained for different external stimulus configurations and without paying attention. To reproduce the known neuronal response variability, we found that the neurons should receive about equal, or balanced, levels of excitatory and inhibitory inputs and whose levels are high as they are in in vivo conditions. Next we consider attentional inputs that can induce and reproduce the observed spiking modulations. We also elucidate the role played by the neural network to generate these modulations

  19. Collective philanthropy: describing and modeling the ecology of giving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, William L; Reagan, Andrew James; Dodds, Peter Sheridan

    2014-01-01

    Reflective of income and wealth distributions, philanthropic gifting appears to follow an approximate power-law size distribution as measured by the size of gifts received by individual institutions. We explore the ecology of gifting by analysing data sets of individual gifts for a diverse group of institutions dedicated to education, medicine, art, public support, and religion. We find that the detailed forms of gift-size distributions differ across but are relatively constant within charity categories. We construct a model for how a donor's income affects their giving preferences in different charity categories, offering a mechanistic explanation for variations in institutional gift-size distributions. We discuss how knowledge of gift-sized distributions may be used to assess an institution's gift-giving profile, to help set fundraising goals, and to design an institution-specific giving pyramid.

  20. Kinetics models describing degradation-relaxation effects in nanoinhomogeneous substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Balitska, V.; Brunner, M.

    2017-12-01

    The mathematical models of degradation-relaxation kinetics are considered for jammed systems composed of screen-printed spinel Cu0.1Ni0.1Co1.6Mn1.2O4 and conductive Ag or Ag-Pd alloys. Structurally-intrinsic nanoinhomogeneities due to Ag and Ag-Pd diffusants embedded in spinel phase environment are shown to define governing kinetics of thermally-induced degradation obeying an obvious non-exponential behaviour in the resistance drift. The stretched-to-compressed exponential crossover is detected for degradation-relaxation kinetics in these systems with conductive contacts made of Ag-Pd and Ag alloys. Under essential migration of conductive phase, the resulting kinetics is though to be considerable two-step diffusing process originated from Ag penetration deep into spinel ceramics.

  1. Describing Case Study Method and Identifying the Factors that Contribute to the Successful Conduct of Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad H. Juma'h; Mustafa Cavus

    2001-01-01

    This article has attempted to describe case study, the limitations and critiques on case study methodology and how the proponents have responded to these. Our special focus have been on the debate on theory building from case study research, and a framework for conducting case study research as well as the factors for a successful case study research. The overall conclusion is that the case study has been inappropriately used to generate theories.

  2. The Personal Marketing Pyramid: A Model for Secretarial Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    The author describes his model of a synergistic approach to achieving success. His Personal Marketing Pyramid consists of four sciences: physiology, psychology, sociology, and philosophy. He uses examples related to success in a secretarial career. (CH)

  3. Development of a model describing virus removal process in an activated sludge basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.; Shiragami, N. Unno, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-06-20

    The virus removal process from the liquid phase in an activated sludge basin possibly consists of physicochemical processes, such as adsorption onto sludge flocs, biological processes such as microbial predating and inactivation by virucidal components excreted by microbes. To describe properly the virus behavior in an activated sludge basin, a simple model is proposed based on the experimental data obtained using a poliovirus type 1. A three-compartments model, which include the virus in the liquid phase and in the peripheral and inner regions of sludge flocs is employed. By using the model, the Virus removal process was successfully simulated to highlight the implication of its distribution in the activated sludge basin. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Developing a Successful Open Source Training Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Lopez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Training programs for open source software provide a tangible, and sellable, product. A successful training program not only builds revenue, it also adds to the overall body of knowledge available for the open source project. By gathering best practices and taking advantage of the collective expertise within a community, it may be possible for a business to partner with an open source project to build a curriculum that promotes the project and supports the needs of the company's training customers. This article describes the initial approach used by Canonical, the commercial sponsor of the Ubuntu Linux operating system, to engage the community in the creation of its training offerings. We then discuss alternate curriculum creation models and some of the conditions that are necessary for successful collaboration between creators of existing documentation and commercial training providers.

  5. An extended car-following model to describe connected traffic dynamics under cyberattacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wu, Xinkai; Qin, Hongmao; Wang, Yunpeng

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the impacts of the potential cyberattacks on vehicles are modeled through an extended car-following model. To better understand the mechanism of traffic disturbance under cyberattacks, the linear and nonlinear stability analysis are conducted respectively. Particularly, linear stability analysis is performed to obtain different neutral stability conditions with various parameters; and nonlinear stability analysis is carried out by using reductive perturbation method to derive the soliton solution of the modified Korteweg de Vries equation (mKdV) near the critical point, which is used to draw coexisting stability lines. Furthermore, by applying linear and nonlinear stability analysis, traffic flow state can be divided into three states, i.e., stable, metastable and unstable states which are useful to describe shockwave dynamics and driving behaviors under cyberattacks. The theoretical results show that the proposed car-following model is capable of successfully describing the car-following behavior of connected vehicles with cyberattacks. Finally, numerical simulation using real values has confirmed the validity of theoretical analysis. The results further demonstrate our model can be used to help avoid collisions and relieve traffic congestion with cybersecurity threats.

  6. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. However, reductive dechlorination is a complex biologi...

  7. Aging Successfully: A Four-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Yen, Tung-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The study was designed to validate a model for a successful aging process and examine the gender differences in the aging process. Three hundred twelve participants who were 65 or older completed a Taiwan Social Change Survey that measures four factors that define successful aging process: including physical, psychological, social support, and…

  8. Butler–Volmer–Monod model for describing bio-anode polarization curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.; Heijne, ter A.; Stein, N.; Rozendal, R.A.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    A kinetic model of the bio-anode was developed based on a simple representation of the underlying biochemical conversions as described by enzyme kinetics, and electron transfer reactions as described by the Butler–Volmer electron transfer kinetics. This Butler–Volmer–Monod model was well able to

  9. Model of key success factors for Business Intelligence implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mesaros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New progressive technologies recorded growth in every area. Information-communication technologies facilitate the exchange of information and it facilitates management of everyday activities in enterprises. Specific modules (such as Business Intelligence facilitate decision-making. Several studies have demonstrated the positive impact of Business Intelligence to decision-making. The first step is to put in place the enterprise. The implementation process is influenced by many factors. This article discusses the issue of key success factors affecting to successful implementation of Business Intelligence. The article describes the key success factors for successful implementation and use of Business Intelligence based on multiple studies. The main objective of this study is to verify the effects and dependence of selected factors and proposes a model of key success factors for successful implementation of Business Intelligence. Key success factors and the proposed model are studied in Slovak enterprises.

  10. Introducing mixotrophy into a biogeochemical model describing an eutrophied coastal ecosystem: The Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghyoot, Caroline; Lancelot, Christiane; Flynn, Kevin J.; Mitra, Aditee; Gypens, Nathalie

    2017-09-01

    Most biogeochemical/ecological models divide planktonic protists between phototrophs (phytoplankton) and heterotrophs (zooplankton). However, a large number of planktonic protists are able to combine several mechanisms of carbon and nutrient acquisition. Not representing these multiple mechanisms in biogeochemical/ecological models describing eutrophied coastal ecosystems can potentially lead to different conclusions regarding ecosystem functioning, especially regarding the success of harmful algae, which are often reported as mixotrophic. This modelling study investigates the implications for trophic dynamics of including 3 contrasting forms of mixotrophy, namely osmotrophy (using alkaline phosphatase activity, APA), non-constitutive mixotrophy (acquired phototrophy by microzooplankton) and also constitutive mixotrophy. The application is in the Southern North Sea, an ecosystem that faced, between 1985 and 2005, a significant increase in the nutrient supply N:P ratio (from 31 to 81 mol N:P). The comparison with a traditional model shows that, when the winter N:P ratio in the Southern North Sea is above 22 molN molP-1 (as occurred from mid-1990s), APA allows a 3-32% increase of annual gross primary production (GPP). In result of the higher GPP, the annual sedimentation increases as well as the bacterial production. By contrast, APA does not affect the export of matter to higher trophic levels because the increased GPP is mainly due to Phaeocystis colonies, which are not grazed by copepods. Under high irradiance, non-constitutive mixotrophy appreciably increases annual GPP, transfer to higher trophic levels, sedimentation, and nutrient remineralisation. In this ecosystem, non-constitutive mixotrophy is also observed to have an indirect stimulating effect on diatoms. Constitutive mixotrophy in nanoflagellates appears to have little influence on this ecosystem functioning. An important conclusion from this work is that contrasting forms of mixotrophy have different

  11. FUZZY MODELING BY SUCCESSIVE ESTIMATION OF RULES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an algorithm for automatically deriving fuzzy rules directly from a set of input-output data of a process for the purpose of modeling. The rules are extracted by a method termed successive estimation. This method is used to generate a model without truncating the number of fired rules, to within user ...

  12. A Model of Successful School Leadership from the International Successful School Principalship Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gurr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Successful School Principalship Project (ISSPP has been actively conducting research about the work of successful principals since 2001. Findings from four project books and eight models derived from this project are synthesised into a model of successful school leadership. Building on Gurr, Drysdale and Mulford’s earlier model, the work of school leaders is described as engaging within the school context to influence student and school outcomes through interventions in teaching and learning, school capacity building, and the wider context. The qualities a leader brings to their role, a portfolio approach to using leadership ideas, constructing networks, collaborations and partnerships, and utilising accountability and evaluation for evidence-informed improvement, are important additional elements. The model is applicable to all in leadership roles in schools.

  13. Accuracy Assessment for Cad Modeling of Freeform Surface Described by Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golba Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of comparative analysis of modeling accuracy the freeform surface constructed by using a variety of algorithms for surface modeling. Also determined the accuracy of mapping the theoretical freeform surface described by mathematical equation. To model surface objects used: SolidWorks 2012, CATIA v5 and Geomagic Studio 12. During the design process of CAD models were used: profile curves, fitting parametric surface and polygonal mesh. To assess the accuracy of the CAD models used Geomagic Qualify 12. On the basis of analyse defined the scope of application of each modeling techniques depending on the nature of the constructed object.

  14. A model based on soil structural aspects describing the fate of genetically modified bacteria in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, van der N.; Elsas, van J.D.; Heijnen, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation model was developed which describes growth and competition of bacteria in the soil environment. In the model, soil was assumed to contain millions of pores of a few different size classes. An introduced bacterial strain, e.g. a genetically modified micro-organism (GEMMO), was

  15. CLIC Detector Concepts as described in the CDR: Differences between the GEANT4 and Engineering Models

    CERN Document Server

    Elsener, K; Schlatter, D; Siegrist, N

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC_ILD and CLIC_SiD detector concepts as used for the CDR Vol. 2 in 2011 exist both in GEANT4 simulation models and in engineering layout drawings. At this early stage of a conceptual design, there are inevitably differences between these models, which are described in this note.

  16. A standard protocol for describing individual-based and agent-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Volker; Berger, Uta; Bastiansen, Finn; Eliassen, Sigrunn; Ginot, Vincent; Giske, Jarl; Goss-Custard, John; Grand, Tamara; Heinz, Simone K.; Huse, Geir; Huth, Andreas; Jepsen, Jane U.; Jorgensen, Christian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Muller, Birgit; Pe'er, Guy; Piou, Cyril; Railsback, Steven F.; Robbins, Andrew M.; Robbins, Martha M.; Rossmanith, Eva; Ruger, Nadja; Strand, Espen; Souissi, Sami; Stillman, Richard A.; Vabo, Rune; Visser, Ute; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models that describe autonomous individual organisms (individual based models, IBM) or agents (agent-based models, ABM) have become a widely used tool, not only in ecology, but also in many other disciplines dealing with complex systems made up of autonomous entities. However, there is no standard protocol for describing such simulation models, which can make them difficult to understand and to duplicate. This paper presents a proposed standard protocol, ODD, for describing IBMs and ABMs, developed and tested by 28 modellers who cover a wide range of fields within ecology. This protocol consists of three blocks (Overview, Design concepts, and Details), which are subdivided into seven elements: Purpose, State variables and scales, Process overview and scheduling, Design concepts, Initialization, Input, and Submodels. We explain which aspects of a model should be described in each element, and we present an example to illustrate the protocol in use. In addition, 19 examples are available in an Online Appendix. We consider ODD as a first step for establishing a more detailed common format of the description of IBMs and ABMs. Once initiated, the protocol will hopefully evolve as it becomes used by a sufficiently large proportion of modellers.

  17. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Shirley; Kos, Bor; Last, David; Guez, David; Daniels, Dianne; Harnof, Sagi; Mardor, Yael; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2016-03-01

    Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This model can be used for individual treatment planning. Cell death and BBB disruption models were developed based on the Peleg-Fermi model in combination with numerical models of the electric field. The model calculates the electric field thresholds for cell kill and BBB disruption and describes the dependence on the number of treatment pulses. The model was validated using in vivo experimental data consisting of rats brains MRIs post electroporation treatments. Linear regression analysis confirmed that the model described the IRE and BBB disruption volumes as a function of treatment pulses number (r(2) = 0.79; p disruption, the ratio increased with the number of pulses. BBB disruption radii were on average 67% ± 11% larger than IRE volumes. The statistical model can be used to describe the dependence of treatment-effects on the number of pulses independent of the experimental setup.

  18. Mathematical Modeling Projects: Success for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Therese

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical modeling allows flexibility for a project-based experience. We share details of our regular capstone course, successful for virtually 100% of our math majors for almost two decades. Our research-like approach in this course accommodates a variety of student backgrounds and interests, and has produced some award-winning student…

  19. A revised multi-Fickian moisture transport model to describe non-Fickian effects in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study and a refinement of the sorption rate model in a so-called multi-Fickian or multi-phase model. This type of model describes the complex moisture transport system in wood, which consists of separate water vapor and bound-water diffusion interacting through sorption...... sorption allow a simplification of the system to be modeled by a single Fickian diffusion equation. To determine the response of the system, the sorption rate model is essential. Here the function modeling the moisture-dependent adsorption rate is investigated based on existing experiments on thin wood...... conditions for the model are discussed, since discrepancies from corresponding models of moisture transport in paper products have been found. ©2007 by Walter de Gruyter....

  20. A Revised Multi-Fickian Moisture Transport Model To Describe Non-Fickian Effects In Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan; Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a study and a refinement of the sorption rate model in a so-called multi-Fickian or multiphase model. This type of model describes the complex moisture transport system in wood, which consists of separate water vapor and bound-water diffusion interacting through sorption...... sorption allow a simplification of the system to be modeled by a single Fickian diffusion equation. To determine the response of the system, the sorption rate model is essential. Here the function modeling the moisture-dependent adsorption rate is investigated based on existing experiments on thin wood...... conditions for the model are discussed, since discrepancies from corresponding models of moisture transport in paper products have been found....

  1. Describing the processes of propagation and eliminating wildfires with the use of agent models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Dorrer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new method of describing the processes of propagation and elimination of wildfires on the basis of agent-based modeling is proposed. The main structural units of the creation of such models are the classes of active objects (agents. Agent approach, combined with Geographic Information Systems (GIS can effectively describe the interaction of a large number of participants in the process to combat wildfires: fire spreading, fire crews, mechanization, aerial means and other. In this paper we propose a multi-agent model to predict the spread of wildfire edge and simulate the direct method of extinguishing a ground fire with non-mechanized crews. The model consist with two classes of agents, designated A and B. The burning fire edge is represented as a chain of A-agents, each of which simulates the burning of an elementary portion of vegetation fuel. Fire front movement (moving the A-agent described by the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with using the indicatrises of normal front rate of spread (figurotris. The configuration of the front calculated on basis the algorithm of mobile grids. Agents other type, B-agents, described extinguishing process; they move to the agents of A type and act on them, reducing the combustion intensity to zero. Modeling system presented as two-level coloured nested Petri Net, which describes the agents’ interaction semantics. This model is implemented as a GIS-oriented software system that can be useful both in the fire fighting management as well as in staff training tactics to fighting wildfires. Some examples of modeling decision making on а ground fire extinguishing are presented.

  2. A mathematical model describes the malignant transformation of low grade gliomas: Prognostic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena U Bogdańska

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most frequent type of primary brain tumours. Low grade gliomas (LGGs, WHO grade II gliomas may grow very slowly for the long periods of time, however they inevitably cause death due to the phenomenon known as the malignant transformation. This refers to the transition of LGGs to more aggressive forms of high grade gliomas (HGGs, WHO grade III and IV gliomas. In this paper we propose a mathematical model describing the spatio-temporal transition of LGGs into HGGs. Our modelling approach is based on two cellular populations with transitions between them being driven by the tumour microenvironment transformation occurring when the tumour cell density grows beyond a critical level. We show that the proposed model describes real patient data well. We discuss the relationship between patient prognosis and model parameters. We approximate tumour radius and velocity before malignant transformation as well as estimate the onset of this process.

  3. A STRUCTURAL MODEL DESCRIBE CHINESE TRADESMEN ATTITUDES TOWARDS GREEK STUDENTS CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia D. ANASTASIADOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tests evaluates 43 Chinese tradesmen opinios describe the main factors that influnce Greek consumers’ behavior. A structural model was constructed to represent the relationship between consumer components. The model was tested for its Convergent and Discriminant Validity. Moreover it was tested for its reliability and construct reliability. The findings from this study may be used by Chinese tradesmen to develop their marketing campains and customers.

  4. Dynamic model describing response of glass-fiber extrusion process to external perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpashchikov, V. L.; Martynenko, O. G.; Shnip, A. I.

    1984-11-01

    A model is proposed for describing the dynamics of glass-fiber extrusion, and on its basis are determined the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the produced fiber cross-section, depending on technological perturbations. The effect of viscous relaxation on the magnitude of residual stresses in a multilayer optical fiber is also evaluated on this basis.

  5. A Three-Compartment Model Describing Temperature Changes in Tethered Flying Blowflies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Schwering, P.B.W.; Tinbergen, J.

    1993-01-01

    A three-compartment model is presented that describes temperature measurements of tethered flying blowflies, obtained by thermal imaging. During rest, the body temperature is approximately equal to the ambient temperature. At the start of flight, the thorax temperature increases exponentially with a

  6. Robustness of a cross contamination model describing transfer of pathogens during grinding of meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant’Ana, A. S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a cross contamination model for its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and L. monocytogenes during grinding of varying sizes and numbers of pieces of meats in two grinder systems. Data from 19 trials were collected. Three evaluation approaches were...... that grinding was influenced by sharpness of grinder knife, specific grinder and grinding temperature....

  7. Describing Growth Pattern of Bali Cows Using Non-linear Regression Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Hafiz A.W

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the best fit non-linear regression model to describe the growth pattern of Bali cows. Estimates of asymptotic mature weight, rate of maturing and constant of integration were derived from Brody, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz and Logistic models which were fitted to cross-sectional data of body weight taken from 74 Bali cows raised in MARDI Research Station Muadzam Shah Pahang. Coefficient of determination (R2 and residual mean squares (MSE were used to determine the best fit model in describing the growth pattern of Bali cows. Von Bertalanffy model was the best model among the four growth functions evaluated to determine the mature weight of Bali cattle as shown by the highest R2 and lowest MSE values (0.973 and 601.9, respectively, followed by Gompertz (0.972 and 621.2, respectively, Logistic (0.971 and 648.4, respectively and Brody (0.932 and 660.5, respectively models. The correlation between rate of maturing and mature weight was found to be negative in the range of -0.170 to -0.929 for all models, indicating that animals of heavier mature weight had lower rate of maturing. The use of non-linear model could summarize the weight-age relationship into several biologically interpreted parameters compared to the entire lifespan weight-age data points that are difficult and time consuming to interpret.

  8. Describing the longitudinal course of major depression using Markov models: Data integration across three national surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Robert C

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most epidemiological studies of major depression report period prevalence estimates. These are of limited utility in characterizing the longitudinal epidemiology of this condition. Markov models provide a methodological framework for increasing the utility of epidemiological data. Markov models relating incidence and recovery to major depression prevalence have been described in a series of prior papers. In this paper, the models are extended to describe the longitudinal course of the disorder. Methods Data from three national surveys conducted by the Canadian national statistical agency (Statistics Canada were used in this analysis. These data were integrated using a Markov model. Incidence, recurrence and recovery were represented as weekly transition probabilities. Model parameters were calibrated to the survey estimates. Results The population was divided into three categories: low, moderate and high recurrence groups. The size of each category was approximated using lifetime data from a study using the WHO Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI. Consistent with previous work, transition probabilities reflecting recovery were high in the initial weeks of the episodes, and declined by a fixed proportion with each passing week. Conclusion Markov models provide a framework for integrating psychiatric epidemiological data. Previous studies have illustrated the utility of Markov models for decomposing prevalence into its various determinants: incidence, recovery and mortality. This study extends the Markov approach by distinguishing several recurrence categories.

  9. Regularization of a massless dirac model to describe anomalous electromagnetic response of Weyl semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takane, Yoshitake

    2016-01-01

    An unbounded massless Dirac model with two nondegenerate Dirac cones is the simplest model for Weyl semimetals, which show the anomalous electromagnetic response of chiral magnetic effect (CME) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE). However, if this model is naively used to analyze the electromagnetic response within a linear response theory, it gives the result apparently inconsistent with the persuasive prediction based on a lattice model. We show that this serious difficulty is related to the breaking of current conservation in the Dirac model due to quantum anomaly and can be removed if current and charge operators are redefined to include the contribution from the anomaly. We demonstrate that the CME as well as the AHE can be properly described using newly defined operators, and clarify that the CME is determined by the competition between the contribution from the anomaly and that from low-energy electrons. (author)

  10. New Model to describe the interaction of slow neutrons with solid deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, J.R

    2009-01-01

    A new scattering kernel to describe the interaction of slow neutrons with solid Deuterium was developed. The main characteristics of that system are contained in the formalism, including the lattice s density of states, the Young-Koppel quantum treatment of the rotations, and the internal molecular vibrations. The elastic processes involving coherent and incoherent contributions are fully described, as well as the spin-correlation effects. The results from the new model are compared with the best available experimental data, showing very good agreement. [es

  11. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, R K; Srivastava, R

    1979-12-01

    Models and computer codes which may be used to describe flow reactors in which high purity, solar grade silicon is produced via reduction of gaseous silicon halides are described. A prominent example of the type of process which may be studied using the codes developed in this program is the SiCl/sub 4//Na reactor currently being developed by the Westinghouse Electric Corp. During this program two large computer codes were developed. The first is the CHEMPART code, an axisymmetric, marching code which treats two-phase flows with models describing detailed gas-phase chemical kinetics, particle formation, and particle growth. This code, based on the AeroChem LAPP (Low Altitude Plume Program) code can be used to describe flow reactors in which reactants mix, react, and form a particulate phase. Detailed radial gas-phase composition, temperature, velocity, and particle size distribution profiles are computed. Also, depositon of heat, momentum, and mass (either particulate or vapor) on reactor walls is described. The second code is a modified version of the GENMIX boundary layer code which is used to compute rates of heat, momentum, and mass transfer to the reactor walls. This code lacks the detailed chemical kinetics and particle handling features of the CHEMPART code but has the virtue of running much more rapidly than CHEMPART, while treating the phenomena occurring in the boundary layer in more detail than can be afforded using CHEMPART. These two codes have been used in this program to predict particle formation characteristics and wall collection efficiencies for SiCl/sub 4//Na flow reactors. Results are described.

  12. Calibration and validation of a model describing complete autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular SBR system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mutlu, Ayten Gizem; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A validated model describing the nitritation-anammox process in a granular sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system is an important tool for: a) design of future experiments and b) prediction of process performance during optimization, while applying process control, or during system scale......-up. RESULTS: A model was calibrated using a step-wise procedure customized for the specific needs of the system. The important steps in the procedure were initialization, steady-state and dynamic calibration, and validation. A fast and effective initialization approach was developed to approximate pseudo...... screening of the parameter space proposed by Sin et al. (2008) - to find the best fit of the model to dynamic data. Finally, the calibrated model was validated with an independent data set. CONCLUSION: The presented calibration procedure is the first customized procedure for this type of system...

  13. Mathematical model describing the thyroids-pituitary axis with distributed time delays in hormone transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neamţu, Mihaela; Stoian, Dana; Navolan, Dan Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In the present paper we provide a mathematical model that describe the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis. Since there is a spatial separation between thyroid and pituitary gland in the body, time is needed for transportation of thyrotropin and thyroxine between the glands. Thus, the distributed time delays are considered as both weak and Dirac kernels. The delayed model is analyzed regarding the stability and bifurcation behavior. The last part contains some numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of our results and conclusions.

  14. A new model for describing remission times: the generalized beta-generated Lindley distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA DO CARMO S. LIMA

    Full Text Available New generators are required to define wider distributions for modeling real data in survival analysis. To that end we introduce the four-parameter generalized beta-generated Lindley distribution. It has explicit expressions for the ordinary and incomplete moments, mean deviations, generating and quantile functions. We propose a maximum likelihood procedure to estimate the model parameters, which is assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation study. We also derive an additional estimation scheme by means of least square between percentiles. The usefulness of the proposed distribution to describe remission times of cancer patients is illustrated by means of an application to real data.

  15. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F; Ferguson, Andrew L; Barton, John P; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  16. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F.; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  17. Improving uncertainty estimation in urban hydrological modeling by statistically describing bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Del Giudice

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic models are useful tools for urban water management. Unfortunately, it is still challenging to obtain accurate results and plausible uncertainty estimates when using these models. In particular, with the currently applied statistical techniques, flow predictions are usually overconfident and biased. In this study, we present a flexible and relatively efficient methodology (i to obtain more reliable hydrological simulations in terms of coverage of validation data by the uncertainty bands and (ii to separate prediction uncertainty into its components. Our approach acknowledges that urban drainage predictions are biased. This is mostly due to input errors and structural deficits of the model. We address this issue by describing model bias in a Bayesian framework. The bias becomes an autoregressive term additional to white measurement noise, the only error type accounted for in traditional uncertainty analysis. To allow for bigger discrepancies during wet weather, we make the variance of bias dependent on the input (rainfall or/and output (runoff of the system. Specifically, we present a structured approach to select, among five variants, the optimal bias description for a given urban or natural case study. We tested the methodology in a small monitored stormwater system described with a parsimonious model. Our results clearly show that flow simulations are much more reliable when bias is accounted for than when it is neglected. Furthermore, our probabilistic predictions can discriminate between three uncertainty contributions: parametric uncertainty, bias, and measurement errors. In our case study, the best performing bias description is the output-dependent bias using a log-sinh transformation of data and model results. The limitations of the framework presented are some ambiguity due to the subjective choice of priors for bias parameters and its inability to address the causes of model discrepancies. Further research should focus on

  18. Validation of mathematical models to describe fluid dynamics of a cold riser by gamma ray attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Ana Cristina Bezerra Azedo de

    2004-12-01

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a riser in a cold type FCC model was investigated by means of catalyst concentration distribution measured with gamma attenuation and simulated with a mathematical model. In the riser of the cold model, MEF, 0,032 m in diameter, 2,30 m in length the fluidized bed, whose components are air and FCC catalyst, circulates. The MEF is operated by automatic control and instruments for measuring fluid dynamic variables. An axial catalyst concentration distribution was measured using an Am-241 gamma source and a NaI detector coupled to a multichannel provided with a software for data acquisition and evaluation. The MEF was adapted for a fluid dynamic model validation which describes the flow in the riser, for example, by introducing an injector for controlling the solid flow in circulation. Mathematical models were selected from literature, analyzed and tested to simulate the fluid dynamic of the riser. A methodology for validating fluid dynamic models was studied and implemented. The stages of the work were developed according to the validation methodology, such as data planning experiments, study of the equations which describe the fluidodynamic, computational solvers application and comparison with experimental data. Operational sequences were carried out keeping the MEF conditions for measuring catalyst concentration and simultaneously measuring the fluid dynamic variables, velocity of the components and pressure drop in the riser. Following this, simulated and experimental values were compared and statistical data treatment done, aiming at the required precision to validate the fluid dynamic model. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data were carried out under validation criteria. The fluid dynamic behavior of the riser was analyzed and the results and the agreement with literature were discussed. The adopt model was validated under the MEF operational conditions, for a 3 to 6 m/s gas velocity in the riser and a slip

  19. Suitability of parametric models to describe the hydraulic properties of an unsaturated coarse sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Andy; Rudolph, David L.; Kachanoski , R. Gary

    1998-01-01

    The performance of parametric models used to describe soil water retention (SWR) properties and predict unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) as a function of volumetric water content (θ) is examined using SWR and K(θ) data for coarse sand and gravel sediments. Six 70 cm long, 10 cm diameter cores of glacial outwash were instrumented at eight depths with porous cup ten-siometers and time domain reflectometry probes to measure soil water pressure head (h) and θ, respectively, for seven unsaturated and one saturated steady-state flow conditions. Forty-two θ(h) and K(θ) relationships were measured from the infiltration tests on the cores. Of the four SWR models compared in the analysis, the van Genuchten (1980) equation with parameters m and n restricted according to the Mualem (m = 1 - 1/n) criterion is best suited to describe the θ(h) relationships. The accuracy of two models that predict K(θ) using parameter values derived from the SWR models was also evaluated. The model developed by van Genuchten (1980) based on the theoretical expression of Mualem (1976) predicted K(θ) more accurately than the van Genuchten (1980) model based on the theory of Burdine (1953). A sensitivity analysis shows that more accurate predictions of K(θ) are achieved using SWR model parameters derived with residual water content (θr) specified according to independent measurements of θ at values of h where θ/h ∼ 0 rather than model-fit θr values. The accuracy of the model K(θ) function improves markedly when at least one value of unsaturated K is used to scale the K(θ) function predicted using the saturated K. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydraulic properties of coarse-grained sediments can be accurately described using the parametric models. In addition, data collection efforts should focus on measuring at least one value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and as complete a set of SWR data as possible, particularly in the dry range.

  20. A simplified model to describe the flow field on tidal floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Oyen, T.; Lanzoni, S.; D'Alpaos, A.; Temmerman, S.; Troch, P.; Carniello, L.

    2012-04-01

    Tidal salt marshes are intriguing morphological features occurring abundantly at the boundary between the continental shelf and the main land. These areas are vital for the coastal ecosystem since they provide the lion's share of primary production in the coastal zone and host an extremely high biodiversity. Moreover, these regions act as a first barrier against storm surges. Presently, however, climatic changes challenge the existence of tidal salt marshes. Numerical models are suitable tools to assess the proneness of tidal salt marshes. Yet, these models need to be simplified since the phenomenon evolves over long time scales and large spatial scales, thus preventing the use of sophisticated models. Here, a new simplified hydrodynamic model is presented to describe the flow field on the floodplains of tidal salt marshes. The model follows from a study of the magnitude of the terms appearing in the momentum balance; expanding subsequently the conservation equations in the small variables appearing. A comparison with a full-fledged numerical model appears to support the simplified approach, suggesting that this new model could provide a valuable tool to address the eco-morphological evolution of tidal landscapes.

  1. A metallic solution model with adjustable parameter for describing ternary thermodynamic properties from its binary constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zheng; Qiu Guanzhou

    2007-01-01

    A metallic solution model with adjustable parameter k has been developed to predict thermodynamic properties of ternary systems from those of its constituent three binaries. In the present model, the excess Gibbs free energy for a ternary mixture is expressed as a weighted probability sum of those of binaries and the k value is determined based on an assumption that the ternary interaction generally strengthens the mixing effects for metallic solutions with weak interaction, making the Gibbs free energy of mixing of the ternary system more negative than that before considering the interaction. This point is never considered in the models currently reported, where the only difference in a geometrical definition of molar values of components is considered that do not involve thermodynamic principles but are completely empirical. The current model describes the results of experiments very well, and by adjusting the k value also agrees with those from models used widely in the literature. Three ternary systems, Mg-Cu-Ni, Zn-In-Cd, and Cd-Bi-Pb are recalculated to demonstrate the method of determining k and the precision of the model. The results of the calculations, especially those in Mg-Cu-Ni system, are better than those predicted by the current models in the literature

  2. A model describing intra-granular fission gas behaviour in oxide fuel for advanced engineering tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzocri, D.; Pastore, G.; Barani, T.; Magni, A.; Luzzi, L.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pitts, S. A.; Alfonsi, A.; Hales, J. D.

    2018-04-01

    The description of intra-granular fission gas behaviour is a fundamental part of any model for the prediction of fission gas release and swelling in nuclear fuel. In this work we present a model describing the evolution of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in terms of bubble number density and average size, coupled to gas release to grain boundaries. The model considers the fundamental processes of single gas atom diffusion, gas bubble nucleation, re-solution and gas atom trapping at bubbles. The model is derived from a detailed cluster dynamics formulation, yet it consists of only three differential equations in its final form; hence, it can be efficiently applied in engineering fuel performance codes while retaining a physical basis. We discuss improvements relative to previous single-size models for intra-granular bubble evolution. We validate the model against experimental data, both in terms of bubble number density and average bubble radius. Lastly, we perform an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis by propagating the uncertainties in the parameters to model results.

  3. A bottom-up model to describe consumers’ preferences towards late season peaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, E.; Albisu, L.M.

    2015-07-01

    Peaches are consumed in Mediterranean countries since ancient times. Nowadays there are few areas in Europe that produce peaches with Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), and the Calanda area is one of them. The aim of this work is to describe consumers’ preferences towards late season PDO Calanda peaches in the city of Zaragoza, Spain, by a bottom-up model. The bottom-up model proves greater amount of information than top-down models. In this approach it is estimated one utility function per consumer. Thus, it is not necessary to make assumptions about preference distributions and correlations across respondents. It was observed that preference distributions were neither normal nor independently distributed. If those preferences were estimated by top-down models, conclusions would be biased. This paper also explores a new way to describe preferences through individual utility functions. Results show that the largest behavioural group gathered origin sensitive consumers. Their utility increased if the peaches were produced in the Calanda area and, especially, when peaches had the PDO Calanda brand. In sequence, the second most valuable attribute for consumers was the price. Peach size and packaging were not so important on purchase choice decision. Nevertheless, it is advisable to avoid trading smallest size peaches (weighting around 160 g/fruit). Traders also have to be careful by using active packaging. It was found that a group of consumers disliked this kind of product, probably, because they perceived it as less natural. (Author)

  4. A bottom-up model to describe consumers’ preferences towards late season peaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etiénne Groot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peaches are consumed in Mediterranean countries since ancient times. Nowadays there are few areas in Europe that produce peaches with Protected Designation of Origin (PDO, and the Calanda area is one of them. The aim of this work is to describe consumers’ preferences towards late season PDO Calanda peaches in the city of Zaragoza, Spain, by a bottom-up model. The bottom-up model proves greater amount of information than top-down models. In this approach it is estimated one utility function per consumer. Thus, it is not necessary to make assumptions about preference distributions and correlations across respondents. It was observed that preference distributions were neither normal nor independently distributed. If those preferences were estimated by top-down models, conclusions would be biased. This paper also explores a new way to describe preferences through individual utility functions. Results show that the largest behavioural group gathered origin sensitive consumers. Their utility increased if the peaches were produced in the Calanda area and, especially, when peaches had the PDO Calanda brand. In sequence, the second most valuable attribute for consumers was the price. Peach size and packaging were not so important on purchase choice decision. Nevertheless, it is advisable to avoid trading smallest size peaches (weighting around 160 g/fruit. Traders also have to be careful by using active packaging. It was found that a group of consumers disliked this kind of product, probably, because they perceived it as less natural.

  5. Application of the International Water Association activated sludge models to describe aerobic sludge digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, M; Eskicioglu, C

    2011-12-01

    Batch and semi-continuous flow aerobic digesters were used to stabilize thickened waste-activated sludge at different initial conditions and mean solids retention times. Under dynamic conditions, total suspended solids, volatile suspended solids (VSS) and total and particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD and PCOD) were monitored in the batch reactors and effluent from the semi-continuous flow reactors. Activated Sludge Model (ASM) no. 1 and ASM no. 3 were applied to measured data (calibration data set) to evaluate the consistency and performances of models at different flow regimes for digester COD and VSS modelling. The results indicated that both ASM1 and ASM3 predicted digester COD, VSS and PCOD concentrations well (R2, Ra2 > or = 0.93). Parameter estimation concluded that compared to ASM1, ASM3 parameters were more consistent across different batch and semi-continuous flow runs with different operating conditions. Model validation on a data set independent from the calibration data successfully predicted digester COD (R2 = 0.88) and VSS (R2 = 0.94) concentrations by ASM3, while ASM1 overestimated both reactor COD (R2 = 0.74) and VSS concentrations (R2 = 0.79) after 15 days of aerobic batch digestion.

  6. A Bayesian method for construction of Markov models to describe dynamics on various time-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Emily K; Andersen, Hans C

    2010-10-14

    probable CMMM for the chosen mesoscopic time step. We applied this method of Markov model construction to several toy systems (random walks in one and two dimensions) as well as the dynamics of alanine dipeptide in water. The resulting Markov state models were indeed successful in capturing the dynamics of our test systems on a variety of mesoscopic time-scales.

  7. Fitting mathematical models to describe the rheological behaviour of chocolate pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Carla; Diogo, Filipa; Alves, M. Rui

    2016-06-01

    The flow behavior is of utmost importance for the chocolate industry. The objective of this work was to study two mathematical models, Casson and Windhab models that can be used to fit chocolate rheological data and evaluate which better infers or previews the rheological behaviour of different chocolate pastes. Rheological properties (viscosity, shear stress and shear rates) were obtained with a rotational viscometer equipped with a concentric cylinder. The chocolate samples were white chocolate and chocolate with varying percentages in cacao (55%, 70% and 83%). The results showed that the Windhab model was the best to describe the flow behaviour of all the studied samples with higher determination coefficients (r2 > 0.9).

  8. Ordinal regression models to describe tourist satisfaction with Sintra's world heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriño, Helena

    2013-10-01

    In Tourism Research, ordinal regression models are becoming a very powerful tool in modelling the relationship between an ordinal response variable and a set of explanatory variables. In August and September 2010, we conducted a pioneering Tourist Survey in Sintra, Portugal. The data were obtained by face-to-face interviews at the entrances of the Palaces and Parks of Sintra. The work developed in this paper focus on two main points: tourists' perception of the entrance fees; overall level of satisfaction with this heritage site. For attaining these goals, ordinal regression models were developed. We concluded that tourist's nationality was the only significant variable to describe the perception of the admission fees. Also, Sintra's image among tourists depends not only on their nationality, but also on previous knowledge about Sintra's World Heritage status.

  9. Models to describe the thermal development rates of Cycloneda sanguinea L. (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachú, Jéssica Ks; Malaquias, José B; Godoy, Wesley Ac; de S Ramalho, Francisco; Almeida, Bruna R; Rossi, Fabrício

    2018-04-01

    Precise estimates of the lower (T min ) and higher (T max ) thermal thresholds as well as the temperature range that provides optimum performance (T opt ) enable to obtain the desired number of individuals in conservation systems, rearing and release of natural enemies. In this study, the relationship between the development rates of Cycloneda sanguinea L. (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) and temperature was described using non-linear models developed by Analytis, Brière, Lactin, Lamb, Logan and Sharpe & DeMichele. There were differences between the models, considering the estimates of the parameters T min , T max , and T opt . All of the tested models were able to describe non-linear responses involving the development rates of C. sanguinea at constant temperatures. Lactin and Lamb gave the highest z weight for egg, while Analytis, Sharpe & DeMichele and Brière gave the highest values for larvae and pupae. The more realistic T opt estimated by the models varied from 29° to 31°C for egg, 27-28 °C for larvae and 28-29 °C for pupae. The Logan, Lactin and Analytis models estimated the T max for egg, larvae and pupae to be approximately 34 °C, while the T min estimated by the Analytis model was 16 °C for larvae and pupae. The information generated by our research will contribute towards improving the rearing and release of C. sanguinea in biological control programs, accurately controlling the rate of development in laboratory conditions or even scheduling the most favourable this species' release. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Computational Models Describing Possible Mechanisms for Generation of Excessive Beta Oscillations in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Pavlides

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease, an increase in beta oscillations within the basal ganglia nuclei has been shown to be associated with difficulty in movement initiation. An important role in the generation of these oscillations is thought to be played by the motor cortex and by a network composed of the subthalamic nucleus (STN and the external segment of globus pallidus (GPe. Several alternative models have been proposed to describe the mechanisms for generation of the Parkinsonian beta oscillations. However, a recent experimental study of Tachibana and colleagues yielded results which are challenging for all published computational models of beta generation. That study investigated how the presence of beta oscillations in a primate model of Parkinson's disease is affected by blocking different connections of the STN-GPe circuit. Due to a large number of experimental conditions, the study provides strong constraints that any mechanistic model of beta generation should satisfy. In this paper we present two models consistent with the data of Tachibana et al. The first model assumes that Parkinsonian beta oscillation are generated in the cortex and the STN-GPe circuits resonates at this frequency. The second model additionally assumes that the feedback from STN-GPe circuit to cortex is important for maintaining the oscillations in the network. Predictions are made about experimental evidence that is required to differentiate between the two models, both of which are able to reproduce firing rates, oscillation frequency and effects of lesions carried out by Tachibana and colleagues. Furthermore, an analysis of the models reveals how the amplitude and frequency of the generated oscillations depend on parameters.

  11. Endorsement of Models Describing Sexual Response of Men and Women with a Sexual Partner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Kristensen, Ellids; Sand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    that current theoretical models of sexual responses accurately reflected their own sexual experience and to what extent this was influenced by sexual dysfunction. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of a large, broadly sampled, nonclinical population, cohort of Danish men and women. The Female Sexual Function...... Index, Female Sexual Distress Scale, and the International Index of Erectile Function were used to describe sexual function. Also, participants completed questionnaires with written descriptions of different sexual responses to describe their most experienced sexual response. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE......: For women, we measured desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, sexual satisfaction, pain during sexual activity, sexual distress, and satisfaction with sexual life. For men, we measured erectile function, orgasm, desire, intercourse satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and satisfaction with sexual life...

  12. A Mulitivariate Statistical Model Describing the Compound Nature of Soil Moisture Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Colin; Widmann, Martin; Bevacqua, Emanuele; Maraun, Douglas; Van Loon, Anne; Vrac, Mathieu

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture in Europe acts to partition incoming energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes, thereby exerting a large influence on temperature variability. Soil moisture is predominantly controlled by precipitation and evapotranspiration. When these meteorological variables are accumulated over different timescales, their joint multivariate distribution and dependence structure can be used to provide information of soil moisture. We therefore consider soil moisture drought as a compound event of meteorological drought (deficits of precipitation) and heat waves, or more specifically, periods of high Potential Evapotraspiration (PET). We present here a statistical model of soil moisture based on Pair Copula Constructions (PCC) that can describe the dependence amongst soil moisture and its contributing meteorological variables. The model is designed in such a way that it can account for concurrences of meteorological drought and heat waves and describe the dependence between these conditions at a local level. The model is composed of four variables; daily soil moisture (h); a short term and a long term accumulated precipitation variable (Y1 and Y_2) that account for the propagation of meteorological drought to soil moisture drought; and accumulated PET (Y_3), calculated using the Penman Monteith equation, which can represent the effect of a heat wave on soil conditions. Copula are multivariate distribution functions that allow one to model the dependence structure of given variables separately from their marginal behaviour. PCCs then allow in theory for the formulation of a multivariate distribution of any dimension where the multivariate distribution is decomposed into a product of marginal probability density functions and two-dimensional copula, of which some are conditional. We apply PCC here in such a way that allows us to provide estimates of h and their uncertainty through conditioning on the Y in the form h=h|y_1,y_2,y_3 (1) Applying the model to various

  13. Critical properties of a ferroelectric superlattice described by a transverse spin-1/2 Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabyaoui, A; Saber, M; Baerner, K; Ainane, A

    2007-01-01

    The phase transition properties of a ferroelectric superlattice with two alternating layers A and B described by a transverse spin-1/2 Ising model have been investigated using the effective field theory within a probability distribution technique that accounts for the self spin correlation functions. The Curie temperature T c , polarization and susceptibility have been obtained. The effects of the transverse field and the ferroelectric and antiferroelectric interfacial coupling strength between two ferroelectric materials are discussed. They relate to the physical properties of antiferroelectric/ferroelectric superlattices

  14. Computational analysis of the model describing HIV infection of CD4+T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atangana, Abdon; Doungmo Goufo, Emile Franc

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of the model underpinning the description of the spread of HIV infection of CD4(+)T cells is examined in detail in this work. Investigations of the disease free and endemic equilibrium are done using the method of Jacobian matrix. An iteration technique, namely, the homotopy decomposition method (HDM), is implemented to give an approximate solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equation systems. The technique is described and illustrated with numerical examples. The approximated solution obtained via HDM is compared with those obtained via other methods to prove the trustworthiness of HDM. Moreover, the lessening and simplicity in calculations furnish HDM with a broader applicability.

  15. Application of a mathematical model to describe the effects of chlorpyrifos on Caenorhabditis elegans development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Windy A Boyd

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being assessed as an alternative model organism as part of an interagency effort to develop better means to test potentially toxic substances. As part of this effort, assays that use the COPAS Biosort flow sorting technology to record optical measurements (time of flight (TOF and extinction (EXT of individual nematodes under various chemical exposure conditions are being developed. A mathematical model has been created that uses Biosort data to quantitatively and qualitatively describe C. elegans growth, and link changes in growth rates to biological events. Chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate pesticide known to cause developmental delays and malformations in mammals, was used as a model toxicant to test the applicability of the growth model for in vivo toxicological testing.L1 larval nematodes were exposed to a range of sub-lethal chlorpyrifos concentrations (0-75 microM and measured every 12 h. In the absence of toxicant, C. elegans matured from L1s to gravid adults by 60 h. A mathematical model was used to estimate nematode size distributions at various times. Mathematical modeling of the distributions allowed the number of measured nematodes and log(EXT and log(TOF growth rates to be estimated. The model revealed three distinct growth phases. The points at which estimated growth rates changed (change points were constant across the ten chlorpyrifos concentrations. Concentration response curves with respect to several model-estimated quantities (numbers of measured nematodes, mean log(TOF and log(EXT, growth rates, and time to reach change points showed a significant decrease in C. elegans growth with increasing chlorpyrifos concentration.Effects of chlorpyrifos on C. elegans growth and development were mathematically modeled. Statistical tests confirmed a significant concentration effect on several model endpoints. This confirmed that chlorpyrifos affects C. elegans development in a concentration dependent

  16. Generating quantitative models describing the sequence specificity of biological processes with the stabilized matrix method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Alessandro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many processes in molecular biology involve the recognition of short sequences of nucleic-or amino acids, such as the binding of immunogenic peptides to major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. From experimental data, a model of the sequence specificity of these processes can be constructed, such as a sequence motif, a scoring matrix or an artificial neural network. The purpose of these models is two-fold. First, they can provide a summary of experimental results, allowing for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in sequence recognition. Second, such models can be used to predict the experimental outcome for yet untested sequences. In the past we reported the development of a method to generate such models called the Stabilized Matrix Method (SMM. This method has been successfully applied to predicting peptide binding to MHC molecules, peptide transport by the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP and proteasomal cleavage of protein sequences. Results Herein we report the implementation of the SMM algorithm as a publicly available software package. Specific features determining the type of problems the method is most appropriate for are discussed. Advantageous features of the package are: (1 the output generated is easy to interpret, (2 input and output are both quantitative, (3 specific computational strategies to handle experimental noise are built in, (4 the algorithm is designed to effectively handle bounded experimental data, (5 experimental data from randomized peptide libraries and conventional peptides can easily be combined, and (6 it is possible to incorporate pair interactions between positions of a sequence. Conclusion Making the SMM method publicly available enables bioinformaticians and experimental biologists to easily access it, to compare its performance to other prediction methods, and to extend it to other applications.

  17. [Dynamic fugacity model for describing the fate of persistent organic pollutants in the river].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Feng-Lin; Quan, Xie; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic model depending on temperature with fugacity approach is formulated which describes the fate of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in a river. The fugacity capacity, the degradation rate and transfer coefficients of pollutants are depending on temperature in the model. The model is illustrated by calculating the fate of gamma-HCH in Liao River. The results show that from 273K to 298K, the fugacity capacities in air, water and sediment of gamma-HCH are respectively reduced in 8.4%, 89.7% and 89.7%. However, in the same range of temperature, the degradation rate coefficients in air, water and sediment, and volatilization and diffusion rate coefficients of gamma-HCH are increased in 0.69, 22.0, 4.5, 7.9 and 1.6 times, respectively. The calculated value agree well with the field observed value in the order of magnitude, which shows that the model is appropriate for simulating the fate of POPs in a long time.

  18. Species-free species distribution models describe macroecological properties of protected area networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jason L; Fordyce, James A

    2017-01-01

    Among the greatest challenges facing the conservation of plants and animal species in protected areas are threats from a rapidly changing climate. An altered climate creates both challenges and opportunities for improving the management of protected areas in networks. Increasingly, quantitative tools like species distribution modeling are used to assess the performance of protected areas and predict potential responses to changing climates for groups of species, within a predictive framework. At larger geographic domains and scales, protected area network units have spatial geoclimatic properties that can be described in the gap analysis typically used to measure or aggregate the geographic distributions of species (stacked species distribution models, or S-SDM). We extend the use of species distribution modeling techniques in order to model the climate envelope (or "footprint") of individual protected areas within a network of protected areas distributed across the 48 conterminous United States and managed by the US National Park System. In our approach we treat each protected area as the geographic range of a hypothetical endemic species, then use MaxEnt and 5 uncorrelated BioClim variables to model the geographic distribution of the climatic envelope associated with each protected area unit (modeling the geographic area of park units as the range of a species). We describe the individual and aggregated climate envelopes predicted by a large network of 163 protected areas and briefly illustrate how macroecological measures of geodiversity can be derived from our analysis of the landscape ecological context of protected areas. To estimate trajectories of change in the temporal distribution of climatic features within a protected area network, we projected the climate envelopes of protected areas in current conditions onto a dataset of predicted future climatic conditions. Our results suggest that the climate envelopes of some parks may be locally unique or have

  19. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB model to describe Laternula elliptica (King, 1832 seasonal feeding and metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Agüera

    Full Text Available Antarctic marine organisms are adapted to an extreme environment, characterized by a very low but stable temperature and a strong seasonality in food availability arousing from variations in day length. Ocean organisms are particularly vulnerable to global climate change with some regions being impacted by temperature increase and changes in primary production. Climate change also affects the biotic components of marine ecosystems and has an impact on the distribution and seasonal physiology of Antarctic marine organisms. Knowledge on the impact of climate change in key species is highly important because their performance affects ecosystem functioning. To predict the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems, a holistic understanding of the life history and physiology of Antarctic key species is urgently needed. DEB (Dynamic Energy Budget theory captures the metabolic processes of an organism through its entire life cycle as a function of temperature and food availability. The DEB model is a tool that can be used to model lifetime feeding, growth, reproduction, and their responses to changes in biotic and abiotic conditions. In this study, we estimate the DEB model parameters for the bivalve Laternula elliptica using literature-extracted and field data. The DEB model we present here aims at better understanding the biology of L. elliptica and its levels of adaptation to its habitat with a special focus on food seasonality. The model parameters describe a metabolism specifically adapted to low temperatures, with a low maintenance cost and a high capacity to uptake and mobilise energy, providing this organism with a level of energetic performance matching that of related species from temperate regions. It was also found that L. elliptica has a large energy reserve that allows enduring long periods of starvation. Additionally, we applied DEB parameters to time-series data on biological traits (organism condition, gonad growth to describe the

  20. Development of a Composite Non-Electrostatic Surface Complexation Model Describing Plutonium Sorption to Aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B A; Kersting, A; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-10-28

    Due to their ubiquity in nature and chemical reactivity, aluminosilicate minerals play an important role in retarding actinide subsurface migration. However, very few studies have examined Pu interaction with clay minerals in sufficient detail to produce a credible mechanistic model of its behavior. In this work, Pu(IV) and Pu(V) interactions with silica, gibbsite (Aloxide), and Na-montmorillonite (smectite clay) were examined as a function of time and pH. Sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to gibbsite and silica increased with pH (4 to 10). The Pu(V) sorption edge shifted to lower pH values over time and approached that of Pu(IV). This behavior is apparently due to surface mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Surface complexation constants describing Pu(IV)/Pu(V) sorption to aluminol and silanol groups were developed from the silica and gibbsite sorption experiments and applied to the montmorillonite dataset. The model provided an acceptable fit to the montmorillonite sorption data for Pu(V). In order to accurately predict Pu(IV) sorption to montmorillonite, the model required inclusion of ion exchange. The objective of this work is to measure the sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to silica, gibbsite, and smectite (montmorillonite). Aluminosilicate minerals are ubiquitous at the Nevada National Security Site and improving our understanding of Pu sorption to aluminosilicates (smectite clays in particular) is essential to the accurate prediction of Pu transport rates. These data will improve the mechanistic approach for modeling the hydrologic source term (HST) and provide sorption Kd parameters for use in CAU models. In both alluvium and tuff, aluminosilicates have been found to play a dominant role in the radionuclide retardation because their abundance is typically more than an order of magnitude greater than other potential sorbing minerals such as iron and manganese oxides (e.g. Vaniman et al., 1996). The sorption database used in recent HST models (Carle et al., 2006

  1. Model tool to describe chemical structures in XML format utilizing structural fragments and chemical ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Alain, Krief; Aghila, Gnanasekaran

    2010-05-24

    We have developed a model structure-editing tool, ChemEd, programmed in JAVA, which allows drawing chemical structures on a graphical user interface (GUI) by selecting appropriate structural fragments defined in a fragment library. The terms representing the structural fragments are organized in fragment ontology to provide a conceptual support. ChemEd describes the chemical structure in an XML document (ChemFul) with rich semantics explicitly encoding the details of the chemical bonding, the hybridization status, and the electron environment around each atom. The document can be further processed through suitable algorithms and with the support of external chemical ontologies to generate understandable reports about the functional groups present in the structure and their specific environment.

