WorldWideScience

Sample records for model studies presented

  1. Lithium-Ion Battery Safety Study Using Multi-Physics Internal Short-Circuit Model (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G-.H.; Smith, K.; Pesaran, A.

    2009-06-01

    This presentation outlines NREL's multi-physics simulation study to characterize an internal short by linking and integrating electrochemical cell, electro-thermal, and abuse reaction kinetics models.

  2. A model study of present-day Hall-effect circulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placke, B. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Quantum Information, Aachen (Germany); Bosco, S. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Quantum Information, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Fundamentals of Future Information Technologiesh, Juelich (Germany); DiVincenzo, D.P. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Quantum Information, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Fundamentals of Future Information Technologiesh, Juelich (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute, Theoretical Nanoelectronics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    Stimulated by the recent implementation of a three-port Hall-effect microwave circulator of Mahoney et al. (MEA), we present model studies of the performance of this device. Our calculations are based on the capacitive-coupling model of Viola and DiVincenzo (VD). Based on conductance data from a typical Hall-bar device obtained from a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field, we numerically solve the coupled field-circuit equations to calculate the expected performance of the circulator, as determined by the S parameters of the device when coupled to 50Ω ports, as a function of frequency and magnetic field. Above magnetic fields of 1.5 T, for which a typical 2DEG enters the quantum Hall regime (corresponding to a Landau-level filling fraction ν of 20), the Hall angle θ{sub H} = tan{sup -1} σ{sub xy}/σ{sub xx} always remains close to 90 , and the S parameters are close to the analytic predictions of VD for θ{sub H} = π/2. As anticipated by VD, MEA find the device to have rather high (kΩ) impedance, and thus to be extremely mismatched to 50Ω, requiring the use of impedance matching. We incorporate the lumped matching circuits of MEA in our modeling and confirm that they can produce excellent circulation, although confined to a very small bandwidth. We predict that this bandwidth is significantly improved by working at lower magnetic field when the Landau index is high, e.g. ν = 20, and the impedance mismatch is correspondingly less extreme. Our modeling also confirms the observation of MEA that parasitic port-to-port capacitance can produce very interesting countercirculation effects. (orig.)

  3. Comparative animal models for the study of lymphohematopoietic tumors: strengths and limitations of present approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Owen A; Toner, Lorraine E; Vrhovac, Radovan; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin; Smith, Emily A; Bergman, Philip

    2005-07-01

    The lymphomas probably represent the most complex and heterogenous set of malignancies known to cancer medicine. Underneath the single term lymphoma exist some of the fastest growing cancers known to science (i.e Burkitt's and lymphoblastic lymphoma), as well as some of the slowest growing (i.e. small lymphocytic lymphoma [SLL] and follicular lymphoma). It is this very biology that can dictate the selection of drugs and treatment approaches for managing these patients, strategies that can range from very aggressive combination chemotherapy administered in an intensive care unit (for example, patients with Burkitt's lymphoma), to watch and wait approaches that may go on for years in patients with SLL. This impressive spectrum of biology emerges from a relatively restricted number of molecular defects. The importance of these different molecular defects is of course greatly influenced by the intrinsic biology that defines the lymphocyte at its different stages of differentiation and maturation. It is precisely this molecular understanding that is beginning to form the basis for a new approach to thinking about lymphoma, and novel approaches to its management. Unfortunately, while our understanding of human lymphoma has blossomed, our ability to generate appropriate animal models reflective of this biology has not. Most preclinical models of these diseases still rely upon sub-cutaneous xenograft models of only the most aggressive lymphomas like Burkitt's lymphoma. While these models clearly serve an important role in understanding biology, and perhaps more importantly, in identifying promising new drugs for these diseases, they fall short in truly representing the broader, more heterogenous biology found in patients. Clearly, depending upon the questions being posed, or the types of drugs being studied, the best model to employ may vary from situation to situation. In this article, we will review the numerous complexities associated with various animal models of

  4. Geochemical modelling and speciation studies of metal pollutants present in selected water systems in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magu, M. M.; Govender, P. P.; Ngila, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    Metal pollutants in water poses great threats to living beings and hence requires to be monitored regularly to avoid loss of lives. Various analytical methods are available to monitor these pollutants in water and can be improved with time. Modelling of metal pollutants in any water system helps chemists, engineers and environmentalists to greatly understand the various chemical processes in such systems. Water samples were collected from waste water treatment plant and river from highlands close to its source all the way to the ocean as it passing through areas with high anthropogenic activities. Pre-concentration of pollutants in the samples was done through acid digestion and metal pollutants were analysed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectra (ICP-OES) to determine the concentration levels. Metal concentrations ranged between 0.1356-0.4658 mg/L for Al; 0.0031-0.0050 mg/L for Co, 0.0019-0.0956 mg/L for Cr; 0.0028-0.3484 mg/L for Cu; 0.0489-0.3474 mg/L for Fe; 0.0033-0.0285 mg/L for Mn; 0.0056-0.0222 mg/L for Ni; 0.0265-0.4753 mg/L for Pb and 0.0052-0.5594 mg/L for Zn. Modelling work was performed using PHREEQC couple with Geochemist's workbench (GWB) to determine speciation dynamics and bioavailability of these pollutants. Modelling thus adds value to analytical methods and hence a better complementary tool to laboratory-based experimental studies.

  5. The chlorine budget of the present-day atmosphere - A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sze, Nien-Dak

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of source gases to the total amount of inorganic chlorine (ClY) is examined analytically with a time-dependent model employing 11 source gases. The source-gas emission data are described, and the modeling methodology is set forth with attention given to the data interpretation. The abundances and distributions are obtained for all 11 source gases with corresponding ClY production rates and mixing ratios. It is shown that the ClY production rate and the ClY mixing ratio for each source gas are spatially dependent, and the change in the relative contributions from 1950 to 1990 is given. Ozone changes in the past decade are characterized by losses in the polar and midlatitude lower stratosphere. The values for CFC-11, CCl4, and CH3CCl3 suggest that they are more evident in the lower stratosphere than is suggested by steady-state estimates based on surface concentrations.

  6. Presenting Enterprise Architecture Strategies Using Business Model Canvas (Case Study of E-commerce PT Xyz)

    OpenAIRE

    Christini, Chintamy; Rahmad, Basuki

    2015-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) is known as enabler of business. One of the study that align business and IT is enterprise architecture. In this era, one of the business that become a trend the world is electronic commerce (e-commerce). With the suitable enterprise architecture strategies, e-commerce can be improved according to the business and IT condition. This paper represents about study case of an Indonesian e-commerce website which is still unknown by internet users and the SWOT strategy a...

  7. User-independent diffusion tensor imaging analysis pipelines in a rat model presenting ventriculomegalia: A comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakpo, Luis; Pierre, Wyston C; Jin, Chen; Londono, Irène; Pouliot, Philippe; Lodygensky, Gregory A

    2017-11-01

    Automated analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data is an appealing way to process large datasets in an unbiased manner. However, automation can sometimes be linked to a lack of interpretability. Two whole-brain, automated and voxelwise methods exist: voxel-based analysis (VBA) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). In VBA, the amount of smoothing has been shown to influence the results. TBSS is free of this step, but a projection procedure is introduced to correct for residual misalignments. This projection assigns the local highest fractional anisotropy (FA) value to the mean FA skeleton, which represents white matter tract centers. For both methods, the normalization procedure has a major impact. These issues are well documented in humans but, to our knowledge, not in rodents. In this study, we assessed the quality of three different registration algorithms (ANTs SyN, DTI-TK and FNIRT) using study-specific templates and their impact on automated analysis methods (VBA and TBSS) in a rat pup model of diffuse white matter injury presenting large unilateral deformations. VBA and TBSS results were stable and anatomically coherent across the three pipelines. For VBA, in regions around the large deformations, interpretability was limited because of the increased partial volume effect. With TBSS, two of the three pipelines found a significant decrease in axial diffusivity (AD) at the known injury site. These results demonstrate that automated voxelwise analyses can be used in an animal model with large deformations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  9. Economic burden of torture for a refugee host country: development of a model and presentation of a country case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele; Frey, Conrad; Chastonay, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background Torture is an important social and political problem worldwide that affects millions of people. Many host countries give victims of torture the status of refugee and take care of them as far as basic needs; health care, professional reinsertion, and education. Little is known about the costs of torture. However, this knowledge could serve as an additional argument for the prevention and social mobilization to fight against torture and to provide a powerful basis of advocacy for rehabilitation programs and judiciary claims. Objectives Development of a model for estimating the economic costs of torture and applying the model to a specific country. Methods The estimation of the possible prevalence of victims of torture was based on a review of the literature. The identification of the socioeconomic factors to be considered was done by analogy with various health problems. The estimation of the loss of the productivity and of the economic burden of disease related to torture was done through the human capital approach and the component technique analysis. Case study The model was applied to the situation in Switzerland of estimated torture victims Switzerland is confronted with. Results When applied to the case study, the direct costs – such as housing, food, and clothing – represent roughly 130 million Swiss francs (CHF) per year; whereas, health care costs amount to 16 million CHF per year, and the costs related to education of young people to 34 million CHF per year. Indirect costs, namely those costs related to the loss of the productivity of direct survivors of torture, have been estimated to one-third of 1 billion CHF per year. This jumps to 10,073,419,200 CHF in the loss of productivity if one would consider 30 years of loss per survivor. Conclusion Our study shows that a rough estimation of the costs related to torture is possible with some prerequisites, such as access to social and economic indicators at the country level. PMID:24729721

  10. Presenting "recious Knowledge": Using Film to Model Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Youth Civic Activism for Social Studies Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhouse, Hillary

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I examine the potential for developing preservice social studies teachers' understanding of transformational resistance, Latin@ civil rights movements, and culturally sustaining pedagogy through a project using the film Precious Knowledge. This documentary depicts high school students in a Mexican American Studies (MAS) program…

  11. Modeling Present and Future River Runoff Using Global Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    AD-A265 274 October 1992 TBESIS Modeling Present and Future River Runoff Using Global Atmospheric Models Captain Scott C. Van Blarcum AFIT Student... ATMOSPHERIC MODELS BY SCOTT C. VAN BLARCUM A thesis submitted to the Graduate School-New Brunswick Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey in...03 020 I1UIlU1ll ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Modeling Present and Future River Runoff Using Global Atmospheric Models by SCOTT C. VAN BLARCUM Thesis

  12. Fuel model studies. Comparison of our present version of GAPCON-THERMAL-2 with results from the EPRI code comparison study. Partial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.; Jansson, L.

    1978-08-01

    Runs with our present version of GAPCON-THERMAL-2 have been compared to results from the EPRI code comparison study. Usually also our version of GAPCON predicts high temperatures, 100-300 K or 10-15% higher than average code predictions and experimental results. The well-known temperaturegas release instablility is found also with GAPCON. In this case one identifies the gas release limits 1400 deg C and 1700 deg C as instablility points. (author)

  13. An interpretative model of early indicators of specific developmental dyslexia in preschool age: a comparative presentation of three studies in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakopoulou, Victoria; Anagnostopoulou, Areti; Christodoulides, Pavlos; Stavrou, Lambros; Sarri, Ioanna; Mavreas, Venetsanos; Tzoufi, Meropi

    2011-01-01

    The detection of specific factors of the developmental dyslexia at an early stage, and the identification of the role of those factors responsible for its manifestation, is a fundamental area of study on dyslexia in the recent literature. The objective of the present study is to clarify that dysfunctions in the following specific domains contribute in a causal model to the occurrence of dyslexia at an early stage: phonological awareness, psychomotor ability (body shape, spatio-temporal orientation, grapho-motor ability and laterality), perception, memory, attention, prereading and prewriting skills. The results of three studies, --carried out in Greece--which revealed the above factors as main predictors of the early onset of Specific Developmental Dyslexia (SDD) and confirmed the importance of intervention methods to it, led us to the construction of the proposed, causal model. The findings of these three studies converge on the perspective that the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of dysfunctions in the above domains, from preschool age, enable the early and reliable prevention of future difficulties in the learning process of children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrological catchment modelling: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses basic issues in hydrological modelling and flood forecasting, ranging from the roles of physically-based and data-driven rainfall runoff models, to the concepts of predictive uncertainty and equifinality and their implications. The evolution of a wide range of hydrological catchment models employing the physically meaningful and data-driven approaches introduces the need for objective test beds or benchmarks to assess the merits of the different models in reconciling the alternative approaches. In addition, the paper analyses uncertainty in models and predictions by clarifying the meaning of uncertainty, by distinguishing between parameter and predictive uncertainty and by demonstrating how the concept of equifinality must be addressed by appropriate and robust inference approaches. Finally, the importance of predictive uncertainty in the decision making process is highlighted together with possible approaches aimed at overcoming the diffidence of end-users.

  15. Modeling of present and Eemian stable water isotopes in precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjolte, Jesper

    interglacial. Present day boundary conditions were used except for the insolation and the SST patterns. The modeled summer temperatures for the Northern Hemisphere were found to match proxy data well, with the large summer insolation anomalies causing warmer summers than for present day. The peak summer......The subject of this thesis is the modeling of the isotopic temperature proxies d18O, dD and deuterium excess in precipitation. Two modeling studies were carried out, one using the regional climate model, and one using a global climate model. In the regional study the model was run for the period...... 1959 to 2001 using meteorological data and a domain including Greenland and the surrounding North Atlantic. The model was found to reproduce the observed seasonal variability of temperature and precipitation well. In comparison with ice core data from Greenland and observations from coastal stations...

  16. Model for Presenting Resources in Scholar's Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Mary; Newby, Jill

    2005-01-01

    Presenting electronic resources to users through a federated search engine introduces unique opportunities and challenges to libraries. This article reports on the decision-making tools and processes used for selecting collections of electronic resources by a project team at the University of Arizona (UA) Libraries for the Association of Research…

  17. Presenting Software Metrics Indicators- A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantazos, Kostas; Shollo, Arisa; Staron, Miroslaw

    2010-01-01

    decisions based on indicators. In essence, visualizing indicators and their dependencies can communicate the information to the stakeholders efficiently if done correctly, or mislead them if not done properly. In this paper we present results of a case study conducted in a unit of Ericsson. During the case...... study we identified the main requirements for methods for visualizing the indicators, developed these visualizations and conducted a series of interviews evaluating them. The results show that the dashboard presentation is the best solution, but that the simple, tabular visualizations are next best...

  18. Presenting an Evaluation Model for the Cancer Registry Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Asadi, Farkhondeh; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Farough; Shahbodaghi, Reihaneh

    2017-12-01

    As cancer is increasingly growing, cancer registry is of great importance as the main core of cancer control programs, and many different software has been designed for this purpose. Therefore, establishing a comprehensive evaluation model is essential to evaluate and compare a wide range of such software. In this study, the criteria of the cancer registry software have been determined by studying the documents and two functional software of this field. The evaluation tool was a checklist and in order to validate the model, this checklist was presented to experts in the form of a questionnaire. To analyze the results of validation, an agreed coefficient of %75 was determined in order to apply changes. Finally, when the model was approved, the final version of the evaluation model for the cancer registry software was presented. The evaluation model of this study contains tool and method of evaluation. The evaluation tool is a checklist including the general and specific criteria of the cancer registry software along with their sub-criteria. The evaluation method of this study was chosen as a criteria-based evaluation method based on the findings. The model of this study encompasses various dimensions of cancer registry software and a proper method for evaluating it. The strong point of this evaluation model is the separation between general criteria and the specific ones, while trying to fulfill the comprehensiveness of the criteria. Since this model has been validated, it can be used as a standard to evaluate the cancer registry software.

  19. Present-day heat flow model of Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Parro, Laura M.; Jim?nez-D?az, Alberto; Mansilla, Federico; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Until the acquisition of in-situ measurements, the study of the present-day heat flow of Mars must rely on indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of the lithosphere and its mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, on scaling of heat flow variations arising from crustal thicknes...

  20. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    effectivities more than a number of fixed essential characteristics. Luiz Artur Ferrareto (UFRGS, undertaking a theoretical proposal for categorizing radio content in four different levels of planning (segment, form, programming and content itself tries to “compare and contrast the practices of Brazilian commercial broadcasting companies to those used on the radio in the United States, a reference market for our national entrepreneurs”. Madalena Oliveira (University of Minho focuses on the current stage of communication researches in Portugal reflecting on the challenges for studying a culture based on listening in times of looking. Marko Ala-Fossi, (University of Tampere beginning with the statement that “radio evolution greatly depends not only on the cultural context of a country but also on the whole social, political, economic development of societies” gives us a projection on radio development around the world for the next decades. Closing the dossier, Rafael Duarte Oliveira Venancio (UFU assuming radio as language by definition and not as a device understands it as a section and an operating model in such language as it intersects the world. Another six articles, not enrolled in the dossier, round the edition off. Fernando de Tacca debates the category of “photocine” recurring to three recent Spanish productions. Gustavo Souza investigates the possibility of identifying a point of view in documentary movies while establishing a debate that joins the materialities of image and sound with the subjectivity resulting from interpretation. Vinicius Bandeira develops on the special duplicity present in the movies between what is and what is not subsumed by the camera. Neide Jallageas proposes the study of visual communication design from the first modelings, attempting especially to the radical propositions from the early XXth century avant-garde movement. Gilson Schwartz debates on the impact from the distribution of videogames as hegemonic cultural practice in

  1. A diverse array of creatine kinase and arginine kinase isoform genes is present in the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a cnidarian model system for studying developmental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, Kouji; Ellington, W Ross; Suzuki, Tomohiko

    2012-04-15

    Phosphagen (guanidino) kinases (PK) constitute a family of homologous phosphotransferases catalyzing the reversible transfer of the high-energy phosphoryl group of ATP to naturally occurring guanidine compounds. Prior work has shown that PKs can be phylogenetically separated into two distinct groups- an arginine kinase (AK) subfamily and a creatine kinase (CK) subfamily. The latter includes three CK isoforms- cytoplasmic CK (CyCK), mitochondrial CK (MiCK) and three-domain flagellar CK (fCK). In the present study we identified six unique PK genes from the draft genome sequence of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a well-known model organism for understanding metazoan developmental evolution. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) methods, full length cDNAs were amplified for all of these PKs. These cDNAs were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as 6x His-tagged fusion proteins. The six PKs were identified as the three typical CK isoforms (CyCK, MiCK and fCK), two unusual AKs (a two-domain AK (2DAK) and a three-domain AK (3DAK)) and a PK which phosphorylated arginine. The latter enzyme had a very low AK activity (its apparent V(max) value being less than 0.2% that of 3DAK), lacks several key residues necessary for AK enzyme activity, and was tentatively designated as AK1. As far as we know, this constitutes the first report of an AK with the three fused AK domains. The Bayesian tree suggested that the third domain of 3DAK likely evolved from the gene for domain 2 of typical two-domain AK found widely in cnidarians. Construction of phylogenetic trees and comparison of exon-intron organizations of their respective genes indicated that the N. vectensis three-domain fCK and 3DAK evolved independently, and both enzymes are likely to be targeted to cell membranes since they have a myristoylation signal at their respective N-termini. These results complement prior work on other basal invertebrates showing that multiple CK and AK

  2. Present studies on the radiosterilized drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciniec, B.; Dettlaff, K.

    2007-01-01

    Lecture presents present status of radiosterilization of drugs and medical materials as compared to other sterilization methods. Literature review is shown on degradation of different kinds of drugs sterilized upon action of the sterilising doses of radiation

  3. Present status of composite models in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1986-03-01

    The present status of composite models in particle physics is reviewed with emphasis on the minimal composite model. The subjects to discuss include 1) minimal composite model, 2) generations, 3) mass spectrum and 4) Miyazawa's SUSY and Nambu's SUSY. (author)

  4. Nuclear model developments in FLUKA for present and future applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerutti Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The FLUKAS code [1–3] is used in research laboratories all around the world for challenging applications spanning a very wide range of energies, projectiles and targets. FLUKAS is also extensively used for in hadrontherapy research studies and clinical planning systems. In this paper some of the recent developments in the FLUKAS nuclear physics models of relevance for very different application fields including medical physics are presented. A few examples are shown demonstrating the effectiveness of the upgraded code.

  5. Nuclear model developments in FLUKA for present and future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Francesco; Empl, Anton; Fedynitch, Anatoli; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ruben, GarciaAlia; Sala, Paola R.; Smirnov, George; Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2017-09-01

    The FLUKAS code [1-3] is used in research laboratories all around the world for challenging applications spanning a very wide range of energies, projectiles and targets. FLUKAS is also extensively used for in hadrontherapy research studies and clinical planning systems. In this paper some of the recent developments in the FLUKAS nuclear physics models of relevance for very different application fields including medical physics are presented. A few examples are shown demonstrating the effectiveness of the upgraded code.

  6. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  7. Heat Pump Water Heater Modeling in EnergyPlus (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.; Christensen, C.

    2012-03-01

    This presentation summarizes NREL's development of a HPWH model for use in hourly building energy simulation programs, such as BEopt; this presentation was given at the Building America Stakeholder meeting on March 1, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  8. Urban phenological studies – Past, present, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochner, Susanne; Menzel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Phenology is believed to be a suitable bio-indicator to track climate change. Based on the strong statistical association between phenology and temperature phenological observations provide an inexpensive means for the temporal and spatial analysis of the urban heat island. However, other environmental factors might also weaken this relationship. In addition, the investigation of urban phenology allows an estimation of future phenology from current information since cities with their amplified temperatures may serve as a proxy for future conditions. Nevertheless, the design of spatial compared to long-term studies might be influenced by different factors which should be taken into consideration when interpreting results from a specific study. In general, plants located in urban areas tend to flush and bloom earlier than in the countryside. What are the consequences of these urban–rural differences? This review will document existing findings on urban phenology and will highlight areas in which further research is needed. - Highlights: • Urban phenology can be used for the estimation of the urban heat island effect. • Confounding factors weaken the phenology–temperature relationship. • Urban phenology is useful as a proxy for climate change impacts on phenology. • Differences in the study design hinder the generalisation of one specific method. • Urban–rural variations in phenology affect vegetation, meteorology, human health. - Studies on urban phenology can be used to detect urban heat islands and to assess climate change impacts but it still remains important to adequately link spatial and long-term data

  9. The Present State of Homeric Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcock, M. M.

    1967-01-01

    A personal point of view concerning various aspects of Homerica characterizes this brief state-of-the-art report. Commentary is directed to: (1) first readers; (2) the Parry-Lord approach to the study of the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey" as representatives of a type of oral, formulaic, poetry; (3) analysts, unitarians, and…

  10. PREGO (presentation of Graves' orbitopathy) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Žarković, Miloš; Azzolini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    characteristics of 269 patients studied in 2012 were similar to those collected in the year 2000, including smoking rates (40.0% vs 40.2%). Mild (60.5% vs 41.2%, pthyroid disease to being seen in EUGOGO...... centres (6 vs 16 months) and from first symptoms of GO (9 vs 16 months) or from diagnosis of GO (6 vs 12 months) to first consultation in EUGOGO centres were shorter in 2012 (pdisease...

  11. present

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the 1969/70 academic calendar. English became the medium of instruction from Standard 5 into university education and was made a compulsory subject of study throughout the education system ...... assumptions led to the abandonment of the use of vernaculars in class. Our study also established that the exercise is ...

  12. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  13. Building models for marketing decisions : Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, PSH; Wittink, DR

    We review five eras of model building in marketing, with special emphasis on the fourth and the fifth eras, the present and the future. At many firms managers now routinely use model-based results for marketing decisions. Given an increasing number of successful applications, the demand for models

  14. Building models for marketing decisions : past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, Dick R.

    2000-01-01

    We review five eras of model building in marketing, with special emphasis on the fourth and the fifth eras, the present and the future. At many firms managers now routinely use model-based results for marketing decisions. Given an increasing number of successful applications, the demand for models

  15. Recovering alternative presentation models of a web page with VAQUITA

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillon, Laurent; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Souchon, Nathalie

    2002-01-01

    VAQUITA allows developers to reverse engineer a presentation model of a web page according to multiple reverse engineering options. The alternative models offered by these options not only widen the spectrum of possible presentation models but also encourage developers in exploring multiple reverse engineering strategies. The options provide filtering capabilities in a static analysis of HTML code that are targeted either at multiple widgets simultaneously or at single widgets ...

  16. Modeling population exposures to silver nanoparticles present in consumer products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Steven G.; Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Cai, Ting; Xu, Shu S.; Alexander, Jocelyn A.; Mi, Zhongyuan; Calderon, Leonardo; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lee, KiBum; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-11-01

    Exposures of the general population to manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) are expected to keep rising due to increasing use of MNPs in common consumer products (PEN 2014). The present study focuses on characterizing ambient and indoor population exposures to silver MNPs (nAg). For situations where detailed, case-specific exposure-related data are not available, as in the present study, a novel tiered modeling system, Prioritization/Ranking of Toxic Exposures with GIS (geographic information system) Extension (PRoTEGE), has been developed: it employs a product life cycle analysis (LCA) approach coupled with basic human life stage analysis (LSA) to characterize potential exposures to chemicals of current and emerging concern. The PRoTEGE system has been implemented for ambient and indoor environments, utilizing available MNP production, usage, and properties databases, along with laboratory measurements of potential personal exposures from consumer spray products containing nAg. Modeling of environmental and microenvironmental levels of MNPs employs probabilistic material flow analysis combined with product LCA to account for releases during manufacturing, transport, usage, disposal, etc. Human exposure and dose characterization further employ screening microenvironmental modeling and intake fraction methods combined with LSA for potentially exposed populations, to assess differences associated with gender, age, and demographics. Population distributions of intakes, estimated using the PRoTEGE framework, are consistent with published individual-based intake estimates, demonstrating that PRoTEGE is capable of capturing realistic exposure scenarios for the US population. Distributions of intakes are also used to calculate biologically relevant population distributions of uptakes and target tissue doses through human airway dosimetry modeling that takes into account product MNP size distributions and age-relevant physiological parameters.

  17. Methodology for geometric modelling. Presentation and administration of site descriptive models; Metodik foer geometrisk modellering. Presentation och administration av platsbeskrivande modeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munier, Raymond [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Jan [Golder Associates (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This report presents a methodology to construct, visualise and present geoscientific descriptive models based on data from the site investigations, which the SKB currently performs, to build an underground nuclear waste disposal facility in Sweden. It is designed for interaction with SICADA (SKB:s site characterisation database) and RVS (SKB:s Rock Visualisation System). However, the concepts of the methodology are general and can be used with other tools capable of handling 3D geometries and parameters. The descriptive model is intended to be an instrument where site investigation data from all disciplines are put together to form a comprehensive visual interpretation of the studied rock mass. The methodology has four main components: 1. Construction of a geometrical model of the interpreted main structures at the site. 2. Description of the geoscientific characteristics of the structures. 3. Description and geometrical implementation of the geometric uncertainties in the interpreted model structures. 4. Quality system for the handling of the geometrical model, its associated database and some aspects of the technical auditing. The geometrical model forms a basis for understanding the main elements and structures of the investigated site. Once the interpreted geometries are in place in the model, the system allows for adding descriptive and quantitative data to each modelled object through a system of intuitive menus. The associated database allows each geometrical object a complete quantitative description of all geoscientific disciplines, variabilities, uncertainties in interpretation and full version history. The complete geometrical model and its associated database of object descriptions are to be recorded in a central quality system. Official, new and old versions of the model are administered centrally in order to have complete quality assurance of each step in the interpretation process. The descriptive model is a cornerstone in the understanding of the

  18. Modeling of present and Eemian stable water isotopes in precipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjolte, Jesper

    The subject of this thesis is the modeling of the isotopic temperature proxies d18O, dD and deuterium excess in precipitation. Two modeling studies were carried out, one using the regional climate model, and one using a global climate model. In the regional study the model was run for the period...... the modeled isotopes do not agree with ice core data. The discrepancy between the model output and the ice core data is attributed to the boundary conditions, where changes in ice sheets and vegetation have not been accounted for....

  19. Teacher-Scientist Partnerships: Past, Present, and Future Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Past and present models of teacher-scientist partnerships will be illustrated with examples cultivated from direct experience. Future models will be proposed, informed by this experience, as well as current STEM reform and policy iniitiatives and evidence-based education research.

  20. The Effects of Presentation Format for Behavior Modeling of Interpersonal Skills in Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, Min Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the most effective model presentation format in behavior modeling to teach interpersonal skills in online learning environments. Four model presentation formats were compared; video, pictures plus audio, audio only, and text-script only. The effects of the model presentation were investigated in terms of…

  1. Presenting a Model for Setting in Narrative Fiction Illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Salimi Namin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims at presenting a model for evaluating and enhancing training the setting in illustration for narrative fictions for undergraduate students of graphic design who are weak in setting. The research utilized expert’s opinions through a survey. The designed model was submitted to eight experts, and their opinions were used to have the model adjusted and improved. Used as research instruments were notes, materials in text books, papers, and related websites, as well as questionnaires. Results indicated that, for evaluating and enhancing the level of training the setting in illustration for narrative fiction to students, one needs to extract sub-indexes of setting. Moreover, definition and recognition of the model of setting helps undergraduate students of graphic design enhance the level of setting in their works skill by recognizing details of setting. Accordingly, it is recommended to design training packages to enhance these sub-indexes and hence improve the setting for narrative fiction illustration.

  2. The Synoptic View as a Model for Poster Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, D. D.; Arrowsmith, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    Originally referencing the first three chapters of the New Testament, the term "synoptic" has come to mean "a general view of the whole, or of the principal parts of a thing." Large format posters provide an opportunity to present research in synoptic form, rather than as an arrangement of PowerPoint slides and text. In synoptic views, data, analyses, and linkages are presented en masse with the graphical design used as a guide to the linkages. Conclusions about the meanings of the information are largely left to the viewers as they study the information and seek relationships-a natural activity for scientists. Numerous formats produce synoptic views of geoscientific information. Each imposes order on the information through spatial, temporal, or causal connections and provide context for multiple variables. Maps are the most common synoptic presentations. Additional map-sheet information, such as stratigraphic columns and cross sections, gain meaning from and contribute meaning to the areal view. Two and three-dimensional models, including flow charts and organizational diagrams offer a means of portraying complex interactions. Time lines and spatial line (e.g., latitude, depth, distance) diagrams, especially those with additional axes to plot related variables, show temporal or spatial trends, progress, or fluctuation. Some organizational schemes are specific to the sciences. The periodic table is a synoptic portrayal of the elements that designates their chemical behavior by their positions. As an illustration of phenomena, the well designed synoptic poster provides a multi-scale perspective that slices across time, space, or other parameters to expose the significant behaviors of the given system. Bruce Railsback's (2003) reorganization of the periodic table to emphasize the charged species most common in geologic processes is an outstanding example of synoptic design. Edward Tufte's works on graphical style and visual explanations are also excellent guides to

  3. Numerical modelling of present and future hydrology at Laxemar- Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassner, Mona; Sabel, Ulrika (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden)); Bosson, Emma; Berglund, Sten (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has performed site investigations at two potential sites for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. This report presents results of water flow modelling of the Laxemar area. The modelling reported in this document is focused on the near-surface groundwater, i.e. groundwater in Quaternary deposits and shallow rock, and surface water systems, and was performed using the MIKE SHE tool. The main objective of the modelling was to provide input to the radionuclide transport and dose calculations that were carried out as a part of the comparison between the Laxemar and Forsmark sites

  4. Macro-System Model Project #AN011 (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M.

    2010-06-08

    A review of the Macro-System Model for hydrogen production pathways analysis, including objectives, accomplishments, collaborations, and future work. Presented at the 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010, in Washington, DC.

  5. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-09-01

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must be absorbed by overdesign and warranty costs. Degradation models are needed that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. Models should also provide engineering feedback for next generation battery designs. This presentation reviews both multi-dimensional physical models and simpler, lumped surrogate models of battery electrochemical and mechanical degradation. Models are compared with cell- and pack-level aging data from commercial Li-ion chemistries. The analysis elucidates the relative importance of electrochemical and mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms in real-world operating environments. Opportunities for extending the lifetime of commercial battery systems are explored.

  6. Statistical Model of the 2001 Czech Census for Interactive Presentation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grim, Jiří; Hora, Jan; Boček, Pavel; Somol, Petr; Pudil, Pavel

    Vol. 26, č. 4 (2010), s. 1-23 ISSN 0282-423X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/07/1594; GA MŠk 1M0572 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Interactive statistical model * census data presentation * distribution mixtures * data modeling * EM algorithm * incomplete data * data reproduction accuracy * data mining Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.492, year: 2010 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/RO/grim-0350513.pdf

  7. Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Title: Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface Author: Tomáš Kohan Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor of the master thesis: RNDr. Ondřej Šerý, Ph.D., Department of Distributed and Dependable Systems Abstract: This thesis is devoted to design and implementation of the new debugging interface of the Java PathFinder application. As a suitable inte- face container was selected the Eclipse development environment. The created interface should vis...

  8. Modeling of Soybean under Present and Future Climates in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel António Dina Talacuece

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to calibrate and validate the generic crop model (CROPGRO-Soybean and estimate the soybean yield, considering simulations with different sowing times for the current period (1990–2013 and future climate scenario (2014–2030. The database used came from observed data, nine climate models of CORDEX (Coordinated Regional climate Downscaling Experiment-Africa framework and MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis. The calibration and validation data for the model were acquired in field experiments, carried out in the 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 growing seasons in the experimental area of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA in Angónia, Mozambique. The yield of two soybean cultivars: Tgx 1740-2F and Tgx 1908-8F was evaluated in the experiments and modeled for two distinct CO2 concentrations. Our model simulation results indicate that the fertilization effect leads to yield gains for both cultivars, ranging from 11.4% (Tgx 1908-8F to 15% (Tgx 1740-2Fm when compared to the performance of those cultivars under current CO2 atmospheric concentration. Moreover, our results show that MERRA, the RegCM4 (Regional Climatic Model version 4 and CNRM-CM5 (Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques – Climatic Model version 5 models provided more accurate estimates of yield, while others models underestimate yield as compared to observations, a fact that was demonstrated to be related to the model’s capability of reproducing the precipitation and the surface radiation amount.

  9. Past and present of sediment and carbon biogeochemical cycling models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Mackenzie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The global carbon cycle is part of the much more extensive sedimentary cycle that involves large masses of carbon in the Earth's inner and outer spheres. Studies of the carbon cycle generally followed a progression in knowledge of the natural biological, then chemical, and finally geological processes involved, culminating in a more or less integrated picture of the biogeochemical carbon cycle by the 1920s. However, knowledge of the ocean's carbon cycle behavior has only within the last few decades progressed to a stage where meaningful discussion of carbon processes on an annual to millennial time scale can take place. In geologically older and pre-industrial time, the ocean was generally a net source of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere owing to the mineralization of land-derived organic matter in addition to that produced in situ and to the process of CaCO3 precipitation. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations because of fossil fuel combustion and land use changes, the direction of the air-sea CO2 flux has reversed, leading to the ocean as a whole being a net sink of anthropogenic CO2. The present thickness of the surface ocean layer, where part of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions are stored, is estimated as of the order of a few hundred meters. The oceanic coastal zone net air-sea CO2 exchange flux has also probably changed during industrial time. Model projections indicate that in pre-industrial times, the coastal zone may have been net heterotrophic, releasing CO2 to the atmosphere from the imbalance between gross photosynthesis and total respiration. This, coupled with extensive CaCO3 precipitation in coastal zone environments, led to a net flux of CO2 out of the system. During industrial time the coastal zone ocean has tended to reverse its trophic status toward a non-steady state situation of net autotrophy, resulting in net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and storage of carbon in the coastal ocean, despite the significant calcification

  10. Surviving the present: Modeling tools for organizational change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pangaro, P. (Pangaro Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry, like the rest of modern American business, is beset by a confluence of economic, technological, competitive, regulatory, and political pressures. For better or worse, business schools and management consultants have leapt to the rescue, offering the most modern conveniences that they can purvey. Recent advances in the study of organizations have led to new tools for their analysis, revision, and repair. There are two complementary tools that do not impose values or injunctions in themselves. One, called the organization modeler, captures the hierarchy of purposes that organizations and their subparts carry out. Any deficiency or pathology is quickly illuminated, and requirements for repair are made clear. The second, called THOUGHTSTICKER, is used to capture the semantic content of the conversations that occur across the interactions of parts of an organization. The distinctions and vocabulary in the language of an organization, and the relations within that domain, are elicited from the participants so that all three are available for debate and refinement. The product of the applications of these modeling tools is not the resulting models but rather the enhancement of the organization as a consequence of the process of constructing them.

  11. Surviving the present: Modeling tools for organizational change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pangaro, P.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry, like the rest of modern American business, is beset by a confluence of economic, technological, competitive, regulatory, and political pressures. For better or worse, business schools and management consultants have leapt to the rescue, offering the most modern conveniences that they can purvey. Recent advances in the study of organizations have led to new tools for their analysis, revision, and repair. There are two complementary tools that do not impose values or injunctions in themselves. One, called the organization modeler, captures the hierarchy of purposes that organizations and their subparts carry out. Any deficiency or pathology is quickly illuminated, and requirements for repair are made clear. The second, called THOUGHTSTICKER, is used to capture the semantic content of the conversations that occur across the interactions of parts of an organization. The distinctions and vocabulary in the language of an organization, and the relations within that domain, are elicited from the participants so that all three are available for debate and refinement. The product of the applications of these modeling tools is not the resulting models but rather the enhancement of the organization as a consequence of the process of constructing them

  12. A Parabolic Model Presentation of Solar Radiation Data at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ife, Nigeria has been analysed and simple parabolic models established for predicting them. The models appear in the form of parabolic equations with three parameters. The necessary physical interpretations of the model parameters, their ...

  13. PRESENT STATUS OF RESEARCH IN DEBRIS FLOW MODELING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1985-01-01

    A viable rheological model should consist of both a time-independent part and a time-dependent part. A generalized viscoplastic fluid model that has both parts as well as two major rheological properties (i. e. , the normal stress effect and soil yield criteria) is shown to be sufficiently accurate, yet practical, for general use in debris flow modeling. Other rheological models, such as the Bingham plastic fluid model and the so-called Coulomb-viscous model, are compared in terms of the generalized viscoplastic fluid model.

  14. OpenDolphin: presentation models for compelling user interfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Shared applications run on the server. They still need a display, though, be it on the web or on the desktop. OpenDolphin introduces a shared presentation model to clearly differentiate between "what" to display and "how" to display. The "what" is managed on the server and is independent of the UI technology whereas the "how" can fully exploit the UI capabilities like the ubiquity of the web or the power of the desktop in terms of interactivity, animations, effects, 3D worlds, and local devices. If you run a server-centric architecture and still seek to provide the best possible user experience, then this talk is for you. About the speaker Dierk König (JavaOne Rock Star) works as a fellow for Canoo Engineering AG, Basel, Switzerland. He is a committer to many open-source projects including OpenDolphin, Groovy, Grails, GPars and GroovyFX. He is lead author of the "Groovy in Action" book, which is among ...

  15. Making sense to modelers: Presenting UML class model differences in prose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the difference between two models, such as different versions of a design, can be difficult. It is a commonly held belief in the model differencing community that the best way of presenting a model difference is by using graph or tree-based visualizations. We disagree and present an...... by a controlled experiment that tests three alternatives to presenting model differences. Our findings support our claim that the approach presented here is superior to EMF Compare.......Understanding the difference between two models, such as different versions of a design, can be difficult. It is a commonly held belief in the model differencing community that the best way of presenting a model difference is by using graph or tree-based visualizations. We disagree and present...... an alternative approach where sets of low-level model differences are abstracted into high-level model differences that lend themselves to being presented textually. This format is informed by an explorative survey to elicit the change descriptions modelers use themselves. Our approach is validated...

  16. Present status of the VMI and related models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharff-Goldhaber, G.

    1980-05-01

    This article traces the evolution of the Variable Moment of Inertia model in its relation to the shell model, the Bohr-Mottelson model and the Interacting Boson Model. The discovery of a new type of spectrum, that of pseudomagic nuclei (isobars of doubly magic nuclei) is reported, and an explanation for their dynamics is suggested. The type of rotational motion underlying the ground state band of an e-e nucleus is shown to depend on whether the minimum number of valence nucleon pairs of one kind (neutrons or protons) is less than or equal to 2 or > 2. In the former case the alpha-dumbbell model holds; in the latter the two-fluid model

  17. VIDEO BLOGGING AND ENGLISH PRESENTATION PERFORMANCE: A PILOT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Hung, Shao-Ting; Danny Huang, Heng-Tsung

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the utility of video blogs in improving EFL students' performance in giving oral presentations and, further, examined the students' perceptions toward video blogging. Thirty-six English-major juniors participated in a semester-long video blog project for which they uploaded their 3-min. virtual presentation clips over 18 weeks. Their virtual presentation clips were rated by three raters using a scale for speaking performance that contained 14 presentation skills. Data sources included presentation clips, reflections, and interviews. The results indicated that the students' overall presentation performance improved significantly. In particular, among the 14 presentation skills projection, intonation, posture, introduction, conclusion, and purpose saw the most substantial improvement. Finally, the qualitative data revealed that learners perceived that the video blog project facilitated learning but increased anxiety.

  18. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study: Phase 2 (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Lefton, S.; Kumar, N.; Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation summarizes the scope and results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  19. Webinar Presentation: Assessing Neurodevelopment in Parallel Animal and Human Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Assessing Neurodevelopment in Parallel Animal and Human Studies, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment held on Sept. 9, 2015.

  20. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIE(PRESENTATION FOR MNA WORKSHOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  1. St-Laurent block project : wind impact modeling study[Report presented to the Societe de Developpement Angus SDA]; Projet du quadrilatere St-Laurent : etude sur modele reduit des impacts eoliens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubel, T.; Saucet, J.P. [Le Groupe-Conseil LaSalle Inc., LaSalle, PQ (Canada)

    2009-03-15

    A study was conducted to determine how the proposed construction of a large building complex along Sainte-Catherine Street in Montreal will influence the movement of air in the city block and the comfort of pedestrians. Different configurations of wind interactions were simulated using a 1/225 scaled version of the proposed construction. This report described the methodology and study results. It included an analysis of wind regimes at the site. During the simulations, the movement of air around the building complex was reproduced to scale. Wind speed measurements were taken at 33 reference points. It was concluded that the construction of the complex may result in discomfort to pedestrians on the sidewalks as well as those in a covered passages. The installation of a deflector or planting of vegetation may reduce some of the discomfort. Alternatively, a change in the building's geometry may diminish some of the wind impact. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  2. Bonissone CIDU Presentation: Design of Local Fuzzy Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — After reviewing key background concepts in fuzzy systems and evolutionary computing, we will focus on the use of local fuzzy models, which are related to both kernel...

  3. [Herpes simplex virus vaccine studies: from past to present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Dürdal

    2006-10-01

    The dramatical increase in the prevalence of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections and the significant physical and psychosocial morbidity of HSV type 2 infections, generate the need for an efficacious HSV vaccine. The most important properties of HSVs that should be targeted for a successful vaccine are neuronal invasion, latency and reactivation in spite of specific host immune responses. The major expectation for an ideal HSV vaccine candidate is to induce sterilizing immunity, which must be effective at all portals of HSV entry; to prevent or reduce the symptomatic disease and to eliminate or at least to limit the asymptomatic viral shedding. The first vaccine studies have began in the 1920s and in the intervening eight decades there have been many attempts to develop an effective one. Although encouraging findings came from experiments in various animal models, human studies have been disappointing, unfortunately. The vaccine strategies that have undergone clinical evaluation until today included autoinoculation of live HSV, whole inactivated vaccines, attenuated live virus vaccines, modified live virus subunit vaccines, cell culture-derived subunit vaccines, recombinant subunit (glycoprotein) vaccines, DISC (Disabled Infectious Single Cycle) virus vaccines, viral vectors and naked DNA vaccines. In most of the clinical studies the failure of HSV vaccines in spite of inducing very high levels of specific neutralizing antibodies have emphasized that cell-mediated immune response, especially Thl type immunity is important in preventing both primary disease and recurrences with HSV, rather than humoral response. The most hopeful result was obtained with HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL vaccine in clinical studies. This vaccine was found 74% effective in preventing genital disease in HSV seronegative women but was not effective in men or seropositive women. In recent years it is possible to genetically engineer HSV to produce a vaccine strain that is protective without

  4. On the complementary presentation of results of risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Bayer, A.

    1983-01-01

    The presentation of the loss of years of life provides the opportunity to illustrate in complementary way the mortality risks evaluated as part of risk studies. As phase A of the DRS (German risk study nuclear power plants) bears upon the results of the American ''Reactor Safety Study'' (WASH 1400) it does not contain that factor of failure which has only been determined in subsequent studies. Phase B intends to present the results of risk assessments increasingly in form of abridged lifetime. (orig.) [de

  5. Spotlight on the presenter : a study into presentations of conference papers with PowerPoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertz, B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 1. Introduction PowerPoint is the most widely used presentation software tool. As of 2012, PowerPoint had more than 200 million presenters worldwide. Presenters all over the world use the program. Some use it for university teaching, others for business

  6. Spotlight on the presenter : a study into presentations of conference papers with PowerPoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertz, B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    1. Introduction

    PowerPoint is the most widely used presentation software tool. As of 2012, PowerPoint had more than 200 million presenters worldwide. Presenters all over the world use the program. Some use it for university teaching, others

  7. Mood disorders and season of presentation: A preliminary study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between season and mood is complex. This study attempts to clarify one aspect of the relationship: the impact of season on mood in terms of the hypothesised seasonal variation in the presentation of mood disorders at Baragwanath Hospital. Although a preliminary study, the results show a statistically ...

  8. A prospective study on the clinico-pathological presentation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Main objective: To determine the clinico-pathological presentation and management of odontogenic myxoma at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Study design: A prospective descriptive study. Setting: The Oral Surgery and Oral Pathology Department and the Department of Histopathology and Morbid ...

  9. Estimating net present value variability for deterministic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Groenendaal, W.J.H.

    1995-01-01

    For decision makers the variability in the net present value (NPV) of an investment project is an indication of the project's risk. So-called risk analysis is one way to estimate this variability. However, risk analysis requires knowledge about the stochastic character of the inputs. For large,

  10. Minimal Z' models present bounds and early LHC reach

    CERN Document Server

    Salvioni, Ennio; Zwirner, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    We consider `minimal' Z' models, whose phenomenology is controlled by only three parameters beyond the Standard Model ones: the Z' mass and two effective coupling constants. They encompass many popular models motivated by grand unification, as well as many arising in other theoretical contexts. This parameterization takes also into account both mass and kinetic mixing effects, which we show to be sizable in some cases. After discussing the interplay between the bounds from electroweak precision tests and recent direct searches at the Tevatron, we extend our analysis to estimate the early LHC discovery potential. We consider a center-of-mass energy from 7 towards 10 TeV and an integrated luminosity from 50 to several hundred pb^-1, taking all existing bounds into account. We find that the LHC will start exploring virgin land in parameter space for M_Z' around 700 GeV, with lower masses still excluded by the Tevatron and higher masses still excluded by electroweak precision tests. Increasing the energy up to 10...

  11. Past, Present, and Future in the Scientific Study of Religion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mccorkle, William W.; Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    The study of religion is by its nature and by its history multi-disciplinary, incorporating diverse research paradigms ranging from historiography to experimental approaches and from scientific positivism to postmodern reflection. At a conference on the Past, Present, and Future in the Scientific...... Study of Religion (March 1-3, 2012), the keynote speakers pro- vided an assessment of the field of religious studies. While they agreed on the relevance of traditional methods (in particular those coming from history and anthropology) for the study of religion, the speakers also stressed...

  12. THE STUDY OF CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF SOLITARY NODULE THYROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmikanthan Premalatha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thyroid disorders are the most common endocrine disorder seen in clinical practice and solitary thyroid nodule is one of the common presentations of thyroid disease. A discrete swelling in an otherwise impalpable gland is termed isolated or solitary nodule of thyroid.1 The prevalence of thyroid nodule increases from near zero at 15 years to 50% by about 60 to 65 years on sonography. At most 10% of these nodules are palpable even by experienced clinicians. This study is about the clinical presentation, histopathology and management of solitary nodule thyroid in MGM GH Tiruchirappalli. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES- To determine the age and sex incidence among the cases of solitary nodule thyroid. To study the percentage of euthyroid, hypothyroid or hyperthyroid state in patients presenting with solitary nodule thyroid. To study the proportion of malignant and benign cases among the solitary nodule thyroid at M.G.M. Govt. Hospital, Tiruchirappalli. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study includes 58 cases of solitary nodule of thyroid noted during the period Jan 2016-Dec 2016. Factors were tabulated and analysed statistically. RESULTS From the present study, the mean age at presentation found to be 42.5 years with preponderance to females. Because of periods of fluctuations in the demands of the hormonal requirement in female in their life cycle (puberty, menstrual cycles, pregnancy, menopause, the chances of thyroid nodule formation are very high as compared with male counterparts. From the study, distribution of malignancy is about 10.34. The incidence of malignancy found to be 12%, sensitivity is 87.5%, specificity is 100% for FNAC and HPE. CONCLUSION Majority of the patients are between 30-49 years of age. Incidence of solitary thyroid nodule is more common in female. Female: male ratio is almost about 15:1 Commonest symptom is swelling over anterior or lateral aspect of neck Among the benign lesion dominant nodule is most common and papillary and

  13. On the Present State of Information Society Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Alistair S.

    2001-01-01

    Assesses the present condition of the emerging specialism of information society studies. Topics include the information economy; information technology; the information explosion; the Japanese version of information society; information society as social democracy; sociology and information science; scholarly journals; and the need for…

  14. Presentation of chronic daily headache : A clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, E L H; Schroevers, M.; Honkoop, P.C.; Sorbi, M.

    We studied the presentation of chronic daily headache in 258 patients from a private headache practice, 50 men and 208 women. Chronic daily headache was defined as headaches, occurring at least 5 days per week for at least 1 year. Seventy-seven percent of the patients experienced the onset of

  15. Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Ibanez, E.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.; King, J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation accompanies Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, a follow-on to Phase 1, which examined the operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation on the electric power system in the West and was one of the largest variable generation studies to date. High penetrations of variable generation can induce cycling of fossil-fueled generators. Cycling leads to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions. Phase 2 calculated these costs and emissions, and simulated grid operations for a year to investigate the detailed impact of variable generation on the fossil-fueled fleet. The presentation highlights the scope of the study and results.

  16. MODELS OF STATE REFORMS IN AGRICULTURE: PAST AND PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А Г Киселев

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines social and economic consequences of collectivization to compare this state policy with the changes in agriculture in the 1990s, and to estimate chances of the Russian agriculture to overcome the current crisis. The article is based on archive data on collectivization and on the program developed by the Academy of High Ecotechnologies. The authors believe that at the time of collectivization, it was a way to optimize agriculture: largely due to collectivization, though with all its losses and ‘extremes’, the soviet agriculture was partially industrialized and provided the country with food in the hardest years of the Great Patriotic War and in the post-war period, thus ensuring the food security of the Soviet state. The ‘emergency’ model of the so-called ‘return to civilization’ that was adopted under the reforms of the 1990s aimed at turning the collective farmer into an individual farmer or a rural wageworker, but such a social ‘migration’ strategy imposed ‘from above’ deformed the rural social stratum and determined serious economic problems. Today the authors consider the neo-collective farms as a promising perspec-tive. They also support the program developed by the Academy of High Ecotechnologies for intensification of agricultural production on the basis of progressive domestic and foreign technologies, which will allow to increase the agricultural production in the next three to five years by several times. In particular, for more effective use of agricultural technologies and processing industries, the program suggests develop-ing the enlarged organizational-economic structures - ‘agropromkhozes’.

  17. Prospective study of emergency presentation of abdominal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh R. Mishra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing countries like India, where poverty, malnutrition and overcrowding prevail, tuberculosis continues to be one of the important causes of morbidity, mortality and loss of working man hours. Abdominal tuberculosis (TB can affect the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, lymph nodes of the small bowel mesentery or the solid viscera (e.g. liver, spleen, pancreas etc Patient of abdominal Koch’s can present as those with a chronic undulating course and those with an acute or subacute abdominal catastrophe. In emergency the patient may present with various presentations like stricture causing obstruction or with perforation and require a different management from those routine such cases Aim and Objective: To study the varied presentation of patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis as acute surgical abdomen presenting in emergency setting to those with a subacute course. To evaluate the line of management whether operative or conservative, the operative details, post operative course and the final outcome of the disease. To study the incidence of HIV positivity in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Methods and material: The study was designed as a prospective observational study conducted during a study period between June 2006 and June 2008 in a tertiary care centre in Mumbai. All patients with a clinical suspicion of abdominal tuberculosis were included in the study with confirmation on histopathological examination. Patient’s written informed valid consent was taken after explaining the nature of study. Result and Conclusion: Age group commonly affected was between 21-30 years with male predominance. Amongst the various complications of abdominal tuberculosis intestinal obstruction was the most common mainly due to stricture and less commonly due to hyperplastic ileocaecal mass. Next common complication observed was free perforation of the intestine which occurs at a site proximal to a tight stricture. All patients were

  18. Geothermal Exploration Case Studies on OpenEI (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, K.; Bennett, M.; Atkins, D.

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) resource assessment (Williams et al., 2008) outlined a mean 30 GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal resource in the western United States. One goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) is to accelerate the development of this undiscovered resource. DOE has focused efforts on helping industry identify hidden geothermal resources to increase geothermal capacity in the near term. Increased exploration activity will produce more prospects, more discoveries, and more readily developable resources. Detailed exploration case studies akin to those found in oil and gas (e.g. Beaumont and Foster, 1990-1992) will give developers central location for information gives models for identifying new geothermal areas, and guide efficient exploration and development of these areas. To support this effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been working with GTO to develop a template for geothermal case studies on the Geothermal Gateway on OpenEI. In 2012, the template was developed and tested with two case studies: Raft River Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Raft_River_Geothermal_Area) and Coso Geothermal Area (http://en.openei.org/wiki/Coso_Geothermal_Area). In 2013, ten additional case studies were completed, and Semantic MediaWiki features were developed to allow for more data and the direct citations of these data. These case studies are now in the process of external peer review. In 2014, NREL is working with universities and industry partners to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough data set to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  19. Study on Awakening Effect by Fragrance Presentation Against Drowsy Driving and Construction of Fragrance Presentation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakamu, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Shimizu, Takayuki; Yanagida, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Tomoaki; Yamamoto, Shin; Yamada, Muneo

    Traffic accidents caused by drowsy driving never disappear and easily result in fatal crash when heavy vehicle is involved. General methods to prevent drowsy driving are caution-advisory indicators and alarm sounds. However visual and auditory information are excessive enough to alert drivers. This study aims to focus on olfactory stimuli, which do not provoke interference with driving actions, and examine the effectiveness in combating drowsiness. Changing type of scent, we performed investigations on the effectiveness of each countermeasure to remain alert against drowsy driving.

  20. Adolescents' presentation of food in social media: An explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christopher; E Chaplin, John; Hillman, Thomas; Berg, Christina

    2016-04-01

    The study aimed to explore how adolescents communicate food images in a widely used social media image-sharing application. We examined how and in what context food was presented and the type of food items that were frequently portrayed by following a youth related hashtag on Instagram. The hashtag #14år ("14 years") was used to find adolescent users on Instagram: these users public photo streams were then searched for food items they had shared with others. Food items were identified and categorized based on type of food and how the food items were presented. Most of the adolescent users (85%) shared images containing food items. A majority of the images (67.7%) depicted foods high in calories but low in nutrients. Almost half of these images were arranged as a still life with food brand names clearly exposed. Many of these images were influenced by major food marketing campaigns. Fruits and vegetables occurred in 21.8% of all images. This food group was frequently portrayed zoomed in with focus solely on the food, with a hashtag or caption expressing palatability. These images were often presented in the style of a cook book. Food was thus presented in varied ways. Adolescents themselves produced images copying food advertisements. This has clear health promotion implications since it becomes more challenging to monitor and tackle young people's exposure to marketing of unhealthy foods in these popular online networks because images are part of a lifestyle that the young people want to promote. Shared images contain personal recommendations, which mean that they may have a more powerful effect than commercial advertising. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Present, past and future of the European rock fern Asplenium fontanum: combining distribution modelling and population genetics to study the effect of climate change on geographic range and genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystriakova, Nadia; Ansell, Stephen W; Russell, Stephen J; Grundmann, Michael; Vogel, Johannes C; Schneider, Harald

    2014-02-01

    Climate change is expected to alter the geographic range of many plant species dramatically. Predicting this response will be critical to managing the conservation of plant resources and the effects of invasive species. The aim of this study was to predict the response of temperate homosporous ferns to climate change. Genetic diversity and changes in distribution range were inferred for the diploid rock fern Asplenium fontanum along a South-North transect, extending from its putative last glacial maximum (LGM) refugia in southern France towards southern Germany and eastern-central France. This study reconciles observations from distribution models and phylogeographic analyses derived from plastid and nuclear diversity. Genetic diversity distribution and niche modelling propose that genetic diversity accumulates in the LGM climate refugium in southern France with the formation of a diversity gradient reflecting a slow, post-LGM range expansion towards the current distribution range. Evidence supports the fern's preference for outcrossing, contradicting the expectation that homosporous ferns would populate new sites by single-spore colonization. Prediction of climate and distribution range change suggests that a dramatic loss of range and genetic diversity in this fern is possible. The observed migration is best described by the phalanx expansion model. The results suggest that homosporous ferns reproducing preferentially by outcrossing accumulate genetic diversity primarily in LGM climate refugia and may be threatened if these areas disappear due to global climate change.

