WorldWideScience

Sample records for model student perspectives

  1. Students' Models of Curve Fitting: A Models and Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta

    2010-01-01

    The Models and Modeling Perspectives (MMP) has evolved out of research that began 26 years ago. MMP researchers use Model Eliciting Activities (MEAs) to elicit students' mental models. In this study MMP was used as the conceptual framework to investigate the nature of students' models of curve fitting in a problem-solving environment consisting of…

  2. Correlation Between Blended Learning Model With The Perspective Of Learning Effectiveness For Nursing Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susila Sumartiningsih

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The learning model is one of the enabling factors that influence the achievement of students. That students have a good learning outcomes the lecturer must choose appropriate learning models. But in fact not all lecturers choose the most appropriate learning model with the demands of learning outcomes and student characteristics.The study design was descriptive quantitative correlation. Total population of 785 the number of samples are 202 were taken by purposive sampling. Techniques of data collection is done by cross-sectional and then processed through the Spearman test. The results showed no significant relationship between classroom lecture method in the context of blended learning models to study the effectiveness perspective the p value of 0.001. There is a significant relationship between e-learning methods in the context of blended learning models with perspective of activities study of nursing students the p value of 0.028. There is a significant relationship between learning model of blended learning with the perspective of nursing students learning effectiveness p value 0.167. Researchers recommend to future researchers conduct more research on the comparison between the effectiveness of the learning model based on student learning centers with the e-learning models and its impact on student achievement of learning competencies as well as to the implications for other dimensions of learning outcomes and others.

  3. The Model of Strategic e-Learning: Understanding and Evaluating Student e-Learning from Metacognitive Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Jung

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the Model of Strategic e-Learning to explain and evaluate student e-learning from metacognitive perspectives. An in-depth interview, pilot study and main study are employed to construct the model and develop an instrument--the Online Learning Strategies Scale (OLSS). The model framework is constructed and illustrated by four…

  4. Student perspectives of a Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in a brain injury rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Freyr; Fleming, Jennifer; Marshall, Kathryn; Ninness, Nadine

    2017-10-01

    Professional practice education is a core and essential component of occupational therapy training. With increasing numbers of education programmes and more students requiring professional practice placements, development of innovative models of professional practice education has emerged, but these require investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student experiences and perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in an inpatient brain injury rehabilitation unit. A qualitative approach, guided by phenomenological theory was used. Participants were 15 students who had completed a professional practice placement in the Student-Led Groups Program. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews and analysed thematically. Three over-arching themes emerged from the data; balance of support and freedom, development of clinical skills and missed opportunities. Students described how the structure of the placement facilitated independent learning and autonomy that was balanced with support from clinicians and student peers. Students perceived that they had developed a breadth of clinical skills and also had missed some learning opportunities in this professional practice placement structure. Overall student perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program were positive, supporting the continued use of this model of professional practice education in this setting. The results highlight the value of structured and consistent approaches for supervision, including the use of formal approaches to peer supervision in the initial stages of learning. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. Chinese College Students' Physical Activity Correlates and Behavior: A Transtheoretical Model Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shanying; Li, Xianxiong; Tao, Kun; Zeng, Nan; Ayyub, Mohammad; Peng, Qingwen; Yan, Xiaoni; Wang, Junli; Wu, Yizhong; Lei, Mingzhi

    2017-01-01

    Guided by the Transtheoretical Model (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1982), this study investigated the differences of physical activity levels and correlates (i.e., self-efficacy, decisional balance, process of change) across different stages of change levels among Chinese college students. The relationships between students' physical activity…

  6. Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses--A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Margareta; Kullén Engström, Agneta; Ohlsson, Ulla; Sundler, Annelie J; Bisholt, Birgitta

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses. The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design. The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study. A questionnaire including the CLES+T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception. Students meeting CNTs agreed more strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor. In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An Experiential Learning Perspective on Students' Satisfaction Model in a Flipped Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xuesong; Gu, Jibao; Liu, Hefu; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increasing interest in the flipped classroom model, and many flipped programs have been funded and implemented to explore the effectiveness of this new model. However, previous studies centering on comparative assessment have indicated that it is not always entirely successful in terms of promoting students'…

  8. New perspectives on health professions students' e-learning: Looking through the lens of the "visitor and resident" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Maralyn; Howden, Stella