  2. Computer-aided Nonlinear Control System Design Using Describing Function Models

    CERN Document Server

    Nassirharand, Amir

    2012-01-01

    A systematic computer-aided approach provides a versatile setting for the control engineer to overcome the complications of controller design for highly nonlinear systems. Computer-aided Nonlinear Control System Design provides such an approach based on the use of describing functions. The text deals with a large class of nonlinear systems without restrictions on the system order, the number of inputs and/or outputs or the number, type or arrangement of nonlinear terms. The strongly software-oriented methods detailed facilitate fulfillment of tight performance requirements and help the designer to think in purely nonlinear terms, avoiding the expedient of linearization which can impose substantial and unrealistic model limitations and drive up the cost of the final product. Design procedures are presented in a step-by-step algorithmic format each step being a functional unit with outputs that drive the other steps. This procedure may be easily implemented on a digital computer with example problems from mecha...

  3. A new model to describe the relationship between species richness and sample size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the sampling of species richness, the number of newly found species declines as increase of sample size, and the number of distinct species tends to an upper asymptote as sample size tends to the infinity. This leads to a curve of species richness vs. sample size. In present study, I follow my principle proposed earlier (Zhang, 2016, and re-develop the model, y=K(1-e^(-rx/K, for describing the relationship between species richness (y and sample size (x, where K is the expected total number of distinct species, and r is the maximum variation of species richness per sample size (i.e., max dy/dx. Computer software and codes were given.

  4. Inclusion of models to describe severe accident conditions in the fuel simulation code DIONISIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Daverio, Hernando [Gerencia Reactores y Centrales Nucleares, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Denis, Alicia [Sección Códigos y Modelos, Gerencia Ciclo del Combustible Nuclear, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida General Paz 1499, 1650 San Martín, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-04-15

    The simulation of fuel rod behavior is a complex task that demands not only accurate models to describe the numerous phenomena occurring in the pellet, cladding and internal rod atmosphere but also an adequate interconnection between them. In the last years several models have been incorporated to the DIONISIO code with the purpose of increasing its precision and reliability. After the regrettable events at Fukushima, the need for codes capable of simulating nuclear fuels under accident conditions has come forth. Heat removal occurs in a quite different way than during normal operation and this fact determines a completely new set of conditions for the fuel materials. A detailed description of the different regimes the coolant may exhibit in such a wide variety of scenarios requires a thermal-hydraulic formulation not suitable to be included in a fuel performance code. Moreover, there exist a number of reliable and famous codes that perform this task. Nevertheless, and keeping in mind the purpose of building a code focused on the fuel behavior, a subroutine was developed for the DIONISIO code that performs a simplified analysis of the coolant in a PWR, restricted to the more representative situations and provides to the fuel simulation the boundary conditions necessary to reproduce accidental situations. In the present work this subroutine is described and the results of different comparisons with experimental data and with thermal-hydraulic codes are offered. It is verified that, in spite of its comparative simplicity, the predictions of this module of DIONISIO do not differ significantly from those of the specific, complex codes.

  5. Regression models describing Rosa hybrida response to day/night temperature and photosynthetic photon flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, D.A.; Hammer, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A central composite rotatable design was used to estimate quadratic equations describing the relationship of irradiance, as measured by photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), and day (DT) and night (NT) temperatures to the growth and development of Rosa hybrida L. in controlled environments. Plants were subjected to 15 treatment combinations of the PPF, DT, and NT according to the coding of the design matrix. Day and night length were each 12 hours. Environmental factor ranges were chosen to include conditions representative of winter and spring commercial greenhouse production environments in the midwestern United States. After an initial hard pinch, 11 plant growth characteristics were measured every 10 days and at flowering. Four plant characteristics were recorded to describe flower bud development. Response surface equations were displayed as three-dimensional plots, with DT and NT as the base axes and the plant character on the z-axis while PPF was held constant. Response surfaces illustrated the plant response to interactions of DT and NT, while comparisons between plots at different PPF showed the overall effect of PPF. Canonical analysis of all regression models revealed the stationary point and general shape of the response surface. All stationary points of the significant models were located outside the original design space, and all but one surface was a saddle shape. Both the plots and analysis showed greater stem diameter, as well as higher fresh and dry weights of stems, leaves, and flower buds to occur at flowering under combinations of low DT (less than or equal to 17C) and low NT (less than or equal to 14C). However, low DT and NT delayed both visible bud formation and development to flowering. Increased PPF increased overall flower stem quality by increasing stem diameter and the fresh and dry weights of all plant parts at flowering, as well as decreased time until visible bud formation and flowering. These results summarize measured development at

  6. Decompression Sickness After Air Break in Prebreathe Described with a Survival Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Pilmanis, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    Data from Brooks City-Base show the decompression sickness (DCS) and venous gas emboli (VGE) consequences of air breaks in a resting 100% O2 prebreathe (PB) prior to a hypobaric exposure. METHODS: DCS and VGE survival times from 95 controls for a 60 min PB prior to 2-hr or 4-hr exposures to 4.37 psia are statistically compared to 3 break in PB conditions: a 10 min (n=40), 20 min (n=40), or 60 min break (n=32) 30 min into the PB followed by 30 min of PB. Ascent rate was 1,524 meters / min and all exposures included light exercise and 4 min of VGE monitoring of heart chambers at 16 min intervals. DCS survival time for combined control and air breaks were described with an accelerated log logistic model where exponential N2 washin during air break was described with a 10 min half-time and washout during PB with a 60 min half-time. RESULTS: There was no difference in VGE or DCS survival times among 3 different air breaks, or when air breaks were compared to control VGE times. However, 10, 20, and 60 min air breaks had significantly earlier survival times compared to control DCS times, certainly early in the exposures. CONCLUSION: Air breaks of 10, 20, and 60 min after 30 min of a 60 min PB reduced DCS survival time. The survival model combined discrete comparisons into a global description mechanistically linked to asymmetrical N2 washin and washout kinetics based on inspired pN2. Our unvalidated regression is used to compute additional PB time needed to compensate for an air break in PB within the range of tested conditions.

  7. Model approach brings multi-level success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Mark

    2012-08-01

    n an article that first appeared in US magazine, Medical Construction & Design, Mark Howell, senior vice-president of Skanska USA Building, based in Seattle, describes the design and construction of a new nine-storey, 350,000 ft2 extension to the Good Samaritan Hospital in Puyallup, Washington state. He explains how the use of an Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) approach by the key players, and extensive use of building information modelling (BIM), combined to deliver a healthcare facility that he believes should meet the needs of patients, families, and the clinical care team, 'well into the future'.

  8. Can a Linear Sigma Model Describe Walking Gauge Theories at Low Energies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarro, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, many investigations of confining Yang Mills gauge theories near the edge of the conformal window have been carried out using lattice techniques. These studies have revealed that the spectrum of hadrons in nearly conformal ("walking") gauge theories differs significantly from the QCD spectrum. In particular, a light singlet scalar appears in the spectrum which is nearly degenerate with the PNGBs at the lightest currently accessible quark masses. This state is a viable candidate for a composite Higgs boson. Presently, an acceptable effective field theory (EFT) description of the light states in walking theories has not been established. Such an EFT would be useful for performing chiral extrapolations of lattice data and for serving as a bridge between lattice calculations and phenomenology. It has been shown that the chiral Lagrangian fails to describe the IR dynamics of a theory near the edge of the conformal window. Here we assess a linear sigma model as an alternate EFT description by performing explicit chiral fits to lattice data. In a combined fit to the Goldstone (pion) mass and decay constant, a tree level linear sigma model has a Χ2/d.o.f. = 0.5 compared to Χ2/d.o.f. = 29.6 from fitting nextto-leading order chiral perturbation theory. When the 0++ (σ) mass is included in the fit, Χ2/d.o.f. = 4.9. We remark on future directions for providing better fits to the σ mass.

  9. A new overall kinetic model describing calcite precipitation from brine-like solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charara, M.; Lopez, O.; Zuddas, P.

    2005-12-01

    Future CO2 injections would modify strongly the physic and the chemistry of the brine aquifer hosts (i.e. temperature, chemical composition, PCO2 partial pressure etc...). Although many geological systems can be represented using thermodynamic concepts and principles, the factors governing their fate and evolution can only be understood if the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions are well known. One of the most important problems in the application of carbonate fluid-rock interactions is the function governing the variation on precipitation rate. A general rate law describing the calcite precipitation is: R=k,f(PCO2),g(I),h(T),φ(Π ai),φ([CO32-]) where R is the precipitation rate, k is the apparent kinetic constant of caclite crystal growth, PCO2 is the partial pressure of CO2 at equilibrium (from 30 to 3.104Pa), I is the fluid ionic strength (from 0.1 to 1 mol.kg-1), T is the temperature (from 5 to 60°C), ai is the activity of the specific brine constituents (accelerators, inhibitors, both organic and inorganic) and [CO32-] is the concentration in carbonate ion (from 100 to 400 mmol.kg-1) assumed to be the macroscopical variable governing the overall reaction. Based on parametric inversion of previous and new kinetic data, we established an empirical model describing the variation of calcite precipitation rate as a function of these multiset parameters and variables. The model robustness validation (square correlation coefficient of 0.95) was obtained by compairing experimental measured and calculated rates. We found that, despite temperature and fluid ionic strength rule the reaction kinetic mechanisms, the variation of PCO2 partial pressure enhances by three orders of magnitude the rate of calcite precipitation even in completly buffered brine-like conditions. Our results indicate that, in present day sedimentary basins, the main role played by PCO2 partial pressure is independent from the desequilibrium condition contrar to both temperature and ionic

  10. Describing team development within a novel GP-led urgent care centre model: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Majeed, Azeem; Greenfield, Geva

    2016-06-23

    Urgent care centres (UCCs) co-located within an emergency department were developed to reduce the numbers of inappropriate emergency department admissions. Since then various UCC models have developed, including a novel general practitioner (GP)-led UCC that incorporates both GPs and emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). Traditionally these two groups do not work alongside each other within an emergency setting. Although good teamwork is crucial to better patient outcomes, there is little within the literature about the development of a team consisting of different healthcare professionals in a novel healthcare setting. Our aim was therefore to describe staff members' perspectives of team development within the GP-led UCC model. Open-ended semistructured interviews, analysed using thematic content analysis. GP-led urgent care centres in two academic teaching hospitals in London. 15 UCC staff members including six GPs, four ENPs, two receptionists and three managers. Overall participants were positive about the interprofessional team that had developed and recognised that this process had taken time. Hierarchy within the UCC setting has diminished with time, although some residual hierarchical beliefs do appear to remain. Staff appreciated interdisciplinary collaboration was likely to improve patient care. Eight key facilitating factors for the team were identified: appointment of leaders, perception of fair workload, education on roles/skill sets and development of these, shared professional understanding, interdisciplinary working, ED collaboration, clinical guidelines and social interactions. A strong interprofessional team has evolved within the GP-led UCCs over time, breaking down traditional professional divides. Future implementation of UCC models should pro-actively incorporate the eight facilitating factors identified from the outset, to enable effective teams to develop more quickly. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  11. The generalized model of polypeptide chain describing the helix-coil transition in biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamasakhlisov, E.S.; Badasyan, A.V.; Tsarukyan, A.V.; Grigoryan, A.V.; Morozov, V.F.

    2005-07-01

    In this paper we summarize some results of our theoretical investigations of helix-coil transition both in single-strand (polypeptides) and two-strand (polynucleotides) macromolecules. The Hamiltonian of the Generalized Model of Polypeptide Chain (GMPC) is introduced to describe the system in which the conformations are correlated over some dimensional range Δ (it equals 3 for polypeptide, because one H-bond fixes three pairs of rotation, for double strand DNA it equals to one chain rigidity because of impossibility of loop formation on the scale less than Δ). The Hamiltonian does not contain any parameter designed especially for helix-coil transition and uses pure molecular microscopic parameters (the energy of hydrogen bond formation, reduced partition function of repeated unit, the number of repeated units fixed by one hydrogen bond, the energies of interaction between the repeated units and the solvent molecules). To calculate averages we evaluate the partition function using the transfer-matrix approach. The GMPC allowed to describe the influence of a number of factors, affecting the transition, basing on a unified microscopic approach. Thus we obtained, that solvents change transition temperature and interval in different ways, depending on type of solvent and on energy of solvent- macromolecule interaction; stacking on the background of H-bonding increases stability and decreases cooperativity of melting. For heterogeneous DNA we could analytically derive well known formulae for transition temperature and interval. In the framework of GMPC we calculate and show the difference of two order parameters of helix-coil transition - the helicity degree, and the average fraction of repeated units in helical conformation. Given article has the aim to review the results obtained during twenty years in the context of GMPC. (author)

  12. The clinical adoption meta-model: a temporal meta-model describing the clinical adoption of health information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Health information systems (HISs) hold the promise to transform health care; however, their adoption is challenged. We have developed the Clinical Adoption Meta-Model (CAMM) to help describe processes and possible challenges with clinical adoption. The CAMM, developed through an action research study to evaluate a provincial HIS, is a temporal model with four dimensions: availability, use, behaviour changes, and outcome changes. Seven CAMM archetypes are described, illustrating classic trajectories of adoption of HISs over time. Each archetype includes an example from the literature. The CAMM and its archetypes can support HIS implementers, evaluators, learners, and researchers. PMID:24884588

  13. The clinical adoption meta-model: a temporal meta-model describing the clinical adoption of health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan; Lau, Francis

    2014-05-29

    Health information systems (HISs) hold the promise to transform health care; however, their adoption is challenged. We have developed the Clinical Adoption Meta-Model (CAMM) to help describe processes and possible challenges with clinical adoption. The CAMM, developed through an action research study to evaluate a provincial HIS, is a temporal model with four dimensions: availability, use, behaviour changes, and outcome changes. Seven CAMM archetypes are described, illustrating classic trajectories of adoption of HISs over time. Each archetype includes an example from the literature. The CAMM and its archetypes can support HIS implementers, evaluators, learners, and researchers.

  14. A model for successful use of student response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kathleen; Kientz, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model developed to assist teachers in selecting, implementing, and assessing student response system (SRS) use in the classroom. Research indicates that SRS technology is effective in achieving desired outcomes in higher education settings. Studies indicate that effective SRS use promotes greater achievement of learning outcomes, increased student attention, improved class participation, and active engagement. The model offered in this article is based on best practices described in the literature and several years of SRS use in a traditional higher education classroom setting. Student feedback indicates increased class participation and engagement with SRS technology. Teacher feedback indicates opportunities for contingent teaching. The model described in this article provides a process to assist teachers in the successful selection, implementation, and assessment of SRS technology in the classroom.

  15. Conceptual modeling of postmortem evaluation findings to describe dairy cow deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnel, C S; Garry, F B; Hill, A E; Lombard, J E; Gould, D H

    2010-01-01

    Dairy cow mortality levels in the United States are excessive and increasing over time. To better define cause and effect and combat rising mortality, clearer definitions of the reasons that cows die need to be acquired through thorough necropsy-based postmortem evaluations. The current study focused on organizing information generated from postmortem evaluations into a monitoring system that is based on the fundamentals of conceptual modeling and that will potentially be translatable into on-farm relational databases. This observational study was conducted on 3 high-producing, commercial dairies in northern Colorado. Throughout the study period a thorough postmortem evaluation was performed by veterinarians on cows that died on each dairy. Postmortem data included necropsy findings, life-history features (e.g., birth date, lactation number, lactational and reproductive status), clinical history and treatments, and pertinent aspects of operational management that were subject to change and considered integral to the poor outcome. During this study, 174 postmortem evaluations were performed. Postmortem evaluation results were conceptually modeled to view each death within the context of the web of factors influencing the dairy and the cow. Categories were formulated describing mortality in terms of functional characteristics potentially amenable to easy performance evaluation, management oversight, and research. In total, 21 death categories with 7 category themes were created. Themes included specific disease processes with variable etiologies, failure of disease recognition or treatment, traumatic events, multifactorial failures linked to transition or negative energy balance issues, problems with feed management, miscellaneous events not amenable to prevention or treatment, and undetermined causes. Although postmortem evaluations provide the relevant information necessary for framing a cow's death, a restructuring of on-farm databases is needed to integrate this

  16. Describing high-dimensional dynamics with low-dimensional piecewise affine models: applications to renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-06-01

    We introduce a low-dimensional description for a high-dimensional system, which is a piecewise affine model whose state space is divided by permutations. We show that the proposed model tends to predict wind speeds and photovoltaic outputs for the time scales from seconds to 100 s better than by global affine models. In addition, computations using the piecewise affine model are much faster than those of usual nonlinear models such as radial basis function models.

  17. Nucleon described by the chiral soliton in the chiral quark soliton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, T.; Goeke, K.

    1998-02-01

    We give a survey of recent development and applications of the chiral quark soliton model (also called the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio soliton model) with N f=2 and N f=3 quark flavors for the structure of baryons. The model is an effective chiral quark model obtained from the instanton liquid model of the quantum chromodynamics. Mesons appear as quark-antiquark excitations and baryons arise as non-topological solitons with three valence quarks and a polarized Dirac sea. In this model, a wide variety of observables of baryons is considered.

  18. Nucleon described by the chiral soliton in the chiral quark soliton model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watabe, T.; Goeke, K. [Ruhr-Univ., Bochum (Germany). Inst. fur Theor. Phys. II

    1998-02-02

    We give a survey of recent development and applications of the chiral quark soliton model (also called the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio soliton model) with N{sub f} = 2 and N{sub f} = 3 quark flavors for the structure of baryons. The model is an effective chiral quark model obtained from the instanton liquid model of the quantum chromodynamics. Mesons appear as quark-antiquark excitations and baryons arise as non-topological solitons with three valence quarks and a polarized Dirac sea. In this model, a wide variety of observables of baryons is considered. (orig.). 12 refs.

  19. Review Of Applied Mathematical Models For Describing The Behaviour Of Aqueous Humor In Eye Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierka, M.; Jurczak, P.

    2015-12-01

    In the paper, currently used methods for modeling the flow of the aqueous humor through eye structures are presented. Then a computational model based on rheological models of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is proposed. The proposed model may be used for modeling the flow of the aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular meshwork is modeled as an array of rectilinear parallel capillary tubes. The flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids is considered. As a results of discussion mathematical equations of permeability of porous media and velocity of fluid flow through porous media have been received.

  20. Ability of the Gaussian plume model to predict and describe spore dispersal over a potato crop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkerboer, H.P.; Beniers, J.E.; Jaspers, D.; Schouten, H.J.; Goudriaan, J.; Rabbinge, R.; Werf, van der W.

    2002-01-01

    The Gaussian plume model (GPM) is considered as a valuable tool in predictions of the atmospheric transport of fungal spores and plant pollen in risk assessments. The validity of the model in this important area of application has not been extensively evaluated. A field experiment was set up to test

  1. The Role of Peer Tutoring: Steps to Describing a Three-Dimensional Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kevin

    A comprehensive, three-dimensional model of peer tutoring, constructed by gathering current theories and research and locating them on a dynamic continuum of the tutoring process, allows researchers to break new ground in tutor research and might eventually offer a new heuristic for training peer tutors. The first axis in the model, the focus…

  2. FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT MODEL OF LEARNING SUCCESS ACHIEVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhailova Elena Konstantinovna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problem of assessment of the school students’ learning success achievements. The problem is investigated from the viewpoint of assessing the students’ learning outcomes that is aimed to ensure the teachers and students with the means and conditions to improve the educational process and results.

  3. How well do basic models describe the turbidity currents coming down Monterey and Congo Canyon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, M.; Simmons, S.; Heerema, C.; Xu, J. P.; Azpiroz, M.; Clare, M. A.; Cooper, C.; Gales, J. A.; Maier, K. L.; Parsons, D. R.; Paull, C. K.; Sumner, E. J.; Talling, P.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents rival rivers in their global capacity to transport sediment and organic carbon. Furthermore, turbidity currents break submarine cables that now transport >95% of our global data traffic. Accurate turbidity current models are thus needed to quantify their transport capacity and to predict the forces exerted on seafloor structures. Despite this need, existing numerical models are typically only calibrated with scaled-down laboratory measurements due to the paucity of direct measurements of field-scale turbidity currents. This lack of calibration thus leaves much uncertainty in the validity of existing models. Here we use the most detailed observations of turbidity currents yet acquired to validate one of the most fundamental models proposed for turbidity currents, the modified Chézy model. Direct measurements on which the validation is based come from two sites that feature distinctly different flow modes and grain sizes. The first are from the multi-institution Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) in Monterey Canyon, California. An array of six moorings along the canyon axis captured at least 15 flow events that lasted up to hours. The second is the deep-sea Congo Canyon, where 10 finer grained flows were measured by a single mooring, each lasting several days. Moorings captured depth-resolved velocity and suspended sediment concentration at high resolution (<30 second) for each of the 25 events. We use both datasets to test the most basic model available for turbidity currents; the modified Chézy model. This basic model has been very useful for river studies over the past 200 years, as it provides a rapid estimate of how flow velocity varies with changes in river level and energy slope. Chézy-type models assume that the gravitational force of the flow equals the friction of the river-bed. Modified Chézy models have been proposed for turbidity currents. However, the absence of detailed measurements of friction and sediment concentration within

  4. Spherical sector model for describing the experimental small-angle neutron scattering data for dendrimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogachev, A. V.; Cherny, A. Yu.; Ozerin, A. N.; Gordeliy, V. I.; Kuklin, A. I.

    2007-01-01

    A new model for interpreting the results of small-angle neutron scattering from dendrimer solutions is proposed. The mathematical description is given and the theoretical small-angle scattering curves for spherical sectors with different parameters are presented. It is shown that the model proposed is in good agreement with the experimental results. Comparison of the experimental small-angle neutron scattering curves for polyallylcarbosilane dendrimers of the ninth generation with model scattering curves suggests that the inner dendrimer sphere is permeable to a solvent whose density is lower than the density of the solvent beyond the dendrimer by a factor of at least 2

  5. Describing macro-scale structure of the snow cover by a dynamic-stochastic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Gelfan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities to investigate the spatial structure of snow cover by means of dynamic-stochastic model are discussed in this article. Basin of the Cheboksary reservoir (area of 376 500 sq.km was used as an example. Results of numerical experiments show that our dynamic-stochastic model of the snow cover formation reproduces a snow field structure with adequate accuracy. The fractal dimensions of the modeled fields are in good correspondence with respective dimensions of fields obtained from data of the in situ observations.

  6. A benchmark simulation model to describe plant-wide phosphorus transformations in WWTPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Ikumi, D.; Kazadi-Mbamba, C.

    of monitoring and plant-wide control strategies, respectively. In addition, researchers working within the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for Wastewater Treatment Plants developed other BSM related spin-off products, such as the dynamic influent generator, sensor/actuators/fault models...... to BSM2-P, for example: 1) new/upgraded mathematical models; 2) model integration; 3) new influent characterization; 4) new plant layout; and, 5) new/extended evaluation criteria. The paper covers and analyses all these aspects at a reasonable level of detail, identifies the main bottlenecks that need......) pursue biological/chemical phosphorus removal. However, realistic descriptions of combined C, N and P removal, adds a major, but unavoidable degree of complexity in wastewater treatment process models. This paper identifies and discusses important issues that need to be addressed to upgrade the BSM2...

  7. Spatial succession modeling of biological communities: a multi-model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenJun; Wei, Wu

    2009-11-01

    Strong spatial correlation may exist in the spatial succession of biological communities, and the spatial succession can be mathematically described. It was confirmed by our study on spatial succession of both plant and arthropod communities along a linear transect of natural grassland. Both auto-correlation and cross-correlation analyses revealed that the succession of plant and arthropod communities exhibited a significant spatial correlation, and the spatial correlation for plant community succession was stronger than arthropod community succession. Theoretically it should be reasonable to infer a site's community composition from the last site in the linear transect. An artificial neural network for state space modeling (ANNSSM) was developed in present study. An algorithm (i.e., Importance Detection Method (IDM)) for determining the relative importance of input variables was proposed. The relative importance for plant families Gramineae, Compositae and Leguminosae, and arthropod orders Homoptera, Diptera and Orthoptera, were detected and analyzed using IDM. ANNSSM performed better than multivariate linear regression and ordinary differential equation, while ordinary differential equation exhibited the worst performance in the simulation and prediction of spatial succession of biological communities. A state transition probability model (STPM) was proposed to simulate the state transition process of biological communities. STPM performed better than multinomial logistic regression in the state transition modeling. We suggested a novel multi-model framework, i.e., the joint use of ANNSSM and STPM, to predict the spatial succession of biological communities. In this framework, ANNSSM and STPM can be separately used to simulate the continuous and discrete dynamics.

  8. Using logic model methods in systematic review synthesis: describing complex pathways in referral management interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Susan K; Blank, Lindsay; Woods, Helen Buckley; Payne, Nick; Rimmer, Melanie; Goyder, Elizabeth

    2014-05-10

    There is increasing interest in innovative methods to carry out systematic reviews of complex interventions. Theory-based approaches, such as logic models, have been suggested as a means of providing additional insights beyond that obtained via conventional review methods. This paper reports the use of an innovative method which combines systematic review processes with logic model techniques to synthesise a broad range of literature. The potential value of the model produced was explored with stakeholders. The review identified 295 papers that met the inclusion criteria. The papers consisted of 141 intervention studies and 154 non-intervention quantitative and qualitative articles. A logic model was systematically built from these studies. The model outlines interventions, short term outcomes, moderating and mediating factors and long term demand management outcomes and impacts. Interventions were grouped into typologies of practitioner education, process change, system change, and patient intervention. Short-term outcomes identified that may result from these interventions were changed physician or patient knowledge, beliefs or attitudes and also interventions related to changed doctor-patient interaction. A range of factors which may influence whether these outcomes lead to long term change were detailed. Demand management outcomes and intended impacts included content of referral, rate of referral, and doctor or patient satisfaction. The logic model details evidence and assumptions underpinning the complex pathway from interventions to demand management impact. The method offers a useful addition to systematic review methodologies. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42013004037.

  9. Investigation of nonlinear models to describe long-term egg production in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narinc, Dogan; Karaman, Emre; Aksoy, Tulin; Firat, Mehmet Ziya

    2013-06-01

    In this study, long-term egg production was monitored in a Japanese quail flock, which had not undergone any genetic improvement, for 52 wk as of the age of sexual maturity. The study aimed to detect some traits with respect to egg production, to determine the cumulative hen-housed egg numbers, and to compare goodness of fit of different nonlinear models for the percentage of hen-day egg production. The mean age at first egg was 38.9 d and the age at 50% egg production was 45.3 d. The quail reached peak production at 15 wk of age (wk 9 of egg production period) when the percentage of hen-day egg production was found to be 94%. The cumulative hen-housed egg number for 52 wk as of the age of sexual maturity was 253.08. The monomolecular function, a nonsigmoid model, was used in the nonlinear regression analysis of the cumulative egg numbers. Parameters a, b, and c of the monomolecular model were estimated to be 461.70, 473.31, and 0.065, respectively. Gamma, McNally, Adams-Bell, and modified compartmental models, widely used in hens previously, were used in the nonlinear regression analysis of the percentages of hen-day egg production. The goodness of fit for these models was compared using the values of pseudo-R², Akaike's information criterion, and Bayesian information criterion. It was determined that all the models are adequate but that the Adams-Bell model displayed a slightly better fit for the percentage of hen-day egg production in Japanese quail than others.

  10. An empirical model to describe performance degradation for warranty abuse detection in portable electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Hyunseok; Choi, Seunghyuk; Kim, Keunsu; Youn, Byeng D.; Pecht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Portable electronics makers have introduced liquid damage indicators (LDIs) into their products to detect warranty abuse caused by water damage. However, under certain conditions, these indicators can exhibit inconsistencies in detecting liquid damage. This study is motivated by the fact that the reliability of LDIs in portable electronics is suspected. In this paper, first, the scheme of life tests is devised for LDIs in conjunction with a robust color classification rule. Second, a degradation model is proposed by considering the two physical mechanisms—(1) phase change from vapor to water and (2) water transport in the porous paper—for LDIs. Finally, the degradation model is validated with additional tests using actual smartphone sets subjected to the thermal cycling of −15 °C to 25 °C and the relative humidity of 95%. By employing the innovative life testing scheme and the novel performance degradation model, it is expected that the performance of LDIs for a particular application can be assessed quickly and accurately. - Highlights: • Devise an efficient scheme of life testing for a warranty abuse detector in portable electronics. • Develop a performance degradation model for the warranty abuse detector used in portable electronics. • Validate the performance degradation model with life tests of actual smartphone sets. • Help make a decision on warranty service in portable electronics manufacturers

  11. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  12. A Mathematic Model That Describes Modes of MdSGHV Transmission within House Fly Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste R. Vallejo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is proposed that one potential component by which the Musca domestica salivary gland hypertrophy virus (MdSGHV infects individual flies is through cuticular damage. Breaks in the cuticle allow entry of the virus into the hemocoel causing the infection. Male flies typically have a higher rate of infection and a higher rate of cuticular damage than females. A model for the transmission of MdSGHV was formulated assuming several potential and recognized means of transmission. The model yields results that are in agreement with field data that measured the infection rate in house flies on dairy farms in Florida. The results from this model indicate that MdSGHV will be maintained at a stable rate within house fly populations and support the future use of MdSGHV as a birth control agent in house fly management.

  13. A gauge model describing N relativistic particles bound by linear forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, A.T.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic model of N particles bound by linear forces is obtained by applying the gauging procedure to the linear canonical symmteries of a simple (rudimentary) nonrelativistic N-particle Lagrangian extended to relativistic phase space. The new (gauged) Lagrangian is formally Poincare invariant, the Hamiltonian is a linear combination of first-class constraints which are closed with respect to Pisson brackets and generate the localized canonical symmteries. The gauge potentials appear as the Lagrange multipliers of the constraints. Gauge fixing and quantization of the model are also briefly discussed. 11 refs

  14. Feasibility study for a plasticity model to describe the transient thermomechanical behavior of Zircaloy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valanis, K.C.

    1979-11-01

    The conceptual framework of the endochronic theory is described and a summary of its capabilities, as well as past and potential applications to the mechanical response of metals to general histories of deformation, temperature, and radiation is given. The purely mechanical part of the theory is developed on the basis of the concept of intrinsic time which serves to incorporate in a unified and concise fashion the effects of strain history and strain rate on the stress response. The effects of temperature are introduced by means of the theory of deformation kinetics through its relation to the internal variable theory of irreversible thermodynamics. As a result, physically sound formulae are developed which account for the effect of temperature history on the stress response. An approach to describing irradiation effects is briefly discussed. More research would be needed to define appropriate constitutive representations for Zircaloy. The endochronic theory is also looked at from a numerical analysis viewpoint of future applications to problems of practical interest. In appendix B a first cut attempt has been made to assess the computational efficiencies of material constitutive equation approaches

  15. q-deformed Einstein's model to describe specific heat of solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Atanu; Das, Prasanta Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Realistic phenomena can be described more appropriately using generalized canonical ensemble, with proper parameter sets involved. We have generalized the Einstein's theory for specific heat of solid in Tsallis statistics, where the temperature fluctuation is introduced into the theory via the fluctuation parameter q. At low temperature the Einstein's curve of the specific heat in the nonextensive Tsallis scenario exactly lies on the experimental data points. Consequently this q-modified Einstein's curve is found to be overlapping with the one predicted by Debye. Considering only the temperature fluctuation effect(even without considering more than one mode of vibration is being triggered) we found that the CV vs T curve is as good as obtained by considering the different modes of vibration as suggested by Debye. Generalizing the Einstein's theory in Tsallis statistics we found that a unique value of the Einstein temperature θE along with a temperature dependent deformation parameter q(T) , can well describe the phenomena of specific heat of solid i.e. the theory is equivalent to Debye's theory with a temperature dependent θD.

  16. Using Rouse-Fowler model to describe radiation-induced electrical conductivity of nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyuryagina, N. S.; Yalovets, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Using the Rouse-Fowler (RF) model this work studies the radiation-induced electrical conductivity of a polymer nanocomposite material with spherical nanoparticles against the intensity and exposure time of gamma-ray, concentration and size of nanoparticles. The research has found the energy distribution of localized statesinduced by nanoparticles. The studies were conducted on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with CdS nanoparticles.

  17. Benchmarking of numerical models describing the dispersion of radionuclides in the Arctic Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, E.M.; Gurbutt, P.; Harms, I.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project (IASAP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a working group was created to model the dispersal and transfer of radionuclides released from radioactive waste disposed of in the Kara Sea. The objectives of this group are: (1...

  18. Predictive model to describe water migration in cellular solid foods during storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.A.; Hirte, A.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water migration in cellular solid foods during storage causes loss of crispness. To improve crispness retention, physical understanding of this process is needed. Mathematical models are suitable tools to gain this physical knowledge. RESULTS: Water migration in cellular solid foods

  19. Integrated model of insulin and glucose kinetics describing both hepatic glucose and pancreatic insulin regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlandsen, Mogens; Martinussen, Christoffer; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2018-01-01

    )) with a single IVGTT series. In general the estimated population parameters compares well with reported values in similar studies. Overall the model fits the data series well and the random variation in the 8 selected parameters can account for both intra- and inter-individual variations in the data series...

  20. Exponential law as a more compatible model to describe orbits of planetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saeedi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   According to the Titus-Bode law, orbits of planets in the solar system obey a geometric progression. Many investigations have been launched to improve this law. In this paper, we apply square and exponential models to planets of solar system, moons of planets, and some extra solar systems, and compare them with each other.

  1. Kinetic model describing the UV/H2O2 photodegradation of phenol from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio-Clemente Ainhoa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model for phenol transformation through the UV/H2O2 system was developed and validated. The model includes the pollutant decomposition by direct photolysis and HO•, HO2• and O2 •- oxidation. HO• scavenging effects of CO3 2-, HCO3 -, SO4 2- and Cl- were also considered, as well as the pH changes as the process proceeds. Additionally, the detrimental action of the organic matter and reaction intermediates in shielding UV and quenching HO• was incorporated. It was observed that the model can accurately predict phenol abatement using different H2O2/phenol mass ratios (495, 228 and 125, obtaining an optimal H2O2/phenol ratio of 125, leading to a phenol removal higher than 95% after 40 min of treatment, where the main oxidation species was HO•. The developed model could be relevant for calculating the optimal level of H2O2 efficiently degrading the pollutant of interest, allowing saving in costs and time.

  2. A vapour bubble collapse model to describe the fragmentation of low-melting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.; Schober, P.

    1977-11-01

    By means of a model, the fragmentation of a hot melt of metal in consequence of collapsing vapour-bubbles is investigated. In particular the paper deals with the development of the physical model-ideas for calculation of the temperature of contact that adjusts between the temperature of the melt and the coolant, of the waiting-time until bubble-nucleation occurs and of the maximal obtainable vapour-bubble-radius in dependence of the coolant-temperature. After that follows the description of the computing-program belonging to this model and of the results of an extensive parameter-study. The study examined the influence of the temperature of melt and coolant, the melted mass, the nucleation-site-density, the average maximum bubble-radius, the duration of film-breakdown and the coefficient of heat-transition. The calculation of the process of fragmentation turns out to be according to expectation, whereas the duration of this process seems to be somewhat too long. The dependence of the surface-enlargement on the subcooling of the water-bath and the initial temperature of the melt is not yet reproduced satisfactorily by the model. The reasons for this are the temperature-increase of the water-bath as well as the fact that the coupling of heat-flux-density and nucleation-site-density are not taken into consideration. Further improvement of the model is necessary and may improve the results in the sense of the experimental observations. (orig.) [de

  3. A physical model describing the interaction of nuclear transport receptors with FG nucleoporin domain assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Raphael; Osmanović, Dino; Ehret, Severin; Araya Callis, Carolina; Frey, Steffen; Stewart, Murray; You, Changjiang; Görlich, Dirk; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Richter, Ralf P

    2016-04-08

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls bulk nucleocytoplasmic exchange. It consists of nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine motifs (FG domains). As a bottom-up nanoscale model for the permeability barrier, we have used planar films produced with three different end-grafted FG domains, and quantitatively analyzed the binding of two different nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), NTF2 and Importin β, together with the concomitant film thickness changes. NTR binding caused only moderate changes in film thickness; the binding isotherms showed negative cooperativity and could all be mapped onto a single master curve. This universal NTR binding behavior - a key element for the transport selectivity of the NPC - was quantitatively reproduced by a physical model that treats FG domains as regular, flexible polymers, and NTRs as spherical colloids with a homogeneous surface, ignoring the detailed arrangement of interaction sites along FG domains and on the NTR surface.

  4. A stochastic Markov chain model to describe lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul K; Mason, Jeremy; Bethel, Kelly; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic Markov chain model for metastatic progression is developed for primary lung cancer based on a network construction of metastatic sites with dynamics modeled as an ensemble of random walkers on the network. We calculate a transition matrix, with entries (transition probabilities) interpreted as random variables, and use it to construct a circular bi-directional network of primary and metastatic locations based on postmortem tissue analysis of 3827 autopsies on untreated patients documenting all primary tumor locations and metastatic sites from this population. The resulting 50 potential metastatic sites are connected by directed edges with distributed weightings, where the site connections and weightings are obtained by calculating the entries of an ensemble of transition matrices so that the steady-state distribution obtained from the long-time limit of the Markov chain dynamical system corresponds to the ensemble metastatic distribution obtained from the autopsy data set. We condition our search for a transition matrix on an initial distribution of metastatic tumors obtained from the data set. Through an iterative numerical search procedure, we adjust the entries of a sequence of approximations until a transition matrix with the correct steady-state is found (up to a numerical threshold). Since this constrained linear optimization problem is underdetermined, we characterize the statistical variance of the ensemble of transition matrices calculated using the means and variances of their singular value distributions as a diagnostic tool. We interpret the ensemble averaged transition probabilities as (approximately) normally distributed random variables. The model allows us to simulate and quantify disease progression pathways and timescales of progression from the lung position to other sites and we highlight several key findings based on the model.

  5. Scale-up model describing the impact of lubrication on tablet tensile strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Joseph; Moore, Francis

    2010-10-31

    Lubrication of 2:1 and 1:1 blends of microcrystalline cellulose and spray-dried lactose or dibasic calcium phosphate (DCP) with 0.33% or 1% magnesium stearate, as model free-flowing pharmaceutical formulations, was performed in rotary drum blenders. Blender process parameters examined in this study included type (Bin, V, and Turbula), volume (0.75-Quart to 200-L), fraction of headspace in the blender after the blend is loaded (30-70%), speed (6-202 rpm), and time (up to 225 min). Based on analysis of the experimental data, the following model for the impact of the lubrication process on tablet tensile strength at 0.85 solid fraction, TS(SF=0.85), was obtained, TS(SF=0.85)=TS(SF=0.85,0) [βexp(-γ×V(1/3)×F(headspace)×r)+(1-β)], where V is blender volume, F(headspace) is the headspace fraction, r is the number of revolutions (i.e. speed × time), TS(SF=0.85,0) is the initial tensile strength of the blend, β is the sensitivity of the blend to lubrication, and γ is the lubrication rate constant of the formulation. This model can be used to maintain tensile strength during scale-up, by ensuring that (V(1/3)F(headspace)r)(1)=(V(1/3)F(headspace)r)(2). The model also suggests that formulations with DCP are less sensitive to lubrication and more slowly lubricated than formulations with spray-dried lactose (i.e. smaller β and γ values). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Describing team development within a novel GP-led urgent care centre model : a qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Sarah; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Majeed, Azeem; Greenfield, Geva

    2016-01-01

    Objective:\\ud Urgent care centres (UCCs) co-located within an emergency department were developed to reduce the numbers of inappropriate emergency department admissions. Since then various UCC models have developed, including a novel general practitioner (GP)-led UCC that incorporates both GPs and emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). Traditionally these two groups do not work alongside each other within an emergency setting. Although good teamwork is crucial to better patient outcomes, there...

  7. Formulation and integration of constitutive models describing large deformations in thermoplasticity and thermoviscoplasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansohn, W.

    1997-10-01

    This report deals with the formulation and numerical integration of constitutive models in the framework of finite deformation thermomechanics. Based on the concept of dual variables, plasticity and viscoplasticity models exhibiting nonlinear kinematic hardening as well as nonlinear isotropic hardening rules are presented. Care is taken that the evolution equations governing the hardening response fulfill the intrinsic dissipation inequality in every admissible process. In view of the development of an efficient numerical integration procedure, simplified versions of these constitutive models are supposed. In these versions, the thermoelastic strains are assumed to be small and a simplified kinematic hardening rule is considered. Additionally, in view of an implementation into the ABAQUS finite element code, the elasticity law is approximated by a hypoelasticity law. For the simplified onstitutive models, an implicit time-integration algorithm is developed. First, in order to obtain a numerical objective integration scheme, use is made of the HUGHES-WINGET-Algorithm. In the resulting system of ordinary differential equations, it can be distinguished between three differential operators representing different physical effects. The structure of this system of differential equations allows to apply an operator split scheme, which leads to an efficient integration scheme for the constitutive equations. By linearizing the integration algorithm the consistent tangent modulus is derived. In this way, the quadratic convergence of Newton's method used to solve the basic finite element equations (i.e. the finite element discretization of the governing thermomechanical field equations) is preserved. The resulting integration scheme is implemented as a user subroutine UMAT in ABAQUS. The properties of the applied algorithm are first examined by test calculations on a single element under tension-compression-loading. For demonstrating the capabilities of the constitutive theory

  8. A stochastic Markov chain model to describe lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K Newton

    Full Text Available A stochastic Markov chain model for metastatic progression is developed for primary lung cancer based on a network construction of metastatic sites with dynamics modeled as an ensemble of random walkers on the network. We calculate a transition matrix, with entries (transition probabilities interpreted as random variables, and use it to construct a circular bi-directional network of primary and metastatic locations based on postmortem tissue analysis of 3827 autopsies on untreated patients documenting all primary tumor locations and metastatic sites from this population. The resulting 50 potential metastatic sites are connected by directed edges with distributed weightings, where the site connections and weightings are obtained by calculating the entries of an ensemble of transition matrices so that the steady-state distribution obtained from the long-time limit of the Markov chain dynamical system corresponds to the ensemble metastatic distribution obtained from the autopsy data set. We condition our search for a transition matrix on an initial distribution of metastatic tumors obtained from the data set. Through an iterative numerical search procedure, we adjust the entries of a sequence of approximations until a transition matrix with the correct steady-state is found (up to a numerical threshold. Since this constrained linear optimization problem is underdetermined, we characterize the statistical variance of the ensemble of transition matrices calculated using the means and variances of their singular value distributions as a diagnostic tool. We interpret the ensemble averaged transition probabilities as (approximately normally distributed random variables. The model allows us to simulate and quantify disease progression pathways and timescales of progression from the lung position to other sites and we highlight several key findings based on the model.

  9. Assessment of different models to describe wax precipitation in flow assurance problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martos, C.; Coto, B.; Espada, J.J.; Robustillo, M.D. [Rey Juan Carlos Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Technology; Pena, J.L. [Repsol-YPF, Madrid (Spain). Alfonso Cortina Technology Centre

    2008-07-01

    Paraffinic waxes found in crude oils cause flow assurance problems because these compounds can precipitate when temperature decreases during oil production, transport through pipelines or storage. The key variables involved in the wax precipitation process are the wax appearance temperature (WAT) and the wax precipitation curve (WPC). A good understanding of the liquid-solid equilibrium is required in order to model the precipitation process. However, new experimental data is needed to address this issue, particularly the composition of the raw crude oil, the amount of precipitated waxes against temperature and the nature of such waxes. Most models available in the literature require the knowledge of the n-paraffin distribution of crude oil. This type of determination can be carried out using different chromatographic techniques. In this study, experimental WAT and WPC were determined by means of a recently developed multistage fractional precipitation procedure. The trapped crude oil of the precipitated mixtures at each temperature was determined by the 1H NMR technique to determine the true amount of wax precipitated at each temperature. The n-paraffin distribution for the chosen crude oils was determined by chromatographic techniques. The predictive capabilities of the available models was verified by comparing experimental and predicted results. 3 refs.

  10. Describing model of empowering managers by applying structural equation modeling: A case study of universities in Ardabil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghahremani Germi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Empowerment is still on the agenda as a management concept and has become a widely used management term in the last decade or so. The purpose of this research was describing model of empowering managers by applying structural equation modeling (SEM at Ardabil universities. Two hundred and twenty managers of Ardabil universities including chancellors, managers, and vice presidents of education, research, and studies participated in this study. Clear and challenging goals, evaluation of function, access to resources, and rewarding were investigated. The results indicated that the designed SEM for empowering managers at university reflects a good fitness level. As it stands out, the conceptual model in the society under investigation was used appropriately. Among variables, access to resources with 88 per cent of load factor was known as the affective variable. Evaluation of function containing 51 per cent of load factor was recognized to have less effect. Results of average rating show that evaluation of function and access to resources with 2.62 coefficients stand at first level. Due to this, they had great impact on managers' empowerment. The results of the analysis provided compelling evidence that model of empowering managers was desirable at Ardabil universities.

  11. A theoretical model describing the one-dimensional growth of single crystals on free sustained substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ziran; Wang, Ke; Lu, Chenxi; Jin, Ying; Sui, Chenghua; Yan, Bo; Gao, Fan; Cai, Pinggen; Lv, Bin; Li, Yun; Chen, Naibo; Sun, Guofang; Xu, Fengyun; Ye, Gaoxiang

    2018-03-01

    We develop a theoretical model that interprets the growth mechanism of zinc (Zn) crystal nanorods on a liquid substrate by thermal evaporation. During deposition, Zn atoms diffuse randomly on an isotropic and quasi-free sustained substrate, the nucleation of the atoms results in the primary nanorod (or seed crystal) growth. Subsequently, a characteristic one-dimensional atomic aggregation is proposed, which leads to the accelerating growth of the crystal nanorod along its preferential growth direction until the growth terminates. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  12. Monte Carlo model to describe depth selective fluorescence spectra of epithelial tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Ina; Weber, Crystal Redden; Schwarz, Richard A.; Williams, Michelle; El-Naggar, Adel; Gillenwater, Ann; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model to predict fluorescence spectra of the oral mucosa obtained with a depth-selective fiber optic probe as a function of tissue optical properties. A model sensitivity analysis determines how variations in optical parameters associated with neoplastic development influence the intensity and shape of spectra, and elucidates the biological basis for differences in spectra from normal and premalignant oral sites. Predictions indicate that spectra of oral mucosa collected with a depth-selective probe are affected by variations in epithelial optical properties, and to a lesser extent, by changes in superficial stromal parameters, but not by changes in the optical properties of deeper stroma. The depth selective probe offers enhanced detection of epithelial fluorescence, with 90% of the detected signal originating from the epithelium and superficial stroma. Predicted depth-selective spectra are in good agreement with measured average spectra from normal and dysplastic oral sites. Changes in parameters associated with dysplastic progression lead to a decreased fluorescence intensity and a shift of the spectra to longer emission wavelengths. Decreased fluorescence is due to a drop in detected stromal photons, whereas the shift of spectral shape is attributed to an increased fraction of detected photons arising in the epithelium. PMID:19123659

  13. SPATIAL MODELLING FOR DESCRIBING SPATIAL VARIABILITY OF SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES IN EASTERN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Bogunović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to characterize the field-scale spatial variability and test several interpolation methods to identify the best spatial predictor of penetration resistance (PR, bulk density (BD and gravimetric water content (GWC in the silty loam soil in Eastern Croatia. The measurements were made on a 25 x 25-m grid which created 40 individual grid cells. Soil properties were measured at the center of the grid cell deep 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Results demonstrated that PR and GWC displayed strong spatial dependence at 0-10 cm BD, while there was moderate and weak spatial dependence of PR, BD and GWC at depth of 10-20 cm. Semi-variogram analysis suggests that future sampling intervals for investigated parameters can be increased to 35 m in order to reduce research costs. Additionally, interpolation models recorded similar root mean square values with high predictive accuracy. Results suggest that investigated properties do not have uniform interpolation method implying the need for spatial modelling in the evaluation of these soil properties in Eastern Croatia.

  14. Continuous time random walk model better describes the tailing of atrazine transport in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiancai; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Hu, Weiping; Crawford, John W

    2008-05-01

    Contaminant transport in soils is complicated and involves some physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. In this research, the soil column displacement experiments of Cl(-) and atrazine under different flow velocities were carried out. The data sets of Cl(-) transport in sandy loam fitted to the convection dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (TRM) indicated that the effects of physical nonequilibrium process produced by immobile water on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Cl(-) and atrazine transport through the repacking soil columns were negligible. The two-site model (TSM) and the continuous time random walk (CTRW) were also used to fit atrazine transport behavior at the flow rate of 19.86 cm h(-1). The CTRW convincingly captured the full evolution of atrazine BTC in the soil column, especially for the part of long tailing. However, the TSM failed to characterize the tailing of atrazine BTC in the soil column. The calculated fraction of equilibrium sorption sites, F, ranging from 0.78 to 0.80 for all flow rates suggested the contribution of nonequilibrium sorption sites to the asymmetry of atrazine BTCs. Furthermore, the data sets for the flow rates of 6.68 cm h(-1) and 32.81 cm h(-1) were predicted by the TSM and the CTRW. As to the flow rate of 6.68 cm h(-1), the CTRW predicted the entire BTC of atrazine transport better than the TSM did. For the flow rate of 32.81 cm h(-1), the CTRW characterized the late part of the tail better, while the TSM failed to predict the tailings of atrazine BTC.