  2. Study of microorganisms present in deep geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, H.; Lion, R.; Bianchi, A.; Garcin, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work has been executed in the scope of the studies on high activity radioactive wastes storage in deep geological environments. The authors make reference to an as complete as possible literature on the existence of microorganisms in those environments or under similar conditions. Then they describe the equipment and methods they have implemented to perform their study of the populations present in three deep-reaching drill-holes in Auriat (France), Mol (Belgique) and Troon (Great Britain). The results of the study exhibit the presence of a certain biological activity, well adapted to that particular life environment. Strains appear to be very varied from the taxonomic point of view and seemingly show an important potential of mineral alteration when provided with an adequate source of energy. Complementary studies, using advanced techniques such as those employed during the work forming the basis of this paper, seem necessary for a more accurate evaluation of long-term risks of perturbation of a deep storage site [fr

  3. Verification Techniques for Parameter Selection and Bayesian Model Calibration Presented for an HIV Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Mami Tonoe

    Uncertainty quantification plays an important role when making predictive estimates of model responses. In this context, uncertainty quantification is defined as quantifying and reducing uncertainties, and the objective is to quantify uncertainties in parameter, model and measurements, and propagate the uncertainties through the model, so that one can make a predictive estimate with quantified uncertainties. Two of the aspects of uncertainty quantification that must be performed prior to propagating uncertainties are model calibration and parameter selection. There are several efficient techniques for these processes; however, the accuracy of these methods are often not verified. This is the motivation for our work, and in this dissertation, we present and illustrate verification frameworks for model calibration and parameter selection in the context of biological and physical models. First, HIV models, developed and improved by [2, 3, 8], describe the viral infection dynamics of an HIV disease. These are also used to make predictive estimates of viral loads and T-cell counts and to construct an optimal control for drug therapy. Estimating input parameters is an essential step prior to uncertainty quantification. However, not all the parameters are identifiable, implying that they cannot be uniquely determined by the observations. These unidentifiable parameters can be partially removed by performing parameter selection, a process in which parameters that have minimal impacts on the model response are determined. We provide verification techniques for Bayesian model calibration and parameter selection for an HIV model. As an example of a physical model, we employ a heat model with experimental measurements presented in [10]. A steady-state heat model represents a prototypical behavior for heat conduction and diffusion process involved in a thermal-hydraulic model, which is a part of nuclear reactor models. We employ this simple heat model to illustrate verification

  4. Present status of theories and data analyses of mathematical models for carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Michiaki; Kawaguchi, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Reviewed are the basic mathematical models (hazard functions), present trend of the model studies and that for radiation carcinogenesis. Hazard functions of carcinogenesis are described for multi-stage model and 2-event model related with cell dynamics. At present, the age distribution of cancer mortality is analyzed, relationship between mutation and carcinogenesis is discussed, and models for colorectal carcinogenesis are presented. As for radiation carcinogenesis, models of Armitage-Doll and of generalized MVK (Moolgavkar, Venson, Knudson, 1971-1990) by 2-stage clonal expansion have been applied to analysis of carcinogenesis in A-bomb survivors, workers in uranium mine (Rn exposure) and smoking doctors in UK and other cases, of which characteristics are discussed. In analyses of A-bomb survivors, models above are applied to solid tumors and leukemia to see the effect, if any, of stage, age of exposure, time progression etc. In miners and smokers, stages of the initiation, promotion and progression in carcinogenesis are discussed on the analyses. Others contain the analyses of workers in Canadian atomic power plant, and of patients who underwent the radiation therapy. Model analysis can help to understand the carcinogenic process in a quantitative aspect rather than to describe the process. (R.T.)

  5. Study of impulse control disorders among women presenting nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoyeux, Michel; Kerner, Laurent; Thauvin, Isabelle; Loi, Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    Objective. Impulse control disorders (ICDs) include intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, trichotillomania, pyromania and pathological gambling. Several studies have showed an association between ICDs and alcohol use disorders. The rate of co-occurrence ICDs and nicotine dependence has never been investigated. We thus assessed the frequency of all ICDs in a population of nicotine-dependent women compared to non-smoking women. We also checked criteria of two other impulsive behaviours, compulsive buying and bulimia. Methods. Five hundred consecutive patients were assessed by a general practitioner in Paris (France). One hundred and twenty-seven women presenting the DSM-IV-R criteria for nicotine dependence were included. They were compared to 127 women consulting the same practitioner but who did not smoke. Diagnosis of ICD (pyromania, kleptomania, trichotillomania, intermittent explosive disorder, pathological gambling) and of bulimia was based on DSM-IV criteria and a modified version of the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview (MIDI). Diagnosis of compulsive buying was made with the McElroy et al. criteria and a specific questionnaire. Cigarette smoking was studied using the Fagerström questionnaire and the DSM-IV-R criteria for nicotine dependence. Alcohol use disorders were assessed with the DSM-IV-R criteria for dependence and the CAGE and the MAST questionnaires. Results. Thirteen patients presented trichotillomania, 22 explosive intermittent disorder and 12 pathological gambling. All these diagnoses were equally frequent in the nicotine-positive and nicotine-negative groups. We found no case of pyromania. Compulsive buying was the most frequent impulse control disorder. It was significantly more frequent in the nicotine-positive group than in the nicotine-negative group (58 vs. 39 cases, P=0.01). Scores of the compulsive buying scale were higher in the nicotine-positive group (4.07 vs. 2.9, P=0.01). None of the patients presented an association

  6. Development and Analysis of a Swept Blade Aeroelastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preus, R.; Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department-of-Energy-funded Competitiveness Improvement Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed new capabilities for aeroelastic modeling of precurved and preswept blades for small wind turbines. This presentation covers the quest for optimized rotors, computer-aided engineering tools, a case study, and summary of the results.

  7. Present studies on the radio-sterilized drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciniec, B.; Dettlaff, K.

    2007-01-01

    Lecture presents present status of radiosterilization of drugs and medical materials as compared to other sterilization methods. Literature review is shown on degradation of different kinds of drugs sterilized upon action of the sterilising doses of radiation

  8. Presentation Of Comparative Data for Transportation Planning Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Clear, yet detailed, presentations of transportation planning data to lay groups as well as to technical groups is becoming more and more of a necessity in the planning process. Presentation of technical information in understandable terms has become...

  9. Utilizing past and present mouse systems to engineer more relevant pancreatic cancer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCant, Brian T; Principe, Daniel R; Guerra, Carmen; Pasca di Magliano, Marina; Grippo, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  10. Utilizing Past and Present Mouse Systems to Engineer More Relevant Pancreatic Cancer Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T DeCant

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of pancreatic cancer has prompted the development of numerous mouse models that aim to recapitulate the phenotypic and mechanistic features of this deadly malignancy. This review accomplishes two tasks. First, it provides an overview of the models that have been used as representations of both the neoplastic and carcinoma phenotypes. Second, it presents new modeling schemes that ultimately will serve to more faithfully capture the temporal and spatial progression of the human disease, providing platforms for improved understanding of the role of non-epithelial compartments in disease etiology as well as evaluating therapeutic approaches.

  11. [DESCRIPTION AND PRESENTATION OF THE RESULTS OF ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM PROCESSING USING AN INFORMATION MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myznikov, I L; Nabokov, N L; Rogovanov, D Yu; Khankevich, Yu R

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes to apply the informational modeling of correlation matrix developed by I.L. Myznikov in early 1990s in neurophysiological investigations, such as electroencephalogram recording and analysis, coherence description of signals from electrodes on the head surface. The authors demonstrate information models built using the data from studies of inert gas inhalation by healthy human subjects. In the opinion of the authors, information models provide an opportunity to describe physiological processes with a high level of generalization. The procedure of presenting the EEG results holds great promise for the broad application.

  12. Composition of intraocular foreign bodies: experimental study of ultrasonographic presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Augusto Nogueira Costa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the reliability of ultrasound in determining the size and identify the sonographic features and artifacts generated by intraocular foreign bodies of different materials. METHODS: Experimental study using 36 enucleated porcine eyes. Fragments of nine different compositions (wood, glass, plastic, cardboard, iron, aluminum, lead, powder and concrete and similar dimensions (4 mm were implanted via scleral incision into the vitreous cavity of 36 porcine eyes, four eyes were used for each material. Ultrasound examination was performed in all eyes using the contact technique, conductive gel and 10-MHz transducer (EZScan, Sonomed. RESULTS: Considering the material fragments of gunpowder, lead, concrete, aluminum, wood and glass, the size determined by ultrasound was considered statistically similar to the actual size. The material iron presented ultrasound-determined dimension statistically smaller than its actual size. Cardboard and plastic materials showed ultrasound-determined measurements far greater than the actual. All fragments of intraocular foreign bodies demonstrated hyper-reflective interfaces, irrespective of their composition. Whereas the artifacts generated by different materials, it was found that the materials iron, aluminum and lead showed reverberation of great extent. The material wood showed no reverberation. The length of the reverberation artifact for the materials iron, glass, aluminum and cardboard was lower when compared to other materials. All materials presented posterior shadowing artifact, with the exception of aluminum. CONCLUSION: Ultrasonography was considered a reliable technique to determine the size of intraocular foreign bodies in pigs, with little influence caused by its composition. Ultrasound artifacts generated were considered material-dependent and can assist the examiner to identify the nature of a foreign body of unknown etiology. Ultrasonography aided the surgeon to identify, locate and

  13. CLIMBER-2: a climate system model of intermediate complexity. Pt. 1. Model description and performance for present climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoukhov, V.; Ganopolski, A.; Brovkin, V.; Claussen, M.; Eliseev, A.; Kubatzki, C.; Rahmstorf, S.

    1998-02-01

    A 2.5-dimensional climate system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 and its performance for present climate conditions are presented. The model consists of modules describing atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, land surface processes, terrestrial vegetation cover, and global carbon cycle. The modules interact (on-line) through the fluxes of momentum, energy, water and carbon. The model has a coarse spatial resolution, allowing nevertheless to capture the major features of the Earth`s geography. The model describes temporal variability of the system on seasonal and longer time scales. Due to the fact that the model does not employ any type of flux adjustment and has fast turnaround time, it can be used for study of climates significantly different from the present one and allows to perform long-term (multimillennia) simulations. The constraints for coupling the atmosphere and ocean without flux adjustment are discussed. The results of a model validation against present climate data show that the model successfully describes the seasonal variability of a large set of characteristics of the climate system, including radiative balance, temperature, precipitation, ocean circulation and cryosphere. (orig.) 62 refs.

  14. Evaluation of a novel periodontal risk assessment model in patients presenting for dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, R Viswa

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to develop a new periodontal risk assessment model based on the periodontal risk assessment (PRA) model by Lang and Tonetti, and to evaluate the risk assessment capability of the proposed model. Twenty-six patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis were selected randomly and a thorough examination and charting of the periodontal status was performed. An intra-oral periapical radiograph of the area with the deepest probing depth was also taken. The following parameters were recorded: percentage of sites with BOP, number of sites with pocket depths > or = 5mm, number of teeth lost, bone loss/age ratio, attachment loss/age ratio, diabetic and smoking status, dental status, other systemic factors and risk determinants. Using Microsoft Excel, the parameters were plotted on the radar chart as per the original and the proposed model. Of the cases identified by the original model, 42.3% were high-risk cases and 30.8% of the cases were low-risk cases. In the proposed model, 46.2% of high-risk cases and 46.2% of low-risk cases were identified. Only 7.7% of the cases identified with the new model were moderate-risk cases. Statistical analysis demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the risk scores of the two models. The results suggest that risk assessment by this model does not vary significantly as compared to the original model, and both are equally adept at detecting potential risk groups.

  15. Presentation of infection in older patients--a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Dafna; Schlesinger, Agata; Daitch, Vered; Akayzen, Yulia; Farbman, Laura; Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2015-06-01

    Traditional wisdom suggests that infections in older patients have atypical presentation, including blunted febrile response. Data are scarce. We analyzed data from a prospectively collected database on presentation of infection in 4,308 patients, and compared the presentation of older patients (≥ 75 years) versus adults (presentation on day of admission, including vital signs and laboratory parameters. No difference in fever values as a presenting sign of infection was found between older patients and adults (median fever 38.3°C, interquartile range [IQR] 37.4-39.0°C; and 38.4°C, IQR 37.3-39.0°C, respectively, P = 0.08). Median leukocyte count was significantly higher in older patients (median 11.60, IQR 8.30-15.72 in older patients; 10.84, 7.50-15.00 in adults, P Presentation with septic shock, acute renal failure, and reduced consciousness was significantly more common in older patients. These findings were also consistent in the subgroups of bacteremic patients and patients with microbiologically documented infection. Elevated fever and leukocytosis were found to be at least equally common in older patients compared to younger adults as part of the presentation of infection.

  16. Mean field theory of nuclei and shell model. Present status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Hitoshi

    2003-01-01

    Many of the recent topics of the nuclear structure are concerned on the problems of unstable nuclei. It has been revealed experimentally that the nuclear halos and the neutron skins as well as the cluster structures or the molecule-like structures can be present in the unstable nuclei, and the magic numbers well established in the stable nuclei disappear occasionally while new ones appear. The shell model based on the mean field approximation has been successfully applied to stable nuclei to explain the nuclear structure as the finite many body system quantitatively and it is considered as the standard model at present. If the unstable nuclei will be understood on the same model basis or not is a matter related to fundamental principle of nuclear structure theories. In this lecture, the fundamental concept and the framework of the theory of nuclear structure based on the mean field theory and the shell model are presented to make clear the problems and to suggest directions for future researches. At first fundamental properties of nuclei are described under the subtitles: saturation and magic numbers, nuclear force and effective interactions, nuclear matter, and LS splitting. Then the mean field theory is presented under subtitles: the potential model, the mean field theory, Hartree-Fock approximation for nuclear matter, density dependent force, semiclassical mean field theory, mean field theory and symmetry, Skyrme interaction and density functional, density matrix expansion, finite range interactions, effective masses, and motion of center of mass. The subsequent section is devoted to the shell model with the subtitles: beyond the mean field approximation, core polarization, effective interaction of shell model, one-particle wave function, nuclear deformation and shell model, and shell model of cross shell. Finally structure of unstable nuclei is discussed with the subtitles: general remark on the study of unstable nuclear structure, asymptotic behavior of wave

  17. Modelling of present and future hydrology and solute transport at Forsmark. SR-Site Biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosson, Emma (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stocholm (Sweden)); Sassner, Mona; Sabel, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Lars-Goeran (DHI Sverige AB (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    Radioactive waste from nuclear power plants in Sweden is managed by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, SKB. SKB has performed site investigations at two different locations in Sweden, referred to as the Forsmark and Laxemar-Simpevarp areas, with the objective of siting a final repository for high-level radioactive waste. In 2009 a decision was made to focus on the Forsmark site. This decision was based on a large amount of empirical evidence suggesting Forsmark to be more suitable for a geological repository /SKB 2010b/. This report presents model results of numerical flow and transport modelling of surface water and near-surface groundwater at the Forsmark site for present and future conditions. Both temperate and periglacial climates have been simulated. Also different locations of the shoreline have been applied to the model, as well as different models of vegetation and Quaternary deposits. The modelling was performed using the modelling tool MIKE SHE and was based on the SDM-Site Forsmark MIKE SHE model (presented by Bosson et al. in SKB report R-08-09). The present work is a part of the biosphere modelling performed for the SR-Site safety assessment. The Forsmark area has a flat, small-scale topography. The study area is almost entirely below 20 m.a.s.l. (metres above sea level). There is a strong correlation between the topography of the ground surface and the ground water level in the Quaternary deposits (QD); thus, the surface water divides and the groundwater divides for the QD can be assumed to coincide. No major water courses flow through the catchment. Small brooks, which often dry out in the summer, connect the different sub-catchments with each other. The main lakes in the area, Lake Bolundsfjaerden, Lake Fiskarfjaerden, Lake Gaellsbotraesket and Lake Eckarfjaerden, all have sizes of less than one km2. The lakes are in general shallow. Approximately 70% of the catchment areas are covered by forest. Agricultural land is only present in

  18. Varied Presentation of Schwannoma – A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruquaya Mir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas can occur anywhere in the body with unusual presentation. They are difficult to diagnose preoperatively. Fine needle aspiration biopsy does not appear to provide an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Complete excision of the mass should be the goal of surgical excision.

  19. A retrospective study of fracture cases presented to university of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a nineteen years survey, 70 fracture cases were presented to the University of Maiduguri Veterinary Teaching Hospital (UMVTH). The percentage distribution of the fracture cases was determined according to species, etiology, affected bone, sex, age and type of fracture. The canine specie had the highest number of ...

  20. Violence and Alcohol: A Study of Injury Presentations to Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demographic and injury circumstances data were collected on trauma patients consecutively presenting to hospitals. Alcohol consumption was assessed by either blood analysis or breath test, using a Lion Alcolmeter-SD2, in patients aged 16 years and above who arrived within an interval of 10 hours from the time of injury.

  1. Present status of radiochemical double β decay study (238U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, A.; Chevallier, J.; Escoubes, B.; Schulz, N.; Sens, J.C.; Madic, C.; Maillard, C.

    1989-01-01

    The reasons for which the 238 U is a suitable candidate for the β β decay processes are explained. The strategy adopted for the radiochemical separation of the 234 U is given. A chemical system based on extraction chromatography is applied. The Pu IV breakthrough curves obtained at 40C during 238 Pu/ 238 U separation cycles are presented. A short description of the chromatographic facility is given. The solution adopted for the low background α spectrometer is explained

  2. Present status and problems of radionuclide studies in emergency cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Kiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    Scintigraphy is just right for diagnosing emergency cases due to its noninvasive and simple method, but emergency radionuclide studies have not become practical as a result of difficulty problems. Recently, nuclear medical devices have become easier to use in operations. It is become of this, that I have submitted this report regarding the problems of radionuclide studies in emergency cases. There were 101 cases (1.4 %) out of 7,310 cases for the year period Sept. 1981 - Aug. 1982. The studies consisted of 12 brain imaging cases, 9 plumonary imaging cases, 22 cardiac study cases (cardio-angiography cases 8, 99m-Tc-PYP myocardium imaging cases 12, 201-Tl myocardium imaging cases 2), 12 renal study cases, 11 G.I. blood loss cases, 35 peripheral angiography cases. In the near future, we will have to be ready to perform emergency radionuclide studies if the need arises. (author)

  3. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO 2 and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request

  4. Presenting the Students' Academic Achievement Causal Model based on Goal Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Ebrahim; Pour-Safar, Ali; Taheri, Mahdokht; Sedighi Pashaky, Abdullah; Asadi Louyeh, Ataollah

    2017-10-01

    Several factors play a role in academic achievement, individual's excellence and capability to do actions and tasks that the learner is in charge of in learning areas. The main goal of this study was to present academic achievement causal model based on the dimensions of goal orientation and learning approaches among the students of Medical Science and Dentistry courses in Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This study is based on a cross-sectional model. The participants included 175 first and second students of the Medical and Dentistry schools in Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected by random cluster sampling [121 persons (69%) Medical Basic Science students and 54 (30.9%) Dentistry students]. The measurement tool included the Goal Orientation Scale of Bouffard and Study Process Questionnaire of Biggs) and the students' Grade Point Average. The study data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and structural equations modeling. SPSS 14 and Amos were used to analyze the data. The results indicated a significant relationship between goal orientation and learning strategies (P<0.05). In addition, the results revealed that a significant relationship exists between learning strategies[Deep Learning (r=0.37, P<0.05), Surface Learning (r=-0.21,P<0.05)], and academic achievement.The suggested model of research is fitted to the data of the research. Results showed that the students' academic achievement model fits with experimental data, so it can be used in learning principles which lead to students' achievement in learning.

  5. Feminist Studies / Activities in Japan: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Takemura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The essay provides an overview of feminist studies in Japan nowadays, exploring in particular how new perspectives on sexuality and postcolonial theory have been gradually incorporated into feminist studies since the 1990s. In relation to sexuality, approaches to gender-sexuality have been enriched by the incorporation of new theories from areas such as literary criticism, art or history, among others. This has allowed for new critical examinations of heterosexism and of questions about gender and sexuality, and has eventually derived in the institutionalization of feminist studies with a poststructuralist influence in the Japanese academia. The article also analyzes the incorporation of postcolonial studies into feminist studies, as well as the impact that the question of prostitution during the war has had on them.

  6. KioskAR: An Augmented Reality Game as a New Business Model to Present Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoones A. Sekhavat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of KioskAR, which is a pervasive game implemented using augmented reality (AR. This game introduces a new business model that makes it possible for players to present their artworks in virtual kiosks using augmented reality, while they are having fun playing the game. In addition to competition between the players in the game, this game requires social interaction between players to earn more points. A user study is conducted to evaluate the sense of presence and the usability of the application. The results of experiments show that KioskAR can achieve a high level of usability as well as sense of presence.

  7. Rebuilding for Sustainability: Case Studies in the Making (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billman, L.

    2013-06-01

    NREL has made significant contributions to communities suffering from natural disasters since 2007 in terms of technical assistance regarding energy efficiency and renewable energy options. NREL's work has covered all aspects of energy, including energy opportunities in community planning, policy design, new program design, and specific project design and implementation for energy related to electricity generation, building energy use, and transportation. This presentation highlights work done in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina; Greensburg, Kansas, following a devastating tornado; and New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy.

  8. Stable isotopes in pharmacology studies: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, T.R.

    1986-01-01

    Stable-isotope techniques offer advantages over older methods in safety, sensitivity, specificity, and reduction in numbers of subjects required and analytic determinations for some types of pharmacology studies. In addition to their use as internal standards in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analytic methods, stable isotopes have been successfully employed in studies of absorption, bioavailability, distribution, biotransformation, excretion, metabolite identification, time-dependent and dose-dependent pharmacokinetic changes, drug interactions, pharmacologic changes during pregnancy, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity. 32 references

  9. Head Trauma Patients Presented To Emergency Department; an Epidemiologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Forouzan; Kambiz Masoumi; Hassan Motamed; Alireza Teimouri; Hassan Barzegari; Behzad Zohrevandi; Fatemeh Rasouli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Traumatic brain injuries are among the most important causes of mortality and disability. Since there is a lot of controversy regarding discharge of head trauma patients, especially those with mild traumatic brain injuries, this study was designed aiming to evaluate traumatic brain injuries from an epidemiologic point of view. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, patients with isolated head trauma, and all those who underwent computed tomography (CT) were includ...

  10. Fast reactor physics at CEA: present studies and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, P.

    1980-09-01

    This paper aims at giving a general survey of the fast reactor core physics and shielding studies wich are in progress at CEA (1979-1983) in order to solve the neutronic problems related to: - core design optimization, - reactor operation and fuel management, - safety, for the development of fast commercial breeders in France after the SUPER-PHENIX 1 construction is achieved

  11. Nigeria Gas Utilization Study: Presentation of NGUS Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    The Nigeria gas utilization study is an assessment of the magnitude and distribution of Nigeria's discovered and undiscovered gas, an estimate of gas composition emphasizing ethane and liquids content. It also assesses, at a scoping level, the cost to develop, produce and deliver gas for domestic and export projects

  12. Are sawfishes still present in Mozambique? A baseline ecological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth H. Leeney

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sawfishes (Pristidae were formerly abundant in the western Indian Ocean, but current data on sawfish presence and distribution are lacking for most of the region. This paper summarises historical records of sawfishes in Mozambican waters and presents the findings of the first assessment of the presence and status of sawfishes in Mozambique. A countrywide baseline assessment was undertaken between May and July 2014, using interviews with artisanal, semi-industrial and industrial fishers, fish traders and fisheries monitoring staff as the primary source of information on sawfish distribution, recent catches, socio-economic value and cultural importance. Additional interviews were conducted via email or telephone with individuals running sport fishing operations or who otherwise had considerable experience interacting with the fishing sectors or the marine environment in Mozambique. Where encountered, sawfish rostra were photographed and a series of measurements and associated data were collected. In total, 200 questionnaire surveys and seven interviews with recreational fishing and dive operators were conducted, and 19 rostra were documented from museum archives and private collections, belonging to two sawfish species, the Largetooth Sawfish (Pristis pristis and Green Sawfish (P. zijsron. The most recent captures of sawfishes were reported to have occurred in 2014. Two key sites were identified where both recent encounters were reported and numerous Largetooth Sawfish rostra were documented. Gill nets were the fishing gear most commonly attributed to sawfish catches. Sawfishes did not hold any cultural importance in Mozambique, but they have at least some socio-economic importance to artisanal fishers, primarily through the sale of their fins. The meat did not appear to be held in high regard and was usually consumed locally. Sampling and further research is now required to confirm the presence of sawfishes and to assess the primary threats to

  13. Detailed study of transmutation scenarios involving present day reactor technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document makes a detailed technical evaluation of three families of separation-transmutation scenarios for the management of radioactive wastes. These scenarios are based on 2 parks of reactors which recycle plutonium and minor actinides in an homogeneous way. A first scenario considers the multi-recycling of Pu and Np and the mono-recycling of Am and Cm using both PWRs and FBRs. A second scenario is based on PWRs only, while a third one considers FBRs only. The mixed PWR+FBR scenario requires innovative options and gathers more technical difficulties due to the americium and curium management in a minimum flux of materials. A particular attention has been given to the different steps of the fuel cycle (fuels and targets fabrication, burnup, spent fuel processing, targets management). The feasibility of scenarios of homogeneous actinides recycling in PWRs-only and in FBRs-only has been evaluated according to the results of the first scenario: fluxes of materials, spent fuel reprocessing by advanced separation, impact of the presence of actinides on PWRs and FBRs operation. The efficiency of the different scenarios on the abatement of wastes radio-toxicity is presented in conclusion. (J.S.)

  14. Recognizing Presentations of Pemphigoid Gestationis: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadie Henry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pemphigoid gestationis (PG is an autoimmune blistering disease that occurs in approximately 1 in 50,000 pregnancies. Failing to recognize PG may lead to inadequate maternal treatment and possible neonatal complications. Case Report. At 18 weeks of gestation, a 36-year-old otherwise healthy Caucasian G4P1 presented with pruritic papules on her anterior thighs, initially treated with topical steroids. At 31 weeks of gestation, she was switched to oral steroids after her rash and pruritus worsened. The patient had an uncomplicated SVD of a healthy female infant at 37 weeks of gestation and was immediately tapered off steroid treatment, resulting in a severe postpartum flare of her disease. Discussion. This case was similar to reported cases of pruritic urticarial papules followed by blisters; however, this patient had palm, sole, and mucous membrane involvement, which is rare. Biopsy for direct immunofluorescence or ELISA is the preferred test for diagnosis. Previous case reports describe severe postdelivery flares that require higher steroid doses. Obstetrical providers need to be familiar with this disease although it is rare, as this condition can be easily confused with other dermatoses of pregnancy. Adequate treatment is imperative for the physical and psychological well-being of the mother and infant.

  15. Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission Systems: Terminology and Present Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of continuously variable transmission systems in many different areas such as aerospace, robotics, machinery and automotive industries as an alternative to conventional speed changers with constant ratio becomes widely.Especially in the automotive industry, these systems have been used increasingly, since they enable that internal combustion engines in vehicles run at optimal speeds, and consequently provide considerable fuel savings and therefore lower emission values and also they provide powerful acceleration and quiet working. CVT systems have several constructive variants such as belted, chained, balled, toroidal etc. In this paper, toroidal CVT systems based on elastohydrodynamic principles are concerned with, and fundamental works of last two decades in this field are reviewed. However, the relevant terminology and dynamics along with the control of these systems are briefly treated for better understanding of the literature mentioned. Attention is drawn to the lack of some significant issues in present research works, and potential future works are pointed out. This paper, to the authors’ knowledge, will be the first review on toroidal CVT systems in Turkish literature

  16. Head Trauma Patients Presented To Emergency Department; an Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Forouzan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injuries are among the most important causes of mortality and disability. Since there is a lot of controversy regarding discharge of head trauma patients, especially those with mild traumatic brain injuries, this study was designed aiming to evaluate traumatic brain injuries from an epidemiologic point of view. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, patients with isolated head trauma, and all those who underwent computed tomography (CT were included using convenience sampling. Demographic data and final diagnosis of the patients were extracted from their medical profile, and were analyzed using SPSS 21 and appropriate statistical tests. Results: 786 patients with the mean age of 24 ± 16.8 years (range: 0.5 – 75 were evaluated (67.8% male. 42 patients (5.3% had abnormal CT scan and were hospitalized. 7 of them (16.7% of hospitalized, 3.3% of low-risk, and 0.9% of all patients were in the group categorized as low-risk regarding probability of brain injuries. 12 (1.5% participants needed surgery, 2 of which (0.9% were initially categorized as low-risk. Vomiting was significantly more in patients with abnormal CT scan (45.2% compared to those who had normal CT scan (19.6% (p = 0.0001. No significant difference was detected between the 2 groups in other symptoms. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that by making decisions based on clinical findings alone, there is a probability of about 3.3% error in management of head trauma patients. In addition, 0.9% of the patients initially categorized as low-risk, needed surgical intervention in the end.

  17. Present status of radiochemical double beta decay study (238U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Maillard, C.; Chevallier, A.; Chevallier, J.; Escoubes, B.; Schulz, N.; Sens, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive experiment has been designed that will be able to measure an assumed half-life of 1.9x10 22 yr. This double beta corresponds to the activity of 27000 238 Pu nuclei formed during a year, in a 200 m deep mine, from 300 kg of 238 U, giving 210 alpha decays per year. Plutonium 238 et 239 will be determined by alpha spectroscopy after extraction chromatography. Experimental studies were undertaken to select the best conditions for running the extraction chromatography cycles

  18. Evolutionary Studies in Business: A Presentation of a New Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Fernández Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Evolutionary Studies in Business is a new open access journal led by an international interdisciplinary team of scholars located in eight institutions from three continents who wants to attract contributions that help shed light on the new questions, challenges, methodologies and realities, faced by businesses in an evolutionary perspective. The journal calls particularly for review essays that deal with new research topics about business, and provide useful overviews of the key ideas, scholars, and debates about important research topics concerning business and its environment. The strategic areas of interest for submissions from authors are: Management Challenges, Entrepreneurship, Science and Business, Creative Industries, International Business, Business History, and Latin American Businesses. JESB will also publish articles about relevant online resources that contain information of interest to academic scholars and business practitioners.

  19. Present Status of Historical Seismicity Studies in Colombia and Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia, A.; Cifuentes, H.; Altez Ortega, R.; Palme, C.; Dimate, C.

    2013-05-01

    After the publication of the SISRA (CERESIS-1985) regional project, a unified catalog of seismic parameters and intensities for South America, researchers in historical seismicity have continued advancing on different scales in the area of this study of seismic hazard. The most important initiatives carried out in this area in Colombia and Venezuela can be grouped as follows: a) Reviews of destructive earthquakes in national and international historic archives, principally by Altez and FUNVISIS in Venezuela and Espinosa, Salcedo, and Sarabia et al in Colombia, leading to the preparation of seismologic catalogues, scientific and dissemination articles, reports, books, among others. b) Organization and systematization of historic information to develop public domain data bases and information, specifically the Historic Seismologic Teleinformation System in Venezuela, carried out between 2004 and 2008 under the coordination of Christl Palme and accessible on-line: http://sismicidad.ciens.ula.ve. As well, the "Historia Sísmica de Colombia 1550-1830" (Seismic History in Colombia 1550-1830) data base, in CD-ROM, by Espinosa Baquero (2003) and the historic seismicity information system of Colombia (Servicio Geológico Colombiano-Universidad Nacional de Colombia), published on the internet in 2012: http://agata.ingeominas.gov.co:9090/SismicidadHistorica/. c) Macroseismic studies for the development of intensity attenuation equations and the quantification and revaluation of basic historic earthquake parameters using isoseismal maps (Rengifo et al., Palme et al., Salcedo et al., among others) and procedures such as Boxer and Bakun & Wentworth (Palme et al., Dimaté, among others), which have produced significant changes in the parameters of some of the large earthquakes. d) Symposiums of researchers to promote interest and development in the discipline, including Jornadas Venezolanas de Sismología Histórica (Venezuelan Congress of Historical Seismology), held

  20. PIXE in cultural heritage studies: present role and new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France, Palais du Louvre, Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The non-destructive study of artistic and archaeological objects relies on the use of a large panel of modern analytical tools. Among them, PIXE plays a prominent role due to its almost unique combination of excellent analytical features in terms of sensitivity and accuracy combined with a non-destructive and even non-invasive character. the latter advantage stems from extensive instrumental progress - like the external beam - carried out since the advent of PIXE in the 1970s to account for the precious and unique nature of artworks and archaeological artifacts that preclude any sampling or damage. the situation has however evolved in the recent years as several competing techniques providing non-destructively the chemical composition have arisen, which more or less shake the privileged status of PIXE. On one hand, analytical techniques implemented with tabletop or movable XRF instruments have been massively developed, which allow in situ analysis and represent a progress in terms of artworks safety and flexibility of analysis. On the other hand, access to synchrotron radiation facilities is becoming easier and therefore the use of the powerful X-ray absorption techniques (XANES, EXAFS), that add chemical environment information to the elemental analysis, is progressively gaining popularity. Considering these trends, it seems important to reassess the place of PIXE in the field of art and archaeology and to underline its specific assets. the aim of this article is to pinpoint the situation where PIXE is the best analytical tool with regard to the specificity of art and archaeological items and to stress the new challenges it will have to face. Case studies carried out with the AGLAE facility of the C2RMF will illustrate the situations where PIXE exhibits specific advantages: Light element measurement. The high ionization cross section of light elements by charged particles favors the accurate measurement of sodium, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, whose

  1. PIXE in cultural heritage studies: present role and new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, T.; Dran, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The non-destructive study of artistic and archaeological objects relies on the use of a large panel of modern analytical tools. Among them, PIXE plays a prominent role due to its almost unique combination of excellent analytical features in terms of sensitivity and accuracy combined with a non-destructive and even non-invasive character. the latter advantage stems from extensive instrumental progress - like the external beam - carried out since the advent of PIXE in the 1970s to account for the precious and unique nature of artworks and archaeological artifacts that preclude any sampling or damage. the situation has however evolved in the recent years as several competing techniques providing non-destructively the chemical composition have arisen, which more or less shake the privileged status of PIXE. On one hand, analytical techniques implemented with tabletop or movable XRF instruments have been massively developed, which allow in situ analysis and represent a progress in terms of artworks safety and flexibility of analysis. On the other hand, access to synchrotron radiation facilities is becoming easier and therefore the use of the powerful X-ray absorption techniques (XANES, EXAFS), that add chemical environment information to the elemental analysis, is progressively gaining popularity. Considering these trends, it seems important to reassess the place of PIXE in the field of art and archaeology and to underline its specific assets. the aim of this article is to pinpoint the situation where PIXE is the best analytical tool with regard to the specificity of art and archaeological items and to stress the new challenges it will have to face. Case studies carried out with the AGLAE facility of the C2RMF will illustrate the situations where PIXE exhibits specific advantages: Light element measurement. The high ionization cross section of light elements by charged particles favors the accurate measurement of sodium, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, whose

  2. Present-day heat flow and seismicity of Mars as predicted from convective thermal evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesa, A.-C.; Tosi, N.; Knapmeyer, M.; Grott, M.; Breuer, D.; Golombek, M.; Wieczorek, M.; Spohn, T.

    2017-09-01

    The InSight (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) Discovery class mission, to be launched in 2018, will perform a comprehensive geophysical investigation of Mars using a seismometer and a heat flow probe as well as precision tracking. The seismic and heat flow data are ultimately important to constrain the present-day interior structure and heat budget of the planet, and, in turn, offer constraints on its thermal and chemical evolution. As the InSight lander will perform its measurements at a single location, in the Elysium Planitia region, numerical simulations of the dynamics of the interior can greatly help to interpret the data in a global context. In this study we present 3D numerical thermal evolution models of Mars and focus on the present-day state. Furthermore, we compare our results with available estimates of elastic lithosphere thickness and seismicity.

  3. Presenting Knowledge Management Implementation Model with Fuzzy Approach in Information Technology Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razmi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of modern sciences and more competitive becoming environment in the technology era, knowledge management is being counted as one of the most important stable competitive advantages of technology oriented organizations. This matter is of higher importance in high technology organizations, especially those active in information technology field due to their unique identity. This way, knowledge management has been already shifted to one of the most important priorities of such organizations that in case of not identifying, applying, recording and creating that knowledge, the organization is inevitable to pay fortunesto revive the knowledge gone. The purpose of this research is presenting a comprehensive knowledge management implementation model in information technology industry. Therefore, the measures of the suggested research’s model were identified by studying identical researches and projects done in knowledge management and information technology sector and also through consultation with the experts. This way, a questionnaire was designed in two parts and distributed among experts in the understudied organizations. The research’s data were analyzed through T Test and Binomial Test through fuzzy approach due to the constraints presented by the Lickert scale. The research findings demonstrate that the stages of knowledge management implementation model in information technology sector include knowledge evaluation, knowledge leverage, knowledge planning, knowledge culture, knowledge strategies, knowledge management processes, suitable knowledge infrastructures, knowledge organization and knowledge presentation. There also exist actions in each stage that effect successful implementation of the mentioned stages.

  4. A review of the evidence linking adult attachment theory and chronic pain: presenting a conceptual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Pamela; Ownsworth, Tamara; Strong, Jenny

    2008-03-01

    It is now well established that pain is a multidimensional phenomenon, affected by a gamut of psychosocial and biological variables. According to diathesis-stress models of chronic pain, some individuals are more vulnerable to developing disability following acute pain because they possess particular psychosocial vulnerabilities which interact with physical pathology to impact negatively upon outcome. Attachment theory, a theory of social and personality development, has been proposed as a comprehensive developmental model of pain, implicating individual adult attachment pattern in the ontogenesis and maintenance of chronic pain. The present paper reviews and critically appraises studies which link adult attachment theory with chronic pain. Together, these papers offer support for the role of insecure attachment as a diathesis (or vulnerability) for problematic adjustment to pain. The Attachment-Diathesis Model of Chronic Pain developed from this body of literature, combines adult attachment theory with the diathesis-stress approach to chronic pain. The evidence presented in this review, and the associated model, advances our understanding of the developmental origins of chronic pain conditions, with potential application in guiding early pain intervention and prevention efforts, as well as tailoring interventions to suit specific patient needs.

  5. Modeling nonstationary extreme wave heights in present and future climates of Greek Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Galiatsatou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the generalized extreme value (GEV distribution function was used to assess nonstationarity in annual maximum wave heights for selected locations in the Greek Seas, both in the present and future climates. The available significant wave height data were divided into groups corresponding to the present period (1951–2000, a first future period (2001–2050, and a second future period (2051–2100. For each time period, the parameters of the GEV distribution were specified as functions of time-varying covariates and estimated using the conditional density network (CDN. For each location and selected time period, a total number of 29 linear and nonlinear models were fitted to the wave data, for a given combination of covariates. The covariates used in the GEV-CDN models consisted of wind fields resulting from the Regional Climate Model version 3 (RegCM3 developed by the International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP with a spatial resolution of 10 km × 10 km, after being processed using principal component analysis (PCA. The results obtained from the best fitted models in the present and future periods for each location were compared, revealing different patterns of relationships between wind components and extreme wave height quantiles in different parts of the Greek Seas and different periods. The analysis demonstrates an increase of extreme wave heights in the first future period as compared with the present period, causing a significant threat to Greek coastal areas in the North Aegean Sea and the Ionian Sea.

  6. 3D instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, Anne; Spakman, Wim; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Pranger, Casper

    2017-04-01

    To study the sensitivity of surface observables to subduction and mantle flow, i.e. the coupling of crustal tectonics and the underlying mantle dynamics, we have developed 3D numerical models of the instantaneous crust-mantle dynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. These models comprise both a realistic crust-lithosphere system and the underlying mantle. The focus for this presentation lies on the regional crustal flow response to the present-day Aegean subduction system. Our curved model domain measures 40°x40°x2900km with the Aegean subduction system taken as the geographic center. Model set-ups are based on geological and geophysical data of the eastern Mediterranean. We first create a 3D synthetic geometry of the crust-lithosphere system in a stand-alone program, including the present-day configuration of the plates in the region and crust and lithosphere thickness variations abstracted from Moho and LAB maps (Faccenna et al., 2014, Carafa et al., 2015). In addition we construct the geometry of the Aegean slab from a seismic tomography model (UU-P07; Amaru, 2007) and earthquake hypocenters (NCEDC, 2014). Geometries are then imported into the finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) using specially designed plugins. The mantle initial temperature conditions can include deviations from an adiabatic profile obtained from conversion of the UU-P07 seismic velocity anomalies to temperature anomalies using a depth-dependent scaling (Karato, 2008). We model compressible mantle flow for which material properties are obtained from thermodynamics P-T lookup-tables (Perple_X, Connolly, 2009) in combination with nonlinear viscoplastic rheology laws. Sublithospheric flow through the lateral model boundaries is left free via open boundary conditions (Chertova et al., 2012), while plate motion is prescribed at the model sides in terms of relative as well as absolute plate motion velocities (e.g. Doubrovine et al., 2012). So far, we used a free-slip surface, but

  7. Presenting the students’ academic achievement causal model based on goal orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EBRAHIM NASIRI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several factors play a role in academic achievement, individual’s excellence and capability to do actions and tasks that the learner is in charge of in learning areas. The main goal of this study was to present academic achievement causal model based on the dimensions of goal orientation and learning approaches among the students of Medical Science and Dentistry courses in Guilan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This study is based on a cross-sectional model. The participants included 175 first and second year students of the Medical and Dentistry schools in Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected by random cluster sampling [121 persons (69% Medical Basic Science students and 54 (30.9% Dentistry students]. The measurement tool included the Goal Orientation Scale of Bouffard and Study Process Questionnaire of Biggs and the students’ Grade Point Average. The study data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and structural equations modeling. SPSS 14 and Amos were used to analyze the data. Results: The results indicated a significant relationship between goal orientation and learning strategies (P<0.05. In addition, the results revealed that a significant relationship exists between learning strategies [Deep Learning (r=0.37, P<0.05, Surface Learning (r=-0.21, P<0.05], and academic achievement. The suggested model of research is fitted to the data of the research. Conclusion: Results showed that the students’ academic achievement model fits with experimental data, so it can be used in learning principles which lead to students’ achievement in learning.

  8. Presenting a conceptual model of data collection to manage the groundwater quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourbakhsh Zahra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model was proposed in the present study, which highlighted important independent and dependent variables in order to managing the groundwater quality. Furthermore, the methods of selection of variable and collection of related data were explained. The study was carried out in the Tajan Plain, north of Iran; 50 drinking wells were considered as sampling points. In this model the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was proposed to select the indicator water quality parameters. According to expert opinions and characteristics of the study area ten factors were chosen as variables influencing the quality of groundwater (land use types, lithology units, geology units, distance of wells to the outlet, distance to the residential areas, direction toward the residential areas, depth of the groundwater table, the type of aquifer, transmissivity and population. Geographic Information System (AecGIS 9.3 was used to manage the spatial-based variables and the data of non-spatial-based variables were obtained from relevant references. A database, which contains all collected data related to groundwater quality management in the studied area, was created as the output of the model. The output of this conceptual model can be used as an input for quantitative and mathematical models. Results show that 6 parameters (sulphate, iron, nitrate, electrical conductivity, calcium, and total dissolved solids (TDS were the best indicators for groundwater quality analysis in the area. More than 50% of the wells were drilled in the depth of groundwater table about 5 meters, in this low depth pollutants can load into the wells and also 78% of the wells are located within 5 km from the urban area; it can be concluded from this result that the intensive urban activities could affect groundwater quality.

  9. A binomial random sum of present value models in investment analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Βουδούρη, Αγγελική; Ντζιαχρήστος, Ευάγγελος

    1997-01-01

    Stochastic present value models have been widely adopted in financial theory and practice and play a very important role in capital budgeting and profit planning. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a binomial random sum of stochastic present value models and offer an application in investment analysis.

  10. Quercus suber range dynamics by ecological niche modelling: from the Last Interglacial to present time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessella, Federico; Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Schirone, Bartolomeo

    2015-07-01

    Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) is widely used to depict species potential occurrence according to environmental variables under different climatic scenarios. We tested the ENM approach to infer past range dynamics of cork oak, a keystone species of the Mediterranean Biome, from 130 ka to the present time. Hindcasting implications would deal with a better species risk assessment and conservation management for the future. We modelled present and past occurrence of cork oak using seven ENM algorithms, starting from 63,733 spatially unique presence points at 30 arc-second resolution. Fourteen environmental variables were used and four time slices were considered (Last Interglacial, Last Glacial Maximum, mid-Holocene and present time). A threshold-independent evaluation of the goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated by means of ROC curve and fossil or historical evidences were used to validate the results. Four weighted average maps depicted the dynamics of area suitability for cork oak in the last 130 ka. The derived species autoecology allowed its long-term occurrence in the Mediterranean without striking range reduction or shifting. Fossil and historical post-processing validation support the modelled past spatial extension and a neglected species presence at Levantine until the recent time. Despite the severe climatic oscillation since the Last Glacial Maximum, cork oak potential distribution area experienced limited range changes, confirming its strong link with the Mediterranean Basin. The ecological amplitude of Quercus suber could be therefore adopted as a reference to trace the Mediterranean bioclimate area. A better knowledge of the past events of Mediterranean vegetation, a wider range of study species and environmental determinants are essential to inform us about its current state, its sensitivity to human impact and the potential responses to future changes.

  11. BRCAPRO 6.0 Model Validation in Male Patients Presenting for BRCA Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Zahi I; Jackson, Michelle; Garby, Carolyn; Song, Juhee; Giordano, Sharon H; Hortobágyi, Gabriel N; Singletary, Claire N; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; Arun, Banu K; Litton, Jennifer K

    2015-06-01

    BRCAPRO is a risk assessment model to estimate the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. BRCA mutation carriers are at higher risk of developing breast, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. BRCAPRO was developed for women and found to be superior to other risk assessment models. The present study evaluated the validity of BRCAPRO at predicting the risk of male patients carrying a BRCA mutation. A total of 146 men who presented for genetic counseling and testing from February1997 to September 2011, and their test results were included in the present study. BRCAPRO risk assessment for all patients was calculated using the BRCAPRO clinical CancerGene assessment software. The mean age at presentation was 57 years. Of the 146 patients, 48 had breast cancer, 18 had pancreatic cancer, 39 had prostate cancer, 27 had other primary cancers, and 37 had no cancer. Fifty patients (34%) tested positive for a BRCA mutation (22 BRCA1, 27 BRCA2, and 1 BRCA1 and BRCA2). The mean BRCAPRO score for all patients was 24.96%. The BRCAPRO score was significantly higher for patients who tested positive for a BRCA mutation (46.19% vs. 13.9%, p BRCA mutation. At a cutoff point of 30.02%, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.74, 0.81, 0.67, and 0.86, respectively. BRCAPRO appears to be a valid risk assessment tool for determining the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation in men. Men carrying genetic mutations in the BRCA gene have a greater risk than the general population of developing certain types of cancer, including breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. BRCAPRO is a risk assessment model that predicts the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. The present study aimed at validating BRCAPRO for use with men seen for genetic counseling, whether affected by cancer or not. The data available for 146 patients revealed that BRCAPRO was effective at identifying patients at risk of BRCA mutation. These findings could help in identifying a subset

  12. Hydrological Modeling in Northern Tunisia with Regional Climate Model Outputs: Performance Evaluation and Bias-Correction in Present Climate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Foughali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate the performance of a hydrological balance model in a watershed located in northern Tunisia (wadi Sejnane, 378 km2 in present climate conditions using input variables provided by four regional climate models. A modified version (MBBH of the lumped and single layer surface model BBH (Bucket with Bottom Hole model, in which pedo-transfer parameters estimated using watershed physiographic characteristics are introduced is adopted to simulate the water balance components. Only two parameters representing respectively the water retention capacity of the soil and the vegetation resistance to evapotranspiration are calibrated using rainfall-runoff data. The evaluation criterions for the MBBH model calibration are: relative bias, mean square error and the ratio of mean actual evapotranspiration to mean potential evapotranspiration. Daily air temperature, rainfall and runoff observations are available from 1960 to 1984. The period 1960–1971 is selected for calibration while the period 1972–1984 is chosen for validation. Air temperature and precipitation series are provided by four regional climate models (DMI, ARP, SMH and ICT from the European program ENSEMBLES, forced by two global climate models (GCM: ECHAM and ARPEGE. The regional climate model outputs (precipitation and air temperature are compared to the observations in terms of statistical distribution. The analysis was performed at the seasonal scale for precipitation. We found out that RCM precipitation must be corrected before being introduced as MBBH inputs. Thus, a non-parametric quantile-quantile bias correction method together with a dry day correction is employed. Finally, simulated runoff generated using corrected precipitation from the regional climate model SMH is found the most acceptable by comparison with runoff simulated using observed precipitation data, to reproduce the temporal variability of mean monthly runoff. The SMH model is the most accurate to

  13. Parametric Modeling of Urban Landscape: Decoding the Brasilia of Lucio Costa from Modernism to Present Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara Moura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the case study of the Pilot-Plan of Brasilia, important example of modernist urban design protected as human heritage. Discusses a methodological process to promote visualization of maximum envelops of urban volumes, organized in a set of rules and scripts which structures urban parameters in a logic of volume constructions. Applies City Engine - ESRI facilities to construct and visualize the urban rules. It has the goal to promote characterization, analysis, proposals and simulation of urban parameters in order to support decision making in land use transformation. The research deals with the difficulties of management urban pressure of transformation and the maintenance of urban cultural heritage. The methodology defends the change from authorial urban design to the decoding of collective values and goals. The 3D modeling and dynamic visualization promotes the composition of the whole, which means to work in a relative mode, and not in an absolute sense. Although it had been developed for a particular case study, the protected historical area of Brasilia, it presents methodological processes of how to structure rules of three-dimensional modeling to simulate the maximum constructive authorized by planning legislation (maximum envelopes, so that it can be reapplied in any other situation of definition of parameters in urban master plans and in laws for land use and occupation.

  14. Past, Present, and Future Anthropogenic Emissions over Asia: a Regional Air Quality Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jung-Hun; Jung, Bujeon; Choi, Ki-Chul; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Rokjin J.; Youn, Daeok; Jeong, Jaein; Moon, Byung-Kwon; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2010-05-01

    Climate change will also affect future regional air quality which has potential human health, ecosystem, and economic implications. To analyze the impacts of climate change on Asian air quality, the NIER (National Institute of Environmental Research, Korea) integrated modeling framework was developed based on global-to-regional climate and atmospheric chemistry models. In this study, we developed emission inventories for the modeling framework for 1980~2100 with an emphasis on Asia emissions. Two emission processing systems which have functions of emission projection, spatial/temporal allocation, and chemical speciation have been also developed in support of atmospheric chemistry models including GEOS-Chem and Models-3/CMAQ. Asia-based emission estimates, projection factors, temporal allocation parameters were combined to improve regional modeling capability of past, present and future air quality over Asia. The global CO emissions show a 23% decrease from the years 1980 to 2000. For the future CO (from year 2000 to 2100), the A2 scenario shows a 95% increase due to the B40 (Residential-Biofuel) sector of Western Africa, Eastern Africa and East Asia and the F51 (Transport Road-Fossil fuel) sector of Middle East, USA and South Asia. The B1 scenario, however, shows a 79% decrease of emissions due to B40 and F51 sectors of East Asia, South Asia and USA for the same period. In many cases, Asian emissions play important roles for global emission increase or decrease depending on the IPCC scenarios considered. The regional ozone forming potential will be changed due to different VOC/NOx emission ratio changes in the future. More similarities and differences of Asian emission characteristics, in comparison with its global counterpart, are investigated.

  15. Mappings from models presenting topological mass mechanisms to purely topological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Costa, J.V.; Bouffon, L.O.; Lemes, V.E.R.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a class of mappings between the fields of the Cremmer-Sherk and pure BF model in 4D. These mappings are established both with an interactive procedure as well as with an exact mapping procedure. Related equivalencies in 5D and 3D are discussed. (author)

  16. Mappings From Models Presenting Topological Mass Mechanisms to Purely Topological Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Costa, J.V.; Ventura, O.S.; Bouffon, L.O.; Lemes, V.E.R.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a class of mappings between the fields of the Cremmer-Sherk and pure BF model in 4D. These mappings are established both with an iterative procedure as well as with an exact mapping procedure. Related equivalences in 5D and 3D are discussed

  17. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  18. Modelling economic losses of historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Stucki, Peter; Bresch, David; Dierer, Silke; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    simulate the wind field and related economic impact of both historic and present-day high-impact winter storms in Switzerland since end of the 19th century. Our technique involves the dynamical downscaling of the 20CR to 3 km horizontal resolution using the numerical Weather Research and Forecasting model and the subsequent loss simulation using an open-source impact model. This impact model estimates, for modern economic and social conditions, storm-related economic losses at municipality level, and thus allows a numerical simulation of the impact from both historic and present-day severe winter storms in Switzerland on a relatively fine spatial scale. In this study, we apply the modelling chain to a storm sample of almost 90 high-impact winter storms in Switzerland since 1871, and we are thus able to make a statement of the typical wind and loss patterns of hazardous windstorms in Switzerland. To evaluate our modelling chain, we compare simulated storm losses with insurance loss data for the present-day windstorms "Lothar" and "Joachim" in December 1999 and December 2011, respectively. Our study further includes a range of sensitivity experiments and a discussion of the main sources of uncertainty.

  19. Battery Ownership Model: A Tool for Evaluating the Economics of Electrified Vehicles and Related Infrastructure (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, M.; Brooker, A.; Johnson, C.; Mendelsohn, M.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-11-01

    This presentation uses a vehicle simulator and economics model called the Battery Ownership Model to examine the levelized cost per mile of conventional (CV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in comparison with the cost to operate an electric vehicle (EV) under a service provider business model. The service provider is assumed to provide EV infrastructure such as charge points and swap stations to allow an EV with a 100-mile range to operate with driving profiles equivalent to CVs and HEVs. Battery cost, fuel price forecast, battery life, and other variables are examined to determine under what scenarios the levelized cost of an EV with a service provider can approach that of a CV. Scenarios in both the United States as an average and Hawaii are examined. The levelized cost of operating an EV with a service provider under average U.S. conditions is approximately twice the cost of operating a small CV. If battery cost and life can be improved, in this study the cost of an EV drops to under 1.5 times the cost of a CV for U.S. average conditions. In Hawaii, the same EV is only slightly more expensive to operate than a CV.

  20. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  1. Studies on Cup Anemometer Performances Carried out at IDR/UPM Institute. Past and Present Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Roibas-Millan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the research derived from a wide experience on cup anemometer calibration works at IDR/UPM Institute (Instituto Universitario de Microgravedad “Ignacio Da Riva” is summarized. This research started in 2008, analyzing large series of calibrations, and is focused on two main aspects: (1 developing a procedure to predict the degradation level of these wind sensors when working on the field and (2 modeling cup anemometer performances. The wear and tear level of this sensor is evaluated studying the output signal and its main frequencies through Fourier analysis. The modeling of the cup anemometer performances is carried out analyzing first the cup aerodynamics. As a result of this process, carried out through several testing and analytical studies since 2010, a new analytical method has been developed. This methodology might represent an alternative to the classic approach used in the present standards of practice such as IEC 64000-12.