    2017-07-01

    The growth of e-learning in health professional education reflects expansion of personal use of online resources. Understanding the user perspective in a fast-changing digital world is essential to maintain the currency of our approach. Mixed methods were used to investigate a cohort of postgraduate, e-learning healthcare students' perspectives on their use of online resources for personal and/or professional roles, via questionnaire and student-constructed diagrams, capturing use of online resources (underpinned by White's model of "resident" and "visitor" online engagement). Semistructured interviews explored the use and value of resources afforded via the online environment. The 45 study participants described a range of prior experiences with online resources in personal and professional capacities, but overall students tended to use online "tools" ("visitor" mode) rather than highly collaborative networks ("resident" mode). In relation to e-learning, the dominant interview theme was valuing knowledge transfer from the tutor and using "visitor" behaviors to maximize knowledge acquisition. Peer-learning opportunities were less valued and barriers to collaborative "resident" modes were identified. These findings help to inform e-learning course design to promote engagement. The results enable recommendations for use of the "Visitor and Residents" model and for planning activities that learners might utilize effectively.

  9. The structure of personality of a good teacher from students perspective according to the Big-Five model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genc Lajoš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the identification of desirable personality characteristics of teachers from students perspective in the Big-Five Model of personality from a phenomenological approach. The description of personality of a good teacher was obtained from students of the University of Novi Sad (n=443. The Big Five Inventory (BFI was applied with the instruction to respond to claims as a good teacher would answer. The students’ estimates indicate that a good teacher is expected to have lower emotional instability, but more pronounced extroversion, openness to experience, cooperativeness (pleasantness and consciousness with regard to referent values in general population. For the domain of neuroticism, the difference is either small or medium in size, for cooperativeness of a medium size, and for extroversion, consciousness and openness to experience the difference is large. The gender of students does not influence their expectations. Methodological dilemmas in this area of research and implications of the results for the selection and professional development of teachers are discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179010 i br. 47020

  10. Student Perspectives on Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.

    2011-01-01

    Context: While burnout has received a great deal of attention within the athletic training profession, there is little data on how it affects athletic training students (ATSs). Objective: To determine what factors influence burnout among ATSs enrolled in accredited athletic training education programs. Design and Setting: Basic, interpretive…

  11. A Teachers’ Perspective of Inclusive Education for Students With Special Needs in a Model Demonstration Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narbis Ballhysa

    2011-01-01

    Determining the factors that attract FDI, and furthermore identify the main characteristics of the host country’s economy, are essential to understand the reason of FDI inflows to a country or region. In the empirical perspective, various studies give different results. More specifically, this paper has focused on determining the factors for and against FDI in Albania.

  12. Using Feature Films to Teach Public Relations: An Assessment Model from Nonmajor Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Angela Ka Ying; Hutton, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching fundamental public relations courses to students from diverse backgrounds poses additional complexities in learning effectiveness. This exploratory study evaluated the effectiveness and identified the challenges of using films to teach public relations among nonmajor students. Results from an online survey and two focus groups found that…

  13. Student Participation: A Democratic Education perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health Promoting Schools, and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Netwo...... and token participation are presented and discussed in the paper. Underpinning values that these models endorse as important for the processes of health promotion in schools include self-determination, participation, democracy, diversity, and equity....

  14. Mobile Device Intervention for Student Support Services in Distance Education Context--FRAME Model Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalita S.; Jamatia, Biplab; Aggarwal, A. K.; Kannan, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study conducted to analyse the effect of mobile device intervention for student support services and to gauge its use for enhancing teaching--learning process as a future study in the context of offer of Distance Education programmes. The study was conducted with the learners of the coveted Post Graduate…

  15. Motivational Perspectives on Student Cheating: Toward an Integrated Model of Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Tamera B.; Anderman, Eric M.

    2006-01-01

    This article uses theoretical concepts from self-efficacy theory, goal theory, expectancy value, and intrinsic motivation theory as a way to organize the vast and largely atheoretical literature on academic cheating. Specifically, it draws on 3 particular questions that students encounter when deciding whether to cheat: (a) What is my purpose?,…

  16. Global Host Partner Perspectives: Utilizing a Conceptual Model to Strengthen Collaboration with Host Partners for International Nursing Student Placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Margot; Gleeson, Judith; Konnert, Candace; Wong, Katherine; Valerio, Bautista

    2016-07-01

    Collaboration in international nursing student placements requires equitable partnerships between global partners to address areas of shared importance, such as equity and justice in health promotion. This qualitative study was the first to use the Leffers and Mitchell Conceptual Model for Partnership and Sustainability in Global Health to elicit global host partners' perspectives regarding effective collaboration for Canadian community health nursing placements in the Dominican Republic. Focus group and semi-structured interview methodology was conducted with Dominican Republic (Dominican and Haitian) host partners (n = 23) about the engagement processes and host partner factors for effective partnership. Dominican (83%) and Haitian (17%) participants, comprised similar numbers of male and female adults aged 18-60 years (mean age = 36 years), represented the full range of the Dominican Republic host partners (e.g., teachers, health professionals). Interpretive analysis revealed themes that included (1) the unique role of the cultural broker; (2) relational collaboration in a collective society; (3) reciprocal approaches that honor local expertise; and (4) contextual socioeconomic and cultural factors that influence partnerships. Future research and implications at the individual, community, and policy levels are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dual Enrollment Participation from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanny, M. Allison

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the experiences of five high school students previously enrolled in dual enrollment courses, and discusses the perceived benefits and disadvantages of these experiences from the student perspective.