  15. Improving student success using predictive models and data visualisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Ayad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to educate a competitive workforce is a global problem. In the US, for example, despite billions of dollars spent to improve the educational system, approximately 35% of students never finish high school. The drop rate among some demographic groups is as high as 50–60%. At the college level in the US only 30% of students graduate from 2-year colleges in 3 years or less and approximately 50% graduate from 4-year colleges in 5 years or less. A basic challenge in delivering global education, therefore, is improving student success. By student success we mean improving retention, completion and graduation rates. In this paper we describe a Student Success System (S3 that provides a holistic, analytical view of student academic progress.1 The core of S3 is a flexible predictive modelling engine that uses machine intelligence and statistical techniques to identify at-risk students pre-emptively. S3 also provides a set of advanced data visualisations for reaching diagnostic insights and a case management tool for managing interventions. S3's open modular architecture will also allow integration and plug-ins with both open and proprietary software. Powered by learning analytics, S3 is intended as an end-to-end solution for identifying at-risk students, understanding why they are at risk, designing interventions to mitigate that risk and finally closing the feedback look by tracking the efficacy of the applied intervention.

  16. A holistic conceptual framework model to describe medication adherence in and guide interventions in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaam, Myriam; Awaisu, Ahmed; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Kheir, Nadir

    2018-04-01

    Nonadherence to medications in patients with diabetes, which results in poor treatment outcomes and increased healthcare costs, is commonly reported globally. Factors associated with medication adherence have also been widely studied. However, a clear and comprehensive, disease-specific conceptual framework model that captures all possible factors has not been established. This study aimed to develop a conceptual framework that addresses the complex network of barriers to medication adherence in patients with diabetes. Fourteen databases and grey literature sources were systematically searched for systematic reviews reporting barriers to medication adherence in patients with diabetes. A thematic approach was used to categorize all identified barriers from the reviews and to create a matrix representing the complex network and relations of the different barriers. Eighteen systematic reviews were identified and used for the development of the conceptual framework. Overall, six major themes emerged: patient-, medication-, disease-, provider-, system-, and societal-related factors. Each of these themes was further classified into different sub-categories. It was noted that most interactions were identified to be within the patient-related factors, which not only interact with other themes but also within the same theme. Patient's demographics as well as cultural beliefs were the most notable factors in terms of interactions with other categories and themes. The intricate network and interaction of factors identified between different themes and within individual themes indicate the complexity of the problem of adherence. This framework will potentially enhance the understanding of the complex relation between different barriers for medication adherence in diabetes and will facilitate design of more effective interventions. Future interventions for enhancing medication adherence should look at the overall factors and target multiple themes of barriers to improve patient

  17. Multilevel regression models describing regional patterns of invertebrate and algal responses to urbanization across the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, T.F.; Kashuba, R.; Qian, S.S.; Alameddine, I.; Cha, Y.K.; Lee, B.; Coles, J.F.; McMahon, G.

    2011-01-01

    Multilevel hierarchical regression was used to examine regional patterns in the responses of benthic macroinvertebrates and algae to urbanization across 9 metropolitan areas of the conterminous USA. Linear regressions established that responses (intercepts and slopes) to urbanization of invertebrates and algae varied among metropolitan areas. Multilevel hierarchical regression models were able to explain these differences on the basis of region-scale predictors. Regional differences in the type of land cover (agriculture or forest) being converted to urban and climatic factors (precipitation and air temperature) accounted for the differences in the response of macroinvertebrates to urbanization based on ordination scores, total richness, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera richness, and average tolerance. Regional differences in climate and antecedent agriculture also accounted for differences in the responses of salt-tolerant diatoms, but differences in the responses of other diatom metrics (% eutraphenic, % sensitive, and % silt tolerant) were best explained by regional differences in soils (mean % clay soils). The effects of urbanization were most readily detected in regions where forest lands were being converted to urban land because agricultural development significantly degraded assemblages before urbanization and made detection of urban effects difficult. The effects of climatic factors (temperature, precipitation) on background conditions (biogeographic differences) and rates of response to urbanization were most apparent after accounting for the effects of agricultural development. The effects of climate and land cover on responses to urbanization provide strong evidence that monitoring, mitigation, and restoration efforts must be tailored for specific regions and that attainment goals (background conditions) may not be possible in regions with high levels of prior disturbance (e.g., agricultural development). ?? 2011 by The North American

  18. Achieving Success in Measurement and Reliability Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Ted; Munson, John C.; Schneidewind, Norman; Stark, George

    1993-01-01

    Panel Session at the International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering 1993, Saturday: 6 November 1993, 0830-1000 and 1030-1200 The NASA Space Shuttle on-board software is one of the nation’s most safety-critical software systems. The process which produces this software has been rated at maturity level five. Among the quality assurance methods that are used to ensure the software is free of safetycritical faults is the use of reliability modelling and predi...

  19. Modelling the effect of food availability on recruitment success of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show the importance of food (especially diatoms and copepods) dynamics on the spatial and temporal patterns of recruitment success, and also confirm the importance of the spawning area, timing and water depth on the recruitment success of Cape anchovy larvae. Keywords: 3-D modelling, IBM model, pelagic ...

  20. Random transitions described by the stochastic Smoluchowski-Poisson system and by the stochastic Keller-Segel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanis, P H; Delfini, L

    2014-03-01

    We study random transitions between two metastable states that appear below a critical temperature in a one-dimensional self-gravitating Brownian gas with a modified Poisson equation experiencing a second order phase transition from a homogeneous phase to an inhomogeneous phase [P. H. Chavanis and L. Delfini, Phys. Rev. E 81, 051103 (2010)]. We numerically solve the N-body Langevin equations and the stochastic Smoluchowski-Poisson system, which takes fluctuations (finite N effects) into account. The system switches back and forth between the two metastable states (bistability) and the particles accumulate successively at the center or at the boundary of the domain. We explicitly show that these random transitions exhibit the phenomenology of the ordinary Kramers problem for a Brownian particle in a double-well potential. The distribution of the residence time is Poissonian and the average lifetime of a metastable state is given by the Arrhenius law; i.e., it is proportional to the exponential of the barrier of free energy ΔF divided by the energy of thermal excitation kBT. Since the free energy is proportional to the number of particles N for a system with long-range interactions, the lifetime of metastable states scales as eN and is considerable for N≫1. As a result, in many applications, metastable states of systems with long-range interactions can be considered as stable states. However, for moderate values of N, or close to a critical point, the lifetime of the metastable states is reduced since the barrier of free energy decreases. In that case, the fluctuations become important and the mean field approximation is no more valid. This is the situation considered in this paper. By an appropriate change of notations, our results also apply to bacterial populations experiencing chemotaxis in biology. Their dynamics can be described by a stochastic Keller-Segel model that takes fluctuations into account and goes beyond the usual mean field approximation.

  1. A standardised graphic method for describing data privacy frameworks in primary care research using a flexible zone model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuchinke, W.; Ohmann, C.; Verheij, R.A.; Veen, E.B. van; Arvanitis, T.N.; Taweel, A.; Delaney, B.C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model describing core concepts and principles of data flow, data privacy and confidentiality, in a simple and flexible way, using concise process descriptions and a diagrammatic notation applied to research workflow processes. The model should help to generate robust data

  2. A consilience model to describe N2O production during biological N removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo Felez, Carlos; Smets, Barth F.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, is produced during biological nitrogen conversion in wastewater treatment operations. Complex mechanisms underlie N2O production by autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms, which continue to be unravelled. Mathematical models that describe nitric oxide...... (NO) and N2O dynamics have been proposed. Here, a first comprehensive model that considers all relevant NO and N2O production and consumption mechanisms is proposed. The model describes autotrophic NO production by ammonia oxidizing bacteria associated with ammonia oxidation and with nitrite reduction...

  3. A comparison of macroscopic models describing the collective response of sedimenting rod-like particles in shear flows

    KAUST Repository

    Helzel, Christiane

    2016-07-22

    We consider a kinetic model, which describes the sedimentation of rod-like particles in dilute suspensions under the influence of gravity, presented in Helzel and Tzavaras (submitted for publication). Here we restrict our considerations to shear flow and consider a simplified situation, where the particle orientation is restricted to the plane spanned by the direction of shear and the direction of gravity. For this simplified kinetic model we carry out a linear stability analysis and we derive two different nonlinear macroscopic models which describe the formation of clusters of higher particle density. One of these macroscopic models is based on a diffusive scaling, the other one is based on a so-called quasi-dynamic approximation. Numerical computations, which compare the predictions of the macroscopic models with the kinetic model, complete our presentation.

  4. A Labor Market Success Model of Young Male Hispanic Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenstat, Paul

    The study develops a labor market success model of young male inner-city Hispanics and examines several variables influencing labor market success. A sample of inner-city Puerto Ricans who attended the eighth grade in two schools in Wilmington, Delaware, in the 1966-1971 period was chosen and interviewed. Small control groups of blacks and whites…

  5. End Users and ERP Systems� Success. Three Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina MIHAI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Information systems (IS have an enormous impact on organizations, individual work, and performance in general. As a result, many research works in the field of IS are focused on the interrelationship between individual performance and IS performance. During the last 20 to 30 years many models have been developed and tested by researchers. Their main objective was to investigate IS success and user performance in different environments. Therefore, a number of models appeared, their goal being the studying of the success, usefulness, end user adoption and utilization of IS, and other user and IS-related aspects in different organizations. This research paper presents three of the most important models developed in specialized literature, which deal with measuring IS success and end user adoption of the IS: the TAM model, the D&M model, and the TTF model. The research also provides an overview of some studies that have applied these models in the field of ERP systems.

  6. Evaluation of a cross contamination model describing transfer of salmonella spp. and listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Hansen, Tina Beck; Aabo, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The cross contamination model (Møller et al. 2012) was evaluated to investigate its capability of describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef of varying sizes (50 – 324 g) and numbers of pieces to be ground (10 – 100), in two...... grinder systems. Methods: Data from 19 trials were collected. Three different evaluation approaches were applied: i) an Acceptable Simulation Zone (ASZ) method compared observed with simulated transfer from the proposed model, ii) each trial was fitted and its respective parameter estimates were...... integrated in a Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model (Møller et al. 2015), and iii) the Total Transfer Potential (TTP) was calculated for each of the 20 fitted parameter estimates. Results: The ASZ showed that the Møller et al. (2012) model could only describe seven of the 19 trials...

  7. Direct construction of predictive models for describing growth Salmonella enteritidis in liquid eggs – a one-step approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to develop a new approach using a one-step approach to directly construct predictive models for describing the growth of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in liquid egg white (LEW) and egg yolk (LEY). A five-strain cocktail of SE, induced to resist rifampicin at 100 mg/L, ...

  8. Biological Effectiveness and Application of Heavy Ions in Radiation Therapy Described by a Physical and Biological Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Kjeld J.; Hansen, Johnny W.

    is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied...... simultaneously in therapy....

  9. Comparison of various models to describe the charge-pH dependence of poly(acrylic acid)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lützenkirchen, J.; Male, van J.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Sjöberg, S.

    2011-01-01

    The charge of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in dilute aqueous solutions depends on pH and ionic strength. We report new experimental data and test various models to describe the deprotonation of PAA in three different NaCl concentrations. A simple surface complexation approach is found to be very

  10. Validation of a Simulation Model Describing the Glucose-Insulin-Glucagon Pharmacodynamics in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    Currently, no consensus exists on a model describing endogenous glucose production (EGP) as a function of glucagon concentrations. Reliable simulations to determine the glucagon dose preventing or treating hypoglycemia or to tune a dual-hormone artificial pancreas control algorithm need a validated...

  11. Strategies for efficient numerical implementation of hybrid multi-scale agent-based models to describe biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilfone, Nicholas A; Kirschner, Denise E; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-03-01

    Biologically related processes operate across multiple spatiotemporal scales. For computational modeling methodologies to mimic this biological complexity, individual scale models must be linked in ways that allow for dynamic exchange of information across scales. A powerful methodology is to combine a discrete modeling approach, agent-based models (ABMs), with continuum models to form hybrid models. Hybrid multi-scale ABMs have been used to simulate emergent responses of biological systems. Here, we review two aspects of hybrid multi-scale ABMs: linking individual scale models and efficiently solving the resulting model. We discuss the computational choices associated with aspects of linking individual scale models while simultaneously maintaining model tractability. We demonstrate implementations of existing numerical methods in the context of hybrid multi-scale ABMs. Using an example model describing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we show relative computational speeds of various combinations of numerical methods. Efficient linking and solution of hybrid multi-scale ABMs is key to model portability, modularity, and their use in understanding biological phenomena at a systems level.

  12. Establishing a Cloud Computing Success Model for Hospitals in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiunn-Woei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the critical quality-related factors that affect cloud computing success of hospitals in Taiwan. In this study, private cloud computing is the major research target. The chief information officers participated in a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that the integration of trust into the information systems success model will have acceptable explanatory power to understand cloud computing success in the hospital. Moreover, information quality and system quality directly affect cloud computing satisfaction, whereas service quality indirectly affects the satisfaction through trust. In other words, trust serves as the mediator between service quality and satisfaction. This cloud computing success model will help hospitals evaluate or achieve success after adopting private cloud computing health care services.

  13. Establishing a Cloud Computing Success Model for Hospitals in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Woei Lian PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the critical quality-related factors that affect cloud computing success of hospitals in Taiwan. In this study, private cloud computing is the major research target. The chief information officers participated in a questionnaire survey. The results indicate that the integration of trust into the information systems success model will have acceptable explanatory power to understand cloud computing success in the hospital. Moreover, information quality and system quality directly affect cloud computing satisfaction, whereas service quality indirectly affects the satisfaction through trust. In other words, trust serves as the mediator between service quality and satisfaction. This cloud computing success model will help hospitals evaluate or achieve success after adopting private cloud computing health care services.

  14. A standardised graphic method for describing data privacy frameworks in primary care research using a flexible zone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Ohmann, Christian; Verheij, Robert A; van Veen, Evert-Ben; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan C

    2014-12-01

    To develop a model describing core concepts and principles of data flow, data privacy and confidentiality, in a simple and flexible way, using concise process descriptions and a diagrammatic notation applied to research workflow processes. The model should help to generate robust data privacy frameworks for research done with patient data. Based on an exploration of EU legal requirements for data protection and privacy, data access policies, and existing privacy frameworks of research projects, basic concepts and common processes were extracted, described and incorporated into a model with a formal graphical representation and a standardised notation. The Unified Modelling Language (UML) notation was enriched by workflow and own symbols to enable the representation of extended data flow requirements, data privacy and data security requirements, privacy enhancing techniques (PET) and to allow privacy threat analysis for research scenarios. Our model is built upon the concept of three privacy zones (Care Zone, Non-care Zone and Research Zone) containing databases, data transformation operators, such as data linkers and privacy filters. Using these model components, a risk gradient for moving data from a zone of high risk for patient identification to a zone of low risk can be described. The model was applied to the analysis of data flows in several general clinical research use cases and two research scenarios from the TRANSFoRm project (e.g., finding patients for clinical research and linkage of databases). The model was validated by representing research done with the NIVEL Primary Care Database in the Netherlands. The model allows analysis of data privacy and confidentiality issues for research with patient data in a structured way and provides a framework to specify a privacy compliant data flow, to communicate privacy requirements and to identify weak points for an adequate implementation of data privacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  15. Evidence in Support of the Independent Channel Model Describing the Sensorimotor Control of Human Stance Using a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantsje H. Pasma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Independent Channel (IC model is a commonly used linear balance control model in the frequency domain to analyze human balance control using system identification and parameter estimation. The IC model is a rudimentary and noise-free description of balance behavior in the frequency domain, where a stable model representation is not guaranteed. In this study, we conducted firstly time-domain simulations with added noise, and secondly robot experiments by implementing the IC model in a real-world robot (PostuRob II to test the validity and stability of the model in the time domain and for real world situations. Balance behavior of seven healthy participants was measured during upright stance by applying pseudorandom continuous support surface rotations. System identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the balance behavior with the IC model in the frequency domain. The IC model with the estimated parameters from human experiments was implemented in Simulink for computer simulations including noise in the time domain and robot experiments using the humanoid robot PostuRob II. Again, system identification and parameter estimation were used to describe the simulated balance behavior. Time series, Frequency Response Functions, and estimated parameters from human experiments, computer simulations, and robot experiments were compared with each other. The computer simulations showed similar balance behavior and estimated control parameters compared to the human experiments, in the time and frequency domain. Also, the IC model was able to control the humanoid robot by keeping it upright, but showed small differences compared to the human experiments in the time and frequency domain, especially at high frequencies. We conclude that the IC model, a descriptive model in the frequency domain, can imitate human balance behavior also in the time domain, both in computer simulations with added noise and real world situations with a

  16. Development of a mathematical model describing hydrolysis and co-fermentation of C6 and C5 sugars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morales Rodriguez, Ricardo; Gernaey, Krist; Meyer, Anne S.

    2010-01-01

    Reliable production of biofuels and specifically bioethanol has attracted a significant amount of research recently. Within this context, this study deals with dynamic simulation of bioethanol production processes and in particular aims at developing a mathematical model for describing simultaneous...... the degree of reliability. The mathematical model for the SSCF has been tested for a modified version of the process flowsheet proposed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The model can now be used to evaluate different process configurations for 2G bioethanol production using corn stover...

  17. DaMoScope and its internet graphics for the visual control of adjusting mathematical models describing experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, V. I.; Ezhela, V. V.; Kuyanov, Yu. V.; Tkachenko, N. P.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of using the dynamic atlas of the experimental data and mathematical models of their description in the problems of adjusting parametric models of observable values depending on kinematic variables is presented. The functional possibilities of an image of a large number of experimental data and the models describing them are shown by examples of data and models of observable values determined by the amplitudes of elastic scattering of hadrons. The Internet implementation of an interactive tool DaMoScope and its interface with the experimental data and codes of adjusted parametric models with the parameters of the best description of data are schematically shown. The DaMoScope codes are freely available

  18. DaMoScope and its internet graphics for the visual control of adjusting mathematical models describing experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, V. I.; Ezhela, V. V.; Kuyanov, Yu. V.; Tkachenko, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    The experience of using the dynamic atlas of the experimental data and mathematical models of their description in the problems of adjusting parametric models of observable values depending on kinematic variables is presented. The functional possibilities of an image of a large number of experimental data and the models describing them are shown by examples of data and models of observable values determined by the amplitudes of elastic scattering of hadrons. The Internet implementation of an interactive tool DaMoScope and its interface with the experimental data and codes of adjusted parametric models with the parameters of the best description of data are schematically shown. The DaMoScope codes are freely available.

  19. Calibration of the computer model describing flows in the water supply system; example of the application of a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowska-Szostak, Maria; Orłowski, Ryszard

    2017-11-01

    The paper discusses some relevant aspects of the calibration of a computer model describing flows in the water supply system. The authors described an exemplary water supply system and used it as a practical illustration of calibration. A range of measures was discussed and applied, which improve the convergence and effective use of calculations in the calibration process and also the effect of such calibration which is the validity of the results obtained. Drawing up results of performed measurements, i.e. estimating pipe roughnesses, the authors performed using the genetic algorithm implementation of which is a software developed by Resan Labs company from Brazil.

  20. Models Predicting Success of Infertility Treatment: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarinara, Alireza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammad, Kazem; Shahnazari, Parisa; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertile couples are faced with problems that affect their marital life. Infertility treatment is expensive and time consuming and occasionally isn’t simply possible. Prediction models for infertility treatment have been proposed and prediction of treatment success is a new field in infertility treatment. Because prediction of treatment success is a new need for infertile couples, this paper reviewed previous studies for catching a general concept in applicability of the models. Methods: This study was conducted as a systematic review at Avicenna Research Institute in 2015. Six data bases were searched based on WHO definitions and MESH key words. Papers about prediction models in infertility were evaluated. Results: Eighty one papers were eligible for the study. Papers covered years after 1986 and studies were designed retrospectively and prospectively. IVF prediction models have more shares in papers. Most common predictors were age, duration of infertility, ovarian and tubal problems. Conclusion: Prediction model can be clinically applied if the model can be statistically evaluated and has a good validation for treatment success. To achieve better results, the physician and the couples’ needs estimation for treatment success rate were based on history, the examination and clinical tests. Models must be checked for theoretical approach and appropriate validation. The privileges for applying the prediction models are the decrease in the cost and time, avoiding painful treatment of patients, assessment of treatment approach for physicians and decision making for health managers. The selection of the approach for designing and using these models is inevitable. PMID:27141461

  1. A New Model for Describing the Rheological Behavior of Heavy and Extra Heavy Crude Oils in the Presence of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban A. Taborda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes for the first time a mathematical model for describing the rheological behavior of heavy and extra-heavy crude oils in the presence of nanoparticles. This model results from the combination of two existing mathematical models. The first one applies to the rheology of pseudoplastic substances, i.e., the Herschel-Bulkley model. The second one was previously developed by our research group to model the rheology of suspensions, namely the modified Pal and Rhodes model. The proposed model is applied to heavy and extra heavy crude oils in the presence of nanoparticles, considering the effects of nanoparticles concentration and surface chemical nature, temperature, and crude oil type. All the experimental data evaluated exhibited compelling goodness of fitting, and the physical parameters in the model follow correlate well with variations in viscosity. The new model is dependent of share rate and opens new possibilities for phenomenologically understanding viscosity reduction in heavy crude by adding solid nanoparticles and favoring the scale-up in enhanced oil recovery (EOR and/or improved oil recovery (IOR process.

  2. Sustaining a successful RN compensation model through transparency and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Karmen R; Attlesey-Pries, Jacqueline M; Syverson, Renae C; Uthke, Lorraine D; Wottreng, Diane M; Muehlenbein, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    In the March 2005 issue of The Journal of Nursing Administration, authors from an academic medical center outlined a new RN salary program that addressed recruitment and retention of valued resources and established an approach for pay and pay practices for staff RNs across an integrated practice. This follow-up article describes experiences in implementing the program and the successful outcomes achieved.

  3. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  4. Empirical evaluation of a forecasting model for successful facilitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The forecasting model identified 8 key attributes for facilitation success based on performance measures from the 1999 Facilitator Customer Service Survey. During 2000 the annual Facilitator Customer Satisfaction Survey was employed to validate the findings of the forecasting model. A total of 1910 questionnaires were ...

  5. A physically-motivated model describing the dynamic interactions between residual limb and socket in lower limb prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noll Veronika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The amputee’s well-being and mobility are distinclty related to socket fit and resulting biomechanical interaction between residual limb and prosthetic socket. Understanding the dynamic interactions at the interface may lead to new socket standards. This paper introduces a physically-motivated reduced model of the interface, describing the dynamic interactions between residual limb and prosthetic socket. The model allows to investigate the sensitivity to changes of specific parameters in an isolated matter. A simulation study shows how stress distribution changes if friction coefficients are varied which might advance liner design.

  6. Users' guide to system dynamics model describing Coho salmon survival in Olema Creek, Point Reyes National Seashore, Marin County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Torregrosa, Alicia; Madej, Mary Ann; Reichmuth, Michael; Fong, Darren

    2014-01-01

    The system dynamics model described in this report is the result of a collaboration between U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and National Park Service (NPS) San Francisco Bay Area Network (SFAN) staff, whose goal was to develop a methodology to integrate inventory and monitoring data to better understand ecosystem dynamics and trends using salmon in Olema Creek, Marin County, California, as an example case. The SFAN began monitoring multiple life stages of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Olema Creek during 2003 (Carlisle and others, 2013), building on previous monitoring of spawning fish and redds. They initiated water-quality and habitat monitoring, and had access to flow and weather data from other sources. This system dynamics model of the freshwater portion of the coho salmon life cycle in Olema Creek integrated 8 years of existing monitoring data, literature values, and expert opinion to investigate potential factors limiting survival and production, identify data gaps, and improve monitoring and restoration prescriptions. A system dynamics model is particularly effective when (1) data are insufficient in time series length and/or measured parameters for a statistical or mechanistic model, and (2) the model must be easily accessible by users who are not modelers. These characteristics helped us meet the following overarching goals for this model: Summarize and synthesize NPS monitoring data with data and information from other sources to describe factors and processes affecting freshwater survival of coho salmon in Olema Creek. Provide a model that can be easily manipulated to experiment with alternative values of model parameters and novel scenarios of environmental drivers. Although the model describes the ecological dynamics of Olema Creek, these dynamics are structurally similar to numerous other coastal streams along the California coast that also contain anadromous fish populations. The model developed for Olema can be used, at least as a

  7. Formulation of a Success Model in Pharmaceutical R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunju Rachel Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, pharmaceutical R&D has been demanded to increase productivity in terms of time efficiency and innovation as well. There have been discontinuous challenges coming up in this industry, such as globalized R&D competition, stricter regulation, lengthy process of clinical trials, and so on. Considering external changes, high competition, and discontinuities in the industry, it is a good time to redefine the concept of success in pharmaceutical R&D. Thus, this article attempts to formulate a new success model in pharmaceutical R&D, through contextualizing the industry’s success factors.

  8. Evaluation of a cross contamination model describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, C O A; Sant'Ana, A S; Hansen, S K H; Nauta, M J; Silva, L P; Alvarenga, V O; Maffei, D; Silva, F F P; Lopes, J T; Franco, B D G M; Aabo, S; Hansen, T B

    2016-06-02

    In a previous study, a model was developed to describe the transfer and survival of Salmonella during grinding of pork (Møller, C.O.A., Nauta, M.J., Christensen, B.B., Dalgaard, P., Hansen, T.B., 2012. Modelling transfer of Salmonella typhimurium DT104 during simulation of grinding of pork. Journal of Applied Microbiology 112 (1), 90-98). The robustness of this model is now evaluated by studying its performance for predicting the transfer and survival of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of different types of meat (pork and beef), using two different grinders, different sizes and different numbers of pieces of meats to be ground. A total of 19 grinding trials were collected. Acceptable Simulation Zone (ASZ), visual inspection of the data, Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA), as well as the Total Transfer Potential (TTP) were used as approaches to evaluate model performance and to access the quality of the cross contamination model predictions. Using the ASZ approach and considering that 70% of the observed counts have to be inside a defined acceptable zone of ±0.5 log10CFU per portion, it was found that the cross contamination parameters suggested by Møller et al. (2012) were not able to describe all 19 trials. However, for each of the collected grinding trials, the transfer event was well described when fitted to the model structure proposed by Møller et al. (2012). Parameter estimates obtained by fitting observed trials performed at different conditions, such as size and number of pieces of meat to be ground, may not be applied to describe cross contamination of unlike processing. Nevertheless, the risk estimates, as well as the TTP, revealed that the risk of disease may be reduced when the grinding of meat is performed in a grinder made of stainless steel (for all surfaces in contact with the meat), using a well-sharpened knife and holding at room temperatures lower than 4°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Designing success: describing a collaborative clothing design ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative research methods were used in this study, namely observation and semi-structured interviews. Findings suggest that collective creativity resulted from the collaboration between the designers and apprentice designers who worked in teams. Collective creativity proved to be beneficial to the apprentice designers ...

  10. The Drivers of Success in Business Model Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savič

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing empirical literature on business models is still inconclusive about the key drivers of successful business model transformation. The paper explores this issue by using a single longitudinal case study design in combination with grounded theory approach on a medium-sized, high-tech and globally oriented company. Based on on-site visits, interviews and secondary documentation data analysis, the study identifies six generic drivers of successful business model transformation: transformational leadership, discovery driven decision-making, industry improvement – customer specific orientation, content-oriented communication, self-initiative collaborators, and phased separation strategy. The new drivers supplement our existing knowledge on how successful transformation takes place and add to existing drivers, while extensive discussion of their implications may help the managers to execute business transformations more effectively.

  11. Forest-succession models and their ecological and management implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, D.; Smith, T.M.; Weinstein, D.A.; Shugart, H.H.

    1981-01-01

    Computer models of forest succession have been developed to an extent that allows their use as a tool for predicting forest ecosystem behavior over long periods of time. This paper outlines the use of one approach to forest succession modeling for a variety of problems including: (1) determining the effect of climate change on forests; (2) integrating information on wildlife habitat changes with the changes in forest structure associated with timber management; (3) assessing the potential effect of air pollutants on forest dynamics; and (4) determining the theoretical importance of disturbance on forest community diversity and function.

  12. Analytical model to describe fluorescence spectra of normal and preneoplastic epithelial tissue: comparison with Monte Carlo simulations and clinical measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung K; Arifler, Dizem; Drezek, Rebekah; Follen, Michele; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has shown promise for the detection of precancerous changes in vivo. The epithelial and stromal layers of tissue have very different optical properties; the albedo is relatively low in the epithelium and approaches one in the stroma. As precancer develops, the optical properties of the epithelium and stroma are altered in markedly different ways: epithelial scattering and fluorescence increase, and stromal scattering and fluorescence decrease. We present an analytical model of the fluorescence spectrum of a two-layer medium such as epithelial tissue. Our hypothesis is that accounting for the two different tissue layers will provide increased diagnostic information when used to analyze tissue fluorescence spectra measured in vivo. The Beer-Lambert law is used to describe light propagation in the epithelial layer, while light propagation in the highly scattering stromal layer is described with diffusion theory. Predictions of the analytical model are compared to results from Monte Carlo simulations of light propagation under a range of optical properties reported for normal and precancerous epithelial tissue. In all cases, the mean square error between the Monte Carlo simulations and the analytical model are within 15%. Finally, model predictions are compared to fluorescence spectra of normal and precancerous cervical tissue measured in vivo; the lineshape of fluorescence agrees well in both cases, and the decrease in fluorescence intensity from normal to precancerous tissue is correctly predicted to within 5%. Future work will explore the use of this model to extract information about changes in epithelial and stromal optical properties from clinical measurements and the diagnostic value of these parameters. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  13. Electronic Commerce Success Model: A Search for Multiple Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didi Achjari

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study attempts to develop and examine framework of e-commerce success. In order to obtain comprehensive and robust measures, the framework accomodates key factors that are identified in the literature concerning the success of electronic commerce. The structural model comprises of four exogenous variables (Internal Driver, Internal Impediment, External Driver and Exgternal Impediment and one endogenous variable (Electornic Commerce Success eith 24 observed variables. The study that was administered within large Australian companies using questionaire survey concluded that benefits for both internal organization and external parties from the use of e-commerce were the main factor tro predict perceived and/or expected success of electronic commerce.

  14. Biological effectiveness and application of heavy ions in radiation therapy described by a physical and biological model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, K.J.; Hansen, J.W.

    1982-12-01

    A description is given of the physical basis for applying track structure theory in the determination of the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation of single- and multi-hit target systems. It will be shown that for applying the theory to biological systems the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation is inadequately described by an RBE-factor, whereas the complete formulation of the probability of survival must be used, as survival depends on both radiation quality and dose. The theoretical model of track structure can be used in dose-effect calculations for neutron-, high-LET, and low-LET radiation applied simultaneously in therapy. (author)

  15. Incorporation of lipophilic pathways into the porous pathway model for describing skin permeabilization during low-frequency sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ahmet; Sens, Ashley; Mitragotri, Samir

    2002-09-18

    Application of low-frequency sonophoresis (LFS) has been shown to increase skin permeability, thereby facilitating delivery of hydrophilic solutes. We have previously shown that the modified porous pathway model provides an adequate theoretical description of transdermal delivery of hydrophilic solutes through pores in the presence and absence of ultrasound. However, small hydrophilic solutes (M(w)<400 Da) that exhibit a moderate partition coefficient, K(o/w) (0.1model to describe transdermal drug transport in the absence and presence of ultrasound. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Viscoelastic Characteristics of Fins, Muscle and Skin in Crucian Carp (Carassius Auratus) Described by the Fractional Zener Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ming; Jia Lai-Bing; Yin Xie-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Fish are supposed to be able to adapt to various underwater environments. The mechanical properties of the body of a fish is of essential importance in order to explore the source of high efficiency during fish swimming. We investigate the viscoelastic properties of the fins, muscle and skin of Crucian carp (carassius auratus). A fractional Zener model is used to fit the relaxation force and the results show that the model can describe the relaxation process well. With a Fourier transform, we discuss the response functions of the fins, muscle and skin of Crucian carp under the external excitation of a harmonic force. Comparison of these results with the cruising frequency of Crucian carp shows that the dissipation due to internal viscoelasticity during cruising is small. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  17. A Novel Dynamic Model Describing the Spread of the MERS-CoV and the Expression of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS coronavirus, a newly identified pathogen, causes severe pneumonia in humans. MERS is caused by a coronavirus known as MERS-CoV, which attacks the respiratory system. The recently defined receptor for MERS-CoV, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4, is generally expressed in endothelial and epithelial cells and has been shown to be present on cultured human nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium cells. In this paper, a class of novel four-dimensional dynamic model describing the infection of MERS-CoV is given, and then global stability of the equilibria of the model is discussed. Our results show that the spread of MERS-CoV can also be controlled by decreasing the expression rate of DPP4.

  18. A simple model of universe describing the early inflation and the late accelerated expansion in a symmetric manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique (IRSAMC), CNRS and UPS, Université de Toulouse (France)

    2013-07-23

    We construct a simple model of universe which 'unifies' vacuum energy and radiation on the one hand, and matter and dark energy on the other hand in the spirit of a generalized Chaplygin gas model. Specifically, the phases of early inflation and late accelerated expansion are described by a generalized equation of state p/c{sup 2} = αρ+kρ{sup 1+1/n} having a linear component p = αρc{sup 2} and a polytropic component p = kρ{sup 1+1/n}c{sup 2}. For α= 1/3, n= 1 and k=−4/(3ρ{sub P}), where ρ{sub P}= 5.1610{sup 99} g/m{sup 3} is the Planck density, this equation of state describes the transition between the vacuum energy era and the radiation era. For t≥ 0, the universe undergoes an inflationary expansion that brings it from the Planck size l{sub P}= 1.6210{sup −35} m to a size a{sub 1}= 2.6110{sup −6} m on a timescale of about 23.3 Planck times t{sub P}= 5.3910{sup −44} s (early inflation). When t > t{sub 1}= 23.3t{sub P}, the universe decelerates and enters in the radiation era. We interpret the transition from the vacuum energy era to the radiation era as a second order phase transition where the Planck constant ℏ plays the role of finite size effects (the standard Big Bang theory is recovered for ℏ= 0). For α= 0, n=−1 and k=−ρ{sub Λ}, where ρ{sub Λ}= 7.0210{sup −24} g/m{sup 3} is the cosmological density, the equation of state p/c{sup 2} = αρ+kρ{sup 1+1/n} describes the transition from a decelerating universe dominated by pressureless matter (baryonic and dark matter) to an accelerating universe dominated by dark energy (late inflation). This transition takes place at a size a{sub 2}= 0.204l{sub Λ}. corresponding to a time t{sub 2}= 0.203t{sub Λ} where l{sub Λ}= 4.38 10{sup 26} m is the cosmological length and t{sub Λ}= 1.46 10{sup 18} s the cosmological time. The present universe turns out to be just at the transition between these two periods (t{sub 0}∼t{sub 2}). Our model gives the same results as the standard

  19. An analytical mechanical model to describe the response of NiTi rotary endodontic files in a curved root canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Agnes Marie Francoise [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Ecole des Ponts Paristech (ENPC), Champs-sur-Marne (France); Bahia, Maria Guiomar de Azevedo [Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Ehrlacher, Alain [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Ecole des Ponts Paristech (ENPC), Champs-sur-Marne (France); Buono, Vicente Tadeu Lopes, E-mail: vbuono@demet.ufmg.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, School of Engineering, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-08-01

    Aim: To build a mathematical model describing the mechanical behavior of NiTi rotary files while they are rotating in a root canal. Methodology: The file was seen as a beam undergoing large transformations. The instrument was assumed to be rotating steadily in the root canal, and the geometry of the canal was considered as a known parameter of the problem. The formulae of large transformations mechanics then allowed the calculation of the Green-Lagrange strain field in the file. The non-linear mechanical behavior of NiTi was modeled as a continuous piecewise linear function, assuming that the material did not reach plastic deformation. Criteria locating the changes of behavior of NiTi were established and the tension field in the file, and the external efforts applied on it were calculated. The unknown variable of torsion was deduced from the equilibrium equation system using a Coulomb contact law which solved the problem on a cycle of rotation. Results: In order to verify that the model described well reality, three-point bending experiments were managed on superelastic NiTi wires, whose results were compared to the theoretical ones. It appeared that the model gave a good mentoring of the empirical results in the range of bending angles that interested us. Conclusions: Knowing the geometry of the root canal, one is now able to write the equations of the strain and stress fields in the endodontic instrument, and to quantify the impact of each macroscopic parameter of the problem on its response. This should be useful to predict failure of the files under rotating bending fatigue, and to optimize the geometry of the files. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mechanical model of the behavior of a NiTi endodontic instrument was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model was validated with results of three-point bending tests on NiTi wires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is appropriate for the optimization of instruments' geometry.

  20. A Lotka-Volterra competition model with seasonal succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sze-Bi; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    A complete classification for the global dynamics of a Lotka-Volterra two species competition model with seasonal succession is obtained via the stability analysis of equilibria and the theory of monotone dynamical systems. The effects of two death rates in the bad season and the proportion of the good season on the competition outcomes are also discussed. © Springer-Verlag 2011

  1. Leader Succession: A Model and Review for School Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskel, Cecil; Cosgrove, Dorothy

    Recent research casts doubt on the commonly held notions that administrators affect student learning through instructional leadership and that changing administrators will improve school performance. To help construct a model for examining the process of leader succession that specifies a number of major school process and outcome variables…

  2. Student Success in College Composition through the Puente Project Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Barbara

    Much can be learned from California's Puente Project Model that would help students' success in classrooms as well as in college in general, and in their daily lives. Puente, which means "bridge" in Spanish, began in 1982 at Chabot College in northern California and is now in 38 colleges and 19 high schools statewide. Originally designed…

  3. Using landscape disturbance and succession models to support forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Gustafson; Brian R. Sturtevant; Anatoly S. Shvidenko; Robert M. Scheller

    2010-01-01

    Managers of forested landscapes must account for multiple, interacting ecological processes operating at broad spatial and temporal scales. These interactions can be of such complexity that predictions of future forest ecosystem states are beyond the analytical capability of the human mind. Landscape disturbance and succession models (LDSM) are predictive and...

  4. A Competitive Success Model in the Hotel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    González Rodríguez, María Rosario; Martín Samper, Rosario del Carmen; Jiménez Caballero, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper focus on identifying those factors involved in the competitive success of hotel companies and the interrelations between them, taking into account the socio-economic influence that these companies might have on Andalusian region and the few studies carried out in tourism sector so far. The study tries to specify an econometric model that may include factors that appear as mechanisms for the generation of competitive advantage. The research model allows us t...

  5. Membrane capacitive memory alters spiking in neurons described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth H Weinberg

    Full Text Available Excitable cells and cell membranes are often modeled by the simple yet elegant parallel resistor-capacitor circuit. However, studies have shown that the passive properties of membranes may be more appropriately modeled with a non-ideal capacitor, in which the current-voltage relationship is given by a fractional-order derivative. Fractional-order membrane potential dynamics introduce capacitive memory effects, i.e., dynamics are influenced by a weighted sum of the membrane potential prior history. However, it is not clear to what extent fractional-order dynamics may alter the properties of active excitable cells. In this study, we investigate the spiking properties of the neuronal membrane patch, nerve axon, and neural networks described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. We find that in the membrane patch model, as fractional-order decreases, i.e., a greater influence of membrane potential memory, peak sodium and potassium currents are altered, and spike frequency and amplitude are generally reduced. In the nerve axon, the velocity of spike propagation increases as fractional-order decreases, while in a neural network, electrical activity is more likely to cease for smaller fractional-order. Importantly, we demonstrate that the modulation of the peak ionic currents that occurs for reduced fractional-order alone fails to reproduce many of the key alterations in spiking properties, suggesting that membrane capacitive memory and fractional-order membrane potential dynamics are important and necessary to reproduce neuronal electrical activity.

  6. Membrane capacitive memory alters spiking in neurons described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Seth H

    2015-01-01

    Excitable cells and cell membranes are often modeled by the simple yet elegant parallel resistor-capacitor circuit. However, studies have shown that the passive properties of membranes may be more appropriately modeled with a non-ideal capacitor, in which the current-voltage relationship is given by a fractional-order derivative. Fractional-order membrane potential dynamics introduce capacitive memory effects, i.e., dynamics are influenced by a weighted sum of the membrane potential prior history. However, it is not clear to what extent fractional-order dynamics may alter the properties of active excitable cells. In this study, we investigate the spiking properties of the neuronal membrane patch, nerve axon, and neural networks described by the fractional-order Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. We find that in the membrane patch model, as fractional-order decreases, i.e., a greater influence of membrane potential memory, peak sodium and potassium currents are altered, and spike frequency and amplitude are generally reduced. In the nerve axon, the velocity of spike propagation increases as fractional-order decreases, while in a neural network, electrical activity is more likely to cease for smaller fractional-order. Importantly, we demonstrate that the modulation of the peak ionic currents that occurs for reduced fractional-order alone fails to reproduce many of the key alterations in spiking properties, suggesting that membrane capacitive memory and fractional-order membrane potential dynamics are important and necessary to reproduce neuronal electrical activity.

  7. A Lagging Model for Describing Drawdown Induced by a Constant-Rate Pumping in a Leaky Confined Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye-Chen; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2017-10-01

    This study proposes a generalized Darcy's law with considering phase lags in both the water flux and drawdown gradient to develop a lagging flow model for describing drawdown induced by constant-rate pumping (CRP) in a leaky confined aquifer. The present model has a mathematical formulation similar to the dual-porosity model. The Laplace-domain solution of the model with the effect of wellbore storage is derived by the Laplace transform method. The time-domain solution for the case of neglecting the wellbore storage and well radius is developed by the use of Laplace transform and Weber transform. The results of sensitivity analysis based on the solution indicate that the drawdown is very sensitive to the change in each of the transmissivity and storativity. Also, a study for the lagging effect on the drawdown indicates that its influence is significant associated with the lag times. The present solution is also employed to analyze a data set taken from a CRP test conducted in a fractured aquifer in South Dakota, USA. The results show the prediction of this new solution with considering the phase lags has very good fit to the field data, especially at early pumping time. In addition, the phase lags seem to have a scale effect as indicated in the results. In other words, the lagging behavior is positively correlated with the observed distance in the Madison aquifer.

  8. Acquisition Integration Models: How Large Companies Successfully Integrate Startups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Carbone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A have been popular means for many companies to address the increasing pace and level of competition that they face. Large companies have pursued acquisitions to more quickly access technology, markets, and customers, and this approach has always been a viable exit strategy for startups. However, not all deals deliver the anticipated benefits, in large part due to poor integration of the acquired assets into the acquiring company. Integration can greatly impact the success of the acquisition and, indeed, the combined company’s overall market success. In this article, I explore the implementation of several integration models that have been put into place by a large company and extract principles that may assist negotiating parties with maximizing success. This perspective may also be of interest to smaller companies as they explore exit options while trying to ensure continued market success after acquisition. I assert that business success with acquisitions is dependent on an appropriate integration model, but that asset integration is not formulaic. Any integration effort must consider the specific market context and personnel involved.

  9. Numerical Modeling Describing the Effects of Heterogeneous Distributions of Asperities on the Quasi-static Evolution of Frictional Slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, P. A.; Parker, J. M.; Glaser, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    A better understanding of how slip accumulates along faults and its relation to the breakdown of shear stress is beneficial to many engineering disciplines, such as, hydraulic fracture and understanding induced seismicity (among others). Asperities forming along a preexisting fault resist the relative motion of the two sides of the interface and occur due to the interaction of the surface topographies. Here, we employ a finite element model to simulate circular partial slip asperities along a nominally flat frictional interface. Shear behavior of our partial slip asperity model closely matched the theory described by Cattaneo. The asperity model was employed to simulate a small section of an experimental fault formed between two bodies of polymethyl methacrylate, which consisted of multiple asperities whose location and sizes were directly measured using a pressure sensitive film. The quasi-static shear behavior of the interface was modeled for cyclical loading conditions, and the frictional dissipation (hysteresis) was normal stress dependent. We further our understanding by synthetically modeling lognormal size distributions of asperities that were randomly distributed in space. Synthetic distributions conserved the real contact area and aspects of the size distributions from the experimental case, allowing us to compare the constitutive behaviors based solely on spacing effects. Traction-slip behavior of the experimental interface appears to be considerably affected by spatial clustering of asperities that was not present in the randomly spaced, synthetic asperity distributions. Estimates of bulk interfacial shear stiffness were determined from the constitutive traction-slip behavior and were comparable to the theoretical estimates of multi-contact interfaces with non-interacting asperities.

  10. Indirect estimation of the Convective Lognormal Transfer function model parameters for describing solute transport in unsaturated and undisturbed soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2012-05-01

    Solute transport in partially saturated soils is largely affected by fluid velocity distribution and pore size distribution within the solute transport domain. Hence, it is possible to describe the solute transport process in terms of the pore size distribution of the soil, and indirectly in terms of the soil hydraulic properties. In this paper, we present a conceptual approach that allows predicting the parameters of the Convective Lognormal Transfer model from knowledge of soil moisture and the Soil Moisture Characteristic (SMC), parameterized by means of the closed-form model of Kosugi (1996). It is assumed that in partially saturated conditions, the air filled pore volume act as an inert solid phase, allowing the use of the Arya et al. (1999) pragmatic approach to estimate solute travel time statistics from the saturation degree and SMC parameters. The approach is evaluated using a set of partially saturated transport experiments as presented by Mohammadi and Vanclooster (2011). Experimental results showed that the mean solute travel time, μ(t), increases proportionally with the depth (travel distance) and decreases with flow rate. The variance of solute travel time σ²(t) first decreases with flow rate up to 0.4-0.6 Ks and subsequently increases. For all tested BTCs predicted solute transport with μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model performed much better as compared to predictions with μ(t) and σ²(t) estimated from calibration of solute transport at shallow soil depths. The use of μ(t) estimated from the conceptual model therefore increases the robustness of the CLT model in predicting solute transport in heterogeneous soils at larger depths. In view of the fact that reasonable indirect estimates of the SMC can be made from basic soil properties using pedotransfer functions, the presented approach may be useful for predicting solute transport at field or watershed scales. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in the definition of parametric distributions used to describe individual patient variation in health economic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Koen; IJzerman, Maarten J; Koopman, Miriam; Koffijberg, Hendrik

    2017-12-15

    Parametric distributions based on individual patient data can be used to represent both stochastic and parameter uncertainty. Although general guidance is available on how parameter uncertainty should be accounted for in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there is no comprehensive guidance on reflecting parameter uncertainty in the (correlated) parameters of distributions used to represent stochastic uncertainty in patient-level models. This study aims to provide this guidance by proposing appropriate methods and illustrating the impact of this uncertainty on modeling outcomes. Two approaches, 1) using non-parametric bootstrapping and 2) using multivariate Normal distributions, were applied in a simulation and case study. The approaches were compared based on point-estimates and distributions of time-to-event and health economic outcomes. To assess sample size impact on the uncertainty in these outcomes, sample size was varied in the simulation study and subgroup analyses were performed for the case-study. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in distributions that reflect stochastic uncertainty substantially increased the uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes, illustrated by larger confidence ellipses surrounding the cost-effectiveness point-estimates and different cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Although both approaches performed similar for larger sample sizes (i.e. n = 500), the second approach was more sensitive to extreme values for small sample sizes (i.e. n = 25), yielding infeasible modeling outcomes. Modelers should be aware that parameter uncertainty in distributions used to describe stochastic uncertainty needs to be reflected in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, as it could substantially impact the total amount of uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes. If feasible, the bootstrap approach is recommended to account for this uncertainty.

  12. Accounting for parameter uncertainty in the definition of parametric distributions used to describe individual patient variation in health economic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Degeling

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parametric distributions based on individual patient data can be used to represent both stochastic and parameter uncertainty. Although general guidance is available on how parameter uncertainty should be accounted for in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, there is no comprehensive guidance on reflecting parameter uncertainty in the (correlated parameters of distributions used to represent stochastic uncertainty in patient-level models. This study aims to provide this guidance by proposing appropriate methods and illustrating the impact of this uncertainty on modeling outcomes. Methods Two approaches, 1 using non-parametric bootstrapping and 2 using multivariate Normal distributions, were applied in a simulation and case study. The approaches were compared based on point-estimates and distributions of time-to-event and health economic outcomes. To assess sample size impact on the uncertainty in these outcomes, sample size was varied in the simulation study and subgroup analyses were performed for the case-study. Results Accounting for parameter uncertainty in distributions that reflect stochastic uncertainty substantially increased the uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes, illustrated by larger confidence ellipses surrounding the cost-effectiveness point-estimates and different cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Although both approaches performed similar for larger sample sizes (i.e. n = 500, the second approach was more sensitive to extreme values for small sample sizes (i.e. n = 25, yielding infeasible modeling outcomes. Conclusions Modelers should be aware that parameter uncertainty in distributions used to describe stochastic uncertainty needs to be reflected in probabilistic sensitivity analysis, as it could substantially impact the total amount of uncertainty surrounding health economic outcomes. If feasible, the bootstrap approach is recommended to account for this uncertainty.

  13. Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes. Fifth quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R.K.

    1979-02-01

    This program aims at developing mathematical models, and computer codes based on these models, which will allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors in which gaseous silicon compounds are converted to condensed-phase silicon. The reactors to be modeled are flow reactors in which silane or one of the halogenated silanes is thermally decomposed or reacted with an alkali metal, H/sub 2/ or H atoms. Because the product of interest is particulate silicon, processes which must be modeled, in addition to mixing and reaction of gas-phase reactants, include the nucleation and growth of condensed Si via coagulation, condensation, and heterogeneous reaction. During this report period computer codes were developed and used to calculate: (1) coefficients for Si vapor and Si particles describing transport due to concentration and temperature gradients (i.e., Fick and Soret diffusion, respectively), and (2) estimates of thermochemical properties of Si n-mers. The former are needed to allow the mass flux of Si to reactor walls to be calculated. Because of the extremely large temperature gradients that exist in some of the reactors to be used in producing Si (particularly the Westinghouse reactor), it was found that thermal (Soret) diffusion can be the dominant transport mechanism for certain sizes of Si particles. The thermochemical estimates are required to allow computation of the formation rate of Si droplets. With the completion of these calculations the information and coding of the particle routines in the modified LAPP code is at the point where debugging can be done and that is now in progress.