  2. Applying the Many-Facet Rasch Model to Evaluate PowerPoint Presentation Performance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ramazan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the usefulness of the many-facet Rasch model (MFRM) in evaluating the quality of performance related to PowerPoint presentations in higher education. The Rasch Model utilizes item response theory stating that the probability of a correct response to a test item/task depends largely on a single parameter, the ability of the…

  3. Use of the FAR Guide to Present a Pedagogical Analogical Model of Gel Electrophoresis in Year 10 Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a qualitative, practice based study describing the use of the Focus-Action-Reflection (FAR) Guide (Harrison & Treagust, 2000) to address the shortcomings of a pedagogical analogical model in Year 10 Science. The aim of this paper is to present my experience of the FAR Guide in relation to an analogical model that gave rise to…

  4. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  5. Presenting Thin Media Models Affects Women's Choice of Diet or Normal Snacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahe, Barbara; Krause, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Our study explored the influence of thin- versus normal-size media models and of self-reported restrained eating behavior on women's observed snacking behavior. Fifty female undergraduates saw a set of advertisements for beauty products showing either thin or computer-altered normal-size female models, allegedly as part of a study on effective…

  6. Characteristics of Tropical Cyclones in High-resolution Models in the Present Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Sobel, Adam H.; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Daehyun; Kumar, Arun; LaRow, Timothy E.; Lim, Young-Kwon; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Reed, Kevin; hide

    2014-01-01

    The global characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) simulated by several climate models are analyzed and compared with observations. The global climate models were forced by the same sea surface temperature (SST) fields in two types of experiments, using climatological SST and interannually varying SST. TC tracks and intensities are derived from each model's output fields by the group who ran that model, using their own preferred tracking scheme; the study considers the combination of model and tracking scheme as a single modeling system, and compares the properties derived from the different systems. Overall, the observed geographic distribution of global TC frequency was reasonably well reproduced. As expected, with the exception of one model, intensities of the simulated TC were lower than in observations, to a degree that varies considerably across models.

  7. Characteristics of Tropical Cyclones in High-Resolution Models of the Present Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Sobel, Adam H.; Jonas, Jeffery A.; Kim, Daeyhun; Kumar, Arun; LaRow, Timothy E.; Lim, Young-Kwon; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Roberts, Malcolm J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The global characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) simulated by several climate models are analyzed and compared with observations. The global climate models were forced by the same sea surface temperature (SST) in two types of experiments, using a climatological SST and interannually varying SST. TC tracks and intensities are derived from each model's output fields by the group who ran that model, using their own preferred tracking scheme; the study considers the combination of model and tracking scheme as a single modeling system, and compares the properties derived from the different systems. Overall, the observed geographic distribution of global TC frequency was reasonably well reproduced. As expected, with the exception of one model, intensities of the simulated TC were lower than in observations, to a degree that varies considerably across models.

  8. Presenting Numerical Modelling of Explosive Volcanic Eruption to a General Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, C.; Todesco, M.; Neri, A.; Blasi, G.

    2001-12-01

    Numerical modeling of explosive volcanic eruptions has been widely applied, during the last decades, to study pyroclastic flows dispersion along volcano's flanks and to evaluate their impact on urban areas. Results from these transient multi-phase and multi-component simulations are often reproduced in form of computer animations, representing the spatial and temporal evolution of relevant flow variables (such as temperature, or particle concentration). Despite being a sophisticated, technical tool to analyze and share modeling results within the scientific community, these animations truly look like colorful cartoons showing an erupting volcano and are especially suited to be shown to a general public. Thanks to their particular appeal, and to the large interest usually risen by exploding volcanoes, these animations have been presented several times on television and magazines and are currently displayed in a permanent exposition, at the Vesuvius Observatory in Naples. This work represents an effort to produce an accompanying tool for these animations, capable of explaining to a large audience the scientific meaning of what can otherwise look as a graphical exercise. Dealing with research aimed at the study of dangerous, explosive volcanoes, improving the general understanding of these scientific results plays an important role as far as risk perception is concerned. An educated population has better chances to follow an appropriate behavior, i.e.: one that could lead, on the long period, to a reduction of the potential risk. In this sense, a correct divulgation of scientific results, while improving the confidence of the population in the scientific community, should belong to the strategies adopted to mitigate volcanic risk. Due to the relevance of the long term final goal of such divulgation experiment, this work represents an interdisciplinary effort, combining scientific expertise and specific competence from the modern communication science and risk

  9. False recognition following study of semantically related lists presented in jumbled word form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Sara H; Taylor, John P; DeSouza, Kara D; Wallace, William P

    2008-05-01

    Three experiments explored a jumbled word effect in false recognition. Lists of theme-related items were presented in word or nonword form. Results indicated that critical lures semantically related to studied items were falsely recognised regardless of whether they were presented as words or nonwords. High false recognition rates to either SLEEP or SELEP following study of an appropriate theme list of items in nonword form should only occur if nonwords are recoded at study. With study conditions conducive to recoding, jumbled words induced false recognitions based on semantic associations among their respective base words. Disrupting a recoding process by creating "difficult" letter rearrangements for jumbled words (Experiment 2) appeared to eliminate the false recognition effect. In Experiment 3, presentation durations ranged from 110 ms to 880 ms. Although there was little evidence of a semantic false recognition effect at the fastest presentation rate, the brief durations appeared to be effective in eliminating the effect when items were studied in nonword form. These results appear to be consistent with an encoding activation/retrieval monitoring model.

  10. Buddleja thyrsoides Lam. crude extract presents antinociceptive effect on an arthritic pain model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Maria Fernanda Pessano; Brusco, Indiara; da Silva Brum, Evelyne; Piana, Mariana; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Trevisan, Gabriela; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan

    2017-08-17

    Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease which reduces the life quality of affected individuals. Therapeutic tools used for treating inflammatory pain are associated with several undesirable effects. Buddleja thyrsoides Lam., known as 'Barbasco' or 'Cambara', is mostly used in several disorders and possesses antirheumatic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the B. thyrsoides crude extract applied orally and topically in acute pain models and an arthritic pain model induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) paw injection in male mice (25-30 g). The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the B. thyrsoides extract crude revealed the presence of the lupeol, stigmasterol, and β-sitosterol. The stability study of the B. thyrsoides gel did not show relevant changes at low temperatures. The oral treatment with the B. thrysoides extract prevented the capsaicin-induced spontaneous nociception and the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, but did not alter the thermal threshold in the tail immersion test. The B. thyrsoides antinociceptive effect was not reversed by naloxone in the capsaicin test. The B. thyrsoides oral or topical treatment reversed the CFA-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with maximum inhibition ( I max ) of 69 ± 6 and 68 ± 5% as well as 78 ± 15 and 87 ± 12%, respectively. Moreover, the topical but not oral treatment inhibited the CFA-induced cell infiltration, but did not reduce the paw edema significantly. The oral treatment with B. thyrsoides did not cause adverse effects. These findings suggest that the oral or topical treatment with B. thyrsoides presents antinociceptive actions in an arthritic pain model without causing adverse effects. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Case Study: Revising a Formal Case Study Presentation as an Independent Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the process of researching and revising a case study presentation on an individual who experienced anesthetic awareness during an abdominal surgery and eventually committed suicide. Topics addressed include the author's selection of an undergraduate student with a science and teaching background to work on the case…

  12. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei Yuit

    2015-01-01

    The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners' and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre.

  13. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yuit Chan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners’ and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre.

  14. The oral case presentation: toward a performance-based rhetorical model for teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei Yuit

    2015-01-01

    The oral case presentation is an important communicative activity in the teaching and assessment of students. Despite its importance, not much attention has been paid to providing support for teachers to teach this difficult task to medical students who are novices to this form of communication. As a formalized piece of talk that takes a regularized form and used for a specific communicative goal, the case presentation is regarded as a rhetorical activity and awareness of its rhetorical and linguistic characteristics should be given due consideration in teaching. This paper reviews practitioners’ and the limited research literature that relates to expectations of medical educators about what makes a good case presentation, and explains the rhetorical aspect of the activity. It is found there is currently a lack of a comprehensive model of the case presentation that projects the rhetorical and linguistic skills needed to produce and deliver a good presentation. Attempts to describe the structure of the case presentation have used predominantly opinion-based methodologies. In this paper, I argue for a performance-based model that would not only allow a description of the rhetorical structure of the oral case presentation, but also enable a systematic examination of the tacit genre knowledge that differentiates the expert from the novice. Such a model will be a useful resource for medical educators to provide more structured feedback and teaching support to medical students in learning this important genre. PMID:26194482

  15. Genesis and evolution of the Skyrme model from 1954 to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyuk, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Not widely known facts on the genesis of the Skyrme model are presented in a historical survey, based on Skyrme's earliest papers and on his own published remembrance. We consider the evolution of Skyrme's model description of nuclear matter from the ''Mesonic Fluid'' model up to its final version, known as the baryon model. We pay special tribute to some well-known ideas in contemporary particle physics which one can find in Skyrme's earlier papers, such as: Nuclear Democracy, the Solitonic Mechanism, the Nonlinear Realization of Chiral Symmetry, Topological Charges, Fermi-Bose Transmutation, etc. It is curious to note in the final version of the Skyrme model gleams of Kelvin's ''Vortex Atoms'' theory. In conclusion we make a brief analysis of the validity of Skyrme's conjectures in view of recent results and pinpoint some questions which still remain. (author). 93 refs, 4 figs

  16. South polar permanent CO2 ice cap presentation in the Global Mars Multiscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel-Rastgar, Farahnaz

    2018-02-01

    The atmospheric influence caused by the Martian permanent south CO2 ice cap is examined to improve the Global Mars Multiscale Model (GM3) to see if it can significantly improve the representation of south polar meteorology. However, the seasonal carbon dioxide ice in the polar regions is presented in the surface ice simulation by the Global Mars Multiscale Model but the model does not produce a permanent south CO2 ice cap, and the physics code must modify to capture the realistic physical such as ice process detail; probably makes a bias in terms of total CO2 ice and meteorological processes in the model aside from ice formation. The permanent south CO2 ice cap in the model can significantly improve the representation of south polar meteorology for example in predicted surface temperatures, surface pressures, horizontal and zonal winds over the south cap and possible initiation of dust storms at south polar region during the southern summer period.

  17. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit (oral presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents an...

  18. A water balance model for Saxonian catchments - present state and projections up to 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Peter; Hauffe, Corina; Baldy, Agnes; Schwarze, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The impact of climate change on the regional water balance regime may have severe consequences for agriculture, forestry and water resources management. In this respect the following questions arise: Will extensive irrigation be necessary on Saxonian crop land in future? Which are the necessary adaptions in water resources management? Are new agricultural and forestry concepts necessary? Therefore, the project KliWES aims at modelling the present water balance regime for whole Saxonia (with the exception of the mining regions and the Elbe-corridor which is largely governed by flood events). Moreover, the effects of climate projections from the WetReg model (CEC) on the water balance regime have been investigated. The calibration strategy relies on splitting up the measured discharges into the major water balance components (evaporation, surface flow, subsurface flow and percolation) by a geometrical analysis of the hydrograph (DIFGA, Schwarze et al.). Thereafter, the water balance software ArcEGMO (Pfützner et al.) has been calibrated on these water balance components. Calibration parameters include correction factors for soil macroporosity, evapo-transpiration and the distribution factor between fast and slow groundwater components. Geological and Soil data have been drawn from official databases (LfULG). Subareas where no continuous gauge data are available have been parametrised by a regionalisation procedure relying on correlations between parameters and physical properties of the subareas considered. Possibilities and limitations of such a regionalisation procedure have been pointed out. Focal point of the present study is an investigation of water balance components in different spatial and temporal resolutions. The Results of the model for the climate projections show drastic increase of evaporation and decrease of groundwater recharge especially in the north-eastern parts of Saxonia (Lausitz). Here, this problem is worsened by the predominantly sandy soils

  19. A model for time-dependent cosmological constant and its consistency with the present Friedmann universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novello, M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barcelos-Neto, J [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Salim, J M [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2002-06-07

    We use a model where the cosmological term can be related to the chiral gauge anomaly of a possible quantum scenario of the initial evolution of the universe. We show that this term is compatible with the Friedmann behaviour of the present universe.

  20. Implementing Adaptability in the Standard Reference Model for Intelligent Multimedia Presentation Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rutledge (Lloyd); L. Hardman (Lynda); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThis paper discusses the implementation of adaptability in environments that are based on the Standard Reference Model for Intelligent Multimedia Presentation Systems. This adaptability is explored in the context of style sheets, which are represented in such formats as DSSSL. The use of

  1. Mobile Applications in Cell Biology Present New Approaches for Cell Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Mayara Lustosa; Galembeck, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology apps were surveyed in order to identify whether there are new approaches for modelling cells allowed by the new technologies implemented in tablets and smartphones. A total of 97 apps were identified in 3 stores surveyed (Apple, Google Play and Amazon), they are presented as: education 48.4%, games 26.8% and medicine 15.4%. The apps…

  2. Animal Models of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma-Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Harit; Lohani, Kush Raj; Lee, Tommy H; Agrawal, Devendra K; Mittal, Sumeet K

    2015-12-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is the fastest rising cancer in the United States. It develops from long-standing gastroesophageal reflux disease which affects >20% of the general population. It carries a very poor prognosis with 5-year survival Animal models can provide a comprehensive functional and anatomic platform for such a study. Rats and mice have been the most widely studied but disease homology with humans has been questioned. No animal model naturally simulates the inflammation to adenocarcinoma progression as in humans, with all models requiring surgical bypass or destruction of existing antireflux mechanisms. Valuable properties of individual models could be utilized to holistically evaluate disease progression. In this review paper, we critically examined the current animal models of Barrett's esophagus, their differences and homologies with human disease and how they have shaped our current understanding of Barrett's carcinogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Gilchrist, James J; Pensulo, Paul; Mandala, Wilson L; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Kenny, Julia; Wilson, Lorna K; Phiri, Amos; MacLennan, Jenny M; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Graham, Stephen M

    2017-12-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0-15 years) and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15-25%) died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94%) of cases. 211/259 (81%) of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71-82%), 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45-58%) had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36-49%) had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children.

  4. Being present in action: a theoretical model about the interlocking between intentions and environmental affordances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eTriberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuropsychological evidence suggest that a key role in linking perceptions and intentions is played by sense of presence. Despite this phenomenon having been studied primarily in the field of virtual reality (conceived as the illusion of being in the virtual space, recent research highlighted that it is a fundamental feature of everyday experience. Specifically, the function of presence as a cognitive process is to locate the Self in a physical space or situation, based on the perceived possibility to act in it; so, the variations in sense of presence allow one to continuously adapt his own action to the external environment. Indeed intentions, as the cognitive antecedents of action, are not static representations of the desired outcomes, but dynamic processes able to adjust their own representational content according to the opportunities/restrictions emerging in the environment. Focusing on the peculiar context of action mediated by interactive technologies, we here propose a theoretical model showing how each level of an intentional hierarchy (future-directed; present directed; and motor intentions can interlock with environmental affordances in order to promote a continuous stream of action and activity.

  5. Novel threadlike structures may be present on the large animal organ surface: evidence in Swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Nam, Min-Ho; Yoon, Ji Woong; Kwon, Hee-Min; Yoon, Seung Zhoo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS) development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure) that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  6. Being Present in Action: A Theoretical Model About the "Interlocking" Between Intentions and Environmental Affordances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triberti, Stefano; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Recent neuropsychological evidence suggest that a key role in linking perceptions and intentions is played by sense of presence. Despite this phenomenon having been studied primarily in the field of virtual reality (conceived as the illusion of being in the virtual space), recent research highlighted that it is a fundamental feature of everyday experience. Specifically, the function of presence as a cognitive process is to locate the Self in a physical space or situation, based on the perceived possibility to act in it; so, the variations in sense of presence allow one to continuously adapt his own action to the external environment. Indeed intentions, as the cognitive antecedents of action, are not static representations of the desired outcomes, but dynamic processes able to adjust their own representational content according to the opportunities/restrictions emerging in the environment. Focusing on the peculiar context of action mediated by interactive technologies, we here propose a theoretical model showing how each level of an intentional hierarchy (future-directed; present directed; and motor intentions) can "interlock" with environmental affordances in order to promote a continuous stream of action and activity.

  7. Novel Threadlike Structures May Be Present on the Large Animal Organ Surface: Evidence in Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Hee Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  8. Studies on DANESS Code Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon

    2009-09-01

    The DANESS code modeling study has been performed. DANESS code is widely used in a dynamic fuel cycle analysis. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has used the DANESS code for the Korean national nuclear fuel cycle scenario analysis. In this report, the important models such as Energy-demand scenario model, New Reactor Capacity Decision Model, Reactor and Fuel Cycle Facility History Model, and Fuel Cycle Model are investigated. And, some models in the interface module are refined and inserted for Korean nuclear fuel cycle model. Some application studies have also been performed for GNEP cases and for US fast reactor scenarios with various conversion ratios

  9. Presentation on the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC): A Working Model and Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.; Vican, L.

    2015-12-01

    Physical analog models and demonstrations can be effective educational tools for helping instructors teach abstract concepts in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Reducing the learning challenges for students using physical analog models and demonstrations, however, can often increase instructors' workload and budget because the cost and time needed to produce and maintain such curriculum materials is substantial. First, this presentation describes a working model for the Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC) to support instructors' use of physical analog models and demonstrations in the science classroom. The working model is based on a combination of instructional resource models developed by the Association of College & Research Libraries and by the Physics Instructional Resource Association. The MEDL-CMC aims to make the curriculum materials available for all science courses and outreach programs within the institution where the MEDL-CMC resides. The sustainability and value of the MEDL-CMC comes from its ability to provide and maintain a variety of physical analog models and demonstrations in a wide range of science disciplines. Second, the presentation then reports on the development, progress, and future of the MEDL-CMC at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Development of the UCLA MEDL-CMC was funded by a grant from UCLA's Office of Instructional Development and is supported by the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences. Other UCLA science departments have recently shown interest in the UCLA MEDL-CMC services, and therefore, preparations are currently underway to increase our capacity for providing interdepartmental service. The presentation concludes with recommendations and suggestions for other institutions that wish to start their own MEDL-CMC in order to increase educational effectiveness and decrease instructor workload. We welcome an interuniversity collaboration to

  10. External validation of a model to predict the survival of patients presenting with a spinal epidural metastasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Feuth, T.; Rades, D.; Hedlund, R.; Villas, C.; Linden, Y. van der; Borm, W.; Kappelle, A.C.; Maazen, R.W. van der; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of spinal metastases is evolving. The major problem is the selection of patients who may benefit from surgical treatment. One of the criteria is an expected survival of at least 3 months. A prediction model has been previously developed. The present study has been performed in

  11. An investigation on the relationship between the user model and graphic representations for the automated generation of multimedia presentations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Schwarz

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis investigates a possible solution to adapting an automatically generated presentation to an anonymous user. We will explore the field of User Modeling, specifically Adaptive Hypermedia, to find suitable methods. In our case study, we combine the methods we find to develop a

  12. Temperature trends during the Present and Last Interglacial periods - a multi-model-data comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, P.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Martrat, B.; Charbit, S.; Renssen, H.; Gröger, M.; Krebs-Kanzow, U.; Lohmann, G.; Lunt, D. J.; Pfeiffer, M.; Phipps, S. J.; Prange, M.; Ritz, S. P.; Schulz, M.; Stenni, B.; Stone, E. J.; Varma, V.

    2014-09-01

    Though primarily driven by insolation changes associated with well-known variations in Earth's astronomical parameters, the response of the climate system during interglacials includes a diversity of feedbacks involving the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, vegetation and land ice. A thorough multi-model-data comparison is essential to assess the ability of climate models to resolve interglacial temperature trends and to help in understanding the recorded climatic signal and the underlying climate dynamics. We present the first multi-model-data comparison of transient millennial-scale temperature changes through two intervals of the Present Interglacial (PIG; 8-1.2 ka) and the Last Interglacial (LIG; 123-116.2 ka) periods. We include temperature trends simulated by 9 different climate models, alkenone-based temperature reconstructions from 117 globally distributed locations (about 45% of them within the LIG) and 12 ice-core-based temperature trends from Greenland and Antarctica (50% of them within the LIG). The definitions of these specific interglacial intervals enable a consistent inter-comparison of the two intervals because both are characterised by minor changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and more importantly by insolation trends that show clear similarities. Our analysis shows that in general the reconstructed PIG and LIG Northern Hemisphere mid-to-high latitude cooling compares well with multi-model, mean-temperature trends for the warmest months and that these cooling trends reflect a linear response to the warmest-month insolation decrease over the interglacial intervals. The most notable exception is the strong LIG cooling trend reconstructed from Greenland ice cores that is not simulated by any of the models. A striking model-data mismatch is found for both the PIG and the LIG over large parts of the mid-to-high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere where the data depicts negative temperature trends that are not in agreement with near zero

  13. The radiation performance standard. A presentation model for ionizing radiation in the living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaap, L.E.J.J.; Bosmans, G.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Hendriks, Ch.F.

    1998-01-01

    By means of the so-called radiation performance standard (SPN, abbreviated in Dutch) the total radioactivity from building constructions which contributes to the indoor radiation dose can be calculated. The SPN is implemented with related boundary values and is part of the Building Decree ('Bouwbesluit') in the Netherlands. The model, presented in this book, forms the basis of a new Dutch radiation protection standard, to be published by the Dutch Institute for Standardization NEN (formerly NNI). 14 refs

  14. Present state of global wetland extent and wetland methane modelling: methodology of a model inter-comparison project (WETCHIMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wania

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Wetland and Wetland CH4 Intercomparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP was created to evaluate our present ability to simulate large-scale wetland characteristics and corresponding methane (CH4 emissions. A multi-model comparison is essential to evaluate the key uncertainties in the mechanisms and parameters leading to methane emissions. Ten modelling groups joined WETCHIMP to run eight global and two regional models with a common experimental protocol using the same climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing datasets. We reported the main conclusions from the intercomparison effort in a companion paper (Melton et al., 2013. Here we provide technical details for the six experiments, which included an equilibrium, a transient, and an optimized run plus three sensitivity experiments (temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The diversity of approaches used by the models is summarized through a series of conceptual figures, and is used to evaluate the wide range of wetland extent and CH4 fluxes predicted by the models in the equilibrium run. We discuss relationships among the various approaches and patterns in consistencies of these model predictions. Within this group of models, there are three broad classes of methods used to estimate wetland extent: prescribed based on wetland distribution maps, prognostic relationships between hydrological states based on satellite observations, and explicit hydrological mass balances. A larger variety of approaches was used to estimate the net CH4 fluxes from wetland systems. Even though modelling of wetland extent and CH4 emissions has progressed significantly over recent decades, large uncertainties still exist when estimating CH4 emissions: there is little consensus on model structure or complexity due to knowledge gaps, different aims of the models, and the range of temporal and spatial resolutions of the models.

  15. EcoClimate: a database of climate data from multiple models for past, present, and future for macroecologists and biogeographers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Souza Lima-Ribeiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies in biogeography and macroecology have been increasing massively since climate and biodiversity databases became easily accessible. Climate simulations for past, present, and future have enabled macroecologists and biogeographers to combine data on species’ occurrences with detailed information on climatic conditions through time to predict biological responses across large spatial and temporal scales. Here we present and describe ecoClimate, a free and open data repository developed to serve useful climate data to macroecologists and biogeographers. ecoClimate arose from the need for climate layers with which to build ecological niche models and test macroecological and biogeographic hypotheses in the past, present, and future. ecoClimate offers a suite of processed, multi-temporal climate data sets from the most recent multi-model ensembles developed by the Coupled Modeling Intercomparison Projects (CMIP5 and Paleoclimate Modeling Intercomparison Projects (PMIP3 across past, present, and future time frames, at global extents and 0.5° spatial resolution, in convenient formats for analysis and manipulation. A priority of ecoClimate is consistency across these diverse data, but retaining information on uncertainties among model predictions. The ecoClimate research group intends to maintain the web repository updated continuously as new model outputs become available, as well as software that makes our workflows broadly accessible.

  16. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  17. The effect of PLS regression in PLS path model estimation when multicollinearity is present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke; Kristensen, Kai; Eskildsen, Jacob

    PLS path modelling has previously been found to be robust to multicollinearity both between latent variables and between manifest variables of a common latent variable (see e.g. Cassel et al. (1999), Kristensen, Eskildsen (2005), Westlund et al. (2008)). However, most of the studies investigate...

  18. Present and Future of Dengue Fever in Nepal: Mapping Climatic Suitability by Ecological Niche Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bipin Kumar; Cao, Chunxiang; Xu, Min; Khanal, Laxman; Naeem, Shahid; Pandit, Shreejana

    2018-01-23

    Both the number of cases of dengue fever and the areas of outbreaks within Nepal have increased significantly in recent years. Further expansion and range shift is expected in the future due to global climate change and other associated factors. However, due to limited spatially-explicit research in Nepal, there is poor understanding about the present spatial distribution patterns of dengue risk areas and the potential range shift due to future climate change. In this context, it is crucial to assess and map dengue fever risk areas in Nepal. Here, we used reported dengue cases and a set of bioclimatic variables on the MaxEnt ecological niche modeling approach to model the climatic niche and map present and future (2050s and 2070s) climatically suitable areas under different representative concentration pathways (RCP2.6, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5). Simulation-based estimates suggest that climatically suitable areas for dengue fever are presently distributed throughout the lowland Tarai from east to west and in river valleys at lower elevations. Under the different climate change scenarios, these areas will be slightly shifted towards higher elevation with varied magnitude and spatial patterns. Population exposed to climatically suitable areas of dengue fever in Nepal is anticipated to further increase in both 2050s and 2070s on all the assumed emission scenarios. These findings could be instrumental to plan and execute the strategic interventions for controlling dengue fever in Nepal.

  19. Crystal study and econometric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    An econometric model was developed that can be used to predict demand and supply figures for crystals over a time horizon roughly concurrent with that of NASA's Space Shuttle Program - that is, 1975 through 1990. The model includes an equation to predict the impact on investment in the crystal-growing industry. Actually, two models are presented. The first is a theoretical model which follows rather strictly the standard theoretical economic concepts involved in supply and demand analysis, and a modified version of the model was developed which, though not quite as theoretically sound, was testable utilizing existing data sources.

  20. The Relationship between Spiritual Health and other Dimensions of Health: Presentation of a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Heidari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes to humankind will have different effects on health service delivery. Health might used to be intended to provide physical health in the past; today, however, many researchers and clinicians consider the concept health to be beyond physical health. In support of this claim, it is enough to indicate that the bio-psycho-social model has for years been held by scientific communities to be a fully admitted model. However, the missing ring in this model, as suggested by many, is the spiritual health. In recent years, the relationship between spirituality and clinical interventions with a comprehensive focus on health has been under increasing scrutiny. Although different models have been presented for investigation of the relationship between spiritual health and other dimensions, the fundamental challenge in this regard is the actual place of spiritual health compared with other dimensions. In this article, attempts are made to address the position and weight of spiritual health from the Islam’s point of view.

  1. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Gilchrist, James J.; Pensulo, Paul; Mandala, Wilson L.; Mwimaniwa, Grace; Banda, Meraby; Kenny, Julia; Wilson, Lorna K.; Phiri, Amos; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Graham, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0–15 years) and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15–25%) died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94%) of cases. 211/259 (81%) of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71–82%), 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45–58%) had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36–49%) had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at <7 months (OR 10.0; 95%CI 2.8–35.1), dyspnea (OR 4.2; 95%CI 1.5–12.0) and HIV infection (OR 3.3; 95%CI 1.1–10.2) were independent risk factors for inpatient mortality. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children

  2. Presentation of life-threatening invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease in Malawian children: A prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calman A MacLennan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonellae commonly cause invasive disease in African children that is often fatal. The clinical diagnosis of these infections is hampered by the absence of a clear clinical syndrome. Drug resistance means that empirical antibiotic therapy is often ineffective and currently no vaccine is available. The study objective was to identify risk factors for mortality among children presenting to hospital with invasive Salmonella disease in Africa. We conducted a prospective study enrolling consecutive children with microbiologically-confirmed invasive Salmonella disease admitted to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, in 2006. Data on clinical presentation, co-morbidities and outcome were used to identify children at risk of inpatient mortality through logistic-regression modeling. Over one calendar year, 263 consecutive children presented with invasive Salmonella disease. Median age was 16 months (range 0-15 years and 52/256 children (20%; 95%CI 15-25% died. Nontyphoidal serovars caused 248/263 (94% of cases. 211/259 (81% of isolates were multi-drug resistant. 251/263 children presented with bacteremia, 6 with meningitis and 6 with both. Respiratory symptoms were present in 184/240 (77%; 95%CI 71-82%, 123/240 (51%; 95%CI 45-58% had gastrointestinal symptoms and 101/240 (42%; 95%CI 36-49% had an overlapping clinical syndrome. Presentation at <7 months (OR 10.0; 95%CI 2.8-35.1, dyspnea (OR 4.2; 95%CI 1.5-12.0 and HIV infection (OR 3.3; 95%CI 1.1-10.2 were independent risk factors for inpatient mortality. Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is characterized by high mortality and prevalence of multi-drug resistant isolates, along with non-specific presentation. Young infants, children with dyspnea and HIV-infected children bear a disproportionate burden of the Salmonella-associated mortality in Malawi. Strategies to improve prevention, diagnosis and management of invasive Salmonella disease should be targeted at these children.

  3. Design and creating model and interactive presentation of GEM for Microcosm Exhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Lakdee, Natthaphop

    2017-01-01

    GEM or Gas Electron Multiplier is the newer and easier way to amplify electron signal than conventional CSS. It was first created by Fabio Sauli at CERN in 1997 and was developed to get better efficiency over time. Right now, it was brought to use in many detector stations at CERN. To make GEM more publicly known, one of the ways is show in Microcosm Exhibition which is always visited by people from around the world everyday, so my main project as summer student is to design and create the model and interactive presentation which make GEM interesting and easy to understand by ordinary people.

  4. Beyond the standard Higgs at the LHC. Present constraints on little Higgs models and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonini, Marco

    2014-11-01

    This thesis discusses the consistency of different Little Higgs models with the collected collider data as of the summer of 2013. Moreover, future prospects for possible discoveries and mass measurement methods of new physics signals at the foreseen LHC run II with increased center-of-mass energy are presented. Little Higgs models belong to a class of extensions of the Standard Higgs model, predicting a strong interaction regime at a compositeness scale Λ=4πf approximate global symmetry spontaneously broken at the scale f. A natural hierarchy between the compositeness and the electroweak scale is introduced by the Collective Symmetry Breaking mechanism: one-loop diagrams generating the Higgs mass term are forced to be at most logarithmically sensitive to Λ. A naturally light Higgs boson can thus be accommodated, consistently with a perturbative theory until a scale of order 10 TeV. We have probed the parameter space of three prominent examples of Little Higgs models, namely the Simplest Little Higgs model, the Littlest Higgs model, and the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity, against electroweak precision observables and the collected LHC data concerning both Higgs properties and direct searches for new particles, with √(s)=7,8 TeV and up to 25 fb -1 of integrated luminosity. Lower bounds on the scale f are set, within a certain degree of confidence level, which allow to draw conclusions on the ''naturalness'' of the different models. Optimisations of the existing direct searches setups, assuming a Little Higgs signal, as well as dedicated mass measurement methods designed for the foreseen LHC runs with √(s)=13,14 TeV are thoroughly discussed and proposed in this thesis. Special attention will be dedicated to final states including either a large or negligible fraction of missing transverse momentum. In particular, we will propose a dedicated collider search tailored for the discovery and mass measurement of a top partner, exploiting jet

  5. The Effect of Google Earth and Wiki Models on Oral Presentation Skills of University EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awada, Ghada; Diab, Hassan B.

    2018-01-01

    This article reports the results of an experimental study that investigated the effectiveness of Google Earth and Wiki tools in improving the oral presentation skills of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners and boosting their motivation for learning. The participants (n =81) are enrolled in writing classes at two English-medium…

  6. Radionuclides in fruit systems: Model-model intercomparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkov, I. [Cambridge Environmental, 58 Charles Street, Cambridge, MA 02141 (United States)]. E-mail: linkov@cambridgeenvironmental.com; Carini, F. [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Via Emilia Parmense, 84, I-29100 Piacenza (Italy); Collins, C. [T.H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences and Engineering (United Kingdom); Eged, K. [Department of Radiochemistry, University of Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 H-8201, H-8200 Veszprem (Hungary); Mitchell, N.G. [Mouchel Consulting Ltd., West Hall, Parvis Road, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 6EZ (United Kingdom); Mourlon, C. [Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN)/Division of Environmental Protection (DPRE), Laboratory of Environmental Modelling - LMODE, CE/Cadarache, 13 108 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Ould-Dada, Z. [Food Standards Agency, Radiological Protection and Research Management Division, Aviation House, 125 Kingsway, Room 715B, London WC2B 6NH (United Kingdom); Robles, B. [CIEMAT, Dept. de Impacto Ambiental (DIAE), Edif. 3A, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sweeck, L. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Venter, A. [Enviros Consulting Ltd., Telegraphic House, Waterfront Quay, Salford Quays, Greater Manchester, M50 3XW (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Modeling is widely used to predict radionuclide distribution following accidental radionuclide releases. Modeling is crucial in emergency response planning and risk communication, and understanding model uncertainty is important not only in conducting analysis consistent with current regulatory guidance, but also in gaining stakeholder and decision-maker trust in the process and confidence in the results. However, while methods for dealing with parameter uncertainty are fairly well developed, an adequate representation of uncertainties associated with models remains rare. This paper addresses uncertainty about a model's structure (i.e., the relevance of simplifying assumptions and mathematical equations) that is seldom addressed in practical applications of environmental modeling. The use of several alternative models to derive a range of model outputs or risks is probably the only available technique to assess consistency in model prediction. Since each independent model requires significant resources for development and calibration, multiple models are not generally applied to the same problem. This study uses results from one such model intercomparison conducted by the Fruits Working Group, which was created under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) Program. Model-model intercomparisons presented in this study were conducted by the working group for two different scenarios (acute or continuous deposition), one radionuclide ({sup 137}Cs), and three fruit-bearing crops (strawberries, apples, and blackcurrants). The differences between models were as great as five orders of magnitude for short-term predictions following acute radionuclide deposition. For long-term predictions and for the continuous deposition scenario, the differences between models were about two orders of magnitude. The difference between strawberry, apple, and blackcurrant contamination predicted by one model is far less than the

  7. Radionuclides in fruit systems. Model-model intercomparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkov, I. [Cambridge Environmental, 58 Charles Street, Cambridge, MA 02141 (United States); Carini, F. [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Via Emilia Parmense, 84, I-29100 Piacenza (Italy); Collins, C. [T.H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences and Engineering (United Kingdom); Eged, K. [Department of Radiochemistry, University of Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 H-8201, H-8200 Veszprem (Hungary); Mitchell, N.G. [Mouchel Consulting Ltd., West Hall, Parvis Road, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 6EZ (United Kingdom); Mourlon, C. [Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety IPSN, Division of Environmental Protection (DPRE), Laboratory of Environmental Modelling LMODE, CE/Cadarache, 13 108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ould-Dada, Z. [Food Standards Agency, Radiological Protection and Research Management Division, Aviation House, 125 Kingsway, Room 715B, London WC2B 6NH (United Kingdom); Robles, B. [CIEMAT, Dept. de Impacto Ambiental (DIAE), Edif. 3A, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sweeck, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Venter, A. [Enviros Consulting Ltd., Telegraphic House, Waterfront Quay, Salford Quays, Greater Manchester, M50 3XW (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Modeling is widely used to predict radionuclide distribution following accidental radionuclide releases. Modeling is crucial in emergency response planning and risk communication, and understanding model uncertainty is important not only in conducting analysis consistent with current regulatory guidance, but also in gaining stakeholder and decision-maker trust in the process and confidence in the results. However, while methods for dealing with parameter uncertainty are fairly well developed, an adequate representation of uncertainties associated with models remains rare. This paper addresses uncertainty about a model's structure (i.e., the relevance of simplifying assumptions and mathematical equations) that is seldom addressed in practical applications of environmental modeling. The use of several alternative models to derive a range of model outputs or risks is probably the only available technique to assess consistency in model prediction. Since each independent model requires significant resources for development and calibration, multiple models are not generally applied to the same problem. This study uses results from one such model intercomparison conducted by the Fruits Working Group, which was created under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) Program. Model-model intercomparisons presented in this study were conducted by the working group for two different scenarios (acute or continuous deposition), one radionuclide ({sup 137}Cs), and three fruit-bearing crops (strawberries, apples, and blackcurrants). The differences between models were as great as five orders of magnitude for short-term predictions following acute radionuclide deposition. For long-term predictions and for the continuous deposition scenario, the differences between models were about two orders of magnitude. The difference between strawberry, apple, and blackcurrant contamination predicted by one model is far less than the

  8. In vitro three-dimensional cancer metastasis modeling: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei-jing, Han; Wei, Yuan; Jiang-rui, Zhu; Qihui, Fan; Junle, Qu; Li-yu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of most cancer deaths, as opposed to dysregulated cell growth of the primary tumor. Molecular mechanisms of metastasis have been studied for decades and the findings have evolved our understanding of the progression of malignancy. However, most of the molecular mechanisms fail to address the causes of cancer and its evolutionary origin, demonstrating an inability to find a solution for complete cure of cancer. After being a neglected area of tumor biology for quite some time, recently several studies have focused on the impact of the tumor microenvironment on cancer growth. The importance of the tumor microenvironment is gradually gaining attention, particularly from the perspective of biophysics. In vitro three-dimensional (3-D) metastatic models are an indispensable platform for investigating the tumor microenvironment, as they mimic the in vivo tumor tissue. In 3-D metastatic in vitro models, static factors such as the mechanical properties, biochemical factors, as well as dynamic factors such as cell-cell, cell-ECM interactions, and fluid shear stress can be studied quantitatively. With increasing focus on basic cancer research and drug development, the in vitro 3-D models offer unique advantages in fundamental and clinical biomedical studies. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345), and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 7154221).

  9. International Symposium on Isotopes in Hydrology, Marine Ecosystems, and Climate Change Studies. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have had a far-reaching impact on the aquatic environments - both marine and freshwater systems. The protection of these systems against further deterioration and the promotion of sustainable use are vital. In order to deepen understanding about the main processes affecting the present situation, as well as possible developments in the future, further investigation is required. The oceans play a major role in climate change, for example, and ocean acidification by increased CO2 release is one major threat to the world's oceans. Isotope methods can play a critical role in identifying and quantifying key processes within aquatic environments. Addressing the problems of global water resources has become a matter of urgency. Water resources are subject to multiple pressures for various reasons, including increasing populations, climate change, rising food and energy costs, the global economic crisis and pollutant loading. Isotope hydrology provides the unique and critical tools required to address complex water problems and helps managers and policy makers understand the closely intertwined relationship between water resources and the various pressures affecting them, as well as the issue of sustainability. The symposium will be an important forum for the exchange of knowledge on the present state of marine and freshwater environments, use of isotopes in water resources investigations and management, and climate change studies. The meeting will involve leading scientists in the field of climate change and hydrology, as well as representatives from other United Nations bodies and international organizations that focus on climate change and other important environmental issues. TOPICS: The role of isotopes in understanding and modelling climate change, marine ecosystems and the water cycle; Carbon dioxide sequestration and related aspects of the carbon cycle, such as ocean acidification; Isotopes in groundwater flow modelling for large aquifers

  10. Geographical Information System Model for Potential Mines Data Management Presentation in Kabupaten Gorontalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roviana, D.; Tajuddin, A.; Edi, S.

    2017-03-01

    Mining potential in Indonesian is very abundant, ranging from Sabang to Marauke. Kabupaten Gorontalo is one of many places in Indonesia that have different types of minerals and natural resources that can be found in every district. The abundant of mining potential must be balanced with good management and ease of getting information by investors. The current issue is, (1) ways of presenting data/information about potential mines area is still manually (the maps that already capture from satellite image, then printed and attached to information board in the office) it caused the difficulties of getting information; (2) the high cost of maps printing; (3) the difficulties of regency leader (bupati) to obtain information for strategic decision making about mining potential. The goal of this research is to build a model of Geographical Information System that could provide data management of potential mines, so that the investors could easily get information according to their needs. To achieve that goal Research and Development method is used. The result of this research, is a model of Geographical Information System that implemented in an application to presenting data management of mines.

  11. Modelling the eutrophication of the Seine Bight (France) under historical, present and future riverine nutrient loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugier, P.; Billen, G.; Guillaud, J. F.; Garnier, J.; Ménesguen, A.

    2005-03-01

    of human activity in the watershed are simulated by the two models, including a reconstitution of the 'pristine' state, a historical state corresponding to the situation at the end of the 18th century, as well as several scenarios corresponding to the present situation with alternative policies of wastewater nitrogen and/or phosphorus treatment.

  12. Multi-nutrient, multi-group model of present and future oceanic phytoplankton communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Litchman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton community composition profoundly affects patterns of nutrient cycling and the dynamics of marine food webs; therefore predicting present and future phytoplankton community structure is crucial to understand how ocean ecosystems respond to physical forcing and nutrient limitations. We develop a mechanistic model of phytoplankton communities that includes multiple taxonomic groups (diatoms, coccolithophores and prasinophytes, nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, silicate and iron, light, and a generalist zooplankton grazer. Each taxonomic group was parameterized based on an extensive literature survey. We test the model at two contrasting sites in the modern ocean, the North Atlantic (North Atlantic Bloom Experiment, NABE and subarctic North Pacific (ocean station Papa, OSP. The model successfully predicts general patterns of community composition and succession at both sites: In the North Atlantic, the model predicts a spring diatom bloom, followed by coccolithophore and prasinophyte blooms later in the season. In the North Pacific, the model reproduces the low chlorophyll community dominated by prasinophytes and coccolithophores, with low total biomass variability and high nutrient concentrations throughout the year. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the identity of the most sensitive parameters and the range of acceptable parameters differed between the two sites. We then use the model to predict community reorganization under different global change scenarios: a later onset and extended duration of stratification, with shallower mixed layer depths due to increased greenhouse gas concentrations; increase in deep water nitrogen; decrease in deep water phosphorus and increase or decrease in iron concentration. To estimate uncertainty in our predictions, we used a Monte Carlo sampling of the parameter space where future scenarios were run using parameter combinations that produced acceptable modern day outcomes and the

  13. Three-dimensional instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Pranger, Casper; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Fraters, Menno; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean region (Eastern Mediterranean) is exemplary of the interaction between crustal tectonics, plate motion, subduction and mantle flow: African subduction underneath the region has been continuous for at least the last 100 My, leading to about 2100-2500 km of subducted lithosphere residing in the mantle (van Hinsbergen et al., 2005). During this subduction, decoupled upper continental and oceanic crust accreted into a wedge of stacked nappes. In turn, these nappes have been significantly extended, predominantly during the last 25 My, due to the retreat of the African slab relative to Eurasia (van Hinsbergen and Schmid, 2012). As a first step to better understanding the coupling of the tectonic evolution of the crust and the underlying mantle dynamics, we are developing 3-D numerical models of the instantaneous dynamics of the present-day Aegean subduction system using the finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012). The instantaneous models are set up with initial slab geometries derived from tomography and realistic plate boundary configurations and incorporate the major crustal weak zones of the overriding plate. Our modeling results in predictions of flow fields and stress, strain rate and rotation rate fields for the present-day tectonic setting of the Aegean region. By comparing our various model predictions to the widely available observations, such as focal mechanisms, GPS velocities and seismic anisotropy, we aim at an improved understanding of how mantle flow, subduction morphology and possibly slab segmentation, as well as the rheological behavior of the overriding plate, control present-day tectonic deformation. We expect to show preliminary results of this comparison. Kronbichler, M., Heister, T. and Bangerth, W. (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29. Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J., Hafkenscheid, E., Spakman, W., Meulenkamp, J. E. and Wortel, R. (2005

  14. A model presented for classification ECG signals base on Case-Based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Sayari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of heart diseases/abnormalities can prolong life and enhance the quality of living through appropriate treatment; thus classifying cardiac signals will be helped to immediate diagnosing of heart beat type in cardiac patients. The present paper utilizes the case base reasoning (CBR for classification of ECG signals. Four types of ECG beats (normal beat, congestive heart failure beat, ventricular tachyarrhythmia beat and atrial fibrillation beat obtained from the PhysioBank database was classified by the proposed CBR model. The main purpose of this article is classifying heart signals and diagnosing the type of heart beat in cardiac patients that in proposed CBR (Case Base Reasoning system, Training and testing data for diagnosing and classifying types of heart beat have been used. The evaluation results from the model are shown that the proposed model has high accuracy in classifying heart signals and helps to clinical decisions for diagnosing the type of heart beat in cardiac patients which indeed has high impact on diagnosing the type of heart beat aided computer.

  15. Using MultiMedia Content to Present Business Ethics: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanwick, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to empirically examine whether presenting a multimedia case study enhances the learning experience of students in an undergraduate management class. A questionnaire was administered before and after the presentation of the case study and the results showed that the multimedia case did indeed enhance the learning…

  16. The changing radiative forcing of fires: global model estimates for past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Ward

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fires are a global phenomenon that impact climate and biogeochemical cycles, and interact with the biosphere, atmosphere and cryosphere. These impacts occur on a range of temporal and spatial scales and are difficult to quantify globally based solely on observations. Here we assess the role of fires in the climate system using model estimates of radiative forcing (RF from global fires in pre-industrial, present day, and future time periods. Fire emissions of trace gases and aerosols are derived from Community Land Model simulations and then used in a series of Community Atmosphere Model simulations with representative emissions from the years 1850, 2000, and 2100. Additional simulations are carried out with fire emissions from the Global Fire Emission Database for a present-day comparison. These results are compared against the results of simulations with no fire emissions to compute the contribution from fires. We consider the impacts of fire on greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol effects (including aerosol effects on biogeochemical cycles, and land and snow surface albedo. Overall, we estimate that pre-industrial fires were responsible for a RF of −1 W m−2 with respect to a pre-industrial climate without fires. The largest magnitude pre-industrial forcing from fires was the indirect aerosol effect on clouds (−1.6 W m−2. This was balanced in part by an increase in carbon dioxide concentrations due to fires (+0.83 W m−2. The RF of fires increases by 0.5 W m−2 from 1850 to 2000 and 0.2 W m−2 from 1850 to 2100 in the model representation from a combination of changes in fire activity and changes in the background environment in which fires occur, especially increases and decreases in the anthropogenic aerosol burden. Thus, fires play an important role in both the natural equilibrium climate and the climate perturbed by anthropogenic activity and need to be considered in future

  17. Geometric modelling of channel present in reservoir petroleum using Bezier splines; Modelagem da geometria de paleocanais presentes em reservatorios petroliferos usando splines de Bezier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Carlos Eduardo S. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Programa de Recursos Humanos 25 da ANP]. E-mail: carlos@dme.ufcg.edu.br; Silva, Rosana M. da [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica e Estatistica]. E-mail: rosana@dme.ufcg.edu.br

    2004-07-01

    This work presents an implementation of a synthetic model of a channel found in oil reservoir. The generation these models is one of the steps to the characterization and simulation of the equal probable three-dimensional geological scenery. O implemented model was obtained from fitting techniques of geometric modeling of curves and surfaces to the geological parameters (width, thickness, sinuosity and preferential direction) that defines the form to be modeled. The parameter sinuosity is related with the parameter wave length and the local amplitude of the channel, the parameter preferential direction indicates the way of the flow and the declivity of the channel. The modeling technique used to represent the surface of the channel is the sweeping technique, the consist in effectuate a translation operation from a curve along a guide curve. The guide curve, in our implementation, was generated by the interpolation of points obtained form sampled values or simulated of the parameter sinuosity, using the cubic splines of Bezier technique. A semi-ellipse, determinate by the parameter width and thickness, representing a transversal section of the channel, is the transferred curve through the guide curve, generating the channel surface. (author)

  18. Animal Models of Seizures and Epilepsy: Past, Present, and Future Role for the Discovery of Antiseizure Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy requires the use of seizure models. Except for some early treatments, including bromides and phenobarbital, the antiseizure activity of all clinically used drugs was, for the most part, defined by acute seizure models in rodents using the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure tests and the electrically kindled rat. Unfortunately, the clinical evidence to date would suggest that none of these models, albeit useful, are likely to identify those therapeutics that will effectively manage patients with drug resistant seizures. Over the last 30 years, a number of animal models have been developed that display varying degrees of pharmacoresistance, such as the phenytoin- or lamotrigine-resistant kindled rat, the 6-Hz mouse model of partial seizures, the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice, or rats in which spontaneous recurrent seizures develops after inducing status epilepticus by chemical or electrical stimulation. As such, these models can be used to study mechanisms of drug resistance and may provide a unique opportunity for identifying a truly novel antiseizure drug (ASD), but thus far clinical evidence for this hope is lacking. Although animal models of drug resistant seizures are now included in ASD discovery approaches such as the ETSP (epilepsy therapy screening program), it is important to note that no single model has been validated for use to identify potential compounds for as yet drug resistant seizures, but rather a battery of such models should be employed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to discover novel, highly effective ASDs. The present review describes the previous and current approaches used in the search for new ASDs and offers some insight into future directions incorporating new and emerging animal models of therapy resistance.

  19. Studying and Modeling Vibration Transducers and Accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Ágoston

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents types and operating mode of vibration sensors. Piezoelectric sensing elements are often used in accelerometers. It will be investigate the structure and transfer function of the seismic mass type sensing element. The article presents how the piezoelectric sensing element works and how can be modeled with an electronic circuit. The transfer functions of the electronic circuit models are studied in Matlab and the results are presented. It will be presented the influence of the seismic mass on the accelerometer’s working frequency domain.

  20. Body wave travel times and amplitudes for present-day seismic model of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raevskiy, Sergey; Gudkova, Tamara

    At the moment Martian interior structure models are constrained by the satellite observational data (the mass, the moment of inertia factor, the Love number k _{2}) (Konopliv et al., 2011) and high pressure experimental data (Bertka and Fei, 1997). Seismological observations could provide unparalleled capability for studying Martian interiors. Future missions include seismic experiments on Mars (Lognonné et al., 2012). The main instrument for these seismic experiments is a broadband seismometer (Robert et al., 2012). When seismic measurements are not yet available, physically consistent interior models, characterized by properties of relevant minerals, make possible to study of the seismic response of the planet. \\To estimate travel times for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP body waves as a function of epicentral distance and hypocentral depth, as well as their amplitudes at the surface for a given marsquake, software product was developed in MatLab, as it encompasses many plotting routines that plot resulting travel times and ray paths. The computational results have been compared with the program TTBox (Knapmeyer, 2004). The code computes seismic ray paths and travel times for a one-dimentional spherical interior model (density and seismic velocities are functions of a radius only). Calculations of travel times tables for direct P, S, core reflected PcP, ScS and core refracted PKP waves and their amplitudes are carried out for a trial seismic model of Mars M14_3 from (Zharkov et al., 2009): the core radius is 1800 km, the thickness of the crust is 50 km. Direct and core reflected P and S waves are recorded to a maximum epicentral distance equal to about 100(°) , and PKP arrivals can be detected for epicental distances larger than 150(°) . The shadow zone is getting wider in comparison with previous results (Knapmeyer, 2010), as the liquid core radius of the seismic model under consideration is larger. Based on the estimates of

  1. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  2. Investigating the Effective Factors on Entering into International Markets by Presenting the Local Islamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyed Mohammad Ali Alamolhodaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The internationalization of small and medium size businesses is regarded as one of the most leading general policies in many of the world’s countries. The reason is that it is often the small and medium size companies which have a vital role in industrial innovation and gain profit for their societies through economic development. This research has investigated and identified the effective factors (organizational factors and business etiquette in Islam on entering into international markets by presenting local Islamic model in the companies of incubator of Science and Technology Park. The statistical population of the research includes the existing companies of Incubator of Mashhad Science and Technology Park. The statistical sample was investigated through simple random sampling from managers of active companies in export in Science and Technology Park. AMOS and SPSS software were applied for data analysis to identify the effects among variables survey research methodology and questionnaire tools were used.

  3. Methodology in Seeking Stakeholder Perceptions of Effective Technical Oral Presentations: An Exploratory Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Ena; Patil, Arun; Sargunan, Rajeswary Appacutty

    2010-01-01

    Engineering communication studies indicate the importance of oral presentations as an indispensable component of workplace oral communication activities; however, since there is limited literature regarding stakeholder perceptions of effective presentation skills and attributes in technical oral presentations or final year engineering project…

  4. Academic Oral Presentation Self-Efficacy: A Cross-Sectional Interdisciplinary Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Tavakoli, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant role of oral presentation in the academic context, many university students evade opportunities for participation due to low self-efficacy. The present study has been conducted to compare oral presentation self-efficacy of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners with undergraduates and postgraduates of Non-EFL majors,…

  5. Stroke Mortality, Clinical Presentation and Day of Arrival: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. O'Brien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent studies report that acute stroke patients who present to the hospital on weekends have higher rates of 28-day mortality than similar patients who arrive during the week. However, how this association is related to clinical presentation and stroke type has not been systematically investigated. Methods and Results. We examined the association between day of arrival and 28-day mortality in 929 validated stroke events in the ARIC cohort from 1987–2004. Weekend arrival was defined as any arrival time from midnight Friday until midnight Sunday. Mortality was defined as all-cause fatal events from the day of arrival through the 28th day of followup. The presence or absence of thirteen stroke signs and symptoms were obtained through medical record review for each event. Binomial logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (OR; 95% CI for the association between weekend arrival and 28-day mortality for all stroke events and for stroke subtypes. The overall risk of 28-day mortality was 9.6% for weekday strokes and 10.1% for weekend strokes. In models controlling for patient demographics, clinical risk factors, and event year, weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day mortality (0.87; 0.51, 1.50. When stratified by stroke type, weekend arrival was not associated with increased odds of mortality for ischemic (1.17, 0.62, 2.23 or hemorrhagic (0.37; 0.11, 1.26 stroke patients. Conclusions. Presence or absence of thirteen signs and symptoms was similar for weekday patients and weekend patients when stratified by stroke type. Weekend arrival was not associated with 28-day all-cause mortality or differences in symptom presentation for strokes in this cohort.

  6. Presentation skills amongst surgical trainees at a national conference: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Edward; Peacock, Oliver; Liyanage, Shehan; Elsey, Elizabeth; Lund, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The ability to deliver public presentations is important for doctors of all specialities. Despite this, there is little emphasis on training in presentation skills within medical curriculae. The aim of this paper was to establish the current standard of presentations being delivered by surgical trainees at a national conference and to confirm the need for further training. Design An observational study of 96 six-minute research presentations. Setting A national surgical conference ...

  7. The Transition From the Present-Day Climate to a Snowball Earth Simulated With a Comprehensive Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.; Marotzke, J.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, Marotzke and Botzet (2007) have shown that in a comprehensive climate model both the current climate and a completely ice-covered Earth are stable states under today's total solar irradiance (TSI) and greenhouse gas concentrations. By setting TSI to near-zero they were able to cause a transition from the present-day climate to the ice-covered state within 15 years [1]. In order to study the bifurcation point, we have repeated this experiment with the same model, i.e. the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM, at lower resolution (horizontally T31 in the atmosphere and 3.0 degrees in the ocean). We give estimates for the critical values of TSI and greenhouse gas concentrations needed to trigger the transition from the present-day to the ice- covered state. Starting from today's climate and setting TSI to 44% of today's value leads to a glaciation within 30 years. Furthermore, we investigate the degree of oceanic ice-cover needed for an unstoppable glaciation. We find that only an almost completely ice-covered ocean guarantees that the model does not return to the present-day climate when TSI is reset to its today's value. Our results indicate that a snowball Earth could, in principle, be triggered by a brief decrease of TSI. [1] Marotzke, J. and M. Botzet (2007), Present-day and ice-covered equilibrium states in a comprehensive climate model, Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 34, No. 16, L16704, doi:10.1029/2006GL028880

  8. Ecoclimatic indicators to study crop suitability in present and future climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caubel, Julie; Garcia de Cortazar Atauri, Inaki; Huard, Frédéric; Launay, Marie; Ripoche, Dominique; Gouache, David; Bancal, Marie-Odile; Graux, Anne-Isabelle; De Noblet, Nathalie

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is expected to affect both regional and global food production through changes in overall agroclimatic conditions. It is therefore necessary to develop simple tools of crop suitability diagnosis in a given area so that stakeholders can envisage land use adaptations under climate change conditions. The most common way to investigate potential impacts of climate on the evolution of agrosystems is to make use of an array of agroclimatic indicators, which provide synthetic information derived from climatic variables and calculated within fixed periods (i.e. January first - 31th July). However, the information obtained during these periods does not enable to take account of the plant response to climate. In this work, we present some results of the research program ORACLE (Opportunities and Risks of Agrosystems & forests in response to CLimate, socio-economic and policy changEs in France (and Europe). We proposed a suite of relevant ecoclimatic indicators, based on temperature and rainfall, in order to evaluate crop suitability for both present and new climatic conditions. Ecoclimatic indicators are agroclimatic indicators (e.g., grain heat stress) calculated during specific phenological phases so as to take account of the plant response to climate (e.g., the grain filling period, flowering- harvest). These indicators are linked with the ecophysiological processes they characterize (for e.g., the grain filling). To represent this methodology, we studied the suitability of winter wheat in future climatic conditions through three distinct French sites, Toulouse, Dijon and Versailles. Indicators have been calculated using climatic data from 1950 to 2100 simulated by the global climate model ARPEGE forced by a greenhouse effect corresponding to the SRES A1B scenario. The Quantile-Quantile downscaling method was applied to obtain data for the three locations. Phenological stages (emergence, ear 1 cm, flowering, beginning of grain filling and harvest) have been

  9. Ecoclimatic indicators to study crop suitability in present and future climatic conditionsTIC CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caubel, Julie; Garcia de Cortazar Atauri, Inaki; Huard, Frédéric; Launay, Marie; Ripoche, Dominique; Gouache, David; Bancal, Marie-Odile; Graux, Anne-Isabelle; De Noblet, Nathalie

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is expected to affect both regional and global food production through changes in overall agroclimatic conditions. It is therefore necessary to develop simple tools of crop suitability diagnosis in a given area so that stakeholders can envisage land use adaptations under climate change conditions. The most common way to investigate potential impacts of climate on the evolution of agrosystems is to make use of an array of agroclimatic indicators, which provide synthetic information derived from climatic variables and calculated within fixed periods (i.e. January first - 31th July). However, the information obtained during these periods does not enable to take account of the plant response to climate. In this work, we present some results of the research program ORACLE (Opportunities and Risks of Agrosystems & forests in response to CLimate, socio-economic and policy changEs in France (and Europe). We proposed a suite of relevant ecoclimatic indicators, based on temperature and rainfall, in order to evaluate crop suitability for both present and new climatic conditions. Ecoclimatic indicators are agroclimatic indicators (e.g., grain heat stress) calculated during specific phenological phases so as to take account of the plant response to climate (e.g., the grain filling period, flowering- harvest). These indicators are linked with the ecophysiological processes they characterize (for e.g., the grain filling). To represent this methodology, we studied the suitability of winter wheat in future climatic conditions through three distinct French sites, Toulouse, Dijon and Versailles. Indicators have been calculated using climatic data from 1950 to 2100 simulated by the global climate model ARPEGE forced by a greenhouse effect corresponding to the SRES A1B scenario. The Quantile-Quantile downscaling method was applied to obtain data for the three locations. Phenological stages (emergence, ear 1 cm, flowering, beginning of grain filling and harvest) have been

  10. Promoter or enhancer, what's the difference? Deconstruction of established distinctions and presentation of a unifying model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin

    2015-01-01

    of enhancers. Among the different approaches, profiling of enhancer RNAs yields the highest specificity and may be superior in detecting in vivo activity. I discuss their apparent similarities to promoters, which challenge the established view of enhancers and promoters as distinct entities, and present......Gene transcription is strictly controlled by the interplay of regulatory events at gene promoters and gene-distal regulatory elements called enhancers. Despite extensive studies of enhancers, we still have a very limited understanding of their mechanisms of action and their restricted spatio...