  18. Evaluating students' perspectives about virtual classrooms with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the connections between student perspectives and the SPGP. ... technical characteristics of virtual classrooms were evaluated through students' views, ..... Students needed to use other internet tools, blogs, forums, social networking, etc. Instructor could coordinate the learning activities. Students were generally passive ...

  19. Academic Relevance: College Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarik, Christopher; Whelchel, Taylor

    2018-01-01

    This study examined academic relevance from the perspective of college students. A qualitative focus group method was used to explore how students perceived the applicability and usefulness of their academic courses and coursework. Two focus groups of college students (N = 22) with varied class rank and academic majors were conducted. Data…

  20. Evaluation of the achievement of educational objectives of the Community Oral Health and Periodontics Departments using the CIPP model of evaluation–students' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakdaman A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Evaluation is a continuous process which is necessary for improvement of students learning and planning for required changes to obtain the educational objectives. The aim of the present study was to assess students' perspective on the achievement of the educational objectives of the Community Oral Health and Periodontology Departments using the CIPP model of evaluation."nMaterials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey has been conducted using a questionnaire consists of four domains as introduced in the CIPP model of evaluation (Context, Input, Process and Product. Two groups of senior dental students of the dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were approached. Data was collected anonymously and was analyzed with non-parametric Mann-Whitney test using the SPSS statistical package."nResults: The response rate was 67.7% for year 6 and 87.5% for the year 5 students. Respondents considered material presented in Periodontology Department more relevant and in need for their future career. However, teaching skills and motivation of the educators in Periodontology Department was considered inadequate. 67% of students reported having problem with material taught in Periodontology Department. Overall, significant difference in domains of Context and Process was observed between two departments (p<0.05. In the output domain students rated their clinical and theoretical ability "weak" in relation to splint, implant, management of acute gingivitis and electrosurgery compared with other topics which rated "good". Students considered their ability in using the principals of Evidence-Based Dentistry moderate."nConclusion: The evaluation of the educational achievements of the two departments (COH and Periodontics using CIPP model of evaluation showed that there is significant difference in two domains (Context and Process. In those topics which achievement was reported weak the revision of teaching methods is

  1. On the Training Model of China's Local Normal University Students during the Transitional Period from the Perspective of Happiness Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiwei, Huang

    2016-01-01

    As a theory based on the hypothesis of "happy man" about human nature, happiness management plays a significant guiding role in the optimization of the training model of local Chinese normal university students during the transitional period. Under the guidance of this theory, China should adhere to the people-oriented principle,…

  2. Increasing Employability by Implementing a Work-Integrated Learning Partnership Model in South Africa--A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susanne; Govender, Cookie M.

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa, 70 per cent of the population is under 35 years old. South Africa has a vision to increase youth employment by focusing on education, training and skills development that will promote employment opportunities. A work-integrated learning (WIL) partnership model was developed to provide students with work experience and to increase…

  3. Student Perspectives on Self-Directed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Carolinda; Morris, Sherrill R.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate student perspectives regarding specific factors associated with self-directed learning were collected through eight focus groups. A total of 80 upperclassmen provided input revealing three emergent themes in the focus groups responses: (1) Student-Controlled, (2) Faculty-Controlled, and (3) Administration-Controlled Facilitators and…

  4. Perspective: adopting an asset bundles model to support and advance minority students' careers in academic medicine and the scientific pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-11-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in academic medicine, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics requires the adoption of a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students as they navigate the scientific pipeline. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support to continue toward careers in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, socioeconomic status). The authors define "asset bundles" as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach.