  14. Development of a Predictive Model for Induction Success of Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Pruenza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Induction of the labour process is an extraordinarily common procedure used in some pregnancies. Obstetricians face the need to end a pregnancy, for medical reasons usually (maternal or fetal requirements or less frequently, social (elective inductions for convenience. The success of induction procedure is conditioned by a multitude of maternal and fetal variables that appear before or during pregnancy or birth process, with a low predictive value. The failure of the induction process involves performing a caesarean section. This project arises from the clinical need to resolve a situation of uncertainty that occurs frequently in our clinical practice. Since the weight of clinical variables is not adequately weighted, we consider very interesting to know a priori the possibility of success of induction to dismiss those inductions with high probability of failure, avoiding unnecessary procedures or postponing end if possible. We developed a predictive model of induced labour success as a support tool in clinical decision making. Improve the predictability of a successful induction is one of the current challenges of Obstetrics because of its negative impact. The identification of those patients with high chances of failure, will allow us to offer them better care improving their health outcomes (adverse perinatal outcomes for mother and newborn, costs (medication, hospitalization, qualified staff and patient perceived quality. Therefore a Clinical Decision Support System was developed to give support to the Obstetricians. In this article, we had proposed a robust method to explore and model a source of clinical information with the purpose of obtaining all possible knowledge. Generally, in classification models are difficult to know the contribution that each attribute provides to the model. We had worked in this direction to offer transparency to models that may be considered as black boxes. The positive results obtained from both the

  15. Application of inverse modeling technique to describe hydrogeochemical processes responsible to spatial distribution of groundwater quality along flowpath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjahyo NugrohoAdji

    2013-07-01

    The result shows that firstly, the aquifer within the research area can be grouped into several aquifer systems (i.e. denudational hill, colluvial plain, alluvial plain, and beach ridges from recharge to discharge which generally have potential groundwater resources in terms of the depth and fluctuation of groundwater table. Secondly, flownets analysis gives three flowpaths that are plausible to be modeled in order to describe their hydrogeochemical reactions. Thirdly, the Saturation Indices (SI analysis shows that there are a positive correlation between the mineral occurrence and composition and the value of SI from recharge to discharge. In addition, The Mass Balance Model indicates that dissolution and precipitation of aquifer minerals is dominantly change the chemical composition along flowpath and the rate of the mass transfer between two wells shows a discrepancy and be certain of the percentage of the nature of aquifer mineral. Lastly, there is an interesting characteristic of mass balance chemical reaction occurs which is the entire chemical reaction shows that the sum of smallest mineral fmmol/litre will firstly always totally be reacted.

  16. A one-dimensional model to describe flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to super critical impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Romero, A.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to dynamic tension. We explore loading rates above the critical impact velocity: the wave initiated in the impacted end by the applied velocity is the trigger for the localization of plastic deformation. The problem has been addressed using two kinds of numerical simulations: (1) one-dimensional finite difference calculations and (2) axisymmetric finite element computations. The latter calculations have been used to validate the capacity of the finite difference model to describe plastic flow localization at high impact velocities. The finite difference model, which highlights due to its simplicity, allows to obtain insights into the role played by the strain rate and temperature sensitivities of the material in the process of dynamic flow localization. Specifically, we have shown that viscosity can stabilize the material behavior to the point of preventing the appearance of the critical impact velocity. This is a key outcome of our investigation, which, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature.

  17. Models describing mackerel (Scomber scombrus early life growth in the North and Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula in 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Villamor

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Mackerel (Scomber scombrus in early life stages were captured in 2000 in the north and northwest of the Iberian Peninsula (ICES Divisions VIIIc and IXa North. Daily rings on their otolith sagittae were identified. Otoliths from 377 larvae and post-larvae caught in April and May 2000, ranging in length from 2.3 to 23.7 mm LS (Standard length and ranging in age from 7 to 38 days after hatching were analysed. Additionally, 68 otoliths from juveniles and pre-recruits caught between July and October 2000 with a length range of 121-202 mm LS and aged between 65-186 days after hatching were analysed. Gompertz and Logistic growth models were fitted to the pooled length at age data of the larvae-postlarvae and juveniles-pre-recruits. As length at hatch is assumed in the literature to be 3.0 mm, the models were applied in two ways; not forced to pass through L0=3.0 mm and forced to pass through L0=3.0 mm. The unforced logistic growth curve appeared to be the most suitable for describing growth during the first year of life of mackerel (L? = 191.6 mm; K= 0.070; t0= 66.7 d.

  18. Mechanisms for improving mass transfer in food with ultrasound technology: Describing the phenomena in two model cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Alberto Claudio; Ibarz, Albert; Augusto, Pedro Esteves Duarte

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate how ultrasound mechanisms (direct and indirect effects) improve the mass transfer phenomena in food processing, and which part of the process they are more effective in. Two model cases were evaluated: the hydration of sorghum grain (with two water activities) and the influx of a pigment into melon cylinders. Different treatments enabled us to evaluate and discriminate both direct (inertial flow and "sponge effect") and indirect effects (micro channel formation), alternating pre-treatments and treatments using an ultrasonic bath (20 kHz of frequency and 28 W/L of volumetric power) and a traditional water-bath. It was demonstrated that both the effects of ultrasound technology are more effective in food with higher water activity, the micro channels only forming in moist food. Moreover, micro channel formation could also be observed using agar gel cylinders, verifying the random formation of these due to cavitation. The direct effects were shown to be important in mass transfer enhancement not only in moist food, but also in dry food, this being improved by the micro channels formed and the porosity of the food. In conclusion, the improvement in mass transfer due to direct and indirect effects was firstly discriminated and described. It was proven that both phenomena are important for mass transfer in moist foods, while only the direct effects are important for dry foods. Based on these results, better processing using ultrasound technology can be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. One-dimensional Fermi accelerator model with moving wall described by a nonlinear van der Pol oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botari, Tiago; Leonel, Edson D

    2013-01-01

    A modification of the one-dimensional Fermi accelerator model is considered in this work. The dynamics of a classical particle of mass m, confined to bounce elastically between two rigid walls where one is described by a nonlinear van der Pol type oscillator while the other one is fixed, working as a reinjection mechanism of the particle for a next collision, is carefully made by the use of a two-dimensional nonlinear mapping. Two cases are considered: (i) the situation where the particle has mass negligible as compared to the mass of the moving wall and does not affect the motion of it; and (ii) the case where collisions of the particle do affect the movement of the moving wall. For case (i) the phase space is of mixed type leading us to observe a scaling of the average velocity as a function of the parameter (χ) controlling the nonlinearity of the moving wall. For large χ, a diffusion on the velocity is observed leading to the conclusion that Fermi acceleration is taking place. On the other hand, for case (ii), the motion of the moving wall is affected by collisions with the particle. However, due to the properties of the van der Pol oscillator, the moving wall relaxes again to a limit cycle. Such kind of motion absorbs part of the energy of the particle leading to a suppression of the unlimited energy gain as observed in case (i). The phase space shows a set of attractors of different periods whose basin of attraction has a complicated organization.

  20. Entrepreneurial Women in Radiology: Role Models of Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Yoshimi; Meltzer, Carolyn C; DeStigter, Kristen K; Destounis, Stamatia; Pawley, Barbara K; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Radiology is undeniably male dominated. Alongside surgery and orthopedic surgery, academic radiology ranks near the bottom in having the lowest proportion of full-time female faculty members. Despite many efforts to recruit talented women, the pipeline entering the radiologic disciplines continues to flow at a trickle. One factor is the relative lack of role models for female medical students. Entrepreneurial women in radiology can lead the field with their innovation and creativity, courage, and commitment. In this article, the authors highlight two entrepreneurial female radiologists who shared their success stories at the American Association for Women Radiologists' session at the 2015 ACR annual meeting. Their successes underscore the potential for such women to serve as role models to female medical students and even college undergraduates. Despite the gender gap in radiology, the field has yielded some exceptional women who can take on challenges, overcome barriers and assume risks, create strategies and processes to operationalize their visions, secure funding, and expand their enterprises to make sustainable impacts both at home and abroad. As we move toward more patient- and family-centered care models and become increasingly visible to diverse populations, there is no better time for female leaders in radiology to inspire the next generation to join our essential and rewarding specialty. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Developing entrepreneurial competencies for successful business model canvas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundah, D. I. E.; Langi, C.; Maramis, D. R. S.; Tawalujan, L. dan

    2018-01-01

    We explore the competencies of entrepreneurship that contribute to business model canvas. This research conducted at smoked fish industries in Province of North Sulawesi, Indonesia. This research used a mixed method which integrating both quantitative and qualitative approaches in a sequential design. The technique of snowball sampling and questionnaire has been used in collecting data from 44 entrepreneurs. Structural equation modeling with SmartPLS application program has been used in analyzing this data to determine the effect of entrepreneurial competencies on business model canvas. We also investigate 3 entrepreneurs who conducted smoked fish business and analyzed their business by using business model canvas. Focus Group Discussion is used in collecting data from 2 groups of entrepreneurs from 2 different locations. The empirical results show that entrepreneurial competencies which consists of managerial competencies, technical competencies, marketing competencies, financial competencies, human relations competencies, and the specific working attitude of entrepreneur has a positive and significantly effect on business model canvas. Additionally, the empirical cases and discussion with 2 groups of entrepreneurs support the quantitative result and it found that human relations competencies have greater influence in achieving successful business model canvas.

  2. Model of succession in degraded areas based on carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerk, Axel; Szyszko, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Degraded areas constitute challenging tasks with respect to sustainable management of natural resources. Maintaining or even establishing certain successional stages seems to be particularly important. This paper presents a model of the succession in five different types of degraded areas in Poland based on changes in the carabid fauna. Mean Individual Biomass of Carabidae (MIB) was used as a numerical measure for the stage of succession. The run of succession differed clearly among the different types of degraded areas. Initial conditions (origin of soil and origin of vegetation) and landscape related aspects seem to be important with respect to these differences. As characteristic phases, a ‘delay phase’, an ‘increase phase’ and a ‘stagnation phase’ were identified. In general, the runs of succession could be described by four different parameters: (1) ‘Initial degradation level’, (2) ‘delay’, (3) ‘increase rate’ and (4) ‘recovery level’. Applying the analytic solution of the logistic equation, characteristic values for the parameters were identified for each of the five area types. The model is of practical use, because it provides a possibility to compare the values of the parameters elaborated in different areas, to give hints for intervention and to provide prognoses about future succession in the areas. Furthermore, it is possible to transfer the model to other indicators of succession. PMID:21738419

  3. Successful public-private partnerships: The NYPD shield model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadeo, Vincent; Iannone, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    This article will identify the challenges that post 9/11 law enforcement faces regarding privatepublic partnerships and describe in detail the NYPD Shield programme, created to combat those challenges. Recommendations made by the 911 Commission included the incorporation of the private sector into future homeland security strategies. One such strategy is NYPD Shield. This programme is a nationally recognized award-winning public-private partnership dedicated to providing counterterrorism training and information sharing with government agencies, non-government organizations, private businesses, and the community. Information is shared through several platforms that include a dedicated website, instruction of counterterrorism training curricula, e-mail alerts, intelligence assessments and the hosting of quarterly conferences. This article also details how the NYPD Shield is providing its successful template to other law enforcement agencies enabling them to initiate similar programmes in their respective jurisdictions, and in doing so joining a National Shield Network.

  4. Extension of the GroIMP modelling platform to allow easy specification of differential equations describing biological processes within plant models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmerling, R.; Evers, J.B.; Smolenova, K.; Buck-Sorlin, G.H.; Kurth, W.

    2013-01-01

    In simulation models of plant development, physiological processes taking place in plants are typically described in terms of ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations). On the one hand, those processes drive the development of the plant structure and on the other hand, the developed structure again

  5. Habitat fragmentation and reproductive success: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tortorec, Eric; Helle, Samuli; Käyhkö, Niina; Suorsa, Petri; Huhta, Esa; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2013-09-01

    1. There is great interest on the effects of habitat fragmentation, whereby habitat is lost and the spatial configuration of remaining habitat patches is altered, on individual breeding performance. However, we still lack consensus of how this important process affects reproductive success, and whether its effects are mainly due to reduced fecundity or nestling survival. 2. The main reason for this may be the way that habitat fragmentation has been previously modelled. Studies have treated habitat loss and altered spatial configuration as two independent processes instead of as one hierarchical and interdependent process, and therefore have not been able to consider the relative direct and indirect effects of habitat loss and altered spatial configuration. 3. We investigated how habitat (i.e. old forest) fragmentation, caused by intense forest harvesting at the territory and landscape scales, is associated with the number of fledged offspring of an area-sensitive passerine, the Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris). We used structural equation modelling (SEM) to examine the complex hierarchical associations between habitat loss and altered spatial configuration on the number of fledged offspring, by controlling for individual condition and weather conditions during incubation. 4. Against generally held expectations, treecreeper reproductive success did not show a significant association with habitat fragmentation measured at the territory scale. Instead, our analyses suggested that an increasing amount of habitat at the landscape scale caused a significant increase in nest predation rates, leading to reduced reproductive success. This effect operated directly on nest predation rates, instead of acting indirectly through altered spatial configuration. 5. Because habitat amount and configuration are inherently strongly collinear, particularly when multiple scales are considered, our study demonstrates the usefulness of a SEM approach for hierarchical partitioning

  6. Goals and Values in School: A Model Developed for Describing, Evaluating and Changing the Social Climate of Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodi, Mara Westling

    2010-01-01

    This paper defines a broad model of the psychosocial climate in educational settings. The model was developed from a general theory of learning environments, on a theory of human values and on empirical studies of children's evaluations of their schools. The contents of the model are creativity, stimulation, achievement, self-efficacy, creativity,…

  7. Development of a cloud microphysical model and parameterizations to describe the effect of CCN on warm cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kuba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available First, a hybrid cloud microphysical model was developed that incorporates both Lagrangian and Eulerian frameworks to study quantitatively the effect of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN on the precipitation of warm clouds. A parcel model and a grid model comprise the cloud model. The condensation growth of CCN in each parcel is estimated in a Lagrangian framework. Changes in cloud droplet size distribution arising from condensation and coalescence are calculated on grid points using a two-moment bin method in a semi-Lagrangian framework. Sedimentation and advection are estimated in the Eulerian framework between grid points. Results from the cloud model show that an increase in the number of CCN affects both the amount and the area of precipitation. Additionally, results from the hybrid microphysical model and Kessler's parameterization were compared. Second, new parameterizations were developed that estimate the number and size distribution of cloud droplets given the updraft velocity and the number of CCN. The parameterizations were derived from the results of numerous numerical experiments that used the cloud microphysical parcel model. The input information of CCN for these parameterizations is only several values of CCN spectrum (they are given by CCN counter for example. It is more convenient than conventional parameterizations those need values concerned with CCN spectrum, C and k in the equation of N=CSk, or, breadth, total number and median radius, for example. The new parameterizations' predictions of initial cloud droplet size distribution for the bin method were verified by using the aforesaid hybrid microphysical model. The newly developed parameterizations will save computing time, and can effectively approximate components of cloud microphysics in a non-hydrostatic cloud model. The parameterizations are useful not only in the bin method in the regional cloud-resolving model but also both for a two-moment bulk microphysical model and

  8. Evaluation of a new mathematical model to describe Clostridium perfringens growth during the cooling of cooked ground beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Decker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model previously developed to study microbial growth in food products under an isothermal environment was adapted to a time-varying temperature regime. The resulting model was applied to study the growth of Clostridium perfringens in meat products. This micro-organism is of particular relevance to public health and economy due to the loss of productivity caused by it. Results showed a similar performance of the model used compared to the Baranyi model under an isothermal situation and a slightly better performance under a non-isothermal temperature profile.

  9. A plant wide aqueous phase chemistry model describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores-Alsina, X.; Mbamba, C. Kazadi; Solon, K.

    /pairing is presented and interfaced with industry standard models. The module involves extensive consideration of non-ideality by including ion activities instead of molar concentrations and complex ion pairing. The general equilibria are formulated as a set of Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs) instead......There is a growing interest within the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) modelling community to correctly describe physico-chemical processes after many years of mainly focusing on biokinetics (Batstone et al., 2012). Indeed, future modelling needs, such as a plant-wide phosphorus (P) description...... cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some of the most frequently used WWTP process simulation models. Finally, it is shown how traditional wastewater modelling studies can...

  10. A unified degree day model describes survivorship of Copitarsia corruda Pogue & Simmons (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) at different constant temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.N. G& #243; mez; R.C. Venette; J.R. Gould; D.F. Winograd

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of survivorship are critical to quantify the probability of establishment by an alien invasive species, but survival curves rarely distinguish between the effects of temperature on development versus senescence. We report chronological and physiological age-based survival curves for a potentially invasive noctuid, recently described as Copitarsia...

  11. A model describing the flowering of single plants, and the heritability of flowering traits of Dimorphotheca pluvialis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, L.; Keizer, L.C.P.; Elberse, I.A.M.; Dolstra, O.

    1999-01-01

    In the development of new crops such as Dimorphoteca pluvialis (L.) Moench, improvement of flowering synchronisation is an important breeding objective. The flowering of single plants of Dimorphotheca pluvialis could be described by a logistic curve obtained by the regression of cumulative number of

  12. Analytical model to describe the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in roofs; Modelo analitico que describe el comportamiento termico de un sistema de descarga de calor en techos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Gomez, V.H.; Contreras-Espinosa, J.J.; Gonzalez-Ortiz, G.; Morillon-Galvez, D.; Fernandez-Zayas, J.L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: vichugo@servidor.unam.mx; jjuancon2000@yahoo.com.mx; gilberto_gonzalez25@hotmail.com; damg@pumas.iingen.unam.mx; JFernandezZ@iingen.unam.mx

    2012-01-15

    The present study proposes an analytical model which describes the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in roof, when the surfaces that constitute it are not translucent. Such a model derives from a thermal balance carried out to a heat discharge system in roofs. To validate it, an experimental prototype that allows simulating the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in wall and roof was used, and the results were compared to those obtained with the proposed analytical model. It was found that the thermal behavior of the analytical model is similar to the thermal behavior of the experimental prototype; a worthless variation was detected among their respective outcome (The difference of temperatures can be caused by the heat transfer coefficient, of which no studies defining its behavior accurately have been found). Therefore, it can be considered that the proposed analytical model can be employed to simulate the thermal behavior of a heat discharge system in roofs when the surfaces that constitute it are opaque. [Spanish] En el presente estudio se propone un modelo analitico que describe el comportamiento termico de un sistema de descarga de calor en techo, cuando las superficies que lo componen no son translucidos. Dicho modelo surge a partir de un balance termico realizado a un sistema de descarga de calor en techos. Para validarlo, se realizaron dos corridas experimentales en un prototipo que permite simular el comportamiento termico de un sistema de descarga de calor en techo y se compararon los resultados medidos con los calculados por el modelo analitico propuesto. Se encontro que, el comportamiento termico del modelo analitico es similar al comportamiento termico del prototipo experimental, se detecto una variacion despreciable entre los valores arrojados por ambos modelos (la diferencia de temperaturas puede estar ocasionada por la obtencion del coeficiente convectivo de transferencia de calor, del cual no se han encontrado estudios que

  13. BLOW-3A. A theoretical model to describe transient two-phase flow conditions in LMFBR coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni, M.; Struwe, D.

    1982-12-01

    The computer programme BLOW-3A describes sodium boiling phenomena in subassemblies of fast breeder reactors as well as in in-pile or out-of-pile experiments simulating different failure conditions. This report presents a complete documentation of the code from three main viewpoints: the theoretical foundations of the programme are first described with particular reference to the most recent developments; the structure of the programme is then explained in all details necessary for the user to get a rapid acquaintance with it; eventually several examples of the programme validation are discussed thus enabling the reader to acquire a full picture of the possible applications of the code and at the same time to know its validity range. (orig.) [de

  14. Study of market model describing the contrary behaviors of informed and uninformed agents: Being minority and being majority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Xia; Liao, Hao; Medo, Matus; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Yeung, Chi Ho

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the contrary behaviors of the informed investors and uniformed investors, and then construct a competition model with two groups of agents, namely agents who intend to stay in minority and those who intend to stay in majority. We find two kinds of competitions, inter- and intra-groups. The model shows periodic fluctuation feature. The average distribution of strategies illustrates a prominent central peak which is relevant to the peak-fat-tail character of price change distribution in stock markets. Furthermore, in the modified model the tolerance time parameter makes the agents diversified. Finally, we compare the strategies distribution with the price change distribution in real stock market, and we conclude that contrary behavior rules and tolerance time parameter are indeed valid in the description of market model.

  15. New models for success emerge for US natural gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addy, W.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Very few companies in the US natural gas industry are confident in their ability to compete effectively in the brave new world of deregulation. Boston Consulting Group recently conducted an internal study to help the industry think about its future and identify models for success in this new environment. The authors examined the historical performance of 800 companies using several shareholder-value indicators, including cash-flow returns on investment, a measure of cash returns on cash invested that correlates closely to share price. Based on that review and discussions with investment managers and industry analysts, the authors were able to focus on a handful of companies that actually have thrived and created value against the difficult landscape of the past decade. Interviews with their senior executives provided important strategic and operational insights

  16. Development of a physiologically-based computational kidney model to describe the renal excretion of hydrophilic agents in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eNiederalt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A physiologically-based kidney model was developed to analyze the renal excretion and kidney exposure of hydrophilic agents, in particular contrast media, in rats. In order to study the influence of osmolality and viscosity changes, the model mechanistically represents urine concentration by water re-absorption in different segments of kidney tubules and viscosity dependent tubular fluid flow.The model was established using experimental data on the physiological steady state without administration of any contrast media or drugs. These data included the sodium and urea concentration gradient along the cortico-medullary axis, water reabsorption, urine flow and sodium as well as urea urine concentrations for a normal hydration state. The model was evaluated by predicting the effects of mannitol and contrast media administration and comparing to experimental data on cortico-medullary concentration gradients, urine flow, urine viscosity, hydrostatic tubular pressures and single nephron glomerular filtration rate. Finally the model was used to analyze and compare typical examples of ionic and non-ionic monomeric as well as non-ionic dimeric contrast media with respect to their osmolality and viscosity. With the computational kidney model, urine flow depended mainly on osmolality, while osmolality and viscosity were important determinants for tubular hydrostatic pressure and kidney exposure. The low diuretic effect of dimeric contrast media in combination with their high intrinsic viscosity resulted in a high viscosity within the tubular fluid. In comparison to monomeric contrast media, this led to a higher increase in tubular pressure, to a reduction in glomerular filtration rate and tubular flow and to an increase in kidney exposure.The presented kidney model can be implemented into whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models and extended in order to simulate the renal excretion of lipophilic drugs which may also undergo active secretion

  17. A model for describing the eutrophication in a heavily regulated coastal lagoon. Application to the Albufera of Valencia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio Fernández, Pilar; Gómez, Andrés García; Alba, Javier García; Díaz, César Álvarez; Revilla Cortezón, José Antonio

    2012-12-15

    A simplified two-dimensional eutrophication model was developed to simulate temporal and spatial variations of chlorophyll-a in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. This model considers the hydrodynamics of the whole study area, the regulated connexion of the lagoon with the sea, the variability of the input and output nutrient loads, the flux from the sediments to the water column, the phytoplankton growth and mortality kinetics, and the zooplankton grazing. The model was calibrated and validated by applying it to the Albufera of Valencia, a hypertrophic system whose connection to the sea is strongly regulated by a system of sluice-gates. The calibration and validation results presented a significant agreement between the model and the data obtained in several surveys. The accuracy was evaluated using a quantitative analysis, in which the average uncertainty of the model prediction was less than 6%. The results confirmed an expected phytoplankton bloom in April and October, achieving mean maximum values around 250 μg l(-1) of chlorophyll-a. A mass balance revealed that the eutrophication process is magnified by the input loads of nutrients, mainly from the sediments, as well as by the limited connection of the lagoon with the sea. This study has shown that the developed model is an efficient tool to manage the eutrophication problem in heavily regulated coastal lagoons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A flexible Bayesian model for describing temporal variability of N2O emissions from an Australian pasture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Grace, Peter; Rowlings, David; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2013-01-01

    Soil-based emissions of nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a well-known greenhouse gas, have been associated with changes in soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) and soil temperature in many previous studies. However, it is acknowledged that the environment–N 2 O relationship is complex and still relatively poorly unknown. In this article, we employed a Bayesian model selection approach (Reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo) to develop a data-informed model of the relationship between daily N 2 O emissions and daily WFPS and soil temperature measurements between March 2007 and February 2009 from a soil under pasture in Queensland, Australia, taking seasonal factors and time-lagged effects into account. The model indicates a very strong relationship between a hybrid seasonal structure and daily N 2 O emission, with the latter substantially increased in summer. Given the other variables in the model, daily soil WFPS, lagged by a week, had a negative influence on daily N 2 O; there was evidence of a nonlinear positive relationship between daily soil WFPS and daily N 2 O emission; and daily soil temperature tended to have a linear positive relationship with daily N 2 O emission when daily soil temperature was above a threshold of approximately 19 °C. We suggest that this flexible Bayesian modeling approach could facilitate greater understanding of the shape of the covariate-N 2 O flux relation and detection of effect thresholds in the natural temporal variation of environmental variables on N 2 O emission. - Highlights: • A Bayesian model selection approach was used to develop a data-informed model. • Daily soil temperature influenced N 2 O flux above approximately 19 °C. • The effects of daily WFPS on N 2 O flux were complex and changeable. • Daily N 2 O flux was also significantly related to a complex seasonal pattern. • The approach facilitated understanding of the temporal variations of variables on N 2 O

  19. Model for describing plasmonic nanolasers using Maxwell-Liouville equations with finite-difference time-domain calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Dhara J.; Wang, Danqing; Odom, Teri W.; Schatz, George C.

    2017-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of lasing action when plasmonic metallic structures that show lattice plasmon resonances are embedded in a gain medium. Our model combines classical electrodynamics for arrays of gold nanoparticles with a four-level quantum Liouville model of the laser dye photophysics. A numerical solution was implemented using finite-difference time-domain calculations coupled with a finite-difference solution to the Liouville equation. A particular focus of this work is the influence of dephasing in the quantum dynamics on the emission intensity at the threshold for lasing. We find that dephasing in the quantum system leads to reduced lasing emission, but with little effect on the long-term population inversion. Both electronic and vibrational dephasing is considered, but only electronic dephasing is significant, with the fully dephased result appearing for dephasing times comparable to plasmon dephasing (˜10 fs) while fully coherent results involve >100 ps dephasing times as determined by the rate of stimulated emission. There are factor-of-2 differences between the Maxwell-Liouville results (greater emission intensities and narrower widths) compared to the corresponding results of rate-equation models of the dye states, which indicates the importance of using the Maxwell-Liouville approach in modeling these systems. We also examine rate-equation models with and without constraints arising from the Pauli exclusion principle, and we find relatively small effects.

  20. On one peculiarity of the model describing the interaction of the electron beam with the semiconductor surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepovich, M. A.; Amrastanov, A. N.; Seregina, E. V.; Filippov, M. N.

    2018-01-01

    The problem of heat distribution in semiconductor materials irradiated with sharply focused electron beams in the absence of heat exchange between the target and the external medium is considered by mathematical modeling methods. For a quantitative description of energy losses by probe electrons a model based on a separate description of the contributions of absorbed in the target and backscattered electrons and applicable to a wide class of solids and a range of primary electron energies is used. Using the features of this approach, the nonmonotonic dependence of the temperature of the maximum heating in the target on the energy of the primary electrons is explained. Some modeling results are illustrated for semiconductor materials of electronic engineering.

  1. Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas: plots must obey the laws they refer to and models shall describe biophysical reality!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkov, Igor I

    2011-06-01

    In the companion paper, we discussed in details proper linearization, calculation of the inactive osmotic volume, and analysis of the results on the Boyle-vant' Hoff plots. In this Letter, we briefly address some common errors and misconceptions in osmotic modeling and propose some approaches, namely: (1) inapplicability of the Kedem-Katchalsky formalism model in regards to the cryobiophysical reality, (2) calculation of the membrane hydraulic conductivity L(p) in the presence of permeable solutes, (3) proper linearization of the Arrhenius plots for the solute membrane permeability, (4) erroneous use of the term "toxicity" for the cryoprotective agents, and (5) advantages of the relativistic permeability approach (RP) developed by us vs. traditional ("classic") 2-parameter model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A physics-based crystallographic modeling framework for describing the thermal creep behavior of Fe-Cr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    This Report addresses the Milestone M2MS-16LA0501032 of NEAMS Program (“Develop hardening model for FeCrAl cladding), with a deadline of 09/30/2016. Here we report a constitutive law for thermal creep of FeCrAl. This Report adds to and complements the one for Milestone M3MS-16LA0501034 (“Interface hardening models with MOOSE-BISON”), where we presented a hardening law for irradiated FeCrAl. The last component of our polycrystal-based constitutive behavior, namely, an irradiation creep model for FeCrAl, will be developed as part of the FY17 Milestones, and the three regimes will be coupled and interfaced with MOOSE-BISON.

  3. Applying a modified Donnan model to describe the surface complexation of chromate to iron oxyhydroxide agglomerates with heteromorphous pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongsu; Semiat, Raphael

    2017-11-15

    In this study, a modified Donnan model (mDM) is incorporated into surface complexation model (SCM) to better understand the physicochemical processes for adsorption of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), on porous iron oxyhydroxide agglomerates (IOAs). The mDM includes a chemical potential term μ att to account for ionic transport and electrostatic interaction in micropores (d mi 2nm) demonstrating high Cr(VI) adsorption in a broad range of ionic strengths. The batch data was then fitted with Donnan model in PHREEQC to obtain Stern (ψ S ) and Donnan (ψ D ) potentials used for μ att calculation. The decreasing μ att values with ionic strength indicated obstructing effect of electrolyte ions on Cr(VI) uptake in micropores. Finally, the ionic activity coefficients and reaction constants were corrected using Pitzer model due to the high level electrolytes accumulated in the Donnan layer through osmotic and electrostatic attraction. Results of this study have captured the effects of inner structure of IOAs on Cr(VI) uptake and quantitatively discerned the contribution of micropores and macropores for adsorption reactions at different ionic strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Strategy for Describing the Biosphere at Candidate Sites for Repositories of Nuclear Waste: Linking Ecosystem and Landscape Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindborg, Tobias; Loefgren, Anders; Soederbaeck, Bjoern; Kautsky, Ulrik; Lindborg, Regina; Bradshaw, Clare

    2006-01-01

    To provide information necessary for a license application for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. has started site investigations at two sites in Sweden. In this paper, we present a strategy to integrate site-specific ecosystem data into spatially explicit models needed for safety assessment studies and the environmental impact assessment. The site-specific description of ecosystems is developed by building discipline-specific models from primary data and by identifying interactions and stocks and flows of matter among functional units at the sites. The conceptual model is a helpful initial tool for defining properties needed to quantify system processes, which may reveal new interfaces between disciplines, providing a variety of new opportunities to enhance the understanding of the linkages between ecosystem characteristics and the functional properties of landscapes. This type of integrated ecosystem-landscape characterization model has an important role in forming the implementation of a safety assessment for a deep repository

  5. Evaluation of a cross contamination model describing transfer of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes during grinding of pork and beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cleide Oliveira de Almeida; Sant'Ana, A.S.; Hansen, Solvej Katrine Holm

    2016-01-01

    A cross contamination model was challenged and evaluated applying a new approach.•QMRA and Total Transfer Potential (TTP) were included.•Transfer estimates were not applicable for unlike processing.•The risk of disease may be reduced when using a stainless steel grinder.•Well-sharpened knife...

  6. Gaze patterns reveal how texts are remembered: A mental model of what was described is favored over the text itself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traub, Franziska; Johansson, Roger; Holmqvist, Kenneth

    Several studies have reported that spontaneous eye movements occur when visuospatial information is recalled from memory. Such gazes closely reflect the content and spatial relations from the original scene layout (e.g., Johansson et al., 2012). However, when someone has originally read a scene...... description, the memory of the physical layout of the text itself might compete with the memory of the spatial arrangement of the described scene. 
The present study was designed to address this fundamental issue by having participants read scene descriptions that were manipulated to be either congruent...... or incongruent with the spatial layout of the text itself. 28 participants read and recalled three texts: (1) a scene description congruent with the spatial layout of the text; (2) a scene description incongruent with the spatial layout of the text; and (3) a control text without any spatial scene content...

  7. Business Models for Successfully Maintaining Games for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Moderator Tom; Isaac, Participants Fikry; Ashford, Chris; Goldman, Ron; Lenihan, David J; Poole, Brent; Buday, Richard; van Rijswijk, Jurriaan

    2013-04-01

    Videogames for health provide innovative, exciting, and possibly highly effective new media for helping players change their behaviors or otherwise benefit their health. Getting the right videogames into the hands of players who can benefit most in a way that pays for the continued innovation and creation of such games is a current challenge. Entertainment videogame companies, which create games primarily to enhance players' enjoyment, have used the general business marketplace (e.g., online stores, walk-in stores, app stores) to deliver their products directly to consumers and earn enough capital to invest in making new products. No one believes, however, that enough kids or adults would use the general business marketplace to purchase games for health in sufficient volume to provide the down payment for the innovation and creation of new games for health. A successful business model is critical to the financial future of games for health. We asked members of our Editorial Board who are in health-related companies (Fikry Isaac, MD, MPH), in several game development companies (Chris Ashford, Ron Goldman, David J. Lenihan, Brent Poole, and Richard Buday, FAIA), and the head of the Games for Health Europe Foundation (Jurriaan van Rijswijk, MSc) to address questions in a roundtable about the current and possible future business models for games for health.

  8. Capitalizing on Citizen Science Data for Validating Models and Generating Hypotheses Describing Meteorological Drivers of Mosquito-Borne Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, R. A.; Low, R.; Paull, S.; Anyamba, A.; Soebiyanto, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature and precipitation are important drivers of mosquito population dynamics, and a growing set of models have been proposed to characterize these relationships. Validation of these models, and development of broader theories across mosquito species and regions could nonetheless be improved by comparing observations from a global dataset of mosquito larvae with satellite-based measurements of meteorological variables. Citizen science data can be particularly useful for two such aspects of research into the meteorological drivers of mosquito populations: i) Broad-scale validation of mosquito distribution models and ii) Generation of quantitative hypotheses regarding changes to mosquito abundance and phenology across scales. The recently released GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper (GO-MHM) app engages citizen scientists in identifying vector taxa, mapping breeding sites and decommissioning non-natural habitats, and provides a potentially useful new tool for validating mosquito ubiquity projections based on the analysis of remotely sensed environmental data. Our early work with GO-MHM data focuses on two objectives: validating citizen science reports of Aedes aegypti distribution through comparison with accepted scientific data sources, and exploring the relationship between extreme temperature and precipitation events and subsequent observations of mosquito larvae. Ultimately the goal is to develop testable hypotheses regarding the shape and character of this relationship between mosquito species and regions.

  9. Modelling of turbulent hydrocarbon combustion. Test of different reactor concepts for describing the interactions between turbulence and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Kremer, H. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl fuer Energieanlagentechnik, Bochum (Germany); Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-12-31

    The detailed modelling of turbulent reactive flows with CFD-codes is a major challenge in combustion science. One method of combining highly developed turbulence models and detailed chemistry in CFD-codes is the application of reactor based turbulence chemistry interaction models. In this work the influence of different reactor concepts on methane and NO{sub x} chemistry in turbulent reactive flows was investigated. Besides the classical reactor approaches, a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR), the Eddy-Dissipation Combustion Model (EDX) and the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC) were included. Based on a detailed reaction scheme and a simplified 2-step mechanism studies were performed in a simplified computational grid consisting of 5 cells. The investigations cover a temperature range from 1273 K to 1673 K and consider fuel-rich and fuel-lean gas mixtures as well as turbulent and highly turbulent flow conditions. All test cases investigated in this study showed a strong influence of the reactor residence time on the species conversion processes. Due to this characteristic strong deviations were found for the species trends resulting from the different reactor approaches. However, this influence was only concentrated on the `near burner region` and after 4-5 cells hardly any deviation and residence time dependence could be found. The importance of the residence time dependence increased when the species conversion was accelerated as it is the case for overstoichiometric combustion conditions and increased temperatures. The study focused furthermore on the fine structure in the EDC. Unlike the classical approach this part of the cell was modelled as a PFR instead of a PSR. For high temperature conditions there was hardly any difference between both reactor types. However, decreasing the temperature led to obvious deviations. Finally, the effect of the selective species transport between the cells on the conversion process was investigated

  10. Incorporating NDVI in a gravity model setting to describe spatio-temporal patterns of Lyme borreliosis incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, J. M.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Farifteh, J.; Maes, P.; Aerts, J. M.; Coppin, P.

    2012-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common tick-borne disease in Europe and incidence growth has been reported in several European countries during the last decade. LB is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and the main vector of this pathogen in Europe is the tick Ixodes ricinus. LB incidence and spatial spread is greatly dependent on environmental conditions impacting habitat, demography and trophic interactions of ticks and the wide range of organisms ticks parasite. The landscape configuration is also a major determinant of tick habitat conditions and -very important- of the fashion and intensity of human interaction with vegetated areas, i.e. human exposure to the pathogen. Hence, spatial notions as distance and adjacency between urban and vegetated environments are related to human exposure to tick bites and, thus, to risk. This work tested the adequacy of a gravity model setting to model the observed spatio-temporal pattern of LB as a function of location and size of urban and vegetated areas and the seasonal and annual change in the vegetation dynamics as expressed by MODIS NDVI. Opting for this approach implies an analogy with Newton's law of universal gravitation in which the attraction forces between two bodies are directly proportional to the bodies mass and inversely proportional to distance. Similar implementations have proven useful in fields like trade modeling, health care service planning, disease mapping among other. In our implementation, the size of human settlements and vegetated systems and the distance separating these landscape elements are considered the 'bodies'; and the 'attraction' between them is an indicator of exposure to pathogen. A novel element of this implementation is the incorporation of NDVI to account for the seasonal and annual variation in risk. The importance of incorporating this indicator of vegetation activity resides in the fact that alterations of LB incidence pattern observed the last decade have been ascribed

  11. How Mathematics Describes Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklu, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    The circle of life is something we have all heard of from somewhere, but we don't usually try to calculate it. For some time we have been working on analyzing a predator-prey model to better understand how mathematics can describe life, in particular the interaction between two different species. The model we are analyzing is called the Holling-Tanner model, and it cannot be solved analytically. The Holling-Tanner model is a very common model in population dynamics because it is a simple descriptor of how predators and prey interact. The model is a system of two differential equations. The model is not specific to any particular set of species and so it can describe predator-prey species ranging from lions and zebras to white blood cells and infections. One thing all these systems have in common are critical points. A critical point is a value for both populations that keeps both populations constant. It is important because at this point the differential equations are equal to zero. For this model there are two critical points, a predator free critical point and a coexistence critical point. Most of the analysis we did is on the coexistence critical point because the predator free critical point is always unstable and frankly less interesting than the coexistence critical point. What we did is consider two regimes for the differential equations, large B and small B. B, A, and C are parameters in the differential equations that control the system where B measures how responsive the predators are to change in the population, A represents predation of the prey, and C represents the satiation point of the prey population. For the large B case we were able to approximate the system of differential equations by a single scalar equation. For the small B case we were able to predict the limit cycle. The limit cycle is a process of the predator and prey populations growing and shrinking periodically. This model has a limit cycle in the regime of small B, that we solved for

  12. A kinetic model describes metabolic response to perturbations and distribution of flux control in the benzenoid network of Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón, Amy Marshall; Sengupta, Neelanjan; Rhodes, David; Dudareva, Natalia; Morgan, John

    2010-04-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the genetic enhancement of plant metabolism; however, attempts at genetic modification are often unsuccessful due to an incomplete understanding of network dynamics and their regulatory properties. Kinetic modeling of plant metabolic networks can provide predictive information on network control and response to genetic perturbations, which allow estimation of flux at any concentration of intermediate or enzyme in the system. In this research, a kinetic model of the benzenoid network was developed to simulate whole network responses to different concentrations of supplied phenylalanine (Phe) in petunia flowers and capture flux redistributions caused by genetic manipulations. Kinetic parameters were obtained by network decomposition and non-linear least squares optimization of data from petunia flowers supplied with either 75 or 150 mm(2)H(5)-Phe. A single set of kinetic parameters simultaneously accommodated labeling and pool size data obtained for all endogenous and emitted volatiles at the two concentrations of supplied (2)H(5)-Phe. The generated kinetic model was validated using flowers from transgenic petunia plants in which benzyl CoA:benzyl alcohol/phenylethanol benzoyltransferase (BPBT) was down-regulated via RNAi. The determined in vivo kinetic parameters were used for metabolic control analysis, in which flux control coefficients were calculated for fluxes around the key branch point at Phe and revealed that phenylacetaldehyde synthase activity is the primary controlling factor for the phenylacetaldehyde branch of the benzenoid network. In contrast, control of flux through the beta-oxidative and non-beta-oxidative pathways is highly distributed.

  13. A Monte Carlo-adjusted goodness-of-fit test for parametric models describing spatial point patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Dao, Ngocanh

    2014-04-03

    Assessing the goodness-of-fit (GOF) for intricate parametric spatial point process models is important for many application fields. When the probability density of the statistic of the GOF test is intractable, a commonly used procedure is the Monte Carlo GOF test. Additionally, if the data comprise a single dataset, a popular version of the test plugs a parameter estimate in the hypothesized parametric model to generate data for theMonte Carlo GOF test. In this case, the test is invalid because the resulting empirical level does not reach the nominal level. In this article, we propose a method consisting of nested Monte Carlo simulations which has the following advantages: the bias of the resulting empirical level of the test is eliminated, hence the empirical levels can always reach the nominal level, and information about inhomogeneity of the data can be provided.We theoretically justify our testing procedure using Taylor expansions and demonstrate that it is correctly sized through various simulation studies. In our first data application, we discover, in agreement with Illian et al., that Phlebocarya filifolia plants near Perth, Australia, can follow a homogeneous Poisson clustered process that provides insight into the propagation mechanism of these plants. In our second data application, we find, in contrast to Diggle, that a pairwise interaction model provides a good fit to the micro-anatomy data of amacrine cells designed for analyzing the developmental growth of immature retina cells in rabbits. This article has supplementary material online. © 2013 American Statistical Association, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and Interface Foundation of North America.

  14. A multi-physics modelling framework to describe the behaviour of nano-scale multilayer systems undergoing irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villani, Aurelien

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage is known to lead to material failure and thus is of critical importance to lifetime and safety within nuclear reactors. While mechanical behaviour of materials under irradiation has been the subject of numerous studies, the current predictive capabilities of such phenomena appear limited. The clustering of point defects such as vacancies and self interstitial atoms gives rise to creep, void swelling and material embrittlement. Nano-scale metallic multilayer systems have be shown to have the ability to evacuate such point defects, hence delaying the occurrence of critical damage. In addition, they exhibit outstanding mechanical properties. The objective of this work is to develop a thermodynamically consistent continuum framework at the meso and nano-scales, which accounts for the major physical processes encountered in such metallic multilayer systems and is able to predict their microstructural evolution and behavior under irradiation. Mainly three physical phenomena are addressed in the present work: stress-diffusion coupling and diffusion induced creep, the void nucleation and growth in multilayer systems under irradiation, and the interaction of dislocations with the multilayer interfaces. In this framework, the microstructure is explicitly modeled, in order to account accurately for their effects on the system behavior. The diffusion creep strain rate is related to the gradient of the vacancy flux. A Cahn-Hilliard approach is used to model void nucleation and growth, and the diffusion equations for vacancies and self interstitial atoms are complemented to take into account the production of point defects due to irradiation cascades, the mutual recombination of defects and their evacuation through grain boundaries. In metallic multilayers, an interface affected zone is defined, with an additional slip plane to model the interface shearable character, and where dislocations cores are able to spread. The model is then implemented numerically

  15. PFLOTRAN User Manual: A Massively Parallel Reactive Flow and Transport Model for Describing Surface and Subsurface Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtner, Peter C. [OFM Research, Redmond, WA (United States); Hammond, Glenn E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Chuan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bisht, Gautam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, Benjamin [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Richard [Intel Corporation, Portland, OR (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kumar, Jitendra [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-20

    PFLOTRAN solves a system of generally nonlinear partial differential equations describing multi-phase, multicomponent and multiscale reactive flow and transport in porous materials. The code is designed to run on massively parallel computing architectures as well as workstations and laptops (e.g. Hammond et al., 2011). Parallelization is achieved through domain decomposition using the PETSc (Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation) libraries for the parallelization framework (Balay et al., 1997). PFLOTRAN has been developed from the ground up for parallel scalability and has been run on up to 218 processor cores with problem sizes up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. Written in object oriented Fortran 90, the code requires the latest compilers compatible with Fortran 2003. At the time of this writing this requires gcc 4.7.x, Intel 12.1.x and PGC compilers. As a requirement of running problems with a large number of degrees of freedom, PFLOTRAN allows reading input data that is too large to fit into memory allotted to a single processor core. The current limitation to the problem size PFLOTRAN can handle is the limitation of the HDF5 file format used for parallel IO to 32 bit integers. Noting that 232 = 4; 294; 967; 296, this gives an estimate of the maximum problem size that can be currently run with PFLOTRAN. Hopefully this limitation will be remedied in the near future.

  16. Experimental formulation of a kinetic model describing the nitrification process in biological aerated filters filled with plastic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Alessio; De Rosa, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The present work reports the results of a series of experimental tests performed on cylindrically shaped biological aerated filters (BAFs) to define a new model for reactors design. The nitrification performance was analysed by monitoring a laboratory pilot plant over a six-month period; the dependence of the nitrification rate from the biomass surface density, from ammonia nitrogen concentration and dissolved oxygen concentration was determined using kinetic batch tests. The controls performed on the pilot plant exhibited a nitrification efficiency of approximately 98% at loadings up to [Formula: see text]. Over this value, the pilot plant performance decreased without a correlation with the applied loads. In response to the inlet ammonia loading increase, the bacterial surface density showed a logistic growing trend. The results of kinetic tests proved that the nitrification rate was not affected by the ammonia nitrogen concentration; instead, a first-order kinetic with respect to the dissolved oxygen concentration was detected. Moreover, it was observed that a minimum oxygen concentration, which was proportional to the bacterial surface density, was necessary to initiate the nitrification process. The reaction rate related to bacterial surface density exhibited an increasing trend that was followed by a subsequent decreasing behaviour. The results of kinetic tests and the identification of the relationship between bacterial surface density and ammonia loading permitted the formulation of a mathematical model to predict BAFs' nitrification efficiency.

  17. Improved rigorous upper bounds for transport due to passive advection described by simple models of bounded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang-Bae; Krommes, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The work of Krommes and Smith on rigorous upper bounds for the turbulent transport of a passively advected scalar [/ital Ann. Phys./ 177:246 (1987)] is extended in two directions: (1) For their ''reference model,'' improved upper bounds are obtained by utilizing more sophisticated two-time constraints which include the effects of cross-correlations up to fourth order. Numerical solutions of the model stochastic differential equation are also obtained; they show that the new bounds compare quite favorably with the exact results, even at large Reynolds and Kubo numbers. (2) The theory is extended to take account of a finite spatial autocorrelation length L/sub c/. As a reasonably generic example, the problem of particle transport due to statistically specified stochastic magnetic fields in a collisionless turbulent plasma is revisited. A bound is obtained which reduces for small L/sub c/ to the quasilinear limit and for large L/sub c/ to the strong turbulence limit, and which provides a reasonable and rigorous interpolation for intermediate values of L/sub c/. 18 refs., 6 figs

  18. Monte Carlo model to describe depth selective fluorescence spectra of epithelial tissue: applications for diagnosis of oral precancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Ina; Weber, Crystal Redden; Schwarz, Richard A; Williams, Michelle; El-Naggar, Adel; Gillenwater, Ann; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo model to predict fluorescence spectra of the oral mucosa obtained with a depth-selective fiber optic probe as a function of tissue optical properties. A model sensitivity analysis determines how variations in optical parameters associated with neoplastic development influence the intensity and shape of spectra, and elucidates the biological basis for differences in spectra from normal and premalignant oral sites. Predictions indicate that spectra of oral mucosa collected with a depth-selective probe are affected by variations in epithelial optical properties, and to a lesser extent, by changes in superficial stromal parameters, but not by changes in the optical properties of deeper stroma. The depth selective probe offers enhanced detection of epithelial fluorescence, with 90% of the detected signal originating from the epithelium and superficial stroma. Predicted depth-selective spectra are in good agreement with measured average spectra from normal and dysplastic oral sites. Changes in parameters associated with dysplastic progression lead to a decreased fluorescence intensity and a shift of the spectra to longer emission wavelengths. Decreased fluorescence is due to a drop in detected stromal photons, whereas the shift of spectral shape is attributed to an increased fraction of detected photons arising in the epithelium.

  19. The Landau-Lifshitz equation describes the Ising spin correlation function in the free-fermion model

    CERN Document Server

    Rutkevich, S B

    1998-01-01

    We consider time and space dependence of the Ising spin correlation function in a continuous one-dimensional free-fermion model. By the Ising spin we imply the 'sign' variable, which takes alternating +-1 values in adjacent domains bounded by domain walls (fermionic world paths). The two-point correlation function is expressed in terms of the solution of the Cauchy problem for a nonlinear partial differential equation, which is proved to be equivalent to the exactly solvable Landau-Lifshitz equation. A new zero-curvature representation for this equation is presented. In turn, the initial condition for the Cauchy problem is given by the solution of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation, which has also been derived. In the Ising limit the above-mentioned partial and ordinary differential equations reduce to the sine-Gordon and Painleve III equations, respectively. (author)

  20. Development of an Electronic Portfolio System Success Model: An Information Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Igor; Mu, Enrique; Divjak, Blazenka

    2013-01-01

    This research has two main goals: to develop an instrument for assessing Electronic Portfolio (ePortfolio) success and to build a corresponding ePortfolio success model using DeLone and McLean's information systems success model as the theoretical framework. For this purpose, we developed an ePortfolio success measurement instrument and structural…

  1. The Influence of Quality on E-Commerce Success: An Empirical Application of the Delone and Mclean IS Success Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ultan Sharkey; Murray Scott; Thomas Acton

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses difficulties in measuring e-commerce success by implementing the DeLone and McLean (D&M) model of IS success (1992, 2003) in an e-commerce environment. This research considers the influence of quality on e-commerce success by measuring the information quality and system quality attributes of an e-commerce system and the intention to use, user satisfaction and intention to transact from a sample of respondents. This research provides an empirical e-commerce application ...

  2. LANDIS 4.0 users guide. LANDIS: a spatially explicit model of forest landscape disturbance, management, and succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong S. He; Wei Li; Brian R. Sturtevant; Jian Yang; Bo Z. Shang; Eric J. Gustafson; David J. Mladenoff

    2005-01-01

    LANDIS 4.0 is new-generation software that simulates forest landscape change over large spatial and temporal scales. It is used to explore how disturbances, succession, and management interact to determine forest composition and pattern. Also describes software architecture, model assumptions and provides detailed instructions on the use of the model.

  3. Chaotic-Dynamical Conceptual Model to Describe Fluid Flow and Contaminant Transport in a Fractured Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, Boris; Doughty, Christine; Geller, Jil T.

    1999-01-01

    DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has led to the contamination of (or threatens to contaminate) underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is the determination of the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently, through narrow pathways, driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential flow pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following activities: Development of multi scale conceptual models and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media and (b) the temporal dynamics of flow and transport; Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow; Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils and remediation efforts. This approach is based on the consideration of multi scale spatial heterogeneity and flow phenomena that are affected by

  4. Social Media Success for Academic Knowledge Sharing in Indonesia (Conceptual Model Development)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assegaff, Setiawan

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate how success is the social media as a tool for knowledge sharing among scholars in Indonesia. To evaluate the success of social media we develop a model base on Delone and McLeane IS Success Model. In this article, we would like discuss the process of developing the research model. In developing the model, we conduct literature review from knowledge management, social media and IS Success Model area from previous study. This study resulted in the social success model for academic knowledge sharing in Indonesia.