  11. The Microscopic Models of Collective Excitations. Present Status and Possible Ways of Improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, S.T.

    1968-01-01

    The paper analyses possible generalizations of the known collective excitation models in the following directions: (a) inclusion of other kinds of interactions, generating new types of oscillations, (b) improvement of the quasiboson approximation. The classification of excitations according to the quantum numbers of correlate pairs provides the basis for the corresponding classification of the elementary interactions generating these excitations. For low excitations the number of important ''generating interactions'' is not large and practically all of them have been tested. A special study is made of the particle-particle channel where ''elementary interactions'' can be introduced without any new parameters, if the hypothesis of gauge invariance of nucleon-nucleon interaction is used. Additional (to usual pairing) interaction in the particle-particle channel generates 0 + -states - ''coherent pairing fluctuation'' — having a uniquely large probability ratio of EO and E2 transitions into the ground band. The experimental identification of such states is of great interest. The necessity to: reject the quasiboson approximation is dictated by the complicated vibrational-rotational structure of experimental nuclear spectra. The main difficulty of their theoretical description is the absence of a consistent microscopic picture of rotational excitations. Only in very special models can the group theory be applied and show how rotation appears in the system of interacting particles. A method worked out by Belyaev and Zelevinsky is considered, which gives the possibility of a microscopic description of rotations. The proposed method includes some aspects of group theory approach that, together with the equations of motion for pair operators,allow the consideration of realistic models in a sufficiently good approximation. The illustration of the method serves to obtain the rotational spectrum for j N configuration with a further generalization on an arbitrary number of

  12. Nonlinear modeling of ferroelectric-ferromagnetic composites based on condensed and finite element approaches (Presentation Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricoeur, Andreas; Lange, Stephan; Avakian, Artjom

    2015-04-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling is an inherent property of only a few crystals exhibiting very low coupling coefficients at low temperatures. On the other hand, these materials are desirable due to many promising applications, e.g. as efficient data storage devices or medical or geophysical sensors. Efficient coupling of magnetic and electric fields in materials can only be achieved in composite structures. Here, ferromagnetic (FM) and ferroelectric (FE) phases are combined e.g. including FM particles in a FE matrix or embedding fibers of the one phase into a matrix of the other. The ME coupling is then accomplished indirectly via strain fields exploiting magnetostrictive and piezoelectric effects. This requires a poling of the composite, where the structure is exposed to both large magnetic and electric fields. The efficiency of ME coupling will strongly depend on the poling process. Besides the alignment of local polarization and magnetization, it is going along with cracking, also being decisive for the coupling properties. Nonlinear ferroelectric and ferromagnetic constitutive equations have been developed and implemented within the framework of a multifield, two-scale FE approach. The models are microphysically motivated, accounting for domain and Bloch wall motions. A second, so called condensed approach is presented which doesn't require the implementation of a spatial discretisation scheme, however still considering grain interactions and residual stresses. A micromechanically motivated continuum damage model is established to simulate degradation processes. The goal of the simulation tools is to predict the different constitutive behaviors, ME coupling properties and lifetime of smart magnetoelectric devices.

  13. Interpretation of Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Models: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel

    2017-11-27

    This paper is an overview of the most significant and impactful interpretation approaches of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models, their development, and application. The evolution of the interpretation paradigm from "model → descriptors → (structure)" to "model → structure" is indicated. The latter makes all models interpretable regardless of machine learning methods or descriptors used for modeling. This opens wide prospects for application of corresponding interpretation approaches to retrieve structure-property relationships captured by any models. Issues of separate approaches are discussed as well as general issues and prospects of QSAR model interpretation.

  14. Models of presentation of intraarticular masses; Normas de presentacion de las masas intraarticulares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, M. [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset. Valencia (Spain); Molla, E. [Clinica Quiron. Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, L.; Galant, J. [Hospital San Juan. Alicante (Spain); Madariaga, B. [Hospital Clinico Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Intraarticular masses are relatively rare, and their magnetic resonance (MR) features are little known. The purpose of this report was to asses the presentation and MR imaging findings associated with the different histological types encountered in a series of 22 patients. We review the MR imaging findings in 22 intraarticular masses (18 in knee, two in ankle and two in shoulder). The variables studied were: calcifications, edema, morphology, methemoglobin, hemosiderin, homogeneity, margins, bone changes, T1-weighted signal intensity, T2-weightes/STIR signal intensity, clinical presentation and patient age. The statistical relationships were determined by {chi}''2 test and ANOVA (Student-Newman-Keuls). Among the intraarticular masses, there were 14 cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis (SVNP) (63.6%), 3 cases of themangioma (13.6%), 3 cases of synovial sarcoma (13.6%) and 2 cases of chondrosarcoma (9.1%). Statistical significant relationships were observed between histological type and; calcifications (p=0.004), which were irregular in chondrosarcomas and appeared as phleboliths in hemangionas: morphology (p=0.007), which was serpiginous in hemangiomas and oval in focal SVNP; areas of hemosiderin (p=0.002)in SVNP and synovial sarcoma: clinica presentation (p=0.003), with skin changes in cases of hemangioma: and age (p=0.04), hemangioma patients being younger (mean: 21 years) and those with synovial sarcoma being older (mean: 56 years). In cases of intraarticular masses, the presence of calcification, tumor morphology, the presence of hemosiderin, patient age and clinical presentation show statistically significant differences depending on the histological type. (Author) 23 refs.

  15. Presenting a comprehensive market oriented model and evaluating its impact on organization performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taqi Amini

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Like other innovative strategies, companies have paid more attention to market oriented strategies in recent years. This has been focused by organizations for improved effectiveness and the organization performance accelerated a lot in business competition. In responding to this fact, organizations are trying to formulate many of the issues familiar to large organizations, which have involved with market oriented strategy planning. This paper reviews key elements in market-oriented strategy planning with regard to competitiveness and performance in large organizations and outlines a comprehensive model for strategy planning in profit organizations. These elements include environment, top management, organization structure and market oriented strategy. Professional question of this study has a particularly important role in formulating relations of this model. These elements are well positioned to evaluate the impact of market-oriented strategy planning on organizations and their expected impacts on organization performance. A well-organized questionnaire to help organizations with their planning is proposed in this survey. Based on the proposed questionnaire, data obtained from Tehran food industry experts and analyzed by using SEM method. Results accepted eight hypotheses and rejected one.

  16. Presentation skills amongst surgical trainees at a national conference: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Edward; Peacock, Oliver; Liyanage, Shehan; Elsey, Elizabeth; Lund, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    The ability to deliver public presentations is important for doctors of all specialities. Despite this, there is little emphasis on training in presentation skills within medical curriculae. The aim of this paper was to establish the current standard of presentations being delivered by surgical trainees at a national conference and to confirm the need for further training. An observational study of 96 six-minute research presentations. A national surgical conference in the United Kingdom. Four independent observers each appraised 24 six-minute presentations by surgical trainees against a pre-determined standard. A set of 19 audit criteria were established after a literature search to ascertain commonly accepted presentation standards. These outcome measures included keeping to time, number of slides used, the nature of slide content, methods of data representation, use of images and presentation style. A total of 61 (64%) presenters overran. The median number of slides used was 13 (range 6-28). Thirty-three (34%) presenters displayed slides with more than six bullet points on two or more occasions. Sixty-four (67%) presenters displayed whole paragraphs of text on two or more occasions. Sixty-eight (71%) presenters displayed raw numerical data in the course of their presentations. Seventy (73%) presenters used images. Thirty-one (32%) presenters repeatedly read out sentences word-for-word from their slides. Nineteen (20%) presenters appeared not to know their presentation content well. Presentation skills amongst surgical trainees are well below those that should be aspired to. Efforts to improve training, motivation and the examples set by senior surgeons should be instigated in order to improve this situation.

  17. Past and present variability of the solar-terrestrial system: measurement, data analysis and theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Provenzale, A. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The course Past and present variability of the solar-terrestrial system: measurement, data analysis and theoretical models is explicitly devoted to these issues. A solar cycle ago, in summer 1985, G. Cini organized a similar school, in a time when this field was in a very early stage of development and definitely fewer high-quality measurements were available. After eleven years, the field has grown toward becoming a robust scientific discipline, new data have been obtained, and new ideas have been proposed by both solar physicists and climate dynamicists. For this reason, the authors felt that it was the right time to organize a new summer school, with the aim of formalizing the developments that have taken place during these years, and also for speculating and maybe dreaming of new results that will be achieved in the upcoming years. The papers of the lectures have now been collected in this volume. First, in order to know what the authors talking about, they need to obtain reliable data from terrestrial archives,and to properly date the records that have been measured. To these crucial aspects is devoted the first part of the book, dealing with various types of proxy data and with the difficult issue of the dating of the records.

  18. Modeling High-Energy Gamma-Rays from the Fermi Bubbles - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Megan [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    In 2010, the Fermi Bubbles were discovered at the galactic center of the Milky Way. These giant gamma-ray structures, extending 50 degrees in galactic latitude and 20-30 degrees in galactic longitude, were not predicted. We wish to develop a model for the gamma-ray emission of the Fermi Bubbles. To do so, we assume that second order Fermi acceleration is responsible for the high-energy emission of the bubbles. Second order Fermi acceleration requires charged particles and irregular magnetic fields—both of which are present in the disk of the Milky Way galaxy. I use the assumption of second order Fermi acceleration in the transport equation, which describes the diffusion of particles. By solving the steady-state case of the transport equation, I compute the proton spectrum due to Fermi second order acceleration and compare this analytical solution to a numerical solution provided by Dr. P. Mertsch. Analytical solutions to the transport equation are taken from Becker, Le, & Dermer and are used to further test the numerical solution. I find that the numerical solution converges to the analytical solution in all cases. Thus, we know the numerical solution accurately calculates the proton spectrum. The gamma-ray spectrum follows the proton spectrum, and will be computed in the future.

  19. Designing PDT-based combinations to overcome chemoresistance in heterocellular 3D tumor models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Imran; Briars, Emma A.; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Anbil, Sriram; Vecchio, Daniela; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Hanna, William R.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    A major barrier to treating advanced-stage cancers is heterogeneity in the responsiveness of metastatic disease to conventional therapies leading to resistance and treatment failure. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to synergize with conventional agents and to overcome the evasion pathways that cause resistance. Developing PDT-based combinations that target resistant tumor populations and cooperate mechanistically with conventional agents is an increasingly promising approach to improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity, particularly in complex disease sites. Identifying the molecular, cellular, and microenvironmental cues that lead to heterogeneity and treatment resistance is critical to developing strategies to target unresponsive regions of stubborn disease. Cell-based research platforms that integrate key microenvironmental cues are emerging as increasingly important tools to improve the translational efficiency of new agents, and to design combination regimens. Among the challenges associated with developing and scaling complex cell-based screening platforms is the need to integrate, and balance, biological relevance with appropriate, high-content imaging routines that provide meaningful quantitative readouts of therapeutic response. The benefits and challenges associated with deriving meaningful insights from complex cell-based models will be presented, with a particular emphasis on overcoming chemoresistance mediated by physical stress and communication with stromal partners (e.g. tumor endothelial cells, which are emerging as dynamic regulators of treatment resistance) using PDT-based combinations.

  20. A feasibility study of damage detection in beams using high-speed camera (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chao; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2017-04-01

    In this paper a method for damage detection in beam structures using high-speed camera is presented. Traditional methods of damage detection in structures typically involve contact (i.e., piezoelectric sensor or accelerometer) or non-contact sensors (i.e., laser vibrometer) which can be costly and time consuming to inspect an entire structure. With the popularity of the digital camera and the development of computer vision technology, video cameras offer a viable capability of measurement including higher spatial resolution, remote sensing and low-cost. In the study, a damage detection method based on the high-speed camera was proposed. The system setup comprises a high-speed camera and a line-laser which can capture the out-of-plane displacement of a cantilever beam. The cantilever beam with an artificial crack was excited and the vibration process was recorded by the camera. A methodology called motion magnification, which can amplify subtle motions in a video is used for modal identification of the beam. A finite element model was used for validation of the proposed method. Suggestions for applications of this methodology and challenges in future work will be discussed.

  1. Emotional noun processing: an ERP study with rapid serial visual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shengnan; He, Weiqi; Zhan, Lei; Qi, Zhengyang; Zhu, Chuanlin; Luo, Wenbo; Li, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Reading is an important part of our daily life, and rapid responses to emotional words have received a great deal of research interest. Our study employed rapid serial visual presentation to detect the time course of emotional noun processing using event-related potentials. We performed a dual-task experiment, where subjects were required to judge whether a given number was odd or even, and the category into which each emotional noun fit. In terms of P1, we found that there was no negativity bias for emotional nouns. However, emotional nouns elicited larger amplitudes in the N170 component in the left hemisphere than did neutral nouns. This finding indicated that in later processing stages, emotional words can be discriminated from neutral words. Furthermore, positive, negative, and neutral words were different from each other in the late positive complex, indicating that in the third stage, even different emotions can be discerned. Thus, our results indicate that in a three-stage model the latter two stages are more stable and universal.

  2. Emotional noun processing: an ERP study with rapid serial visual presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengnan Yi

    Full Text Available Reading is an important part of our daily life, and rapid responses to emotional words have received a great deal of research interest. Our study employed rapid serial visual presentation to detect the time course of emotional noun processing using event-related potentials. We performed a dual-task experiment, where subjects were required to judge whether a given number was odd or even, and the category into which each emotional noun fit. In terms of P1, we found that there was no negativity bias for emotional nouns. However, emotional nouns elicited larger amplitudes in the N170 component in the left hemisphere than did neutral nouns. This finding indicated that in later processing stages, emotional words can be discriminated from neutral words. Furthermore, positive, negative, and neutral words were different from each other in the late positive complex, indicating that in the third stage, even different emotions can be discerned. Thus, our results indicate that in a three-stage model the latter two stages are more stable and universal.

  3. Evapotranspiration and irrigation algorithms in hydrologic modeling:Present Status and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrologic models are used extensively for predicting water availability and water quality responses to alternative irrigation, tillage, crop, and fertilizer management practices and global climate change. Modeling results have been frequently used by regulatory agencies for developing remedial meas...

  4. Insight into runoff characteristics using hydrological modeling in the data-scarce southern Tibetan Plateau: Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingyong; Yang, Shengtian; Zhao, Changsen; Zhou, Qiuwen; Hou, Lipeng

    2017-01-01

    Regional hydrological modeling in ungauged regions has attracted growing attention in water resources research. The southern Tibetan Plateau often suffers from data scarcity in watershed hydrological simulation and water resources assessment. This hinders further research characterizing the water cycle and solving international water resource issues in the area. In this study, a multi-spatial data based Distributed Time-Variant Gain Model (MS-DTVGM) is applied to the Yarlung Zangbo River basin, an important international river basin in the southern Tibetan Plateau with limited meteorological data. This model is driven purely by spatial data from multiple sources and is independent of traditional meteorological data. Based on the methods presented in this study, daily snow cover and potential evapotranspiration data in the Yarlung Zangbo River basin in 2050 are obtained. Future (2050) climatic data (precipitation and air temperature) from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-AR5) are used to study the hydrological response to climate change. The result shows that river runoff will increase due to precipitation and air temperature changes by 2050. Few differences are found between daily runoff simulations from different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) for 2050. Historical station observations (1960-2000) at Nuxia and model simulations for two periods (2006-2009 and 2050) are combined to study inter-annual and intra-annual runoff distribution and variability. The inter-annual runoff variation is stable and the coefficient of variation (CV) varies from 0.21 to 0.27. In contrast, the intra-annual runoff varies significantly with runoff in summer and autumn accounting for more than 80% of the total amount. Compared to the historical period (1960-2000), the present period (2006-2009) has a slightly uneven intra-annual runoff temporal distribution, and becomes more balanced in

  5. Insight into runoff characteristics using hydrological modeling in the data-scarce southern Tibetan Plateau: Past, present, and future.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyong Cai

    Full Text Available Regional hydrological modeling in ungauged regions has attracted growing attention in water resources research. The southern Tibetan Plateau often suffers from data scarcity in watershed hydrological simulation and water resources assessment. This hinders further research characterizing the water cycle and solving international water resource issues in the area. In this study, a multi-spatial data based Distributed Time-Variant Gain Model (MS-DTVGM is applied to the Yarlung Zangbo River basin, an important international river basin in the southern Tibetan Plateau with limited meteorological data. This model is driven purely by spatial data from multiple sources and is independent of traditional meteorological data. Based on the methods presented in this study, daily snow cover and potential evapotranspiration data in the Yarlung Zangbo River basin in 2050 are obtained. Future (2050 climatic data (precipitation and air temperature from the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC-AR5 are used to study the hydrological response to climate change. The result shows that river runoff will increase due to precipitation and air temperature changes by 2050. Few differences are found between daily runoff simulations from different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 for 2050. Historical station observations (1960-2000 at Nuxia and model simulations for two periods (2006-2009 and 2050 are combined to study inter-annual and intra-annual runoff distribution and variability. The inter-annual runoff variation is stable and the coefficient of variation (CV varies from 0.21 to 0.27. In contrast, the intra-annual runoff varies significantly with runoff in summer and autumn accounting for more than 80% of the total amount. Compared to the historical period (1960-2000, the present period (2006-2009 has a slightly uneven intra-annual runoff temporal distribution, and becomes more

  6. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  7. Presentation and interpretation of food intake data: factors affecting comparability across studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mieke; Wenhold, Friede A M; Macintyre, Una E; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss; Steyn, Nelia P; Oldewage-Theron, Wilna H

    2013-01-01

    Non-uniform, unclear, or incomplete presentation of food intake data limits interpretation, usefulness, and comparisons across studies. In this contribution, we discuss factors affecting uniform reporting of food intake across studies. The amount of food eaten can be reported as mean portion size, number of servings or total amount of food consumed per day; the absolute intake value for the specific study depends on the denominator used because food intake data can be presented as per capita intake or for consumers only. To identify the foods mostly consumed, foods are reported and ranked according to total number of times consumed, number of consumers, total intake, or nutrient contribution by individual foods or food groups. Presentation of food intake data primarily depends on a study's aim; reported data thus often are not comparable across studies. Food intake data further depend on the dietary assessment methodology used and foods in the database consulted; and are influenced by the inherent limitations of all dietary assessments. Intake data can be presented as either single foods or as clearly defined food groups. Mixed dishes, reported as such or in terms of ingredients and items added during food preparation remain challenging. Comparable presentation of food consumption data is not always possible; presenting sufficient information will assist valid interpretation and optimal use of the presented data. A checklist was developed to strengthen the reporting of food intake data in science communication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Environment and health in Gela (Sicily): present knowledge and prospects for future studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmeci, Loredana; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Carere, Mario; Cori, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    40-km range. Infact, the overall mortality rate for tumor and non-tumor causes in Gela is significantly higher for both sexes, and this is shown also in the Municipality of Niscemi, especially among the male population. Hospital discharge records for tumor causes, but especially for non-tumor ones, exceeded expectations in both genders and must be analysed taking into consideration the attraction exerted on the surrounding areas by the Gela hospital. Data analysis according to 5 ten-year birth cohorts, from 1915 to 1964, shows a decreasing mortality trend, whereas the increase of hospital admissions is confirmed in the younger generations. The issue of birth defects is recurrent in this area: a suitable register is lacking so that updated figures cannot be presented. However, data previously published showed excesses of prevalence rates of several specific birth defects, mainly urinary tract and genital anomalies. The same is worth in the incidence of new cancer cases since the development of a proper register is yet in progress. Tools and methodologies that should be applied in Gela to study environment-health relations are proposed, like Life Cycle Analysis, dispersion patterns and an air-quality monitoring system. A conceptual model considering all pollution sources and different exposure patterns present in Gela, developed by the Multidisciplinary Working Group, is presented. Among the activities carried out by regional authorities, two Reports on the Regional Environment Protection Agency monitoring activity and on the EU Program SEARCH, School Environment And Respiratory Health in Children, are included. A section is devoted to understanding what is necessary to build an epidemiological monitoring system specifically designed for this area, in order to keep under permanent control environment-related health outcomes. This includes a systematic and continuative collection, storage and analysis of environmental-induced diseases, exposure and risk factors, as well

  9. The Past, Present and Future of Cyber-Physical Systems: A Focus on Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward A. Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about better engineering of cyber-physical systems (CPSs through better models. Deterministic models have historically proven extremely useful and arguably form the kingpin of the industrial revolution and the digital and information technology revolutions. Key deterministic models that have proven successful include differential equations, synchronous digital logic and single-threaded imperative programs. Cyber-physical systems, however, combine these models in such a way that determinism is not preserved. Two projects show that deterministic CPS models with faithful physical realizations are possible and practical. The first project is PRET, which shows that the timing precision of synchronous digital logic can be practically made available at the software level of abstraction. The second project is Ptides (programming temporally-integrated distributed embedded systems, which shows that deterministic models for distributed cyber-physical systems have practical faithful realizations. These projects are existence proofs that deterministic CPS models are possible and practical.

  10. The past, present and future of cyber-physical systems: a focus on models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward A

    2015-02-26

    This paper is about better engineering of cyber-physical systems (CPSs) through better models. Deterministic models have historically proven extremely useful and arguably form the kingpin of the industrial revolution and the digital and information technology revolutions. Key deterministic models that have proven successful include differential equations, synchronous digital logic and single-threaded imperative programs. Cyber-physical systems, however, combine these models in such a way that determinism is not preserved. Two projects show that deterministic CPS models with faithful physical realizations are possible and practical. The first project is PRET, which shows that the timing precision of synchronous digital logic can be practically made available at the software level of abstraction. The second project is Ptides (programming temporally-integrated distributed embedded systems), which shows that deterministic models for distributed cyber-physical systems have practical faithful realizations. These projects are existence proofs that deterministic CPS models are possible and practical.

  11. A Case Study Application Of Time Study Model In Paint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a case study in the development and application of a time study model in a paint manufacturing company. The organization specializes in the production of different grades of paint and paint containers. The paint production activities include; weighing of raw materials, drying of raw materials, dissolving ...

  12. Towards the social media studies of science: social media metrics, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Costas, Rodrigo

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we aim at providing a general reflection around the present and future of social media metrics (or altmetrics) and how they could evolve into a new discipline focused on the study of the relationships and interactions between science and social media, in what could be seen as the social media studies of science.

  13. A Study of the Effect of Color in Memory Retention When Used in Presentation Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnohie, Bruce Vernon

    A study of the effects of color as used in presentation software on short-range (immediately following treatment) and long-range (one hour following treatment) memory retention was conducted. Previous studies have concentrated on color as cueing or coding mechanisms primarily in print media and have not explored the effect of individual colors as…

  14. Present-day 3D structural model of the Po Valley basin, Northern Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turrini, C.; Lacombe, O.; Roure, F.

    2014-01-01

    A 3D structural model of the Po Valley basin (Northern Italy) was built by integrating the dataset available from the public domain (DEM, wells, isobath-maps, cross-sections, outcrop-trends).The model shows the complex foredeep-foreland architecture across the basin, from the Moho level to the

  15. Preserving the Public Good: Presenting an Organizational Model for the Changing Future of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Stephanie Parra

    2011-01-01

    Institutions of higher education face financial pressure to become self-sustaining (Gumport, 2001; 2000). This rapidly growing economic demand is negatively affecting the social mission of higher education (Kezar, 2004). Scholars suggest the implementation of a new model of higher education, one that blends a for-profit model with the traditional…

  16. Product modeling standards for the building and construction industry : Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolman, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    For the past ten years most sectors of industry have been developing standards for the electronic sharing and exchange of product model data. While several related industries, such as automotive and shipbuilding manufacturing have been relatively successful in integrating electronic product models

  17. Presentation of a stochastic model estimating the wind energy contribution in remote island electrical networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldellis, J.K.; Kapsali, M.; Tiligadas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study estimates the maximum wind energy contribution to an isolated micro-grid. ► An integrated computational tool is developed on the basis of stochastic analysis. ► The probability distribution of the wind energy surplus and deficit is estimated. ► The results indicate that a strict penetration limit is imposed to wind energy. -- Abstract: The electrification in remote islands whose electricity distribution network is not connected to the mainland’s grid is mostly based on Autonomous Power Stations (APSs) that are usually characterized by a considerably high electricity production cost, while at the same time the contribution of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) in these regions accounts for less than 10% of the total electricity generation. This actually results from the fact that despite the excellent wind potential of most of these islands, the wind energy contribution is significantly restricted from limits imposed to protect the remote electrical grids from possible instability problems, due to the stochastic wind speed behavior and the variable electricity consumption. On the basis of probability distribution of the load demand of a representative Greek island and the corresponding data related to the available wind potential, the present study estimates the maximum – acceptable by the local grid – wind energy contribution. For that reason, an integrated computational algorithm has been developed from first principles, based on a stochastic analysis. According to the results obtained, it becomes evident that with the current wind turbine technology, wind energy cannot play a key role in coping with the electrification problems encountered in many Greek island regions, excluding however the case of introducing bulk energy storage systems that may provide considerable recovery of the remarkable wind energy rejections expected.

  18. A Cross-Cultural Study of Risky Online Self-Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Claire M; Cutello, Clara A; Gummerum, Michaela; Hanoch, Yaniv

    2018-01-01

    The use of social media is pervasive among young adults. However, not all posted content is beneficial to their self-presentation, but can have negative and damaging consequences. This study investigated how individual differences in self-monitoring and impulsiveness influence risky online self-presentation in British and Italian samples. British participants (n = 88) were more likely to post comments and images related to their alcohol and drug use, whereas Italian (n = 90) participants posted more offensive content and personal information. High self-monitoring and high impulsiveness was positively predictive of risky self-presentation online regardless of nationality, highlighting the normative influence of social media culture, and the influence of both spontaneous and deliberative behavior on posting inappropriate content online. These novel insights regarding the way young adults present themselves on social network sites could help explain differences in self-presentation.

  19. Multidimensional Big Spatial Data Modeling Through A Case Study: Lte Rf Subsystem Power Consumption Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antón Castro, Francesc/François; Musiige, Deogratius; Mioc, Darka

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a case study for comparing different multidimensional mathematical modeling methodologies used in multidimensional spatial big data modeling and proposing a new technique. An analysis of multidimensional modeling approaches (neural networks, polynomial interpolation and homoto...

  20. Carcinogenic risk for workers exposed to ionizing radiation. A critical review of present epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies on workers who have been exposed to ionizing radiation have allowed to demonstrate certain cancer risks associated with elevated, often retrospectively reconstituted exposures. Present studies on still active workers or workers having worked for the last 15 years are indispensable to define the risk associated with low irradiation doses; they must, however, take into account confounding factors that may play a role in the etiology of the cancer studied

  1. The FODA-TDMA satellite access scheme - Presentation, study of the system, and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Nedo; Ferro, Erina

    1991-12-01

    A description is given of FODA-TDMA, a satellite access scheme designed for mixed traffic. The study of the system is presented and the choice of some parameters is justified. A simplified analytic solution is found, describing the steady-state behavior of the system. Some results of the simulation tests for an already existing hardware environment are also presented for the channel speeds of 2 and 8 Mb/s, considering both the stationary and the transient cases. The results of the experimentation at 2 Mb/s on the satellite Eutelsat-F2 are also presented and compared with the results of the simulation.

  2. "Medical informatics in a medical research facility. An interactive multimedia presentation". Diabetes as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinik, E; Sirman, D; Georges, L P; Phillips, J

    1991-01-01

    This interactive demonstration provides a model for integrating information in a medical facility. By the use of networking computers, diagnostic data and scientific data are shared between geographically-separated clinical and research units. Data collected in a patient database in the outpatient clinic is sorted on specified qualifying criteria and the resulting subset further analyzed for research studies. To show the process of patient selection from a general database to a diabetes database, and further selection to a subset of diabetes, i.e., Diabetic Neuropathy, the authors used HyperCard. Firstly, HyperCard provided us with a flexible design allowing for both vertical and horizontal progressions. Because we wanted to include an educational component on diabetes and its complications, this flexibility was important. At any point in the demonstration, the viewer is able to access more information nested in several levels. Secondly, we wanted to be able to import a variety of programs that are used to translate diagnostic data into scientific data that is analyzed and prepared for publication in a medical textbook or journal. According to Douglas Adams, author of "Pathways and Relationships", HyperCard occupies the same niche in the evolution of software as human beings do in the evolution of life. "It's the fact that we are unspecialized but infinitely adaptable that has been our success as a species. In the same way, HyperCard is unspecialized but can turn its hand to any kind of task. And if the task is beyond it, HyperCard can use the phone, go for a ride on Excel, or go out and find a powerful graphics tool or sophisticated wordprocessing program!"

  3. Prospective validation of a predictive model that identifies homeless people at risk of re-presentation to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Gaye; Hepworth, Graham; Weiland, Tracey; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie Frances; Kelaher, Margaret; Dunt, David

    2012-02-01

    To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of a predictive model to identify homeless people at risk of representation to an emergency department. A prospective cohort analysis utilised one month of data from a Principal Referral Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. All visits involving people classified as homeless were included, excluding those who died. Homelessness was defined as living on the streets, in crisis accommodation, in boarding houses or residing in unstable housing. Rates of re-presentation, defined as the total number of visits to the same emergency department within 28 days of discharge from hospital, were measured. Performance of the risk screening tool was assessed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios. Over the study period (April 1, 2009 to April 30, 2009), 3298 presentations from 2888 individuals were recorded. The homeless population accounted for 10% (n=327) of all visits and 7% (n=211) of all patients. A total of 90 (43%) homeless people re-presented to the emergency department. The predictive model included nine variables and achieved 98% (CI, 0.92-0.99) sensitivity and 66% (CI, 0.57-0.74) specificity. The positive predictive value was 68% and the negative predictive value was 98%. The positive likelihood ratio 2.9 (CI, 2.2-3.7) and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.03 (CI, 0.01-0.13). The high emergency department re-presentation rate for people who were homeless identifies unresolved psychosocial health needs. The emergency department remains a vital access point for homeless people, particularly after hours. The risk screening tool is key to identify medical and social aspects of a homeless patient's presentation to assist early identification and referral. Copyright © 2012 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental Models as a Service: Enabling Interoperability through RESTful Endpoints and API Documentation (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achieving interoperability in environmental modeling has evolved as software technology has progressed. The recent rise of cloud computing and proliferation of web services initiated a new stage for creating interoperable systems. Scientific programmers increasingly take advantag...

  5. Using Integrated Environmental Modeling to Automate a Process-Based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, and...

  6. Parametric study for horizontal steam generator modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovtcharova, I. [Energoproekt, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-12-31

    In the presentation some of the calculated results of horizontal steam generator PGV - 440 modelling with RELAP5/Mod3 are described. Two nodalization schemes have been used with different components in the steam dome. A study of parameters variation on the steam generator work and calculated results is made in cases with separator and branch.

  7. Developing Charismatic Delivery through Transformational Presentations: Modeling the Persona of Steve Jobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivic, Rebecca K.; Green, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    How can public speaking instructors teach students how to be charismatic and confident speakers? The activity presented in this article suggests that instructors foster competent and charismatic presentational skills by having students channel the stylistic capabilities of an exceptional speaker. The activity requires students to take on the…

  8. Full text publication rates of studies presented at an international emergency medicine scientific meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jannet W M; Graham, Colin A

    2011-09-01

    The publication rate of full text papers following an abstract presentation at a medical conference is variable, and few studies have examined the situation with respect to international emergency medicine conferences. This retrospective study aimed to identify the publication rate of abstracts presented at the 2006 International Conference on Emergency Medicine (ICEM) held in Halifax, Canada. The full text publication rate was 33.2%, similar to previous emergency medicine meetings. English language barriers may play a role in the low publication rate seen.

  9. Campus network security model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-ku; Song, Li-ren

    2011-12-01

    Campus network security is growing importance, Design a very effective defense hacker attacks, viruses, data theft, and internal defense system, is the focus of the study in this paper. This paper compared the firewall; IDS based on the integrated, then design of a campus network security model, and detail the specific implementation principle.

  10. Urban Studies: A Learning Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Terry L.; Sundeen, Richard

    1979-01-01

    The urban studies learning model described in this article was found to increase students' self-esteem, imbue a more flexible and open perspective, contribute to the capacity for self-direction, produce increases on the feeling reactivity, spontaneity, and acceptance of aggression scales, and expand interpersonal competence. (Author/WI)

  11. Presentation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froejmark, M.

    1992-10-01

    The report presents a wide, easily understandable description of presentation technique and man-machine communication. General fundamentals for the man-machine interface are illustrated, and the factors that affect the interface are described. A model is presented for describing the operators work situation, based on three different levels in the operators behaviour. The operator reacts routinely in the face of simple, known problems, and reacts in accordance with predetermined plans in the face of more complex, recognizable problems. Deep fundamental knowledge is necessary for truly complex questions. Today's technical status and future development have been studied. In the future, the operator interface will be based on standard software. Functions such as zooming, integration of video pictures, and sound reproduction will become common. Video walls may be expected to come into use in situations in which several persons simultaneously need access to the same information. A summary of the fundamental rules for the design of good picture ergonomics and design requirements for control rooms are included in the report. In conclusion, the report describes a presentation technique within the Distribution Automation and Demand Side Management area and analyses the know-how requirements within Vattenfall. If different systems are integrated, such as geographical information systems and operation monitoring systems, strict demands are made on the expertise of the users for achieving a user-friendly technique which is matched to the needs of the human being. (3 figs.)

  12. Modeling soluble salt assemblages on Mars: past aqueous history and present-day habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J. D.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2014-12-01

    Soluble salt assemblages formed through aqueous processes are widespread on Mars. These minerals are important for understanding the past aqueous history of Mars and indicate critical habitability parameters such as pH, temperature, water activity, and salinity. Equilibrium models have been used to determine solution chemistry and salt precipitation sequences from aqueous chemical data; however, current models are limited by a lack of experimental data for low-temperature perchlorates, and some model predictions are clearly anomalous. To address the need for accurate equilibrium models, we have developed a comprehensive model for low-temperature perchlorate-rich brines using (1) previously neglected literature data, (2) experimental solubilities determined in low-temperature perchlorate solutions, and (3) solubility and heat capacity results determined using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Our resulting model is a significant improvement over existing models, such as FREZCHEM, particularly for perchlorate mixtures. We have applied our model to evaporation and freezing of a nominal Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) solution measured at the Phoenix site. For a freezing WCL solution, our model indicates that ice, KClO4, hydromagnesite (3MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·3H2O), calcite (CaCO3), meridianiite (MgSO4·11H2O), MgCl2·12H2O, NaClO4·2H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O form at the eutectic (209 K); whereas, KClO4, hydromagnesite, kieserite (MgSO4·H2O), anhydrite (CaSO4), halite (NaCl), NaClO4·H2O, and Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O form upon complete evaporation at 298 K. In general, evaporation yields more dehydrated mineral assemblages than salts produced by freezing. Hydrated phases that form during evaporation contain 0.3 wt. % water, which compares with 1.2 wt. % during freezing. Given independent evidence for the presence of calcite and minimum water contents in Martian soils of ~1.5 wt. %, salts at the Phoenix site, and possibly elsewhere, appear more likely to have formed during

  13. Management of breech presentation at term: a retrospective cohort study of 10 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, J; Rodríguez, L; Cobos, P; Osuna, C; Del Mar Centeno, M; Larrieta, R; Martínez-Astorquiza, T; Fernández-Llebrez, L

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of management of childbirth (external cephalic version (ECV) plus planned vaginal delivery (PVD)) of breech presentation at term (⩾37 weeks of gestation). This retrospective cohort study was based on data collected of singleton breech presentations at term in the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Service, Cruces University Hospital (Biscay, Spain), from January 2003 to December 2012. We attended 2377 singleton breech pregnancies at term. We attended 1684 singleton breech term deliveries, attempting vaginal delivery after selection in 52.9% of cases and were successful in 57.5% of attempts. A total of 1360 ECV were attempted, with a success rate of 50.3% of those attempted. The use of ECV has decreased the rate of breech presentation at delivery by 39.0%, the rate of breech presentation as a caesarean section (CS) indication by 47.1% (CS due to breech presentation/total of CS) and the rate of CS for breech presentation out of the total of deliveries by 39.1% (CS due to breech presentation/total of deliveries). Early postnatal parameters (5-min Apgar score, umbilical cord arterial pH and acid-base analysis) were significantly lower following PVD compared with planned CS for breech presentation. However, we did not find any differences in the rates of admissions to the neonatal unit or neonatal mortality. Management of breech presentation with a protocol that includes ECV, careful selection criteria and active management of vaginal delivery achieve a great decrease in the rate of CS for breech presentation.

  14. Modeling the present and future impact of aviation on climate: an AOGCM approach with online coupled chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Huszar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our work is among the first that use an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM with online chemistry to evaluate the impact of future aviation emissions on temperature. Other particularities of our study include non-scaling to the aviation emissions, and the analysis of models' transient response using ensemble simulations. The model we use is the Météo-France CNRM-CM5.1 earth system model extended with the REPROBUS chemistry scheme. The time horizon of our interest is 1940–2100, assuming the A1B SRES scenario. We investigate the present and future impact of aviation emissions of CO2, NOx and H2O on climate, taking into account changes in greenhouse gases, contrails and contrail-induced cirrus (CIC. As in many transport-related impact studies, we distinguish between the climate impacts of CO2 emissions and those of non-CO2 emissions. Aviation-produced aerosol is not considered in the study. Our modeling system simulated a notable sea-ice bias in the Arctic, and therefore results concerning the surface should be viewed with caution. The global averaged near-surface CO2 impact reaches around 0.1 K by the end of the 21st century, while the non-CO2 impact reaches 0.2 K in the second half of the century. The NOx emissions impact is almost negligible in our simulations, as our aviation-induced ozone production is small. As a consequence, the non-CO2 signal is very similar to the CIC signal. The seasonal analysis shows that the strongest warming due to aviation is modeled for the late summer and early autumn. In the stratosphere, a significant cooling is attributed to aviation CO2 emissions (−0.25 K by 2100. A −0.3 K temperature decrease is modeled when considering all the aviation emissions, but no significant signal appears from the CIC or NOx forcings in the stratosphere.

  15. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  16. Comparison of models of automatic classification of textural patterns of mineral presents in Colombian coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Carvajal, Jaime; Branch Bedoya, John Willian

    2005-01-01

    The automatic classification of objects is a very interesting approach under several problem domains. This paper outlines some results obtained under different classification models to categorize textural patterns of minerals using real digital images. The data set used was characterized by a small size and noise presence. The implemented models were the Bayesian classifier, Neural Network (2-5-1), support vector machine, decision tree and 3-nearest neighbors. The results after applying crossed validation show that the Bayesian model (84%) proved better predictive capacity than the others, mainly due to its noise robustness behavior. The neuronal network (68%) and the SVM (67%) gave promising results, because they could be improved increasing the data amount used, while the decision tree (55%) and K-NN (54%) did not seem to be adequate for this problem, because of their sensibility to noise

  17. Presenting a new kinetic model for methanol to light olefins reactions over a hierarchical SAPO-34 catalyst using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javad Azarhoosh, Mohammad; Halladj, Rouein; Askari, Sima

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a new kinetic model for methanol to light olefins (MTO) reactions over a hierarchical SAPO-34 catalyst using the Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW) mechanism was presented and the kinetic parameters was obtained using a genetic algorithm (GA) and genetic programming (GP). Several kinetic models for the MTO reactions have been presented. However, due to the complexity of the reactions, most reactions are considered lumped and elementary, which cannot be deemed a completely accurate kinetic model of the process. Therefore, in this study, the LHHW mechanism is presented as kinetic models of MTO reactions. Because of the non-linearity of the kinetic models and existence of many local optimal points, evolutionary algorithms (GA and GP) are used in this study to estimate the kinetic parameters in the rate equations. Via the simultaneous connection of the code related to modelling the reactor and the GA and GP codes in the MATLAB R2013a software, optimization of the kinetic models parameters was performed such that the least difference between the results from the kinetic models and experiential results was obtained and the best kinetic parameters of MTO process reactions were achieved. A comparison of the results from the model with experiential results showed that the present model possesses good accuracy.

  18. Monte Carlo modelling of the Belgian materials testing reactor BR2: present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verboomen, B.; Aoust, Th.; Raedt, Ch. de; Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    2001-01-01

    A very detailed 3-D MCNP-4B model of the BR2 reactor was developed to perform all neutron and gamma calculations needed for the design of new experimental irradiation rigs. The Monte Carlo model of BR2 includes the nearly exact geometrical representation of fuel elements (now with their axially varying burn-up), of partially inserted control and regulating rods, of experimental devices and of radioisotope production rigs. The multiple level-geometry possibilities of MCNP-4B are fully exploited to obtain sufficiently flexible tools to cope with the very changing core loading. (orig.)

  19. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 2: Papers and presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and panels. This volume contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.). Individual papers in this volume were abstracted and indexed for the database.

  20. Presentation of the health impact evaluation study of atmospheric emissions of a major coal combustion installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnard, R.

    2004-12-01

    In the framework of a working group on the major installations, a study has been realized on a today coal combustion installation. The direct risk by inhalation and the risks bond to indirect exposure of atmospheric releases were analyzed. The calculation method is explained and the uncertainties are discussed to present the results. (A.L.B.)

  1. Jejuno-ileal atresia: A 2-year preliminary study on presentation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-11

    Aug 11, 2011 ... Background/Aim: Intestinal atresia is a common cause of neonatal intestinal obstruction. Jejuno-ileum is the commonest site of intestinal atresia. Reports on Jejunoileal atresia in developing countries are still few. The purpose of this study is to determine the presentation and management outcomes of ...

  2. A psychology literature study on modality related issues for multimodal presentation in crisis management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The motivation of this psychology literature study is to obtain modality related guidelines for real-time information presentation in crisis management environment. The crisis management task is usually companied by time urgency, risk, uncertainty, and high information density. Decision makers

  3. Teacher Feedback to Student Oral Presentations in EFL Classrooms: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Teo, Timothy; Yu, Shulin

    2017-01-01

    Whilst much research has been conducted on teacher feedback in various teaching and learning contexts, little is known about how teachers give feedback on student oral presentations to enhance students' oral communicative skills in second-language (L2) education. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews, this case study investigated the…

  4. Estimation of otitis media in ancient populations: A study of past and present Greenlandic Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homøe, P; Lynnerup, N; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    1996-01-01

    Examination of disease patterns in the past has often been difficult due to lack of morphological evidence. This study presents a new unbiased method for estimation of occurrence of infectious middle ear disease (IMED) in childhood. The method is based on the relation between IMED in childhood an...

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology [fr

  6. Jejuno-ileal atresia: A 2-year preliminary study on presentation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aim: Intestinal atresia is a common cause of neonatal intestinal obstruction. Jejuno-ileum is the commonest site of intestinal atresia. Reports on Jejunoileal atresia in developing countries are still few. The purpose of this study is to determine the presentation and management outcomes of neonates with ...

  7. A STUDY ON VARIOUS MODES OF PRESENTATION OF GASTROINTESTINAL TUBERCULOSIS AT EMERGENCY, ITS MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal tuberculosis is the 6th most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, among which ileocaecal tuberculosis is most common. Tuberculosis has been declared a global emergency by the World Health Organization (WHO and is the most important communicable disease worldwide. Approximately one third of the world population is infected and about three millions die each year from this disease. It presents with a wide variety of symptoms and signs. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis presents to emergency department as subacute intestinal obstruction, acute intestinal obstruction and peritonitis. Although Antitubercular chemotherapy is the mainstay in treatment of abdominal tuberculosis, surgical intervention becomes necessary for two reasons- diagnostic and therapeutic. Diagnostic laparotomy becomes necessary for histopathological/microbiological diagnosis, more often in patients with peritoneal or lymph node TB. Therapeutic surgery is the treatment of choice in emergency for treating intestinal obstruction & peritonitis. Morbidity and mortality will be high in patients with late presentation and associated comorbidities. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: (1 To study various modes of presentation and management of Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis at emergency surgical care, in our hospital, its management and outcomes. (2 To evaluate the morbidity and mortality in acute presentations of Gastrointestinal tuberculosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS An Observational study of 40 patients admitted in the acute surgical care unit of Our Hospital, Hyderabad, presenting with acute abdomen who have been confirmed to have Gastrointestinal tuberculosis at laparotomy and on histopathology from Aug 2013 to Aug 2015. The patient was managed by laparotomy and procedure according to the mode of presentation. All the patients were given ATT post operatively. RESULTS Gastrointestinal tuberculosis is more common in 2nd and 3rd decade of life. Acute presentations were found to be more common

  8. First-order fire effects on herbs and Shrubs: present knowledge and process modeling needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten Stephan; Melanie Miller; Matthew B. Dickinson

    2010-01-01

    Herbaceous plants and shrubs have received little attention in terms of fire effects modeling despite their critical role in ecosystem integrity and resilience after wildfires and prescribed burns. In this paper, we summarize current knowledge of direct effects of fire on herb and shrub (including cacti) vegetative tissues and seed banks, propose key components for...

  9. Solar PV Manufacturing Cost Model Group: Installed Solar PV System Prices (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodrich, A. C.; Woodhouse, M.; James, T.

    2011-02-01

    EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Program is charged with leading the Secretary's SunShot Initiative to reduce the cost of electricity from solar by 75% to be cost competitive with conventional energy sources without subsidy by the end of the decade. As part of this Initiative, the program has funded the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop module manufacturing and solar PV system installation cost models to ensure that the program's cost reduction targets are carefully aligned with current and near term industry costs. The NREL cost analysis team has leveraged the laboratories' extensive experience in the areas of project finance and deployment, as well as industry partnerships, to develop cost models that mirror the project cost analysis tools used by project managers at leading U.S. installers. The cost models are constructed through a "bottoms-up" assessment of each major cost element, beginning with the system's bill of materials, labor requirements (type and hours) by component, site-specific charges, and soft costs. In addition to the relevant engineering, procurement, and construction costs, the models also consider all relevant costs to an installer, including labor burdens and overhead rates, supply chain costs, and overhead and materials inventory costs, and assume market-specific profits.

  10. Having an IM-PACT: A Model for Improving Instructional Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Ruth

    2000-01-01

    Explains IM-PACT (Instructional Model-Purpose, Audience, Content, Technique), a framework for systematic lesson design in an information literacy context. Includes an example of IM-PACT's application to a high school-level information skills lesson plan, collaboratively designed by the teacher-librarian and English teacher. (LRW)

  11. Present State of the Single and Twin Aperture Short Dipole Model Program for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, N I; Kurtyka, T; Leroy, D; Oberli, L R; Perini, D; Russenschuck, Stephan; Siegel, N; Siemko, A; Tommasini, D; Vanenkov, I; Walckiers, L; Weterings, W

    1998-01-01

    The LHC model program for main dipoles is based on the design, fabrication and testing at CERN of a number of single and twin aperture 1m long magnets. So far, a number of single aperture models, each with specific characteristics, were tested at 2 K at a rate of about one per month. These magnets are the main tool used to check coil performance as a function of design and assembly options in view of optimizing and finalizing choices of components and procedures. Initial quenching field levels of 8.8 T were obtained and the short sample limit of the cable at 1.9 K was reached corresponding to a central bore field of 10 T. A few twin aperture dipole models were also built and tested, using the same structural components as for the long magnets which are now being built in industry. The paper discusses the main characteristics of the models built so far, the instrumentation developed to date and the experience obtained. Finally it describes the plans aimed at continuing a vigorous program to provide input to th...

  12. Inferring the past and present connectivity across the range of a North American leaf beetle: combining ecological niche modeling and a geographically explicit model of coalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellicour, Simon; Fearnley, Shannon; Lombal, Anicée; Heidl, Sarah; Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Rank, Nathan E; Mardulyn, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    The leaf beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis occurs across Western North America, either at high elevation or in small, isolated populations along the coast, and thus has a highly fragmented distribution. DNA sequence data (three loci) were collected from five regions across the species range. Population connectivity was examined using traditional ecological niche modeling, which suggested that gene flow could occur among regions now and in the past. We developed geographically explicit coalescence models of sequence evolution that incorporated a two-dimensional representation of the hypothesized ranges suggested by the niche-modeling estimates. We simulated sequence data according to these models and compared them to observed sequences to identify most probable scenarios regarding the migration history of C. aeneicollis. Our results disagreed with initial niche-modeling estimates by clearly rejecting recent connectivity among regions, and were instead most consistent with a long period of range fragmentation, extending well beyond the last glacial maximum. This application of geographically explicit models of coalescence has highlighted some limitations of the use of climatic variables for predicting the present and past range of a species and has explained aspects of the Pleistocene evolutionary history of a cold-adapted organism in Western North America. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. The present status of the study on the validity of concurrent verbalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Megumi; Takahashi, Hideaki.

    1993-09-01

    We reviewed study on the validity of the method of verbal reports. The method of verbal reports gives us detailed information about human cognitive process as compared with observing a sequence of actions, while it is subjected to criticism for the validity as data. Ericsson and Simon proposed a model of verbalization and investigated conditions to keep verbal reports valid. Although a lot of studies quote their model as a base of adopting the method of verbal reports, verification the validity of verbal reports is incomplete because effects of verbalization is not clear. We pointed out that it is necessary to take into consideration kinds of task strategies, effects of trial repetition, effects of task difficulty to examine precisely effects of verbalization. (author)

  14. Multivariate spatio-temporal modelling for assessing Antarctica's present-day contribution to sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit-Mangion, Andrew; Rougier, Jonathan; Schön, Nana; Lindgren, Finn; Bamber, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Antarctica is the world's largest fresh-water reservoir, with the potential to raise sea levels by about 60 m. An ice sheet contributes to sea-level rise (SLR) when its rate of ice discharge and/or surface melting exceeds accumulation through snowfall. Constraining the contribution of the ice sheets to present-day SLR is vital both for coastal development and planning, and climate projections. Information on various ice sheet processes is available from several remote sensing data sets, as well as in situ data such as global positioning system data. These data have differing coverage, spatial support, temporal sampling and sensing characteristics, and thus, it is advantageous to combine them all in a single framework for estimation of the SLR contribution and the assessment of processes controlling mass exchange with the ocean. In this paper, we predict the rate of height change due to salient geophysical processes in Antarctica and use these to provide estimates of SLR contribution with associated uncertainties. We employ a multivariate spatio-temporal model, approximated as a Gaussian Markov random field, to take advantage of differing spatio-temporal properties of the processes to separate the causes of the observed change. The process parameters are estimated from geophysical models, while the remaining parameters are estimated using a Markov chain Monte Carlo scheme, designed to operate in a high-performance computing environment across multiple nodes. We validate our methods against a separate data set and compare the results to those from studies that invariably employ numerical model outputs directly. We conclude that it is possible, and insightful, to assess Antarctica's contribution without explicit use of numerical models. Further, the results obtained here can be used to test the geophysical numerical models for which in situ data are hard to obtain. © 2015 The Authors. Environmetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. An Ionospheric Metric Study Using Operational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, J. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Thompson, D. C.; Scherliess, L.; Harris, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    One of the outstanding challenges in upgrading ionospheric operational models is quantifying their improvement. This challenge is not necessarily an absolute accuracy one, but rather answering the question, "Is the newest operational model an improvement over its predecessor under operational scenarios?" There are few documented cases where ionospheric models are compared either with each other or against "ground truth". For example a CEDAR workshop team, PRIMO, spent almost a decade carrying out a models comparison with ionosonde and incoherent scatter radar measurements from the Millstone Hill, Massachusetts location [Anderson et al.,1998]. The result of this study was that all models were different and specific conditions could be found when each was the "best" model. Similarly, a National Space Weather Metrics ionospheric challenge was held and results were presented at a National Space Weather meeting. The results were again found to be open to interpretation, and issues with the value of the specific metrics were raised (Fuller-Rowell, private communication, 2003). Hence, unlike the tropospheric weather community, who have established metrics and exercised them on new models over many decades to quantify improvement, the ionospheric community has not yet settled on a metric of both scientific and operational value. We report on a study in which metrics were used to compare various forms of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), the Ionospheric Forecast Model (IFM), and the Utah State University Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements Model (USU-GAIM) models. The ground truth for this study was a group of 11 ionosonde data sets taken between 20 March and 19 April 2004. The metric parameter was the ionosphere's critical frequency. The metric was referenced to the IRI. Hence, the study addressed the specific question what improvement does IFM and USU-GAIM have over IRI. Both strengths (improvements) and weaknesses of these models are discussed

  16. Late presentation of developmental dysplasia of the hip : a 15-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, C; Adam, J; Paton, R

    2017-09-01

    Despite the presence of screening programmes, infants continue to present with late developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), the impact of which is significant. The aim of this study was to assess infants with late presenting dislocation of the hip despite universal clinical neonatal and selective ultrasound screening. Between 01 January 1997 to 31 December 2011, a prospective, longitudinal study was undertaken of a cohort of 64 670 live births. Late presenting dislocation was defined as presentation after three months of age. Diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound and plain radiography. Patient demographics, referral type, reason for referral, risk factors (breech presentation/strong family history) and clinical and radiological findings were recorded. There were 31 infants with an irreducible dislocation of the hip, an incidence of 0.48 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34 to 0.68) per 1000 live births. Of these, 18 (0.28 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.44) per 1000 live births; 58%) presented late. All infants had a documented normal newborn clinical examination and no abnormality reported in the six to eight week check. Of the 18 late presenting cases 72% (n = 13) had no risk factors: 16 were referred by GPs and two were late due to administrative issues (missed appointments). The mean time to diagnosis was 62.4 weeks (19 to 84). Despite universal clinical neonatal and selective ultrasound screening, late cases of irreducible hip dislocation still occur. We recommend an update of the national screening programme for DDH, a review of training and education of healthcare professionals involved in the physical examination of neonates and infants, and the addition of a further assessment after the six to eight week check. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1250-5. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. Kuala Kemaman hydraulic model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Kadir Ishak

    2005-01-01

    There The problems facing the area of Kuala Kemaman are siltation and erosion at shoreline. The objectives of study are to assess the best alignment of the groyne alignment, to ascertain the most stable shoreline regime and to investigate structural measures to overcome the erosion. The scope of study are data collection, wave analysis, hydrodynamic simulation and sediment transport simulation. Numerical models MIKE 21 are used - MIKE 21 NSW, for wind-wave model, which describes the growth, decay and transformation of wind-generated waves and swell in nearshore areas. The study takes into account effects of refraction and shoaling due to varying depth, energy dissipation due to bottom friction and wave breaking, MIKE 21 HD - modelling system for 2D free-surface flow which to stimulate the hydraulics phenomena in estuaries, coastal areas and seas. Predicted tidal elevation and waves (radiation stresses) are considered into study while wind is not considered. MIKE 21 ST - the system that calculates the rates of non-cohesive (sand) sediment transport for both pure content and combined waves and current situation

  18. Identification of stroke during the emergency call: a descriptive study of callers' presentation of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Annika; von Euler, Mia; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin; Castrén, Maaret; Bohm, Katarina

    2015-04-28

    To evaluate symptoms presented by the caller during emergency calls regarding stroke, and to assess if symptoms in the Face-Arm-Speech-Time Test (FAST) are related to identification of stroke. Emergency calls to the Emergency Medical Communication Center (EMCC) concerning patients discharged with stroke diagnosis in a large teaching hospital in Stockholm, Sweden, in January-June 2011. The emergency calls of 179 patients who arrived at hospital by ambulance, and who were discharged with a stroke diagnosis and consented to participate were included in the study. Frequencies of stroke symptoms presented and a comparison of symptoms presented in calls with dispatch code stroke or other dispatch code. Of the 179 emergency calls analysed, 64% were dispatched as 'Stroke'. FAST symptoms, that is, facial or arm weakness or speech disturbances, were presented in 64% of the calls and were spontaneously revealed in 90%. Speech disturbance was the most common problem (54%) in all calls, followed by fall/lying position (38%) and altered mental status (27%). For patients with dispatch codes other than stroke, the dominating problem presented was a fall or being in a lying position (66%), followed by speech disturbance (31%) and altered mental status (25%). Stroke-specific symptoms were more common in patients dispatched as stroke. FAST symptoms were reported in 80% of patients dispatched as stroke compared with 35% in those dispatched as something else. This study implicates that fall/lying position and altered mental status could be considered as possible symptoms of stroke during an emergency call. Checking for FAST symptoms in these patients might uncover stroke symptoms. Future studies are needed to evaluate if actively asking for FAST symptoms in emergency calls presenting falls or a lying position can improve the identification of stroke. Stroke2010/703-31/2. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  19. Using Model-Based System Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-Cycle and Technical Reviews Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Edith L.; Weiland, Karen J.