  5. Students' perspectives on cyber bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatston, Patricia W; Kowalski, Robin; Limber, Susan

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the impact of cyber bullying on students and the possible need for prevention messages targeting students, educators, and parents. A total of 148 middle and high school students were interviewed during focus groups held at two middle and two high schools in a public school district. The focus groups were approximately 45 minutes in length. Students were divided by gender and asked a series of scripted questions by a same-gender student assistance counselor. We found that students' comments during the focus groups suggest that students-particularly females-view cyber bullying as a problem, but one rarely discussed at school, and that students do not see the school district personnel as helpful resources when dealing with cyber bullying. Students are currently experiencing the majority of cyber bullying instances outside of the school day; however there is some impact at school. Students were able to suggest some basic strategies for dealing with cyber bullying, but were less likely to be aware of strategies to request the removal of objectionable websites, as well as how to respond as a helpful bystander when witnessing cruel online behavior. We conclude that school districts should address cyber bullying through a combination of policies and information that are shared with students and parents. Schools should include cyber bullying as part of their bullying prevention strategies and include classroom lessons that address reporting and bystander behavior.

  6. Student Discipline Strategies: Practitioner Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    This applied dissertation presented a mixed method design to gain a broader perspective of the perceptions of classroom management practitioners within a particular school district. Many teachers, or practitioners, experience issues with classroom management because of their understanding of strategies they use. Because of the researcher's…

  7. Student-Student Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: An Exploratory Study from the Coach Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbom, Stefan; Hrastinski, Stefan; Cleveland-Innes, Martha

    2012-01-01

    There are comparatively few studies on one-to-one tutoring in online settings, even though it has been found to be an effective model. This paper explores student-student online coaching from the coach perspective. The empirical case is the project Math Coach, where K-12 students are coached by teacher students using instant messaging. This…

  8. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad Reza; Norouzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students' perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students' perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran). Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver.14. Chi- square test was used to compare the nursing students' perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66%) were male. 44 students (30.1%) had work experience (3.58±6.48 month). Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05). Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039), how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032), supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001) with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5%) and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%), respectively. Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery.

  9. Multimodal Student Interaction Online: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Therese Ornberg

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the influence of tool and task design on student interaction in language learning at a distance. Interaction in a multimodal desktop video conferencing environment, FlashMeeting, is analyzed from an ecological perspective with two main foci: participation rates and conversational feedback strategies. The quantitative…

  10. A Haldane perspective from a Fisher student

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 5. A Haldane perspective from a Fisher student. W. F. BODMER. HALDANE AT 125 Volume 96 Issue 5 November 2017 pp 743-746. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/096/05/0743-0746. Keywords.

  11. Capturing Student Perspectives through a "Reggio" Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Diane; Bath, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This research considers the views and perspectives of a group of students on an Education Studies and Early Years course in an English university that took part in an arts project inspired by the philosophy and pedagogy of the Reggio Emilia preschools in Italy. This ethnographic study included semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire which…

  12. Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment (SHINE) Students - Student Representatives' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahud, D. M.; Niembro, T.

    2014-12-01

    The SHINE workshop is an annual meeting of solar and heliospheric scientists which, in addition to aiming to improve understanding of solar disturbances and their propagation to, and effect, on the Earth (shinecon.org), is dedicated to actively supporting students. This dedication is substantiated in part through the National Science Foundation (NSF) providing funding for student attendance to the workshop, which enables student participation. Another example of SHINE's commitment to its student members is the incorporation of a Student Day prior to the workshop since 2003, entirely organized and run by two student representatives. While there are variations in format from year to year, Student Day consists of tutorials and research talks exclusively by student volunteers to an audience of only students. The day is intended to provide a low-stress environment for students to learn about the various topics addressed during the workshop, to ask questions freely, and to engage in scientific discussion with other students which hopefully is a catalyst for collaboration. As a result of positive experiences, over the past decade student attendance and participation in the workshop have increased. At the SHINE 2014 workshop, nearly a third of attendees were students. SHINE student visibility has increased over the years, with student posters being advertised at breakfast, inclusion of a student day summary by the student representatives during a plenary session, and continued support from the steering committee. Students are also promoting a broader impact of SHINE sciences via increased social media presence. From a student representative's perspective, SHINE has built and fostered a healthy student community and encourages students to engage in shaping the future of the field.

  13. Designing informal learning spaces using student perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew David Riddle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design of informal learning spaces at an Australian university that support students in the generation of knowledge. Recent learning space design projects at La Trobe have been informed by a number of pre-existing projects, including a small research project on student use of technologies, a national project on learning space design, and a significant curriculum renewal process at the university. It demonstrates the ways in which evidence based on student perspectives and principles developed through applied research in teaching and learning can inform real world learning space design projects in a higher education context.