  5. Africa's Great Green Wall Initiative: a model for restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrahmouni, Nora; Sacande, Moctar

    2014-05-01

    The Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative was launched to address the increasing challenges of land degradation, desertification and drought, climate change, food insecurity and poverty in more than 20 countries. Restoration of agro-sylvo-pastoral landscapes and degraded lands is one of the priority interventions initiated, enabling the springing up of green nests of life. When complete, the Great Green Wall of Africa will reverse the seemingly unstoppable desertification and address the development of its drylands' inhabitant rural communities. Today's planting of modest seedlings will grow into vast mosaics of forest and agroforestry landscapes and grasslands, which will provide essential ecosystem goods and services, restore lost livelihoods and create new wealth. The ambition of reforestation efforts within this initiative - the like of which the world has never seen before - sounds like an impossible dream. However, learning from past mistakes and capitalising on current advancement in science and technology, it is a reality that is taking root. Following a successful restoration model that RBG Kew experts have devised, we are helping to mobilise, train and support communities in four border regions in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In collaboration with FAO, the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership is using its unique expertise to ensure that seeds of environmentally well-adapted and economically useful local species are collected and planted in communal gardens and village agroforestry systems managed by the communities themselves. In our first year, an estimated total of 162,000 seedlings and 61 kg of seeds from 40 useful native species, including grasses for livestock, have been planted to cover 237 ha of farmer-managed land in 19 villages. The keen interest it has created has indicated that these figures will rise five-fold in the second year. These green bricks are the foundations of the living wall that will eventually reach across the

  6. Incorporation of FcRn-mediated disposition model to describe the population pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal IgG antibody in clinical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chee M

    2016-03-01

    The two-compartment linear model used to describe the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TMAbs) offered little biological insight to antibody disposition in humans. The purpose of this study is to develop a semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model to describe the population PK of TMAbs in clinical patients. A standard two-compartment linear PK model from a previously published population PK model of pertuzumab was used to simulate intensive PK data of 100 subjects for model development. Two different semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition models were developed and First Order Conditional Estimation (FOCE) with the interaction method in NONMEM was used to obtain the final model estimates. The performances of these models were then compared with the two-compartment linear PK model used to simulate the data for model development. A semi-mechanistic FcRn-mediated IgG disposition model consisting of a peripheral tissue compartment and FcRn-containing endosomes in the central compartment best describes the simulated pertuzumab population PK data. This developed semi-mechanistic population PK model had the same number of model parameters, produced very similar concentration-time profiles but provided additional biological insight to the FcRn-mediated IgG disposition in human subjects compared with the standard linear two-compartment linear PK model. This first reported semi-mechanistic model may serve as an important model framework for developing future population PK models of TMAbs in clinical patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Applying the Chaboche model for describing the creep deformation behaviour of screwed connections; Die Anwendung des Chaboche-Modells zur Beschreibung des Kriechverformungsverhaltens von Schraubenverbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Fischer, R.; Maile, K.; Mayer, K.H.

    1998-09-01

    The work reported was to describe the multiaxial deformation and stress conditions in cyclically loaded screw-and-nut joints, using as a basis a viscoplastic model, and to derive from this approach possible ways of revealing the in-service behaviour of components from first damage to failure. For computation of the stresses and damage affecting the screwed joint, the constitutive equations of Chaboche-Nuoailhs have been integrated with the UMAT user subroutine into the ABAQUS FE calculation code. Parallel examinations have been carried out under conditions of creep fatigue at 550 C. The experimental results and the calculated FE results have been compared. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Arbeit war es die mehrachsige Verformungs- und Spannungssituation an instationaer belasteten Schrauben-Mutter-Verbindungen auf der Basis eines viskoplastischen Modells zu beschreiben und hieraus entsprechend Moeglichkeiten zur Ermittlung des Schaedigungs- und Versagensverhaltens dieser Bauteile aufzuzeigen. Fuer die Berechnung des Beanspruchungszustandes der Schrauben-Mutter-Verbindung wurden die konstitutiven Gleichungen von Chaboche-Nouailhas als User-Subroutine UMAT in das FE-Programm ABAQUS implementiert. Parallel wurden Versuche an der erwaehnten Verbindung unter Kriechermuedung bei 550 C durchgefuehrt. Die Ergebnisse der Versuche und der FE-Berechnung wurden einander gegenuebergestellt. (orig./MM)

  8. A suite of multi-segment fugacity models describing the fate of organic contaminants in aquatic systems: application to the Rihand Reservoir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Christopher S; Mackay, Donald; Bahadur, Nisheeth P; Boocock, David G B

    2002-10-01

    The fugacity-based quantitative water-air-sediment interaction (QWASI) model is described which can be used to establish a mass balance for an organic or metallic contaminant in a lake ecosystem consisting of water, suspended matter, bottom sediments and the atmosphere. A suite of such models is described and discussed with various degrees of complexity including versions treating equilibrium and non-equilibrium situations, steady-state and dynamic conditions with either single or multiple segments. It is suggested that when seeking to apply a mass balance model to a specific lake and contaminant situation, it is desirable to start with a simple model and increase the complexity as circumstances dictate. This approach is illustrated by application of QWASI models to the Rihand Reservoir in India for lindane and benzo(a)pyrene. The roles are discussed by which such models can contribute to improved management of chemicals that may adversely affect aquatic systems, especially in developing regions.

  9. A review of successful aging models: Proposing proactive coping as an important additional strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, C.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.

    2007-01-01

    Successful aging is an important concept, and one that has been the subject of much research. During the last 15 years, the emphasis of this research has shifted from formulating criteria for successful aging to describing the processes involved in successful aging. The main purpose of the present

  10. A review of successful aging models: proposing proactive coping as an important additional strategy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, C.; Ridder, D.T.D. de; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Successful aging is an important concept, and one that has been the subject of much research. During the last 15 years, the emphasis of this research has shifted from formulating criteria for successful aging to describing the processes involved in successful aging. The main purpose of the present

  11. The business of emergency medicine: a model for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, John; Hall, Peter; Carr, Janet

    2004-02-01

    Today's EPOs and their physicians face an array of daunting challenges. Falling reimbursement, rising malpractice costs. ED and hospital crowding,and demands for improving ED efficiency and patient satisfaction all contribute to the challenging and sometimes threatening environment of EM practice. The EP involved in a busy and often hectic ED shift may feel unduly and unnecessarily distracted when required to continuously acknowledge and address the business aspect of the practice. Nevertheless,regardless of the size and structure, fiscal viability ultimately determines the EPO's ability to continue to offer access to care. This article contends that a comprehensive business strategy drives superior financial performance and supports the organization's mission. The business strategy must identify financial and non-financial determinants of the EPO's success and provide a mechanism for understanding how the organization's resources are converted to value for customers. The section offers a framework for developing this strategy, for identifying possible gaps or deficiencies, and for measuring and monitoring progress in achieving strategic objectives and ultimately, the EPO's mission. The importance of the mission and the dynamic EM environment require that the strategy development process be more than an annual exercise for the leadership of the organization. Though key leaders in any size EPO--set the course for the organization, the entire organization must be aware and understand the strategy before they commit themselves and adopt actions and behaviors that promote it. The model presented here provides a graphic display that lends itself well to consistent communication of a comprehensive strategy in a concise way throughout the organization.Furthermore, the balance of the model, across four perspectives, recognizes the value of balanced organizational objectives and lends itself well to the creation of a measurement system that supports cause and effect

  12. Two-Year Apprenticeships--A Successful Model of Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammermann, Marlise; Stalder, Barbara E.; Hattich, Achim

    2011-01-01

    Educational policy is asked to support young people in their successful transition from education to employment. In Switzerland, a two-year apprenticeship with Federal VET Certificate was established in 2002 aimed at increasing the employability of low-achieving school leavers. It is a low-threshold VET programme offering standardised vocational…

  13. Development and Application of a Category System to Describe Pre-Service Science Teachers' Activities in the Process of Scientific Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Walzer, Christine; Hergert, Susann; Krüger, Dirk

    2017-09-01

    As part of their professional competencies, science teachers need an elaborate meta-modelling knowledge as well as modelling skills in order to guide and monitor modelling practices of their students. However, qualitative studies about (pre-service) science teachers' modelling practices are rare. This study provides a category system which is suitable to analyse and to describe pre-service science teachers' modelling activities and to infer modelling strategies. The category system was developed based on theoretical considerations and was inductively refined within the methodological frame of qualitative content analysis. For the inductive refinement, modelling practices of pre-service teachers (n = 4) have been video-taped and analysed. In this study, one case was selected to demonstrate the application of the category system to infer modelling strategies. The contribution of this study for science education research and science teacher education is discussed.

  14. Modelling the rate of secondary succession after farmland abandonment in a Mediterranean mountain area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beguería, S.; Pueyo, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Secondary succession after farmland abandonment has become a common process in north Mediterranean countries, especially in mountain areas. In this paper a methodology is tested which combines Markov chains and logistic multivariate regression to model secondary succession after farmland

  15. The Quantum Atomic Model "Electronium": A Successful Teaching Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Marion; Niedderer, Hans; Scott, Philip; Leach, John

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the quantum atomic model Electronium. Outlines the Bremen teaching approach in which this model is used, and analyzes the learning of two students as they progress through the teaching unit. (Author/MM)

  16. An alternative developmental table to describe non-model fish species embryogenesis: application to the description of the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis L. 1758) development.

    OpenAIRE

    Alix, Maud; Chardard, Dominique; Ledoré, Yannick; Fontaine, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background Fish correspond to the most diversified phylum among vertebrates with a large variety of species. Even if general features are distinguishable during the embryogenesis, several differences in term of timing, organ implementation or step progression always occur between species. Moreover, the developmental timing of wild non-model fish often presents variability within a species. In that context, it is necessary to define a model of developmental table flexible enough to describe fi...

  17. A simple mathematical model that describes the growth of the area and the number of total and viable cells in yeast colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, E-M; Gil de Prado, E; Wrent, P; de Silóniz, M-I; Barreiro, P; Correa, E C; Conejero, F; Murciano, A; Peinado, J M

    2014-12-01

    We propose a model, based on the Gompertz equation, to describe the growth of yeasts colonies on agar medium. This model presents several advantages: (i) one equation describes the colony growth, which previously needed two separate ones (linear increase of radius and of the squared radius); (ii) a similar equation can be applied to total and viable cells, colony area or colony radius, because the number of total cells in mature colonies is proportional to their area; and (iii) its parameters estimate the cell yield, the cell concentration that triggers growth limitation and the effect of this limitation on the specific growth rate. To elaborate the model, area, total and viable cells of 600 colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces fabryi, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Rhodotorula glutinis have been measured. With low inocula, viable cells showed an initial short exponential phase when colonies were not visible. This phase was shortened with higher inocula. In visible or mature colonies, cell growth displayed Gompertz-type kinetics. It was concluded that the cells growth in colonies is similar to liquid cultures only during the first hours, the rest of the time they grow, with near-zero specific growth rates, at least for 3 weeks. Mathematical models used to predict microbial growth are based on liquid cultures data. Models describing growth on solid surfaces, highlighting the differences with liquids cultures, are scarce. In this work, we have demonstrated that a single Gompertz equation describes accurately the increase of the yeast colonies, up to the point where they reach their maximum size. The model can be used to quantify the differences in growth kinetics between solid and liquid media. Moreover, as all its parameters have biological meaning, it could be used to build secondary models predicting yeast growth on solid surfaces under several environmental conditions. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. The Carerra Model: A Success in Pregnancy Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elling, Duane M.

    This document outlines the development, evaluation, and replication of the Carrera model for pregnancy prevention. The Carerra model helps teens avoid pregnancy by empowering them to develop and reach personal goals, and by providing them with information on sexual issues, including abstinence, contraception, and the consequences of sexual…

  19. Successes and failures of the constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Our approach considers the model as a possible bridge between QCD and the experimental data and examines its predictions to see where these succeed and where they fail. We also attempt to improve the model by looking for additional simple assumptions which give better fits to the experimental data. But we avoid complicated models with too many ad hoc assumptions and too many free parameters; these can fit everything but teach us nothing. We define our constituent quark model by analogy with the constituent electron model of the atom and the constituent nucleon model of the nucleus. In the same way that an atom is assumed to consist only of constituent electrons and a central Coulomb field and a nucleus is assumed to consist only of constituent nucleons hadrons are assumed to consist only of their constituent valence quarks with no bag, no glue, no ocean, nor other constituents. Although these constituent models are oversimplified and neglect other constituents we push them as far as we can. Atomic physics has photons and vacuum polarization as well as constituent electrons, but the constituent model is adequate for calculating most features of the spectrum when finer details like the Lamb shift are neglected. 54 references

  20. A Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Ming; Stevens, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success, a theoretical stages-of-growth model, explains long-term success in IT outsourcing relationships. Research showed the IT outsourcing relationship life cycle consists of four distinct, sequential stages: contract, transition, support, and partnership. The model was…

  1. A Model for Physician Leadership Development and Succession Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinsky, Isser; Feerasta, Nadia; Lash, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Although the presence of physicians in formal leadership positions has often been limited to roles of department chiefs, MAC chairs, etc., a growing number of organizations are recruiting physicians to other leadership positions (e.g., VP, CEO) where their involvement is being genuinely sought and valued. While physicians have traditionally risen to leadership positions based on clinical excellence or on a rotational basis, truly effective physician leadership that includes competencies such as strategic planning, budgeting, mentoring, network development, etc., is essential to support organizational goals, improve performance and overall efficiency as well as ensuring the quality of care. In this context, the authors have developed a physician leader development and succession planning matrix and supporting toolkit to assist hospitals in identifying and nurturing the next generation of physician leaders.

  2. Business Model Innovation in Incumbent Organizations: : Challenges and Success Routes

    OpenAIRE

    Salama, Ahmad; Parvez, Khawar

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis major challenges of creating business models at incumbents within mature industries are identified along with a mitigation plan. Pressure is upon incumbent organizations in order to keep up with the latest rapid technological advancements, the launching of startups that almost cover every field of business and the continuous change in customers’ tastes and needs. That along with various factors either forced organizations to continually reevaluate their current business models ...

  3. A plant-wide aqueous phase chemistry module describing pH variations and ion speciation/pairing in wastewater treatment process models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flores Alsina, Xavier; Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Solon, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    standard models. The module accounts for extensive consideration of non-ideality, including ion activities instead of molar concentrations and complex ion pairing. The general equilibria are formulated as a set of Differential Algebraic Equations (DAEs) instead of Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs......There is a growing interest within the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) modelling community to correctly describe physico-chemical processes after many years of mainly focusing on biokinetics. Indeed, future modelling needs, such as a plant-wide phosphorus (P) description, require a major...... at different cationic/anionic loads. In this way, the general applicability/flexibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated, by implementing the aqueous phase chemistry module in some of the most frequently used WWTP process simulation models. Finally, it is shown how traditional wastewater modelling...

  4. Testing a Model of Teaching for Anxiety and Success for English Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önem, Evrim; Ergenç, Iclal

    2013-01-01

    Much research has shown that there is a negative relationship between high levels of anxiety and success for English language teaching. This paper aimed to test a model of teaching for anxiety and success in English language teaching to affect anxiety and success levels at the same time in a control-experiment group with pre- and post-test study…

  5. LINEAR MIXED MODEL TO DESCRIBE THE BASAL AREA INCREMENT FOR INDIVUDUAL CEDRO (Cedrela odorata L.TREES IN OCCIDENTAL AMAZON, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Augusto da Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable growth data from trees are important to establish a rational forest management. Characteristics from trees, like the size, crown architecture and competition indices have been used to mathematically describe the increment efficiently when associated with them. However, the precise role of these effects in the growth-modeling destined to tropical trees needs to be further studied. Here it is reconstructed the basal area increment (BAI of individual Cedrela odorata trees, sampled at Amazon forest, to develop a growth- model using potential-predictors like: (1 classical tree size; (2 morphometric data; (3 competition and (4 social position including liana loads. Despite the large variation in tree size and growth, we observed that these kinds of predictor variables described well the BAI in level of individual tree. The fitted mixed model achieve a high efficiency (R2=92.7 % and predicted 3-years BAI over bark for trees of Cedrela odorata ranging from 10 to 110 cm at diameter at breast height. Tree height, steam slenderness and crown formal demonstrated high influence in the BAI growth model and explaining most of the growth variance (Partial R2=87.2%. Competition variables had negative influence on the BAI, however, explained about 7% of the total variation. The introduction of a random parameter on the regressions model (mixed modelprocedure has demonstrated a better significance approach to the data observed and showed more realistic predictions than the fixed model.

  6. Successful Aging: A Psychosocial Resources Model for Very Old Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kevin Randall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Using data from the first two phases of the Georgia Centenarian Study, we proposed a latent factor structure for the Duke OARS domains: Economic Resources, Mental Health, Activities of Daily Living, Physical Health, and Social Resources. Methods. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on two waves of the Georgia Centenarian Study to test a latent variable measurement model of the five resources; nested model testing was employed to assess the final measurement model for equivalency of factor structure over time. Results. The specified measurement model fit the data well at Time 1. However, at Time 2, Social Resources only had one indicator load significantly and substantively. Supplemental analyses demonstrated that a model without Social Resources adequately fit the data. Factorial invariance over time was confirmed for the remaining four latent variables. Discussion. This study’s findings allow researchers and clinicians to reduce the number of OARS questions asked of participants. This has practical implications because increased difficulties with hearing, vision, and fatigue in older adults may require extended time or multiple interviewer sessions to complete the battery of OARS questions.

  7. Supporting Sophomore Success through a New Learning Community Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Emily E.; Wells, Gayle; Virtue, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    The creation of a Sophomore Learning Community (SLC) model can help address concerns about the "sophomore slump" and sophomore attrition. While managing the logistics of a sophomore LC can be difficult, with proper faculty, staff, and administrative support, positive results can be produced. This article outlines the need for Sophomore…

  8. Carsharing Business Models in Germany: Characteristics, Success and Future Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munzel, K.L.; Boon, W.P.C.; Frenken, K.; Vaskelainen, T.

    2017-01-01

    Carsharing provides an alternative to private car ownership by allowing car use temporarily on an ondemand basis. Operators provide carsharing services using different business models and ownership structures. We distinguish between cooperative, business-to-consumer (B2C) roundtrip and one-way, as

  9. On the successful use of a simplified model to simulate the succession of toxic cyanobacteria in a hypereutrophic reservoir with a highly fluctuating water level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Ali; Lemaire, Bruno J; Vinçon-Leite, Brigitte; Atoui, Ali; Slim, Kamal; Tassin, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    Many freshwater bodies worldwide that suffer from harmful algal blooms would benefit for their management from a simple ecological model that requires few field data, e.g. for early warning systems. Beyond a certain degree, adding processes to ecological models can reduce model predictive capabilities. In this work, we assess whether a simple ecological model without nutrients is able to describe the succession of cyanobacterial blooms of different species in a hypereutrophic reservoir and help understand the factors that determine these blooms. In our study site, Karaoun Reservoir, Lebanon, cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon ovalisporum and Microcystis aeruginosa alternatively bloom. A simple configuration of the model DYRESM-CAEDYM was used; both cyanobacteria were simulated, with constant vertical migration velocity for A. ovalisporum, with vertical migration velocity dependent on light for M. aeruginosa and with growth limited by light and temperature and not by nutrients for both species. The model was calibrated on two successive years with contrasted bloom patterns and high variations in water level. It was able to reproduce the measurements; it showed a good performance for the water level (root-mean-square error (RMSE) lower than 1 m, annual variation of 25 m), water temperature profiles (RMSE of 0.22-1.41 °C, range 13-28 °C) and cyanobacteria biomass (RMSE of 1-57 μg Chl a L -1 , range 0-206 μg Chl a L -1 ). The model also helped understand the succession of blooms in both years. The model results suggest that the higher growth rate of M. aeruginosa during favourable temperature and light conditions allowed it to outgrow A. ovalisporum. Our results show that simple model configurations can be sufficient not only for theoretical works when few major processes can be identified but also for operational applications. This approach could be transposed on other hypereutrophic lakes and reservoirs to describe the competition between dominant phytoplankton

  10. A three-state model for describing the temperature variation of the scintillation properties of Cs2HfCl6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Masanori; Saeki, Keiichiro; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Okada, Go; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yamashita, Shinichi; Asai, Keisuke

    2018-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the scintillation intensity of Cs2HfCl6 was measured and found to increase monotonically from 10 to 300 K, whereas no significant dependence on temperature was observed for the scintillation decay. A simple three-state model in which two excited levels are slightly different in their energies and have similar radiative rates was able to describe the experimental trends. The model is consistent with the experimental observation of two kinds of V k centers and with theoretical predictions of two types of self-trapped excitons reported in the literature.

  11. The European Distribution of Sus Scrofa. Model Outputs from the Project Described within the Poster – Where are All the Boars? An Attempt to Gain a Continental Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Stewart Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild boar is a host of a number of arthropod-vectored diseases and its numbers are on the rise in mainland Europe. The species potentially impacts ecosystems, humans and farming practices and so its distribution is of interest to policy makers in a number of fields beyond that of the primarily epidemiological goal of this study. Three statistical model outputs describing the distribution and abundance of the species Sus scrofa (Wild boar are included in this data package. The extent of this dataset covers continental Europe. These data were presented as a poster [1] at the conference Genes, Ecosystems and Risk of Infection (GERI 2015. The first of the three models provide a European map presenting the probability of presence of Sus scrofa, which can be used to describe the likely geographical distribution of the species. The second and third models provide indices to help describe the likely abundance across the continent. The two indices include “the proportion of suitable habitat where presence is estimated” and a simple classification of boar abundance across Europe using quantiles of existing abundance data and proxies.

  12. A Model of Social Selection and Successful Altruism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-07

    D., The evolution of social behavior. Annual Reviews of Ecological Systems, 5:325-383 (1974). 2. Dawkins , R., The selfish gene . Oxford: Oxford...alive and well. it will be important to re- examine this striking historical experience,-not in terms o, oversimplified models of the " selfish gene ," but...Darwinian Analysis The acceptance by many modern geneticists of the axiom that the basic unit of selection Is the " selfish gene " quickly led to the

  13. Observational constraints on successful model of quintessential Inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang [Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing, 400065 (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Sami, M. [Centre for Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [Physics Division, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zografou Campus, Athens (Greece); Starobinsky, Alexei A., E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: lee.chungchi16@gmail.com, E-mail: sami@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu, E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    We study quintessential inflation using a generalized exponential potential V (φ)∝ exp(−λ φ {sup n} / M {sub Pl} {sup n} ), n >1, the model admits slow-roll inflation at early times and leads to close-to-scaling behaviour in the post inflationary era with an exit to dark energy at late times. We present detailed investigations of the inflationary stage in the light of the Planck 2015 results, study post-inflationary dynamics and analytically confirm the existence of an approximately scaling solution. Additionally, assuming that standard massive neutrinos are non-minimally coupled, makes the field φ dominant once again at late times giving rise to present accelerated expansion of the Universe. We derive observational constraints on the field and time-dependent neutrino masses. In particular, for n =6 (8), the parameter λ is constrained to be, log λ > −7.29 (−11.7); the model produces the spectral index of the power spectrum of primordial scalar (matter density) perturbations as n {sub s} = 0.959 ± 0.001 (0.961 ± 0.001) and tiny tensor-to-scalar ratio, r <1.72 × 10{sup −2} (2.32 × 10{sup −2}) respectively. Consequently, the upper bound on possible values of the sum of neutrino masses Σ m {sub ν} ∼< 2.5 eV significantly enhances compared to that in the standard ΛCDM model.

  14. Modeling Forest Succession among Ecological Land Units in Northern Minnesota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Host

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Field and modeling studies were used to quantify potential successional pathways among fine-scale ecological classification units within two geomorphic regions of north-central Minnesota. Soil and overstory data were collected on plots stratified across low-relief ground moraines and undulating sand dunes. Each geomorphic feature was sampled across gradients of topography or soil texture. Overstory conditions were sampled using five variable-radius point samples per plot; soil samples were analyzed for carbon and nitrogen content. Climatic, forest composition, and soil data were used to parameterize the sample plots for use with LINKAGES, a forest growth model that simulates changes in composition and soil characteristics over time. Forest composition and soil properties varied within and among geomorphic features. LINKAGES simulations were using "bare ground" and the current overstory as starting conditions. Northern hardwoods or pines dominated the late-successional communities of morainal and dune landforms, respectively. The morainal landforms were dominated by yellow birch and sugar maple; yellow birch reached its maximum abundance in intermediate landscape positions. On the dune sites, pine was most abundant in drier landscape positions, with white spruce increasing in abundance with increasing soil moisture and N content. The differences in measured soil properties and predicted late-successional composition indicate that ecological land units incorporate some of the key variables that govern forest composition and structure. They further show the value of ecological classification and modeling for developing forest management strategies that incorporate the spatial and temporal dynamics of forest ecosystems.

  15. Predictive models of objective oropharyngeal OSA surgery outcomes: Success rate and AHI reduction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Ho; Lee, Jae Yong; Cha, Jaehyung; Kim, Kangwoo; Hong, Seung-No; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model of objective oropharyngeal obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) surgery outcomes including success rate and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) reduction ratio in adult OSA patients. Retrospective outcome research. All subjects with OSA who underwent oropharyngeal and/or nasal surgery and were followed for at least 3 months were enrolled in this study. Demographic, anatomical [tonsil size (TS) and palate-tongue position (PTP) grade (Gr)], and polysomnographic parameters were analyzed. The AHI reduction ratio (%) was defined as [(postoperative AHI-preoperative AHI) x 100 / postoperative AHI], and surgical success was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in preoperative AHI with a postoperative AHI predictive equation by Forward Selection likelihood ratio (LR) logistic regression analysis was: [Formula: see text]The best predictive equation according to stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was: [Formula: see text] (TS/PTP Gr = 1 if TS/PTP Gr 3 or 4, TS/PTP Gr = 0 if TS/PTP Gr 1 or 2). The predictive models for oropharyngeal surgery described in this study may be useful for planning surgical treatments and improving objective outcomes in adult OSA patients.

  16. Predictive models of objective oropharyngeal OSA surgery outcomes: Success rate and AHI reduction ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ho Choi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a predictive model of objective oropharyngeal obstructive sleep apnea (OSA surgery outcomes including success rate and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI reduction ratio in adult OSA patients.Retrospective outcome research.All subjects with OSA who underwent oropharyngeal and/or nasal surgery and were followed for at least 3 months were enrolled in this study. Demographic, anatomical [tonsil size (TS and palate-tongue position (PTP grade (Gr], and polysomnographic parameters were analyzed. The AHI reduction ratio (% was defined as [(postoperative AHI-preoperative AHI x 100 / postoperative AHI], and surgical success was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in preoperative AHI with a postoperative AHI < 20.A total of 156 consecutive OSAS adult patients (mean age ± SD = 38.9 ± 9.6, M / F = 149 / 7 were included in this study. The best predictive equation by Forward Selection likelihood ratio (LR logistic regression analysis was: [Formula: see text]The best predictive equation according to stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was: [Formula: see text] (TS/PTP Gr = 1 if TS/PTP Gr 3 or 4, TS/PTP Gr = 0 if TS/PTP Gr 1 or 2.The predictive models for oropharyngeal surgery described in this study may be useful for planning surgical treatments and improving objective outcomes in adult OSA patients.

  17. The social networking application success model : An empirical study of Facebook and Twitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Carol; Davison, R.M.; Huang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    Social networking applications (SNAs) are among the fastest growing web applications of recent years. In this paper, we propose a causal model to assess the success of SNAs, grounded on DeLone and McLean’s updated information systems (IS) success model. In addition to their original three dimensions

  18. On track for success: an innovative behavioral science curriculum model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedy, John R; Carek, Peter J; Dickerson, Lori M; Mallin, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the behavioral science curriculum currently in place at the Trident/MUSC Family Medicine Residency Program. The Trident/MUSC Program is a 10-10-10 community-based, university-affiliated program in Charleston, South Carolina. Over the years, the Trident/MUSC residency program has graduated over 400 Family Medicine physicians. The current behavioral science curriculum consists of both required core elements (didactic lectures, clinical observation, Balint groups, and Resident Grand Rounds) as well as optional elements (longitudinal patient care experiences, elective rotations, behavioral science editorial experience, and scholars project with a behavioral science focus). All Trident/MUSC residents complete core behavioral science curriculum elements and are free to participate in none, some, or all of the optional behavioral science curriculum elements. This flexibility allows resident physicians to tailor the educational program in a manner to meet individual educational needs. The behavioral science curriculum is based upon faculty interpretation of existing "best practice" guidelines (Residency Review Committee-Family Medicine and AAFP). This article provides sufficient curriculum detail to allow the interested reader the opportunity to adapt elements of the behavioral science curriculum to other residency training programs. While this behavioral science track system is currently in an early stage of implementation, the article discusses track advantages as well as future plans to evaluate various aspects of this innovative educational approach.

  19. The GEOtop model as a tool to describe the strongly coupled energy and water balance in permafrost or seasonally-frozen soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrizzi, S.

    2011-12-01

    GEOtop is a small scale grid-based model that couples the soil heat and water budgets, represents the energy exchange with the atmosphere considering the radiative and turbulent fluxes, and describes the subsurface water flow in its fully three-dimensional nature. In particular, the model reproduces the strong coupling between water and energy balance during soil freezing and thawing processes, considering the highly non-linear heat capacity effect resulting from phase change. In addition, it describes the water and energy budgets in the snow cover, represents blowing snow, and models the temporal evolution of the snow depth and, therefore, its effect on soil temperature. Infiltration in frozen soil and runoff are also represented. Vegetation effects are considered, in particular as regards snow interception, trapping, and the interactions with turbulent and radiative heat exchange. GEOtop is therefore a very useful tool in several applications that involve permafrost and seasonally-frozen soils, both in high altitude and latitude regions. In particular, GEOtop allows evaluating the effects of water lateral transport in the freezing/thawing process, effects that are often neglected, but may be significant. Applications are shown for i) a typical peat-covered arctic environment, where the position of the frost table controls the runoff production rate, due to the strong decrease of the soil hydraulic conductivity with depth; and ii) an alpine site, where borehole data are used to test the model and the effect of the upslope drainage distance is studied.

  20. Pharmacobezoars described and demystified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Serge-Emile

    2011-02-01

    A bezoar is a concretion of foreign material that forms and persists in the gastrointestinal tract. Bezoars are classified by their material origins. Phytobezoars contain plant material, trichobezoars contain hair, lactobezoars contain milk proteins, and pharmacobezoars contain pharmaceutical products. Tablets, suspensions, and even insoluble drug delivery vehicles can, on rare occasions, and sometimes under specific circumstances, form pharmacobezoars. The goal of this review is to catalog and examine all of the available reports in the English language medical literature that convincingly describe the formation and management of pharmacobezoars. Articles included in this review were identified by performing searches using the terms "bezoar," "pharmacobezoar," and "concretion" in the following databases: OVID MEDLINE, PubMed, and JSTOR. The complete MEDLINE and JSTOR holdings were included in the search without date ranges. The results were limited to English language publications. Articles that described nonmedication bezoars were not included in the review. Articles describing phytobezoars, food bezoars, fecal impactions, illicit drug packet ingestions, enteral feeding material bezoars, and hygroscopic diet aid bezoars were excluded. The bibliographic references within the articles already accumulated were then examined in order to gather additional pharmacobezoar cases. The cases are grouped by pharmaceutical agent that formed the bezoar, and groupings are arranged in alphabetical order. Discussions and conclusions specific to each pharmaceutical agent are included in that agent's subheading. Patterns and themes that emerged in the review of the assembled case reports are reviewed and presented in a more concise format. Pharmacobezoars form under a wide variety of circumstances and in a wide variety of patients. They are difficult to diagnose reliably. Rules for suspecting, diagnosing, and properly managing a pharmacobezoar are highly dependent on the

  1. [Deep mycoses rarely described].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, D

    1986-01-01

    Beside deep mycoses very well known: histoplasmosis, candidosis, cryptococcosis, there are other mycoses less frequently described. Some of them are endemic in some countries: South American blastomycosis in Brazil, coccidioidomycosis in California; some others are cosmopolitan and may affect everyone: sporotrichosis, or may affect only immunodeficient persons: mucormycosis. They do not spare Africa, we may encounter basidiobolomycosis, rhinophycomycosis, dermatophytosis, sporotrichosis and, more recently reported, rhinosporidiosis. Important therapeutic progresses have been accomplished with amphotericin B and with antifungus imidazole compounds (miconazole and ketoconazole). Surgical intervention is sometime recommended in chromomycosis and rhinosporidiosis.

  2. Secondary Science Teachers Making Sense of Model-Based Classroom Instruction: Understanding the Learning and Learning Pathways Teachers Describe as Supporting Changes in Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidsten, Connie J.

    Connie J. Hvidsten September 2016 Education Secondary Science Teachers Making Sense of Model-Based Classroom Instruction: Understanding the Learning and Learning Pathways Teachers Describe as Supporting Changes in Teaching Practice This dissertation consists of three papers analyzing writings and interviews of experienced secondary science teachers during and after a two-year professional development (PD) program focused on model-based reasoning (MBR). MBR is an approach to science instruction that provides opportunities for students to use conceptual models to make sense of natural phenomena in ways that are similar to the use of models within the scientific community. The aim of this research is to better understand the learning and learning pathways teachers identified as valuable in supporting changes in their teaching practice. To accomplish this aim, the papers analyze the ways teachers 1) ascribe their learning to various aspects of the program, 2) describe what they learned, and 3) reflect on the impact the PD had on their teaching practice. Twenty-one secondary science teachers completed the Innovations in Science Instruction through Modeling (ISIM) program from 2007 through 2009. Commonalities in the written reflections and interview responses led to a set of generalizable findings related to the impacts and outcomes of the PD. The first of the three papers describes elements of the ISIM program that teachers associated with their own learning. One of the most frequently mentioned PD feature was being in the position of an adult learner. Embedding learning in instructional practice by collaboratively developing and revising lessons, and observing the lessons in one-another's classrooms provided a sense of professional community, accountability, and support teachers reported were necessary to overcome the challenges of implementing new pedagogical practices. Additionally, teachers described that opportunities to reflect on their learning and connect their

  3. Successful immunization against Acanthamoeba keratitis in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, H; He, Y; McCulley, J P; Ma, D; Stewart, G L; Via, M; Haehling, E; Niederkorn, J Y

    1995-03-01

    The feasibility of inducing protective immunity to Acanthamoeba keratitis was tested in a pig model. Experiments were designed to determine if ocular infection with Acanthamoeba trophozoites would elicit protection against reinfection. Additional experiments examined whether injection of parasite antigens either intramuscularly, subconjunctivally, or by both routes would induce immunity. Therefore, four groups of animals were examined: (a) pigs that had resolved a primary corneal infection with Acanthamoeba; (b) pigs immunized intramuscularly; (c) pigs immunized subconjunctivally; and (d) pigs immunized intramuscularly and subconjunctivally. Animals were subsequently challenged with parasite-laden soft contact lenses and observed clinically for the appearance of Acanthamoeba keratitis. Acanthamoeba-specific serum antibody titers and blastogenic responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes were determined weekly. The results indicated that intramuscular injection of Acanthamoeba antigens failed to protect against ocular infection even though hosts developed high titers of IgG antibodies and displayed lymphocyte blastogenic responses to parasite antigens. Ocular infection alone failed to stimulate immunity in any of the animals. By contrast, 50% of the hosts immunized subconjunctivally were protected against corneal disease, and 100% of the animals immunized by a combination of intramuscular and subconjunctival administration of parasite antigens were completely protected against two separate ocular challenges with infectious parasites. Protection did not correlate with either IgG antibody titers or blastogenic potentials of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Interestingly, ocular infection alone failed to stimulate immunity to subsequent ocular challenge with infectious parasites. Thus, administration of parasite antigen via the subconjunctival route can protect against Acanthamoeba keratitis.

  4. WE-AB-BRA-02: Development of Biomechanical Models to Describe Dose-Volume Response to Liver Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, M; Polan, D; Feng, M; Lawrence, T; Haken, R Ten; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that radiotherapy treatment for liver metastases causes marked liver hypertrophy in areas receiving low dose and atrophy/fibrosis in areas receiving high dose. The purpose of this work is to develop and evaluate a biomechanical model-based dose-response model to describe these liver responses to SBRT. Methods: In this retrospective study, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, Morfeus, was expanded to include dose-based boundary conditions. Liver and tumor volumes were contoured on the planning images and CT/MR images three months post-RT and converted to finite element models. A thermal expansion-based relationship correlating the delivered dose and volume response was generated from 22 patients previously treated. This coefficient, combined with the planned dose, was applied as an additional boundary condition to describe the volumetric response of the liver of an additional cohort of metastatic liver patients treated with SBRT. The accuracy of the model was evaluated based on overall volumetric liver comparisons and the target registration error (TRE) using the average deviations in positions of identified vascular bifurcations on each set of registered images, with a target accuracy of the 2.5mm isotropic dose grid (vector dimension 4.3mm). Results: The thermal expansion coefficient models the volumetric change of the liver to within 3%. The accuracy of Morfeus with dose-expansion boundary conditions a TRE of 5.7±2.8mm compared to 11.2±3.7mm using rigid registration and 8.9±0.28mm using Morfeus with only spatial boundary conditions. Conclusion: A biomechanical model has been developed to describe the volumetric and spatial response of the liver to SBRT. This work will enable the improvement of correlating functional imaging with delivered dose, the mapping of the delivered dose from one treatment onto the planning images for a subsequent treatment, and will further provide information to assist

  5. A new predictive dynamic model describing the effect of the ambient temperature and the convective heat transfer coefficient on bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Yaghlene, H; Leguerinel, I; Hamdi, M; Mafart, P

    2009-07-31

    In this study, predictive microbiology and food engineering were combined in order to develop a new analytical model predicting the bacterial growth under dynamic temperature conditions. The proposed model associates a simplified primary bacterial growth model without lag, the secondary Ratkowsky "square root" model and a simplified two-parameter heat transfer model regarding an infinite slab. The model takes into consideration the product thickness, its thermal properties, the ambient air temperature, the convective heat transfer coefficient and the growth parameters of the micro organism of concern. For the validation of the overall model, five different combinations of ambient air temperature (ranging from 8 degrees C to 12 degrees C), product thickness (ranging from 1 cm to 6 cm) and convective heat transfer coefficient (ranging from 8 W/(m(2) K) to 60 W/(m(2) K)) were tested during a cooling procedure. Moreover, three different ambient air temperature scenarios assuming alternated cooling and heating stages, drawn from real refrigerated food processes, were tested. General agreement between predicted and observed bacterial growth was obtained and less than 5% of the experimental data fell outside the 95% confidence bands estimated by the bootstrap percentile method, at all the tested conditions. Accordingly, the overall model was successfully validated for isothermal and dynamic refrigeration cycles allowing for temperature dynamic changes at the centre and at the surface of the product. The major impact of the convective heat transfer coefficient and the product thickness on bacterial growth during the product cooling was demonstrated. For instance, the time needed for the same level of bacterial growth to be reached at the product's half thickness was estimated to be 5 and 16.5 h at low and high convection level, respectively. Moreover, simulation results demonstrated that the predicted bacterial growth at the air ambient temperature cannot be assumed to be

  6. Designing for sustained adoption: A model of developing educational innovations for successful propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Raina; Henderson, Charles; Cole, Renée; Froyd, Jeffrey E.; Friedrichsen, Debra; Stanford, Courtney

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] The physics education research community has produced a wealth of knowledge about effective teaching and learning of college level physics. Based on this knowledge, many research-proven instructional strategies and teaching materials have been developed and are currently available to instructors. Unfortunately, these intensive research and development activities have failed to influence the teaching practices of many physics instructors. This paper describes interim results of a larger study to develop a model of designing materials for successful propagation. The larger study includes three phases, the first two of which are reported here. The goal of the first phase was to characterize typical propagation practices of education developers, using data from a survey of 1284 National Science Foundation (NSF) principal investigators and focus group data from eight disciplinary groups of NSF program directors. The goal of the second phase was to develop an understanding of successful practice by studying three instructional strategies that have been well propagated. The result of the first two phases is a tentative model of designing for successful propagation, which will be further validated in the third phase through purposeful sampling of additional well-propagated instructional strategies along with typical education development projects. We found that interaction with potential adopters was one of the key missing ingredients in typical education development activities. Education developers often develop a polished product before getting feedback, rely on mass-market communication channels for dissemination, and do not plan for supporting adopters during implementation. The tentative model resulting from this study identifies three key propagation activities: interactive development, interactive dissemination, and support of adopters. Interactive development

  7. A model for estimating the minimum number of offspring to sample in studies of reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joseph H; Ward, Eric J; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2011-01-01

    Molecular parentage permits studies of selection and evolution in fecund species with cryptic mating systems, such as fish, amphibians, and insects. However, there exists no method for estimating the number of offspring that must be assigned parentage to achieve robust estimates of reproductive success when only a fraction of offspring can be sampled. We constructed a 2-stage model that first estimated the mean (μ) and variance (v) in reproductive success from published studies on salmonid fishes and then sampled offspring from reproductive success distributions simulated from the μ and v estimates. Results provided strong support for modeling salmonid reproductive success via the negative binomial distribution and suggested that few offspring samples are needed to reject the null hypothesis of uniform offspring production. However, the sampled reproductive success distributions deviated significantly (χ(2) goodness-of-fit test p value reproductive success distribution at rates often >0.05 and as high as 0.24, even when hundreds of offspring were assigned parentage. In general, reproductive success patterns were less accurate when offspring were sampled from cohorts with larger numbers of parents and greater variance in reproductive success. Our model can be reparameterized with data from other species and will aid researchers in planning reproductive success studies by providing explicit sampling targets required to accurately assess reproductive success.

  8. Development of a population pharmacokinetic model to describe olmesartan medoxomil/ hydrochlorothiazide (20/12.5 mg) FDC tablet in male healthy South Korean subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Jung-Woo; Baek, In-Hwan; Seo, Jeong-Won; Jung, Sang-Hoon; Back, Hyun-Moon; Song, Byung-Jeong; Lee, Byung-Yo; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Kang, Wonku; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop population pharmacokinetic models for olmesartan medoxomil and hydrochlorothiazide and to investigate the influence of demographic factors on these population pharmacokinetics. Plasma concentrations of olmesartan medoxomil and hydrochlorothiazide were measured in 41 healthy volunteers enrolled in our bioequivalence study by LC-MS/MS following oral administration of an olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide (20/12.5 mg) fixed-dose combination tablet. This data and covariates were subjected to nonlinear mixed-effect modeling analysis using the NONMEM software. Evaluation featured a visual predicted check and bootstrapping. The distributions of olmesartan medoxomil and hydrochlorothiazide were best fitted using a two-compartment model with no lag time and first-order elimination. When analyzing hydrochlorothiazide kinetics, we found that TCHO and CL/F were correlated, while. HB and Ka influenced olmesartan medoxomil modeling. All evaluations indicated that the pharmacokinetic profiles of olmesartan medoxomil and hydrochlorothiazide were adequately described using our PPK model. This study indicates that demographic factors influence the inter-individual variability in the disposition of the combination drug, and it might be more useful to apply it to the PK of olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide (20/12.5 mg) FDC tablets administered to patients with hypertension. *These two authors contributed equally to this work.

  9. Describing contrast across scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sohaib Ali; Iqbal, Muhammad Zafar; Riaz, Muhammad Mohsin

    2017-06-01

    Due to its sensitive nature against illumination and noise distributions, contrast is not widely used for image description. On the contrary, the human perception of contrast along different spatial frequency bandwidths provides a powerful discriminator function that can be modeled in a robust manner against local illumination. Based upon this observation, a dense local contrast descriptor is proposed and its potential in different applications of computer vision is discussed. Extensive experiments reveal that this simple yet effective description performs well in comparison with state of the art image descriptors. We also show the importance of this description in multiresolution pansharpening framework.

  10. [Successful implementation of the EFQM management model at the Department of Ophthalmology in Graz].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmann, G; Maier, R; Theisl, A; Bauer, H; Klug, U; Foussek, C; Hödl, R; Wedrich, A; Gliebe, W

    2011-04-01

    In the context of legal requirements and scarcer resources, the implementation of a quality management (QM) model will provide a competitive advantage or a site warranty for a hospital. For 3 years, the Department of Ophthalmology in Graz has been working with the EFQM model and has now accomplished the first level quality award, namely "Committed to Excellence (C2E)". The project work towards achieving this C2E-award is described below. EFQM stands for European Foundation for Quality Management, an organization that was founded in 1989 by the EU, together with 14 leading enterprises. In the EFQM model, the maturity of an organization in terms of quality is determined through the achievement of a number of quality awards. The C2E award is the first of these awards. At the beginning of our work for the C2E level, the strengths and weaknesses of the Department of Ophthalmology were determined by means of an EFQM questionnaire. Three improvement measures with the highest impact on the performance of the clinic were identified by the questionnaire: 1. The hospitalization of a cataract patient. 2. The lack of information between the various professional parties. 3. The lack of knowledge within the professional groups of the objectives and strategy of the Department of Ophthalmology. These areas requiring improvement were targeted, addressed and improved in a 6-months project work, structured by the EFQM model. The project work as a whole, the results obtained and the corresponding written documentation were evaluated positively in a 1-day assessment by Quality Austria. The EFQM model is a challenging quality management model. After the necessary training of project members or under the supervision of experienced quality managers, the EFQM model may be successfully applied to patient care, teaching and research in a department of ophthalmology.

  11. Modeling movie success when "nobody knows anything": Conditional stable distribution analysis of film returns

    OpenAIRE

    W David Walls

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we apply a recently-developed statistical model that explicitly accounts for the extreme uncertainty surrounding film returns. The conditional distribution of box-office returns is analyzed using the stable distribution regression model. The regression coefficients in this model represent what is known about the correlates of film success while at the same time permitting the variance of film success at the box office to be infinite. The empirical analysis shows that the conditi...

  12. A model framework to describe growth-linked biodegradation of trace-level pesticides in the presence of coincidental carbon substrates and microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Helbling, Damian E.; Kohler, Hans-Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    , challenges remain in developing engineered remediation strategies for pesticide-contaminated environments because the fundamental processes that regulate growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides in natural environments remain poorly understood. In this research, we developed a model framework to describe......Pollutants such as pesticides and their degradation products occur ubiquitously in natural aquatic environments at trace concentrations (μg L–1 and lower). Microbial biodegradation processes have long been known to contribute to the attenuation of pesticides in contaminated environments. However...... growth-linked biodegradation of pesticides at trace concentrations. We used experimental data reported in the literature or novel simulations to explore three fundamental kinetic processes in isolation. We then combine these kinetic processes into a unified model framework. The three kinetic processes...

  13. Rigorous derivation of the effective model describing a non-isothermal fluid flow in a vertical pipe filled with porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneš, Michal; Pažanin, Igor

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports an analytical investigation of non-isothermal fluid flow in a thin (or long) vertical pipe filled with porous medium via asymptotic analysis. We assume that the fluid inside the pipe is cooled (or heated) by the surrounding medium and that the flow is governed by the prescribed pressure drop between pipe's ends. Starting from the dimensionless Darcy-Brinkman-Boussinesq system, we formally derive a macroscopic model describing the effective flow at small Brinkman-Darcy number. The asymptotic approximation is given by the explicit formulae for the velocity, pressure and temperature clearly acknowledging the effects of the cooling (heating) and porous structure. The theoretical error analysis is carried out to indicate the order of accuracy and to provide a rigorous justification of the effective model.

  14. The effect of Hydrobia ulvae and microphytobenthos on cohesive sediment dynamics on an intertidal mudflat described by means of numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumborg, Ulrik; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Pejrup, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Previous investigations have documented spatial and temporal variations in the erosion threshold, erosion rate, and suspended sediment settling characteristics on an intertidal mudflat in a microtidal coastal plain estuary in the Danish Wadden Sea. The differences seem to be very much controlled...... mudflat investigated. In contrast, biofilms may change net deposition by decreasing erosion, suspended sediment concentration and consequently the resulting settling flux of the suspended material. This study suggests that a numerical hydrodynamic model in combination with a fieldwork-based set......-up of a cohesive sediment transport model may be used to describe and explain net sediment dynamics in a shallow coastal plain estuary. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Function-centered modeling of engineering systems using the goal tree-success tree technique and functional primitives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, Mohammad; Cheon, Se Woo

    1999-01-01

    Most of the complex systems are formed through some hierarchical evolution. Therefore, those systems can be best described through hierarchical frameworks. This paper describes some fundamental attributes of complex physical systems and several hierarchies such as functional, behavioral, goal/condition, and event hierarchies, then presents a function-centered approach to system modeling. Based on the function-centered concept, this paper describes the joint goal tree-success tree (GTST) and the master logic diagram (MLD) as a framework for developing models of complex physical systems. A function-based lexicon for classifying the most common elements of engineering systems for use in the GTST-MLD framework has been proposed. The classification is based on the physical conservation laws that govern the engineering systems. Functional descriptions based on conservation laws provide a simple and rich vocabulary for modeling complex engineering systems

  16. Measuring online learning systems success: applying the updated DeLone and McLean model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Fen

    2007-12-01

    Based on a survey of 232 undergraduate students, this study used the updated DeLone and McLean information systems success model to examine the determinants for successful use of online learning systems (OLS). The results provided an expanded understanding of the factors that measure OLS success. The results also showed that system quality, information quality, and service quality had a significant effect on actual OLS use through user satisfaction and behavioral intention to use OLS.

  17. An alternative developmental table to describe non-model fish species embryogenesis: application to the description of the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis L. 1758) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alix, Maud; Chardard, Dominique; Ledoré, Yannick; Fontaine, Pascal; Schaerlinger, Berenice

    2015-01-01

    Fish correspond to the most diversified phylum among vertebrates with a large variety of species. Even if general features are distinguishable during the embryogenesis, several differences in term of timing, organ implementation or step progression always occur between species. Moreover, the developmental timing of wild non-model fish often presents variability within a species. In that context, it is necessary to define a model of developmental table flexible enough to describe fish development by integrating this variability and allow intra- and inter-specific comparisons. The elaboration of a model passes by the definition of new stages that could be easily observable on individuals. The present study aims at proposing such a model and describing accurately the Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) embryogenesis using microscopic techniques among which time lapse video and histological studies. The Eurasian perch belongs to the Percidae family that includes 235 species classified in 11 genera. It is a member of the Perca gender and inhabits the Northern part of Europe and Asia. At 13 °C, P. fluviatilis development elapses for 15 days from the fertilization to the first oral feeding. The staging division first took into account the cellular status to define periods, then the acquisition of new abilities by the embryo to further define stages. It allowed distinguishing two main stages during the cell cleavage period depending on the synchronization of the cell divisions, two stages during the gastrulation period depending on the cell speed migration and five stages during the organogenesis according to the acquisition of key abilities as proposed in the saltatory theory. During each stage, organs implementation was carefully followed with a particular attention for the visual and digestive systems. In addition, our study shows that embryos hatch at various developmental stages while they all begin to feed at a fixed date, 15 days after the fertilization whatever

  18. Signing on to sign out, part 2: describing the success of a web-based patient sign-out application and how it will serve as a platform for an electronic discharge summary program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Sherman; Tsai, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre developed and implemented a physician-focused web-based patient sign-out application in January of 2005 with 40 different groups throughout the hospital now using it. More groups are continuing to request access to the system, including nursing and other multidisciplinary groups. The success of the system is attributable to its simplicity and usability as there is rarely any downtime and no formal training for physicians is ever necessary. The next step is to create an electronic discharge summary program. Using an electronic system to complete discharge summaries will allow more efficient completion of discharge summaries, improve the quality of discharge summaries and improve the timeliness of delivery to the family physician. Integrating the electronic discharge summary program with the current sign-out application is a logical approach because the two processes follow each other in the flow of care, information from the sign-out application is transferable to the discharge summary and both processes are essential for maintaining the continuity of care.