    2017-01-01

    This is the presentation for the AIAA Space conference in September 2017. It highlights key information from Using Model-Based Systems Engineering to Provide Artifacts for NASA Project Life-cycle and Technical Reviews paper.

  20. Recommendations on presenting LHC searches for missing transverse energy signals using simplified s-channel models of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boveia, Antonio [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp Univ., Wilrijk (Belgium); Buchmueller, Oliver [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Busoni, Giorgio [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); D' Eramo, Francesco [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); De Roeck, Albert [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Antwerp Univ., Wilrijk (Belgium); De Simone, Andrea [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Doglioni, Caterina [Lund Univ. (Sweden); Dolan, Matthew J. [Univ. of Melbourne (Australia); Genest, Marie-Helene [Univ. of Grenoble, Saint-Martin-d' Hares (France); Hahn, Kristian [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Haisch, Ulrich [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Harris, Philip C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Heisig, Jan [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Ippolito, Valerio [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Kahlhoefer, Felix [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Khoze, Velentin V. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Sichota [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Wien (Austria); Landsberg, Greg [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Lowette, Steven [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Malik, Sarah [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Mangano, Michelangelo [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); McCabe, Christopher [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mrenna, Stephen [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pani, Priscilla [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); du Pree, Tristan [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Riotto, Antonio [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salek, David [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Shepherd, William [Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark); Tait, Tim M.P. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Wang, Lian-Tao [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Worm, Steven [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Zurek, Kathryn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-14

    This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on s-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.

  1. Recommendations on presenting LHC searches for missing transverse energy signals using simplified $s$-channel models of dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Boveia, Antonio; Busoni, Giorgio; D'Eramo, Francesco; De Roeck, Albert; De Simone, Andrea; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolan, Matthew J.; Genest, Marie-Helene; Hahn, Kristian; Haisch, Ulrich; Harris, Philip C.; Heisig, Jan; Ippolito, Valerio; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Khoze, Valentin V.; Kulkarni, Suchita; Landsberg, Greg; Lowette, Steven; Malik, Sarah; Mangano, Michelangelo; McCabe, Christopher; Mrenna, Stephen; Pani, Priscilla; Pree, Tristan du; Riotto, Antonio; Salek, David; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Shepherd, William; Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Worm, Steven; Zurek, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.

  2. Landscape modelling of past, present and future state of areas affected by mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Brejcha

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface mining of brown coal changed Iron mountains basin region fundamentally. Hundreds of millions of hauled masses significantly affected the landscape appearance. Involvement of government authorities and citizens of the affected towns and villages is essential and participation is expected. For proper assessment of the projected mining intent with subsequent remediation of the consequences, processing of 3D models and interactive visualizations options shared with web technology is an important factor. Creation of dump body 3D model, including internal composition, can play important role in various tasks solving, for example in hydrology or geotechnics. High-quality processing of these materials requires use of modern surveying technology, CAD systems and various tools of computer graphics processing.

  3. Past, present and future of the pathophysiological model of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Obeso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current model of basal ganglia was introduced two decades ago and has settled most of our current understanding of basal ganglia function and dysfunction. Extensive research efforts have been carried out in recent years leading to further refinement and understanding of the normal and diseased basal ganglia. Several questions, however, are yet to be resolved. This short review provides a synopsis of the evolution of thought regarding the pathophysiological model of the BG and summarizes the main recent findings and additions to this field of research. We have also tried to identify major challenges that need to be addressed and resolved in the near future. Detailed accounts and state-of-the-art developments concerning research on the basal ganglia are provided in the articles that make up this Special Issue.

  4. Present capabilities and new developments in antenna modeling with the numerical electromagnetics code NEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, G.J.

    1988-04-08

    Computer modeling of antennas, since its start in the late 1960's, has become a powerful and widely used tool for antenna design. Computer codes have been developed based on the Method-of-Moments, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, or integration of Maxwell's equations. Of such tools, the Numerical Electromagnetics Code-Method of Moments (NEC) has become one of the most widely used codes for modeling resonant sized antennas. There are several reasons for this including the systematic updating and extension of its capabilities, extensive user-oriented documentation and accessibility of its developers for user assistance. The result is that there are estimated to be several hundred users of various versions of NEC world wide. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  5. The present and future of the most favoured inflationary models after Planck 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, Miguel; Ramírez, Héctor; Boubekeur, Lotfi; Mena, Olga [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 (Spain); Giusarma, Elena, E-mail: miguel.escudero@ific.uv.es, E-mail: hector.ramirez@ific.uv.es, E-mail: lboubekeur@usfq.edu.ec, E-mail: elena.giusarma@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: olga.mena@ific.uv.es [Physics Department and INFN, Università di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    The value of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in the region allowed by the latest Planck 2015 measurements can be associated to a large variety of inflationary models. We discuss here the potential of future Cosmic Microwave Background cosmological observations in disentangling among the possible theoretical scenarios allowed by our analyses of current Planck temperature and polarization data. Rather than focusing only on r, we focus as well on the running of the primordial power spectrum, α{sub s} and the running thereof, β{sub s}. If future cosmological measurements, as those from the COrE mission, confirm the current best-fit value for β{sub s} ∼> 10{sup −2} as the preferred one, it will be possible to rule-out the most favoured inflationary models.

  6. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S. Malskaer; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2008-01-01

    . The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow cover. Gases considered are carbon dioxide and methane for all three carbon isotopes, nitrous oxide......A new, low-order Earth system model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years...... ocean layer and segment area stems from observed ocean depth distributions. Sediment burial is calculated from sedimentation velocities at the base of the bioturbated layer. Bioturbation rates and oxic and anoxic remineralisation rates depend on organic carbon rain rates and dissolved oxygen...

  7. Review on discretization techniques for complex fluid flow models: past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, A.; Chinesta, F.; Cueto, E.; Phillips, T.

    2007-04-01

    In the last decades several new and advanced numerical strategies have been proposed for solving the flow models of complex fluids. Most of them were based in the classical discretization techniques (finite elements, finite volumes, finite differences, spectral methods, meshless approachesĚ) applied on the macroscopic descriptions of such flows (differential and integral models) where special advances were introduced for accounting for the mixed character of the associated variational formulations as well as for stabilizing the advection terms in the motion and constitutive equations. Recently micro-macro approaches are being the more and more applied. They allows to avoid closure relations and the microscopic physics are better described. These models are based on kinetic theory and their main difficulty concerns the curse of dimension. The microstructure conformation is defined in a multidimensional space where standard discretization techniques fail. To overcome this difficulty stochastic techniques were introduced (inspired in the Monte Carlo techniques) but the control of the statistical noise and the low convergence order are some of their main drawbacks. Other new strategies have been recently proposed, as for example the ones based on the sparse grid and the separated representation that allows circumventing the aforementioned difficulties. However the models are the more and more focused on the microscopic scale, where they are formulated in terms of Brownian or molecular dynamics. They allow describing very precisely the molecular dynamics, but the computing time remains its main drawback. Thus, in the next years new efforts must be paid to reduce the computing time involved in microscopic simulations and the definitions of bridges between the different descriptions scales.

  8. 3D modelling and Virtual Reality as a Tool for Presenting Architecture to a Customer

    OpenAIRE

    Mosunova, Mariia

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, modern technologies are becoming more and more developed and they are used in different fields. Virtual reality is a new technological boom. Subsequently, it is possible to combine virtual reality and the design field. This thesis is a research about virtual reality, 3D modelling and how it can be used in the architectural sphere. Tyris Software, a company in Valencia, Spain, commissioned the project. The main goal was to invent and develop a platform for architects and customer...

  9. Improving the reliability of seasonal climate forecasts through empirical downscaling and multi-model considerations; presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available , discrimination and sharpness. We present seasonal prediction verification for the equatorial Pacific Ocean (where El Niño and La Niña events occur) sea-surface temperatures. The verification is done over a recent multi-decadal period for which hindcasts (re-forecasts...

  10. Recommendations on presenting LHC searches for missing transverse energy signals using simplified s-channel models of dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boveia, Antonio; Buchmueller, Oliver; Busoni, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments.......This document summarises the proposal of the LHC Dark Matter Working Group on how to present LHC results on $s$-channel simplified dark matter models and to compare them to direct (indirect) detection experiments....

  11. Present mantle flow in North China Craton constrained by seismic anisotropy and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, W.; Guo, Z.; Zhang, H.; Chen, Y. J.

    2017-12-01

    North China Carton (NCC) has undergone complicated geodynamic processes during the Cenozoic, including the westward subduction of the Pacific plate to its east and the collision of the India-Eurasia plates to its southwest. Shear wave splitting measurements in NCC reveal distinct seismic anisotropy patterns at different tectonic blocks, that is, the predominantly NW-SE trending alignment of fast directions in the western NCC and eastern NCC, weak anisotropy within the Ordos block, and N-S fast polarization beneath the Trans-North China Orogen (TNCO). To better understand the origin of seismic anisotropy from SKS splitting in NCC, we obtain a high-resolution dynamic model that absorbs multi-geophysical observations and state-of-the-art numerical methods. We calculate the mantle flow using a most updated version of software ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) with high-resolution temperature and density structures from a recent 3-D thermal-chemical model by Guo et al. (2016). The thermal-chemical model is obtained by multi-observable probabilistic inversion using high-quality surface wave measurements, potential fields, topography, and surface heat flow (Guo et al., 2016). The viscosity is then estimated by combining the dislocation creep, diffusion creep, and plasticity, which is depended on temperature, pressure, and chemical composition. Then we calculate the seismic anisotropy from the shear deformation of mantle flow by DREX, and predict the fast direction and delay time of SKS splitting. We find that when complex boundary conditions are applied, including the far field effects of the deep subduction of Pacific plate and eastward escaping of Tibetan Plateau, our model can successfully predict the observed shear wave splitting patterns. Our model indicates that seismic anisotropy revealed by SKS is primarily resulting from the LPO of olivine due to the shear deformation from asthenospheric flow. We suggest that two branches of mantle flow may contribute to the

  12. The cultural route of present and lost landscapes in the centre of Bucharest - digital model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria

    2015-04-01

    We are developing a digital model of the Magheru boulevard in central Bucharest. This N-S axis in the centre of the city is a unique encounter with interwar architecture. It is a protected area in the city, with buildings listed individually or as group of monuments, and also with protection at urban planning level. But at the same time the landscape does not facilitate the building of urban routes between monuments. A GIS model of the area exists, but does not yet take into account this heritage value of the buildings, being developed in a civil engineering environment. It is also one of the few partial 3D models of Bucharest. It allows datascapes of various buidling characteristics. At the same time a 3D model which equally covers all items in an area is ressources expensive. Hence, we propose, similarly to strategic planning to do a Kevin Lynch type selection. Landmarks will be identified as nodes of the routes, and the remaining area treated as zone. Ways connect the nodes and we paid special attention as we will see to their landscape. We developed a concept on how to further build from the idea of layers in GIS to include the issue of scale. As such, floor plans can build strategic points for the nodes of the route such as in Nolli or Sitte plans. Cooperation between GIS and GoogleEarth is envisaged, since GoogleEarth allows for detailing in SketchUp for the interior space. This way we developed an alternative digital model to the levels of detail of CityGML, the classical for 3D city models. The route itself is to be analysed with the method of Space Syntax. While this part of the research focused on the built heritage, on culture, we included also issues of landscape. First, the landscape of the boulevard has to be shaped as to build the route between these nodes of the route. Our concept includes the creation of pocket parks and of links between the pocket parks through vegetal and mineral elements to connect them. Existing urban spaces and empty plots are

  13. Tackling causes and costs of ED presentation for American football injuries: a population-level study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Blair J; Haring, R Sterling; Asemota, Anthony O; Scott, John W; Canner, Joseph K; Nejim, Besma J; George, Benjamin P; Alsulaim, Hatim; Kirsch, Thomas D; Schneider, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    American tackle football is the most popular high-energy impact sport in the United States, with approximately 9 million participants competing annually. Previous epidemiologic studies of football-related injuries have generally focused on specific geographic areas or pediatric age groups. Our study sought to examine patient characteristics and outcomes, including hospital charges, among athletes presenting for emergency department (ED) treatment of football-related injury across all age groups in a large nationally representative data set. Patients presenting for ED treatment of injuries sustained playing American tackle football (identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code E007.0) from 2010 to 2011 were studied in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. Patient-specific injuries were identified using the primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code and categorized by type and anatomical region. Standard descriptive methods examined patient demographics, diagnosis categories, and ED and inpatient outcomes and charges. During the study period 397363 football players presented for ED treatment, 95.8% of whom were male. Sprains/strains (25.6%), limb fractures (20.7%), and head injuries (including traumatic brain injury; 17.5%) represented the most presenting injuries. Overall, 97.9% of patients underwent routine ED discharge with 1.1% admitted directly and fewer than 11 patients in the 2-year study period dying prior to discharge. The proportion of admitted patients who required surgical interventions was 15.7%, of which 89.9% were orthopedic, 4.7% neurologic, and 2.6% abdominal. Among individuals admitted to inpatient care, mean hospital length of stay was 2.4days (95% confidence interval, 2.2-2.6) and 95.6% underwent routine discharge home. The mean total charge for all patients was $1941 (95% confidence interval, $1890-$1992) with substantial

  14. Summarized presentation of the numerical model used for the pressurizer of a light water nuclear reactor. Description and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siarry, P.

    1981-12-01

    The pressurizer model is first described together with its coupling to the nuclear unit. The different stages involved in the validation are then presented: validation of overall qualitative behavior; validation of the open loop pressurizer model; validation of the various units for controlling pressures and levels; simulation of two large transients (Bugey plant) [fr

  15. An ergonomics study of computerized emergency operating procedures: Presentation style, task complexity, and training level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Song; Song Fei; Li Zhizhong; Zhao Qianyi; Luo Wei; He Xuhong; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2008-01-01

    Emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are widely used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the development of information technology, computerized EOPs are taking the place of paper-based ones. Unlike paper-based EOPs, the industrial practice of computerized EOPs is still quite limited. Ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately. This study focuses on the effects of EOP presentation style, task complexity, and training level on the performance of the operators in the execution of computerized EOPs. One simulated computerized EOP system was developed to present two EOPs, each with different task complexity levels, by two presentation styles (Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination). Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. Statistical analysis of the experimental results indicates that: (1) complexity, presentation style, and training level all can significantly influence the error rate. High-complexity tasks and lack of sufficient training may lead to a higher error rate. Style B caused a significantly higher error rate than style A did in the skilled phase. So the designers of computerized procedures should take the presentation styles of EOPs into account. (2) Task complexity and training level can significantly influence operation time. No significant difference was found in operation time between the two presentation styles. (3) Training level can also significantly influence the subjective workload of EOPs operations. This implies that adequate training is very important for the performance of computerized EOPs even if emergency responses with computerized EOPs are much more simple and easy than that with paper-based EOPs

  16. Occupancy models to study wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Larissa; Adams, Michael John

    2005-01-01

    Many wildlife studies seek to understand changes or differences in the proportion of sites occupied by a species of interest. These studies are hampered by imperfect detection of these species, which can result in some sites appearing to be unoccupied that are actually occupied. Occupancy models solve this problem and produce unbiased estimates of occupancy and related parameters. Required data (detection/non-detection information) are relatively simple and inexpensive to collect. Software is available free of charge to aid investigators in occupancy estimation.

  17. Optical metabolic imaging measures early drug response in an allograft murine breast cancer model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2017-02-01

    Previous work has shown that cellular-level Optical Metabolic Imaging (OMI) of organoids derived from human breast cancer cell-line xenografts accurately and rapidly predicts in vivo response to therapy. To validate OMI as a predictive measure of treatment response in an immune-competent model, we used the polyomavirus middle-T (PyVmT) transgenic mouse breast cancer model. The PyVmT model includes intra-tumoral heterogeneity and a complex tumor microenvironment that can influence treatment responses. Three-dimensional organoids generated from primary PyVmT tumor tissue were treated with a chemotherapy (paclitaxel) and a PI3K inhibitor (XL147), each alone or in combination. Cellular subpopulations of response were measured using the OMI Index, a composite endpoint of metabolic response comprised of the optical redox ratio (ratio of the fluorescence intensities of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H to FAD) as well as the fluorescence lifetimes of NAD(P)H and FAD. Combination treatment significantly decreased the OMI Index of PyVmT tumor organoids (p<0.0001) and in vivo tumors (p<0.0001) versus controls. Subpopulation analyses revealed a homogeneous response to combined therapy in both cultured organoids and in vivo tumors, while single agent treatment with XL147 alone or paclitaxel alone elicited heterogeneous responses in organoids. Tumor volume decreased with combination treatment through treatment day 30. These results indicate that OMI of organoids generated from PyVmT tumors can accurately reflect drug response in heterogeneous allografts with both innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, this method is promising for use in humans to predict long-term treatment responses accurately and rapidly, and could aid in clinical treatment planning.

  18. Development of guidelines for giving community presentations about eating disorders: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doley, Joanna Rachel; Hart, Laura Merilyn; Stukas, Arthur Anthony; Morgan, Amy Joanna; Rowlands, Danielle Lisa; Paxton, Susan Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Concerns exist around how to talk about eating disorders (EDs) due to evidence that suggests discussing ED symptoms and behaviours may cause or worsen symptoms in vulnerable people. Using expert consensus, we developed a set of guidelines for giving safe community presentations about EDs. Participants with professional ED expertise, and people with lived experience of an ED, were recruited for a Delphi study. N  = 26 panel members rated 367 statements for both a) inclusion in guidelines, and b) their potential to be helpful (increase knowledge, reduce stigma) or harmful (increase stigma, cause/worsen ED symptoms). After each round of the study, statements were classified as endorsed, re-rate, or not endorsed. 208 statements were endorsed by the panel over three rounds. 13 statements were strongly endorsed in the first round, with both people with lived experience and professionals agreeing it is important for presentations to include information on etiology of EDs and to promote help-seeking. Several statements had a high level of disagreement between those with lived experience and professionals, including the idea that presentations should suggest dieting is likely to result in weight gain. The experts were able to develop consensus on a wide range of issues. Panel members, particularly people with lived experience, were sensitive to aspects of presentations that may be harmful to an audience. The guidelines fill an important gap in the literature and provide guidance to those educating the public about EDs; they should, however, be further evaluated to test their efficacy.

  19. Building trusted national identity management systems: Presenting the privacy concern-trust (PCT) model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, Joseph K.; Olesen, Henning

    systems. We adopted a qualitative research approach in our analysis of data that was gathered through a series of interviews and a stakeholder workshop in Ghana. Our findings indicate that, beyond the threshold level of trust, societal information privacy concern is low; hence, trust is high, thereby......This paper discusses the effect of trust and information privacy concerns on citizens’ attitude towards national identity management systems. We introduce the privacyconcerns- trust model, which shows the role of trust in mediating and moderating citizens’ attitude towards identity management...... encouraging further institutional collaboration and acceptance of citizens’ informational self-determination....

  20. Modelling Groundwater Depletion at Regional and Global Scales: Present State and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshihide

    2015-01-01

    Except for frozen water in ice and glaciers, groundwater is the world's largest distributed store of freshwater and has strategic importance to global food and water security. In this paper, the most recent advances quantifying groundwater depletion (GWD) are comprehensively reviewed. This paper critically evaluates the recently advanced modeling approaches estimating GWD at regional and global scales, and the evidence of feedbacks to the Earth system including sea-level rise associated with GWD. Finally, critical challenges and opportunities in the use of groundwater are identified for the adaption to growing food demand and uncertain climate.

  1. The ''Adatom Model'' of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering): The present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, A.; Billmann, J.; Eickmans, J.; Ertuerk, U.; Pettenkofer, C.

    1984-01-01

    The model predicts resonant Raman scattering by adsorbate vibrations through photon excited charge transfer transition from localized electronic states at sites of atomic scale roughness (e.g. 'adatoms') on silver surfaces to the affinity levels of the adsorbates. Experimental tests are discussed: search for the localized states, shifts of the affinity levels, comparison of SERS at sites of ASR and at atomically smooth parts of the surface, changes in SER vibrational bands by shifts of the affinity levels, 'SERS' vibrational selection rules. Infrared enhancement at sites of ASR is conjectured. Different hypotheses on the role of the 'porosity' of coldly deposited silver films are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Medial Longitudinal Arch Angle Presents Significant Differences Between Foot Types: A Biplane Fluoroscopy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsdon, Megan E R; Bushey, Kristen M; Dombroski, Colin E; LeBel, Marie-Eve; Jenkyn, Thomas R

    2016-10-01

    The structure of the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) affects the foot's overall function and its ability to dissipate plantar pressure forces. Previous research on the MLA includes measuring the calcaneal-first metatarsal angle using a static sagittal plane radiograph, a dynamic height-to-length ratio using marker clusters with a multisegment foot model, and a contained angle using single point markers with a multisegment foot model. The objective of this study was to use biplane fluoroscopy to measure a contained MLA angle between foot types: pes planus (low arch), pes cavus (high arch), and normal arch. Fifteen participants completed the study, five from each foot type. Markerless fluoroscopic radiostereometric analysis (fRSA) was used with a three-dimensional model of the foot bones and manually matching those bones to a pair of two-dimensional radiographic images during midstance of gait. Statistically significant differences were found between barefoot arch angles of the normal and pes cavus foot types (p = 0.036), as well as between the pes cavus and pes planus foot types (p = 0.004). Dynamic walking also resulted in a statistically significant finding compared to the static standing trials (p = 0.014). These results support the classification of individuals following a physical assessment by a foot specialist for those with pes cavus and planus foot types. The differences between static and dynamic kinematic measurements were also supported using this novel method.

  3. A study of social information control affordances and gender difference in Facebook self-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Feng-Yang; Tseng, Chih-Yi; Tseng, Fan-Chuan; Lin, Cathy S

    2013-09-01

    Affordances refer to how interface features of an IT artifact, perceived by its users in terms of their potentials for action, may predict the intensity of usage. This study investigates three social information affordances for expressive information control, privacy information control, and image information control in Facebook. The results show that the three affordances can significantly explain how Facebook's interface designs facilitate users' self-presentation activities. In addition, the findings reveal that males are more engaged in expressing information than females, while females are more involved in privacy control than males. A practical application of our study is to compare and contrast the level of affordances offered by various social network sites (SNS) like Facebook and Twitter, as well as differences in online self-presentations across cultures. Our approach can therefore be useful to investigate how SNS design features can be tailored to specific gender and culture needs.

  4. Reducing audio stimulus presentation latencies across studies, laboratories, and hardware and operating system configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babjack, Destiny L; Cernicky, Brandon; Sobotka, Andrew J; Basler, Lee; Struthers, Devon; Kisic, Richard; Barone, Kimberly; Zuccolotto, Anthony P

    2015-09-01

    Using differing computer platforms and audio output devices to deliver audio stimuli often introduces (1) substantial variability across labs and (2) variable time between the intended and actual sound delivery (the sound onset latency). Fast, accurate audio onset latencies are particularly important when audio stimuli need to be delivered precisely as part of studies that depend on accurate timing (e.g., electroencephalographic, event-related potential, or multimodal studies), or in multisite studies in which standardization and strict control over the computer platforms used is not feasible. This research describes the variability introduced by using differing configurations and introduces a novel approach to minimizing audio sound latency and variability. A stimulus presentation and latency assessment approach is presented using E-Prime and Chronos (a new multifunction, USB-based data presentation and collection device). The present approach reliably delivers audio stimuli with low latencies that vary by ≤1 ms, independent of hardware and Windows operating system (OS)/driver combinations. The Chronos audio subsystem adopts a buffering, aborting, querying, and remixing approach to the delivery of audio, to achieve a consistent 1-ms sound onset latency for single-sound delivery, and precise delivery of multiple sounds that achieves standard deviations of 1/10th of a millisecond without the use of advanced scripting. Chronos's sound onset latencies are small, reliable, and consistent across systems. Testing of standard audio delivery devices and configurations highlights the need for careful attention to consistency between labs, experiments, and multiple study sites in their hardware choices, OS selections, and adoption of audio delivery systems designed to sidestep the audio latency variability issue.

  5. Feasibility study of computerized presentation of procedures of a nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagawa, Kenichi; Niwa, Yuji; Urakami, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Introduction of a digital instrumentation control system is in progress in recent nuclear power plants, and an application of Computer Based Procedures (CBP) is being considered. The Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Incorporated has developed a system for a Computerized Presentation of Procedures (CPP) which corresponds to CBP. By fiscal year 2002, all items in the emergency operation procedures of a model plant were made displayable on the CPP. In 2003, the CPP instead of the paper based procedures was used for trial by the operators of a nuclear power plant in an actual training simulator, and feasibility of its practical application was evaluated. Based on the result, we considered subjects which should be taken into account in the future. As a result, improvements of CPP and its navigation system, etc. to enable operations with multi-procedures in parallel were extracted as primary subjects for introduction of CBP in the future as well as practical application of CPP. (author)

  6. Pesticides in groundwater: modelling and data analysis of the past, present and future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binning, Philip John; McKnight, Ursula S.; Malaguerra, Flavio

    Pesticides are the most frequently detected groundwater contaminants in Denmark. However, there is still a great deal of debate about the fate of pesticides and their future occurrence in our environment. We do not really understand the link between past usage and current observations, and are no......Pesticides are the most frequently detected groundwater contaminants in Denmark. However, there is still a great deal of debate about the fate of pesticides and their future occurrence in our environment. We do not really understand the link between past usage and current observations...... to jointly manage our groundwater and surface water resources. Here, observed pesticide data is analyzed and combined with models to address these questions and needs. Groundwater and surface water pesticide observations reflect the fact that these two hydrological components have a strong interaction...

  7. ED Triage Decision-Making With Mental Health Presentations: A "Think Aloud" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E; Boyce-Gaudreau, Krystal; Sanderson, Ana; Baker, John A

    2015-11-01

    Triage is the process whereby persons presenting to the emergency department are quickly assessed by a nurse and their need for care and service is prioritized. Research examining the care of persons presenting to emergency departments with psychiatric and mental health problems has shown that triage has often been cited as the most problematic aspect of the encounter. Three questions guided this investigation: Where do the decisions that triage nurses make fall on the intuitive versus analytic dimensions of decision making for mental health presentations in the emergency department, and does this differ according to comfort or familiarity with the type of mental health/illness presentation? How do "decision aids" (i.e., structured triage scales) help in the decision-making process? To what extent do other factors, such as attitudes, influence triage nurses' decision making? Eleven triage nurses participating in this study were asked to talk out loud about the reasoning process they would engage in while triaging patients in 5 scenarios based on mental health presentations to the emergency department. Themes emerging from the data were tweaking the results (including the use of intuition and early judgments) to arrive at the desired triage score; consideration of the current ED environment; managing uncertainty and risk (including the consideration of physical reasons for presentation); and confidence in communicating with patients in distress and managing their own emotive reactions to the scenario. Findings support the preference for using the intuitive mode of decision making with only tacit reliance on the decision aid. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rodent models for studying empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Sehoon; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2016-11-01

    Empathy is the important capacity to recognize and share emotions with others. Recent evidence shows that rodents possess a remarkable affective sensitivity to the emotional state of others and that primitive forms of empathy exist in social lives of rodents. However, due to the ambiguous definitional boundaries between empathy, emotional contagion and other related terms, distinct components of empathic behaviors in rodents need to be clarified. Hence, we review recent experimental studies demonstrating that rodents are able to share emotions with others. Specifically, we highlight several behavioral models that examine different aspects of rodent empathic behaviors in response to the various distress of conspecifics. Experimental approaches using rodent behavioral models will help elucidate the neural circuitry of empathy and its neurochemical association. Integrating these findings with corresponding experiments in humans will ultimately provide novel insights into therapeutic interventions for mental disorders associated with empathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Presentation and management of keloid scarring following median sternotomy: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javangula Kalyana C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Keloid scars following median sternotomy are rare and occur more frequently in pigmented skin. Different management strategies have been described with variable success. We present a case of keloid scar formation following cardiac surgery including our management and the final aesthetic result. Case description A 64 year old female of fair complexion underwent mitral valve replacement. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uncomplicated, however, during the following year, thick keloid scars formed over the incision sites. Initial non surgical measures failed to relieve pain and did not offer any tangible aesthetic benefit. Eventually surgical excision was attempted. She presented to our clinic for nine months follow up with significant improvement in pain and aesthetic result. Discussion and Evaluation Several theories have attempted to explore the pathophysiology of keloid scar formation. A number of predisposing factors have been documented however none existed in this case. A variety of invasive and non invasive approaches have been described but significant differences in success rates and methodology of investigations still precludes a standardized management protocol. Conclusions In this case study a rare presentation of keloid scar has been presented. The variety of methods used to improve pain and aesthetic result demonstrates the propensity of keloid scars to recur and the therapeutic challenges that surgeons have to face in their quest for a satisfactory patient outcome.

  10. A mathematical model of past, present and future shore level displacement in Fennoscandia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasse, T. [Sveriges Geologiska Undersoekning, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    Shore level displacement in Fennoscandia is mainly due to two interactive vertical movements, glacio-isostatic uplift and eustatic sea level rise. A recent investigation of the lake-tilting phenomenon has made it possible to discern the course of glacio-isostatic. As a consequence an iteration process to estimate glacio-isostatic uplift and eustatic rise using empirical data of the shore level displacement has been started. The model indicates that there are two mechanisms involved in glacio-isostatic uplift, one slow and the other fast. The main uplift, still in progress, acts slowly. Arctan functions have proved to be suitable tools for describing slow glacio-isostatic uplift. The time of maximal uplift rate is isochronous, meaning that slow uplift occurred simultaneously in all Fennoscandia in an interactive movement. For slow uplift there is a relationship between the rate of decline and the crustal thickness. In areas with greater crustal thickness the rate of decline of the glacio-isostatic recovery is lower than in areas with thinner crust. The fast mechanism gave rise to a crustal subsidence which started about 12 500 BP. After about 10 300 BP, in the early Holocene, the subsidence was restored by a fast uplift. Normal distribution functions have been used for calculating the fast mechanism. The mantle material exhibits plastic behaviour. When the mantle encounters short-lived stresses the material behaves like an elastic solid but in response to long-term stresses it will flow. The slow mechanism can be linked to viscous flow and as a response to long-term stresses. The fast mechanism is probably the response to a short-lived stress. This stress could have been caused by renewed ice loading, due to a self-triggered redistribution of the ice load during deglaciation. Future development regarding glacio-isostatic uplift, eustasy and shore level displacement is predicted in Fennoscandia using the results from the modelling. Predictions are based on the

  11. Co-morbidities in children presenting with chronic suppurative otitis media--a South African study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallbauer, Ute M; Atkins, Mark D; Tiedt, Nicholas J; Butler, Iain R T; Pieters, Madeleine; Elliott, Eugene; Joubert, Gina; Seedat, Riaz Y

    2014-06-01

    Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is common among children in southern Africa. Managing associated co-morbidities may result in earlier disease resolution. Children 4 weeks were recruited to the study. Each child underwent a full clinical examination, a blood count, an HIV test and CD4 cell count, if found to be infected. The study included 86 children, and the median age was 4.6 years. HIV infection was present in 45 of 83 children (54.2%), of which 23 (51.1%) were receiving antiretroviral treatment at the time of presentation. Underweight was present in 22 of 85 (25.9%) children and in 17 of the 45 (37.8%) HIV-infected children. One or more clinical signs (not aural-related) were found in 46 of 86 (53.4%) children. Cholesteatoma was found in 23 of 113 (20.4%) ears, and 9 of 86 (10.5%) children had serious associated aural or intracranial complications. A high percentage of children with CSOM have associated pathology that needs to be diagnosed to optimally manage CSOM. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Modelling and simulation of heat pipes with TAIThermIR (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Max E.

    2016-10-01

    Regarding thermal camouflage usually one has to reduce the surface temperature of an object. All vehicles and installations having a combustion engine usually produce a lot of heat with results on hot spots on the surface which are highly conspicuous. Using heat pipes to transfer this heat to another place on the surface more efficiently might be a way to reduce those hotspots and the overall conspicuity. In a first approach, a model for the Software TAIThermIR was developed to test which parameters of the heat pipes are relevant and what effects can be achieved. It will be shown, that the thermal resistivity of contact zones are quite relevant and the thermal coupling of the engine (source of heat) defines if the alteration of the thermal signature is large or not. Furthermore the impact of the use of heat pipes in relation to surface material is discussed. The influence of different weather scenarios on the change of signatures due to the use of heat pipes is of minor relevance and depends on the choice of the surface material. Finally application issues for real systems are discussed.

  13. Assessment of present and future risk to Italian forests and human health: modelling and mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Alessandra

    2009-05-01

    A review of ozone pollution in Italy shows levels largely above the thresholds established by EU regulation for vegetation and human health protection. The Italian air quality monitoring network appears quantitatively inadequate to cover all the territorial surface, because of scarcity and unequal distribution of monitoring sites. By applying the integrated assessment model RAINS-Italy to the year 2000, the whole of Italy exceeds the AOT40 critical level for forest, while Northern and central areas show strong potential of O(3) impact on human health with approximately 11% of territory >10 O(3)-induced premature deaths. Two scenarios for the year 2020, the Current Legislation and the Maximum Technical Feasible Reduction, show a reduction of AOT40Forest by 29% and 44%, SOMO35 by 31% and 47%, and O(3)-induced premature deaths by 32% and 48%, compared to 2000. RAINS-Italy can be used to improve the map quality and cover areas not reached by the national monitoring network.

  14. In vivo perfusion assessment of an anastomosis surgery on porcine intestinal model (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Opferman, Justin; Decker, Ryan; Cheon, Gyeong W.; Kim, Peter C. W.; Kang, Jin U.; Krieger, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Anastomosis, the connection of two structures, is a critical procedure for reconstructive surgery with over 1 million cases/year for visceral indication alone. However, complication rates such as strictures and leakage affect up to 19% of cases for colorectal anastomoses and up to 30% for visceral transplantation anastomoses. Local ischemia plays a critical role in anastomotic complications, making blood perfusion an important indicator for tissue health and predictor for healing following anastomosis. In this work, we apply a real time multispectral imaging technique to monitor impact on tissue perfusion due to varying interrupted suture spacing and suture tensions. Multispectral tissue images at 470, 540, 560, 580, 670 and 760 nm are analyzed in conjunction with an empirical model based on diffuse reflectance process to quantify the hemoglobin oxygen saturation within the suture site. The investigated tissues for anastomoses include porcine small (jejunum and ileum) and large (transverse colon) intestines. Two experiments using interrupted suturing with suture spacing of 1, 2, and 3 mm and tension levels from 0 N to 2.5 N are conducted. Tissue perfusion at 5, 10, 20 and 30 min after suturing are recorded and compared with the initial normal state. The result indicates the contrast between healthy and ischemic tissue areas and assists the determination of suturing spacing and tension. Therefore, the assessment of tissue perfusion will permit the development and intra-surgical monitoring of an optimal suture protocol during anastomosis with less complications and improved functional outcome.

  15. Vaginal hemodynamic changes during sexual arousal in a rat model by diffuse optical spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeryun; Seong, Myeongsu; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Park, Kwangsung; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2017-02-01

    Not only men suffer from sexual dysfunction, but the number of women who have sexual dysfunction rises. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an objective diagnostic technique to examine the sexual dysfunction of female patients, who are afflicted with the disorders. For this purpose, we developed a diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) probe to measure the change of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentration along with blood flow from vaginal wall of female rats. A cylindrical stainless steel DOS probe with a diameter of 3 mm was designed for the vaginal wall of rats which consisted of two lasers (785 and 850nm) and two spectrometers with a separation of 2 mm. A thermistor was placed on the top of the probe to measure the temperature change from vaginal wall during experiments. A modified Beer-Lambert's law is utilized to acquire the changes of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin, and blood flow information is obtained by diffuse speckle contrast analysis technique. For the experiments, Sprague Dawley ( 400 g) female rats were divided into two groups (control and vaginal dryness model). Vaginal oxygenation, blood flow and temperature were continuously monitored before and after sexual around induced by apomorphine. After the measurement, histologic examination was performed to support the results from DOS probe in the vaginal wall. The hemodynamic information acquired by the DOS probe can be utilized to establish an objective and accurate standard of the female sexual disorders.

  16. Development of Concepts and Models of Performance Evaluation from the 19th Century to the Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornungová Jana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to provide a framework of concepts and models from the area of performance measurement. Due to the fact that the business environment is con-stantly changing, changes also occur in the trends relating to performance. Traditional financial performance measures have been highly criticized and the need identified to integrate non-financial perspectives, such as level of innovation, degree of motivation, intellectual capital and other criteria. Intellectual capital is often a crucial factor in the creation of value in a company. This paper provides a literature review supplemented by the author’s research in the field of performance. The article shows that the performance appraisal system is currently focused on several areas that could affect the performance of the company, which is also part of the overall performance of the economy in the form of GDP growth. Based on the research, it can be said that, for the sample tracked, the selection of performance evaluation system does not depend on the legal form of the business.

  17. Defects in Antigen-Presenting Cells in the BB-DP Rat Model of Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sommandas (Vinod)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractType-1 diabetes is the result of a T cell mediated immune response against the insulin-producing β cells in the islet of Langerhans. In humans, until now, the disease is only clearly detectable at the onset of the disease. Therefore studies to identify initial factors involved in

  18. Present Scenario of Childhood Deafness: A Tertiary Level Health Care Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Shankar Majumdar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans today. Approximately 63 million people in India suffer from significant auditory impairment. Materials and Methods Fifty children of 0-7 years age group, presented to a tertiary level center in Kolkata were assessed by objective and behavioural audiological tests. Result Mean age of presentation was found to be 40.5 months. No risk factor could be identified in 72% of the cases. 47% fell into the profoundly deaf category. Discussion Numerous studies agree that half of the infants with sensorineural hearing loss have no risk factors at birth and thus would be missed by a targeted hearing screening.  Conclusion India certainly faces a worse situation regarding childhood deafness. Implementation of universal neonatal hearing screening along with pre-school hearing assessment can certainly change the scenario.

  19. Frequency and echocardiographic study of dilated cardiomyopathy in children presenting with cardiac failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Mohammad, J.; Hussain, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of echocardiography in diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy as a cause of cardiac failure in children. Design: This was descriptive study. Children presenting with cardiac failure from indoor patients were selected and echocardiography along with chest X- ray, ECG, cardiac enzymes and ASO titre was performed in all patients. Subject: Fifty hospitalized patients with congestive heart failure were selected consecutively from hospitalized patients. Main Outcome: Role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in children presenting with cardiac failure. Results: Out of fifty patients admitted with cardiac failure 27 (54%) cases were found to be dilated cardiomyopathy while congenital heart disease, myocarditis and rheumatic heart disease were found in 12 (24%), 8 (16%) and 3 (6%) cases respectively. Conclusion: Dilated cardiomyopathy is an important cause of cardiac failure in children and echocardiography is an important tool to diagnose and differentiate dilated cardiomyopathy from other causes of cardiac failure. (author)

  20. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X...... as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  1. Unique white matter microstructural patterns in ADHD presentations - a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatkova, Alena; Nestrasil, Igor; Rudser, Kyle; Fine, Jodene Goldenring; Bledsoe, Jesse; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder predominantly inattentive (ADHD-PI) and combined (ADHD-C) presentations are likely distinct disorders that differ neuroanatomically, neurochemically, and neuropsychologically. However, to date, little is known about specific white matter (WM) regions differentiating ADHD presentations. This study examined differences in WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from 20 ADHD-PI, 18 ADHD-C, and 27 typically developed children. Voxel-wise analysis of DTI measurements in major fiber bundles was carried out using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Clusters showing diffusivity abnormalities were used as regions of interest for regression analysis between fractional anisotropy (FA) and neuropsychological outcomes. Compared to neurotypicals, ADHD-PI children showed higher FA in the anterior thalamic radiations (ATR), bilateral inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) and in the left corticospinal tract (CST). In contrast, the ADHD-C group exhibited higher FA in the bilateral cingulum bundle (CB). In the ADHD-PI group, differences in FA in the left ILF and ATR were accompanied by axial diffusivity (AD) abnormalities. In addition, the ADHD-PI group exhibited atypical mean diffusivity in the forceps minor (FMi) and left ATR and AD differences in right CB compared to healthy subjects. Direct comparison between ADHD presentations demonstrated radial diffusivity differences in FMi. WM clusters with FA irregularities in ADHD were associated with neurobehavioral performance across groups. In conclusion, differences in white matter microstructure in ADHD presentations strengthen the theory that ADHD-PI and ADHD-C are two distinct disorders. Regions with white matter irregularity seen in both ADHD presentations might serve as predictors of executive and behavioral functioning across groups. PMID:27159198

  2. Stage at presentation of breast cancer in Luanda, Angola - a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Miguel, Fernando; Freitas, Helga; Tavares, António; Pangui, Salvador; Castro, Clara; Lacerda, Gonçalo Forjaz; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Santos, Lúcio Lara

    2015-10-15

    It is expected that, by 2020, 15 million new cases of cancer will occur every year in the world, one million of them in Africa. Knowledge of cancer trends in African countries is far from adequate, and improvements in cancer prevention efforts are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to characterize breast cancer clinically and pathologically at presentation in Luanda, Angola; we additionally provide quality information that will be useful for breast cancer care planning in the country. Data on breast cancer cases were retrieved from the Angolan Institute of Cancer Control, from 2006 to 2014. For women diagnosed in 2009 (5-years of follow-up), demographic, clinical and pathological information, at presentation, was collected, namely age at diagnosis, parity, methods used for pathological diagnoses, tumor pathological characteristics, stage of disease and treatment. Descriptive statistics were performed. The median age of women diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 was 47 years old (range 25-89). The most frequent clinical presentation was breast swelling with axillary lymph nodes metastasis (44.9 %), followed by a mass larger than 5 cm (14.2 %) and lump (12.9 %). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the main histologic type (81.8 %). Only 10.1 % of cancer cases had a well differentiated histological grade. Cancers were diagnosed mostly at advanced stages (66.7 % in stage III and 11.1 % in stage IV). In this study, breast cancer was diagnosed at a very advanced stage. Although it reports data from a single cancer center in Luanda, Angola it reinforces the need for early diagnosis and increasing awareness. According to the main challenges related to breast cancer diagnosis and treatment herein presented, we propose a realistic framework that would allow for the implementation of a breast cancer care program, built under a strong network based on cooperation, teaching, audit, good practices and the organization of health services. Angola needs urgently a program for

  3. NURE uranium deposit model studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program has sponsored uranium deposit model studies by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (Bendix), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and numerous subcontractors. This paper deals only with models from the following six reports prepared by Samuel S. Adams and Associates: GJBX-1(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Roll-Type Uranium Deposits in Continental Sandstones; GJBX-2(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Uraniferous Humate Deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico; GJBX-3(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Uranium Deposits of the Quartz-Pebble Conglomerate Type; GJBX-4(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Sandstone Uranium Deposits in Mixed Fluvial-Shallow Marine Sedimentary Sequences, South Texas; GJBX-5(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Veinlike Uranium Deposits of the Lower to Middle Proterozoic Unconformity and Strata-Related Types; GJBX-6(81) - Geology and Recognition Criteria for Sandstone Uranium Deposits of the Salt Wash Type, Colorado Plateau Province. A unique feature of these models is the development of recognition criteria in a systematic fashion, with a method for quantifying the various items. The recognition-criteria networks are used in this paper to illustrate the various types of deposits

  4. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Franco Cavaleri

    2018-01-01

    Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome’s curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin’s therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The phar...

  5. Studying time of flight imaging through scattering media across multiple size scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to optical imaging in a variety of different environments and across many size and time scales. Scattering complicates imaging on large scales when imaging through the atmosphere when imaging from airborne or space borne platforms, through marine fog, or through fog and dust in vehicle navigation, for example in self driving cars. On smaller scales, scattering is the major obstacle when imaging through human tissue in biomedical applications. Despite the large variety of participating materials and size scales, light transport in all these environments is usually described with very similar scattering models that are defined by the same small set of parameters, including scattering and absorption length and phase function. We attempt a study of scattering and methods of imaging through scattering across different scales and media, particularly with respect to the use of time of flight information. We can show that using time of flight, in addition to spatial information, provides distinct advantages in scattering environments. By performing a comparative study of scattering across scales and media, we are able to suggest scale models for scattering environments to aid lab research. We also can transfer knowledge and methodology between different fields.

  6. Prospective study of POLG mutations presenting in children with intractable epilepsy: prevalence and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusimaa, Johanna; Gowda, Vasantha; McShane, Anthony; Smith, Conrad; Evans, Julie; Shrier, Annie; Narasimhan, Manisha; O'Rourke, Anthony; Rajabally, Yusuf; Hedderly, Tammy; Cowan, Frances; Fratter, Carl; Poulton, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical features of childhood-onset intractable epilepsy caused by the most common mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Children presenting with nonsyndromic intractable epilepsy of unknown etiology but without documented liver dysfunction at presentation were eligible for this prospective, population-based study. Blood samples were analyzed for the three most common POLG mutations. If any of the three tested mutations were found, all the exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the POLG gene were sequenced. In addition, we retrospectively reviewed the notes of patients presenting with intractable epilepsy in which we had found POLG mutations. All available clinical data were collected by questionnaire and by reviewing the medical records. We analyzed 213 blood DNA samples from patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria of the prospective study. Among these, five patients (2.3%) were found with one of the three common POLG mutations as homozygous or compound heterozygous states. In addition, three patients were retrospectively identified. Seven of the eight patients had either raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate (n = 3) or brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes (n = 4) at presentation with intractable epilepsy. Three patients later developed liver dysfunction, progressing to fatal liver failure in two without previous treatment with sodium valproate (VPA). Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that one patient presented first with an autism spectrum disorder before seizures emerged. Mutations in POLG are an important cause of early and juvenile onset nonsyndromic intractable epilepsy with highly variable associated manifestations including autistic features. This study emphasizes that genetic testing for POLG mutations in patients with nonsyndromic intractable epilepsies is very important for clinical diagnostics, genetic counseling, and treatment decisions

  7. Prospective study of POLG mutations presenting in children with intractable epilepsy: Prevalence and clinical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusimaa, Johanna; Gowda, Vasantha; McShane, Anthony; Smith, Conrad; Evans, Julie; Shrier, Annie; Narasimhan, Manisha; O'Rourke, Anthony; Rajabally, Yusuf; Hedderly, Tammy; Cowan, Frances; Fratter, Carl; Poulton, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the frequency and clinical features of childhood-onset intractable epilepsy caused by the most common mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Methods Children presenting with nonsyndromic intractable epilepsy of unknown etiology but without documented liver dysfunction at presentation were eligible for this prospective, population-based study. Blood samples were analyzed for the three most common POLG mutations. If any of the three tested mutations were found, all the exons and the exon–intron boundaries of the POLG gene were sequenced. In addition, we retrospectively reviewed the notes of patients presenting with intractable epilepsy in which we had found POLG mutations. All available clinical data were collected by questionnaire and by reviewing the medical records. Key Findings We analyzed 213 blood DNA samples from patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria of the prospective study. Among these, five patients (2.3%) were found with one of the three common POLG mutations as homozygous or compound heterozygous states. In addition, three patients were retrospectively identified. Seven of the eight patients had either raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate (n = 3) or brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes (n = 4) at presentation with intractable epilepsy. Three patients later developed liver dysfunction, progressing to fatal liver failure in two without previous treatment with sodium valproate (VPA). Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that one patient presented first with an autism spectrum disorder before seizures emerged. Significance Mutations in POLG are an important cause of early and juvenile onset nonsyndromic intractable epilepsy with highly variable associated manifestations including autistic features. This study emphasizes that genetic testing for POLG mutations in patients with nonsyndromic intractable epilepsies is very important for clinical diagnostics

  8. Emergency department presentation and readmission after index psychiatric admission: a data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Reppermund, Simone; Trollor, Julian

    2018-02-28

    To use linked administrative datasets to assess factors associated with emergency department (ED) presentation and psychiatric readmission in three distinctive time intervals after the index psychiatric admission. A retrospective data-linkage study. Cohort study using four linked government minimum datasets including acute hospital care from July 2005 to June 2012 in New South Wales, Australia. People who were alive and aged ≥18 years on 1 July 2005 and who had their index admission to a psychiatric ward from 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2010. ORs of factors associated with psychiatric admission and ED presentation were calculated for three intervals: 0-1 month, 2-5 months and 6-24 months after index separation. Index admission was identified in 35 056 individuals (51% -males) with a median age of 42 years. A total of 12 826 (37%) individuals had at least one ED presentation in the 24 months after index admission. Of those, 3608 (28%) presented within 0-1 month, 6350 (50%) within 2-5 months and 10 294 (80%) within 6-24 months after index admission. A total of 14 153 (40%) individuals had at least one psychiatric readmission in the first 24 months. Of those, 6808 (48%) were admitted within 0-1 month, 6433 (45%) within 2-5 months and 7649 (54%) within 6-24 months after index admission. Principal diagnoses and length of stay at index admission, sociodemographic factors, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, drug and alcohol comorbidity, intellectual disability and other inpatient service use were significantly associated with ED presentations and psychiatric readmissions, and these relationships varied somewhat over the intervals studied. Social determinants of service use, drug and alcohol intervention, addressing needs of individuals with intellectual disability and recovery-oriented whole-person approaches at index admission are key areas for investment to improve trajectories after index admission. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  9. The time course of emotional picture processing: an event-related potential study using a rapid serial visual presentation paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chuanlin; He, Weiqi; Qi, Zhengyang; Wang, Lili; Song, Dongqing; Zhan, Lei; Yi, Shengnan; Luo, Yuejia; Luo, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    The present study recorded event-related potentials using rapid serial visual presentation paradigm to explore the time course of emotionally charged pictures. Participants completed a dual-target task as quickly and accurately as possible, in which they were asked to judge the gender of the person depicted (task 1) and the valence (positive, neutral, or negative) of the given picture (task 2). The results showed that the amplitudes of the P2 component were larger for emotional pictures than they were for neutral pictures, and this finding represents brain processes that distinguish emotional stimuli from non-emotional stimuli. Furthermore, positive, neutral, and negative pictures elicited late positive potentials with different amplitudes, implying that the differences between emotions are recognized. Additionally, the time course for emotional picture processing was consistent with the latter two stages of a three-stage model derived from studies on emotional facial expression processing and emotional adjective processing. The results of the present study indicate that in the three-stage model of emotion processing, the middle and late stages are more universal and stable, and thus occur at similar time points when using different stimuli (faces, words, or scenes).

  10. Residential traffic exposure and children's emergency department presentation for asthma: a spatial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Gavin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that residential proximity to roadways is associated with an elevated risk of asthma exacerbation. However, there is no consensus on the distance at which these health effects diminishes to background levels. Therefore the optimal, clinically relevant measure of exposure remains uncertain. Using four spatially defined exposure metrics, we evaluated the association between residential proximity to roadways and emergency department (ED presentation for asthma in Perth, Western Australia. Method The study population consisted of 1809 children aged between 0 and 19 years who had presented at an ED between 2002 and 2006 and were resident in a south-west metropolitan area of Perth traversed by major motorways. We used a 1:2 matched case-control study with gastroenteritis and upper limb injury as the control conditions. To estimate exposure to traffic emissions, we used 4 contrasting methods and 2 independently derived sources of traffic data (video-monitored traffic counts and those obtained from the state government road authority. The following estimates of traffic exposure were compared: (1 a point pattern method, (2 a distance-weighted traffic exposure method, (3 a simple distance method and (4 a road length method. Results Risk estimates were sensitive to socio-economic gradients and the type of exposure method that was applied. Unexpectedly, a range of apparent protective effects were observed for some exposure metrics. The kernel density measure demonstrated more than a 2-fold (OR 2.51, 95% CI 2.00 - 3.15 increased risk of asthma ED presentation for the high exposure group compared to the low exposure group. Conclusion We assessed exposure using traffic data from 2 independent sources and compared the results of 4 different exposure metric types. The results indicate that traffic congestion may be one of the most important aspects of traffic-related exposures, despite being overlooked in many

  11. Construction of a radiometer for pyroelectric detector and presentation of a model for detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    An expression has been developed for the pyroelectric voltage as a function of electric and thermal parameters of the detector. It has also been developed expressions for determination of unknown parameters from the experimentally obtained pyroelectric voltage curve as function of time and some other known information. It has also been shown figures of merit for characterization of the detectors, a study showing the detector performance dependence on each electric and thermal parameter and some illustrative experimental results. The radiometer designed and built for this work, is described. (author) [pt

  12. Coffin-Siris syndrome: review and presentation of new cases from a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, B J; Pandya, A; Vanner, L; Kerkering, K; Bodurtha, J

    2001-02-15

    To clarify the phenotypic variability of Coffin-Siris syndrome, we present a review of the literature and 18 new cases. We performed a questionnaire study of patients ascertained through an international support group. Information on their sibs was available for comparison. The most frequent findings include some degree of mental retardation or developmental delay, "coarse" facial appearance, feeding difficulties, frequent infections, and hypoplastic to absent fifth fingernails and fifth distal phalanges. We discuss the key manifestations for diagnosis, medical and developmental implications, and possible pathogenesis. Copyright Wiley-Liss. Inc.

  13. Presentation of main results of Phase I of the SMPR project initiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, F.

    1986-01-01

    As a result of a first Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in August 1983 the IAEA launched a new SMPR Project Initiation Study with the objective of surveying the available designs, examining the major factors influencing the decision-making processes in developing countries and thereby also arriving at an estimate of the potential market. The Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD offered its assistance in making a study of the potential market in industrialized countries. Two questionnaires were used to obtain information from potential suppliers and buyers. Suppliers responded with an overwhelming 23 design concepts which could be offered for export but with varying levels of readiness and provenness. From potential buyers 17 responses were received, 16 of which were from the developing countries. The analysis of the responses which was done by the Agency with the help of experts from Member States gave the basis for a draft report including the OECD/NEA part. This draft was discussed during a second Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in March 1985. The meeting was characterized by a strong supplier interest but also by hesitation of potential buyers to make any kind of commitments relating to the market introduction of SMPRs. All new information has been incorporated into the report together with a number of expressed comments, especially related to the presentation of the economics of SMPRs, the necessity of a reference plant, provenness of major components and systems etc. The results of the study are presented here with direct reference to the SMPR supply situation and the potential market for SMPRs in terms of the decision-making factors: the financial factors, the economical factors, and the technological factors were identified as the most important ones. The economic competitiveness is not the only decision-making factor and consequently it was decided to end the general study called Phase I by the publication of a report. Specific case studies

  14. Descriptive analysis of context evaluation instrument for technical oral presentation skills evaluation: A case study in English technical communication course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abdullah-Adnan; Asmawi, Adelina; Hamid, Mohd Rashid Ab; Mustafa, Zainol bin

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports a pilot study of Context Evaluation using a self-developed questionnaire distributed among engineering undergraduates at a university under study. The study aims to validate the self-developed questionnaires used in the Context evaluation, a component in the CIPP Model. The Context evaluation assesses background information for needs, assets, problems and opportunities relevant to beneficiaries of the study in a defined environment. Through the questionnaire, background information for the assessment of needs, assets and problems related to the engineering undergraduates' perceptions on the teaching and learning of technical oral presentation skills was collected and analysed. The questionnaire was developed using 5-points Likert scale to measure the constructs under study. They were distributed to 100 respondents with 79 returned. The respondents consisted of engineering undergraduates studied at various faculties at one technical university in Malaysia. The descriptive analysis of data for each item which makes up the construct for Context evaluation is found to be high. This implied that engineering undergraduates showed high interest in teaching and learning of technical oral presentation skills, thus their needs are met. Also, they agreed that assets and facilities are conducive to their learning. In conclusion, the context evaluation involving needs and assets factors are both considerably important; their needs are met and the assets and facilities do support their technical oral presentation skills learning experience.