  14. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of…

  15. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Ghiyasvandian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  16. Iranian nursing students' perspectives of educational equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Mohammadpour, Ali; Abbasi, Mahmoud; Javadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Around the world there is a growing consensus that students' rights must be protected, regardless of race, creed, color, sex, religion, and socioeconomic status. One of these rights is the educational equity. However, little is known about these phenomena in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the educational equity from the perspective of nursing students. A qualitative study was conducted. Thus, we purposefully recruited for in-depth interviews 13 nursing students (8 female and 5 male). All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis approach to identify categories and themes. Four main themes emerged from the data: Fair Educational Opportunity, fair evaluation, attempts to combat discrimination, and employing qualified teachers.  It is argued that educational equity should be developed in higher education. Principles of equity and students' rights may form the most basic rationale for all formal and informal efforts to extend the right of equal access to education.

  17. The Definition of Community: A Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Link

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When designing service-learning programs, catch-words like ‘community engagement’ and ‘community partners’ comes to mind. As undergraduate students seeking funding for research-service projects abroad, we are told to work with and through ‘the community’ and to have ‘community-centered’ project design. The dominant rhetoric gives rise to a homogenizing and simplifying view of ‘community’ that is implicit to ‘community engagement’ initiatives. In June 2010, we traveled to Belize on a research grant with the goal of installing slow-sand water filters in a rural community. Our perceptions of ‘community’ profoundly shaped the way we designed and implemented our project, and we quickly found that our initial conception of the ‘community’ was incorrect. We saw that there is a large difference between how the ‘community’ is treated in service-learning discourse and actual on-the-ground realities. This paper offers a unique student perspective on the definition of ‘community.’ We hope that other students will learn from our experiences and that educators will be able to more critically examine how the concept of ‘community’ is presented to students. KEYWORDSservice-learning; community engagement; definition of community; student perspective

  18. Students' perspectives on basic nursing care education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman-de Waal, Getty; Feo, Rebecca; Vermeulen, Hester; Heinen, Maud

    2018-02-05

    The aim of the study is to explore the perspectives of nursing students on their education concerning basic nursing care, learned either during theoretical education or clinical placement, with a specific focus on nutrition and communication. Basic care activities lie at the core of nursing, but are ill-informed by evidence and often poorly delivered. Nursing students' education on basic care might be lacking, and the question remains how they learn to deliver basic care in clinical practice. Descriptive study, using an online questionnaire. Nursing students at the vocational and bachelor level of six nursing schools in the Netherlands were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their perception of basic nursing care education in general (both theoretical education and clinical placement), and specifically in relation to nutrition and communication. Nursing students (n=226 bachelor students, n=30 vocational students) completed the questionnaire. Most students reported that they learned more about basic nursing care during clinical placement than during theoretical education. Vocational students also reported learning more about basic nursing care in both theoretical education and clinical practice than bachelor students. In terms of nutrition, low numbers of students from both education levels reported learning about nutrition protocols and guidelines during theoretical education. In terms of communication, vocational students indicated that they learned more about different aspects of communication during clinical practice than theoretical education, and were also more likely to learn about communication (in both theoretical education and clinical practice) than were bachelor students. Basic nursing care seems to be largely invisible in nursing education, especially at the bachelor level and during theoretical education. Improved basic nursing care will enhance nurse sensitive outcomes and patient satisfaction and will contribute to lower healthcare

  19. Perspectives on multifield models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Multifield models for prediction of nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics are reviewed from the viewpoint of their structure and requirements for closure relationships. Their strengths and weaknesses are illustrated with examples, indicating that they are effective in predicting separated and distributed flow regimes, but have problems for flows with large oscillations. Needs for multifield models are also discussed in the context of reactor operations and accident simulations. The highest priorities for future developments appear to relate to closure relationships for three-dimensional multifield models with emphasis on those needed for calculations of phase separation and entrainment/de-entrainment in complex geometries.

  20. Perspectives on multifield models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.

    1997-01-01

    Multifield models for prediction of nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics are reviewed from the viewpoint of their structure and requirements for closure relationships. Their strengths and weaknesses are illustrated with examples, indicating that they are effective in predicting separated and distributed flow regimes, but have problems for flows with large oscillations. Needs for multifield models are also discussed in the context of reactor operations and accident simulations. The highest priorities for future developments appear to relate to closure relationships for three-dimensional multifield models with emphasis on those needed for calculations of phase separation and entrainment/de-entrainment in complex geometries

  1. Students' perspectives of undergraduate research methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: in this study we used a model of adult learning to explore undergraduate students' views on how to improve the teaching of research methods and biostatistics. Methods: this was a secondary analysis of survey data of 600 undergraduate students from three medical schools in Uganda. The analysis looked at ...

  2. Understanding Student Identity from a Socialization Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, John C.; DeAngelo, Linda; Bethea, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the contribution of current research using the Weidman model of undergraduate socialization to understanding student identity development in college. It illustrates ways in which the framework can be used flexibly and adapted for studying impacts of multiple aspects of the college experience on diverse groups of students.