  19. Successful aging as a continuum of functional independence: lessons from physical disability models of aging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowry, K.A.; Vallejo, A.N.; Studenski, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Successful aging is a multidimensional construct that could be viewed as a continuum of achievement. Based on the disability model proposed by the WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, successful aging includes not only the presence or absence of disease, but also

  20. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  1. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  2. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, J.; Nielsen, L.S.; Lueg, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Dalby, J., Nielsen, Lueg, R., L. S., Pedersen, L., Tomoni, A. C. 2014. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions. Journal of Enterprising Culture, 22(4): 379-498.......Dalby, J., Nielsen, Lueg, R., L. S., Pedersen, L., Tomoni, A. C. 2014. National culture and business model change: a framework for successful expansions. Journal of Enterprising Culture, 22(4): 379-498....

  3. Induction and repair rate of DNA damage: a unified model for describing effects of external and internal irradiation and contamination with heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaldo, Jérôme; Viau, Muriel; Bouchot, Michael; Joubert, Aurélie; Charvet, Anne-Marie; Foray, Nicolas

    2008-03-07

    DNA is a key-target for genotoxic stress. Hence, the knowledge of induction and repair rate of DNA damage are crucial to describe and predict the impact of stress situations. Unfortunately, DNA damage induction and repair rates are generally assessed separately whereas they act either concomitantly or transiently in living organisms. Furthermore, the interplay of induction and repair raises the question whether DNA repair adapts to respond to different amounts of DNA damage. In a previous report, we proposed a stochastic interpretation of the repair rate of the major radiation-induced DNA damage. We provided evidence that the repair rate of individual DNA damage is time-independent whereas that of a population of DNA damage is time-dependent (Foray, N., Charvet, A.-M., Duchemin, D., Favaudon, V., Lavalette, D., 2005. The repair rate of radiation-induced DNA damage: a stochastic interpretation based on the gamma function. J. Theor. Biol. 236, 448-458). Here, to better describe situations in which DNA damage induction and repair occur together, our biostatistical model was modified by the introduction of a DNA damage induction parameter. Theoretical and experimental data were compared and discussed by taking concrete experimental situations: X-rays irradiation at different dose-rates, internal irradiation with radioactive compound, contamination with heavy metal and detection of DNA damage by immunofluorescence. By assuming that DNA repair rate is invariant whatever the amount of DNA damage, our model provides good prediction of experimental data suggesting its relevance for the description of complex situations of co-toxicities.

  4. The Success of Linear Bootstrapping Models: Decision Domain-, Expertise-, and Criterion-Specific Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Esther; Wittmann, Werner W.

    2016-01-01

    The success of bootstrapping or replacing a human judge with a model (e.g., an equation) has been demonstrated in Paul Meehl’s (1954) seminal work and bolstered by the results of several meta-analyses. To date, however, analyses considering different types of meta-analyses as well as the potential dependence of bootstrapping success on the decision domain, the level of expertise of the human judge, and the criterion for what constitutes an accurate decision have been missing from the literature. In this study, we addressed these research gaps by conducting a meta-analysis of lens model studies. We compared the results of a traditional (bare-bones) meta-analysis with findings of a meta-analysis of the success of bootstrap models corrected for various methodological artifacts. In line with previous studies, we found that bootstrapping was more successful than human judgment. Furthermore, bootstrapping was more successful in studies with an objective decision criterion than in studies with subjective or test score criteria. We did not find clear evidence that the success of bootstrapping depended on the decision domain (e.g., education or medicine) or on the judge’s level of expertise (novice or expert). Correction of methodological artifacts increased the estimated success of bootstrapping, suggesting that previous analyses without artifact correction (i.e., traditional meta-analyses) may have underestimated the value of bootstrapping models. PMID:27327085

  5. Temperature dependent forward current-voltage characteristics of Ni/Au Schottky contacts on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures described by a two diodes model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Giuseppe; Giannazzo, Filippo; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the temperature dependence of Ni/Au Schottky contacts on AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. The electrical properties of the Schottky barrier were monitored by means of forward current-voltage (I-V) measurements, while capacitance-voltage measurements were used to determine the properties of the two dimensional electron gas. The forward I-V characteristics of Schottky diodes revealed a strong deviation from the ideal behavior, which could not be explained by a standard thermionic emission model. Thus, the Ni/AlGaN/GaN system has been described by a "two diode model," considering the presence of a second barrier height at the AlGaN/GaN heterojunction. Following this approach, the anomalous I-V curves could be explained and the value of the flat-band barrier height (at zero-electric field) could be correctly determined, thus resulting in good agreement with literature data based on photoemission measurements.

  6. The Social Networking Application Success Model: An Empirical Study of Facebook and Twitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol X. J. Ou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Social networking applications (SNAs are among the fastest growing web applications of recent years. In this paper, we propose a causal model to assess the success of SNAs, grounded on DeLone and McLean’s updated information systems (IS success model. In addition to their original three dimensions of quality, i.e., system quality, information quality and service quality, we propose that a fourth dimension - networking quality - contributes to SNA success. We empirically examined the proposed research model with a survey of 168 Facebook and 149 Twitter users. The data validates the significant role of networking quality in determining the focal SNA’s success. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  7. Model of Islamic Social Entrepreneurship: A Study on Successful Muslim Social Entrepreneur in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulven Mohd Adib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since research effort in the area is minimal, there is a clear need to examine the practice of Islamic social entrepreneurship among successful Muslim social entrepreneurs in Malaysia. One such practice is to organize charitable activities to benefit the community through the gains made from entrepreneurial activities that are based on social mission and vision. The research problem is lacking of model on Islamic social entrepreneurship. The main objective of this paper is to develop a Model of Islamic Social Entrepreneurship based on successful Muslim social entrepreneur in Malaysia. The research method used in this study is literature review, content analysis, and interview with 14 participants constituting nine successful Muslim social entrepreneurs and five experts with religious academic backgrounds participated in the study. The research finding shows that model of Islamic social entrepreneurship is the major contribution of the study which could serve as guidelines for successful Muslim social entrepreneurs, particularly young entrepreneurs.

  8. The Application of Various Nonlinear Models to Describe Academic Growth Trajectories: An Empirical Analysis Using Four-Wave Longitudinal Achievement Data from a Large Urban School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Tacksoo

    2012-01-01

    This study introduced various nonlinear growth models, including the quadratic conventional polynomial model, the fractional polynomial model, the Sigmoid model, the growth model with negative exponential functions, the multidimensional scaling technique, and the unstructured growth curve model. It investigated which growth models effectively…

  9. Examining Management Success Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatrano, Louis A.

    The derivation of a model of management success potential in hospitals or health services administration is described. A questionnaire developed to assess management success potential in health administration students was voluntarily completed by approximately 700 incoming graduate students in 35 university health services administration programs…

  10. Sharing Responsibility for College Success: A Model Partnership Moves Students to Diplomas and Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Joel

    2014-01-01

    In order to prepare the large number of postsecondary-educated youth our economy demands, high schools and higher education must break through the boundaries that have traditionally separated them and assume joint responsibility for student success. This brief describes an unusual school district partnership with colleges that has achieved…

  11. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Allison

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1 organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2 community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week", but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3 self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4 decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5 delivery system

  12. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Damin; Bailie, Ross; Cunningham, Joan; Robinson, Gary; Dowden, Michelle; Stewart, Allison; Connors, Christine; Weeramanthri, Tarun

    2008-01-01

    Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1) organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2) community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores) and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week"), but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3) self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4) decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5) delivery system design

  13. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory - use of the Chronic Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Damin; Bailie, Ross; Cunningham, Joan; Robinson, Gary; Dowden, Michelle; Stewart, Allison; Connors, Christine; Weeramanthri, Tarun

    2008-05-28

    Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1) organisational influence - strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2) community linkages - facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores) and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week"), but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3) self management - promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4) decision support - facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5) delivery system design - strengthened by provision of transport for

  14. Modeling Success: Using Preenrollment Data to Identify Academically At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.; Compton, Jonathan; Wohlgemuth, Darin; Forbes, Greg; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Improving student success and degree completion is one of the core principles of strategic enrollment management. To address this principle, institutional data were used to develop a statistical model to identify academically at-risk students. The model employs multiple linear regression techniques to predict students at risk of earning below a…

  15. North Dakota's Experience with the Academy Model: A Successful Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tom; Clapper, Ann

    2016-01-01

    In this article, professors share how the district/university partnership model thriving at Kansas State University was successfully replicated in North Dakota, and was adapted to match their own department goals. While teacher leadership has become a theme among Kansas State academies, their model was created out of principal preparation efforts.…

  16. Potentials and limitations of using large-scale forest inventory data for evaluating forest succession models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didion, M.P.; Kupferschmid, A.D.; Lexer, M.J.; Rammer, W.; Seidl, R.; Bugmann, H.

    2009-01-01

    Forest gap models have been applied widely to examine forest development under natural conditions and to investigate the effect of climate change on forest succession. Due to the complexity and parameter requirements of such models a rigorous evaluation is required to build confidence in the

  17. Assessing eGovernment Systems Success: A Validation of the DeLone and McLean Model of Information Systems Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Shun; Liao, Yi-Wen

    2008-01-01

    With the proliferation of the Internet and World Wide Web applications, people are increasingly interacting with government to citizen (G2C) eGovernment systems. It is therefore important to measure the success of G2C eGovernment systems from the citizen's perspective. While general information systems (IS) success models have received much…

  18. Structural equation modeling of a potentially successful person in network marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattana Hiranpong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a structural equation model to explain the attributes of a potentially successful person in network marketing. The researcher collected data on 400 network marketers, from 10 companies, who had been in business seriously for at least 2 years. The results showed that a potentially successful person in network marketing exhibitted four latent variables: 1 unsatisfied valued life-desire discrepancy 2 effectiveness of choice in closing the gap on discrepancies 3 Phalanuphap—power to move people, and 4 assertiveness when significant others have become an obstacle. There is a causal relationship between these latent variables and success in network marketing, and the structural equation modeling of potentially successful persons in network marketing which was developed in this study fits well with the empirical data.

  19. A Statewide Model for Assisting Nursing Home Residents to Transition Successfully to the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Buttke

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Minnesota’s Return to Community Initiative (RTCI is a novel, statewide initiative to assist private paying nursing home residents to return to the community and to remain in that setting without converting to Medicaid. The objective of this manuscript is to describe in detail RTCI’s development and design, its key operational components, and characteristics of its clients and their care outcomes. Data on client characteristics and outcomes come from the Minimum Data Set, staff assessments of clients and caregivers, and Medicaid eligibility files. Most clients transitioned by the RTCI had entered the nursing facility from a hospital. Clients overwhelmingly wanted to return to the community and fit a health and functional profile making them good candidates for community discharge. Most clients went to a private residence, living alone or with a spouse; yet, adult children were the most frequent caregivers. At one year of follow-up 76% of individuals were alive and living in the community and only a small percentage (8.2% had converted to Medicaid. The RTCI holds promise as a successful model for states to adopt in assisting individuals who are at risk to become long stay nursing home residents instead to return to the community.

  20. Validation of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Adebowale I.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study is an adaptation of the widely used DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of hospital information systems in a developing country. Methods A survey research design was adopted in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 442 health information management personnel in five Nigerian teaching hospitals. A structural equation modeling technique was used to validate the model's constructs. Results It was revealed that syst...

  1. A Partial Test and Development of Delone and Mclean's Model of IS Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Seddon

    1996-11-01

    Full Text Available DeLone and McLean's (1992 comprehensive review of different information system success measures concludes with a model of interrelationships between six IS Success constructs. This paper critically examines the meaning of four of these constructs and the evidence of relationships between them. It then provides results from empirical tests of these relationships. Tests are conducted using both conventional ordinary least squares regression path analysis and structural equation modeling - with substantially similar results. The empirical results provide substantial support for the "up stream" two thirds of DeLone and McLean's model. Three factors. System Quality, Information Quality, and Usefulness, are found to explain 75% of the variance in the overall User Satisfaction measure. The empirical results also provide substantial support for the use of usefulness as an IS success measure, and of the hitherto-unreported importance of "Importance of the task" in user perceptions of IS usefulness.

  2. Impact of supplemental instruction leader on the success of supplemental instruction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Haslam, Jeanne

    Supplemental instruction utilizes peer-assisted study sessions to provide review sessions on course material and an opportunity to discuss and work out problems. The impact of supplemental instruction on student performance is well researched and used in a large number of universities around the world due to its proven success. However, the impact of the student leader who plays a significant role in this model is rarely discussed in the literature. We present a case study on the impact of student leader on the success of supplemental instruction model. This case study was done for an Introductory Physics course correlating student performance and the supplemental instruction sessions they attended. Further analysis revealed that the academic performance and work ethics of the student leader has a significant impact on the success of the supplemental instruction model. Important factors to consider when selecting a student leader, the challenges and possible remedies will also be discussed.

  3. Information Systems Success In Public Administration: Proposal For An Exploratory Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyvison de Lima Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Investments in Information Systems (IS have been significantly increasing and hence the relevance of the studies on the IS success is persistent. Delone and Mclean (2003 developed an IS successful model which is a benchmark for researches in the area, however, in the perspective of the public sector, studies are still rare. In this research it was sought to propose an exploratory model of successful IS in public administration, from the identification of each construct items of the Delone and McLean (2003 original model, through multiple case studies in three Municipalities and a Town Hall of the Southern Cone of Rondônia state, in Brazil. Based on the empirical research, it was found that the IS success factors in municipal public administration are close to those factors indicated in the reviewed literature, however, showing some particularities of the public sector. A model of successful factors and items of IS, from the confrontation between literature and empirical data, is presented in the end of this work.

  4. Joint modeling of success and treatment discontinuation in in vitro fertilization programs: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troude Pénélope

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As discontinuation in in vitro fertilization (IVF programs has been associated with a poor prognosis, one hypothesis is that some couple-specific predictive factors in IVF may be shared with opposite effect by both success (i.e. live birth and treatment discontinuation processes. Our objective was to perform a joint analysis of these two processes to examine the hypothesis of a link between the two processes. Methods Analyses were conducted on a retrospective cohort of 3,002 women who began IVF between 1998 and 2002 in two French IVF centers: a Parisian center and a center in a medium-sized city in central France. A shared random effects model based on a joint modelization of IVF treatment success and discontinuation was used to study the link between the two processes. Results Success and discontinuation processes were significantly linked in the medium-sized city center, whereas they were not linked in the Parisian center. The center influenced risk of treatment discontinuation but not chance of success. The well-known inverse-J relation between the woman’s age and chance of success was observed, as expected. Risk of discontinuation globally increased as the woman’s age increased. Conclusions The link between success and discontinuation processes could depend on the fertility center. In particular, the woman’s decision to pursue or to discontinue IVF in a particular center could depend on the presence of other IVF centers in the surrounding area.

  5. Critical success factors model developing for sustainable Kaizen implementation in manufactur-ing industry in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haftu Hailu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify critical success factors and model developing for sustaining kaizen implementation. Peacock shoe is one of the manufacturing industries in Ethiopia facing challenges on sustaining. The methodology followed is factor analysis and empirically testing hypothesis. A database was designed using SPSS version 20. The survey was validated using statistical validation using the Cronbach alpha index; the result is 0.908. The KMO index value was obtained for the 32 items and had a value of 0.642 with Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square 4503.007, degree of freedom 496 and significance value 0.000. A factor analysis by principal components and varimax rotation was applied for finding the critical success factors. Finding designates that 32 items were merged into eight critical success factors. All the eight factors together explain for 76.941 % of the variance. Multiple regression model analysis has indicated that some of the critical success factors had relationship with success indicators. Due to constraint of time, the researcher focused only at peacock shoe manufacturing industry. Other limitation also includes the absence of any local research that shows the critical success factors at the moment.

  6. Modelling the critical success factors of agile software development projects in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawanda B. Chiyangwa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The continued in failure of agile and traditional software development projects have led to the consideration, attention and dispute to critical success factors that are the aspects which are most vital to make a software engineering methodology fruitful. Although there is an increasing variety of critical success factors and methodologies, the conceptual frameworks which have causal relationship are limited. Objective: The objective of this study was to identify and provide insights into the critical success factors that influence the success of software development projects using agile methodologies in South Africa. Method: Quantitative method of collecting data was used. Data were collected in South Africa through a Web-based survey using structured questionnaires. Results: These results show that organisational factors have a great influence on performance expectancy characteristics. Conclusion: The results of this study discovered a comprehensive model that could provide guidelines to the agile community and to the agile professionals.

  7. An integrated, multi-sensing approach to describe the dynamic relations between turbulence, fluid-forces, and reconfiguration of a submerged plant model in steady flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves; Aberle, Jochen; Dijkstra, Jasper; Myrhaug, Dag

    2016-04-01

    -force. Point measurements of turbulence were realized by two ADVs which were located upstream and downstream of the surrogate. Detailed motions of the surrogate were recorded by two cameras above and next to the flume. Image processing allowed for the characterization of the mean deformation and the different modes of horizontal and vertical 'vibration' of the surrogate. The experimental results were compared to numerical simulations obtained from an updated version of the Dynveg code developed by Deltares. The results showed a clear correlation between the cylinder's movements and the (drag) force fluctuations. Due to the swaying motion of the surrogate, the turbulence spectrum is significantly affected when the flow passes the plant model. The succession of several motion modes are observed as the velocity increases, affecting the dominant frequencies in the drag force spectrum and the overall drag. These preliminary results emphasise the importance of the dynamics of the plant flow interactions, and provide an example of the use of new methodologies to provide deeper insights into the physics of complex flows.

  8. Information System Success Model for Customer Relationship Management System in Health Promotion Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. Methods The evaluation areas of the CRM system includes three areas: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Results Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. Conclusions This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems. PMID:23882416

  9. Information system success model for customer relationship management system in health promotion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wona; Rho, Mi Jung; Park, Jiyun; Kim, Kwang-Jum; Kwon, Young Dae; Choi, In Young

    2013-06-01

    Intensified competitiveness in the healthcare industry has increased the number of healthcare centers and propelled the introduction of customer relationship management (CRM) systems to meet diverse customer demands. This study aimed to develop the information system success model of the CRM system by investigating previously proposed indicators within the model. THE EVALUATION AREAS OF THE CRM SYSTEM INCLUDES THREE AREAS: the system characteristics area (system quality, information quality, and service quality), the user area (perceived usefulness and user satisfaction), and the performance area (personal performance and organizational performance). Detailed evaluation criteria of the three areas were developed, and its validity was verified by a survey administered to CRM system users in 13 nationwide health promotion centers. The survey data were analyzed by the structural equation modeling method, and the results confirmed that the model is feasible. Information quality and service quality showed a statistically significant relationship with perceived usefulness and user satisfaction. Consequently, the perceived usefulness and user satisfaction had significant influence on individual performance as well as an indirect influence on organizational performance. This study extends the research area on information success from general information systems to CRM systems in health promotion centers applying a previous information success model. This lays a foundation for evaluating health promotion center systems and provides a useful guide for successful implementation of hospital CRM systems.

  10. Focus on connections for successful organizational transformation to model based engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babineau, Guy L.

    2015-05-01

    Organizational Transformation to a Model Based Engineering Culture is a significant goal for Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems in order to achieve objectives of increased engineering performance. While organizational change is difficult, a focus on connections is creating success. Connections include model to model, program phase to program phase and organization to organization all through Model Based techniques. This presentation will address the techniques employed by Northrop Grumman to achieve these results as well as address continued focus and efforts. Model to model connections are very effective in automating implicit linkages between models for the purpose of ensuring consistency across a set of models and also for rapidly assessing impact of change. Program phase to phase connections are very important for reducing development time as well as reducing potential errors in moving from one program phase to another. Organization to organization communication is greatly facilitated using model based techniques to eliminate ambiguity and drive consistency and reuse.

  11. An internally validated prognostic model for success in revision stapes surgery for otosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Inge; Vincent, Robert; Derks, Laura S M; Rauh, Simone P; Heymans, Martijn W; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2018-03-09

    To develop a prediction model that can accurately predict the chance of success following revision stapes surgery in patients with recurrent or persistent otosclerosis at 2- to 6-months follow-up and to validate this model internally. A retrospective cohort study of prospectively gathered data in a tertiary referral center. The associations of 11 prognostic factors with treatment success were tested in 705 cases using multivariable logistic regression analysis with backward selection. Success was defined as a mean air-bone gap closure to 10 dB or less. The most relevant predictors were used to derive a clinical prediction rule to determine the probability of success. Internal validation by means of bootstrapping was performed. Model performance indices, including the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC), and the explained variance were calculated. Success was achieved in 57.7% of cases at 2- to 6-months follow-up. Certain previous surgical techniques, primary causes of failure leading up to revision stapes surgery, and positions of the prosthesis placed during revision surgery were associated with higher success percentages. The clinical prediction rule performed moderately well in the original dataset (Hosmer-Lemeshow P = .78; AUC = 0.73; explained variance = 22%), which slightly decreased following internal validation by means of bootstrapping (AUC = 0.69; explained variance = 13%). Our study established the importance of previous surgical technique, primary cause of failure, and type of the prosthesis placed during the revision surgery in predicting the probability of success following stapes surgery at 2- to 6-months follow-up. 2b. Laryngoscope, 2018. © 2018 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. [Succession caused by beaver (Castor fiber L.) life activity: II. A refined Markov model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logofet; Evstigneev, O I; Aleinikov, A A; Morozova, A O

    2015-01-01

    The refined Markov model of cyclic zoogenic successions caused by beaver (Castor fiber L.) life activity represents a discrete chain of the following six states: flooded forest, swamped forest, pond, grassy swamp, shrubby swamp, and wet forest, which correspond to certain stages of succession. Those stages are defined, and a conceptual scheme of probable transitions between them for one time step is constructed from the knowledge of beaver behaviour in small river floodplains of "Bryanskii Les" Reserve. We calibrated the corresponding matrix of transition probabilities according to the optimization principle: minimizing differences between the model outcome and reality; the model generates a distribution of relative areas corresponding to the stages of succession, that has to be compared to those gained from case studies in the Reserve during 2002-2006. The time step is chosen to equal 2 years, and the first-step data in the sum of differences are given various weights, w (between 0 and 1). The value of w = 0.2 is selected due to its optimality and for some additional reasons. By the formulae of finite homogeneous Markov chain theory, we obtained the main results of the calibrated model, namely, a steady-state distribution of stage areas, indexes of cyclicity, and the mean durations (M(j)) of succession stages. The results of calibration give an objective quantitative nature to the expert knowledge of the course of succession and get a proper interpretation. The 2010 data, which are not involved in the calibration procedure, enabled assessing the quality of prediction by the homogeneous model in short-term (from the 2006 situation): the error of model area distribution relative to the distribution observed in 2010 falls into the range of 9-17%, the best prognosis being given by the least optimal matrices (rejected values of w). This indicates a formally heterogeneous nature of succession processes in time. Thus, the refined version of the homogeneous Markov chain

  13. Procedure to describe clavicular motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez Delgado, Guivey; De Beule, Matthieu; Ortega Cardentey, Dolgis R; Segers, Patrick; Iznaga Benítez, Arsenio M; Rodríguez Moliner, Tania; Verhegghe, Benedict; Palmans, Tanneke; Van Hoof, Tom; Van Tongel, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    For many years, researchers have attempted to describe shoulder motions by using different mathematical methods. The aim of this study was to describe a procedure to quantify clavicular motion. The procedure proposed for the kinematic analysis consists of 4 main processes: 3 transcortical pins in the clavicle, motion capture, obtaining 3-dimensional bone models, and data processing. Clavicular motion by abduction (30° to 150°) and flexion (55° to 165°) were characterized by an increment of retraction of 27° to 33°, elevation of 25° to 28°, and posterior rotation of 14° to 15°, respectively. In circumduction, clavicular movement described an ellipse, which was reflected by retraction and elevation. Kinematic analysis shows that the articular surfaces move by simultaneously rolling and sliding on the convex surface of the sternum for the 3 movements of abduction, flexion, and circumduction. The use of 3 body landmarks in the clavicle and the direct measurement of bone allowed description of the osteokinematic and arthrokinematic movement of the clavicle. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling the Impact of Wilderness Orientation Programs on First-Year Academic Success and Life Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Andrew W.; Kang, Hyoung-Kil

    2015-01-01

    Wilderness orientation programs (WOPs) are becoming a popular method of encouraging college student retention and success. Previous studies have identified outcomes and correlates of participation in these programs, but a cohesive model of impact is lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of WOPs on first-year student success…

  15. The Success of a Policy Model: Irrigation Management Transfer in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rap, E.R.

    2006-01-01

    The Mexican policy of Irrigation Management Transfer has been widely propagated as a success and has become a model for other countries seeking to improve the performance of their irrigation systems while also cutting public expenditures. This article analyses the process of policy-making that has

  16. Modelling the Success of Learning Management Systems: Application of Latent Class Segmentation Using FIMIX-PLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Gaitán, Jorge; Rondán-Cataluña, Francisco Javier; Ramírez-Correa, Patricio E.

    2018-01-01

    There is not a unique attitude towards the implementation of digital technology in educational sceneries. This paper aims to validate an adaptation of the DeLone and McLean information systems success model in the context of a learning management system. Furthermore, this study means to prove (1) the necessity of segmenting students in order to…

  17. Modeling management information systems’ success: a study in the domain of further education and training

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Visser, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available system’s evaluation theory and an analysis of FET policy documents were used to propose an initial success evaluation model and tool (questionnaire) for an educational environment (FET colleges) in South Africa. Using a quantitative approach the tool...

  18. The Effect of 7E Model on Conceptual Success of Students in the Unit of Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Umit; Colak, Alp; Salar, Riza

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the course materials developed in accordance with 7E model in the unit of electromagnetism in high school physics class on students' conceptual success. The present study was conducted with a total of 52 11th grade students in two separate classrooms at a high school. The action research…

  19. Developing a Model and Applications for Probabilities of Student Success: A Case Study of Predictive Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Carol Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This case study relates to distance learning students on open access courses. It demonstrates the use of predictive analytics to generate a model of the probabilities of success and retention at different points, or milestones, in a student journey. A core set of explanatory variables has been established and their varying relative importance at…

  20. Model of Islamic Social Entrepreneurship: A Study on Successful Muslim Social Entrepreneur in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Boulven Mohd Adib; Abdullah S.; Bahari Azizan; Ramli A. J.; Hussin N. S.; Jamaluddin Jamsari; Ahmad Z.

    2018-01-01

    Since research effort in the area is minimal, there is a clear need to examine the practice of Islamic social entrepreneurship among successful Muslim social entrepreneurs in Malaysia. One such practice is to organize charitable activities to benefit the community through the gains made from entrepreneurial activities that are based on social mission and vision. The research problem is lacking of model on Islamic social entrepreneurship. The main objective of this paper is to develop a Model ...

  1. Modeling the relations between flow regime components, species traits, and spawning success of fishes in warmwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, S.W.; Peterson, J.T.; Freeman, Mary C.; Kwak, T.J.; Irwin, E.

    2010-01-01

    Modifications to stream hydrologic regimes can have a profound influence on the dynamics of their fish populations. Using hierarchical linear models, we examined the relations between flow regime and young-of-year fish density using fish sampling and discharge data from three different warmwater streams in Illinois, Alabama, and Georgia. We used an information theoretic approach to evaluate the relative support for models describing hypothesized influences of five flow regime components representing: short-term high and low flows; short-term flow stability; and long-term mean flows and flow stability on fish reproductive success during fish spawning and rearing periods. We also evaluated the influence of ten fish species traits on fish reproductive success. Species traits included spawning duration, reproductive strategy, egg incubation rate, swimming locomotion morphology, general habitat preference, and food habits. Model selection results indicated that young-of-year fish density was positively related to short-term high flows during the spawning period and negatively related to flow variability during the rearing period. However, the effect of the flow regime components varied substantially among species, but was related to species traits. The effect of short-term high flows on the reproductive success was lower for species that broadcast their eggs during spawning. Species with cruiser swimming locomotion morphologies (e.g., Micropterus) also were more vulnerable to variable flows during the rearing period. Our models provide insight into the conditions and timing of flows that influence the reproductive success of warmwater stream fishes and may guide decisions related to stream regulation and management. ?? 2010 US Government.

  2. Exploring the relationship between sustainability and project success - conceptual model and expected relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Silvius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is one of the most important challenges of our time. Companies are integrating sustainability in their marketing, communication and their actions. Sustainability has more recently also been linked to project management. The logic behind this link is that sustainability needs change and projects are realizing change. Several studies explored how the concept of sustainability impact project management. The research project reported in this paper elaborates on these works by studying how sustainability affects project success. Project managers, logically, strive for project success and considering sustainability may influence this success. Based upon a review of relevant literature, the paper develops a conceptual model that provides a more detailed understanding of how considering different dimensions of sustainability may affect the individual criteria of project success. The study also provides a conceptual mapping of the different relationships between dimensions of sustainability and criteria of project success. This mapping shows that the most positive relationships are expected for the relationship between sustainability and the success criteria stakeholder satisfaction, future readiness and controlled project execution. The expected relationship between considering sustainability and completing the project on schedule and within budget is uncertain.

  3. Petri nets as a modeling tool for discrete concurrent tasks of the human operator. [describing sequential and parallel demands on human operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, W.; Geiser, G.

    1978-01-01

    The basic concepts of Petri nets are reviewed as well as their application as the fundamental model of technical systems with concurrent discrete events such as hardware systems and software models of computers. The use of Petri nets is proposed for modeling the human operator dealing with concurrent discrete tasks. Their properties useful in modeling the human operator are discussed and practical examples are given. By means of and experimental investigation of binary concurrent tasks which are presented in a serial manner, the representation of human behavior by Petri nets is demonstrated.

  4. Maximum Potential Score (MPS: An operating model for a successful customer-focused strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello González, José Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of marketers’ chief objectives is to achieve customer loyalty, which is a key factor for profitable growth. Therefore, they need to develop a strategy that attracts and maintains customers, giving them adequate motives, both tangible (prices and promotions and intangible (personalized service and treatment, to satisfy a customer and make him loyal to the company. Finding a way to accurately measure satisfaction and customer loyalty is very important. With regard to typical Relationship Marketing measures, we can consider listening to customers, which can help to achieve a competitive sustainable advantage. Customer satisfaction surveys are essential tools for listening to customers. Short questionnaires have gained considerable acceptance among marketers as a means to achieve a customer satisfaction measure. Our research provides an indication of the benefits of a short questionnaire (one/three questions. We find that the number of questions survey is significantly related to the participation in the survey (Net Promoter Score or NPS. We also prove that a the three question survey is more likely to have more participants than a traditional survey (Maximum Potential Score or MPS . Our main goal is to analyse one method as a potential predictor of customer loyalty. Using surveys, we attempt to empirically establish the causal factors in determining the satisfaction of customers. This paper describes a maximum potential operating model that captures with a three questions survey, important elements for a successful customer-focused strategy. MPS may give us lower participation rates than NPS but important information that helps to convert unhappy customers or just satisfied customers, into loyal customers.

  5. The boundary for growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii in acidified products described by models for time to growth and probability of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, P; Poulos, P G; Cole, M B; Vandeven, M H; Legan, J D

    2000-02-01

    Models to predict days to growth and probability of growth of Zygosaccharomyces bailii in high-acid foods were developed, and the equations are presented here. The models were constructed from measurements of growth of Z. bailii using automated turbidimetry over a 29-day period at various pH, NaCl, fructose, and acetic acid levels. Statistical analyses were carried out using Statistical Analysis Systems LIFEREG procedures, and the data were fitted to log-logistic models. Model 1 predicts days to growth based on two factors, combined molar concentration of salt plus sugar and undissociated acetic acid. This model allows a growth/no-growth boundary to be visualized. The boundary is comparable with that established by G. Tuynenburg Muys (Process Biochem. 6:25-28, 1971), which still forms the basis of industry assumptions about the stability of acidic foods. Model 2 predicts days to growth based on the four independent factors of salt, sugar, acetic acid, and pH levels and is, therefore, much more useful for product development. Validation data derived from challenge studies in retail products from the U.S. market are presented for Model 2, showing that the model gives reliable, fail-safe predictions and is suitable for use in predicting growth responses of Z. bailii in high-acid foods. Model 3 predicts probability of growth of Z. bailii in 29 days. This model is most useful for spoilage risk assessment. All three models showed good agreement between predictions and observed values for the underlying data.

  6. Determination of the saturated film conductivity to improve the EMFX model in describing the soil hydraulic properties over the entire moisture range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Guan, Huade; Zhu, Gaofeng

    2017-06-01

    Difficulty in measuring hydraulic conductivity, particularly under dry conditions, calls for methods of predicting the conductivity from easily obtained soil properties. As a complement to the recently published EMFX model, a method based on two specific suction conditions is proposed to estimate saturated film conductivity from the soil water retention curve. This method reduces one fitting parameter in the previous EMFX model, making it possible to predict the hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve over the complete moisture range. Model performance is evaluated with published data of soils in a broad texture range from sand to clay. The testing results indicate that 1) the modified EMFX model (namely the EMFX-K model), incorporating both capillary and adsorption forces, provides good agreement with the conductivity data over the entire moisture range; 2) a value of 0.5 for the tortuosity factor in the EMFX-K model as that in the Mualem's model gives comparable estimation of the relative conductivity associated with the capillary force; and 3) a value of -1.0 × 10-20 J for the Hamaker constant, rather than the commonly used value of -6.0 × 10-20 J, appears to be more appropriate to represent solely the effect of the van der Waals forces and to predict the film conductivity. In comparison with the commonly used van Genuchten-Mualem model, the EMFX-K model significantly improves the prediction of hydraulic conductivity under dry conditions. The sensitivity analysis result suggests that the uncertainty in the film thickness estimation is important in explaining the model underestimation of hydraulic conductivity for the soils with fine texture, in addition to the uncertainties from the measurements and the model structure. High quality data that cover the complete moisture range for a variety of soil textures are required to further test the method.

  7. Developments to the Sylvan stand structure model to describe wood quality changes in southern bottomland hardwood forests because of forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian R. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Growth models can produce a wealth of detailed information that is often very difficult to perceive because it is frequently presented either as summary tables, stand view or landscape view visualizations. We have developed new tools for use with the Sylvan model (Larsen 1994) that allow the analysis of wood-quality changes as a consequence of forest management....

  8. Temple Health Connection: a successful collaborative model of community-based primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Nancy L; Lourie, Rita J; Brian, Donna; Foley, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Temple Health Connection exemplifies the education, research, and service missions of the university through the provision of culturally competent and effective primary health care. This article reports on the history and successes of a community-based, community-driven academic nursing center at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Pender's Health Promotion Model has been used to guide the design of interventions, and theoretical propositions are related to community programs and projects. Demographic characteristics of the population served and statistics on both primary care and community outreach efforts are presented. Collaborative efforts are framed in terms of successful funding and programming initiatives.

  9. A Primary Human Critical Success Factors Model for the ERP System Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenko Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Many researchers have investigated various Critical success factors (CSFs and the different causes of ERP implementation project failures. Despite a detailed literature preview, we were unable to find an appropriate research with a comprehensive overview of the true causes behind CSFs, observed from a human factors perspective. The objective of this research was therefore to develop and evaluate the Primary human factors (PHFs model and to confirm the significant impact of PHFs on traditional CSFs and on the project success.

  10. Education and Successful Aging Trajectories: A Longitudinal Population-Based Latent Variable Modelling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Theodore D; Stephan, Blossom C M; Brayne, Carol; Muniz, Graciela

    2017-12-01

    As the population ages, interest is increasing in studying aging well. However, more refined means of examining predictors of biopsychosocial conceptualizations of successful aging (SA) are required. Existing evidence of the relationship between early-life education and later-life SA is unclear. The Successful Aging Index (SAI) was mapped onto the Cognitive Function and Aging Study (CFAS), a longitudinal population-based cohort (n = 1,141). SAI scores were examined using growth mixture modelling (GMM) to identify SA trajectories. Unadjusted and adjusted (age, sex, occupational status) ordinal logistic regressions were conducted to examine the association between trajectory membership and education level. GMM identified a three-class model, capturing high, moderate, and low functioning trajectories. Adjusted ordinal logistic regression models indicated that individuals in higher SAI classes were significantly more likely to have higher educational attainment than individuals in the lower SAI classes. These results provide evidence of a life course link between education and SA.

  11. A comparison of Reduced Life Expectancy (RLE) model with Haber's Rule to describe effects of exposure time on toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vibha; Yu, Qiming J.; Connell, Des W.

    2015-01-01

    The Reduced Life Expectancy (RLE) Model (LC 50  = [ln(NLE) – ln(LT 50 )]/d) has been proposed as an alternative to Haber's Rule. The model is based on a linear relationship between LC 50 (Lethal Exposure Concentration) and lnLT 50 (Lethal Exposure Time) and uses NLE (Normal Life Expectancy) as a limiting point as well as a long term data point (where d is a constant). The purposes of this paper were to compare the RLE Model with Haber's Rule with available toxicity data and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each approach. When LT 50 is relatively short and LC 50 is high, Haber's Rule is consistent with the RLE model. But the difference between the two was evident in the situation when LT 50 is relatively long and LC 50 is low where the RLE model is a marked departure from Haber's Rule. The RLE Model can be used to appropriately evaluate long term effects of exposure. - Highlights: • The strength and weakness of Haber's Rule in relation to the RLE model is needed. • Haber's Rule now used universally is quite inappropriate for environmental toxicity. • Normal life expectancy, a new parameter l is used to evaluate effects of exposure time on toxicity. • According to RLE model when LC 50 approaches zero, then LT 50  = Normal Life Expectancy. • The RLE model can be used to evaluate long term effects of exposure-accurately and easily. - The RLE approach is a more appropriate alternative particularly to evaluate long term effects of exposure. It can be easily used to estimate long term effects of exposure

  12. A practice model for rural district nursing success in end-of-life advocacy care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Frances M; Fitzgerald, Les; Bish, Melanie R

    2017-08-24

    The development of a practice model for rural district nursing successful end-of-life advocacy care. Resources to help people live well in the end stages of life in rural areas can be limited and difficult to access. District nurse advocacy may promote end-of-life choice for people living at home in rural Australia. The lack of evidence available internationally to inform practice in this context was addressed by exploratory study. A pragmatic mixed method study approved by the University Faculty Ethics Committee and conducted from March 2014 to August 2015 was used to explore the successful end-of-life advocacy of 98 rural Australian district nurses. The findings and results were integrated then compared with theory in this article to develop concepts for a practice model. The model illustrates rural district nurse advocacy success based on respect for the rights and values of people. Advocacy action is motivated by the emotional responses of nurses to the end-of-life vulnerability people experience. The combination of willing investment in relationships, knowing the rural people and resources, and feeling supported, together enables district nurses to develop therapeutic emotional intelligence. This skill promotes moral agency in reflection and advocacy action to overcome emotional and ethical care challenges of access and choice using holistic assessment, communication, organisation of resources and empowering support for the self-determination of person-centred end-of-life goals. Recommendations are proposed from the theoretical concepts in the model. Testing the model in practice is recommended to gain the perceptions of a broader range of rural people both giving and receiving end-of-life-care. A model developed by gathering and comparing district nursing experiences and understanding using mixed methods and existing theory offers evidence for practice of a philosophy of successful person-centred advocacy care in a field of nursing that lacks specific

  13. Successful completion of the Qinshan phase III nuclear power plant-a successful model for Chinese-Canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xiaoxing

    2004-01-01

    This report documents Qinshan CANDU project construction and commissioning experience as well as management strategies and approaches that contributed to the successful completion of the project. The Qinshan phase III (CANDU) nuclear power plant was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 24, 2003, 43 days and 112 days ahead of schedule respectively. The reference plant design is the Wolsong 3 and 4 CANDU-6 units in the Republic of Korea. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 Months from First Concrete to Criticality-a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods (including open top construction, heavy lifts and modularization), electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management, specialized material control including bar coding, and planning. The introduction of new design and construction techniques was achieved by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools will benefit TQNPC in operation of the station, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China and enhancing their opportunities internationally. TQNPC's participation in Quality surveillance (QS) activities of nuclear steam plant (NSP) and Balance of Plant (BOP) offshore equipment benefited TQNPC in acquiring knowledge of specific equipment manufacturing processes, which can be applied to similar activities in China. China has established the capability of manufacturing CANDU fuel and becoming self-reliant in fuel supply. Excellent co-operation and

  14. Model for assessing the success of SMEs in the internacionali­zation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Kubíčková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with evaluating the success of small and medium-sized companies in in­ter­na­tio­na­li­za­tion process. The process of internationalization is defined in the literature in a many ways; there is a countless variety of different approaches and models of internationalization process of firms. Like all processes in the firm also the internationalization process is accompanied by risks. For risk management it is important to know what the key factors of success are in the international arena. In this article is presented a simple evaluation model that could be used by SMEs to determine not only how strong are they compared to competitors, but also at what level are their key success factors in the process of internationalization. The aim was to find a simple method to help small and medium enterprises to assess their situation in the field of internationalization and to help them identify their strengths and weaknesses in this area. Proposed simple evaluation model has the graphic output from which it can be seen in which areas the company is doing well in internationalization process and in what areas is doing badly – then there is room for further improvement. Creating the model it was essential to divide the various factors into several groups and further evaluation to determine the range by which SMEs can quantify the level of success in internationalization process. Before the model was constructed it was necessary to collect data among small and mid-sized firms, and to process the outputs of the survey. After confirmation or to rejection of the certain hypotheses key success factors of SMEs in the internationalization process were selected and these factors were then aggregated into 4 groups. The model was then applied to data obtained from a survey of 40 SMEs and in the paper there are presented specific examples of graphical output of the model for the best and worst rated company. Authors are aware that the model is

  15. Opportunity for collaboration: a conceptual model of success in tobacco control and cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Frances A; Schmitt, Carol L; Rosas, Scott R

    2012-01-01

    Collaborations between cancer prevention and tobacco control programs can leverage scarce resources to address noncommunicable diseases globally, but barriers to cooperation and actual collaboration are substantial. To foster collaboration between cancer prevention and tobacco control programs, the Global Health Partnership conducted research to identify similarities and differences in how the 2 programs viewed program success. Using concept mapping, cancer prevention and tobacco control experts generated statements describing the components of a successful cancer prevention or tobacco control program and 33 participants sorted and rated the final 99 statements. Multidimensional scaling analysis with a 2-dimensional solution was used to identify an 8-cluster conceptual map of program success. We calculated Pearson correlation coefficients for all 99 statements to compare the item-level ratings of both groups and used t tests to compare the mean importance of ratings assigned to each cluster. Eight major clusters of success were identified: 1) advocacy and persuasion, 2) building sustainability, 3) partnerships, 4) readiness and support, 5) program management fundamentals, 6) monitoring and evaluation, 7) utilization of evidence, and 8) implementation. We found no significant difference between the maps created by the 2 groups and only 1 mean difference for the importance ratings for 1 of the clusters: cancer prevention experts rated partnerships as more important to program success than did tobacco control experts. Our findings are consistent with those of research documenting the necessary components of successful programs and the similarities between cancer prevention and tobacco control. Both programs value the same strategies to address a common risk factor: tobacco use. Identifying common ground between these 2 research and practice communities can benefit future collaborations at the local, state, tribal, national, and international levels, and inform the

  16. Validation of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebowale I

    2017-01-01

    This study is an adaptation of the widely used DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of hospital information systems in a developing country. A survey research design was adopted in the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 442 health information management personnel in five Nigerian teaching hospitals. A structural equation modeling technique was used to validate the model's constructs. It was revealed that system quality significantly influenced use (β = 0.53, p Information quality significantly influenced use (β = 0.24, p 0.05), but it significantly influenced perceived net benefits (β = 0.21, p 0.05). The study validates the DeLone and McLean information system success model in the context of a hospital information system in a developing country. Importantly, system quality and use were found to be important measures of hospital information system success. It is, therefore, imperative that hospital information systems are designed in such ways that are easy to use, flexible, and functional to serve their purpose.

  17. A structural equation model to integrate changes in functional strategies during old-field succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vile, Denis; Shipley, Bill; Garnier, Eric

    2006-02-01

    From a functional perspective, changes in abundance, and ultimately species replacement, during succession are a consequence of integrated suites of traits conferring different relative ecological advantages as the environment changes over time. Here we use structural equations to model the interspecific relationships between these integrated functional traits using 34 herbaceous species from a Mediterranean old-field succession and thus quantify the notion of a plant strategy. We measured plant traits related to plant vegetative and reproductive size, leaf functioning, reproductive phenology, seed mass, and production on 15 individuals per species monitored during one growing season. The resulting structural equation model successfully accounts for the pattern of trait covariation during the first 45 years post-abandonment using just two forcing variables: time since site abandonment and seed mass; no association between time since field abandonment and seed mass was observed over these herbaceous stages of secondary succession. All other predicted traits values are determined by these two variables and the cause-effect linkage between them. Adding pre-reproductive vegetative mass as a third forcing variable noticeably increased the predictive power of the model. Increasing the time after abandonment favors species with increasing life span and pre-reproductive biomass and decreasing specific leaf area. Allometric coefficients relating vegetative and reproductive components of plant size were in accordance with allometry theory. The model confirmed the trade-off between seed mass and seed number. Maximum plant height and seed mass were major determinants of reproductive phenology. Our results show that beyond verbal conceptualization, plant ecological strategies can be quantified and modeled.

  18. Describing Compton scattering and two-quanta positron annihilation based on Compton profiles: Two models suited for the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Bohlen, TT; Patera, V; Sala, P R

    2012-01-01

    An accurate description of the basic physics processes of Compton scattering and positron annihilation in matter requires the consideration of atomic shell structure effects and, in specific, the momentum distributions of the atomic electrons. Two algorithms which model Compton scattering and two-quanta positron annihilation at rest accounting for shell structure effects are proposed. Two-quanta positron annihilation is a physics process which is of particular importance for applications such as positron emission tomography (PET). Both models use a detailed description of the processes which incorporate consistently Doppler broadening and binding effects. This together with the relatively low level of complexity of the models makes them particularly suited to be employed by fast sampling methods for Monte Carlo particle transport. Momentum distributions of shell electrons are obtained from parametrized one-electron Compton profiles. For conduction electrons, momentum distributions are derived in the framework...

  19. Analytical model describing the relationship between laser power, beam velocity and melt pool depth in the case of laser (re)melting, -alloying and -dispersing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Meijer, J.; Beckmann, Leo H.J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Laser surface treatment, more specifically laser - (re)melting, -alloying and -dispersing, are techniques for improving wear, fatigue and erosion resistance of mechanical parts, using high power lasers. Analytical models which decrease these processes in a simplified way can be helpful for (a)

  20. Describing the efect of tempering on hysteresis curves of 54SiCr6 spring steel by the effective field model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perevertov, Oleksiy

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 324, č. 8 (2012), s. 1645-1648 ISSN 0304-8853 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M100100906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : hysteresis curve * internal stress * tempering * spring steel * effective field model * coincidence point Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.826, year: 2012

  1. Relating Successful Business Models to Intellectual Capital and Knowledge Management Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    There are a number of natural links between the fields of business models and knowledge management. The contemporary understanding of business models is that they are concerned with describing and analyzing the methods of value creation and the alternative ways of delivering use value to customers...... that are applied by organizations. Similarly, knowledge management also has intricate connections with mechanisms of value creation, through the structuring and improvement of knowledge processes in a given organization. Ensuring that the right knowledge is present is an important part of any business model...... innovation exercise. By applying the lens of intellectual capital, a natural link between business models and knowledge management is established. From this link, it is possible to structure and describe key characteristics. This paper accounts for the relationships between business models and knowledge...

  2. A mathematical model to describe the diurnal pattern of enteric methane emissions from non-lactating dairy cows post-feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteric methane emission is not only a source of energy loss in ruminants, but also a potent contributor to greenhouse gas production. To identify the nature and timing of interventions to reduce methane emissions requires knowledge of temporal kinetics of methane emissions during animal husbandry. Accordingly, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the pattern of enteric methane emissions after feeding in dairy cows. The model facilitated estimation of total enteric methane emissions (V, g produced by the residual substrate (V1, g and newly ingested feed (V2, g. The model was fitted to the 10 h methane emission patterns after morning feeding of 16 non-lactating dairy cows with various body weights (BW, and the obtained parameters were used to predict the kinetics of 24 h methane emission for each animal. The rate of methane emission (g/h reached a maximum within 1 to 2 h after feeding, followed by a gradual post-prandial decline to a basal value before the next feeding. The model satisfactorily fitted curves for each cow according to the criterion of goodness-of-fit, and provided biological descriptions for fluctuations in methane emissions based on basal V1 and feeding V2 in response to the changes in BW and dry matter intake (DMI of different dairy cows. The basal V1 and feeding V2 are probably maintained by slow- and readily-degradable substrates, respectively. The former contributed at least 0.6 of methane production. In summary, the model provides a means to separate basal V1 and feeding V2 within V, and can be used to predict 24 h emission from a single feeding period.

  3. A rate- and state-dependent friction model to describe the seasonal motion of slow-moving earthflows and quantify their potential for catastrophic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerger, A. L.; Rempel, A. W.; Roering, J. J.; Hilley, G. E.; Skarbek, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Slow-moving earthflows regularly exhibit seasonal velocity patterns driven by transient perturbations in effective normal stress that alter the frictional resistance along the sliding surface. These annual velocity patterns are ubiquitous in slow-moving landslides throughout the world, with individual landslides often displaying complex spatial patterns of acceleration that can vary from year to year. Here, we model landslide motion using a rate- and state-dependent frictional treatment that incorporates variations in effective normal stress and material properties, including both velocity-weakening (VW) and velocity-strengthening (VS) patches, along the sliding surface. We calculate changes in effective stress by allowing rainfall-induced changes in pore-water pressure to diffuse vertically from the ground surface to the landslide base. We then solve for changes in frictional strength and velocity along a 1D slip surface that extends the length of the landslide. Model parameters are calibrated using measurements from laboratory tests, field instruments, and satellite InSAR. Our model is able to produce seasonal variations in sliding rate that mimic the patterns commonly displayed by these slope failures. We use our model to identify the conditions under which these slides can transition from non-catastrophic motion to catastrophic failure. We find that non-catastrophic motion occurs if the landslides are comprised of entirely VS material or if their spatial dimensions do not exceed a critical nucleation length, which is determined by the ratio of VW to VS material and the effective stress. Furthermore, this modeling framework suggests that landslides that exhibit spatially varying motion (i.e. consisting of an ensemble of smaller slip patches) may be less likely to fail catastrophically when compared to landslides that exhibit spatially uniform motion if differences in the timing of motion along the landslide reflect the presence of temporary slip barriers (i

  4. Use the predictive models to explore the key factors affecting phytoplankton succession in Lake Erhai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Wang, Huan; Chen, Jun; Shen, Hong; Deng, Xuwei

    2018-01-01

    Increasing algae in Lake Erhai has resulted in frequent blooms that have not only led to water ecosystem degeneration but also seriously influenced the quality of the water supply and caused extensive damage to the local people, as the lake is a water resource for Dali City. Exploring the key factors affecting phytoplankton succession and developing predictive models with easily detectable parameters for phytoplankton have been proven to be practical ways to improve water quality. To this end, a systematic survey focused on phytoplankton succession was conducted over 2 years in Lake Erhai. The data from the first study year were used to develop predictive models, and the data from the second year were used for model verification. The seasonal succession of phytoplankton in Lake Erhai was obvious. The dominant groups were Cyanobacteria in the summer, Chlorophyta in the autumn and Bacillariophyta in the winter. The developments and verification of predictive models indicated that compared to phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton density is more effective for estimating phytoplankton variation in Lake Erhai. CCA (canonical correlation analysis) indicated that TN (total nitrogen), TP (total phosphorus), DO (dissolved oxygen), SD (Secchi depth), Cond (conductivity), T (water temperature), and ORP (oxidation reduction potential) had significant influences (p < 0.05) on the phytoplankton community. The CCA of the dominant species found that Microcystis was significantly influenced by T. The dominant Chlorophyta, Psephonema aenigmaticum and Mougeotia, were significantly influenced by TN. All results indicated that TN and T were the two key factors driving phytoplankton succession in Lake Erhai.