  15. Induction of labor in breech presentation at term: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jorge; Arana, Itziar; Garitano, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Leire; Cobos, Patricia; Osuna, Carmen; Del Mar Centeno, María; Fernández-Llebrez, Luis

    2017-04-01

    To compare the outcome of two methods of labor induction and spontaneous onset of labor in breech presentation at term. A retrospective study between 2003 and 2012. We compare obstetric (indication of induction, Bishop score, cesarean rate) and perinatal outcomes (Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, base excess ≤-12 mmol/L, admission to neonatal unit) between prostaglandins and oxytocin. We also compare labor induction versus spontaneous onset of labor. Of the 1684 breech deliveries, we carried out labor induction in 221 cases (76% with prostaglandins, 24% with oxytocin). The prostaglandins group had significantly lower Bishop scores and the time for induction phase was significantly higher. There were no differences in cesarean rate between both methods of induction or spontaneous onset of labor. The prostaglandins group had higher rates of base excess ≤-12 mmol/L. Compared with spontaneous onset of labor in breech presentation, induction had significant lower rates of newborn weight and higher rates of admission to the neonatal unit. Induction of labor in breech presentation at term is a reasonable and effective option after a careful selection of cases. It was not associated with an increase of perinatal morbidity or cesarean rate compared with spontaneous onset of labor.

  16. Ear discharge in children presenting with acute otitis media: observational study from UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lindsay; Ewings, Paul; Smith, Caroline; Thompson, Matthew; Harnden, Anthony; Mant, David

    2010-02-01

    National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidance to treat otitis media in older children immediately with antibiotics only if they have ear discharge is based on limited evidence. To determine the clinical significance and outcome of ear discharge in children with acute otitis media, in routine clinical practice. Observational cohort study of children with acute otitis media comparing those with and without ear discharge at presentation. Primary care in East Somerset. Two hundred and fifty-six children aged 6 months to 10 years were recruited from primary care. Clinical features and other characteristics were recorded at presentation. Follow-up was undertaken at 2 weeks and 3 months. Children with otitis media who present with ear discharge are much more likely to be treated with antibiotics irrespective of age (adjusted odds ratio 15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3 to 66). Most with discharge have proven bacterial infection (58%, 95% CI = 42 to 72%). They have a more severe systemic illness, with higher axillary temperature (80% increase in odds of ear discharge for each additional degree centigrade, P = 0.02), pulse rate (9% increase in odds for each extra beat, Pmedia 3.3; hearing difficulty at 3 months 4.7; all Pmedia who are sicker and may be at higher risk of adverse outcome. NICE guidance to treat them with antibiotics is supported.

  17. [Lacrimal sac tumors presenting as lacrimal obstruction. Retrospective study in Mexican patients 2007-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coloma-González, I; Flores-Preciado, J; Ceriotto, A; Corredor-Casas, S; Salcedo-Casillas, G

    2014-06-01

    To determine the demographic and clinical data of primary tumors of the lacrimal sac presenting as lacrimal obstruction. Retrospective and descriptive study was conducted between the years 2007 to 2012 on all patients undergoing surgery for low lacrimal obstruction at Dr. Luis Sanchez Bulnes Hospital, an Association for the prevention of blindness in Mexico IAP. Primary tumors of the lacrimal sac represented 2.5% of all lacrimal obstructions, being more common in women than in men (8:1). The large majority (89%) of the cases were non-epithelial, with lymphoid lesions being the most frequent. Benign tumors were presented at a younger age (50 years old) than malignant (70 years old). One-third (33%) of cases were unexpected findings during surgery (100% benign). Just over half (55%) were malignant tumors (1.4% of obstructions), all of them lymphoproliferative lesions. The most frequent clinical tumor was in the inner edge, either with or without epiphora. The progression time varied according to the degree of aggressiveness of the lymphoma (3 months-10 years). Lacrimal sac tumors are rare, but they must be taken into account in patients with an unusual clinical presentation of lacrimal obstruction. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Uptake of external cephalic version for term breech presentation: an Australian population study, 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yu Sun; Roberts, Christine L; Nicholl, Michael C; Ford, Jane B

    2017-07-26

    The safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of external cephalic version (ECV) for term breech presentation has been demonstrated. Clinical guidelines recommend ECV for all eligible women, but the uptake of this procedure in the Australian healthcare setting is unknown. This study aimed to describe ECV uptake in New South Wales, the most populous state of Australia, during 2002 to 2012. Data from routine hospital and birth records were used to identify ECVs conducted at ≥36 weeks' gestation. Women with ECV were compared to women who were potentially eligible for but did not have ECV. Eligibility for ECV was based on clinical guidelines. For those with ECV, birth outcomes following successful and unsuccessful procedures were examined. In N = 32,321 singleton breech pregnancies, 10.5% had ECV, 22.3% were ineligible, and 67.2% were potentially eligible but did not undergo ECV. Compared to women who were eligible but who did not attempt ECV, those who had ECV were more likely to be older, multiparous, overseas-born, public patients at delivery, and to deliver in tertiary hospitals in urban areas (p presentation did not receive ECV. It is unclear whether this is attributable to issues with service provision or low acceptability among women. Policies to improve access to and information about ECV appear necessary to improve uptake among women with term breech presentation. Improved data collection around the diagnosis of breech presentation, ECV attempts, and outcomes may help to identify specific barriers to ECV uptake.

  19. Importance of the mooring system using in marine radioecology, present and planned studies in our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, O.; Belivermis, M.; Cotuk, Y.; Topcuoglu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, the most important biomonitor organism is Mediterranean mussel species (Mytilus galloprovincialis) in handled monitoring studies in the marine radioecology content. This bio indicator species is also important both of the national and international monitoring programs. In this sense, Mediterranean and Black Sea mussel monitoring project was carried out with participating many countries which they have bank to Mediterranean and Black Sea by supported CIESM (Commission Internationale pour l'Expolaration Scientiphique de la mer Mediterranee) during the period of 2002-2004. All scientific data collected in a data bank. Furthermore, some new techniques were created for sampling and preparation of samples in monitoring of radionuclides and chemical pollutants by this project. On the other hand, the advantages of active bio monitoring compare to the passive bio monitoring were presented by discussed significance of mooring system.The mussel transplantation is carried out using of mooring systems for two goals. First one of them, available pollutants are to monitor in the absence of the mussel species in the stations by mussel transplantation in those stations. The other one of them, mussels which they are in same length and physiological state are to transplant the mooring systems and to monitor pollutants in mussel living and intended stations. In our country, the first mussel transplantation with established the mooring system was performed at the Oeluedeniz, Antalya, Tasucu, Botas and Arsuz stations. Active monitoring results of the works for radionuclide concentrations were given in this presented paper as well as passive monitoring findings were compared with the results obtained from Black Sea and Marmara Sea stations. Besides, it was presented the aim and content of mooring system that we planned to establish in the Golden Horn in this presentation.

  20. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cavaleri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome’s curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin’s therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The pharmacology must be better understood and reliably mapped if curcumin is to be accepted and used in modern medical applications. Although the polypharmacology of this extract has been considered, in mainstream medicine, to be a drawback, a perspective change reveals a comprehensive and even synergistic shaping of the NF-kB pathway, including transactivation. Much of the inconsistent research data and unreliable clinical outcomes may be due to a lack of standardization which also pervades research standard samples. The possibility of other well-known curcumin by-products contributing in the polypharmacology is also discussed. A new flowchart of crosstalk in transduction pathways that lead to shaping of nuclear NF-kB transactivation is generated and a new calibration or standardization protocol for the extract is proposed which could lead to more consistent data extraction and improved reliability in therapy.

  1. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, Franco

    2018-01-01

    Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome's curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin's therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The pharmacology must be better understood and reliably mapped if curcumin is to be accepted and used in modern medical applications. Although the polypharmacology of this extract has been considered, in mainstream medicine, to be a drawback, a perspective change reveals a comprehensive and even synergistic shaping of the NF-kB pathway, including transactivation. Much of the inconsistent research data and unreliable clinical outcomes may be due to a lack of standardization which also pervades research standard samples. The possibility of other well-known curcumin by-products contributing in the polypharmacology is also discussed. A new flowchart of crosstalk in transduction pathways that lead to shaping of nuclear NF-kB transactivation is generated and a new calibration or standardization protocol for the extract is proposed which could lead to more consistent data extraction and improved reliability in therapy.

  2. In-silico study of toxicokinetics and disease association of chemicals present in smokeless tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartiya, Deeksha; Kumar, Amit; Kaur, Jasmine; Kumari, Suchitra; Sharma, Amitesh Kumar; Sinha, Dhirendra N; Singh, Harpreet; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2018-03-02

    Smokeless tobacco (SLT) products are consumed by millions of people in over 130 countries around the world. Consumption of SLT has been estimated to cause a number of diseases accounting to more than 0.65 million deaths per year. There is sufficient epidemiological evidence on the association of SLT products with nicotine addiction, cancers of oral cavity and digestive systems but there is a lack of understanding of the role of toxic chemicals in these diseases. We provide the first comprehensive in-silico analysis of chemical compounds present in different SLT products used worldwide. Many of these compounds are found to have good absorption, solubility and permeability along with mutagenic and toxic properties. They are also found to target more than 350 human proteins involved in a plethora of human biological processes and pathways. Along with all the previously known diseases, the present study has identified the association of compounds of SLT products with a number of unknown diseases like neurodegenerative, immune and cardiac diseases (Left ventricular non compaction, dilated cardiomyopathy etc). These findings indicate far-reaching impact of SLT products on human health than already known which needs further validations using epidemiological, in-vitro and in-vivo methodologies. Thus, this study will provide one stop information for the policy makers in development of regulatory policies on toxic contents of SLT products. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Late-presenting developmental dysplasia of the hip in Jordanian males. A retrospective hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Q. Samarah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the pattern of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH in late presenting Jordanian male patients and identify the risk factors and associated findings. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 1145 male patients who attended the Pediatric Orthopedic Clinic for a DDH check up. This study was carried out in the Orthopedic Section, Special Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan between March 2011 and October 2014. Data was collected from medical records, and x-ray measurements were evaluated. Results: Of the 1145 male patients, 43 (3.75% with 70 involved hips were diagnosed with late- presenting DDH. Being a first-born baby resulted in 41.9% increased risk for DDH. Cesarian delivery was significantly associated with an increased risk of hip dislocation (p=0.004 while normal delivery was significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia (p=0.004. No predictable risk factors were found in 44.2% patients with DDH. Bilateral cases were more common than unilateral cases: (26 [60.5%] versus 17 [39.5%]. Limited abduction was a constant finding in all dislocated hips (p less than 0.001. Associated conditions, such as club foot and congenital muscular torticollis were not observed. Conclusion: Cesarian section is a significant risk for dislocated hips while normal delivery is significantly associated with acetabular dysplasia. Bilateral DDH is more common than the unilateral. Club foot and torticollis were not observed in this series.

  4. An MRI, SPECT and Neuropsychological Study of a Patient Presenting with Capgras Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mackie

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25 year old male patient presented with the “delusion of doubles” (Capgras syndrome. The patient underwent detailed neuropsychological, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI investigations. The neuropsychological results indicated that he was of average premorbid intelligence, which was consistent with current estimates, and had a degree of everyday memory dysfunction which was below norms derived from healthy controls, but was average relative to schizophrenic norms. He demonstrated average or above average recognition memory for patterns, spaces or words, but exhibited a marked and disproportionate impairment in face recognition, performing at the 5th percentile. In addition he demonstrated markedly impaired performance on various tests of executive function. MRI scanning revealed no focal abnormality; slight ventricular dilatation was noted. SPECT scanning, however, revealed marked right/left asymmetries of tracer uptake, restricted to occipital and calcarine cortices. These asymmetries were well outside those derived from a cohort of healthy controls. These results are discussed in relation to current neuropsychological models of Capgras syndrome.

  5. Present Food Shopping Habits in the Spanish Adult Population: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Achón

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Information on grocery shopping patterns is one key to understanding dietary changes in recent years in Spain. This report presents an overview of Spanish food shopping patterns in the adult population. A cross-sectional, nationally representative telephone survey was conducted in Spain. Individuals were asked about food shopping responsibility roles, types of visited food stores, time spent, additional behaviors while shopping, the influence of marketing/advertising and, in particular, fresh produce shopping profile. Binary logistic regression models were developed. The final random sample included 2026 respondents aged ≥18 years, of which 1223 were women and 803 were men. Women reported being in charge of most of the food shopping activities. Looking for best prices, more than looking for healthy or sustainable foods, seemed to be a general behavior. Supermarkets were the preferred retail spaces for food price consideration, convenience, variety and availability. Fresh produce shopping was associated with traditional markets and neighborhood stores in terms of reliance and personalized service. It is essential to highlight the importance of the role played by women. They are the main supporters concerned in preserving adequate dietary habits. Economic factors, more than health or food sustainability, are commonly considered by the population. Traditional markets may play an important role in preserving some healthy dietary habits of the Mediterranean food culture in Spain.

  6. Present Food Shopping Habits in the Spanish Adult Population: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achón, María; Serrano, María; García-González, Ángela; Alonso-Aperte, Elena; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2017-05-18

    Information on grocery shopping patterns is one key to understanding dietary changes in recent years in Spain. This report presents an overview of Spanish food shopping patterns in the adult population. A cross-sectional, nationally representative telephone survey was conducted in Spain. Individuals were asked about food shopping responsibility roles, types of visited food stores, time spent, additional behaviors while shopping, the influence of marketing/advertising and, in particular, fresh produce shopping profile. Binary logistic regression models were developed. The final random sample included 2026 respondents aged ≥18 years, of which 1223 were women and 803 were men. Women reported being in charge of most of the food shopping activities. Looking for best prices, more than looking for healthy or sustainable foods, seemed to be a general behavior. Supermarkets were the preferred retail spaces for food price consideration, convenience, variety and availability. Fresh produce shopping was associated with traditional markets and neighborhood stores in terms of reliance and personalized service. It is essential to highlight the importance of the role played by women. They are the main supporters concerned in preserving adequate dietary habits. Economic factors, more than health or food sustainability, are commonly considered by the population. Traditional markets may play an important role in preserving some healthy dietary habits of the Mediterranean food culture in Spain.

  7. A Study on Improvement in Presentation Skills of Students with Self-feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Hiroyuki; Matsuishi, Masakatsu

    This paper discusses how to improve oral presentation skills of students of engineering design courses based upon the PDCA cycle. In this paper the authors proposed a method to improve the presentation skills as follows. We gave assignments to evaluate their presentation skill by observing videos of their presentation. We encouraged our students to feedback the evaluation into the following presentation. By repeating the evaluation and feedback cycle, students achieved considerable progress in oral presentation.

  8. Mixed models in cerebral ischemia study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Henrique Dal Molin Ribeiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data modeling from longitudinal studies stands out in the current scientific scenario, especially in the areas of health and biological sciences, which induces a correlation between measurements for the same observed unit. Thus, the modeling of the intra-individual dependency is required through the choice of a covariance structure that is able to receive and accommodate the sample variability. However, the lack of methodology for correlated data analysis may result in an increased occurrence of type I or type II errors and underestimate/overestimate the standard errors of the model estimates. In the present study, a Gaussian mixed model was adopted for the variable response latency of an experiment investigating the memory deficits in animals subjected to cerebral ischemia when treated with fish oil (FO. The model parameters estimation was based on maximum likelihood methods. Based on the restricted likelihood ratio test and information criteria, the autoregressive covariance matrix was adopted for errors. The diagnostic analyses for the model were satisfactory, since basic assumptions and results obtained corroborate with biological evidence; that is, the effectiveness of the FO treatment to alleviate the cognitive effects caused by cerebral ischemia was found.

  9. Isotope tracers in global water and climate studies of the past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.W.D.; Birks, S.J.; Gibson, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    To date the global distribution of isotopes in modern precipitation has been characterized almost exclusively from the IAEA/WMO GNIP database, although patchiness of GNIP station records in both time and space has limited the potential of isotope hydrology and climate applications in some areas. Herein, we discuss the prospect of utilizing GCMs for simulating global isotope distributions as a supplementary tool for modern and paleoclimate isotope studies to bridge this gap. Such models currently generate reliable zonal isotope fields, and it is anticipated that future enhancements in finescale resolution of GCMs, and incorporation of land-surface feedbacks and topography will allow for future development of a global reanalysis data set ground-truthed by GNIP. Compilation of time-slice maps of past isotope distribution in precipitation from archival records of meteoric waters also offers significant potential to ground-truth paleoclimate simulations extending back tens to hundreds of thousands of years. (author)

  10. Insect symbioses: a case study of past, present, and future fungus-growing ant research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caldera, Eric J; Poulsen, Michael; Suen, Garret

    2009-01-01

    behavior of the leaf-cutters (the most derived attine lineage). Indeed, the discovery that the ants actually use leaf fragments to manure a fungus did not come until the 1800s. More recently, three additional microbial symbionts have been described, including specialized microfungal parasites of the ant......Fungus-growing ants (Attini: Formicidae) engage in an obligate mutualism with fungi they cultivate for food. Although biologists have been fascinated with fungus-growing ants since the resurgence of natural history in the modern era, the early stages of research focused mainly on the foraging......'s fungus garden, antibiotic-producing actinobacteria that help protect the fungus garden from the parasite, and a black yeast that parasitizes the ant-actinobacteria mutualism. The fungus-growing ant symbiosis serves as a particularly useful model system for studying insect-microbe symbioses, because...

  11. A Study of Clinical Presentation and Correlative Histopathological Patterns in Renal Parenchymal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K; Nair, R R; Seethalekshmy, N V; Kurian, G; Mathew, A; Sreedharan, S; Paul, Z

    2018-01-01

    Suspicion and subsequent detection of renal disease is by an assessment of the urinalysis and renal function in the clinical context. Our attempt in this study is to correlate initial presenting features of urinalysis and renal function to the final histopathological diagnosis. A retrospective analysis of 1059 native kidney biopsies performed from January 2002 to June 2015 at Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences was conducted. Correlative patterns between urinalysis, renal function, and final histopathological diagnosis were studied. Five hundred and eleven (48%) patients had nephrotic syndrome. Out of these, 193 (38%) had pure: nephrotic syndrome, 181 (35.8%) had associated microhematuria, 110 (21.7%) had microhematuria and renal failure, and 27 (5.3%) had only associated renal failure. Minimal change disease (MCD) (30%), membranous nephropathy (30%), and IgA nephropathy (29%) were the major diseases in the respective groups. Five hundred and five (47.6%) patients had subnephrotic proteinuria. Out of these, 29 (5.6%) had only subnephrotic proteinuria, 134 (27%) had additional microhematuria, 300 (59%) had subnephrotic proteinuria, microhematuria, and renal failure, and 42 (8%) had subnephrotic proteinuria with renal failure. Lupus Nephritis (45% and 40%) and IgA Nephropathy (32% and 21%) were the major disorders in the subgroups respectively. Forty-two patients (3.7%) were biopsied for isolated renal failure with bland urinary sediment. Cast nephropathy and acute interstitial nephritis were the major diseases. Out of 89 patients with diabetes who were biopsied, 15 (16.8%) had diabetic nephropathy, 45 (50.5%) had no diabetic nephropathy, and 29 (32.5%) had diabetic nephropathy along with a non-diabetic renal disease. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis was the major glomerular disease. IgA nephropathy (22.2%) and membranous nephropathy (15.5%) were the major diseases in patients with diabetes with no diabetic nephropathy. In our population, MCD and membranous

  12. Diabetes Is Associated with Worse Clinical Presentation in Tuberculosis Patients from Brazil: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Leonardo Gil-Santana

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM worldwide, especially in developing countries, and the persistence of tuberculosis (TB as a major public health issue in these same regions, emphasize the importance of investigating this association. Here, we compared the clinical profile and disease outcomes of TB patients with or without coincident DM in a TB reference center in Brazil.We performed a retrospective analysis of a TB patient cohort (treatment naïve of 408 individuals recruited at a TB primary care center in Brazil between 2004 and 2010. Data on diagnosis of TB and DM were used to define the groups. The study groups were compared with regard to TB disease presentation at diagnosis as well as to clinical outcomes such as cure and mortality rates upon anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT initiation. A composite score utilizing clinical, radiological and microbiological parameters was used to compare TB severity between the groups.DM patients were older than non-diabetic TB patients. In addition, diabetic individuals more frequently presented with cough, night sweats, hemoptysis and malaise than those without DM. The overall pattern of lung lesions assessed by chest radiographic examination was similar between the groups. Compared to non-diabetic patients, those with TB-diabetes exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli in sputum samples more frequently at diagnosis and at 30 days after ATT initiation. Notably, higher values of the TB severity score were significantly associated with TB-diabetes comorbidity after adjustment for confounding factors. Moreover, during ATT, diabetic patients required more frequent transfers to TB reference hospitals for complex clinical management. Nevertheless, overall mortality and cure rates were indistinguishable between the study groups.These findings reinforce the idea that diabetes negatively impacts pulmonary TB severity. Our study argues for the systematic screening for DM in TB reference centers in endemic

  13. A STUDY OF THE OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AMONG PATIENTS PRESENTING TO A TERTIARY CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Sukumaran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology marked by a symmetric peripheral polyarthritis. It is the most common form of chronic inflammatory arthritis and often results in joint damage and physical disability. The name is based on the term "rheumatic fever", an illness, which includes joint pain and is derived from the Greekword ῥεύμα-rheuma (nom., ῥεύματος-rheumatos (gen. ("flow, current". The suffix oid ("resembling" gives the translation as joint inflammation that resembles rheumatic fever. The first recognised description of rheumatoid arthritis was made in 1800 by Dr. Augustin Jacob Landré-Beauvais (1772-1840 of Paris. Because, it is a systemic disease, RA may result in a variety of extra-articular manifestations including fatigue, subcutaneous nodules, lung involvement, pericarditis, peripheral neuropathy, vasculitis and haematologic abnormalities. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients who were diagnosed cases of rheumatoid arthritis attending the rheumatology clinic were referred to the Ophthalmology OPD in Government Medical College, Thrissur, for detailed eye examination. RESULTS The study was conducted in 100 patients (88 females and 12 males. Rheumatoid Factor (RF was found to be positive in 60 patients (60%, presence of dry eye did not correlate with rheumatoid positivity (Fishers exact test- the two-tailed P value = 0.4256. Through various tests, we concluded that there was aqueous deficiency in 61% and mucin deficiency in 46% of the patients. Other ocular manifestations present were- scleritis (2%, episcleritis (2% and keratomalacia (2%. CONCLUSION From the present study, we found out that extra-articular involvement of organs in rheumatoid arthritis is significant. The main ocular manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis found in our study were keratoconjunctivitis sicca, episcleritis, scleritis and keratomalacia. Though keratoconjunctivitis sicca was the most common, it did

  14. Study to Evaluate Targeted Management and Syndromic Management in Women Presenting with Abnormal Vaginal Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Veena; Bansal, Charu Lata

    2016-10-01

    Vaginal discharge is a commonest complaint among women in reproductive age group. Infective vaginal discharge can be broadly categorized into vaginitis or mucopurulent cervicitis. Vaginitis is predominantly caused by bacterial vaginosis, vaginal candidiasis, vaginal trichomoniasis, etc. Mucopurulent cervicitis is due to chlamydia or gonococcal infection. The targeted management is based on identification of causative organism and targeting the therapy against it, while syndromic management is based on high risk factors's presence. To study the effect of targeted management as compared to syndromic management in achieving a complete cure for abnormal vaginal discharge and to study the microbial flora of women presenting with abnormal vaginal discharge. The study is a randomized control trial conducted at tertiary health care on 200 women who presented with abnormal vaginal discharge, distributed in two groups A and B each consisted of 100 women. Group A underwent laboratory investigations, and treatment was started as soon as reports were available. Group B was given syndromic management based on high risk factors's presence. Both groups were followed up after 2 weeks. The prevalence of various organisms in vaginal discharge was candidiasis 39 %, bacterial vaginosis 28 %, trichomoniasis 5 %, N. gonorrhoeae 5 % and chlamydia 2 % among the 100 women in group A. Response to treatment for vaginitis was 76.3 % in group A, whereas it was 41 % in group B. With cervicitis, 71.4 % women responded to treatment in targeted group as compared to 54 % in syndromic management group. There is a potential disadvantage of syndromic management because of its total reliability on a subjective clinical assessment.

  15. The present and future situation of "model project for investigation and analysis of medical practice associated deaths" in Osaka, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hisanaga; Sugimoto, Kana; Nakama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuma; Takeuchi, Dan; Ochi, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Mayumi; Tamura, Yoshihide; Tsujino, Masaki; Mitsukuni, Yoichi; Matoba, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    To enhance the quality and safety of medical care, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) launched a model project in September 2005 for investigation and analysis of medical practice associated deaths in an attempt to move the existing system in a different direction. The project, initiated in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, and Kobe, has now been implemented in nine prefectures. In the hope that the model project will lead to the nationwide development of medical safety investigating committees, the MHLW has submitted a provisional third plan. Based on our practical experience of the model project in Osaka, we present and discuss practical problems and legal issues involving surgeons' criminal punishment.

  16. Saltstone SDU6 Modeling Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Si Y.; Hyun, Sinjae

    2013-01-01

    A new disposal unit, designated as Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 (SDU6), is being designed for support of site accelerated closure goals and salt waste projections identified in the new Liquid Waste System Plan. The unit is a cylindrical disposal cell of 375 ft in diameter and 43 ft in height, and it has a minimum 30 million gallons of capacity. SRNL was requested to evaluate the impact of an increased grout placement height on the flow patterns radially spread on the floor and to determine whether grout quality is impacted by the height. The primary goals of the work are to develop the baseline Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model and to perform the evaluations for the flow patterns of grout material in SDU6 as a function of elevation of grout discharge port and grout rheology. Two transient grout models have been developed by taking a three-dimensional multiphase CFD approach to estimate the domain size of the grout materials radially spread on the facility floor and to perform the sensitivity analysis with respect to the baseline design and operating conditions such as elevation height of the discharge port and fresh grout properties. For the CFD modeling calculations, air-grout Volume of Fluid (VOF) method combined with Bingham plastic and time-dependent grout models were used for examining the impact of fluid spread performance for the initial baseline configurations and to evaluate the impact of grout pouring height on grout quality. The grout quality was estimated in terms of the air volume fraction for the grout layer formed on the SDU6 floor, resulting in the change of grout density. The study results should be considered as preliminary scoping analyses since benchmarking analysis is not included in this task scope. Transient analyses with the Bingham plastic model were performed with the FLUENTTM code on the high performance parallel computing platform in SRNL. The analysis coupled with a transient grout aging model was performed by using ANSYS-CFX code

  17. Testing a Poisson counter model for visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Markussen, Bo; Bundesen, Claus

    2012-06-01

    The authors propose and test a simple model of the time course of visual identification of briefly presented, mutually confusable single stimuli in pure accuracy tasks. The model implies that during stimulus analysis, tentative categorizations that stimulus i belongs to category j are made at a constant Poisson rate, v(i, j). The analysis is continued until the stimulus disappears, and the overt response is based on the categorization made the greatest number of times. The model was evaluated by Monte Carlo tests of goodness of fit against observed probability distributions of responses in two extensive experiments and also by quantifications of the information loss of the model compared with the observed data by use of information theoretic measures. The model provided a close fit to individual data on identification of digits and an apparently perfect fit to data on identification of Landolt rings.

  18. Assessment of the paraspinal muscles of subjects presenting an idiopathic scoliosis: an EMG pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larivière Christian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that the back muscles of scoliotic subjects present abnormalities in their fiber type composition. Some researchers have hypothesized that abnormal fiber composition can lead to paraspinal muscle dysfunction such as poor neuromuscular efficiency and muscle fatigue. EMG parameters were used to evaluate these impairments. The purpose of the present study was to examine the clinical potential of different EMG parameters such as amplitude (RMS and median frequency (MF of the power spectrum in order to assess the back muscles of patients presenting idiopathic scoliosis in terms of their neuromuscular efficiency and their muscular fatigue. Methods L5/S1 moments during isometric efforts in extension were measured in six subjects with idiopathic scoliosis and ten healthy controls. The subjects performed three 7 s ramp contractions ranging from 0 to 100% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC and one 30 s sustained contraction at 75% MVC. Surface EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from the paraspinal muscles at L5, L3, L1 and T10. The slope of the EMG RMS/force (neuromuscular efficiency and MF/force (muscle composition relationships were computed during the ramp contractions while the slope of the EMG RMS/time and MF/time relationships (muscle fatigue were computed during the sustained contraction. Comparisons were performed between the two groups and between the left and right sides for the EMG parameters. Results No significant group or side differences between the slopes of the different measures used were found at the level of the apex (around T10 of the major curve of the spine. However, a significant side difference was seen at a lower level (L3, p = 0.01 for the MF/time parameter. Conclusion The EMG parameters used in this study could not discriminate between the back muscles of scoliotic subjects and those of control subject regarding fiber type composition, neuromuscular efficiency and muscle fatigue at the level

  19. The clinical characteristics of patients with glaucoma presenting to Botswana healthcare facilities: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Daniel J; Razai, Mohammad S; Falama, Rosemary; Mongwa, Matlhogonolo; Mutapanduwa, Mishell; Baemisi, Chao; Josiah, Engelinah; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Lehasa, Alice; Brealey, Evelyn; White, Andrew J; Jankowski, Deborah; Kerr-Muir, Malcolm G; Martin, Keith R; Ngondi, Jeremiah M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to establish the clinical characteristics of patients with glaucoma attending eye care facilities in Botswana, and management of glaucoma among patients who received care in these facilities. The study also aimed to calculate the number of new diagnoses of glaucoma within the glaucoma service. Design A prospective, hospital-based, observational study. Setting A multicentre study was undertaken in government-run eye departments in Botswana from June to August 2012. Participants All patients with a diagnosis of glaucoma attending clinics at seven study sites were invited to participate. Outcome measures Examination findings, diagnosis and management were extracted from individual patient-held medical charts. Sociodemographic characteristics, patient knowledge and understanding of glaucoma were assessed through face-to-face interviews. In addition, details of outpatient attendances for 2011 were collected from 21 government-run hospitals. Results The majority of the 366 patients interviewed had a diagnosis of primary glaucoma (86.6%). The diagnoses were mainly made by ophthalmologists (48.6%) and ophthalmic nurses (44.0%). Many patients (38.5%) had been symptomatic for over 6 months before visiting an eye clinic. The mean presenting intraocular pressure was 28.2 mm Hg (SD 11.9 mm Hg). Most follow-up patients (79.2%) had not received surgery, however, many (89.5%) would accept surgery. Only 11.5% of participants had heard of glaucoma prior to diagnosis. Many participants (35.9%) did not understand glaucoma after being diagnosed. The majority (94.9%) of living first-degree relatives had never been examined. The number of newly diagnosed glaucoma cases for 2011 in the south of the country was 14.1/100 000; 95% CI (12.0 to 16.5), in the north it was 16.2/100 000; 95% CI (13.8 to 19.0). Conclusions Glaucoma is a significant burden that presents challenges to ophthalmic services in Botswana. Many patients have limited understanding

  20. Multi-exposure speckle imaging of cerebral blood flow: a pilot clinical study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lisa M.; Kazmi, S. M. S.; Olin, Katherine E.; Waldron, James S.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery is essential for detecting ischemia in a timely manner for a wide range of procedures. Multiple clinical studies have demonstrated that laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has high potential to be a valuable, label-free CBF monitoring technique during neurosurgery. LSCI is an optical imaging method that provides blood flow maps with high spatiotemporal resolution requiring only a coherent light source, a lens system, and a camera. However, the quantitative accuracy and sensitivity of LSCI is limited and highly dependent on the exposure time. An extension to LSCI called multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI) overcomes these limitations, and was evaluated intraoperatively in patients undergoing brain tumor resection. This clinical study (n = 7) recorded multiple exposure times from the same cortical tissue area, and demonstrates that shorter exposure times (≤1 ms) provide the highest dynamic range and sensitivity for sampling flow rates in human neurovasculature. This study also combined exposure times using the MESI model, demonstrating high correlation with proper image calibration and acquisition. The physiological accuracy of speckle-estimated flow was validated using conservation of flow analysis on vascular bifurcations. Flow estimates were highly conserved in MESI and 1 ms exposure LSCI, with percent errors at 6.4% ± 5.3% and 7.2% ± 7.2%, respectively, while 5 ms exposure LSCI had higher errors at 21% ± 10% (n = 14 bifurcations). Results from this study demonstrate the importance of exposure time selection for LSCI, and that intraoperative MESI can be performed with high quantitative accuracy.

  1. Migraine headache is present in the aura phase: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Lipton, Richard B; Dodick, David W; Silberstein, Stephen D; Saper, Joel R; Aurora, Sheena K; Goadsby, Peter J; Charles, Andrew

    2012-11-13

    Migraine aura is commonly considered to be a distinct phase of a migraine attack that precedes headache. The objective of the study was to examine a large number of prospectively recorded attacks of migraine with aura and determine the timing of headache and other migraine symptoms relative to aura. As part of a clinical trial we collected prospective data on the time course of headache and other symptoms relative to the aura. Patients (n = 267) were enrolled from 16 centers, and asked to keep a headache diary for 1 month (phase I). They were asked to record headache symptoms as soon as possible after aura began and always within 1 hour of aura onset. A total of 456 attacks were reported during phase I by 201 patients. These patients were then randomized and included in phase II, during which a total of 405 attacks were reported in 164 patients. In total, we present data from 861 attacks of migraine with aura from 201 patients. During the aura phase, the majority of attacks (73%) were associated with headache. Other migraine symptoms were also frequently reported during the aura: nausea (51%), photophobia (88%), and photophobia (73%). During the first 15 minutes within the onset of aura, 54% of patients reported headache fulfilling the criteria for migraine. Our results indicate that headaches as well as associated migraine symptoms are present early, during the aura phase of the migraine attack in the majority of patients.

  2. THE STUDY OF MICRONUCLUES INDEX IN PATIENTS PRESENTING WITH MALIGNANT LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Micronucleus is the nucleus that expresses the genotypic alterations caused in the process of malignancy. It is characteristically seen in exfoliated epithelial cells like Buccal Mucosa and urinary bladder wall during pre - cancerous and cancerous conditions in less and large proportions respectively. It is commonly used as a Biomarker to assess the stage and severity of neoplasm. Aim of our study is to observe the micronucleus Index in patients presenting with malignant oral lesions. 30 patients with maligna nt lesions from the Department of oral medicine, Vydehi Institute of Dental Sciences and Research Centre were screened for the presence of micronucleus . The buccal scrapings were obtained from the site of the lesion in the oral cavity by conventional metho ds. The obtained slides were stained by using Haematoxylin& Eosin stains and the micronucleus index was calculated. The results showed that the alteration of micronucleus count was observed in malignant conditions with respect to age and gender. Hence it c an be concluded that the micronucleus index can be used as a biomarker or as a screening test in patients presenting with pre malignant conditions

  3. Performance of the present ALICE Inner Tracking System and studies for the upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contin, G

    2012-01-01

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made out of six layers of silicon detectors exploiting three different technologies (pixel, drift and strip). It covers the central pseudorapidity range of |η| < 0.9 and its distance from the beam line ranges from r = 3.9 cm for the innermost pixel layer up to r = 43 cm for the outermost strip layer. The main tasks of the ITS are to reconstruct the primary and secondary vertices, to track and identify charged particles with a low pt cutoff and to improve the momentum resolution at high pt. In this talk I will present the performance of the ITS in p-p and Pb-Pb collisions in 2010, both from the hardware point of view, with a brief overview of the features of the system, and the physics achievements for what concerns the vertexing, the tracking and the particle identification. Furthermore, I will give also an outlook on a possible upgrade of the ALICE ITS which is presently being studied, in order to extend its physics performance by improving the measurements of charmed hadrons and accessing new physics items like the measurement of the beauty hadrons.

  4. Parental responses to child experiences of trauma following presentation at emergency departments: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria; Creswell, Cathy; Butler, Ian; Christie, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Objective Parents are often children's main source of support following fear-inducing traumatic events, yet little is known about how parents provide that support. The aim of this study was to examine parents' experiences of supporting their child following child trauma exposure and presentation at an emergency department (ED). Design Semistructured qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. Setting The setting for this study was two National Health Service EDs in England. Participants 20 parents whose child experienced a traumatic event and attended an ED between August 2014 and October 2015. Results Parents were sensitive to their child's distress and offered reassurance and support for their child to resume normal activities. However, parental beliefs often inhibited children's reinstatement of pretrauma routines. Support often focused on preventing future illness or injury, reflective of parents' concerns for their child's physical well-being. In a minority of parents, appraisals of problematic care from EDs contributed to parents' anxiety and perceptions of their child as vulnerable post-trauma. Forgetting the trauma and avoidance of discussion were encouraged as coping strategies to prevent further distress. Parents highlighted their need for further guidance and support regarding their child's physical and emotional recovery. Conclusions This study provides insight into the experiences of and challenges faced by parents in supporting their child following trauma exposure. Perceptions of their child's physical vulnerability and treatment influenced parents' responses and the supportive strategies employed. These findings may enable clinicians to generate meaningful advice for parents following child attendance at EDs post-trauma. PMID:27821599

  5. Clinical presentation and diffusion weighted MRI of acute cerebral infarction. The Bergen Stroke Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waje-Andreassen Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No large study has compared the yield of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI with clinical examination in order to differentiate lacunar stroke from other stroke subtypes. This differentiation is important for guiding further investigations and treatment. Methods Consecutive patients admitted with cerebral infarction were classified according to the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project scale. Based on DWI and CT stroke was classified as lacunar (LI and non-lacunar (NLI. Acute ischemic lesion Results DWI was performed in 419 (69% patients. Among patients with lacunar syndrome (LACS 45 (40.5% had NLI on DWI. All patients with total anterior syndrome (TACS and 144 (88.3% with partial anterior syndrome (PACS had NLI on DWI. Conclusion DWI is important among patients presenting with clinical symptoms suggestive of lacunar syndrome to differentiate between LI and NLI. On the other hand, there is good correspondence between TACS or PACS and NLI on DWI.

  6. STUDY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED BACTERIAL PNEUMONIAS PRESENTING TO TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

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    Ramakrishna Rachakonda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Patients attending the Pulmonology OPD with symptoms of cough with expectoration of more than 10 days with pulmonary shadows suggestive of pneumonia were included in our study. Patients’ positive for AFB in the sputum and symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis were excluded. MATERIALS AND METHODS 156 patients diagnosed to have pneumonia were included in the study. Patients having a history of cough with expectoration and fever for 10 days or more were subjected to clinical, radiological and sputum examination. Patients in whom tuberculosis was excluded by clinical, radiological and sputum examination and having associated shadows in the chest x-ray above 20 years of age were taken into the study and subjected to thorough clinical examination, haematological and biochemical examination. Sputum was sent for Gram stain and culture and sensitivity. Sensitivity pattern of the organisms isolated were studied. RESULTS 85% of patients belong to 40 years and above age group. 73.12% of these patients are males and rest are females. 54% of the patients presented as bronchopneumonia by Radiology. Bilateral lesions present in 55% of patients followed by right-sided lesions in 26% and left-sided lesions in 19%. Cough, expectoration, fever and chest pain were the common symptoms and nearly all the patients had symptoms. Increased white cell count at the time of admission correlated with increased duration of hospital stay and is statistically significant (the p-value is <0.00001. Active and passive smoking is associated with pneumonia and the value is statistically significant (p<0.00001. Presence of comorbidities is associated with increased hospital stay and the value is statistically significant (p<0.00001. Individual comorbidities are not associated with increased prevalence of pneumonia. Presence of comorbidities compared to absence of comorbidities showed a statistically significant correlation (p value <0.00001. 48% of the patients were

  7. Study of resonant processes in plasmonic nanostructures for sensor applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirunčík, Jiří; Kwiecien, Pavel; Fiala, Jan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    This contribution is focused on the numerical studies of resonant processes in individual plasmonic nanostructures, with the attention particularly given to rectangular nanoparticles and concominant localized surface plasmon resonance processes. Relevant models for the description and anylysis of localized surface plasmon resonance are introduced, in particular: quasistatic approximation, Mie theory and in particular, a generalized (quasi)analytical approach for treating rectangularly shaped nanostructures. The parameters influencing resonant behavior of nanoparticles are analyzed with special interest in morphology and sensor applications. Results acquired with Lumerical FDTD Solutions software, using finite-difference time-domain simulation method, are shown and discussed. Simulations were mostly performed for selected nanostructures composed of finite rectangular nanowires with square cross-sections. Systematic analysis is made for single nanowires with varying length, parallel couple of nanowires with varying gap (cut -wires) and selected dolmen structures with varying gap between one nanowire transversely located with respect to parallel couple of nanowires (in both in-plane and -out-of-plane arrangements). The dependence of resonant peaks of cross-section spectral behavior (absorption, scattering, extinction) and their tunability via suitable structuring and morphology changes are primarily researched. These studies are then followed with an analysis of the effect of periodic arrangements. The results can be usable with respect to possible sensor applications.

  8. Evaluation of biases present in the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Candlish

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cohort multiple randomised controlled trial (cmRCT design provides an opportunity to incorporate the benefits of randomisation within clinical practice; thus reducing costs, integrating electronic healthcare records, and improving external validity. This study aims to address a key concern of the cmRCT design: refusal to treatment is only present in the intervention arm, and this may lead to bias and reduce statistical power. Methods We used simulation studies to assess the effect of this refusal, both random and related to event risk, on bias of the effect estimator and statistical power. A series of simulations were undertaken that represent a cmRCT trial with time-to-event endpoint. Intention-to-treat (ITT, per protocol (PP, and instrumental variable (IV analysis methods, two stage predictor substitution and two stage residual inclusion, were compared for various refusal scenarios. Results We found the IV methods provide a less biased estimator for the causal effect when refusal is present in the intervention arm, with the two stage residual inclusion method performing best with regards to minimum bias and sufficient power. We demonstrate that sample sizes should be adapted based on expected and actual refusal rates in order to be sufficiently powered for IV analysis. Conclusion We recommend running both an IV and ITT analyses in an individually randomised cmRCT as it is expected that the effect size of interest, or the effect we would observe in clinical practice, would lie somewhere between that estimated with ITT and IV analyses. The optimum (in terms of bias and power instrumental variable method was the two stage residual inclusion method. We recommend using adaptive power calculations, updating them as refusal rates are collected in the trial recruitment phase in order to be sufficiently powered for IV analysis.

  9. Analysis of acute ischemic stroke presenting classic lacunar syndrome. A study by diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terai, Satoshi; Ota, Kazuki; Tamaki, Kinya [Hakujyuji Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We retrospectively assessed the pathophysiological features of acute ischemic stroke presenting ''classic'' lacunar syndrome by using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Subjects were 16 patients who were admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of stroke onset and underwent DWI examination on admission. These were divided into three categorical groups; pure motor hemiplegia (PMH) in 8, sensorimotor stroke (SMS) in 7, and dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome (DCHS) in 1. The fresh responsible lesions were identified by DWI in the perforating territory in 7 patients with PMH and 7 with SMS. Four (one had two possible response lesions; pons and corona radiata) and five patients in the respective groups were diagnosed as lacunar infarction on admission (the largest dimension of the lesion measuring smaller than 15 mm). On the contralateral side to the neurological symptoms, DWI revealed high intensities in cortex, subcortical white matter, and anterior and posterior border zones in the remaining one patient with PMH and in the precentral arterial region in one with DCHS. They were diagnosed as atherothrombotic infarction resulting from the occlusion of the internal carotid artery and cerebral embolism due to atrial fibrillation, respectively. Three patients with PMH showed progressive deterioration after admission and follow-up DWI study in an acute stage revealed enlargement of heir ischemic lesions. The present study suggests that DWI is a useful imaging technique for diagnosis of clinical categories and observation for pathophsiological alteration in the acute ischemic stroke patients with ''classic'' lacunar syndrome. Our results also indicate a necessity to be aware that various types of fresh ischemic lesions other than a single lacune might possibly be developing in cases with this syndrome. (author)

  10. Behavioural present value

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Piasecki

    2013-01-01

    Impact of chosen behavioural factors on imprecision of present value is discussed here. The formal model of behavioural present value is offered as a result of this discussion. Behavioural present value is described here by fuzzy set. These considerations were illustrated by means of extensive numerical case study. Finally there are shown that in proposed model the return rate is given, as a fuzzy probabilistic set.

  11. Computerised modelling for developmental biology : an exploration with case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertens, Laura M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies in developmental biology rely on the construction and analysis of models. This research presents a broad view of modelling approaches for developmental biology, with a focus on computational methods. An overview of modelling techniques is given, followed by several case studies. Using

  12. An Overview of Recent Building Downwash Research at EPA/ORD (2017 Regional, State, and Local Modelers' Workshop Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the fate of effluent from an industrial stack is important for assessing its impact on human health. AERMOD is one of several Gaussian plume models containing algorithms to evaluate the effect of buildings on the movement of the effluent from a stack. This presentation ...

  13. Perfectionistic Self-Presentation, Socially Prescribed Perfectionism, and Suicide in Youth: A Test of the Perfectionism Social Disconnection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxborough, Heather M.; Hewitt, Paul L.; Kaldas, Janet; Flett, Gordon L.; Caelian, Carmen M.; Sherry, Simon; Sherry, Dayna L.

    2012-01-01

    The role of interpersonal components of perfectionism in suicide outcomes among youth was assessed and the Perfectionism Social Disconnection Model (PSDM) was tested by determining whether the links between socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP) and perfectionistic self-presentation (PSP) and suicide outcomes are mediated by experiences of social…

  14. Type 2 diabetes genes – Present status and data from Norwegian studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens K. Hertel Hertel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide rise in prevalence of type 2 diabetes has led to an intense search for the genetic risk factors of this disease. In type 2 diabetes and other complex disorders, multiple genetic and environmental factors, as well as the interaction between these factors, determine the phenotype. In this review, we summarize present knowledge, generated by more than two decades of efforts to dissect the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes. Initial studies were either based on a candidate gene approach or attempted to fine-map signals generated from linkage analysis. Despite the detection of multiple genomic regions proposed to be linked to type 2 diabetes, subsequent positional fine-mapping of candidates were mostly inconclusive. However, the introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, applied on thousands of patients and controls, completely changed the field. To date, more than 50 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes have been detected through the establishment of large research consortia, the application of GWAS on intermediary diabetes phenotypes and the use of study samples of different ethnicities. Still, the common variants identified in the GWAS era only explain some of the heritability seen for type 2 diabetes. Thus, focus is now shifting towards searching also for rare variants using new high-throughput sequencing technologies. For genes involved in the genetic predisposition to type 2 diabetes the emerging picture is that there are hundreds of different gene variants working in a complex interplay influencing pancreatic beta cell function/mass and, only to a lesser extent, insulin action. Several Norwegian studies have contributed to the field, extending our understanding of genetic risk factors in type 2 diabetes and in diabetes-related phenotypes like obesity and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Modelling the influence of changing climate in present and future marine eutrophication impacts from spring barley production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosme, Nuno Miguel Dias; Niero, Monia

    2017-01-01

    carrying capacity, or on the presently proposed method, point to the value of adding spatial differentiation to LCIA models. The inclusion of time variation and spatial differentiation in characterisation modelling of marine eutrophication and the identification of a paucity of adequate inventory data...... in Denmark, the paper has two objectives: (i) to estimate the present and future marine eutrophication impacts by combining a novel Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) modelling approach with a quantification of the effects of climate change on its parameterisation, and (ii) to discuss the implications...... was added to the resulting ‘present’ and ‘future’ characterisation factors (CFs) and calculated for the Baltic and North Sea. The temporal variability of both midpoint normalised impact scores and damage scores reflect a 34% and 28% increase of the CFs in the North Sea and Baltic Sea, respectively...

  16. Presentation of studies on the bacterium helicobacter pylori at Maribor teaching hospital between 1988 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Reberšek-Gorišek

    2006-12-01

    study, ranitidine 2 × 150 mg + colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS 2 × 240 mg over 4 weeks in the second study, and CBS 4 × 120 mg + amoxycillin 4 × 500 mg + metronidazole 4 × 500 mg over two weeks in the third study. With the latex agglutination and with the enzyme immune system (Virion-Serion we identified IgG and IgA antibodies against H. pylori in serum, and antigen in feces (HpSA – Meridian. In protocols of epidemiologic characteristics of H. pylori infection we collected and analyzed the data regarding patient age and gender, living and sanitary conditions, socio-economic status and the education level.Results: The studies showed that H. pylori was most frequently present in ulcer disease of duodenum and stomach. The success of antimicrobial treatment and eradication of H. pylori with ranitidine and erythromycin over one week was 11.1 %, with the combination of ranitidine and CBS over four weeks 19.04 %, with the triple combination therapy with CBS + amoxycillin + metronidazole over two weeks 92 %. In dental plaque, H. pylori was confirmed in 16.6 %. Middle age, poor or medium living conditions and economic status, and primary to secondary education were all identified as possible risk factors for H. pylori infection. In asymptomatic patients we confirmed IgG antibodies against H. pylori in serum in 26/34, in 1/34 they were borderline positive, and negative in 7/34 patients. IgA antibodies were present in 17/34, in 6/34 they were borderline positive, and negative in 11/34. Antigen in feces was positive in 10/33 patients, negative in 23/33. Serum IgG and IgA antibodies and antigen in feces were confirmed in 8/23 patients.Conclusions: Our studies resulted in the beginning of H. pylori detection in MTH patients with gastritis and ulcer disease, and in the ascertainment that H. pylori was most frequently present in ulcer disease of stomach and duodenum. For the confirmation of H. pylori, the histologic method, culture and the urease test were introduced

  17. How can present and future satellite missions support scientific studies that address ocean acidification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Joseph; Vandemark, Douglas; Jonsson, Bror; Balch, William; Chakraborty, Sumit; Lohrenz, Steven; Chapron, Bertrand; Hales, Burke; Mannino, Antonio; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Reul, Nicolas; Signorini, Sergio; Wanninkhof, Rik; Yates, Kimberly K.

    2016-01-01

    Space-based observations offer unique capabilities for studying spatial and temporal dynamics of the upper ocean inorganic carbon cycle and, in turn, supporting research tied to ocean acidification (OA). Satellite sensors measuring sea surface temperature, color, salinity, wind, waves, currents, and sea level enable a fuller understanding of a range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena that drive regional OA dynamics as well as the potentially varied impacts of carbon cycle change on a broad range of ecosystems. Here, we update and expand on previous work that addresses the benefits of space-based assets for OA and carbonate system studies. Carbonate chemistry and the key processes controlling surface ocean OA variability are reviewed. Synthesis of present satellite data streams and their utility in this arena are discussed, as are opportunities on the horizon for using new satellite sensors with increased spectral, temporal, and/or spatial resolution. We outline applications that include the ability to track the biochemically dynamic nature of water masses, to map coral reefs at higher resolution, to discern functional phytoplankton groups and their relationships to acid perturbations, and to track processes that contribute to acid variation near the land-ocean interface.

  18. DVT presentations to an emergency department: a study of guideline based care and decision making

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lillis, D

    2016-02-01

    Pre-test probability scoring and blood tests for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) assessment are sensitive, but not specific leading to increased demands on radiology services. Three hundred and eighty-five patients presenting to an Emergency Department (ED), with suspected DVT, were studied to explore our actual work-up of patients with possible DVT relating to risk stratification, further investigation and follow up. Of the 205 patients with an initially negative scan, 36 (17.6%) were brought for review to the ED Consultant clinic. Thirty-four (16.6%) patients underwent repeat compression ultrasound with 5 (2.4%) demonstrating a DVT on the second scan. Repeat compression ultrasound scans were performed on 34 (16.6%) patients with an initially negative scan, with essentially the same diagnostic yield as other larger studies where 100% of such patients had repeat scanning. Where there is ongoing concern, repeat above-knee compression ultrasound within one week will pick up a small number of deep venous thromboses.

  19. Model quality and safety studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    evaluation group (MEG) is a European initiative on evaluation of technical models used within the major industrial hazard area and is supported by the EC DGXII, Directorate-General for Science, Research and Development. Closely related to MEG is REDIPHEM, which is the acronym of a research project supported...... by the EC Environment Research Programme focusing on assessment of the quality of experimental data and models for dense gas dispersion created within the EC funded research programmes. Technical models are used in a number of areas of industrial hazards assessment. It is becoming more and more apparent...... of ensuring that model development is of a standard that is commensurate with the importance of model use. The aim of MEG is to improve the culture in which models are developed and used and so ensure that technical models used in all aspects of major hazard evaluation are up to date with technical...

  20. Stochastic Hourly Weather Generator HOWGH: Validation and its Use in Pest Modelling under Present and Future Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovsky, M.; Hirschi, M.; Spirig, C.

    2014-12-01

    To quantify impact of the climate change on a specific pest (or any weather-dependent process) in a specific site, we may use a site-calibrated pest (or other) model and compare its outputs obtained with site-specific weather data representing present vs. perturbed climates. The input weather data may be produced by the stochastic weather generator. Apart from the quality of the pest model, the reliability of the results obtained in such experiment depend on an ability of the generator to represent the statistical structure of the real world weather series, and on the sensitivity of the pest model to possible imperfections of the generator. This contribution deals with the multivariate HOWGH weather generator, which is based on a combination of parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. Here, HOWGH is used to generate synthetic hourly series of three weather variables (solar radiation, temperature and precipitation) required by a dynamic pest model SOPRA to simulate the development of codling moth. The contribution presents results of the direct and indirect validation of HOWGH. In the direct validation, the synthetic series generated by HOWGH (various settings of its underlying model are assumed) are validated in terms of multiple climatic characteristics, focusing on the subdaily wet/dry and hot/cold spells. In the indirect validation, we assess the generator in terms of characteristics derived from the outputs of SOPRA model fed by the observed vs. synthetic series. The weather generator may be used to produce weather series representing present and future climates. In the latter case, the parameters of the generator may be modified by the climate change scenarios based on Global or Regional Climate Models. To demonstrate this feature, the results of codling moth simulations for future climate will be shown. Acknowledgements: The weather generator is developed and validated within the frame of projects WG4VALUE (project LD12029 sponsored by the Ministry

  1. Present and future radioactive beam studies at GANIL: from SISSI to SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1996-01-01

    The present status of radioactive beam developments at GANIL is discussed. The emphasis is put on the construction of the new SPIRAL radioactive beam facility which is presently underway and of the main trends in physics. (orig.)

  2. Present and future radioactive beam studies at GANIL. From SISSI to SPIRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerreau, D.