  3. Perspectives on Clinical Education: How physiotherapy students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also utilizes the distinctive features of two clinical education organization models to provide insight into how clinical teaching skills and the mentorprotégé relationship between teachers and students can be enhanced in contemporary clinical education in Nigeria. KEYWORDS: clinical education, learning, clinics, clinical ...

  4. An Undergraduate Student's Perspective on Geoscience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, A.; Feeley, T.; Michelfelder, G.

    2011-12-01

    Traditionally, the roles of field experiences in geoscience teaching have come from experienced instructors and researchers with a dedicated interest in how students learn. In this presentation we provide the opposite perspective; that of an undergraduate student at the beginning of her research career. We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with the initial field work and extend our discussion to include subsequent analytical-based laboratory studies. At Montana State University we are addressing key questions related to magma generation and differentiation at three volcanoes in the Central Andes. These are Volcan Uturuncu in southwest Bolivia and the Lazufre system consisting of Lastarria volcano and Cordon del Azufre in Chile and Argentina. To address these issues students collected rock samples and mapped lava flows in the field during the past two Spring Semesters. Upon return to campus the students prepared the samples for whole rock and mineral analyses, followed by travel to and work in external laboratories analyzing and collecting high precision geochemical data. The benefits these experiences provide include the following. First, due to the localities of the field sites, students become familiar with the difficult logistics associated with planning and performing field work in remote localities. Second, in performing the field work, students gain an appreciation of scale and exposure; topics not typically addressed in standard course work. Third, through close interaction with internal and external faculty, graduate students, and professional geologists, undergraduate students build strong relationships with scientists in the area of their interests. Fourth, by acquiring and interpreting high quality field and analytical data, they learn in-depth about modern philosophies, technologies, and data in the geosciences, providing them with skills and experiences that will be of value in their future careers or graduate work. They also learn how to

  5. First-Year Students' Perspectives on Intercultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy; Williams, Rhiannon D.; Shaw, Marta A.; Jie, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    Faculty can play a critical role in supporting students' intercultural development, but studies indicate that instructors report a lack of formal understanding about how to maximize this opportunity. Through the investigation of 115 first-year students' written reflections, this study provides faculty with students' perspectives on intercultural…

  6. Client confidentiality: Perspectives of students in a healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This moral dilemma is difficult for students to circumvent and therefore this paper presents healthcare students' perspectives of confidentiality. Methods. We aimed to explore healthcare students' views and experiences of confidentiality as an ethical principle by adopting a qualitative explorative approach. Purposeful ...

  7. Authentic Classroom Leaders: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Megan S.

    2016-01-01

    In a qualitative study assessing students' perceptions of faculty-student interaction in the online learning environment, findings demonstrated that students make meaning of faculty-student interaction in ways that align with authentic leadership behaviors. Faculty interaction, or lack thereof, shaped students' perceptions of faculty authenticity…

  8. Good Mathematics Teaching from Mexican High School Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sierra, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a qualitative research that identifies the characteristics of good mathematics teaching from the perspective of Mexican high school students. For this purpose, the social representations of a good mathematics teacher and a good mathematics class were identified in a group of 67 students. In order to obtain information, a…

  9. Motivation for Math in Rural Schools: Student and Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.

    2011-01-01

    Rural schools, students, teachers, administrators, families and community leaders face unique challenges from those of their urban and suburban counterparts. This paper investigates motivation in rural secondary schools, with a particular focus on mathematics, from teacher and student perspectives. It integrates recent research on math learning…

  10. College Students' Perspectives on Dating a Person Who Stutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Robert; Mayo, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine college students' perspectives on dating a person who stutters (PWS). One hundred and thirty-two college students responded to a 19-item survey questionnaire. Survey items included questions about participants' familiarity with persons who stutter, family and/or personal history of stuttering, knowledge of…

  11. Consensus and Difference: American Students' Perspectives on the National History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Yongjun; Todd, Reese; Lan, William

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-examine the consensus and difference in American students' understanding of national history, on which there were divergent research results. With three sets of questions that examined students' perspectives of the collective memory, historical significance, and credibility of historical sources, we found that…

  12. The piano teaching situation from a student perspective: A South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses a qualitative survey conducted among piano students in order to determine their needs regarding piano teaching. The empirical research underlying this article indicates that, from the perspective of the piano student, certain needs in the piano teaching situation are not satisfied, while piano lecturers ...