  5. Social Dancing for Successful Ageing: Models for Health, Happiness and Social Inclusion amongst Senior Citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Skinner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article presents findings from a qualitative study of social dancing for successful ageing amongst senior citizens in three locales: in Blackpool (GB, around Belfast (NI, and in Sacramento (US. Findings also attest to the social, psychological and health benefits of social dancing amongst senior citizens. They also articulate three different social dancing models: social dance as tea dance (Sacramento, social dance as practice dance (Blackpool, social dance as motility (Belfast and environs.

  6. A spline polynomial model to describe serum IGF-I concentration from birth to slaughter in calves: effects of weaning age, pre-weaning concentrate feeding and breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, M; Casasús, I; Villalba, D

    2010-04-01

    The statistical analysis of hormones sampled throughout the production cycle is complicated because factors such as age and weight at the measuring date interfere. Spline curves constructed from pieces of low-degree, random-effects polynomials could be used for a more accurate analysis of data. Concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), weight gain, and concentrate intake of Parda de Montaña (PM) (n=27) and Pirenaica calves (n=14) were modeled with a spline model according to age at weaning, pre-weaning concentrate feeding, and breed. At birth, calves were randomly assigned to early weaning (EW) at 90 d or traditional weaning (TW) at 150 d. During lactation, half of PM calves received concentrates (S), whereas the remainder received no concentrates (NS). After weaning, calves received concentrates on an ad libitum basis until they reached a weight of 450 kg. The spline model had better likelihood than a polynomial of 6 degrees or a split-plot model. Serum IGF-1 concentration was greatly affected by age at weaning and pre-weaning concentrate feeding, but not by breed. In NS calves, IGF-1 concentration was greater in EW than in TW calves from 120 to 300 d, irrespective of breed. During lactation, S calves had greater IGF-1 concentration than NS calves. After weaning, EWNS calves reached the IGF-1 concentration of EWS calves after 4 mo on concentrates, whereas TWNS calves attained IGF-1 concentration of TWS calves after only 2 mo, because of their increased concentrate intake relative to TWS calves. Concentration of IGF-1 was positively correlated with the immediate weight gains and intake, but it was not a good predictor of performance in the long term. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of the NDHA model to describe N2O dynamics in activated sludge mixed culture biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domingo-Felez, Carlos; Smets, Barth F.

    pathways by both autotrophic ammonium oxidizing and heterotrophic bacteria. Extant respirometric assays and anaerobic batch experiments were designed to calibrate the endogenous, heterotrophic denitrification and autotrophic ammonium/nitrite oxidation processes together with the associated net N2O...... concentrations; while the nitrifier nitrification pathway showed the largest contribution at high dissolved oxygen levels (51, 19%). The uncertainty of the biological parameter estimates was propagated to N2O model outputs via Monte Carlo simulations as 95% confidence intervals. The accuracy of the estimated...

  8. Is the fluid mosaic (and the accompanying raft hypothesis a suitable model to describe fundamental features of biological membranes? What may be missing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Bagatolli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The structure, dynamics, and stability of lipid bilayers are controlled by thermodynamic forces, leading to overall tensionless membranes with a distinct lateral organization and a conspicuous lateral pressure profile. Bilayers are also subject to built-in curvature-stress instabilities that may be released locally or globally in terms of morphological changes leading to the formation of non-lamellar and curved structures. A key controller of the bilayer’s propensity to form curved structures is the average molecular shape of the different lipid molecules. Via the curvature stress, molecular shape mediates a coupling to membrane-protein function and provides a set of physical mechanisms for formation of lipid domains and laterally differentiated regions in the plane of the membrane. Unfortunately, these relevant physical features of membranes are often ignored in the most popular models for biological membranes. Results from a number of experimental and theoretical studies emphasize the significance of these fundamental physical properties and call for a refinement of the fluid mosaic model (and the accompanying raft hypothesis.

  9. Pathways to Life Success: A Conceptual Model of Financial Well-Being for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soyeon; Xiao, Jing J.; Barber, Bonnie L.; Lyons, Angela C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and test a conceptual model of the potential antecedents and consequences of financial well-being in young adulthood. Data (N = 781) were collected via an online survey conducted at a large state university in the southwestern United States. Our results suggest that self-actualizing personal values,…

  10. Student Success and the Family: Using the Comer Model for Home-School Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Daniel D.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Comer Parents' Program Model, a structure to develop and plan effective parent-school partnerships. Describes the program's three levels (broad-based participation, parents-as-volunteers, and parents-as-decision-makers). Notes the need for a comprehensive plan. Discusses the four key elements of the plan: information exchange,…

  11. Study of dynamical properties in a bi-dimensional model describing the prey–predator dynamics with strong Allee effect in prey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Mandal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we analyze a bi-dimensional differential equation system obtained by considering Holling type II functional response in prey–predator model with strong Allee effect in prey. One of the important consequence of this modification is the existence of separatrix curve which divides the behaviour of the trajectories in the phase plane. The results show that the origin is an attractor for any set of parameter values. Axial equilibrium points are stable or unstable according to the different parametric restrictions. The unique positive equilibrium point, if it exists, can be either an attractor or a repeller surrounded by a limit cycle, whose stability and uniqueness are also established. Therefore long-term coexistence of both populations is possible or they can go to extinction. Conditions on the parameter values are derived to show that the positive equilibrium point can be emerged or annihilated through transcritical bifurcation at axial equilibrium points. The existence of two heteroclinic curves is also established. It is also demonstrated that the origin is a global attractor in the phase plane for some parameter values, which implies that there are satisfying conditions where both populations can go to extinction. Ecological interpretations of all analytical results are provided thoroughly.

  12. Application of two forest succession models at sites in Northeast Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasch, P.; Lindner, M.

    1995-06-01

    In order to simulate potential impacts of climate change on forests, two succession models were applied to sites in the Northeast German lowlands. The models, which had been developed for Alpine (FORECE) and Boreal (FORSKA) forests differ from each other in the way they represent tree growth processes and the impact of environmental factors on establishment and growth. Both models were adjusted and compared with each other at sites that are situated along an ecological gradient from maritime to subcontinental climate. These sites are extending the former environmental space of model application towards water limited conditions, which under a predicted climatic change may have increasing importance for European forests. First results showed that FORECE was unrealistically sensitive to changes in soil moisture. On the other hand, FORSKA generally simulated very low biomasses. Since the structure of FORSKA seemed to be better suited for the simulation of changing environmental conditions, this model was chosen for further model development, applications and sensitivity analyses. Among other changes, establishment rates were increased and some environmental response factors were analysed. The function of account for resource depletion was modified. After the modifications for Central European conditions were made, there was a decrease in performance for the Boreal site. Both simulated total biomasses and species composition had changed. We conclude, that with currently available models, realistic forest dynamics within different climatic zones of Europe cannot be simulated without more substantial model modifications. (orig.)

  13. Chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doughty, C.; Dragila, M.I.; Faybishenko, B.; Podgorney, R.K.; Stoops, T.M.; Wheatcraft, S.W.; Wood, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    'DOE faces the remediation of numerous contaminated sites, such as those at Hanford, INEEL, LLNL, and LBNL, where organic and/or radioactive wastes were intentionally or accidentally released to the vadose zone from surface spills, underground tanks, cribs, shallow ponds, and deep wells. Migration of these contaminants through the vadose zone has lead to the contamination of or threatens to contaminate underlying groundwater. A key issue in choosing a corrective action plan to clean up contaminated sites is to determine the location, total mass, mobility and travel time to receptors for contaminants moving in the vadose zone. These problems are difficult to solve in a technically defensible and accurate manner because contaminants travel downward intermittently through narrow pathways driven by variations in environmental conditions. These preferential pathways can be difficult to find and predict. The primary objective of this project is to determine if and when dynamical chaos theory can be used to investigate infiltration of fluid and contaminant transport in heterogeneous soils and fractured rocks. The objective of this project is being achieved through the following Activities (1) Evaluation of chaotic behavior of flow in laboratory and field experiments using methods from non-linear dynamics; (2) Evaluation of the impact these dynamics may have on contaminant transport through heterogeneous fractured rocks and soils, and how it can be used to guide remediation efforts; (3) Development of a conceptual model and mathematical and numerical algorithms for flow and transport, which incorporate both: (a) the spatial variability of heterogeneous porous and fractured media, and (b) the description of the temporal dynamics of flow and transport, which may be chaotic; and (4) Development of appropriate experimental field and laboratory techniques needed to detect diagnostic parameters for chaotic behavior of flow. This approach is based on the assumption that spatial

  14. Telehealth services in rural and remote Australia: a systematic review of models of care and factors influencing success and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Natalie K; Caffery, Liam J; Smith, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    including clinical speciality, disciplines involved, geographical location and the role of the service. Data relating to the success or sustainability of services were grouped thematically. Inclusion criteria were met by 116 articles that described 72 discrete telehealth services. Telehealth services in rural and remote Australia are described and we have identified six key factors associated with the success and sustainability of services: vision, ownership, adaptability, economics, efficiency and equipment. Telehealth has the potential to address many of the key challenges to providing health in Australia, with its substantial land area and widely dispersed population. This review collates information regarding the telehealth services in Australia and describes models of care and characteristics of successful and sustainable services. We identified a wide variety of telehealth services being provided in rural and remote areas of Australia. There is great potential to increase this number by scaling up and replicating successful services. This review provides information for policy makers, governments and public and private health services that wish to integrate telehealth into routine practice and for telehealth providers to enhance the sustainability of their service.

  15. Identifying Successful Advancement Approaches in Four Catholic Universities: The Effectiveness of the Four Advancement Models of Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonglia, Jean-Pierre K.

    2010-01-01

    The current longitudinal study of the most successful Catholic universities in the United States identifies the prevalence of four advancement models of communication that have contributed to make those institutions successful in their philanthropic efforts. While research by Grunig and Kelly maintained that the two-way symmetrical model of…

  16. Performance evaluation of public hospital information systems by the information system success model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Bae, Sung-Kwon; Ryu, Ji-Hye; Kim, Kyeong Na; An, Chang-Ho; Chae, Young Moon

    2015-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the performance of the newly developed information system (IS) implemented on July 1, 2014 at three public hospitals in Korea. User satisfaction scores of twelve key performance indicators of six IS success factors based on the DeLone and McLean IS Success Model were utilized to evaluate IS performance before and after the newly developed system was introduced. All scores increased after system introduction except for the completeness of medical records and impact on the clinical environment. The relationships among six IS factors were also analyzed to identify the important factors influencing three IS success factors (Intention to Use, User Satisfaction, and Net Benefits). All relationships were significant except for the relationships among Service Quality, Intention to Use, and Net Benefits. The results suggest that hospitals should not only focus on systems and information quality; rather, they should also continuously improve service quality to improve user satisfaction and eventually reach full the potential of IS performance.

  17. Modelling the interactions among factors that influence successful computerisation of small business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Fogarty

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Small businesses face many problems if they are to survive the first five years of operation. The increasing complexity of information needed to run a business in the 21st Century has added another obstacle to what is already a tough course. Sooner or later, survivors are faced with the prospect of investing in computer based information systems (CBIS. Properly handled, the investment will improve the competitiveness of the company. Badly handled, the investment will handicap the company and perhaps even lead to its closure. Using survey methodology, the present study collected information from 171 small businesses that had purchased computer systems with a view to finding out what factors contribute to successful implementation of CBIS. The variables studied included background characteristics of the organization, background characteristics of the Chief Executive Officer, decision making processes, and a range of variables relating to the performance of the system itself. The outcome variable was user satisfaction. We developed and tested a CBIS implementation success model based on these variables. Results showed that although the performance of the system was the immediate determinant of satisfaction, the background variables had both direct and indirect (mediated effects on satisfaction. These findings emphasise the importance of going beyond the immediate surrounds of a computing environment if one wishes to explain the factors that influence CBIS success in small businesses.

  18. A domestic model for successful implementation of enterprise resource planning (ERP systems in Iranian manufacturing enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rahmani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates the human-behavioral dimension of technology acceptance in enterprises. It is evident that accepting a technology depends on the underlying circumstances of the environment. We have approached this issue from two different angles of social and technological architecture. The research tries to explore proper enterprise architecture for ERP system acceptance. Social Architecture (SA is defined as the set of circumstances that makes people behave in a particular way. So behavior of persons (employees of an enterprise can be a function of SA. Hence acceptance of a system can be dictated by SA and manipulating SA can result in desirable success for a technology system. We have achieved various variables of social architecture and have examined their relevance to system acceptance and success in related enterprises (research domain beside technological architecture variables. The results have indicated that a special form of social and technological architecture can lead to success for ERP system in the enterprises of the research domain. This gave us a model of architecture.

  19. Self-management model in the scheduling of successive appointments in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Corredor, David; Cuadra Díaz, José Luis; Mateos Rodríguez, Javier José; Anino Fernández, Joaquín; Mínguez Sánchez, María Dolores; de Lara Simón, Isabel María; Tébar, María Ángeles; Añó, Encarnación; Sanz, María Dolores; Ballester, María Nieves

    2018-01-08

    The rheumatology service of Ciudad Real Hospital, located in an autonomous community of that same name that is nearly in the center of Spain, implemented a self-management model of successive appointments more than 10 years ago. Since then, the physicians of the department schedule follow-up visits for their patients depending on the disease, its course and ancillary tests. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and compare the self-management model for successive appointments in the rheumatology service of Ciudad Real Hospital versus the model of external appointment management implemented in 8 of the hospital's 15 medical services. A comparative and multivariate analysis was performed to identify variables with statistically significant differences, in terms of activity and/or performance indicators and quality perceived by users. The comparison involved the self-management model for successive appointments employed in the rheumatology service of Ciudad Real Hospital and the model for external appointment management used in 8 hospital medical services between January 1 and May 31, 2016. In a database with more than 100,000 records of appointments involving the set of services included in the study, the mean waiting time and the numbers of non-appearances and rescheduling of follow-up visits in the rheumatology department were significantly lower than in the other services. The number of individuals treated in outpatient rheumatology services was 7,768, and a total of 280 patients were surveyed (response rate 63.21%). They showed great overall satisfaction, and the incidence rate of claims was low. Our results show that the self-management model of scheduling appointments has better results in terms of activity indicators and in quality perceived by users, despite the intense activity. Thus, this study could be fundamental for decision making in the management of health care organizations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de

  20. Migration delays caused by anthropogenic barriers: modeling dams, temperature, and success on migrating salmon smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Elizabeth A.; Mather, Martha E.; Parrish, Donna; Allison, Gary W.; McMenemy, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption to migration is a growing problem for conservation and restoration of animal populations. Anthropogenic barriers along migration paths can delay or prolong migrations, which may result in a mismatch with migration-timing adaptations. To understand the interaction of dams (as barriers along a migration path), seasonally changing environmental conditions, timing of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) downstream migration, and ultimate migration success, we used 10 years of river temperature and discharge data as a template upon which we simulated downstream movement of salmon. Atlantic salmon is a cool-water species whose downstream migrating smolts must complete migration before river temperatures become too warm. We found that dams had a local effect on survival as well as a survival effect that was spatially and temporally removed from the encounter with the dam. While smolts are delayed by dams, temperatures downstream can reach lethal or near-lethal temperatures; as a result, the match between completion of migration and the window of appropriate migration conditions can be disrupted. The strength of this spatially and temporally removed effect is at least comparable to the local effects of dams in determining smolt migration success in the presence of dams. We also considered smolts from different tributaries, varying in distance from the river mouth, to assess the potential importance of locally adapted migration timing on the effect of barriers. Migration-initiation temperature affected modeled smolt survival differentially across tributaries, with the success of smolts from upstream tributaries being much more variable across years than that of smolts with a shorter distance to travel. As a whole, these results point to the importance of broadening our spatial and temporal view when managing migrating populations. We must consider not only how many individuals never make it across migration barriers, but also the spatially and temporally removed

  1. Migration delays caused by anthropogenic barriers: Modeling dams, temperature, and success of migrating salmon smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, E.A.; Mather, M. E.; Parrish, D.L.; Allison, G.W.; McMenemy, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption to migration is a growing problem for conservation and restoration of animal populations. Anthropogenic barriers along migration paths can delay or prolong migrations, which may result in a mismatch with migration-timing adaptations. To understand the interaction of dams (as barriers along a migration path), seasonally changing environmental conditions, timing of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) downstream migration, and ultimate migration success, we used 10 years of river temperature and discharge data as a template upon which we simulated downstream movement of salmon. Atlantic salmon is a cool-water species whose downstream migrating smolts must complete migration before river temperatures become too warm. We found that dams had a local effect on survival as well as a survival effect that was spatially and temporally removed from the encounter with the dam. While smolts are delayed by dams, temperatures downstream can reach lethal or near-lethal temperatures;as a result, the match between completion of migration and the window of appropriate migration conditions can be disrupted. The strength of this spatially and temporally removed effect is at least comparable to the local effects of dams in determining smolt migration success in the presence of dams. We also considered smolts from different tributaries, varying in distance from the river mouth, to assess the potential importance of locally adapted migration timing on the effect of barriers. Migration-initiation temperature affected modeled smolt survival differentially across tributaries, with the success of smolts from upstream tributaries being much more variable across years than that of smolts with a shorter distance to travel. As a whole, these results point to the importance of broadening our spatial and temporal view when managing migrating populations. We must consider not only how many individuals never make it across migration barriers, but also the spatially and temporally removed

  2. Inhomogeneous Markov Models for Describing Driving Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jan Emil Banning; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Morales González, Juan Miguel

    It has been predicted that electric vehicles will play a crucial role in incorporating a large renewable component in the energy sector. If electric vehicles are integrated in a naive way, they may exacerbate issues related to peak demand and transmission capacity limits while not reducing pollut...

  3. Effectively translating diabetes prevention: a successful model in a historically underserved community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Carol R; Eckhardt, Sarah; Talavera, Sandra; Goytia, Crispin; Lorig, Kate

    2011-09-01

    Lifestyle interventions can prevent diabetes through weight loss, but they are rarely translated for use in underserved communities. The aim of this study was to describe how a community-academic partnership formed and developed a program to address local health disparities by developing a low-cost, culturally and economically appropriate, peer-led community-based diabetes prevention program. Using a participatory approach, the partnership chose to focus on diabetes prevention, and co-developed all intervention, recruitment, research, and evaluation strategies. The partnership's philosophy to maintain high clinical and scientific standards paired with their ability to represent and engage the community facilitated the development of a randomized controlled trial that achieved statistically significant and sustained weight loss, and the recruitment of a largely Spanish-speaking, low income, uninsured population. The success of this intervention lies in the partnership's commitment to the community, co-ownership of research, and a careful balance between academic rigor and community engagement and relevance.

  4. Modeling N Cycling during Succession after Forest Disturbance: an Analysis of N Mining and Retention Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Ollinger, S. V.; Ouimette, A.; Lovett, G. M.; Fuss, C. B.; Goodale, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic nitrogen losses at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), New Hampshire, USA, have declined in recent decades, a pattern that counters expectations based on prevailing theory. An unbalanced ecosystem nitrogen (N) budget implies there is a missing component for N sink. Hypotheses to explain this discrepancy include increasing rates of denitrification and accumulation of N in mineral soil pools following N mining by plants. Here, we conducted a modeling analysis fused with field measurements of N cycling, specifically examining the hypothesis relevant to N mining and retention in mineral soils. We included simplified representations of both mechanisms, N mining and retention, in a revised ecosystem process model, PnET-SOM, to evaluate the dynamics of N cycling during succession after forest disturbance at the HBEF. The predicted N mining during the early succession was regulated by a metric representing a potential demand of extra soil N for large wood growth. The accumulation of nitrate in mineral soil pools was a function of the net aboveground biomass accumulation and soil N availability and parameterized based on field 15N tracer incubation data. The predicted patterns of forest N dynamics were consistent with observations. The addition of the new algorithms also improved the predicted DIN export in stream water with an R squared of 0.35 (Psuccession, and soil retention about 35% at the current forest stage at the HBEF.

  5. Evaluation of a comprehensive EHR based on the DeLone and McLean model for IS success: approach, results, and success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Udsen, Flemming Witt

    2013-10-01

    The article describes the methodological approach to, and results of an evaluation of a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) in the shake down phase, shortly after its implementation at a regional hospital in Denmark. A formative evaluation based on a mixed-methods case study, designed to be interactive and concurrent was conducted at two hospital departments based on the updated DeLone and McLean framework for evaluating information systems success. To ascertain user assessments of the EHR, we distributed a questionnaire two months after implementation to four groups of staff (physicians, nurses, medical secretaries, and physiotherapists; n=244), and at the same time we conducted thirteen individual, semi-structured interviews with representatives from these four groups. Subsequently, seven follow-up focus group interviews were conducted with the four above-mentioned groups, in order to go deeper into specific user assessments. Simultaneously, focus group interviews with two IT departments and the implementation team were conducted, to gain insight into system provider assessments of the implementation process and the EHR. Before, during, and after implementation, 88 h of ethnographic observation were carried out, to give the researchers an understanding of the daily routine of staff, and their use of health records. Finally, daily system performance data were obtained, to gather factual information on system response and downtime. Overall, staff had positive experiences with the EHR and its operational reliability, response time, login and support. Performance was acceptable. Medical secretaries found the use of the patient administration module cumbersome, and physicians found the establishment of the overview of professionally relevant data challenging. There were demands for improvements to these and other functionalities, and for the EHR to be integrated with other systems and databases. Evaluations immediately following implementation are inherently

  6. Selection of robust variables for transfer of classification models employing the successive projections algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanez, Karla Danielle Tavares Melo; Araújo Nóbrega, Thiago César; Silva Nascimento, Danielle; Galvão, Roberto Kawakami Harrop; Pontes, Márcio José Coelho

    2017-09-01

    Multivariate models have been widely used in analytical problems involving quantitative and qualitative analyzes. However, there are cases in which a model is not applicable to spectra of samples obtained under new experimental conditions or in an instrument not involved in the modeling step. A solution to this problem is the transfer of multivariate models, usually performed using standardization of the spectral responses or enhancement of the robustness of the model. This present paper proposes two new criteria for selection of robust variables for classification transfer employing the successive projections algorithm (SPA). These variables are then used to build models based on linear discriminant analysis (LDA) with low sensitivity with respect to the differences between the responses of the instruments involved. For this purpose, transfer samples are included in the calculation of the cost for each subset of variables under consideration. The proposed methods are evaluated for two case studies involving identification of adulteration of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and hydrated ethyl alcohol fuel (HEAF) using UV-Vis and NIR spectroscopy, respectively. In both cases, similar or better classification transfer results (obtained for a test set measured on the secondary instrument) employing the two criteria were obtained in comparison with direct standardization (DS) and piecewise direct standardization (PDS). For the UV-Vis data, both proposed criteria achieved the correct classification rate (CCR) of 85%, while the best CCR obtained for the standardization methods was 81% for DS. For the NIR data, 92.5% of CCR was obtained by both criteria as well as DS. The results demonstrated the possibility of using either of the criteria proposed for building robust models as an alternative to the standardization of spectral responses for transfer of classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Triple Diagonal modeling: A mechanism to focus productivity improvement for business success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, L.O. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Villareal, L.D. [Army Depot, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Triple Diagonal (M) modeling is a technique to help quickly diagnose an organization`s existing production system and to identify significant improvement opportunities in executing, controlling, and planning operations. TD modeling is derived from ICAM Definition Language (IDEF 0)-also known as Structured Analysis and Design Technique. It has been used successfully at several Department of Defense remanufacturing facilities trying to accomplish significant production system modernization. TD has several advantages over other modeling techniques. First, it quickly does ``As-ls`` analysis and then moves on to identify improvements. Second, creating one large diagram makes it easier to share the TD model throughout an organization, rather than the many linked 8 1/2 {times} 11`` drawings used in traditional decomposition approaches. Third, it acts as a communication mechanism to share understanding about improvement opportunities that may cross existing functional/organizational boundaries. Finally, TD acts as a vehicle to build a consensus on a prioritized list of improvement efforts that ``hangs togethers as an agenda for systemic changes in the production system and the improved integration of support functions.

  8. Hierarchical Bayesian Markov switching models with application to predicting spawning success of shovelnose sturgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holan, S.H.; Davis, G.M.; Wildhaber, M.L.; DeLonay, A.J.; Papoulias, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    The timing of spawning in fish is tightly linked to environmental factors; however, these factors are not very well understood for many species. Specifically, little information is available to guide recruitment efforts for endangered species such as the sturgeon. Therefore, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model for predicting the success of spawning of the shovelnose sturgeon which uses both biological and behavioural (longitudinal) data. In particular, we use data that were produced from a tracking study that was conducted in the Lower Missouri River. The data that were produced from this study consist of biological variables associated with readiness to spawn along with longitudinal behavioural data collected by using telemetry and archival data storage tags. These high frequency data are complex both biologically and in the underlying behavioural process. To accommodate such complexity we developed a hierarchical linear regression model that uses an eigenvalue predictor, derived from the transition probability matrix of a two-state Markov switching model with generalized auto-regressive conditional heteroscedastic dynamics. Finally, to minimize the computational burden that is associated with estimation of this model, a parallel computing approach is proposed. ?? Journal compilation 2009 Royal Statistical Society.

  9. Partnerships for success: A collaborative support model to enhance the first year student experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Einfalt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent discourse about engaging first year students calls for more collaboration in terms of adopting a holistic approach to course delivery and support. This paper discusses a collaborative support model operating at a regional Australian university since 2008. In particular, it describes a collaborative support initiative emerging from this model that is based on providing an informal consultative space where students can drop-in and gain assessment support for research, writing and content. A focus group, online surveys and interviews with co-ordinators were conducted to evaluate the impact of this initiative. Findings suggest that this collaborative support model impacts on the first year student experience by: raising awareness about academic skills and the processes for researching and writing; promoting peer learning opportunities; building confidence and providing suitable support for a diverse range of students.

  10. Five Describing Factors of Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboer, Peter; Vorst, Harrie C. M.; Oort, Frans J.

    2016-01-01

    Two subtypes of dyslexia (phonological, visual) have been under debate in various studies. However, the number of symptoms of dyslexia described in the literature exceeds the number of subtypes, and underlying relations remain unclear. We investigated underlying cognitive features of dyslexia with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. A…

  11. Importance of prediction outlier diagnostics in determining a successful inter-vendor multivariate calibration model transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenard, Robert D; Wehlburg, Christine M; Pell, Randy J; Haaland, David M

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports on the transfer of calibration models between Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) instruments from four different manufacturers. The piecewise direct standardization (PDS) method is compared with the new hybrid calibration method known as prediction augmented classical least squares/partial least squares (PACLS/PLS). The success of a calibration transfer experiment is judged by prediction error and by the number of samples that are flagged as outliers that would not have been flagged as such if a complete recalibration were performed. Prediction results must be acceptable and the outlier diagnostics capabilities must be preserved for the transfer to be deemed successful. Previous studies have measured the success of a calibration transfer method by comparing only the prediction performance (e.g., the root mean square error of prediction, RMSEP). However, our study emphasizes the need to consider outlier detection performance as well. As our study illustrates, the RMSEP values for a calibration transfer can be within acceptable range; however, statistical analysis of the spectral residuals can show that differences in outlier performance can vary significantly between competing transfer methods. There was no statistically significant difference in the prediction error between the PDS and PACLS/PLS methods when the same subset sample selection method was used for both methods. However, the PACLS/PLS method was better at preserving the outlier detection capabilities and therefore was judged to have performed better than the PDS algorithm when transferring calibrations with the use of a subset of samples to define the transfer function. The method of sample subset selection was found to make a significant difference in the calibration transfer results using the PDS algorithm, while the transfer results were less sensitive to subset selection when the PACLS/PLS method was used.

  12. The Impact of Positive Role Models on the Success of Students Involved in Original Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danch, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    To maximize student understanding of the methods of science via performance of authentic scientific research, a mentorship program for middle school students was developed for the 2010 - 2011 school year. A population of 8th grade science students will be selected from a district middle school and be paired with secondary student mentors already conducting individual research as part of a successful preexisting science research program. Students will interact with mentors in a school setting to develop and implement original scientific research projects. Upon completion, students will present their findings at an interscholastic science symposium and/or an in-district science symposium. Students will also receive support from professional scientists at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey through interactive visitations and electronic communication. In an effort to provide diverse role models, mentors from a variety of racial, ethnic, and gender groups will participate. Student success will be evaluated through questionnaires, symposium participation and monitoring of future participation in authentic research programs as participants make the transition from middle to high school.

  13. A prognostic model to predict the success of artificial insemination in dairy cows based on readily available data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, C.J.; Steeneveld, W.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Huijps, K.; Nielen, M.; Hogeveen, H.

    2016-01-01

    A prognosis of the likelihood of insemination success is valuable information for the decision to start inseminating a cow. This decision is important for the reproduction management of dairy farms. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic model for the likelihood of successful first

  14. A prognostic model to predict the success of artificial insemination in dairy cows based on readily available data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, C J; Steeneveld, W; Vernooij, J C M; Huijps, K; Nielen, M; Hogeveen, H

    2016-01-01

    A prognosis of the likelihood of insemination success is valuable information for the decision to start inseminating a cow. This decision is important for the reproduction management of dairy farms. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic model for the likelihood of successful first

  15. Using a micro-level model to generate a macro-level model of productive successful aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jessica K M; Sarkisian, Natalia; Williamson, John B

    2015-02-01

    Aging successfully entails good physical and cognitive health, as well as ongoing participation in social and productive activity. This study hones in on participation in productive activity, a factor that makes an important contribution to successful aging. One conceptual model of productive activity in later life specifies the antecedents and consequences of productivity. This study draws on that micro-level model to develop a corresponding macro-level model and assesses its utility for examining the predictors of and explaining the relationships between one form of productivity (labor force participation rates) and one aspect of well-being (average life expectancy) among males and females. Random effects regression models and path analysis were used to analyze cross-national longitudinal data for 24 high-income Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries at seven time points (1980-2010; 168 observations total). OECD countries with higher labor force participation rates among older workers have higher life expectancies. Labor force participation mediates the effects of gross domestic product per capita on male and female life expectancy, and it mediates the effect of self-employment rate for men, but it acts as a suppressor with regard to the effect of public spending on male and female life expectancy. A well-known micro-level model of productive activity can be fruitfully adapted to account for macro-level cross-national variation in productivity and well-being. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Modeling community succession and assembly: A novel method for network evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WenJun Zhang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of modeling community succession and assembly is in some sense a method for network evolution, as done by Barabasi and Albert (1999. It is also one of the methods to create a sample networkfrom the statistic network I proposed earlier. I think that the mechanism of network evolution supposed by Barabasi and Albert is most likely applicable to the natural phenomena with emergency property. For natural phenomena without emergency property, the present study indicated that a scale-free network may be produced through a new mechanism, i.e., whether the connection of a taxon x occurs, dependent on the type and property of taxon y (in particular, the degree of its direct correlation with x to be connected but not necessarily the existing number of connections of taxon y, as proposed in present study.

  17. Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise.

  18. Commercial Contributions to the Success of the HEDS Enterprise: A Working Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Mark; Askew, Ray

    2000-01-01

    The future of NASA involves the exploration of space beyond the confines of orbit about the Earth. This includes robotic investigations and Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS). The HEDS Strategic Plan states: "HEDS will join with the private sector to stimulate opportunities for commercial development in space as a key to future settlement. Near-term efforts will emphasize joint pilot projects that provide clear benefit to Earth from the development of near-Earth space." In support of this endeavor, NASA has established the Commercial Development of Space as a prime goal and is exploring all the ways in which NASA might make contributions to this development. NASA has long supported the development of space for commercial use. In 1985 it formally established and provided funds to support a program which created a number of joint ventures between universities and industry for this purpose. These were known as Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). In 1999 NASA established a broader policy on commercialization with the aim of encouraging near-term commercial investment in conjunction with the International Space Station. Joint pilot projects will be initiated to stimulate this near-term investment. The long-term development of commercial concepts utilizing space access continues through the activities of the Commercial Space Centers (CSC), a sub-set of the original CCDS group. These Centers primarily require access to space for the conduct of their work. The remainder of the initial Centers focus on the development of tools and infrastructure to support users of the space environment. It is in this arena that long term development for commercial use and infrastructure development will occur. This paper will provide a retrospective examination of the Commercial Centers, the variety of models employed, the lessons learned, and the progress to date. This review will provide the bases for how successful models can be employed to accelerate

  19. Schooling Immigrants in France in the 1990s: Success or Failure of the Republican Model of Integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Agnes

    1997-01-01

    A model relying on state institutions and schools for its transmission, the Republican model, has strongly influenced the perception and treatment of immigrants in France. An analysis of contemporary French schooling shows that the model is still producing cultural assimilation but is less successful in promoting the economic and social…

  20. Analysis of Success Factors to Implement Sustainable Supply Chain Management Using Interpretive Structural Modeling Technique: A Real Case Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengke Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability draws increased supply chain management (SCM attention. This article analyzes critical success to the assessment, evaluation, and attainment of sustainable supply chain management (SSCM, assessed through critical-success identification and qualitative data analysis. Namely, a literature review selected of 188 articles, published between January 1994 and November 2016, helps identify the most influential success factors. The qualitative data analysis pertains to fifteen such successes, identified in the literature review and through our collaboration with other academic researchers and industrial specialists. Notably, the study’s qualitative data analysis, interpretive structural modeling (ISM, unconceals the mutual impact among the most prominent SSCM success factors. The economic benefits and environmental awareness of suppliers are recognized as the most significant success factors, which could allow business enterprises and other organizations to implement a SSCM framework, with intentionality and the sustainability in their business. The article concludes with suggestions for future research directions.

  1. Incumbent Decisions about Succession Transitions in Family Firms: A Conceptual Model

    OpenAIRE

    Britta Boyd; Isabel C. Botero; Tomasz A. Fediuk

    2014-01-01

    In the family business literature, succession research has focused on the family member as they enter the leadership role or on the different issues that affect the succession process. Although researchers have acknowledged that succession in family businesses is “punctuated” by decision making events, less attention has been given to understanding how incumbents make decisions about ownership and management transitions. In an effort to continue to understand the succession process it is impo...

  2. Evaluation of a comprehensive EHR based on the DeLone and McLean model for IS Success: Approach, Results, and Success Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lotte Groth; Udsen, Flemming Witt

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The article describes the methodological approach to, and results of an evaluation of a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) in the shake down phase, shortly after its implementation at a regional hospital in Denmark. Design: A formative evaluation based on a mixed-methods case...... study, designed to be interactive and concurrent was conducted at two hospital departments based on the updated DeLone and McLean framework for evaluating information systems success. Methods: To ascertain user assessments of the EHR, we distributed a questionnaire two months after implementation......:Overall, staff had positive experiences with the EHR and its operational reliability, response time, login and support. Performance was acceptable. Medical secretaries found the use of the patient administration module cumbersome, and physicians found the establishment of the overview of professionally...

  3. A mental model for successful inter-disciplinary collaboration in curriculum innovation for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Detken Scheepers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Pretoria introduced a compulsory Information Literacy module to address the need for delivering motivated knowledgeable employees that embrace information and have the skills to find, select and use relevant information accurately, efficiently and effectively in an explosive information age. Low class attendance, an indication of unmotivated students, as well as the limited scholarly application of information literacy skills in consecutive academic years of study have been identified as possible barriers to the application of the desired skills. A collaborative action research project based on Whole Brain principles was introduced to motivate learners through innovative learning material in the module. A deeper understanding of the role of thinking preferences and thinking avoidances is essential in selecting a team that is responsible for the planning, design, development and delivery of learning opportunities and material. This article discusses the Whole Brain Model® as a mental model that underpins the successful collaboration of multidisciplinary teams and enhances innovative curriculum design that addresses alternative approaches to the teaching of Information Literacy.

  4. Analysis of behavioral intention on ABC system adoption: Model of information systems technology and success acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiq Nensi Veni Indipenrian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of individual behavioral change on the adoption of activity- based costing (ABC system and its usage, using Unified Theory of Accep-tance and Use of Technology (UTAUT and Information System Success Model. The sample involves 78 respondents who have positions as financial manager, controller manager, accounting manager, and production manager in mid-sized manufacturing companies in East java. The data were collected by survey method. This study used a Partial Least Square (PLS as the data analysis method. It was found that not all of the main UTAUT models were supported, because performance expectancy and effort expectancy have no effect on behavioral intention and use behavior to adopt ABC system. Whereas, social factors, information quality and facilitating conditions had a positive effect on behavioral intention and use behavior to adopt ABC system. The different results of this study with several previous studies are probably caused by the differences in the context of system, culture and characteristics of the sample. The implication of this study is not only to propose a theoretical framework for researches in future, but also useful for companies to optimize the use of ABC system that should be supported by top level and mid-level management and the readiness of the individu-als to accept the adoption of the ABC system.

  5. Conceptual Model of Successful Educational online Community of Practice for Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Al-Shahrani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The community of practice is an internet application that nourishes knowledge management and innovation. Implementing the community of practice in education can enhance the learning process and make it an enjoyable, exiting and lifelong experience. In this paper, the researchers intend to create a conceptual model for the successful implementation of community of practice in Education in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia through evaluate the literature review about the educational community of practice. Then, a prototype is developed followed by a survey to collect feed-backs about the experiment. Using the Chi-Square statistical method of qualitative analysis associated with the Design Science Methodology of research, the research is fulfilled. The results illustrated the conceptual model of the effective implementation of the community of practice in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, that define the seven factors to be considered which are network density, culture perceptions, distributed production, knowledge complexity and richness, government enforcement, IT specialist role, and senior members role.

  6. Identifying critical success factors (CSFs) of implementing building information modeling (BIM) in Malaysian construction industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakob, Mazri; Ali, Wan Nur Athirah Wan; Radzuan, Kamaruddin

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) is defined as existing from the earliest concept to demolition and it involves creating and using an intelligent 3D model to inform and communicate project decisions. This research aims to identify the critical success factors (CSFs) of BIM implementation in Malaysian construction industry. A literature review was done to explore previous BIM studies on definitions and history of BIM, construction issues, application of BIM in construction projects as well as benefits of BIM. A series of interviews with multidisciplinary Malaysian construction experts will be conducted purposely for data collection process guided by the research design and methodology approach of this study. The analysis of qualitative data from the process will be combined with criteria identified in the literature review in order to identify the CSFs. Finally, the CSFs of BIM implementation will be validated by further Malaysian industrialists during a workshop. The validated CSFs can be used as a term of reference for both Malaysian practitioners and academics towards measuring BIM effectiveness level in their organizations.

  7. Persistence Statements: Describing Digital Stickiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kunze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a draft vocabulary for making “persistence statements.” These are simple tools for pragmatically addressing the concern that anyone feels upon experiencing a broken web link. Scholars increasingly use scientific and cultural assets in digital form, but choosing which among many objects to cite for the long term can be difficult. There are few well-defined terms to describe the various kinds and qualities of persistence that object repositories and identifier resolvers do or don’t provide. Given an object’s identifier, one should be able to query a provider to retrieve human- and machine-readable information to help judge the level of service to expect and help gauge whether the identifier is durable enough, as a sort of long-term bet, to include in a citation. The vocabulary should enable providers to articulate persistence policies and set user expectations.

  8. Modelling and monitoring vegetation and evapotranspiration on an anthropogenic grassland succession in the Andes of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, B.; Bendix, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the eastern Andes of southern Ecuador the infestation of pasture (mostly C4-grass Setaria sphacelata) by the aggressive bracken fern (Pteridium sp.) still is an unsolved problem. Environmental and exogenous factors and direct plant competition have been hypothesized to drive bracken occurrence. Special attention is given to pasture burning, which stimulates bracken growth, and is common in the relative dry season (Oct-Dec). However, no knowledge is available for a quantitative hypothesis investigation on bracken occurrence under current and future local climate. In this work a modeling approach is presented, in which initial investigations support the application of a two-big-leaf model, and parameterization and model forcing are made with extensive data on physiological traits and on the physical environment. Our main aims here are (i) to show field investigations on a plant scale, which are the basis for a proper model parameterization; and (ii) to provide initialization data, which is based on estimation of green leaf area index from very-high and high resolution optical remote sensing (air-photos and Quickbird images); (iii) to simulate vegetation succession after burn on an experimental site, using in situ climate data and future climate-change scenarios. The modeling approach is based in the main on the vegetation dynamic model called Southern Bracken Competition Model (SoBraCoMo), which has been coupled to a hydrological model written on the catchment model framework (CMF), to simulate soil-vegetation dynamics. Main initialization variables are biochemical parameters (quantum and carboxylation efficiency) and the green leaf area index (green-LAI). Forcing data include soil, leaf and air temperature, soil and air humidity and radiation. The model has been developed and tested on the experimental site (2100 m asl) in the Rio San Francisco Valley, Ecuador. Simulation results on the burn experiment of 2009 showed that stimulation by fire could not boost fern

  9. A mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the human eye : Average course, variability, and influence of refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Schiefer, Julia; Nevalainen, Jukka; Paetzold, Jens; Schiefer, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Previously we developed a mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the superior-temporal and inferior-temporal regions of the human retina, based on traced trajectories extracted from fundus photographs. Aims of the current study were to (i) validate the

  10. articles: Describing migration spatial structure

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Rogers; Frans Willekens; James Raymer; Jani Little

    2002-01-01

    The age structure of a population is a fundamental concept in demography and is generally depicted in the form of an age pyramid. The spatial structure of an interregional system of origin-destination-specific migration streams is, however, a notion lacking a widely accepted definition. We offer a definition in this article, one that draws on the log-linear specification of the geographer's spatial interaction model. We illustrate our definition with observed migration data, we discuss extens...

  11. Electoral entry and success of ethnic minority parties in central and eastern Europe: A hierarchical selection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernauer, Julian; Bochsler, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The paper examines determinants of electoral entry and success of ethnic minority parties in central and eastern Europe. The application of a hierarchical selection model shows that the strategic entry of minority parties depends on their expected electoral success due both to observed...... and unobserved factors. Drawing on formal models of electoral entry, the electoral success of new (or niche) parties is expected to be influenced by the costs of entry (determined by electoral thresholds) and the potential for electoral support. The latter depends on the reactions of political competitors...... and electoral demand, measured here as the size of ethnic groups and the saliency of ethnic issues. In line with these expectations, parties only run if they can expect electoral support sufficient to pass the electoral threshold. This finding would have been overlooked by a na??ve model of electoral success...

  12. The Model for Understanding Success in Quality (MUSIQ): building a theory of context in healthcare quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Heather C; Provost, Lloyd P; Froehle, Craig M; Margolis, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Quality improvement (QI) efforts have become widespread in healthcare, however there is significant variability in their success. Differences in context are thought to be responsible for some of the variability seen. To develop a conceptual model that can be used by organisations and QI researchers to understand and optimise contextual factors affecting the success of a QI project. 10 QI experts were provided with the results of a systematic literature review and then participated in two rounds of opinion gathering to identify and define important contextual factors. The experts subsequently met in person to identify relationships among factors and to begin to build the model. The Model for Understanding Success in Quality (MUSIQ) is organised based on the level of the healthcare system and identifies 25 contextual factors likely to influence QI success. Contextual factors within microsystems and those related to the QI team are hypothesised to directly shape QI success, whereas factors within the organisation and external environment are believed to influence success indirectly. The MUSIQ framework has the potential to guide the application of QI methods in healthcare and focus research. The specificity of MUSIQ and the explicit delineation of relationships among factors allows a deeper understanding of the mechanism of action by which context influences QI success. MUSIQ also provides a foundation to support further studies to test and refine the theory and advance the field of QI science.

  13. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  14. Developing and validating a model to predict the success of an IHCS implementation: the Readiness for Implementation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Hawkins, Robert P; Brennan, Patricia F; Dinauer, Susan; Johnson, Pauley R; Siegler, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate the Readiness for Implementation Model (RIM). This model predicts a healthcare organization's potential for success in implementing an interactive health communication system (IHCS). The model consists of seven weighted factors, with each factor containing five to seven elements. Design Two decision-analytic approaches, self-explicated and conjoint analysis, were used to measure the weights of the RIM with a sample of 410 experts. The RIM model with weights was then validated in a prospective study of 25 IHCS implementation cases. Measurements Orthogonal main effects design was used to develop 700 conjoint-analysis profiles, which varied on seven factors. Each of the 410 experts rated the importance and desirability of the factors and their levels, as well as a set of 10 different profiles. For the prospective 25-case validation, three time-repeated measures of the RIM scores were collected for comparison with the implementation outcomes. Results Two of the seven factors, ‘organizational motivation’ and ‘meeting user needs,’ were found to be most important in predicting implementation readiness. No statistically significant difference was found in the predictive validity of the two approaches (self-explicated and conjoint analysis). The RIM was a better predictor for the 1-year implementation outcome than the half-year outcome. Limitations The expert sample, the order of the survey tasks, the additive model, and basing the RIM cut-off score on experience are possible limitations of the study. Conclusion The RIM needs to be empirically evaluated in institutions adopting IHCS and sustaining the system in the long term. PMID:20962135

  15. Developing a theoretical model and questionnaire survey instrument to measure the success of electronic health records in residential aged care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Qian, Siyu

    2018-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are introduced into healthcare organizations worldwide to improve patient safety, healthcare quality and efficiency. A rigorous evaluation of this technology is important to reduce potential negative effects on patient and staff, to provide decision makers with accurate information for system improvement and to ensure return on investment. Therefore, this study develops a theoretical model and questionnaire survey instrument to assess the success of organizational EHR in routine use from the viewpoint of nursing staff in residential aged care homes. The proposed research model incorporates six variables in the reformulated DeLone and McLean information systems success model: system quality, information quality, service quality, use, user satisfaction and net benefits. Two variables training and self-efficacy were also incorporated into the model. A questionnaire survey instrument was designed to measure the eight variables in the model. After a pilot test, the measurement scale was used to collect data from 243 nursing staff members in 10 residential aged care homes belonging to three management groups in Australia. Partial least squares path modeling was conducted to validate the model. The validated EHR systems success model predicts the impact of the four antecedent variables—training, self-efficacy, system quality and information quality—on the net benefits, the indicator of EHR systems success, through the intermittent variables use and user satisfaction. A 24-item measurement scale was developed to quantitatively evaluate the performance of an EHR system. The parsimonious EHR systems success model and the measurement scale can be used to benchmark EHR systems success across organizations and units and over time. PMID:29315323

  16. Developing a theoretical model and questionnaire survey instrument to measure the success of electronic health records in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Qian, Siyu

    2018-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are introduced into healthcare organizations worldwide to improve patient safety, healthcare quality and efficiency. A rigorous evaluation of this technology is important to reduce potential negative effects on patient and staff, to provide decision makers with accurate information for system improvement and to ensure return on investment. Therefore, this study develops a theoretical model and questionnaire survey instrument to assess the success of organizational EHR in routine use from the viewpoint of nursing staff in residential aged care homes. The proposed research model incorporates six variables in the reformulated DeLone and McLean information systems success model: system quality, information quality, service quality, use, user satisfaction and net benefits. Two variables training and self-efficacy were also incorporated into the model. A questionnaire survey instrument was designed to measure the eight variables in the model. After a pilot test, the measurement scale was used to collect data from 243 nursing staff members in 10 residential aged care homes belonging to three management groups in Australia. Partial least squares path modeling was conducted to validate the model. The validated EHR systems success model predicts the impact of the four antecedent variables-training, self-efficacy, system quality and information quality-on the net benefits, the indicator of EHR systems success, through the intermittent variables use and user satisfaction. A 24-item measurement scale was developed to quantitatively evaluate the performance of an EHR system. The parsimonious EHR systems success model and the measurement scale can be used to benchmark EHR systems success across organizations and units and over time.

  17. Incumbent Decisions about Succession Transitions in Family Firms: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Boyd

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the family business literature, succession research has focused on the family member as they enter the leadership role or on the different issues that affect the succession process. Although researchers have acknowledged that succession in family businesses is “punctuated” by decision making events, less attention has been given to understanding how incumbents make decisions about ownership and management transitions. In an effort to continue to understand the succession process it is important to understand how incumbents make decisions about the type of transitions they intend to engage in (i.e., intra-family succession, out of family succession, or no succession. Building on the theory of planned behavior and the socioemotional wealth framework (SEW, this manuscript presents a conceptual framework to understand the factors that influence succession transitions and the role that contextual factors can play in this decision-making process. We present theory driven propositions and discuss the implications for understanding and evaluation of the succession process.

  18. Toward establishing model organisms for marine protists: Successful transfection protocols for Parabodo caudatus (Kinetoplastida: Excavata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomaa, Fatma; Garcia, Paulo A; Delaney, Jennifer; Girguis, Peter R; Buie, Cullen R; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2017-09-01

    We developed protocols for, and demonstrated successful transfection of, the free-living kinetoplastid flagellate Parabodo caudatus with three plasmids carrying a fluorescence reporter gene (pEF-GFP with the EF1 alpha promoter, pUB-GFP with Ubiquitin C promoter, and pEYFP-Mitotrap with CMV promoter). We evaluated three electroporation approaches: (1) a square-wave electroporator designed for eukaryotes, (2) a novel microfluidic transfection system employing hydrodynamically-controlled electric field waveforms, and (3) a traditional exponential decay electroporator. We found the microfluidic device provides a simple and efficient platform to quickly test a wide range of electric field parameters to find the optimal set of conditions for electroporation of target species. It also allows for processing large sample volumes (>10 ml) within minutes, increasing throughput 100 times over cuvettes. Fluorescence signal from the reporter gene was detected a few hours after transfection and persisted for 3 days in cells transfected by pEF-GFP and pUB-GFP plasmids and for at least 5 days post-transfection for cells transfected with pEYFP-Mitotrap. Expression of the reporter genes (GFP and YFP) was also confirmed using reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). This work opens the door for further efforts with this taxon and close relatives toward establishing model systems for genome editing. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The cardiovascular perfusionist as a model for the successful technologist in high stress situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, P J; Mook, W J

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the psychological profiles of highly stressed medical technologists. One hundred and four individuals representing a cross-section of the United States who function as operators of heart-lung machines during open heart surgery (perfusionists) were studied using both internal and external models based on the works of Eric Berne and Karen Horney. Daily exposure to life and death responsibilities combined with the constant pressures of maintaining current technical skills can make the profession selected for this study representative of high technology professions that require a great deal of coping. Results of this study indicate that there is a balanced psychological profile in successful technologists functioning in long-term, high-stressed occupations. Female perfusionists appear to be more aggressive and critical than their male counterparts. This is seen as an attempt by female perfusionists to compensate for what has historically been a male dominanted, highly technical and high-stressed occupation. Generalizations for candidate selections to high stressed occupations could be made as well as projections of foundations for possible progressive disillusionment (burn out).