    1996-01-01

    The present status of radioactive beam developments at GANIL is discussed. The emphasis is put on the construction of the new SPIRAL radioactive beam facility presently underway and of the main trends in physics. (author)

  3. Design, analysis and presentation of multinational economic studies: the need for guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Francis

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a proliferation in the number of economic evaluations of pharmaceuticals to meet the growing demand for information about the economic benefits of healthcare technologies. The majority of these studies have been commissioned by pharmaceutical companies for the purposes of drawing attention to the resource and quality-of-life aspects of new or existing products. Such information has become important in overcoming a new obstacle, namely the demonstration of cost effectiveness (the so-called 'fourth hurdle'), in addition to the three well-established criteria of quality, tolerability and efficacy. To ensure the maintenance of standards, guidance for economic evaluations has emerged lately in the form of guidelines, regulations, principles, policies and positions. Drummond outlined three purposes of these guidelines, as follows: as a requirement prior to reimbursement, as statements of methodological standards, and as a statement of ethical standards. Such guidelines are designed to assist both the economic analyst and the decision-maker. In laying out the state of the art regarding the methodology of economic evaluation, guidelines assist the analyst in performing high-quality, scientifically valid studies, and assist the decision-maker in properly interpreting and assessing their quality. In response to these growing requirements for cost-effectiveness data globally, it has become increasingly common for economic evaluations to be conducted on an international scale. However, the recommendations in pharmacoeconomics guidelines regarding the manner in which these multinational economic evaluations should be designed, analysed and presented are too limited to be of any real value. This article examines the various issues that must be taken into consideration when conducting multinational studies, and provides a review of the techniques and approaches that have been suggested to date. It concludes with recommendations for potential

  4. Clinical Presentation and Microbial Analyses of Contact Lens Keratitis; an Epidemiologic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Montazeri, Mohammad; Hedayati Goudarzi, Hesam; Montazeri, Mahmood; Akbarian, Nadali

    2014-01-01

    Microbial keratitis is an infective process of the cornea with a potentially and serious visual impairments. Contact lenses are a major cause of microbial keratitis in the developed countries especially among young people. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and microbiological characteristic of CLK in patients referred to the emergency department (ED) of teaching hospitals, Babol, Iran. This is a cross-sectional study of all patients with contact lens induced corneal ulcers admitted to the teaching hospitals of Babol, Iran, from 2011- 2013. An ophthalmologist examined patients with the slit-lamp and clinical features of them were noted (including pain, redness, foreign body sensation, chemosis, epiphora, blurred vision, discomfort, photophobia, discharge, ocular redness and swelling). All suspected infectious corneal ulcers were scraped for microbial culture and two slides were prepared. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 18.0. A total of 14 patients (17 eyes) were recruited into the study (100% female). The patients' age ranged from 16-37 years old (mean age 21.58±7.23 years). The most prevalent observed clinical signs were pain and redness. Three samples reported as sterile. The most common isolated causative organism was pseudomonas aeroginosa (78.6%), Staphylococcus aureus 14.3%, and enterobacter 7.1%, respectively. Treatment outcome was excellent in 23.5%, good in 47.1%, and poor in 29.4% of cases. Improper lens wear and care as well as the lack of awareness about the importance of aftercare visits have been identified as potential risk factors for the corneal ulcer among contact lens wearers. Training and increasing the awareness of adequate lens care and disinfection practices, consulting with an ophthalmologist, and frequent replacement of contact lens storage cases would greatly help reducing the risk of microbial keratitis.

  5. A Multicenter Study of the Presentation, Treatment, and Outcomes of Cervical Dural Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kevin R; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Kanter, Adam S; Steinmetz, Michael P; Arnold, Paul M; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Nassr, Ahmad; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Gum, Jeffrey L; Hart, Robert A; Isaacs, Robert E; Sasso, Rick C; Bumpass, David B; Bydon, Mohamad; Corriveau, Mark; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Jobse, Bruce C; Lubelski, Daniel; Lee, Sungho; Massicotte, Eric M; Pace, Jonathan R; Smith, Gabriel A; Than, Khoi D; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective multicenter case series study. Because cervical dural tears are rare, most surgeons have limited experience with this complication. A multicenter study was performed to better understand the presentation, treatment, and outcomes following cervical dural tears. Multiple surgeons from 23 institutions retrospectively identified 21 rare complications that occurred between 2005 and 2011, including unintentional cervical dural tears. Demographic data and surgical history were obtained. Clinical outcomes following surgery were assessed, and any reoperations were recorded. Neck Disability Index (NDI), modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA), Nurick classification (NuC), and Short-Form 36 (SF36) scores were recorded at baseline and final follow-up at certain centers. All data were collected, collated, and analyzed by a private research organization. There were 109 cases of cervical dural tears among 18 463 surgeries performed. In 101 cases (93%) there was no clinical sequelae following successful dural tear repair. There were statistical improvements ( P < .05) in mJOA and NuC scores, but not NDI or SF36 scores. No specific baseline or operative factors were found to be associated with the occurrence of dural tears. In most cases, no further postoperative treatments of the dural tear were required, while there were 13 patients (12%) that required subsequent treatment of cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Analysis of those requiring further treatments did not identify an optimum treatment strategy for cervical dural tears. In this multicenter study, we report our findings on the largest reported series (n = 109) of cervical dural tears. In a vast majority of cases, no subsequent interventions were required and no clinical sequelae were observed.

  6. Clinical Presentation and Microbial Analyses of Contact Lens Keratitis; an Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ahmad Rasoulinejad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microbial keratitis is an infective process of the cornea with a potentially and serious visual impairments. Contact lenses are a major cause of microbial keratitis in the developed countries especially among young people. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and microbiological characteristic of CLK in patients referred to the emergency department (ED of teaching hospitals, Babol, Iran. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of all patients with contact lens induced corneal ulcers admitted to the teaching hospitals of Babol, Iran, from 2011- 2013. An ophthalmologist examined patients with the slit-lamp and clinical features of them were noted (including pain, redness, foreign body sensation, chemosis, epiphora, blurred vision, discomfort, photophobia, discharge, ocular redness and swelling. All suspected infectious corneal ulcers were scraped for microbial culture and two slides were prepared. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, version 18.0. Results: A total of 14 patients (17 eyes were recruited into the study (100% female. The patients’ age ranged from 16-37 years old (mean age 21.58±7.23 years. The most prevalent observed clinical signs were pain and redness. Three samples reported as sterile. The most common isolated causative organism was pseudomonas aeroginosa (78.6%, Staphylococcus aureus 14.3%, and enterobacter 7.1%, respectively. Treatment outcome was excellent in 23.5%, good in 47.1%, and poor in 29.4% of cases. Conclusion: Improper lens wear and care as well as the lack of awareness about the importance of aftercare visits have been identified as potential risk factors for the corneal ulcer among contact lens wearers. Training and increasing the awareness of adequate lens care and disinfection practices, consulting with an ophthalmologist, and frequent replacement of contact lens storage cases would greatly help reducing the risk of microbial keratitis.

  7. A Study of the Impact of the Graduate Course "Professional Presentations Using Technology."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kristin Dee

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 41 graduate students who had and 211 who had not taken a course on using graphics for presentations found that course participants used more sophisticated media, are more critical of their performance, thought the course should be required, present often and expect to be required to make presentations in their future work. (SK)

  8. Present-day genetic structure of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in Icelandic rivers and ice-cap retreat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Kristinn; Pampoulie, Christophe; Hjorleifsdottir, Sigridur; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur O

    2014-01-01

    Due to an improved understanding of past climatological conditions, it has now become possible to study the potential concordance between former climatological models and present-day genetic structure. Genetic variability was assessed in 26 samples from different rivers of Atlantic salmon in Iceland (total of 2,352 individuals), using 15 microsatellite loci. F-statistics revealed significant differences between the majority of the populations that were sampled. Bayesian cluster analyses using both prior information and no prior information on sampling location revealed the presence of two distinguishable genetic pools - namely, the Northern (Group 1) and Southern (Group 2) regions of Iceland. Furthermore, the random permutation of different allele sizes among allelic states revealed a significant mutational component to the genetic differentiation at four microsatellite loci (SsaD144, Ssa171, SSsp2201 and SsaF3), and supported the proposition of a historical origin behind the observed variation. The estimated time of divergence, using two different ABC methods, suggested that the observed genetic pattern originated from between the Last Glacial Maximum to the Younger Dryas, which serves as additional evidence of the relative immaturity of Icelandic fish populations, on account of the re-colonisation of this young environment following the Last Glacial Maximum. Additional analyses suggested the presence of several genetic entities which were likely to originate from the original groups detected.

  9. Present-day genetic structure of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in Icelandic rivers and ice-cap retreat models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristinn Olafsson

    Full Text Available Due to an improved understanding of past climatological conditions, it has now become possible to study the potential concordance between former climatological models and present-day genetic structure. Genetic variability was assessed in 26 samples from different rivers of Atlantic salmon in Iceland (total of 2,352 individuals, using 15 microsatellite loci. F-statistics revealed significant differences between the majority of the populations that were sampled. Bayesian cluster analyses using both prior information and no prior information on sampling location revealed the presence of two distinguishable genetic pools - namely, the Northern (Group 1 and Southern (Group 2 regions of Iceland. Furthermore, the random permutation of different allele sizes among allelic states revealed a significant mutational component to the genetic differentiation at four microsatellite loci (SsaD144, Ssa171, SSsp2201 and SsaF3, and supported the proposition of a historical origin behind the observed variation. The estimated time of divergence, using two different ABC methods, suggested that the observed genetic pattern originated from between the Last Glacial Maximum to the Younger Dryas, which serves as additional evidence of the relative immaturity of Icelandic fish populations, on account of the re-colonisation of this young environment following the Last Glacial Maximum. Additional analyses suggested the presence of several genetic entities which were likely to originate from the original groups detected.

  10. The Real Cost of "Cosmetic Tourism" Cost Analysis Study of "Cosmetic Tourism" Complications Presenting to a Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Ryan; Berlund, Paul; Eccles-Smith, Jade; Sawhney, Raja

    2015-01-01

    "Cosmetic Tourism," the process of traveling overseas for cosmetic procedures, is an expanding global phenomenon. The model of care by which these services are delivered can limit perioperative assessment and postoperative follow-up. Our aim was to establish the number and type of complications being treated by a secondary referral hospital resulting from "cosmetic tourism" and the cost that has been incurred by the hospital in a 1-year period. Retrospective cost analysis and chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between the financial year of 2012 and 2013 were performed. Twelve "cosmetic tourism" patients presented to the hospital, requiring admission during the study period. Breast augmentation was the most common procedure and infected prosthesis was the most common complication (n = 4). Complications ranged from infection, pulmonary embolism to penile necrosis. The average cost of treating these patients was $AUD 12 597.71. The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52. The "cosmetic tourism" model of care appears to be, in some cases, suboptimal for patients and their regional hospitals. In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad. This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

  11. A prospective cohort study of the clinical presentation of non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: spine and knee symptoms as clinical presentation of hip osteonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauzeur, Jean-Philippe; Malaise, Michel; de Maertelaer, Viviane

    2016-07-01

    To study the clinical presentation of femoral head osteonecrosis (ONFH). Publications dedicated to this aspect of ONFH are rare. Our aim was to systematically collect and describe the clinical data. A prospective survey was conducted in a cohort of ONFH recruited from a dedicated clinic for osteonecrosis. The history of symptoms, medical management, and physical findings were obtained from 88 patients suffering from 125 ONFH. Subgroups were formed: bilateral versus unilateral ONFH, radiological stages 1-2 (pre-fractured) versus fractured stage 3 versus stage 4. ONFH was bilateral in 63 %, especially in corticosteroid users and in sickle-cell cases. These patients were younger but had similar BMIs compared to the unilateral cases. The pain was mechanical in 79 % of hips and inflammatory in 21 %. Acute pain at the onset was present in 55 % of hips. The localization of this pain was variable, including in the groin, the buttocks, or diffused in the lower limbs. A limp was present in 50 % of the patients, only when one hip was painful. The physical examination of the hip was normal in 31 %, especially in stages 1-2 (55 %). The diagnosis delay was 12 months, with inadequate medical management in 51 % of patients. In ONFH cases, no typical clinical pattern was found. The clinical presentation was very variable, sometimes having spine or knee symptoms with a normal physical examination of the hip. ONFH should be systematically suspected in cases of onset of pain in the pelvis, buttocks, groin, and lower limbs.

  12. Present activity of the feasibility study of HTGR-GT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Y.; Miyamoto, Y.; Shiozawa, S.

    2001-01-01

    In JAERI a feasibility study of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor-Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) system has been carried out since January, 1997 as an assigned work by the Science and Technology Agency. The study aims at obtaining a promising concept of HTGR-GT system that yields a high thermal efficiency and at the same time is economically competitive. Designs of a few candidate systems will be undertaken and their power generation costs will be evaluated in parallel with design works, some experimental works such as the fabrication of a plate-fin type heat exchanger core and material tests will be carried out. The study will be continued till 2000 fiscal year. In 1997 fiscal year, a preliminary design of a direct cycle plant of 600 MWt was developed. A reactor inlet gas temperature of 460 deg. C, a reactor outlet gas temperature of 850 deg. C and a helium gas pressure of 6MPa were selected. Some advanced technologies were adopted such as a monolithic fuel compact and a control rod sheath made of carbon/carbon composite material. They were very effective to enhance the heat transfer of fuel and to reduce the core bypass flow. As a result, a power density of 6MW/m 3 and the maximum burnup of 10 5 MWD/ton were achieved. A single-shaft horizontal turbomachine of 3600 rpm was selected to ease the mechanical design of the rotor supported by magnetic bearings. The turbine, two compressors, a generator and six units of intercooler were placed in a turbine vessel, Plate-fin type recuperator and precooler are installed in a vertical heat exchanger vessel. By this design, a net thermal efficiency of 45.7% is expected to be achieved. To develop a high performance plate-fin recuperator, a core model of W200 mm x L200 mm x H200 mm with small fin size of 1.15 mm height was fabricated and as a result of tests, leak tightness, component strength and bonding appearance were found to be satisfactory. In 1998 fiscal year, a design of a direct cycle plant of 300 MWt is undertaken. The

  13. Drilling techniques presently in use by the Geothermal Studies Project, US Geological Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, T.H. Jr.; Sass, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The heat-flow studies program has evolved from one in which holes drilled for other purposes (mining and oil exploration, nuclear tests, hydrologic studies, etc.) provided the bulk of the data to a program in which the free holes, while still providing cost-effective and useful data, are being supplemented increasingly by holes drilled specifically for heat-flow determinations at locations where thermal data of high quality are needed, and where nobody else is interested in drilling. Ideally, heat-flow holes should be located in areas with moderate local relief and should be completed so that vertical water movement is inhibited. The most satisfactory test media for heat-flow determinations are crystalline rocks (particularly granites) and unconsolidated sediments; carbonate rocks and volcanic terranes can provide useful heat-flow data, but they present greater challenges both in drilling and interpretation. Drilling techniques have evolved from that of the continuously cored diamond-drilled hole (adapted from mining exploration) to adaptations of the shot-hole and blast-hole techniques used in petroleum exploration, water-well construction, and quarry operations. Spot cores are obtained where necessary to provide specific petrologic, geochemical, and physical data, but primary reliance is placed on ditch samples from rotary or percussion drilling for routine measurements of thermal conductivity and heat production. In shallow (50 to 100 m) holes in low temperature environments, plastic casing is used to maintain access for later temperature measurements. For deeper holes, steel casing is preferred. The annulus between casing and borehole wall in the lowermost 50 to 80 meters of heat-flow holes is routinely grouted off with a specially designed mixture of cement, bentonite, salt, and water to prevent vertical water movement.

  14. A pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quirke, M

    2014-11-01

    To characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST, Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% Cl =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% Cl 1.9- 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% Cl = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-EO antibiotic therapy.

  15. Methodological developments in searching for studies for systematic reviews: past, present and future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Carol; Glanville, Julie; Wieland, L Susan; Coles, Bernadette; Weightman, Alison L

    2013-09-25

    The Cochrane Collaboration was established in 1993, following the opening of the UK Cochrane Centre in 1992, at a time when searching for studies for inclusion in systematic reviews was not well-developed. Review authors largely conducted their own searches or depended on medical librarians, who often possessed limited awareness and experience of systematic reviews. Guidance on the conduct and reporting of searches was limited. When work began to identify reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for inclusion in Cochrane Reviews in 1992, there were only approximately 20,000 reports indexed as RCTs in MEDLINE and none indexed as RCTs in Embase. No search filters had been developed with the aim of identifying all RCTs in MEDLINE or other major databases. This presented The Cochrane Collaboration with a considerable challenge in identifying relevant studies.Over time, the number of studies indexed as RCTs in the major databases has grown considerably and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) has become the best single source of published controlled trials, with approximately 700,000 records, including records identified by the Collaboration from Embase and MEDLINE. Search filters for various study types, including systematic reviews and the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategies for RCTs, have been developed. There have been considerable advances in the evidence base for methodological aspects of information retrieval. The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions now provides detailed guidance on the conduct and reporting of searches. Initiatives across The Cochrane Collaboration to improve the quality inter alia of information retrieval include: the recently introduced Methodological Expectations for Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) programme, which stipulates 'mandatory' and 'highly desirable' standards for various aspects of review conduct and reporting including searching, the development of Standard Training

  16. A statistical study of weather-related disasters. Past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, H.; Bouwman, A.; Petersen, A.; Ligtvoet, W.

    2012-07-15

    Disasters such as floods, storms, heatwaves and droughts may have serious implications for human health and the economic development of countries. One of the main findings of this report is that disaster burdens are dominated by economic and demographic developments, rather than climate change. Furthermore, disaster burden appears to be spread unequally over rich and poor countries. In Chapter 2 the background of the three regions used throughout this report is described: OECD, BRIICS (Brazil, Russia, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa and remaining countries. Furthermore, an overview of the disaster databases is given, along with definitions of disaster terminology. The statistical treatment of trends in disaster data is shortly exemplified. Chapter 3 gives on overview of the results for disaster burden and trends therein on a global scale. Results are split-up as for different disaster types. In Chapters 4 and 5 the same analysis is performed, but now split-up for three regions. In Chapter 4, disaster burdens are quantified, while analyses of trends in disaster burdens are given in Chapter 5. Here, the analyses are confined to weather-related disaster events only. In Chapter 6 the trend patterns found in Chapter 5, are explained as far as possible. Here, changes in wealth, changes in population, the role of climate change and changes due to adaptation are treated in separate sections. Chapter 7 shortly deals with communicational aspects of disasters: the attribution of individual disasters to climate change and results in the literature which are contradictory to results presented here. Chapters 3 through 7 deal with historical data on disaster burden. In the subsequent Chapters 8 and 9 the future of disaster burden will be dealt with. Chapter 8 gives a short overview of the future of disasters as presented in the literature. In Chapter 9 a PBL case study for flooding on a global scale is given, with predictions for people at risk and economic losses at

  17. Unsafe abortion after legalisation in Nepal: a cross-sectional study of women presenting to hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, C H; Puri, M; Dulal, B; Bajracharya, L; Harper, C C; Blum, M; Henderson, J T

    2013-08-01

    To investigate abortion practices of Nepali women requiring postabortion care. Cross-sectional study. Four tertiary-care hospitals in urban and rural Nepal. A total of 527 women presenting with complications from induced abortion in 2010. Women completed questionnaires on their awareness of the legal status of abortion and their abortion-seeking experiences. The method of induction and whether the abortion was obtained from an uncertified source was documented. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify associated factors. Induction method; uncertified abortion source. In all, 234 (44%) women were aware that abortion was legal in Nepal. Medically induced abortion was used by 359 (68%) women and, of these, 343 (89%) took unsafe, ineffective or unknown substances. Compared with women undergoing surgical abortion, women who had medical abortion were more likely to have obtained information from pharmacists (161/359, 45% versus 11/168, 7%, adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 8.1, 95% confidence interval 4.1-16.0) and to have informed no one about the abortion (28/359, 8% versus 3/168, 2%, aOR 5.5, 95% CI 1.1-26.9). Overall, 291 (81%) medical abortions and 50 (30%) surgical abortions were obtained from uncertified sources; these women were less likely to know that abortion was legal (122/341, 36% versus 112/186, 60%, aOR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7) and more likely to choose a method because it was available nearby (209/341, 61% versus 62/186, 33%, aOR 2.5, 95% CI 1.5-4.3), compared with women accessing certified sources. Among women presenting to hospitals in Nepal with complications following induced abortion of pregnancy, the majority had undergone medically induced abortions using unknown substances acquired from uncertified sources. Women using medications and those accessing uncertified providers were less aware that abortion is now legal in Nepal. These findings highlight the need for continued improvements in the provision and awareness of abortion services in Nepal

  18. A Study of Clinical Profile of Patients presenting with Complications of Acute Febrile Illnesses During Monsoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh Dilip; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Pazare, Amar R; Dubey, Abhishek; Marathe, Kunal K

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe clinico-laboratory profile and outcome of complicated acute febrile illnesses among inpatients in a tertiary care hospital during monsoon. This was an observational, prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India. Between July 2016 to October 2016, adult patients admitted to the hospital with complicated acute febrile illness were included. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and analyzed for each patient. Associations were sought between death and organ specific complications. Out of 276 patients enrolled male gender 187(67.8%) and age group of below 35 years comprised the larger proportion of the cases with total 115(63.2%) dengue,37(80.4%) leptospirosis, 25(69.4%) malaria cases. The most common symptoms reported amongst the enrolled patients included generalized body ache (85.9%), headache (77.4%), vomiting (73.4%), abdominal pain (50%), high coloured urine (34.2%), and breathlessness (32.1%), loose motion (25.1%) and altered Sensorium (8.8%). Clinical signs seen and significantly associated were pedal edema 14.5% (P=0.001), icterus 20.7%(P=0.0001) and tachypnoea 19.4%(P =0.001). Most common complication of dengue was shock (70.9%) followed by hepatic (66.5%) and haematological (65%) derangements, that of malaria was CNS involvement (29.4%), and for leptospirosis it was renal failure (45.9%) followed by respiratory distress (22.3%). Overall mortality in Dengue was 7(3.8%), malaria 2(5.6%), leptospirosis 15(32.6%), Hepatitis E 2(50%). The similarity in clinical presentation and diversity of etiological agents demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of acute febrile illness. This study of clinico-laboratory profile of complicated febrile monsoon illnesses will be helpful to reduce mortality associated with monsoon illnesses by early referral and prompt treatment. Dengue and leptospirosis remain the commonest etiologies and major killer due to respiratory and

  19. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON INCIDENCE, AETIOPATHOGENESIS, CLINICAL PRESENTATION, MANAGEMENT AND PROGNOSIS OF LIVER ABSCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Danasekaran

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Liver abscess continues to be a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the medical fraternity. It is a life-threatening and a potentially serious condition if left untreated. Therefore, it is very important for prompt diagnosis and appropriate management at the earliest. This study was conducted to assess the incidence, aetiology, clinical presentation, management and prognosis of liver abscess in patients attending a tertiary care referral hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted in Madurai Medical College Hospital, Madurai, from March 2015 to August 2016. The study population consists of patients admitted in General Surgery Wards of Madurai Medical College and Hospital, Madurai, with features suggestive of liver abscess. RESULTS Liver abscess was more commonly seen in the age group of 41-50 years. Male predominance 97.9% was seen in liver abscess. Nearly, two thirds of cases of liver abscess had a history of alcohol intake. Majority of liver abscess were amoebic and nearly 10% were pyogenic. Escherichia coli was the commonest organism causing pyogenic liver abscess. Abdominal pain was the commonest symptom of liver abscess followed by abdominal distension and fever. Right hypochondrial tenderness and intercostal tenderness were the common clinical signs in liver abscess. There was a predominant involvement of the right lobe of the liver. Percutaneous aspiration of abscess with antiamoebic and antibiotics forms the mainstay of treatment. Percutaneous catheter drainage is method of choice in failed aspiration and laparoscopic drainage or laparotomy and drainage is indicated in ruptured liver abscess. CONCLUSION Liver abscess was more commonly seen in the age group of 41-50 years. Male predominance 97.9% was seen in liver abscess. Nearly, two-thirds of cases of liver abscess had a history of alcohol intake. Majority of liver abscess were amoebic and nearly 10% were pyogenic. Escherichia coli was the commonest

  20. Simulations of preindustrial, present-day, and 2100 conditions in the NASA GISS composition and climate model G-PUCCINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of atmospheric composition and climate has been developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS that includes composition seamlessly from the surface to the lower mesosphere. The model is able to capture many features of the observed magnitude, distribution, and seasonal cycle of trace species. The simulation is especially realistic in the troposphere. In the stratosphere, high latitude regions show substantial biases during period when transport governs the distribution as meridional mixing is too rapid in this model version. In other regions, including the extrapolar tropopause region that dominates radiative forcing (RF by ozone, stratospheric gases are generally well-simulated. The model's stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE agrees well with values inferred from observations for both the global mean flux and the ratio of Northern (NH to Southern Hemisphere (SH downward fluxes. Simulations of preindustrial (PI to present-day (PD changes show tropospheric ozone burden increases of 11% while the stratospheric burden decreases by 18%. The resulting tropopause RF values are −0.06 W/m2 from stratospheric ozone and 0.40 W/m2 from tropospheric ozone. Global mean mass-weighted OH decreases by 16% from the PI to the PD. STE of ozone also decreased substantially during this time, by 14%. Comparison of the PD with a simulation using 1979 pre-ozone hole conditions for the stratosphere shows a much larger downward flux of ozone into the troposphere in 1979, resulting in a substantially greater tropospheric ozone burden than that seen in the PD run. This implies that reduced STE due to stratospheric ozone depletion may have offset as much as 2/3 of the tropospheric ozone burden increase from PI to PD. However, the model overestimates the downward flux of ozone at high Southern latitudes, so this estimate is likely an upper limit. In the future, the tropospheric ozone burden increases by 101% in 2100 for the A2 scenario

  1. Consumer attitudes and decision-making with regard to genetically engineered food products: A review of the literature and a presentation of models for future research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.; Frewer, Lynn

    to the technology call for the development of a theoretical basis for research into these issues. 2. The aim of the paper is to present three models which we have developed to explain consumer attitudes, buying behaviour and attitude change with regard to genetically engineered food products. All three models build......Executive summary 1. Few studies have to date explained consumer attitudes and purchase decisions with regard to genetically engineered food products. However, the increased marketing of genetically engineered food products and the considerable concern that consumers seem to express with regard...... on established consumer behaviour theory and on existing and comparable research in the field. 3. Consumer attitudes toward genetic engineering in food products are explained in an attitude model that builds on Fishbein's multiattribute attitude model. The model deviates from Fishbein's model in a number of ways...

  2. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future

  3. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y. [and others

    2000-01-19

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future.

  4. Levator claviculae muscle presenting as a hard clavicular mass: imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Santiago, F.; Lopez Milena, G.; Tristan Fernandez, J.M.; Chamorro Santos, C.

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of levator claviculae muscle presenting clinically as a hard mass in the clavicular area due to angular deformity of this bone. To our knowledge, this is the first report where the anomalous muscle shows this clinical presentation. (orig.)

  5. Mathematical Modelling Research in Turkey: A Content Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, H. Coskun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the mathematical modelling studies done between 2004 and 2015 in Turkey and to reveal their tendencies. Forty-nine studies were selected using purposeful sampling based on the term, "mathematical modelling" with Higher Education Academic Search Engine. They were analyzed with content analysis.…

  6. Presentation and conservative management of acute calcific tendinopathy: a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scibek, Jason S; Carcia, Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    The efficacy of a variety of noninvasive, conservative management techniques for calcific tendinopathy has been investigated and established for improving pain and function and/or facilitating a decrease in the size or presence of calcium deposits. Surprisingly, few have reported on the use of traditional therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation alone in the management of this condition, given the often spontaneous resorptive nature of calcium deposits. The purpose of this case is to present the results of a conservative approach, including therapeutic exercise, for the management of calcific tendinopathy of the supraspinatus, with an emphasis on patient outcomes. The patient was a self-referred 41-y-old man with complaints of acute right-shoulder pain and difficulty sleeping. Imaging studies revealed liquefied calcium deposits in the right supraspinatus. The patient reported constant pain at rest (9/10) and tenderness in the area of the greater tuberosity. He exhibited a decrease in all shoulder motions and had reduced strength. The simple shoulder test (SST) revealed limited function (0/12). Conservative management included superficial modalities and medication for pain and a regimen of scapulothoracic and glenohumeral range-of-motion (ROM) and strengthening exercises. At discharge, pain levels decreased to 0/10 and SST scores increased to 12/12. ROM was full in all planes, and resisted motion was strong and pain free. The patient was able to engage in endurance activities and continue practicing as a health care provider. The outcomes with respect to pain, function, and patient satisfaction provide evidence to support the use of conservative therapeutic interventions when managing patients with acute cases of calcific tendinopathy. Successful management of calcific tendinopathy requires attention to outcomes and an understanding of the pathophysiology, prognostic factors, and physical interventions based on the current stage of the calcium deposits and the

  7. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  8. Battlescale Forecast Model Sensitivity Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sauter, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    .... Changes to the surface observations used in the Battlescale Forecast Model initialization led to no significant changes in the resulting forecast values of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, or wind direction...

  9. Primary mediastinal melanoma presenting as superior vena cava syndrome: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann C Gaffey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The rates of melanoma have increased over the past 30 years. Malignant melanoma most commonly occurs in the skin with secondary involvement of other organs. Here, we present an extremely rare case of malignant melanoma of the mediastinum with presentation of superior vena cava syndrome without clinical evidence of extrathoracic disease. The incidence of this clinical presentation is uncommon, resulting in only a handful of case reports in the literature. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(1.000: 56-58

  10. Experimental and modelling studies of infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudici, M.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation describes a study of infiltration in the unsaturated soil with the objective of estimating the recharge to a phreatic aquifer. The study area is at the border of the city of Milan (Northern Italy), which draws water for both domestic and industrial purposes from ground water resources located beneath the urban area. The rate of water pumping from the aquifer system has been varying during the XX century, depending upon the number of inhabitants and the development of industrial activities. This caused variations with time of the depth of the water table below the ground surface and in turn some emergencies: the two most prominent episodes correspond to the middle '70s, when the water table in the city centre was about 30 m below the undisturbed natural conditions, and to the last decade, when the water table has raised at a rate of approximately 1 m/year and caused infiltrations in deep constructions (garages and building foundations, the underground railways, etc.). We have developed four ground water flow models at different scales, which share some characteristics: they are based on quasi-3D approximation (horizontal flow in the aquifers and vertical flow in the aquitards), conservative finite-differences schemes for regular grid with square cells in the horizontal plane and are implemented with proprietary computer codes. Among the problems that were studied for the development of these models, I recall some numerical problems, related to the behaviour of the phreatic aquifer under conditions of strong exploitation. Model calibration and validation for ModMil has been performed with a two-stage process, i.e., using some of the available data for model calibration and the remaining data for model validation. The application of geophysical exploration techniques, in particular seismic and geo-electrical prospecting, has been very useful to complete the data and information on the hydro-geological structure obtained from stratigraphic logs

  11. Kinetic modelling and characterization of microbial community present in a full-scale UASB reactor treating brewery effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enitan, Abimbola M; Kumari, Sheena; Swalaha, Feroz M; Adeyemo, J; Ramdhani, Nishani; Bux, Faizal

    2014-02-01

    The performance of a full-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastewater was investigated by microbial analysis and kinetic modelling. The microbial community present in the granular sludge was detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and further confirmed using polymerase chain reaction. A group of 16S rRNA based fluorescent probes and primers targeting Archaea and Eubacteria were selected for microbial analysis. FISH results indicated the presence and dominance of a significant amount of Eubacteria and diverse group of methanogenic Archaea belonging to the order Methanococcales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanomicrobiales within in the UASB reactor. The influent brewery wastewater had a relatively high amount of volatile fatty acids chemical oxygen demand (COD), 2005 mg/l and the final COD concentration of the reactor was 457 mg/l. The biogas analysis showed 60-69% of methane, confirming the presence and activities of methanogens within the reactor. Biokinetics of the degradable organic substrate present in the brewery wastewater was further explored using Stover and Kincannon kinetic model, with the aim of predicting the final effluent quality. The maximum utilization rate constant U max and the saturation constant (K(B)) in the model were estimated as 18.51 and 13.64 g/l/day, respectively. The model showed an excellent fit between the predicted and the observed effluent COD concentrations. Applicability of this model to predict the effluent quality of the UASB reactor treating brewery wastewater was evident from the regression analysis (R(2) = 0.957) which could be used for optimizing the reactor performance.

  12. Disorderly Households, Self-Presentation, and Mortality: Evidence From a National Study of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Markus H; Upenieks, Laura; MacNeil, Andie

    2017-01-01

    This article examines whether disorderly household conditions and bodily self-presentation predict mortality, above and beyond four sets of variables conceptually linked to both death and disorder. Data come from 2005/2006 and 2010/2011 waves of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. We used naturalistic observation of respondents' homes and bodies, along with a diverse range of additional covariates, to predict probability of death. Older adults living in disorderly households were at highest risk of death over 5 years, primarily because they confronted high levels of frailty. Disorderly bodily self-presentation was also related to mortality risk, but this association could be only partially explained by demographic factors, health conditions, frailty, and low social connectedness. Findings suggest that disorder in the residential context-dress and hygiene in particular-is a strong predictor of mortality. Support providers should be mindful of changes in bodily presentation among community-dwelling older adults.

  13. Lhermitte Sign as a Presenting Symptom of Thoracic Spinal Pathology: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Hills

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old male with ankylosing spondylitis presented with complaints of progressively worsening bilateral leg weakness and difficulty ambulating of 2-week duration. He also felt a sharp, electric, shock-like sensation radiating from his lower back into his legs upon flexing the trunk. There was no history of trauma or other inciting events within the 2 weeks prior to presentation. Thoracic MRI at this visit showed a three-column fracture at T11-T12. He underwent spinal fusion surgery and within 2 days after surgery the radiating electrical sensation with spinal flexion had completely resolved.

  14. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  15. Estimation of otitis media in ancient populations: A study of past and present Greenlandic Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homøe, P; Lynnerup, N; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    1996-01-01

    adult Inuit crania from the pre-European colonization period (before A.D. 1721) of Greenland. The occurrence of IMED as designated by the model was eight out of 34 (23.5 per cent) in living Inuit, 10 out of 56 (17.9 per cent) in crania from the 18th to 19th century and six out of 127 (4.7 per cent......) in crania from the pre-colonization period. These frequencies differed significantly (p

  16. Political Youth Education in Germany. Presenting a Qualitative Study on Its Biographically Long-Term Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzter, Nadine; Ristau, Yan; Schröder, Achim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: There is an impact analysis presented, which explores the long-term effect of extra-curricular political youth education from the perspective of participants. Methods: The former participants retell their own education and life stories about five years later. Life stories were then interpreted in the course of research workshops and…

  17. Presentation and analysis of data on radiographic outcome in clinical trials: experience from the TEMPO study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert; Klareskog, Lars; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Settas, Lucas; Pedersen, Ronald; Fatenejad, Saeed

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate different methods of presentation and analysis of radiographic data in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) randomized controlled trial. A double-blind randomized controlled trial including 682 patients with active RA who were treated with methotrexate, etanercept, or a combination of the 2 drugs

  18. Presentation and analysis of radiographic data in clinical trials and observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landewé, R.; van der Heijde, D.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the advent of sophisticated imaging systems, plain radiography continues to be a valuable outcome variable in clinical trials of inflammatory disorders for a number of reasons. This paper discusses the pros and cons of the different ways in which radiographic data in trials is presented; the

  19. The Linguistic Representation of Rhetorical Function: A Study of How Economists Present Their Knowledge Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Trine

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with how economists present their new knowledge claim in the genre of the research article. In the discipline of economics today, the claim is typically included not only in the obvious results/discussion section(s) but also in three other locations of the article: the abstract, the introduction, and the conclusion. The present…

  20. BIOMOVS: an international model validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haegg, C.; Johansson, G.

    1988-01-01

    BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) is an international study where models used for describing the distribution of radioactive and nonradioactive trace substances in terrestrial and aquatic environments are compared and tested. The main objectives of the study are to compare and test the accuracy of predictions between such models, explain differences in these predictions, recommend priorities for future research concerning the improvement of the accuracy of model predictions and act as a forum for the exchange of ideas, experience and information. (author)

  1. BIOMOVS: An international model validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haegg, C.; Johansson, G.

    1987-01-01

    BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) is an international study where models used for describing the distribution of radioactive and nonradioactive trace substances in terrestrial and aquatic environments are compared and tested. The main objectives of the study are to compare and test the accuracy of predictions between such models, explain differences in these predictions, recommend priorities for future research concerning the improvement of the accuracy of model predictions and act as a forum for the exchange of ideas, experience and information. (orig.)

  2. A Global Flood Model in the Context of the Global Assessment Report 2015: methodology presentation and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudari, Roberto; Campo, Lorenzo; Silvestro, Francesco; Herold, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The Global Assessment Report (GAR) is a major initiative of the UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR). It contributes to the achievement of the Hyogo Framework of Action (HFA) through monitoring risk patterns and trends and progress in disaster risk reduction and by providing guidance, to governments and non-governmental actors alike, on why and how they can, together, reduce disaster risks. Among its goals is an enhanced Global Risk Model, addressing gaps in current knowledge on risk patterns and trends and providing accurate and credible information for the global disaster risk reduction community. Within this goal the present work aimed at improving the Global Flood Model. The contribution will focus on the Hazard maps definition starting form a combination of stream-flow gauges frequency analysis and Hydrologic-hydraulic modelling. The Hazard maps produced by the Global Flood Model are not considering flood defences and are therefore not suitable as such for risk parameters computations; a post-processing procedure to consider flood defences is proposed and applied. The Hazard maps are then used to produce a full set of Possible Flood scenarios in order to compute PML curves. Results are discussed with reference to some example countries highlighting advantages and limitations of the approach undertaken.

  3. Imitation Modeling and Institutional Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Y. Barbashin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of imitation modeling in the conduct of institutional research. The institutional approach is based on the observation of social behavior. To understand a social process means to determine the key rules that individuals use, undertaking social actions associated with this process or phenomenon. This does not mean that institutions determine behavioral reactions, although there are a number of social situations where the majority of individuals follow the dominant rules. If the main laws of development of the institutional patterns are known, one can describe most of the social processes accurately. The author believes that the main difficulty with the analysis of institutional processes is their recursive nature: from the standards of behavior one may find the proposed actions of social agents who follow, obey or violate institutions, but the possibility of reconstructive analysis is not obvious. The author demonstrates how the institutional approach is applied to the analysis of social behavior. The article describes the basic principles and methodology of imitation modeling. Imitation modeling reveals the importance of institutions in structuring social transactions. The article concludes that in the long term institutional processes are not determined by initial conditions.

  4. The Capodimonte Deep Field - Presentation of the survey and first follow-up studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alcala, JM; Pannella, M; Puddu, E; Radovich, M; Silvotti, R; Arnaboldi, M; Capaccioli, M; Covone, G; Dall'Ora, M; De Lucia, G; Grado, A; Longo, G; Mercurio, A; Musella, [No Value; Napolitano, N; Pavlov, M; Rifatto, A; Ripepi, [No Value; Scaramella, R

    2004-01-01

    We present the Capodimonte Deep Field (OACDF), a deep field covering an area of 0.5 deg(2) in the B, V, R optical bands plus six medium-band filters in the wavelength range 773-913 nm. The field reaches the following limiting magnitudes: B-AB similar to 25.3, V-AB similar to 24.8 and R-AB similar to

  5. Study of compulsive buying in patients presenting obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoyeux, Michel; Bailly, Florence; Moula, Hervé; Loi, Sabrina; Adès, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed the prevalence of compulsive buying (CB) among patients presenting an obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). They compared the buying style of patients with and without CB. One thousand five hundred consecutive patients were assessed by a general practitioner in Paris (France). Sixty patients presenting with OCD were included. Patients with CB associated with OCD (n = 14) were compared with those with "pure" OCD (n = 46). Sixty patients paired for sex and age and free from OCD, depression, and anxiety were also recruited among the clients of the same general practitioner. We compared 3 groups: controls, patients with OCD, and patients with OCD + CB. Prevalence of CB was 23% (14 cases) among patients with OCD and 6% (4 cases) in controls (chi(2)(1) = 5.3, P = .02). Patients presenting with OCD + CB had a higher number of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Fourth Edition diagnostic criteria for OCD than patients with pure OCD (6.1 and 5.4, respectively, P = .001). Depression was more frequent in the OCD + CB group (78%) than in the OCD group (42%) and in controls (10%) (P = .02). Patients from the OCD + CB group had higher score at the CAGE questionnaire than those of the OCD group (2 vs 0.7, P = .003). Patients with OCD + CB considered 42% of their purchases as occasions not to be passed up compared with 15.4% in the OCD group and 8.6% in controls. OCD+CD patients used the items they bought after a longer delay than controls and patients with pure OCD (8.2 vs 3 and 3.1 days, respectively). Compulsive buying is more frequent in OCD than in controls. Patients presenting with OCD + CB show more depressive disorders and drink more alcohol. They are more highly implicated in the items they buy and they are more often disappointed by the items once they possess them.

  6. The Role of Presented Objects in Deriving Color Preference Criteria from Psychophysical Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P.; Wei, Minchen

    2016-12-08

    Of the many “components” of a color rendering measure, one is perhaps the most important: the set of color samples (spectral reflectance functions) that are employed as a standardized means of evaluating and rating a light source. At the same time, a standardized set of color samples can never apply perfectly to a real space or a real set of observed objects, meaning there will always be some level of mismatch between the predicted and observed color shifts. This mismatch is important for lighting specifiers to consider, but even more critical for experiments that seek to evaluate the relationship between color rendering measures and human perception. This article explores how the color distortions of three possible experimental object sets compare to the color distortions predicted using the color evaluation samples of IES TM-30-15 (TM-30). The experimental object sets include those from Royer and colleagues [2016], a set of produce (10 fruits and vegetables), and the X-rite Color Checker Classic. The differences are traced back to properties of the samples sets, such as the coverage of color space, average chroma level, and specific spectral features. The consequence of the differences, that the visual evaluation is based on color distortions that are substantially different from what is predicted, can lead to inaccurate criteria or models of a given perception, such as preference. To minimize the error in using criteria or models when specifying color rendering attributes for a given application, the criteria or models should be developed using a set of experimental objects that matches the typical objects of the application as closely as possible. Alternatively, if typical objects of an application cannot be reasonably determined, an object set that matches the distortions predicted by TM-30 as close as possible is likely to provide the most meaningful results.

  7. Feline asthma syndrome: a retrospective study of the clinical presentation in 29 cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, B.M.; Foster, D.J.; Fuentes, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    Feline asthma syndrome (FAS) is a clinical condition characterised by recurrent bouts of coughing, wheezing and, or, dyspnoea. While the aetiology is unproven, the condition is believed to involve a type I immediate hypersensitivity reaction to inhaled allergens. In this paper the clinical data from 29 cats, where a diagnosis of FAS was made, are assessed retrospectively. The most common clinical presentation was recurrent bouts of coughing (n = 26) and dyspnoea (n = 21). Radiographic changes were noted in 24 cats, which included increased bronchial (n = 5), interstitial (n = 7) and mixed (n = 12) (bronchial and interstitial) patterns. Right middle lung lobe collapse was noted in two cats. Abnormal bronchial cytology was present in 16 cats. A predominant eosinophilic sample was collected in only three cats. There were minimal changes in differential white cell counts, and mild eosinophilia was found in only five cats. Prednisolone alone was the most effective therapy, although avoidance of putative aeroallergens and antibacterial therapy was effective in some. On the basis of the data from these cases it would appear that the diagnosis of FAS depends largely on the clinical presentation and radiographic findings. The value of ancillary tests in the diagnosis of FAS appears to be limited

  8. Modelling present-day basal melt rates for Antarctic ice shelves using a parametrization of buoyant meltwater plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazeroms, Werner M. J.; Jenkins, Adrian; Hilmar Gudmundsson, G.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.

    2018-01-01

    Basal melting below ice shelves is a major factor in mass loss from the Antarctic Ice Sheet, which can contribute significantly to possible future sea-level rise. Therefore, it is important to have an adequate description of the basal melt rates for use in ice-dynamical models. Most current ice models use rather simple parametrizations based on the local balance of heat between ice and ocean. In this work, however, we use a recently derived parametrization of the melt rates based on a buoyant meltwater plume travelling upward beneath an ice shelf. This plume parametrization combines a non-linear ocean temperature sensitivity with an inherent geometry dependence, which is mainly described by the grounding-line depth and the local slope of the ice-shelf base. For the first time, this type of parametrization is evaluated on a two-dimensional grid covering the entire Antarctic continent. In order to apply the essentially one-dimensional parametrization to realistic ice-shelf geometries, we present an algorithm that determines effective values for the grounding-line depth and basal slope in any point beneath an ice shelf. Furthermore, since detailed knowledge of temperatures and circulation patterns in the ice-shelf cavities is sparse or absent, we construct an effective ocean temperature field from observational data with the purpose of matching (area-averaged) melt rates from the model with observed present-day melt rates. Our results qualitatively replicate large-scale observed features in basal melt rates around Antarctica, not only in terms of average values, but also in terms of the spatial pattern, with high melt rates typically occurring near the grounding line. The plume parametrization and the effective temperature field presented here are therefore promising tools for future simulations of the Antarctic Ice Sheet requiring a more realistic oceanic forcing.

  9. Case study modelling for an ettringite treatment process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The process modelled in this study includes the formation of ettringite and the recovery of gibbsite through the decomposition of recycled ettringite. The modelling of this process was done using PHREEQC and the results presented in this paper are based on the outcome of different case studies that investigated how the ...

  10. Past and present potential distribution of the Iberian Abies species: A phytogeographic approach using pollen data and species distribution models

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sáez, JA; Benito de Pando, B; Linares, JC; Nieto-Lugilde, D; López-Merino, L

    2010-01-01

    This is the accepted version of the following article: Alba-Sánchez, F., López-Sáez, J. A., Pando, B. B.-d., Linares, J. C., Nieto-Lugilde, D. and López-Merino, L. (2010), Past and present potential distribution of the Iberian Abies species: a phytogeographic approach using fossil pollen data and species distribution models. Diversity and Distributions, 16: 214–228, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1472-4642.2010.00636.x/abstract. Aim -...

  11. Quasi-experimental study designs series-paper 10: synthesizing evidence for effects collected from quasi-experimental studies presents surmountable challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Betsy Jane; Aloe, Ariel M; Duvendack, Maren; Stanley, T D; Valentine, Jeffrey C; Fretheim, Atle; Tugwell, Peter

    2017-09-01

    To outline issues of importance to analytic approaches to the synthesis of quasi-experiments (QEs) and to provide a statistical model for use in analysis. We drew on studies of statistics, epidemiology, and social-science methodology to outline methods for synthesis of QE studies. The design and conduct of QEs, effect sizes from QEs, and moderator variables for the analysis of those effect sizes were discussed. Biases, confounding, design complexities, and comparisons across designs offer serious challenges to syntheses of QEs. Key components of meta-analyses of QEs were identified, including the aspects of QE study design to be coded and analyzed. Of utmost importance are the design and statistical controls implemented in the QEs. Such controls and any potential sources of bias and confounding must be modeled in analyses, along with aspects of the interventions and populations studied. Because of such controls, effect sizes from QEs are more complex than those from randomized experiments. A statistical meta-regression model that incorporates important features of the QEs under review was presented. Meta-analyses of QEs provide particular challenges, but thorough coding of intervention characteristics and study methods, along with careful analysis, should allow for sound inferences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Huntington disease: a case study of early onset presenting as depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesterhus, Pia; Schimmelmann, Benno Graf; Wittkugel, Oliver; Schulte-Markwort, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Huntington disease is a dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disease characterized by choreiform movement disturbances and dementia, usually with adult onset. The rare juvenile-onset Huntington disease differs from the adult phenotype. A case presenting twice, at age 10 with all the signs of a major depression and age 14 with mutism and rigidity, is reported. Meanwhile, the father developed the adult variant of Huntington disease. The boy's diagnosis was confirmed by molecular genetic analysis and magnetic resonance imaging. It is important to be aware of hereditary conditions such as Huntington disease and to provide family counseling before genetic testing and after the diagnosis is confirmed.

  13. Order of stimulus presentation modulates interference in Stroop matching tasks: a reaction time study

    OpenAIRE

    Caldas, Ariane Leão; David, Isabel de Paula Antunes; Portes, Paula Martins; Portugal, Anna Carolina de Almeida; Machado-Pinheiro, Walter

    2015-01-01

    In the classic Stroop effect, the time spent to name the color of an incongruent stimulus (GREEN in blue) is longer than the time necessary to name the color of a congruent stimulus (BLUE in blue). In the “Stroop matching task”, volunteers are instructed to compare attributes of two stimuli, in which one of them is necessarily a Stroop stimulus. Our aim was to investigate whether the order of stimulus presentation can explain some contradictory results and reveal the imposition of high-order ...

  14. The present role of small particle accelerators for the study of Cultural Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandò, P. A.; Fedi, M. E.; Grassi, N.

    2011-04-01

    The role that small particle accelerators play in the field of applications to Cultural Heritage (for material analysis and dating) is critically discussed also in comparison to other techniques, pointing out pros and cons. As to material analysis, some peculiarities of ion beam techniques may be now less unique than they were perhaps ten years ago, but these techniques can still reach unrivalled results thanks to a smart use of their potential: for instance, they can provide elemental maps and resolve layer structures. Concerning Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, its unique performance for radiocarbon dating -- as to sensitivity, precision and quasi non-destructivity -- is described, and perspectives for further improvements are presented.

  15. Past, present and future distributions of an Iberian Endemic, Lepus granatensis: ecological and evolutionary clues from species distribution models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelayo Acevedo

    Full Text Available The application of species distribution models (SDMs in ecology and conservation biology is increasing and assuming an important role, mainly because they can be used to hindcast past and predict current and future species distributions. However, the accuracy of SDMs depends on the quality of the data and on appropriate theoretical frameworks. In this study, comprehensive data on the current distribution of the Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis were used to i determine the species' ecogeographical constraints, ii hindcast a climatic model for the last glacial maximum (LGM, relating it to inferences derived from molecular studies, and iii calibrate a model to assess the species future distribution trends (up to 2080. Our results showed that the climatic factor (in its pure effect and when it is combined with the land-cover factor is the most important descriptor of the current distribution of the Iberian hare. In addition, the model's output was a reliable index of the local probability of species occurrence, which is a valuable tool to guide species management decisions and conservation planning. Climatic potential obtained for the LGM was combined with molecular data and the results suggest that several glacial refugia may have existed for the species within the major Iberian refugium. Finally, a high probability of occurrence of the Iberian hare in the current species range and a northward expansion were predicted for future. Given its current environmental envelope and evolutionary history, we discuss the macroecology of the Iberian hare and its sensitivity to climate change.

  16. Waiting for Superman: A cultural studies analysis in the nightmare of the present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Huddleston

    Full Text Available Abstract While the history of cultural studies cites origins in adult education and contemporary scholars continue to note the need for cultural studies work in schools the connections between cultural studies and educational theorizing seem strained. This paper suggests the recent film Waiting for Superman offers an opportunity for a cultural studies analysis with clear import on education and curriculum theorizing. In specific, this paper notes the important conjuncture of forces at work in the public discourse of so-called education reform in the contemporary US context and suggests that cultural studies analysis may be needed now more than ever. This offering provides linkages between the discursive construction of educative reform efforts, the material lived experiences of those who spend time in educative contexts, and the concomitant ethics that such constructions require. As free-market fundamentalism, neoconservative ideological formations, and representations of school and schooling are all in play, this perspective—both in the material and academic sense—intends to help reinvigorate the conversation between cultural studies and curriculum theorizing and provides new understandings of this “nightmare of the present”.

  17. Studying the relationship between redox and cell growth using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Leslie, Matthew T.; Bapst, Natalya; Smith, John; Gaskins, H. Rex; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging has been used in the past to study the dry mass of cells and study cell growth under various treatment conditions. However, the relationship between cellular redox and growth rates has not yet been studied in this context. This study employed the recombinant Glrx-roGFP2 redox biosensor targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or cytosolic compartments of A549 lung epithelial carcinoma cells. The Glrx-roGFP2s biosensor consists of a modified GFP protein containing internal cysteine residues sensitive to the local redox environment. The formation/dissolution of sulfide bridges contorts the internal chromophore, dictating corresponding changes in florescence emission that provide direct measures of the local redox potential. Combining 2-channel florescent imaging of the redox sensor with quantitative phase imaging allowed observation of redox homeostasis alongside measurements of cellular mass during full cycles of cellular division. The results indicate that mitochondrial redox showed a stronger inverse correlation with cell growth than cytoplasmic redox states; although redox changes are restricted to a 5% range. We are now studying the relationship between mitochondrial redox and cell growth in an isogenic series of breast cell lines built upon the MCF-10A genetic background that vary both in malignancy and metastatic potential.

  18. ImmunoChip study implicates antigen presentation to T cells in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Faraco

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip. Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@, variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L, attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease.

  19. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Kenny, Eimear E.; Trynka, Gosia; Einen, Mali; Rico, Tom J.; Lichtner, Peter; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Javidi, Sirous; Geisler, Peter; Mayer, Geert; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert Jan; Kemlink, David; Sonka, Karel; Nevsimalova, Sona; Rouleau, Guy; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Bourgin, Patrice; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Iranzo, Alex; Bassetti, Claudio; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Thompson, Susan D.; Damotte, Vincent; Fontaine, Bertrand; Breban, Maxime; Gieger, Christian; Klopp, Norman; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hallmayer, Joachim; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip). Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease. PMID:23459209

  20. [Dragged disc syndrome in a patient presenting neurofibromatosis type II: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquel, J-J; Vabres, P; Mercié, M; Klossek, J-M; Dighiero, P

    2005-05-01

    We report a case of dragged disc syndrome associated with neurofibromatosis type II (NF2). A 5-year-old girl with amblyopia (right eye, 20/200; left eye, 20/40) presented with dragged disk syndrome and a posterior subcapsular cataract in the left eye associated with an epiretinal membrane in the right eye. Five years later, she developed exophthalmos in the right eye associated with a cervical mass. MRI revealed schwannoma developing in the left optic nerve sheath associated with a cervicothoracic schwannoma. The child was diagnosed with NF2. Association of posterior subcapsular cataract with macular epiretinal membranes is highly suggestive of NF2, although the dragged disk syndrome has not been previously reported in NF2 to our knowledge. It may also be an ocular feature of this disease.

  1. STRESS RESPONSE STUDIES USING ANIMAL MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will provide the evidence that ozone exposure in animal models induce neuroendocrine stress response and this stress response modulates lung injury and inflammation through adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors.

  2. Model analyses of atmospheric mercury: present air quality and effects of transpacific transport on the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, H.; Liang, X.-Z.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Tao, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric mercury is a toxic air and water pollutant that is of significant concern because of its effects on human health and ecosystems. A mechanistic representation of the atmospheric mercury cycle is developed for the state-of-the-art global climate-chemistry model, CAM-Chem (Community Atmospheric Model with Chemistry). The model simulates the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg) in three forms: elemental mercury (Hg(0)), reactive mercury (Hg(II)), and particulate mercury (PHg). Emissions of mercury include those from human, land, ocean, biomass burning and volcano related sources. Land emissions are calculated based on surface solar radiation flux and skin temperature. A simplified air-sea mercury exchange scheme is used to calculate emissions from the oceans. The chemistry mechanism includes the oxidation of Hg(0) in gaseous phase by ozone with temperature dependence, OH, H2O2 and chlorine. Aqueous chemistry includes both oxidation and reduction of Hg(0). Transport and deposition of mercury species are calculated through adapting the original formulations in CAM-Chem. The CAM-Chem model with mercury is driven by present meteorology to simulate the present mercury air quality during the 1999-2001 period. The resulting surface concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM) are then compared with the observations from worldwide sites. Simulated wet depositions of mercury over the continental United States are compared to the observations from 26 Mercury Deposition Network stations to test the wet deposition simulations. The evaluations of gaseous concentrations and wet deposition confirm a strong capability for the CAM-Chem mercury mechanism to simulate the atmospheric mercury cycle. The general reproduction of global TGM concentrations and the overestimation on South Africa indicate that model simulations of TGM are seriously affected by emissions. The comparison to wet deposition indicates that wet deposition patterns

  3. Presenting the model of risk, disability and hard-to-reach families to inform early intervention services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Michelle; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2017-09-29

    Several concepts - risk, resilience, disability and hard-to-reach families in early intervention services - are talked and written about in many ways. Family Stress Theory can be usefully applied to explore these issues systematically. The relationship between risk and disability is complex, and the role of resilience is not fully understood. The idea of "hard-to-reach families" is not well defined, thus presenting challenges to service providers and policy makers. Reflection: This paper presents the Model of Risk, Disability and Hard-to-Reach Families and uses the model to: (1) define the groups of high risk families and families of children with disabilities and explore the concept of resilience within these groups; (2) describe services offered to these groups; and (3) reflect on service use and so-called "hard-to-reach families". Each section includes suggested applications for service providers that may inform the work done with young children and their families who experience risk or disability. Service providers can apply the Model of Risk, Disability and Hard-to-Reach Families to consider each family's unique strengths and challenges, and use those individual elements to influence service recommendations and anticipate service use. Implications for rehabilitation The concepts of risk, resilience, and hard-to-reach families are poorly defined in the literatures, but have important implications with respect to early childhood intervention services. Family Stress Theory can help to identify high-risk families and account for family resilience It is important for clinicians, researchers and policy makers to consider the relationship between disability and risk with respect to services offered to families and the potential barriers to service use. Clinicians and policy makers have a role in promoting accessible early childhood services.