  13. Cancer metabolism: a modeling perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan eGhaffari Nouran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells alter their metabolism to maintain unregulated cellular proliferation and survival, but this transformation leaves them reliant on constant supply of nutrients and energy. In addition to the widely studied dysregulated glucose metabolism to fuel tumor cell growth, accumulating evidences suggest that utilization of amino acids and lipids contributes significantly to cancer cell metabolism. Also recent progresses in our understanding of carcinogenesis have revealed that cancer is a complex disease and cannot be understood through simple investigation of genetic mutations of cancerous cells. Cancer cells present in complex tumor tissues communicate with the surrounding microenvironment and develop traits which promote their growth, survival and metastasis. Decoding the full scope and targeting dysregulated metabolic pathways that support neoplastic transformations and their preservation requires both the advancement of experimental technologies for more comprehensive measurement of omics as well as the advancement of robust computational methods for accurate analysis of the generated data. Here, we review cancer-associated reprogramming of metabolism and highlight the capability of genome-scale metabolic modeling approaches in perceiving a system-level perspective of cancer metabolism and in detecting novel selective drug targets

  14. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  15. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  16. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university..

  17. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university.

  18. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students' Perspectives on Bullying and School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Mary T.; Day, Stefanie J.; Galvan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Student perspectives reflect school climate. The study examined perspectives among deaf and hard of hearing students in residential and large day schools regarding bullying, and compared these perspectives with those of a national database of hearing students. The participants were 812 deaf and hard of hearing students in 11 U.S. schools. Data…

  19. A Social Perspective on Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews literature on student learning that emphasizes the social factors that affect learning. The influence of student social status and the effects of cooperative learning efforts and individual and group reward structures are discussed. (AM)

  20. Student perspectives on plagiarism in computing

    OpenAIRE

    Joy, Mike; Sinclair, Jane; Boyatt, Russell; Yau, Jane Yin-Kim; Cosma, Georgina

    2012-01-01

    Prevention and detection of plagiarism have formed the basis for many research projects, but student perceptions on plagiarism are arguably not well understood, and this is particularly true in the computing disciplines. This paper considers two aspects of the student experience, (i) the types of plagiaristic activity that students engage in, and (ii) the specific understanding of what plagiarism means for students who write computer programs. In a recent study we classified types of plagiari...

  1. Social Inclusion: A Student Board Member's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Frustration, anxiety, and loneliness define too many high school experiences. For students with mental illness or other disabilities, this characterization is almost universal. Students with disabilities begin their high school careers immediately labeled as "special" and soon are ostracized from the larger student community. In high…

  2. Perceived value of student participation in the field of aerospace engineering from a student's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langen, Sven Kevin; Bentum, Marinus Jan; de Vries, Rowan; Grootjans, Robert; Grootjans, Roelof; Brethouwer, Martijn F.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of student participation in space projects is well known. New students are needed to supplement the future workforce and both experience and enthusiasm are important factors to join any industry. Students can also offer fresh perspectives to existing problems in any field of

  3. A Medical Student Perspective on Physician-Assisted Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, John Y; Callaghan, Katharine A; Allen, Philip; Stahl, Amanda; Brown, Martin T; Tsoi, Alexandra; McInerney, Grace; Dumitru, Ana-Maria G

    2017-09-01

    Physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia (PAS/E) has been increasingly discussed and debated in the public arena, including in professional medical organizations. However, the medical student perspective on the debate has essentially been absent. We present a medical student perspective on the PAS/E debate as future doctors and those about to enter the profession. We argue that PAS/E is not in line with the core principles of medicine and that the focus should be rather on providing high-quality end-of-life and palliative care. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Considerations of Learning in the Workplace in Quebec: Pulp and Paper Students' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie-Zajc, Lorraine; Dolbec, Andre

    A study identified students' perspectives on quality and nature of learning achieved in a vocational program using a cooperative learning approach. The theoretical framework for analysis of the implementation of a vocational program included Lave and Wenger's (1991) concept of situated learning and the Guile and Griffiths' (2001) model of work…

  5. Undergraduate engineering students' experiences of interdisciplinary learning: a phenomenographic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Chien