  20. Is Russia successful in attracting foreign direct investment? Evidence based on gravity model estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariev Oleg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it is to answer the question of whether Russia is successful in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI. Second, it is to identify partner countries that “overinvest” and “underinvest” in the Russian economy. We do this by calculating potential FDI inflows to Russia and comparing them with actual values. This research is associated with the empirical estimation of factors explaining FDI flows between countries. The methodological foundation used for the research is the gravity model of foreign direct investment. In discussing the pros and cons of different econometric methods of the estimation gravity equation, we conclude that the Poisson pseudo maximum likelihood method with instrumental variables (IV PPML is one of the best options in our case. Using a database covering about 70% of FDI flows for the period of 2001-2011, we discover the following factors that explain the variance of bilateral FDI flows in the world economy: GDP value of investing country, GDP value of recipient country, distance between countries, remoteness of investor country, remoteness of recipient country, level of institutions development in host country, wage level in host country, membership of two countries in a regional economic union, common official language, common border and colonial relationships between countries in the past. The potential values of FDI inflows are calculated using coefficients of regressors from the econometric model. We discover that the Russian economy performs very well in attracting FDI: the actual FDI inflows exceed potential values by 1.72 times. Large developed countries (France, Germany, UK, Italy overinvest in the Russian economy, while smaller and less developed countries (Czech Republic, Belarus, Denmark, Ukraine underinvest in Russia. Countries of Southeast Asia (China, South Korea, Japan also underinvest in the Russian economy.

  1. A South African public-private partnership HIV treatment model: viability and success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumbor, Jude; Pascoe, Sophie; Rajap, Shuabe; Townsend, Wendy; Sargent, John; Darkoh, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of people requiring HIV treatment in South Africa calls for efficient use of its human resources for health in order to ensure optimum treatment coverage and outcomes. This paper describes an innovative public-private partnership model which uses private sector doctors to treat public sector patients and ascertains the model's ability to maintain treatment outcomes over time. The study used a retrospective design based on the electronic records of patients who were down-referred from government hospitals to selected private general medical practitioners (GPs) between November 2005 and October 2012. In total, 2535 unique patient records from 40 GPs were reviewed. The survival functions for mortality and attrition were calculated. Cumulative incidence of mortality for different time cohorts (defined by year of treatment initiation) was also established. The median number of patients per GP was 143 (IQR: 66-246). At the time of down-referral to private GPs, 13.8% of the patients had CD4 count private sector based programme can be effectively and efficiently used to either target specific health concerns, key populations or serve as a stop-gap measure to meet urgent health needs.

  2. The successful, rapid transition to a new model of graduate medical education in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggan, Paul J; Samarasekara, Dujeepa D; Archuleta, Sophia; Khoo, See Meng; Sim, Joe Heng Joo; Sin, Clara Siew Ping; Ooi, Shirley Beng Suat

    2012-09-01

    Graduate medical education (GME) in Singapore recently underwent major reform (2009-2012), leading to accreditation of residency programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I) within two years of the initial commitment to change. The main aims of the reforms were to implement best practices in GME, to provide better support structures for program administration, and to bring all specialty training under one administrative umbrella. The authors outline the historic development of GME in Singapore, the complexities of the model in place immediately prior to ACGME-I accreditation, and the difficulties addressed by the proposed changes, leading to a description of implementation efforts at the National University Hospital of Singapore, a university-affiliated academic medical center. The authors describe the institutional factors uniting hospital leaders in support of reform, the recruitment of a team to manage change within the institution, the inauguration of a new office for GME, and the faculty development initiatives needed to educate faculty leading the change process. The preparation and execution of specific initiatives designed to improve GME and the communication strategies needed to coordinate and publicize change efforts are outlined, as well as strategies for sustaining improvements and building them into the culture of the institution. The authors demonstrate that external accreditation can be a powerful driver of educational reform and summarize key lessons derived from Kotter principles, a current model of change management.

  3. Toward a Predictive Model of Community College Student Success in Blended Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volchok, Edward

    2018-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluates early semester predictors of whether or not community college students will successfully complete blended or hybrid courses. These predictors are available to faculty by the fourth week of the semester. Success is defined as receiving a grade of C- or higher. Failure is defined as a grade below a C- or a…

  4. The importance of a precise definition, comprehensive model, and critical discussion of successful aging at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to advance understanding of the concept of successful aging at work to guide rigorous future research and effective practice. Drawing on the gerontology and life-span developmental literatures, I recently proposed a definition and theoretical framework of successful aging at work that

  5. Treatment of Events Representing System Success in Accident Sequences in PSA Models with ET/FT Linking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrbanic, I.; Spiler, J.; Mikulicic, V.; Simic, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of events that represent systems' successes in accident sequences is well known issue associated primarily with those PSA models that employ event tree / fault tree (ET / FT) linking technique. Even theoretically clear, practical implementation and usage creates for certain PSA models a number of difficulties regarding result correctness. Strict treatment of success-events would require consistent applying of de Morgan laws. However, there are several problems related to it. First, Boolean resolution of the overall model, such as the one representing occurrence of reactor core damage, becomes very challenging task if De Morgan rules are applied consistently at all levels. Even PSA tools of the newest generation have some problems with performing such a task in a reasonable time frame. The second potential issue is related to the presence of negated basic events in minimal cutsets. If all the basic events that result from strict applying of De Morgan rules are retained in presentation of minimal cutsets, their readability and interpretability may be impaired severely. It is also worth noting that the concept of a minimal cutset is tied to equipment failures, rather than to successes. For reasons like these, various simplifications are employed in PSA models and tools, when it comes to the treatment of success-events in the sequences. This paper provides a discussion of major concerns associated with the treatment of success-events in accident sequences of a typical PSA model. (author)

  6. A prognostic model to predict the success of artificial insemination in dairy cows based on readily available data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, C J; Steeneveld, W; Vernooij, J C M; Huijps, K; Nielen, M; Hogeveen, H

    2016-08-01

    A prognosis of the likelihood of insemination success is valuable information for the decision to start inseminating a cow. This decision is important for the reproduction management of dairy farms. The aim of this study was to develop a prognostic model for the likelihood of successful first insemination. The parameters considered for the model are readily available on farm at the time a farmer makes breeding decisions. In the first step, variables are selected for the prognostic model that have prognostic value for the likelihood of a successful first insemination. In the second step, farm effects on the likelihood of a successful insemination are quantified and the prognostic model is cross-validated. Logistic regression with a random effect for farm was used to develop the prognostic model. Insemination and test-day milk production data from 2,000 commercial Dutch dairy farms were obtained, and 190,541 first inseminations from this data set were used for model selection. The following variables were used in the selection process: parity, days in milk, days to peak production, production level relative to herd mates, milk yield, breed of the cow, insemination season and calving season, log of the ratio of fat to protein content, and body condition score at insemination. Variables were selected in a forward selection and backward elimination, based on the Akaike information criterion. The variables that contributed most to the model were random farm effect, relative production factor, and milk yield at insemination. The parameters were estimated in a bootstrap analysis and a cross-validation was conducted within this bootstrap analysis. The parameter estimates for body condition score at insemination varied most, indicating that this effect varied most among Dutch dairy farms. The cross-validation showed that the prognosis of insemination success closely resembled the mean insemination success observed in the data set. Insemination success depends on

  7. Validation of mathematical models to describe fluid dynamics of a cold riser by gamma ray attenuation; Validacao de modelos matematicos para descrever a fluidodinamica de um riser utilizando atenuacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Ana Cristina Bezerra Azedo de

    2004-12-15

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a riser in a cold type FCC model was investigated by means of catalyst concentration distribution measured with gamma attenuation and simulated with a mathematical model. In the riser of the cold model, MEF, 0,032 m in diameter, 2,30 m in length the fluidized bed, whose components are air and FCC catalyst, circulates. The MEF is operated by automatic control and instruments for measuring fluid dynamic variables. An axial catalyst concentration distribution was measured using an Am-241 gamma source and a NaI detector coupled to a multichannel provided with a software for data acquisition and evaluation. The MEF was adapted for a fluid dynamic model validation which describes the flow in the riser, for example, by introducing an injector for controlling the solid flow in circulation. Mathematical models were selected from literature, analyzed and tested to simulate the fluid dynamic of the riser. A methodology for validating fluid dynamic models was studied and implemented. The stages of the work were developed according to the validation methodology, such as data planning experiments, study of the equations which describe the fluidodynamic, computational solvers application and comparison with experimental data. Operational sequences were carried out keeping the MEF conditions for measuring catalyst concentration and simultaneously measuring the fluid dynamic variables, velocity of the components and pressure drop in the riser. Following this, simulated and experimental values were compared and statistical data treatment done, aiming at the required precision to validate the fluid dynamic model. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data were carried out under validation criteria. The fluid dynamic behavior of the riser was analyzed and the results and the agreement with literature were discussed. The adopt model was validated under the MEF operational conditions, for a 3 to 6 m/s gas velocity in the riser and a slip

  8. "Grey nomads" in Australia: are they a good model for successful aging and health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Paul F D; Quirk, Frances

    2007-10-01

    Lifestyle factors have been identified as being very important in determining health in later life. Nutrition, exercise, and social environment all interact to promote, or to limit, opportunities for an active and healthy post-working life. Not only are rates of chronic illness and disability reduced through the promotion of healthy lifestyles, but also quality of life is maintained through the compression of morbidity. Governments in Australia, as in the European Union and North America, have highlighted the importance of behavioral change in health promotion strategies with the aim of having an impact on the health-related lifestyles of their populations. This paper examines the example of a group of older Australians, the "grey nomads," who may present opportunities for examining health-related lifestyle changes. The term grey nomad refers to a portion of the older population in Australia who choose to use their later years and retirement as opportunities for travel and leisure, mainly within the confines of the Australian continent. As such, they are similar to groups in North America, such as the "snow birds," who travel to the southern United States to escape the colder winters of more northerly latitudes. Similar seasonal migrations occur from Northern to Southern Europe. What all share in common is an active culture/lifestyle of attempting to "age successfully." Grey nomads also participate in the creation of what can be termed postmodern communities, where they and other regular travelers may develop a sense of community feeling with others who are also regularly returning to the same spot year after year. Social support is highly predictive of health outcomes and such mobile communities may prove a positive factor in promoting good health. In this paper we examine whether the "grey nomads" represent a good model for improving health-related lifestyles in later life.

  9. Insights from the design and implementation of a single-entry model of referral for total joint replacement surgery: Critical success factors and unanticipated consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Zaheed; MacKean, Gail; Bohm, Eric; Noseworthy, Tom; Wang, Jenney Meng Han; DeMone, Brie; Wright, Brock; Marshall, Deborah A

    2018-02-01

    Single-entry models (SEMs) in healthcare allow patients to see the next-available provider and have been shown to improve waiting times, access and patient flow for preference-sensitive, scheduled services. The Winnipeg Central Intake Service (WCIS) for hip and knee replacement surgery was implemented to improve access in the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority. This paper describes the system's design/implementation; successes, challenges, and unanticipated consequences. On two occasions, during and following implementation, we interviewed all members of the WCIS project team, including processing engineers, waiting list coordinators, administrators and policy-makers regarding their experiences. We used semi-structured telephone interviews to collect data and qualitative thematic analysis to analyze and interpret the findings. Respondents indicated that the overarching objectives of the WCIS were being met. Benefits included streamlined processes, greater patient access, improved measurement and monitoring of outcomes. Challenges included low awareness, change readiness, and initial participation among stakeholders. Unanticipated consequences included workload increases, confusion around stakeholder expectations and under-reporting of data by surgeons' offices. Critical success factors for implementation included a requirement for clear communication, robust data collection, physician leadership and patience by all, especially implementation teams. Although successfully implemented, key lessons and critical success factors were learned related to change management, which if considered and applied, can reduce unanticipated consequences, improve uptake and benefit new models of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The organizational structure and group the following criteria in assessing the success of the model construction companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Dušan D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization - an organizational structure presents a schedule of all the potential companies covering all human and material resources in the enterprise, which ensure the realization of business goals in function of their success. Defining the process, the use of SWOT analysis and evaluation of success using appropriate models condition and promote the role of the organization in a construction company. This article is an excerpt from the research within relevant doctoral dissertation [5] and displays the result of the evaluation of business performance of construction companies applying AHP model.

  11. DEVELOPING A CONCEPTUAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS (IS) SUCCESS MODEL FOR INTELLIGENT VEHICLE TRACKING SYSTEMS USED IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES – THE CASE OF GHANA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjin, Daniel Michael Okwabi

    This research developed a conceptual Information Systems (IS) success model to address problems of Intelligent Vehicle Tracking Systems (IVTS) in developing countries – the, case of Ghana. The study was based on existing IS Success Models used in measuring the performance, usefulness...... core theoretical IS concepts required to develop the conceptual IS success model. Research Outcome: the proposed conceptual IS Success Model is developed; has considerably extended the updated DeLone & McLean (2003) IS success model; making it possible to apply IS success model to evaluate...... and successfulness of information systems applicable to IVTS success evaluation. Problems addressed: users of IVTS in developing countries, especially in Ghana, are dissatisfied with the performances of IVTS and services, regarding system & service qualities, information quality, low user-perceptions, low system...

  12. ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN BINUS UNIVERSITY USING DELONE AND MCLEAN INFORMATION SYSTEM SUCCESS MODEL AND COBIT FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Muliadi Kerta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The success of implementation of information system in an organization will supportthe organization in the process of achieving goals. Successful information system will support theorganization's day-to-day operations, so that problem can be resolved more quickly and easily. Theinformation system which has been developed and implemented is also necessary to measure thematurity level. Therefore, it can determine whether the implementation of information systemsmade in accordance with the goals of the organization. Measuring the success of informationsystems used the DeLone and McLean IS success model. To measure the maturity level ofinformation systems used COBIT (Control Objectives for Information and related Technologyframeworks that provides best practices for IT governance and control. The results of this analysiswill assist and support the IT team in order to develop and build information systems that better fitthe needs and goals of the organization.

  13. Statistical modelling of the differences between successive R-R intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Nagaraja, Haikady N; Berntson, Gary G

    2005-02-15

    Understanding the behaviour of R-R interval data and its successive differences is critical to the dynamics of cardiac control. Several time domain measures that quantify R-R interval variability have important clinical significance in terms of risk stratification and evaluating the effectiveness of treatment procedures. The present approach at examining the distributions of successive beat-to-beat differences of R-R interval data from different populations and under different conditions (baseline and reaction times) provides a valuable insight into their previously unexplored distributional properties. In particular, our analysis reveals that the successive differences have non-normal statistical distributions (a contradiction to the commonly used assumption of normality), and the absolute successive R-R interval differences approximately follows a Weibull distribution. As an illustration of the utility of this approach, we explore the statistical properties of the time domain measure: root mean square successive difference, study the association between the Weibull scale parameter estimate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and propose improvements in artifact detection algorithms. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the human eye: average course, variability, and influence of refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansonius, Nomdo M; Schiefer, Julia; Nevalainen, Jukka; Paetzold, Jens; Schiefer, Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    Previously we developed a mathematical model for describing the retinal nerve fiber bundle trajectories in the superior-temporal and inferior-temporal regions of the human retina, based on traced trajectories extracted from fundus photographs. Aims of the current study were to (i) validate the existing model, (ii) expand the model to the entire retina and (iii) determine the influence of refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position on the trajectories. A new set of fundus photographs was collected comprising 28 eyes of 28 subjects. From these 28 photographs, 625 trajectories were extracted. Trajectories in the temporal region of the retina were compared to the existing model. In this region, 347 of 399 trajectories (87%) were within the 95% central range of the existing model. The model was extended to the nasal region. With this extension, the model can now be applied to the entire retina that corresponds to the visual field as tested with standard automated perimetry (up to approximately 30° eccentricity). There was an asymmetry between the superior and inferior hemifields and a considerable location-specific inter-subject variability. In the nasal region, we found two "singularities", located roughly at the one and five o'clock positions for the right optic disc. Here, trajectories from relatively widespread areas of the retina converge. Associations between individual deviations from the model and refraction, optic disc size and optic disc position were studied with multiple linear regression. Refraction (P = 0.021) and possibly optic disc inclination (P = 0.09) influenced the trajectories in the superior-temporal region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Supporting good practice in the provision of services to people with comorbid mental health and alcohol and other drug problems in Australia: describing key elements of good service models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canaway Rachel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-occurrence of mental illness and substance use problems (referred to as "comorbidity" in this paper is common, and is often reported by service providers as the expectation rather than the exception. Despite this, many different treatment service models are being used in the alcohol and other drugs (AOD and mental health (MH sectors to treat this complex client group. While there is abundant literature in the area of comorbidity treatment, no agreed overarching framework to describe the range of service delivery models is apparent internationally or at the national level. The aims of the current research were to identify and describe elements of good practice in current service models of treatment of comorbidity in Australia. The focus of the research was on models of service delivery. The research did not aim to measure the client outcomes achieved by individual treatment services, but sought to identify elements of good practice in services. Methods Australian treatment services were identified to take part in the study through a process of expert consultation. The intent was to look for similarities in the delivery models being implemented across a diverse set of services that were perceived to be providing good quality treatment for people with comorbidity problems. Results A survey was designed based on a concept map of service delivery devised from a literature review. Seventeen Australian treatment services participated in the survey, which explored the context in which services operate, inputs such as organisational philosophy and service structure, policies and procedures that guide the way in which treatment is delivered by the service, practices that reflect the way treatment is provided to clients, and client impacts. Conclusions The treatment of people with comorbidity of mental health and substance use disorders presents complex problems that require strong but flexible service models. While the treatment

  16. A conceptual model of individual competency components as one of the predictors of success in mergers and acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Kovač

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing challenge of how to balance “soft” human factors with “hard” financial factors in mergers and acquisitions (M&A to be successful is not new. However, the real challenge lies in the question of how, and with which yardstick, to measure and compare the human factor in both the acquiring and the acquired companies in all phases of M&A. In this study, a model for measuring and comparing the human factor with competencies is presented. The model enables the measuring of soft factors with quantitative criteria. A tripartite individual competency components construct is conceived: cognitive, affective and conative, to which the personal value system is added. The model discussed is based on empirical findings and the cases of two companies and literature. The model enables companies to compare differences in competencies and thus to plan activities how to overcome those differences and achieve a higher success rate in M&A.

  17. Conceptual models of coronary perfusion pressure and their relationship to defibrillation success in a porcine model of prolonged out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joshua C.; Salcido, David D.; Menegazzi, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The amount of myocardial perfusion required for successful defibrillation after cardiac arrest is unknown. Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) is a surrogate for myocardial perfusion. One limited clinical study identifies a threshold of 15 mmHg required for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Our exploration of threshold and dose models of CPP during the initial bout of CPR indicates higher levels than previously demonstrated are required. CPP required for shock success throughout on-going resuscitation is unknown and other conceptual models of CPP have not been explored. Hypothesis An array of conceptual models of CPP is associated with and predicts defibrillation success throughout resuscitation. Methods Data from 6 porcine cardiac arrest studies were pooled. Mean and area under the curve (AUC) CPP were derived for 30-second epochs. Five conceptual models of CPP were analyzed: threshold, delta, cumulative delta, dose, and cumulative dose. Comparative statistics were performed with one-way ANOVA and two-tailed t-test. Regression models assessed CPP trends and prediction of ROSC. Results For 316 defibrillation attempts in 124 animals, those resulting in ROSC (n=75) had significantly higher threshold, delta, cumulative delta, dose, and cumulative dose CPP than those without. All conceptual models except delta CPP had significantly different values across successive defibrillation attempts and all five models were significant predictors of ROSC, along with experimental design. Conclusions Threshold, delta, cumulative delta, dose, and cumulative dose CPP predict individual defibrillation success throughout resuscitation. PMID:22266069

  18. A Model Midshipman: Factors Related to Academic and Military Success of Prior Enlisted Midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wyrick, Jared

    2005-01-01

    ... to be successful at the Naval Academy. Linear and Bi-Linear regression models are used to analyze the influence of prior-enlisted experience on academic and military performance at the Naval Academy on the classes from 1999 through 2004...

  19. A Path Analysis Model Pertinent to Undergraduates' Academic Success: Examining Academic Confidence, Psychological Capital and Academic Coping Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirikkanat, Berke; Soyer, Makbule Kali

    2018-01-01

    The major purpose of this study was to create a path analysis model of academic success in a group of university students, which included the variables of academic confidence and psychological capital with a mediator variable--academic coping. 400 undergraduates from Marmara University and Istanbul Commerce University who were in sophomore, junior…

  20. Comparison of the sensitivity of landscape-fire-succession models to variation in terrain, fuel pattern, climate and weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Robert E. Keane; Robert H. Gardner; Sandra Lavorel; Mike D. Flannigan; Ian D. Davies; Chao Li; James M. Lenihan; T. Scott Rupp; Florent. Mouillot

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of nlodelled area burned to environmental factors across a range of independently-developed landscape-fire-succession models. The sensitivity of area burned to variation in four factors, namely terrain (flat, undulating and mountainous), fuel pattern (finely and coarsely clumped), climate (observed, warmer &...

  1. The Effects of Educative Software, Based on the Arcs Motivation Model on Student's Academic Success and Permanence in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Ümmü ÇETİN; Ahmet MAHİROĞLU

    2008-01-01

    In this study, education based on ARCS Motivation Model design principles and traditional education were compared in terms of student success and the continuance of learning. To this end, an educative software suitable to the design principles of ARCS Motivation Model for Microsoft Excels' "statistical functions" theme was prepared.With a pretest of the experimental and control group, the equivalence of the groups were determined. In the control group the laboratory study was performed with t...

  2. The Context-Dependency of the Experience of Auditory Succession and Prospects for Embodying Philosophical Models of Temporal Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Kon

    2015-01-01

    Recent philosophical work on temporal experience offers generic models that are often assumed to apply to all sensory modalities. I show that the models serve as broad frameworks in which different aspects of cognitive science can be slotted and, thus, are beneficial to furthering research programs in embodied music cognition. Here I discuss a particular feature of temporal experience that plays a key role in such philosophical work: a distinction between the experience of succession and the ...

  3. Prediction Modeling for Academic Success in Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Scott L.; Crawford, Elizabeth; Wilkerson, Gary B.; Rausch, David; Dale, R. Barry; Harris, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Context: A common goal of professional education programs is to recruit the students best suited for the professional career. Selection of students can be a difficult process, especially if the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of available positions. The ability to predict academic success in any profession has been a challenging…

  4. Creating a Successful Citizen Science Model to Detect and Report Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Waitt, Damon

    2011-01-01

    The Invaders of Texas program is a successful citizen science program in which volunteers survey and monitor invasive plants throughout Texas. Invasive plants are being introduced at alarming rates, and our limited knowledge about their distribution is a major cause for concern. The Invaders of Texas program trains citizen scientists to detect the…

  5. Towards an Open Government Data Success Model : A case study from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purwanto, A.; Janssen, M.F.W.H.A.; Zuiderwijk-van Eijk, AMG; Borge, Vieira; Rouco, José

    2017-01-01

    Governments around the world are following the global open government movement by initiating Open Government Data (OGD) programs. They are motivated by the claim that it will generate economic and social value. However, the success of an OGD initiative will only be realized when OGD is used and when

  6. A System's View of E-Learning Success Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Sean B.; Ashill, Nicholas J.

    2018-01-01

    The past several decades of e-learning empirical research have advanced our understanding of the effective management of critical success factors (CSFs) of e-learning. Meanwhile, the proliferation of measures of dependent and independent variables has been overelaborated. We argue that a significant reduction in dependent and independent variables…

  7. Modelling cheetah relocation success in southern Africa using an iterative Bayesian network development cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Johnson, S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Relocation is one of the strategies used by conservationists to deal with problem cheetahs in southern Africa. The success of a relocation event and the factors that influence it within the broader context of long-term viability of wild cheetah...

  8. Application of Goal Tree-Success Tree model as the knowledge-base of operator advisory systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Modarres, M.

    1987-01-01

    The most important portion of an expert system development is the articulation of knowledge by the expert and its satisfactory formulation in a suitable knowledge representation scheme for mechanization by a computer. A 'deep knowledge' approach called Goal Tree-Success Tree model is devised to represent complex dynamic domain knowledge. This approach can hierarchically model the underlying principles of a given process domain (for example nuclear power plant operations domain). The Goal Tree-Success Tree can then be used to represent the knowledge-base and provide means of selecting an efficient search routine in the inference engine of an expert system. A prototype expert system has been developed to demonstrate the method. This expert system models the operation of a typical system used in the pressurized water reactors. The expert system is modeled for real-time operations if an interface between plant parameters and the expert system is established. The real-time operation provides an ability to quickly remedy minor disturbances that can quickly lead to a system malfunction or trip. A description of both the Goal Tree-Success Tree model and the prototype expert system is presented. (orig.)

  9. Paleogeographic and Depositional Model for the Neogene fluvial succession, Pishin Belt Northwest Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Akhtar Muhammad; Umar, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Miocene subaerial sedimentation started after the final closure of Katawaz Remnant Ocean. Based on detailed field data twelve facies were recognized in Neogene successions exposed in Pishin Belt. These facies were further organized into four facies associations i.e. channels, crevasse splay, natural levee...... and floodplain facies associations. Facies associations and variations provided ample evidences to recognize number of fluvial architectural components in the succession e.g., low-sinuosity sandy braided river, mixed-load meandering, high-sinuosity meandering channels, single-story sandstone and/or conglomerate...... channels, lateral accretion surfaces (point bars) and alluvial fans. Neogene sedimentation in the Pishin Belt was mainly controlled by active tectonism and thrusting in response to oblique collision of the Indian Plate with Afghan Block of the Eurasian Plate along the Chaman-Nushki Fault. Post Miocene...

  10. The highly successful safe remediation of the Fernald waste pits undertaken under the privatization model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Mark; Lojek, Dave; Murphy, Con

    2003-02-23

    Remediation of eight waste pits at the Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald site, located northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio, involves excavating approximately one million tonnes in-situ of low-level waste which were placed in pits during Fernald's production era. This unique project, one of the largest in the history of CERCLA/Superfund, includes uranium and thorium contaminated waste, soils and sludges. These wet soils and sludges are thermally dried in a processing facility to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) transportation and disposal facility waste acceptance criteria, loaded into railcars and shipped to the Envirocare waste disposal facility at Clive, Utah. This project is now approximately 60% complete with more than 415,000 tonnes (460,000 tons) of waste material safely shipped in 74 unit trains to Envirocare. Work is scheduled to be completed in early 2005. Success to date demonstrates that a major DOE site remediation project can be safely and successfully executed in partnership with private industry, utilizing proven commercial best practices, existing site labor resources and support of local stakeholders. In 1997 under the DOE's privatization initiative, Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald) solicited the services of the remediation industry to design, engineer, procure, construct, own and operate a facility that would undertake the remediation of the waste pits. The resulting procurement was awarded to IT Corporation, currently Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc. (Shaw). The contractor was required to finance the procurement and construction of its facilities and infrastructure. The contract was performance-based and payment would be made on the successful loadout of the waste from the facility on a per-ton basis meeting the Envirocare waste acceptance criteria. This paper details the performance to date, the challenges encountered, and the seamless partnering between DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Fluor Fernald

  11. MS PHD'S: A successful model for reaching underrepresented minorities (URM) students through virtual platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, O.; Johnson, A.; Williamson, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Jearld, A., Jr.; Guzman, W. I.

    2014-12-01

    To successfully recruit and retain underrepresented minority (URM) students and early career scientists, many programs supplement traditional curricular activities with multiple online platforms, establishing "virtual communities" that are free and easily accessible. These virtual communities offer readily sustainable opportunities to facilitate communication across a wide range of cultural lines and socioeconomic levels thereby broadening participation and inclusivity in STEM. Established in 2003, the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science Professional Development Program has successfully used virtual community tools such as a listserv, community forum, social media, and VoIP technologies, to extend the face-to-face activities of the program and support the advancement of URM students and early career scientists in STEM. The use of multiple facets of virtual community by MS PHD'S participants supports and encourages "real life" interactions and mentorship, facilitates networking and professional development, and maintains continuity of shared networks. The program is now in its ninth cohort and supports 213 participants. To date, 54 participants have completed their PhD and another 61 are currently enrolled in doctoral programs.

  12. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3-4, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J.

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report

  13. Materials model for describing the austenite-martensite phase transformation considering transformation-induced plasticity; Ein Materialmodell zur Beschreibung der Austenit-Martensit Phasentransformation unter Beruecksichtigung der transformationsinduzierten Plastizitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberste-Brandenburg, C.

    1999-06-01

    In this thesis, a model to describe the austenite martensite transformation was developed. The transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) was taken into consideration. The model can be used to design complex structures. A local examination of the energy and entropy balance at the phase boundary serves as the starting point for the identification of the thermodynamical driving force and the thermodynamic flow. For both, a tensorial description is necessary for a general nonhydrostatically stressed solid. In the second part, a material law for the description of TRIP-Steels was developed based on the values derived in the first part. The different mechanical behavior of the phases, especially the differing yield stresses, was taken into account. The model developed was implemented into the finite element program MARC. Simulations of the material and the structural behavior were performed. The experimentally observed strong dependence of the transformation kinetics on the yield stress of the austenite and the dependence of the orientation of the martensite inclusion on the stress state could be verified. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurde ein Materialmodell zur Beschreibung der Austenit-Martensit Phasenumwandlung unter Beruecksichtigung der transformationsinduzierten Plastizitaet (TRIP) entwickelt. Das Modell ist zur Berechnung ausgedehnter Strukturen einsetzbar. Eine lokale Betrachtung der Energie- und Entropiebilanz an der Phasengrenze bildet den Ausgangspunkt zur Identifikation der thermodynamischen Kraft und des thermodynamischen Flusses bei Beschreibung der Transformationskinetik. Fuer beide Groessen muss fuer den allgemein nichthydrostatischen Spannungszustand eine tensorielle Beschreibung verwendet werden. Im zweiten Teil der Arbeit bilden diese Groessen die Basis zur Entwicklung eines Stoffgesetzes zur Beschreibung des TRIP-Phaenomens. Es wird das unterschiedliche mechanische Verhalten der Phasen, insbesondere die stark unterschiedlichen

  14. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  15. Ajuste de modelos estocásticos lineares e não-lineares para a descrição do perfil longitudinal de árvores Fitting linear and nonlinear stochastic models to describe longitudinal tree profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Machado Pires

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Os modelos polinomiais são mais difundidos no meio florestal brasileiro na descrição do perfil de árvores devido à sua facilidade de ajuste e precisão. O mesmo não ocorre com os modelos não-lineares, os quais possuem maior dificuldade de ajuste. Dentre os modelos não-lineares clássicos, na descrição do perfil, podem-se citar o de Gompertz, o Logístico e o de Weibull. Portanto, este estudo visou comparar os modelos lineares e não lineares para a descrição do perfil de árvores. As medidas de comparação foram o coeficiente de determinação (R², o erro-padrão residual (s yx, o coeficiente de determinação corrigido (R²ajustado, o gráfico dos resíduos e a facilidade de ajuste. Os resultados ressaltaram que, dentre os modelos não-lineares, o que obteve melhor desempenho, de forma geral, foi o modelo Logístico, apesar de o modelo de Gompertz ser melhor em termos de erro-padrão residual. Nos modelos lineares, o polinômio proposto por Pires & Calegario foi superior aos demais. Ao comparar os modelos não-lineares com os lineares, o modelo Logístico foi melhor em razão, principalmente, do fato de o comportamento dos dados ser não-linear, à baixa correlação entre os parâmetros e à fácil interpretação deles, facilitando a convergência e o ajuste.Polynomial models are most commonly used in Brazilian forestry for taper modeling due to its straightforwardly fitting and precision. The use of nonlinear regression classic models, like Gompertz, Logistic and Weibull, is not very common in Brazil. Therefore, this study aimed to verify the best nonlinear and linear models, and among these the best model to describe the longitudinal tree profile. The comparison measures were: R², syx, R²adjusted, residual graphics and fitting convergence. The results pointed out that among the non-linear models the best behavior, in general, was given by the Logistic model, although the Gompertz model was superior compared with the Weibull

  16. Impulsivity, perceived self-regulatory success in dieting, and body mass in children and adolescents: A moderated mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian; Hofmann, Johannes; Weghuber, Daniel; Blechert, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Impulsivity has been suggested to contribute to overeating and obesity. However, findings are inconsistent and it appears that only specific facets of impulsivity are related to eating-related variables and to body mass. In the current study, relationships between self-reported impulsivity, perceived self-regulatory success in dieting, and objectively measured body mass were examined in N = 122 children and adolescents. Scores on attentional and motor impulsivity interactively predicted perceived self-regulatory success in dieting, but not body mass: Higher attentional impulsivity was associated with lower perceived self-regulatory success at high levels of motor impulsivity, but not at low levels of motor impulsivity. A moderated mediation model revealed an indirect effect of attentional and motor impulsivity on body mass, which was mediated by perceived self-regulatory success in dieting. Thus, results show that only specific facets of impulsivity are relevant in eating- and weight-regulation and interact with each other in the prediction of these variables. These facets of impulsivity, however, are not directly related to higher body mass, but indirectly via lower success in eating-related self-regulation in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative analysis of insect succession data from Victoria (Australia) using summary statistics versus preceding mean ambient temperature models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Mel

    2014-03-01

    Minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) can be estimated with preceding mean ambient temperature models that predict carrion taxon pre-appearance interval. But accuracy has not been compared with using summary statistics (mean ± SD of taxon arrival/departure day, range, 95% CI). This study collected succession data from ten experimental and five control (infrequently sampled) pig carcasses over two summers (n = 2 experimental, n = 1 control per placement date). Linear and exponential preceding mean ambient temperature models for appearance and departure times were constructed for 17 taxa/developmental stages. There was minimal difference in linear or exponential model success, although arrival models were more often significant: 65% of linear arrival (r2 = 0.09–0.79) and exponential arrival models (r2 = 0.05–81.0) were significant, and 35% of linear departure (r2 = 0.0–0.71) and exponential departure models (r2 = 0.0–0.72) were significant. Performance of models and summary statistics for estimating mPMI was compared in two forensic cases. Only summary statistics produced accurate mPMI estimates.

  18. The Context-Dependency of the Experience of Auditory Succession and Prospects for Embodying Philosophical Models of Temporal Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent philosophical work on temporal experience offers generic models that are often assumed to apply to all sensory modalities. I show that the models serve as broad frameworks in which different aspects of cognitive science can be slotted and, thus, are beneficial to furthering research programs in embodied music cognition. Here I discuss a particular feature of temporal experience that plays a key role in such philosophical work: a distinction between the experience of succession and the mere succession of experiences. I question the presupposition that there is such an evident, clear distinction and suggest that, instead, how the distinction is drawn is context-dependent. After suggesting a way to modify the philosophical models of temporal experience to accommodate this context-dependency, I illustrate that these models can fruitfully incorporate features of research projects in embodied musical cognition. To do so I supplement a modified retentionalist model with aspects of recent work that links bodily movement with musical perception (Godøy, 2006; 2010a; Jensenius, Wanderley, Godøy, and Leman, 2010. The resulting model is shown to facilitate novel hypotheses, refine the notion of context-dependency and point towards means of extending the philosophical model and an existent research program.

  19. Evaluating the impacts of slope aspect on forest dynamic succession in Northwest China based on FAREAST model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shanshan; Ma, Jianyong; Shugart, Herman H.; Yan, Xiaodong

    2018-03-01

    Mountain forests provide the main water resources and lumber for Northwest China. The understanding of the differences in forests growing among individual slope aspects in mountainous regions is of great significance to the wise management and planning of these natural systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of slope aspect on forest dynamic succession in Northwest China by using the dynamic forest succession model (FAREAST). First, the simulated forest composition and vertical forest zonation produced by the model were compared against recorded data in three sub-regions of the Altai Mountains. The FAREAST model accurately reproduced the vertical zonation, forest composition, growth curves of the dominant species (Larix sibirica), and forest biomass in the Altai Mountains. Transitions along the forest zones of the Altai Mountains averaged about a 400 m difference between the northern and southern sites. Biomass for forests on north-facing slopes were 11.0, 15.3 and 55.9 t C ha-1 higher than for south-facing slopes in the Northeast, Central and Southeast sub-regions, respectively. Second, our analyses showed that the FAREAST model can be used to predict dynamic forest succession in Northwest China under the influence of slope and aspect. In the Altai Mountains, the north-facing slopes supported the best forest growth, followed by the west- and east-facing slopes. South-facing slopes consistently exhibited the lowest growth, biomass storage and forest diversity.

  20. Developing a Mathematical Model for Scheduling and Determining Success Probability of Research Projects Considering Complex-Fuzzy Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Norouzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In project management context, time management is one of the most important factors affecting project success. This paper proposes a new method to solve research project scheduling problems (RPSP containing Fuzzy Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique (FGERT networks. Through the deliverables of this method, a proper estimation of project completion time (PCT and success probability can be achieved. So algorithms were developed to cover all features of the problem based on three main parameters “duration, occurrence probability, and success probability.” These developed algorithms were known as PR-FGERT (Parallel and Reversible-Fuzzy GERT networks. The main provided framework includes simplifying the network of project and taking regular steps to determine PCT and success probability. Simplifications include (1 equivalent making of parallel and series branches in fuzzy network considering the concepts of probabilistic nodes, (2 equivalent making of delay or reversible-to-itself branches and impact of changing the parameters of time and probability based on removing related branches, (3 equivalent making of simple and complex loops, and (4 an algorithm that was provided to resolve no-loop fuzzy network, after equivalent making. Finally, the performance of models was compared with existing methods. The results showed proper and real performance of models in comparison with existing methods.

  1. The Qinshan phase III project-a successful model of sino-canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, S.H.H.; Alikhan, S.; Gu Jun

    2005-01-01

    The Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) Project, the largest-scale cooperative project between China and Canada, was completed in 2003 well in advance of the schedule and 10% under budget. The Third Qinshan (Phase III) Nuclear Power Plant (TQNPP) was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 20, 2003, 43 days and 115 days ahead of schedule respectively. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 months from First Concrete to Criticality - a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods, electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management and control. New design and construction techniques were introduced by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools has benefited TQNPC in its subsequent plant operation, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China as well as enhancing their opportunities internationally. Excellent co-operation and teamwork within the integrated TQNPC/AECL Commissioning Team with well documented QA program, process and procedures also contributed to the remarkable success of the Project. AECL's initial assessment, based on lessons learned, showed that the project schedule could readily be reduced to 66 months and the capital costs reduced by 25% for a replication project. AECL is building on this experience and successful results of TQNPP in its Advanced CANDU Reactor TM (ACR TM ) ** design. (authors)

  2. Pedagogical models for video communication in massive open on-line courses (MOOCs: a success story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Amata Garito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The initiatives on MOOCs promoted in the United States by prestigious universities, such as Stanford, Harvard, MIT, and by private bodies such as Udacity, aroused great interest worldwide; however the teaching and learning models proposed with MOOCs do not appear to rely on solid theoretical bases and, therefore, on valuable psycho-pedagogical models. The aim of this paper is to analyze some pedagogical aspects related to video communication models in order to highlight the strong and weak points of the educational framework of these initiatives. The teaching models adopted by the International Telematic University UNINETTUNO for its video lessons, the distance assessment systems, the teacher/tutor and student distance interaction models reached such a quality level that it allows us to generalize this model and trigger teaching and learning processes of high quality and to lower the dropouts rates of the students enrolled in MOOCs.

  3. An investigation of potential success factors for an introductory model-driven programming course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens; Caspersen, Michael Edelgaard

    2005-01-01

    interval: math grade from high school and course work. The two significant indicators explain 24.2% of the variation of the exam grade. The result concerning math grade contradicts earlier findings. We discuss four aspects of our research: the explanation power of the potential success indicators......, the impact of our findings on teaching, limits of what to conclude from the available data, and the variety of the notion "objects-first". Because of the variety of interpretations of "objects-first", the present research is necessary as a supplement to earlier research in order to make generalizable results...

  4. Building a Path to College Success: Advocacy, Discovery and OER Adoption in Emerging Educational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Kristin M.

    2017-01-01

    In this case study we will examine the role of the library in Open Educational Resources through the lens of library value described in Megan Oakleaf's 2010 ACRL [Association of College and Research Libraries] report. While librarians in our organization have traditionally not played a role in textbook adoptions, the campus academic goal to…

  5. Modeling Successful STEM High Schools in the United States: An Ecology Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Niyazi; Stuessy, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to generate a conceptual framework for specialized Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) schools. To do so, we focused on literature and found specialized STEM schools have existed for over 100 years and recently expanded nationwide. The current perception for these schools can be described as unique environments…

  6. INFORMATION SYSTEM QUALITY INFLUENCE ON ORGANIZATION PERFORMANCE: A MODIFICATION OF TECHNOLOGY-BASED INFORMATION SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE AND SUCCESS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisnawati N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the effect of information system quality on technology-based accounting information systems usage and their impact on organizational performance on local government. This study is based on Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, IS Success Model, and the success of technology-based information systems. This study is a combination of previous studies conducted by Seddon and Kiew (1997, Saeed and Helm (2008, and DeLone and McLean (1992. This study used survey method and took 101 respondents from accounting staff working in Malang and Mojokerto regencies. This study uses Partial Least Square to examine research data. Research result exhibits information system qualities affecting benefit perception and user satisfaction. Technology-based accounting information systems usage in local government is influenced by benefits perception and user satisfaction. Research result concluded that technology-based accounting information systems usage will affect the performance of local government organizations.

  7. An excitable cortex and memory model successfully predicts new pseudopod dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Cooper

    Full Text Available Motile eukaryotic cells migrate with directional persistence by alternating left and right turns, even in the absence of external cues. For example, Dictyostelium discoideum cells crawl by extending distinct pseudopods in an alternating right-left pattern. The mechanisms underlying this zig-zag behavior, however, remain unknown. Here we propose a new Excitable Cortex and Memory (EC&M model for understanding the alternating, zig-zag extension of pseudopods. Incorporating elements of previous models, we consider the cell cortex as an excitable system and include global inhibition of new pseudopods while a pseudopod is active. With the novel hypothesis that pseudopod activity makes the local cortex temporarily more excitable--thus creating a memory of previous pseudopod locations--the model reproduces experimentally observed zig-zag behavior. Furthermore, the EC&M model makes four new predictions concerning pseudopod dynamics. To test these predictions we develop an algorithm that detects pseudopods via hierarchical clustering of individual membrane extensions. Data from cell-tracking experiments agrees with all four predictions of the model, revealing that pseudopod placement is a non-Markovian process affected by the dynamics of previous pseudopods. The model is also compatible with known limits of chemotactic sensitivity. In addition to providing a predictive approach to studying eukaryotic cell motion, the EC&M model provides a general framework for future models, and suggests directions for new research regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying directional persistence.

  8. Exploring the role of fire, succession, climate, and weather on landscape dynamics using comparative modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Geoffrey J. Cary; Mike D. Flannigan; Russell A. Parsons; Ian D. Davies; Karen J. King; Chao Li; Ross A. Bradstock; Malcolm Gill

    2013-01-01

    An assessment of the relative importance of vegetation change and disturbance as agents of landscape change under current and future climates would (1) provide insight into the controls of landscape dynamics, (2) help inform the design and development of coarse scale spatially explicit ecosystem models such as Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs), and (3) guide...

  9. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  10. National Culture and Business Model Change - A Framework for Successful Expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenskov, Lea Houmark; Lueg, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    , we integrate the concepts of business models (Osterwalder and Pigneur, 2005) and national culture (Hofstede, 1980). Our findings explain why and how adjustments in the business model are necessary regarding the company’s communication, team composition, and customer involvement in projects...

  11. Modelling biogeochemical-stratigraphic dynamics of clinoform successions over geological timescales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Jens Jakob Fosselius; Bjerrum, Christian J.

    are investigated with our novel dynamic biogeochemical-stratigraphic model which explicitly calculates sediment and biogeochemical tracer erosion and deposition over multi-kilo-years. In the model organic and uranium enrichment in the distal clinoform develops as a transgressive nature. As a result part...

  12. Sales Training for Army Recruiter Success: Modeling the Sales Strategies and Skills of Excellent Recruiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    strategies used by excellent Army recruiters. Neurolinguistic programming (NLP) was used as the protocol for modeling performance and acquiring...Behavioral and Social Sciences 3001 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22333-5600 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK ARE* 4 WORK UNIT...Modeling ’Expert knowledge,, Neurolinguistics Knowledge engineering; Recruiting Sales, &’ Sales cycle Sales skills Sales strategies 20

  13. Successful therapies for Alzheimer’s disease: Why so many in animal models and none in humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael eFranco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Peering into the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD the outsider realizes that many of the therapeutic strategies tested (in animal models have been successful. One also may notice that there is a deficit in translational research, i.e. to take a successful drug in mice and translate it to the patient. Efforts are still focused on novel projects to expand the therapeutic arsenal to cure mice. Scientific reasons behind so many successful strategies are not obvious. This article aims to review the current approaches to combat AD, and to open a debate on common mechanisms of cognitive enhancement and neuroprotection. In short, either the rodent models are not good and should be discontinued, or we should extract only the most useful information from those models. An example of a question that may be debated for the advancement in AD therapy is: In addition to reducing amyloid and tau pathologies, would it be necessary to boost synaptic strength and cognition? The debate would provide helpful information that could turn around the current negative output in generating effective drugs for patients. Furthermore, discovery of biomarkers in human body fluids, and a clear distinction between cognitive enhancers and disease modifying strategies, should be instrumental for advancing in anti-AD drug discovery.

  14. Canadian Model of Military Leadership as a Successful Mixture of Civilian and Military Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Malinowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The origins of military leadership are rooted in ancient times and its embodiment are great chieftains and commanders. However, since the moment when in organisation and management sciences the civil theories of leadership started to emerge, the military forces have incorporated their solutions to structure the assumptions of new, coherent and effective models of military leadership. A good example of such solutions is the Canadian model of military leadership, competently merging the civil theories with experience and needs of the military environment. This solution may be a perfect example of effective application of leadership theory to modify the existing national model of military leadership and construct a more efficient one.

  15. Describing chaotic attractors: Regular and perpetual points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkowski, Dawid; Prasad, Awadhesh; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2018-03-01

    We study the concepts of regular and perpetual points for describing the behavior of chaotic attractors in dynamical systems. The idea of these points, which have been recently introduced to theoretical investigations, is thoroughly discussed and extended into new types of models. We analyze the correlation between regular and perpetual points, as well as their relation with phase space, showing the potential usefulness of both types of points in the qualitative description of co-existing states. The ability of perpetual points in finding attractors is indicated, along with its potential cause. The location of chaotic trajectories and sets of considered points is investigated and the study on the stability of systems is shown. The statistical analysis of the observing desired states is performed. We focus on various types of dynamical systems, i.e., chaotic flows with self-excited and hidden attractors, forced mechanical models, and semiconductor superlattices, exhibiting the universality of appearance of the observed patterns and relations.

  16. Marital Success from the Perspective of Kozielecki’s Transgression Model

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    Dakowicz Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Spouses exhibit two kinds of behaviours: protective and transgressive. Protective acts are those aiming to overcome current problems, leading to preserving some balance. Transgressive acts are deliberately overstepping everyday marital reality and doing new things in new ways. They lead to changing the relation with the hope of improving it, but also create the risk of deterioration. The more transgressive behaviours spouses exhibit, the more chances they have to get to know each other and experience the joy of being part of a union. Transgressive tendencies stem from a network personality structure and consist of five psychons: cognitive, instrumental, motivational, emotional, and personal. The success of a marriage is the effect of a specific form of transgressive behaviours in marriage exhibited by both spouses, which is recognizing difficulties as they appear, finding their sources, and taking steps together to overcome them.

  17. Potential Success and Barrier Factors for Implementation of the Transition to Independence (TIP Model

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    Christopher M. Kalinyak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative study, 28 key stakeholders who work with transition-aged youth participated in focus group discussions addressing success and barrier factors regarding implementation of a transition to independence process (TIP program for youth, ages 14–29, in three Midwestern cities. All participants had prior knowledge of TIP. The paradigm shift to client-oriented goals and services was acknowledged by respondents as the prime benefit of TIP; youth are more motivated to follow through on self-determined goals. Barrier factors for providers involved collaboration with agencies adhering to provider-oriented interventions, provision of TIP methods training, and reallocation of time and money. Barrier factors for youth involved mistrust of service providers, overcoming maturational deficits, and acquiring and maintaining relationships, reputations, and social supports.

  18. The Cognitive Reserve Model in the Development of Delirium: The Successful Aging After Elective Surgery Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizginer, Sevdenur; Marcantonio, Edward; Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Shafi, Mouhsin; Schmitt, Eva M; Inouye, Sharon K; Jones, Richard N

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the role of cognitive and brain reserve markers in modifying the risk of postoperative delirium associated with a pathophysiologic marker. The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery study (SAGES) enrolled 556 adults age ≥70 years without dementia scheduled for major surgery. Patients were assessed preoperatively and daily during hospitalization for delirium. We used C-reactive protein (CRP) as a pathophysiologic marker of inflammation, previously associated with delirium. Markers of reserve included vocabulary knowledge, education, cognitive activities, occupation type and complexity, head circumference, intracranial volume, and leisure activities. Vocabulary knowledge, cognitive activities, and education significantly modified the association of CRP and postoperative delirium ( P delirium associated with lower grade inflammatory processes, supporting the role of reserve in delirium.

  19. Modeling future scenarios of light attenuation and potential seagrass success in a eutrophic estuary

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    del Barrio, Pilar; Ganju, Neil K.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Hayn, Melanie; García, Andrés; Howarth, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Estuarine eutrophication has led to numerous ecological changes, including loss of seagrass beds. One potential cause of these losses is a reduction in light availability due to increased attenuation by phytoplankton. Future sea level rise will also tend to reduce light penetration and modify seagrass habitat. In the present study, we integrate a spectral irradiance model into a biogeochemical model coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). It is linked to a bio-optical seagrass model to assess potential seagrass habitat in a eutrophic estuary under future nitrate loading and sea-level rise scenarios. The model was applied to West Falmouth Harbor, a shallow estuary located on Cape Cod (Massachusetts) where nitrate from groundwater has led to eutrophication and seagrass loss in landward portions of the estuary. Measurements of chlorophyll, turbidity, light attenuation, and seagrass coverage were used to assess the model accuracy. Mean chlorophyll based on uncalibrated in-situ fluorometry varied from 28 μg L−1 at the landward-most site to 6.5 μg L−1 at the seaward site, while light attenuation ranged from 0.86 to 0.45 m-1. The model reproduced the spatial variability in chlorophyll and light attenuation with RMS errors of 3.72 μg L−1 and 0.07 m-1 respectively. Scenarios of future nitrate reduction and sea-level rise suggest an improvement in light climate in the landward basin with a 75% reduction in nitrate loading. This coupled model may be useful to assess habitat availability changes due to eutrophication and sediment resuspension and fully considers spatial variability on the tidal timescale.

  20. Stimulating seedling growth in early stages of secondary forest succession: a modeling approach to guide tree liberation.

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    Marijke van Kuijk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Excessive growth of non-woody plants and shrubs on degraded lands can strongly hamper tree growth and thus secondary forest succession. A common method to accelerate succession, called liberation, involves opening up the vegetation canopy around young target trees. This can increase growth of target trees by reducing competition for light with neighboring plants. However, liberation has not always the desired effect, likely due to differences in light requirement between tree species. Here we present a 3D-model, which calculates photosynthetic rate of individual trees in a vegetation stand. It enables us to examine how stature, crown structure and physiological traits of target trees and characteristics of the surrounding vegetation together determine effects of light on tree growth. The model was applied to a liberation experiment conducted with three pioneer species in a young secondary forest in Vietnam. Species responded differently to the treatment depending on their height, crown structure and their shade-tolerance level. Model simulations revealed practical thresholds over which the tree growth response is heavily influenced by the height and density of surrounding vegetation and gap radius. There were strong correlations between calculated photosynthetic rates and observed growth: the model was well able to predict growth of trees in young forests and the effects of liberation there upon. Thus our model serves as a useful tool to analyze light competition between young trees and surrounding vegetation and may help assess the potential effect of tree liberation.