  4. Present and future costs of COPD in Iceland and Norway: results from the BOLD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, R.; Johannessen, A.; Benediktsdottir, B.; Gislason, T.; Buist, A.S.; Gulsvik, A.; Sullivan, S.D.; Lee, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) initiative provides standardised estimates of the burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) worldwide. We estimate the current and future economic burden of COPD in Reykjavik, Iceland and Bergen, Norway using data from the BOLD initiative. Data on utilisation of healthcare resources were gathered from the BOLD survey, existing literature and unit costs from national sources. Economic data were applied to a Markov model using transition probabilities derived from Framingham data. Sensitivity analyses were conducted varying unit costs, utilisation and prevalence of disease. The cost of COPD was €478 per patient per yr in Iceland and €284 per patient per yr in Norway. The estimated cumulative costs of COPD for the population aged ≥40 yrs, were €130 million and €1,539 million for the following 10 yrs in Iceland and Norway, respectively. Costs of COPD accounted for 1.2 and 0.7% of healthcare budgets in Iceland and Norway, respectively. Sensitivity analyses showed estimates were most sensitive to changes in exacerbation frequency. COPD has a significant economic burden in both Iceland and Norway and will grow in the future. Interventions aimed at avoiding exacerbations will have the most impact on costs of COPD over the next 20 yrs. PMID:19357148

  5. Report of International Workshop on tracing isotopic composition of past and present precipitation - opportunities for climate and water studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Workshop on Tracing Isotopic Composition of Past and Present Precipitation - Opportunities for Climate and Water Studies, was jointly organized by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Past Global Changes (PAGES) - a core project of the International Geosphere - Biosphere Programme (IGBP), and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). The Global Network ''Isotopes in Precipitation'' (GNIP) was initiated by IAEA in 1958 and became operational in 1961. The main objective was to collect systematic data on isotopic content of precipitation on a global scale and to establish temporal and spatial variations of environmental isotopes in precipitation. The network is now expected to serve additional purposes, namely as a benchmark for the interpretation of paleo-records, as a validation tool for Global Circulation Models, and for establishing large-scale regional (and continental-scale) waster balances. Furthermore, the structure of GNIP should be strengthened. This includes the build-up of: stations located close to major natural climatic archives (e.g. Greenland, mountain areas); stations which represent climatically sensitive areas (indicated by GCM's and biome models). Isotope monitoring of river outflow from major continental basins should be initiated. This could be realized in co-operation with the UNEP/WHO Global Environmental Monitoring System-Water (GEMS-Water). The deuterium excess parameter (δ) is of particular importance in climate modelling and in the understanding of hydro-meteorological pathways. The use of the deuterium excess imposes strict requirements on the accuracy of deuterium and oxygen-18 analysis. A GNIP-based worldwide documentation of quality control regarding sampling, shipping and measurements is needed. The IAEA/WMO database and other isotope data sets should be included in the World Data Center A for palaeo-climatology. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Study on the present and future training of managers and operators for reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.; Preuss, W.; Tietze, A.; Wuest, S.

    1973-09-01

    The study gives a survey on the training methods for the operating personnel of reactors in operation or under construction in the FRG and compares them with the training and testing methods of other countries, in particular the USA. (RW/AK) [de

  7. Counseling a Student Presenting Borderline Personality Disorder in the Small College Context: Case Study and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Matthew R.; Faulkner, Ginger E.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the dynamics and challenges associated with counseling a client experiencing borderline personality disorder in the small college institutional context. The work of counseling centers at small private institutions has been relatively unexplored in the extant college counseling literature. To help fill this gap, the current…

  8. Evaluation of biases present in the cohort multiple randomised controlled trial design : a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candlish, Jane; Pate, Alexander; Sperrin, Matthew; Staa, Tjeerd P van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cohort multiple randomised controlled trial (cmRCT) design provides an opportunity to incorporate the benefits of randomisation within clinical practice; thus reducing costs, integrating electronic healthcare records, and improving external validity. This study aims to address a key

  9. New format presentation for infrared spectral emittance data. Infrared spectrometry studies, phase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. J. P.; Green, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Methods for infrared radiance measurements from geological materials were studied for airborne use over terrains with minimal vegetation. The tasks of the investigation were: (1) calculation of emittance ratios, (2) comparison of IR spectral emittance data with K-band scatterometer data over Pisgah Crater, and (3) standard infrared spectral file. Published papers reporting the research are included.

  10. [Abbreviations of special terms for presentation/paper titles in magnetic resonance study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komi, Masanori; Shiraishi, Junji

    2013-08-01

    A large number of abbreviations have been created for various special terms, and used in magnetic resonance (MR) study. However, the use of these abbreviations in the paper title has been restricted by the majority of societies and journals. In this study, we investigated the use of various abbreviations for special terms in MR study in order to clarify which abbreviation could be used in the paper title without spelling. We used two journals, Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM) and Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) published by the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM), which has been considered to be the most advanced society for MR study in the world, as the reference standard for use of the abbreviations. Except for some basic abbreviations and specific abbreviations that were used on a long-term basis, the majority of abbreviations were used in the paper title with its full spelling in order to ensure generality. It is preferable that abbreviations not be used in the title of the or title of the paper.

  11. American College Students Studying Abroad in China: Language, Identity, and Self-Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hang

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the results of qualitative analyses of data drawn from monthly informal individual interviews of 29 American college students who were spending one semester studying Mandarin Chinese abroad in a program in China. While some data confirm previous findings that some students' identification as Americans was strengthened during…

  12. A dual use case study of space technologies for terrestrial medical applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozmuta, Ioana

    2017-05-01

    Many challenges exist in understanding the human body as a whole, its adaptability, its resilience, its immunological response, its healing and regeneration power. New knowledge is usually obtained by exploring unique conditions and environments and space is one such variable. Primarily, these attributes have been studied in space for the purpose of understanding the effect of the space environment on long duration space travel. However a myriad of lessons learned have emerged that are important for terrestrial medicine problems such as cardiovascular changes, intracranial pressure changes, vision changes, reduced immunity, etc. For medical study purposes, the changes induced by the space environment on the human body are in general fast and predictable; they persist while in the space environment but also revert to the initial pre-flight healthy state upon return to Earth. This provides a unique cycle to study wellness and disease prediction as well as to develop more effective countermeasures for the benefit of people on earth. At a scientific level, the environment of space can be used to develop new lines of investigations and new knowledge to push the terrestrial state of the art (i.e. study of phase diagrams, identification of new system's states, etc). Moreover, the specialized requirements for space medicine have driven advances in terrestrial medical technologies in areas such as monitoring, diagnostic, prevention and treatment. This talk will provide an overview of compelling examples in key areas of interest for terrestrial medical applications.

  13. A Comparative Study of Video Presentation Modes in Relation to L2 Listening Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Video comprehension involves interpreting both sounds and images. Research has shown that processing an aural text with relevant pictorial information effectively enhances second/foreign language (L2) listening comprehension. A hypothesis underlying this mixed-methods study is that a visual-only silent film used as an advance organiser to activate…

  14. Gender Equality in Media Content and Operations: Articulating Academic Studies and Policy--A Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Mirta Edith

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Mirta Lourenço explains the prospects when higher education studies interface with UNESCO for policy change. The baseline is that education institutions' articulation with media organizations, media professionals, policy-makers, and civil society groups is essential to achieve gender equality in and through media.

  15. Insect symbioses: a case study of past, present, and future fungus-growing ant research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caldera, Eric J; Poulsen, Michael; Suen, Garret

    2009-01-01

    , to date, it contains four well-characterized microbial symbionts, including mutualists and parasites that encompass micro-fungi, macro-fungi, yeasts, and bacteria. Here, we discuss approaches for studying insect-microbe symbioses, using the attine ant-microbial symbiosis as our framework. We draw...

  16. APECS: A Model Organization for Bridging Past to Present and Developing a New Generation of Polar Scientists (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K.; Baeseman, J. L.; Membership, Association Of Polar Early Career Scientists

    2010-12-01

    activities—which are often not part of a traditional science graduate program of study. APECS is proof that a community driven effort can become a robust professional organization in just a few short years. Working with senior scientists and other mentors, such as non-science faculty members, educators, members of the media, administrative professionals, and policy makers, to build capacity of the membership and the organization is a major lesson from the establishment of APECS. Additional lessons include, nurturing your volunteers and new ideas. By building connections between senior scientists, and established polar science organizations to new scientists and professionals and fresh ideas APECS is creating a continuum by which polar science can effectively transition from observation, to synthesis, and towards response. In a period where the polar regions are experiencing rapid environmental change, having the tools and skills to work effectively cross-discipline and within, as well as outside the scientific community, will be essential to address the changes through science-based policy and a well-informed public. APECS can serve as a model for other early career initiatives in many disciplines and countries.

  17. A modeling and control framework for operating large-scale electric power systems under present and newly evolving competitive industry structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija D. Ilić

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a systematic, structure-based modeling framework for analysis and control of electric power systems for processes evolving over the mid-term and long-term time horizons. Much simpler models than the detailed dynamics specifically for control design at different hierarchical levels are obtained by applying both temporal and spatial separation. These simple models, or the aggregate models, represent the net effect of interactions among interconnected regions on specific hierarchical levels. They are exact, since no assumptions on weak interconnections among the subsystems are made. Moreover they are easily understood in terms of power flows among the regions. The approach is essential for improving present performance of the system. It is also potentially useful in a competitive utility environment in which it is critical to study the interplay between technical and economic processes.

  18. The Impact of Pecha Kucha Presentations in the Assessment of a Translation Studies Unit at the University of Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, Anna Gadd

    2017-01-01

    Results of a case study on the implementation of Pecha Kucha presentations undertaken at The University of Western Australia in 2015 are presented and discussed here. Pecha Kucha, a fast-paced presentation format consisting of 20 slides set to proceed automatically every 20 seconds, was used in the assessment of the unit "Translation…

  19. Automated adipose study for assessing cancerous human breast tissue using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yu; Yao, Xinwen; Chang, Ernest W.; Bin Amir, Syed A.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer is the third leading cause of death in women in the United States. In human breast tissue, adipose cells are infiltrated or replaced by cancer cells during the development of breast tumor. Therefore, an adipose map can be an indicator of identifying cancerous region. We developed an automated classification method to generate adipose map within human breast. To facilitate the automated classification, we first mask the B-scans from OCT volumes by comparing the signal noise ratio with a threshold. Then, the image was divided into multiple blocks with a size of 30 pixels by 30 pixels. In each block, we extracted texture features such as local standard deviation, entropy, homogeneity, and coarseness. The features of each block were input to a probabilistic model, relevance vector machine (RVM), which was trained prior to the experiment, to classify tissue types. For each block within the B-scan, RVM identified the region with adipose tissue. We calculated the adipose ratio as the number of blocks identified as adipose over the total number of blocks within the B-scan. We obtained OCT images from patients (n = 19) in Columbia medical center. We automatically generated the adipose maps from 24 B-scans including normal samples (n = 16) and cancerous samples (n = 8). We found the adipose regions show an isolated pattern that in cancerous tissue while a clustered pattern in normal tissue. Moreover, the adipose ratio (52.30 ± 29.42%) in normal tissue was higher than the that in cancerous tissue (12.41 ± 10.07%).

  20. Active fault and other geological studies for seismic assessment: present state and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimi, Toshihiro [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Evaluation system of earthquakes from an active fault is, in Japan, based on the characteristic earthquake model of a wide sense that postulates essentially the same (nearly the maximum) magnitude and recurrence interval during the recent geological times. Earthquake magnitude M is estimated by empirical relations among M, surface rupture length L, and surface fault displacement D per event of the earthquake faults on land in Japan. Recurrence interval R of faulting/earthquake is calculated from D and the long-term slip rate S of a fault as R=D/S. Grouping or segmentation of complicatedly distributed faults is an important, but difficult problem in order to distinguish a seismogenic fault unit corresponding to an individual characteristic earthquake. If the time t of the latest event is obtained, the `cautiousness` of a fault can be judged from R-t or t/R. According to this idea, several faults whose t/R exceed 0.5 have been designated as the `precaution faults` having higher probability of earthquake occurrence than the others. A part of above evaluation has been introduced at first into the seismic-safety examination system of NPPs in 1978. According to the progress of research on active faults, the weight of interest in respect to the seismic hazard assessment shifted gradually from the historic data to the fault data. Most of recent seismic hazard maps have been prepared in consideration with active faults on land in Japan. Since the occurrence of the 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu earthquake, social attention has been concentrated upon the seismic hazard due to active faults, because this event was generated from a well-known active fault zone that had been warned as a `precaution fault`. In this paper, a few recent topics on other geological and geotechnical researches aiming at improving the seismic safety of NPPs in Japan were also introduced. (J.P.N.)

  1. Present status and future plan on LMFBR steam generator safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Hiromi; Kuroha, Mitsuo

    1985-01-01

    The results of the sodium-water reaction test which has been carried out for the safety evaluation of the water leak phenomena in the steam generators for the prototype FBR were summarized. This is related to the behavior of minute leak, the behavior of wear and damage propagation of neighboring tubes due to small and medium leaking jets, and the pressure/flow phenomena occurring at the time of large leak. Moreover, this is related to the development of analysis codes, the development of water leak-detecting system, and the development of the techniques for treating reaction products remaining in the system at the time of accidents. Also the research and development required hereafter for determining the basic specification of the steam generators for a demonstration FBR and future FBRs and reducing the cost were examined. The water leaks in the steam generators for FBRs have been reported in the Fermi reactor of USA, the PFR of Great Britain, the BN-350 of USSR, the Phenix reactor of France and so on. In Japan, the sodium-water reaction has been well understood, and the facilities for the countremeasures to it have been established. The sodium-water reaction phenomena, the present status of sodium-water reaction research and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Ribosomes and polyribosomes are present in the squid giant axon: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, J R; Kun, A; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A; Morillas, J; Benech, C R

    1999-05-01

    Ribosomes and polyribosomes were detected by immuno-electron microscopy in the giant axon and small axons of the squid using a polyclonal antibody against rat brain ribosomes. The ribosomal fraction used as antigen was purified by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose density gradient and shown to contain ribosomal RNAs and native ribosomes. The polyclonal antibody raised in rabbits reacted with at least ten proteins on immunoblots of purified rat brain ribosomes as well as with a set of multiple ribosomal proteins prepared from the squid giant fiber lobe. Immunoreactions were performed on cryostat sections of the stellate nerve cut at a distance of more than 3 cm from the stellate ganglion, using pre-embedding techniques. Ribosomes and polyribosomes were identified within the giant axon and small axons using electron microscopic methods, following binding of peroxidase-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG secondary antibody. Polysomes were more frequently localized in peripheral axoplasm, including the cortical layer of the giant axon, and were generally associated with unidentified cytoskeletal filaments or with dense matrix material. The immunochemical demonstration of ribosomes and polyribosomes in the giant axon and small axons of the squid confirms similar observations in the squid and the goldfish obtained with the method of electron spectroscopic imaging, and strongly supports the view that a local system of protein synthesis is present in axons. The immunochemical method here described offers an alternative tool for the selective identification of ribosomes, and is likely to prove of value in the analyses of other axonal systems.

  3. Present status and future plans of the study for preparation of Pu reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Mika; Kageyama, Tomio; Suzuki, Toru

    2007-01-01

    All accountancy analysis at the Plutonium Fuel Development Center of JAEA is performed by isotope dilution mass spectrometry with well-characterized standard materials. Though Pu reference materials has been supplied from foreign country, importing those Pu materials is gradually becoming more difficult and may be almost impossible to import them in future. Thus, in order to establish the capability and expertise for the preparation of Pu reference materials, JAEA has started collaborative work with NBL who has high skills for preparing and supplying nuclear reference materials for long periods. One of the targets of this collaboration is preparation of standard material for IDMS (LSD spike). MOX powder which has been stored in JAEA was dissolved and Purified to obtain Pu solution. A small portion of the Purified solution was transported to NBL for analysis. LSD spike will be prepared from this Pu solution and then validation analysis and performance test including stability test will be performed with NBL and JAEA. This report presents status and future plans for the collaboration work. (author)

  4. Study of the emanation levels of 222Rn present in Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials - NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Marcia Valeria de Fatima da Encarnacao Sa

    2009-01-01

    The presence of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM), contaminating oil and gas facilities, is a common fact in the petroleum industry, and can be severe enough to expose the workers to elevated levels of radiation. Thus, contaminated residues need to be segregated but, this is still a problem without a satisfactory solution. Currently, the most practical and economic option for discarding this material is to stock it in areas of the facility whose access is controlled. Certain equipment used in the petroleum industry has scale and sludge that could be associated to important levels of radioactivity. Typically, the scale is a mixture of carbonate and sulphate minerals, such as barite (BaSO 4 ), that easily incorporates 226 Ra and 228 Ra in its structures. The objective of this work was to measure the emanations of the radon present in these NORM samples, via diffusion chambers containing a nuclear track detector (CR-39). The images of particle alpha tracks emanated by 222 Rn registered on CR-39 were observed with a Nikon E400 optic microscope and captured by a Nikon Coolpix digital camera and then stored in a database, to later count the tracks using the computational program, Image Pro plus. Being that the emanation rate of 222 Rn was proportional to the number of these tracks the methodology permitted the comparison of contamination levels of the analyzed samples. (author)

  5. A clinicopathological study of malignant melanoma with special reference to atypical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Subhalakshmi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is a tumor of melanocytic origin. Lymphatic and hematogenous metastases are common in this condition. Retrospective analysis was performed in 16 consecutive cases diagnosed histopathologically as malignant melanoma at the pathology department of a medial college in eastern India. 75% of the patients were male; majority of them was in their sixth decade. All (100% the lesions were pigmented. The primary site was known in all cases, except two (12.5%. Out of the 14 cases with known primary site 11 (78.57% were cutaneous melanomas, including one arising in labia minora, two (14.29% were ocular and one (7.14% was vaginal in origin. Among cutaneous melanomas, superficial spreading type was the commonest variety and mixed population of epithelioid and spindle cell was the commonest histopathological pattern. The commonest grade of invasion was grade III (Clark′s. The clinical presentation of the case of vaginal melanoma and the two cases of secondary melanomas, including the one with obscure primary tumor, were bewildering and hence are discussed separately.

  6. Present status and future prospects of spherical aberration corrected TEM/STEM for study of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    The present status of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is described from the viewpoint of the observation of nanomaterials. Characteristic features in TEM and STEM are explained using the experimental data obtained by our group and other research groups. Cs correction up to the 3rd-order aberration of an objective lens has already been established and research interest is focused on correcting the 5th-order spherical aberration and the chromatic aberration in combination with the development of a monochromator below an electron gun for smaller point-to-point resolution in optics. Another fundamental area of interest is the limitation of TEM and STEM resolution from the viewpoint of the scattering of electrons in crystals. The minimum size of the exit-wave function below samples undergoing TEM imaging is determined from the calculation of scattering around related atomic columns in the crystals. STEM does not have this limitation because the resolution is, in principle, determined by the probe size. One of the future prospects of Cs-corrected TEM/STEM is the possibility of extending the space around the sample holder by correcting the chromatic and spherical aberrations. This wider space will contribute to the ease of performing in situ experiments and various combinations of TEM and other analysis methods. High-resolution, in situ dynamic and 3D observations/analysis are the most important keywords in the next decade of high-resolution electron microscopy. (topical review)

  7. Histopathology findings in patients presenting with menorrhagia: A study of 100 hysterectomy specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima G Sawke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menorrhagia, by definition, is heavy cyclical blood loss in excess of 80 ml/month of menstrual period lasting longer than 7 days. There are many possible causes of heavy menstrual bleeding which include hormonal imbalance, fibroids, miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, nonhormonal intrauterine device, adenomyosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and rarely uterine, ovarian, or cervical cancer. Treatment depends on the causes of the menorrhagia. Hysterectomy is one of the several surgical procedures as definitive treatment. Objective: To determine the histopathologic spectrum of lesions associated with menorrhagia in different age groups. Study Design: This prospective descriptive study was conducted at the Department of Pathology, People′s College of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal. During the study period, 100 hysterectomy specimens were taken which were performed for the treatment of menorrhagia. Patients with menorrhagia in the age group of 30-50 years were selected after detailed history and fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Result: In our study, it was observed that maximum number of cases were in the age group of 41-50 years (n = 35 followed by the age group of 31-40 (n = 30. Out of 100 cases, 31% cases (n = 31 showed adenomyosis followed by leiomyomas 25% (n = 25, endometrial hyperplasia 23% (n = 23, and endometrial polyp 4% (n = 4. 11% cases (n = 11 showed dual pathology consisting of both adenomyosis and endometrial hyperplasia and 6% cases (n = 6 of leiomyoma with adenomyosis. Conclusion: Uterine adenomyosis and leiomyoma are the most common benign conditions found in hysterectomy specimens with peak incidence at 31-50 years. Patients having menorrhagia above 40 years should be screened for any endometrial pathology. Histopathology is mandatory for confirming diagnosis and the key to effective therapy and optimal outcome.

  8. Study and Implementation of Patient Data Collection and Presentation for an eHealth Application

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Qunying; Xu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    This degree project is a part of information and communication technology supported self-care system for the diabetes, mainly in diabetes data collection and visualization. The report is organized in four main sections: investigation and internet search, literature review, application design and implementation, system test and evaluation. Existed applications and research studies has been compared and, a responsive web application is developed aiming at providing relevant functionalities and ...

  9. Comparative study of gonadotropin levels and clinical presentation in surgical and natural menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Naik Raviraj R, Chandel Rittu S, Abichandani Leela G

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Menopause means complete stoppage of menses for last one year due to failure of follicular activities of the ovaries. This can be determined by the various hormones secreted by ovary such as LH and FSH. As these hormones are responsible for normal maintenance of basic ovarian function in reproductive life; there occurs considerable alteration in their levels in menopause. Aims and Objectives :- 1] To study and compare ovarian function by d...

  10. Descriptive Study of the Presentation of Human Brucellosis in Colombia (2000-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Lopez Guarnizo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to conduct a descriptive study of the occurrence of human brucellosis in Colombia between 2000 and 2012, and, based on previous studies, to determine the prevalence and incidence of the disease, and the limitations for its timely diagnosis and recognition by the Colombian labor system. The research consisted of searching for and analyzing articles on human brucellosis published between 2000 and 2012 in Colombia. It included a phase of information gathering and unstructured interviews with representatives of brucellosis control programs and experienced professionals. We analyzed 17 studies of human brucellosis cases in personnel at risk in slaughterhouses, retailers and vaccinators for animal brucellosis programs: 10 of them reported prevalences between 0.14% and 10.4%, and seven evidenced seropositivity. Information revealed the limitations of the diagnosis, and it demonstrated the little knowledge of the medical community about this disease. In Colombia, there is no clear policy regarding this occupational zoonosis. Brucellosis is mentioned only in Decree 2566 of 2009, in which the new table of occupational diseases is established. The paper concludes that human brucellosis in Colombia is an underdiagnosed, and therefore underreported, disease since there is no mandatory reporting system on the subject.

  11. Modeling of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde with the PEPSE code to conditions of thermal power licensed at present (2027 MWt)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda G, M. A.; Maya G, F.; Medel C, J. E.; Cardenas J, J. B.; Cruz B, H. J.; Mercado V, J. J.

    2011-11-01

    By means of the use of the performance evaluation of power system efficiencies (PEPSE) code was modeled the vapor cycle of the nuclear power station of Laguna Verde to reproduce the nuclear plant behavior to conditions of thermal power, licensed at present (2027 MWt); with the purpose of having a base line before the implementation of the project of extended power increase. The model of the gauged vapor cycle to reproduce the nuclear plant conditions makes use of the PEPSE model, design case of the vapor cycle of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde, which has as main components of the model the great equipment of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. The design case model makes use of information about the design requirements of each equipment for theoretically calculating the electric power of exit, besides thermodynamic conditions of the vapor cycle in different points. Starting from the design model and making use of data of the vapor cycle measured in the nuclear plant; the adjustment factors were calculated for the different equipment s of the vapor cycle, to reproduce with the PEPSE model the real vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. Once characterized the model of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde, we can realize different sensibility studies to determine the effects macros to the vapor cycle by the variation of certain key parameters. (Author)

  12. Amorphous track models: A numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, L.; Bassler, N.

    2010-01-01

    We present an open-source code library for amorphous track modelling which is suppose to faciliate the application and numerical comparability as well as serve as a frame-work for the implementation of new models. We show an example of using the library indicating the choice of submodels has a si...

  13. A decision support tool for sustainable planning of urban water systems: presenting the Dynamic Urban Water Simulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willuweit, Lars; O'Sullivan, John J

    2013-12-15

    Population growth, urbanisation and climate change represent significant pressures on urban water resources, requiring water managers to consider a wider array of management options that account for economic, social and environmental factors. The Dynamic Urban Water Simulation Model (DUWSiM) developed in this study links urban water balance concepts with the land use dynamics model MOLAND and the climate model LARS-WG, providing a platform for long term planning of urban water supply and water demand by analysing the effects of urbanisation scenarios and climatic changes on the urban water cycle. Based on potential urbanisation scenarios and their effects on a city's water cycle, DUWSiM provides the functionality for assessing the feasibility of centralised and decentralised water supply and water demand management options based on forecasted water demand, stormwater and wastewater generation, whole life cost and energy and potential for water recycling. DUWSiM has been tested using data from Dublin, the capital of Ireland, and it has been shown that the model is able to satisfactorily predict water demand and stormwater runoff. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Past, Present, and Future of Soils and Human Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, E. C.; Sauer, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    The idea that human health is tied to the soil is not a new one. As far back as approximately 1400 B.C. the Bible depicts Moses as understanding that fertile soil was essential to the well-being of his people. While exploring Canaan, Moses charged the men he sent to evaluate the fertility of the soil. In 400 B.C. the Greek philosopher Hippocrates provided a list of things that should be considered in a proper medical evaluation, including the ground. By the late 1700 and early 1800s, American farmers had recognized that soil properties had some connection to human health. In "Letters from an American Farmer", published in 1792, J. Hector St. John De Crèvecoeur stated "Men are like plants; the goodness and flavor of the fruit proceeds from the peculiar soil and exposition in which they grow". And in "Larding the Lean Earth", published in 2002, S. Stoll noted that North American farmers in the early 1800s recognized a link between an enduring agriculture and an enduring society, leading them to become concerned about the fertility of their soils and to seek ways of improving the soil in order to insure a healthy society. Continuing into the first half of the 20th Century, a 1940 publication by the International Harvester Company noted that poor soils lead to "stoop-shouldered, poverty-stricken people." Then, in 1947, Sir Albert Howard published his landmark work "The Soil and Health: A Study of Organic Agriculture", a work that took a critical look at modern production agriculture and at the link between soil fertility and health. Despite these various lines of evidence of some earlier level of understanding that healthy soils are required for healthy people, the scientific study of the relationship between soils and human health is a fairly new undertaking. In his 1997 work "Soil and Human Health: A Review", M.A. Oliver states "… there is a dearth of quantitative information on the relations between elements in the soil and human health;…there is much

  15. Study on the surfactants present in atmospheric aerosols collected in the Okinawa Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamegawa, A.; Kasaba, T.; Shimabukuro, W.; Arakaki, T.

    2017-12-01

    The main constituent of atmospheric aerosols is organic substances, which occupy 20 to 70% of the mass. Organic matters in the aerosols contain organic acids, protein and humic acid, which behave similar to surfactants. Since surfactants contain both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups in the molecule, they can play important roles in cloud formation and can affect climate change, but detailed mechanisms and magnitude are not well understood. In addition, surfactants can cause asthma, allergy, dry eye and so on. In this study, our aim is to characterize surfactants in the aerosols collected in different seasons in Okinawa, Japan. Atmospheric aerosols were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) during Sep. 2013 and July 2014. Surfactants in the environment are comprised of artificially synthesized compounds and naturally derived organics so we only differentiate them into anionic and cationic surfactants. Colorimetric methods were used to determine the concentrations of anionic surfactants as methylene blue active substance (MBAS). Cationic surfactants were also measured by colorimetric method as disulfine blue active substance (DBAS) and showed always below detection limit. Thus, we only discuss anionic surfactants measured as MBAS. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and metal concentrations were also measured for the same aerosol samples. Concentrations of MBAS in the studied samples were 2-3 times higher in spring, fall and winter than those collected in summer. MBAS concentration in the aerosols showed strong correlation with sulfate ion and WSOC, and slightly weaker correlation with nss-sulfate ion. Among the metals, only sodium ion showed a relatively strong correlation with MBAS concentrations. It is suggested that the anionic surfactants in the studied aerosols are mainly derived from marine sources.

  16. The past, present, and future of soils and human health studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, E. C.; Sauer, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    The idea that human health is tied to the soil is not a new one. As far back as circa 1400 BC the Bible depicts Moses as understanding that fertile soil was essential to the well-being of his people. In 400 BC the Greek philosopher Hippocrates provided a list of things that should be considered in a proper medical evaluation, including the properties of the local ground. By the late 1700s and early 1800s, American farmers had recognized that soil properties had some connection to human health. In the modern world, we recognize that soils have a distinct influence on human health. We recognize that soils influence (1) food availability and quality (food security), (2) human contact with various chemicals, and (3) human contact with various pathogens. Soils and human health studies include investigations into nutrient supply through the food chain and routes of exposure to chemicals and pathogens. However, making strong, scientific connections between soils and human health can be difficult. There are multiple variables to consider in the soil environment, meaning traditional scientific studies that seek to isolate and manipulate a single variable often do not provide meaningful data. The complete study of soils and human health also involves many different specialties such as soil scientists, toxicologists, medical professionals, anthropologists, etc. These groups do not traditionally work together on research projects, and do not always effectively communicate with one another. Climate change and how it will affect the soil environment/ecosystem going into the future is another variable affecting the relationship between soils and health. Future successes in soils and human health research will require effectively addressing difficult issues such as these.

  17. Long-term prognosis of patients presenting first-ever vestibular symptoms in a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgueiras, Rui; Magalhães, Rui; Correia, Manuel; Silva, Maria Carolina

    2014-09-01

    Vestibular symptoms (VSs) are frequent complaints in patients attending ambulatory care and the emergency room. They may represent a peripheral vestibular disorder or a stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA), yet many patients have VSs that cannot be clearly classified at presentation. This study aims to characterize and determine the long-term prognosis of these patients. In a prospective community-based study involving 104,700 individuals registered at 4 health centers of Northern Portugal, patients with a first-ever-in-lifetime focal neurologic symptom (FNS) were ascertained using comprehensive methods, including referrals from physicians working in the study area and data retrieved from emergency/discharge records. Physicians were encouraged to report/notify any patient who might have experienced an FNS, including those with vertigo or vertigo-like symptoms, imbalance, presyncope, or nonspecific dizziness. After neurologic assessment patients were classified as having a peripheral vestibular symptom (pVS), a stroke/TIA, or an unclassified vestibular symptom (uVS). They were followed up 7 years after the index event at the outpatient clinic; predictors of survival free from stroke or vascular events were determined using Cox proportional hazards models. Of the 1163 patients with an FNS, 360 (31.0%) were included, 16.7% had a stroke/TIA, 57.8% had pVS, and 25.6% had uVS. Most patients presented only isolated VSs (62.8%); 63% were women and mean age was 60.1 years (standard deviation = 16); hypertension (47.8%), hypercholesterolemia (41.9%), and diabetes (19.2%) were the most prevalent vascular risk factors (VRFs). Cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in 63.3%. Adjusting for age, sex, VRFs, and diagnosis (TIA, pVS and uVS), the long-term risk of stroke was higher when CT showed silent infarctions (hazard rate [HR] = 3.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.63-9.60) and the risk of vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, or vascular death) was

  18. Present situation concerning studies on associative n-fixation in sugarcane, 'Saccharum officinarum' L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschel, A.P.; Vose, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    High nitrogenase activity in sugarcane has been confirmed, using 15 N procedure, which indicated rapid translocation of the fixed nitrogen to the plant tissue. It is observed that there are differences in variety concerning nitrogenase activity in the rhizosphere of sugarcane. Basic calculations and an evaluation of possible biological N-fixation with 15 N suggest that possibly as much as 25-30% of the plant nitrogen may be derived from biological fixation. Both eight and electron microscope studies suggest that there are bacteria inside healthy roots and if such a root is surface sterilized and placed ou nitrogen-free media then bacteria stream from the cut surface [pt

  19. The Appreciation and Study of Qur’an Manuscripts from Southeast Asia: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Teh Gallop

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is not on theological aspects of the Qur’an, or on the study of the Qur’anic sciences in Southeast Asia over the past centuries, but rather to attempt to trace the path of the appreciation of old copies of the Qur’an in Southeast Asia as part of the historical record of the Islamic heritage of the region.  In this light, Qur’an manuscripts are viewed as objects of material culture which can cast light on the societies which produced them, and as works of art which testify to the heights of artistic creativity in the region, for illuminated Qur’an manuscripts represent the pinnacle of achievements in the arts of the book in Southeast Asia. This historical record can be measured through a survey of how, where, when and by whom Qur’an manuscripts in Southeast Asia were collected, documented, studied and published, both in Southeast Asia itself and in the west.

  20. Older migrants in exile: the past holding hands with the present - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Dorthe; Minet, Lisbeth; Zeraiq, Lina; Rasmussen, Dlama Nggida; Sodemann, Morten

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the everyday life conditions experienced by older migrants and their reasons for specific age- and health-related behaviour during the conduct of everyday life. The study comprised 16 qualitative interviews with migrants aged 56-96 years from Palestine, Lebanon, Iraq and Somalia. The three themes that emerged from the conditions, meanings and reasons analysis illustrated that the older persons were trapped in various ways -without language, in fragmented families and in an unfamiliar structure. We identified these themes as The importance of the life history, Lost in language barriers and Having a national sense of belonging. The main findings emphasise the vulnerability of older migrants in a resettlement country. With an unclear national identity and without the local language, older migrants struggle to develop a clear vision of their role in a minority community in a foreign country. Besides language skills and the need for interpreters, health professionals need to consider issues such as life history, traumas and national belonging when their usual approaches to managing health-related topics have failed. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Consumer attitudes and decision-making with regard to genetically engineered food products: A review of the literature and a presentation of models for future research

    OpenAIRE

    Bredahl, Lone; Grunert, Klaus G.; Frewer, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Executive summary 1. Few studies have to date explained consumer attitudes and purchase decisions with regard to genetically engineered food products. However, the increased marketing of genetically engineered food products and the considerable concern that consumers seem to express with regard to the technology call for the development of a theoretical basis for research into these issues. 2. The aim of the paper is to present three models which we have developed to explain consumer attitude...

  2. A case study presentation: The MAG3 captopril renal scan, which side are you on ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, A. [The Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC (Australia). Departmen of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: A 68-year-old woman with widespread vascular disease presented to the Nuclear Medicine Department with severe hypertension, (a blood pressure of 200/160 supine), a known small right kidney, and a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. A baseline renal scan was performed with IV administration of 300 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled MAG3. A normal left kidney was demonstrated, with a Grade 0 renogram pattern. The right kidney was non visualised and non functioning. The patient was then administered orally with 25 mg of A.C.E. inhibitor captopril and her blood pressure fell by greater than 100 mm Hg. A second MAG3 Renal Scan was performed. The finding conflicted with results of a Renal Artery Angiogram and Renal Artery Doppler Ultrasound, both demonstrating a normal left renal artery. A repeat MAG3 Renal scan with captopril challenge was performed. Differential diagnosis included: 1.Left sided microvascular disease; 2. A functioning though very ischaemic right kidney that was producing renin, suggested by contrast opacification of the right renal cortex on CT; or 3. A false negative renal artery angiogram, with non-visualisation of an arterial stenosis caused by thrombus or compression of the left renal artery by the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent Renal Vein Renin Sampling measured left renal vein renin activity at 4.50,{mu}g/L/h, (compared with 4.80{mu}g/L/h in the IVC). Right renal vein renin activity was 13.20{mu}g/L/h. This lateralization of renin secretion to the right side with suppression of left sided secretion suggested that the renovascular hypertension was caused by the right kidney. This was a very unusual result, as the MAG3 captopril renal scan had incorrectly and strongly suggested a left sided origin to the renovascular hypertension. In addition, the right kidney not seen to accumulate MAG3 was in fact functioning sufficiently to produce renin. It is hypothesized that the left kidney had adjusted to allow normal function only at very high

  3. A case study presentation: The MAG3 captopril renal scan, which side are you on ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A 68-year-old woman with widespread vascular disease presented to the Nuclear Medicine Department with severe hypertension, (a blood pressure of 200/160 supine), a known small right kidney, and a large abdominal aortic aneurysm. A baseline renal scan was performed with IV administration of 300 MBq of 99m Tc-labelled MAG3. A normal left kidney was demonstrated, with a Grade 0 renogram pattern. The right kidney was non visualised and non functioning. The patient was then administered orally with 25 mg of A.C.E. inhibitor captopril and her blood pressure fell by greater than 100 mm Hg. A second MAG3 Renal Scan was performed. The finding conflicted with results of a Renal Artery Angiogram and Renal Artery Doppler Ultrasound, both demonstrating a normal left renal artery. A repeat MAG3 Renal scan with captopril challenge was performed. Differential diagnosis included: 1.Left sided microvascular disease; 2. A functioning though very ischaemic right kidney that was producing renin, suggested by contrast opacification of the right renal cortex on CT; or 3. A false negative renal artery angiogram, with non-visualisation of an arterial stenosis caused by thrombus or compression of the left renal artery by the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Subsequent Renal Vein Renin Sampling measured left renal vein renin activity at 4.50,μg/L/h, (compared with 4.80μg/L/h in the IVC). Right renal vein renin activity was 13.20μg/L/h. This lateralization of renin secretion to the right side with suppression of left sided secretion suggested that the renovascular hypertension was caused by the right kidney. This was a very unusual result, as the MAG3 captopril renal scan had incorrectly and strongly suggested a left sided origin to the renovascular hypertension. In addition, the right kidney not seen to accumulate MAG3 was in fact functioning sufficiently to produce renin. It is hypothesized that the left kidney had adjusted to allow normal function only at very high circulating

  4. Case studies of computer model applications in consulting practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebein, Gary; Paek, Hyun; Lorang, Mark; McGuinnes, Courtney

    2002-05-01

    Six case studies of computer model applications in a consulting practice will be presented to present the range of issues that can be studied with computer models as well as to understand the limitations of the technique at the present time. Case studies of elliptical conference rooms demonstrate basic acoustic ray principles and suggest remediation strategies. Models of a large themed entertainment venue with multiple amplified sound sources show how visualization of the acoustic ray paths can assist a consultant and client in value engineering locations and amounts of acoustic materials. The acoustic problems with an angled ceiling and large rear wall were studied when an historic church was converted to a music performance hall. The computer model of an historic hall did not present enough detailed information and was supplemented with physical model studies and full size mock-up tests of the insertion of an elevator door that would open directly into the concert room. Studies to demonstrate the amount of room model detail to obtain realistic auralizations were also conducted. The integration of architectural acoustic design and audio system design were studied in computer models of a large church sanctuary.

  5. [Brucellosis, a zoonotic disease present in the population: A time series study in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Lozano, Meztli; Rodríguez-Reyes, Erika Judith; Sánchez-Zamorano, Luisa María

    2015-01-01

    To determinate the relationship of human brucellosis incidence in Mexico during 2000-2011 in relation with domestic ruminant brucellosis. An ecological time series study was analyzed using multilevel poisson multiple regression, the incidence of human brucellosis during 2000-2011 and incidence in ruminants and human development index. The high incidence of bovine brucellosis increased 19% the incidence of human brucellosis. The high incidence of caprine brucellosis increase 17% the incidence of human brucellosis. The presence of new cases of ovine brucellosis increased 13% the incidence rates of human brucellosis. Brucellosis is a public health problem in Mexico, the presence of brucellosis in domestic ruminants and the level of disease control in them affects the presence of the disease in humans.

  6. MISUNDERSTANDINGS IN THE INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION: CASE STUDY OF TURKISH – ARMENIAN RELATIONS FROM 1991 TO PRESENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Sarı GÜVEN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the content of communication between cultures consist essentially of culture and communication word and requires at least two components. Because it requires reciprocal communication. The definition of culture is very different uses in society and beha vioral studies will be used in the context of linguistic and intellectual norms. Given that a large number of cultures around the world must be in contact with each other as well cultures for each culture to communicate with each other. Advances in technol ogy, particularly in communications and transportation; increase of the world population; globalization; tourism and trade; migration and cross - country training programs focused on intercultural communication requirements of mobility. In this study, the di fferent cultural backgrounds of the two neighboring countries, Turkey and Armenia will focus on what is happening in intercultural communication barriers. Both the country's tangible and intangible cultural heritage of movement commonalities and difference s will be revealed by determining the level of communication situations. Elements that prevent contact between the two countries will be made in the solutions one by one. Departing from the point of revealing the communicative dimension of Turkey - Armenia c ommunication will be reviewed. Linguistic communication, nonverbal communication, communication with the two countries will be discussed in socio - cultural and strategic competencies will be examined through these support points. Historical societies, then linguistic communication, geographical, economic, socio - cultural and strategic nature of sameness and difference significant. Two different ethnic groups in the same territory for centuries have created, they are tangible and the two neighboring countries as of 1991, although the spiritual dimension common elements began a communication process. Hence Turkey and Armenia to communicate the judgment to have been

  7. Rumor Propagation Model: An Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto C. Piqueira

    2010-01-01

    information is analogous phenomena. Here, in an analogy with the SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed epidemiological model, the ISS (Ignorant-Spreader-Stifler rumor spreading model is studied. By using concepts from the Dynamical Systems Theory, stability of equilibrium points is established, according to propagation parameters and initial conditions. Some numerical experiments are conducted in order to validate the model.

  8. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy in cardiac hypertrophy study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Yuan, Cai; Shao, Yonghong; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Borg, Thomas K.; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a process initiated by mechanical alterations, is hypothesized to cause long-term molecular-level alteration in the sarcomere lattice, which is the main force-generating component in the heart muscle. This molecular-level alteration is beyond the resolving capacity of common light microscopy. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has unique capability for visualizing ordered molecular structures in biological tissues without labeling. Combined with polarization imaging technique, SHG microscopy is able to extract structural details of myosin at the molecular level so as to reveal molecular-level alterations that occur during hypertrophy. The myosin filaments are believed to possess C6 symmetry; thus, the nonlinear polarization response relationship between generated second harmonic light I^2ωand incident fundamental light I^ω is determined by nonlinear coefficients, χ_15, χ_31 and χ_33. χ_31/χ_15 is believed to be an indicator of the molecular symmetry of myosin filament, whileχ_33/χ_15represents the intramyosin orientation angle of the double helix. By changing the polarization of the incident light and evaluating the corresponding SHG signals, the molecular structure of the myosin, reflected by the χ coefficients, can be revealed. With this method, we studied the structural properties of heart tissues in different conditions, including those in normal, physiologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from postpartum female rats), and pathologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from transverse-aorta constricted rats) conditions. We found that ratios of χ_31/χ_15 showed no significant difference between heart tissues from different conditions; their values were all close to 1, which demonstrated that Kleinman symmetry held for all conditions. Ratios of χ_33/χ_15 from physiologically or pathologically hypertrophic heart tissues were raised and showed significant difference from those from normal heart tissues, which indicated that

  9. Euroconference on the appropriate modellings of galaxy evolution from their cosmological formation to their presently observable structures

    CERN Document Server

    Stasińska, Grażyna; Harfst, Stefan; Kroupa, Pavel; Theis, Christian; THE EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES

    2003-01-01

    Galaxies have a history This has become clear from recent sky surveys which have shown that distant galaxies, formed early in the life of the Universe, differ from the nearby ones New observational windows at ultraviolet, infrared and millimetric wavelengths (provided by ROSAT, IRAM, IUE, IRAS, ISO) have revealed that galaxies contain a wealth of components very hot gas, atomic hydrogen, molecules, dust, dark matter A significant advance is expected from the results of new instruments (VLT, FIRST, XMM) which will allow one to explore the most distant Universe Three Euroconferences were planned to punctuate this new epoch in galactic research, bringing together specialists in various fields of Astronomy This book contains the proceedings of the third conference and presents the actual state-of-the-art of modelling galaxy evolution

  10. Model of the Arctic evolution since the Cretaceous to present, based on upper mantle convection linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobkovsky, Leopold

    2015-04-01

    The present paper comprises a model of Arctic basin evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. The model is based on the mechanism of upper mantle substance circulation beneath the Arctic lithosphere linked with Pacific lithosphere subduction. Seismic tomography data obtained for the Pacific-Eurasia-Arctic joint area indicate that Pacific lithosphere slab sinking to the mantle in subduction zone transforms into the horizontal layer upon reaching the upper mantle foot, this layer extending for two or more thousands km beneath the Eurasian continent. This pattern of seismic tomography indicates the presence of a horizontal convective cell where a flow of substance moving along the upper mantle foot from a subduction zone into the continent is compensated by a return flow moving along the lithosphere foot towards the subduction zone. The return mantle flow makes continental lithosphere extension, giving rise to processes of rifting, magmatism and spreading. The convective cell being continuously supplied with new substance which is transported through the subduction zone it is sure to expand horizontally. The above cell expansion occurs first, due to ocean ward movement of subduction zone (roll back) and secondly, due to the cell front propagation into the continent. The given model allows to understand main features for the Arctic evolution since early-mid Cretaceous to present. Numerous seismic profiling data obtained for shelf and deep water sedimentary basins in the Arctic Ocean as well as on land geological investigation reveal that since Aptian up to present the Arctic region has been characterized by sublatitudinal lithosphere extension. This extension is explained by the effect the return mantle flow related to the subduction of the Northern part of the Pacific plate acts on the Arctic lithosphere foot. The model shows the phenomenon of Arctic plume to be caused by the convective cell uprising flow. In fact lower horizontal flow of convective cell moving

  11. Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

  12. Study of microparticles' anomalous diffusion in active bath using speckle light fields (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pince, Ercag; Sabareesh, Sabareesh K. P.; Volpe, Giorgio; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni S.

    2015-08-01

    Particles undergoing a stochastic motion within a disordered medium is a ubiquitous physical and biological phenomenon. Examples can be given from organelles as molecular machines of cells performing physical tasks in a populated cytoplasm to human mobility in patchy environment at larger scales. Our recent results showed that it is possible to use the disordered landscape generated by speckle light fields to perform advanced manipulation tasks at the microscale. Here, we use speckle light fields to study the anomalous diffusion of micron size silica particles (5 μm) in the presence of active microswimmers. The microswimmers we used in the experiments are motile bacteria, Escherichia coli (E.coli). They constitute an active background constantly agitating passive silica particles within complex optical potentials. The speckle fields are generated by mode mixing inside a multimode optical fiber where a small amount of incident laser power (maximum power = 12 μW/μm2) is needed to obtain an effective random landscape pattern for the purpose of optical manipulation. We experimentally show how complex potentials contribute to the anomalous diffusion of silica particles undergoing collisions with swimming bacteria. We observed an enhanced diffusion of particles interacting with the active bath of E.coli inside speckle light fields: this effect can be tuned and controlled by varying the intensity and the statistical properties of the speckle pattern. Potentially, these results could be of interest for many technological applications, such as the manipulation of microparticles inside optically disordered media of biological interests.

  13. Retrospective study of the investigations of children presenting with lower limbs spasticity in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Carlotta; de Sousa, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    This retrospective study was undertaken to identify how children with spasticity entirely or mainly affecting lower limbs are investigated in a single institution, to address the diagnostic yield of these investigations, and to establish an improved diagnostic algorithm. Clinical documents regarding children referred to our institution for the diagnostic investigation of spastic diplegia and receiving their first clinical appointment between the July 1, 2010, and the December 31, 2010, were identified in our electronic database. Clinical correspondence, case-notes, magnetic resonance imaging reports, and other investigation results were reviewed. For the 26 patients (16 males) identified, there was much variability in the investigations offered. In the 53.84% of them, a specific diagnosis was found, including one case of hereditary spastic paraplegia 3A and one of neuroblastoma. Diagnostic rate could be optimized by a more standardized approach to investigations and by rational genetic testing. A comprehensive diagnostic algorithm is proposed for implementation of etiological diagnosis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Present status of medical study on thorotrast-administered patients in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Kumatori, Y.; Kato, Y.; Hatakeyama, S.; Kamiyama, R.; Iwata, S.

    1986-01-01

    Three-fourths of all thorotrast-administered cases in Japan was warwounded ex-servicemen and their dates of thorotrast injections were concentrated between 1932 and 1945. An epidemiological follow-up study on 147 thorotrast-administered warwounded ex-servicemen whose protocols, contained records of thorotrast-administration, were kept at four former military hospitals, was initiated in 1963. At the end of 1983 the total number of their protocols discovered has increased to 282. On December 31, 1983, the authors found 50 malignant hepatic tumors, 25 other malignant tumors, 16 liver cirrhosis, and 4 blood diseases in 261 intravascularly thorotrast-administered cases. In the remaining 21 cases who had been given thorotrast by the route other than intravascularly, no significant difference was observed in the incidence of any diseases when compared with the controls. In 270 throtrast-administered autopsy cases reported during 1945-1983, 267 had been injected with thorotrast intravascularly and the remaining 3 had been given by other routes. Of the 267 intravascularly thorotrast-administered autopsy cases, 180 were malignant hepatic tumors, 20 liver cirrhosis, 16 leukemias, 5 aplastic anemias, 5 lung cancers, 3 sarcomas of thorotrast injected site, 2 metholiomas, 1 hemangioendothelioma of the spleen, 1 malignant lymphoma, and 1 osteosarcoma. The dosimetry of 96 intravascularly thorotrast-administered autopsy cases was performed for an estimate of the absorbed dose of critical organs, such as the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. (orig./MG)

  15. Using biomarkers to predict treatment response in major depressive disorder: evidence from past and present studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E

    2014-12-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heterogeneous condition with a variable response to a wide range of treatments. Despite intensive efforts, no biomarker has been identified to date that can reliably predict response or non-response to any form of treatment, nor has one been identified that can be used to identify those at high risk of developing treatment-resistant depression (ie, non-response to a sequence of treatments delivered for adequate duration and intensity). This manuscript reviews some past areas of research that have proved informative, such as studies using indexes of hypercortisolism or sleep disturbance, and more recent research findings using measures of inflammation and different indicators of regional cortical activation to predict treatment response. It is concluded that, although no method has yet been demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate to be applied in clinical practice, progress has been made. It thus seems likely that--at some point in the not-too-distant future--it will be possible to prospectively identify, at least for some MDD patients, the likelihood of response or non-response to cognitive therapy or various antidepressant medications.

  16. A comparative study for the echo cardiographic, radiologic and electrocardiographic presentation of the sport heart hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinke, A.

    1982-01-01

    In this work the three most important non-invasive methods - X-ray pictures, electrocardiography and echo cardiography - were compared as to their ability to evaluate the physiological heart enlargement as a result of physical training. Important also was the study of the value of ultrasonic cardiographs. The subjects used were 162 athletes, 36 patients with cardiovascular diseases, and 22 non-athletic control persons. Radiologically the changes in the total size of the heart were determined. For the question of the adapting reaction of the heart because of athletic training the weight-related heart volume is more meaningful than the absolute value. Electrocardiographically it is not possible to come up with any statistically significant statements about the physiological heart enlargement using the Sokoloff-Lyon indexes. Echo cardiographically the regulative heart enlargements can be differentiated into myocardial hypertrophy or ventricular dilation. As a result of this a line can be drawn between physiological and pathological changes. Female athletes show qualitatively, but not quantitatively, the same adapting reaction. The synopsis of the three procedures shows that echo cardiography and radiology show better results than does electrocardiography. Together the methods complement each other in their diagnostic power. (orig./TRV) [de

  17. Present status and perspectives of heavy ion studies on cells and organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.; Craise, L.M.; Mei Mantong.

    1992-01-01

    Biomedical research of heavy ion radiation has been an unique and highly active field in past two decades. Through these intensive research efforts, significant amount of quantitative and qualitative data, which provide insights into biological effects, have been obtained. RBE and LET relationship has been well established for cell inactivation, somatic mutation, and cancer induction. In addition, the effects of oxygen and cell cycle on radiosensitivity of mammalian cells, exposed to heavy ions, have been examined. In spite of such large quantitative information, there is only very limited understanding of the mechanisms of these effects of heavy ions. It remains to be discovered how heavy ions cause various biological effects and why heavy ions can be so effective in producing these effects. As the understanding of molecular effects of heavy ion increases, the potential use of heavy ions in probing molecular mechanism(s) of mutation and neoplastic cell transformation becomes more evident. The exciting progress of heavy ion research in past decades only leads to more challenging questions. Answers for these interesting questions can be obtained by developing new heavy ion facilities for single particle irradiation, by further studies with modern molecular biology techniques, and by innovative approaches. Knowledge from biomedical heavy ion research will not only enhance our basic understanding of fundamental biological processes, such as repair, cell growth control, differentiation, etc., but also help in assessing health risk of space radiation and in improving animal and plant breeding. Research in heavy ion radiobiology is gradually growing from infant to mature stage. (author)

  18. Maxillofacial fractures in a budding teaching hospital: a study of pattern of presentation and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obimakinde, Obitade Sunday; Ogundipe, Kolawole Olubunmi; Rabiu, Taopheeq Bamidele; Okoje, Victoria Nwebuni

    2017-01-01

    Previous reports indicated that there is geographic and sociodemographic variation in the epidemiology of maxillofacial fractures. Audit of maxillofacial injuries managed at any institution is therefore necessary to understand the trends and proffer strategies for prevention. We therefore embarked on this study to determine the pattern of maxillofacial fractures and concomitant injuries in our institution. We carried out a retrospective review of information on demography, aetiology and type of maxillofacial fracture, patients' status, type of crash, level of consciousness and concomitant injuries. The data collected was analysed with SPSS Version 20. A total of 233 patients aged 2 to 66 years were reviewed. A higher male preponderance (M:F 3.4:1) was observed. Road traffic crashes (RTC) accounted for 78.5% of injuries. Motorcycle related crashes were responsible for 69.4% of RTC and 54.5% of all fractures. Fracture of the mandible (63.2% n=172) was the most predominant skeletal injury and the body (25% n=43) was the most common site of fracture while the zygoma (29%) was predominantly affected in the midface. Ninety three patients (40%) suffered loss of consciousness. The relationship between aetiology of injuries and consciousness level of the patients was statistically significant (p=0.001). Of the 43 patients who had concomitant injuries, craniocerebral affectation (60.5%) was the commonest. RTC remains the major aetiology of maxillofacial fractures. The mandible was mostly affected and nearly half of the patients have associated loss of consciousness. There is need for continual advocacy and enforcement of laws on preventive measures among road users.

  19. The present state and future direction of primary care: a qualitative study of GPs' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Helen; Campbell, Stephen M; McDonald, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    Over the past decade there has been a sharp increase in the number of non-profit-sharing salaried doctors employed by practices. This has been accompanied by the introduction of mechanisms to facilitate the entry of other providers into the primary care market. To explore the views of GP principals and salaried doctors on current working practices and the future direction of primary care in England. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Twenty-two nationally representative practices across England, between February and August 2007. Interviews were conducted with 22 principals and seven salaried doctors. A topic guide included questions on motivations for working in primary care, descriptions of working lives, the way in which clinical time was spent, and predictions for future working conditions. Significant changes to GP working arrangements were identified, including increasing pursuit of specialist clinical interests by GP principals and increasing employment of salaried GPs. These developments were reported as improving the working lives of principals but also creating a hierarchical structure at practice level that led to resentment among salaried doctors. Many of the salaried GPs felt disenfranchised and disillusioned by the difference in status and autonomy in decision making and the type of work they performed in the practice. Almost all GPs felt uncertain about the future of primary care and were concerned about the potential threat of private providers delivering primary care within the NHS through a largely salaried workforce. By failing to recognise the problems of employing an increasingly disenfranchised salaried labour force, GP principals may be undermining the very ethos of general practice they otherwise advocate and recreating smaller versions of the private provider organisations they suggest threaten to corrode NHS primary care.

  20. Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration Studies (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummon, M.; Weekley, A.; Searight, K.; Clark, K.

    2013-10-01

    High penetration renewable integration studies require solar power data with high spatial and temporal accuracy to quantify the impact of high frequency solar power ramps on the operation of the system. Our previous work concentrated on downscaling solar power from one hour to one minute by simulation. This method used clearness classifications to categorize temporal and spatial variability, and iterative methods to simulate intra-hour clearness variability. We determined that solar power ramp correlations between sites decrease with distance and the duration of the ramp, starting at around 0.6 for 30-minute ramps between sites that are less than 20 km apart. The sub-hour irradiance algorithm we developed has a noise floor that causes the correlations to approach ~0.005. Below one minute, the majority of the correlations of solar power ramps between sites less than 20 km apart are zero, and thus a new method to simulate intra-minute variability is needed. These intra-minute solar power ramps can be simulated using several methods, three of which we evaluate: a cubic spline fit to the one-minute solar power data; projection of the power spectral density toward the higher frequency domain; and average high frequency power spectral density from measured data. Each of these methods either under- or over-estimates the variability of intra-minute solar power ramps. We show that an optimized weighted linear sum of methods, dependent on the classification of temporal variability of the segment of one-minute solar power data, yields time series and ramp distributions similar to measured high-resolution solar irradiance data.