    Engineers are expected to work with people with different disciplinary knowledge to solve real-world problems that are inherently complex, which is one of the reasons that interdisciplinary learning has become a common pedagogical practice in engineering education. However, empirical evidence on the impact of interdisciplinary learning on undergraduates is lacking. Regardless of the differences in the scope of methods used to assess interdisciplinary learning, frameworks of interdisciplinary learning are imperative for developing attainable outcomes as well as interpreting assessment data. Existing models of interdisciplinary learning have been either conceptual or based on research faculty members' experiences rather than empirical data. The study addressed the gap by exploring the different ways that undergraduate engineering students experience interdisciplinary learning. A phenomenographic methodological framework was used to guide the design, data collection, and data analysis of the study. Twenty-two undergraduate engineering students with various interdisciplinary learning experiences were interviewed using semi-structured protocols. They concretely described their experiences and reflected meaning associated with those experiences. Analysis of the data revealed eight qualitatively different ways that students experience interdisciplinary learning, which include: interdisciplinary learning as (A) no awareness of differences, (B) control and assertion, (C) coping with differences, (D) navigating creative differences, (E) learning from differences, (F) bridging differences, (G) expanding intellectual boundaries, and (H) commitment to holistic perspectives. Categories D through H represent a hierarchical structure of increasingly comprehensive way of experiencing interdisciplinary learning. Further analysis uncovered two themes that varied throughout the categories: (i) engagement with differences and (ii) purpose and integration. Students whose experiences lie

  6. ISLAMIC SCHOOLS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN INDONESIA: A Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihani R.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study explores how students of two different Islamic Senior Secondary Schools in Palangkaraya, Indonesia experience school practices in regards to social justice. Employing a qualitative approach, the researcher conducted ethnographic observations of the schools’ practices and events, and interviewed more than fifty students of the two schools individually and in groups to understand their feelings and perspectives about how the schools promote social justice among them. The findings suggest that several school structures including the subject stream selection, student groupings, the emergence of the model or international classroom were found to have been sources for social injustice. Students of the Social Sciences and Language groups, of low academic performance and economically disadvantaged admitted the feeling of unfair treatment because of this structuration. Confirming the theory of social reproduction, the schools failed to provide distributive, cultural and associational justices, and reasserted further inequalities among members of society.[Artikel ini menjelaskan bagaimana siswa pada dua Sekolah Menengah Atas di Palangkaraya, Indonesia merasakan praktek pendidikan di sekolah mereka, khususnya terkait dengan masalah keadilan sosial. Melalui studi kualitatif, penulis melakukan observasi etnografis terhadap praktek pendidikan dan kegiatan sekolah serta melakukan wawancara dengan lebih dari lima puluh orang siswa, baik secara individual maupun dalam kelompok, untuk mengetahui pandangan mereka mengenai bagaimana sekolah mereka mendorong pelaksanaan prinsip keadilan sosial. Artikel ini menemukan bahwa struktur pendidikan di sekolah tersebut, seperti pengelompokan kelas berdasarkan konsentrasi jurusan, pola keberkelompokan siswa, dan munculnya kelas-kelas internasional, menyebabkan ketidakadilan sosial di dalam institusi pendidikan. Siswa kelas Ilmu Sosial dan Bahasa cenderung minim dalam pencapaian akademik, dan secara ekonomi

  7. On being dyslexic: Student radiographers' perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to provide an insight into life as a dyslexic student radiographer, identify barriers and risks in clinical training, and develop recommendations for the support of students with dyslexia. The paucity of research into dyslexia within the radiography profession is worrying, with attention focused only on the support provided by Higher Education Institutions (HEI) or inferences drawn from the experiences of other healthcare students. The impact and significance of dyslexia for student radiographers in clinical practice has never been investigated. Results: On a self-reporting scale of clinical tasks there was little or no difference between dyslexic students and non-dyslexics. Some minor traits commonly associated with dyslexics were also reported by students with no learning disabilities and an inclusion support plan for all students was advocated. In-depth interviews of 10 student radiographers revealed six distinct themes of visualising the disability, self-protection, strengths and talents, time, the badge of disability and adjustments and support. Like other healthcare students, some radiography students reported significant difficulties and prejudices and very little structured support in the clinical environment. Despite the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act being in place for several years, the support in clinical departments fell significantly short of that provided in the universities. The dyslexic students took extra responsibility for their own learning and some had developed complex coping strategies to overcome any difficulties. Conclusion: Several inclusive recommendations were developed as a result of this study that could be used to support all students on clinical placement.

  8. A Model of Student Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Student workload is a contributing factor to students deciding to withdraw from their study before completion of the course, at significant cost to students, institutions and society. The aim of this paper is to create a basic workload model for a group of undergraduate students studying business law units at Curtin University in Western…

  9. Motivation for math in rural schools: student and teacher perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardré, Patricia L.

    2011-06-01

    Rural schools, students, teachers, administrators, families and community leaders face unique challenges from those of their urban and suburban counterparts. This paper investigates motivation in rural secondary schools, with a particular focus on mathematics, from teacher and student perspectives. It integrates recent research on math learning and motivation from the fields of educational psychology, human neuroscience and rural education, to present an integrated systemic view of motivation for learning math in rural schools.

  10. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  11. Using Internet Polling to Capture Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindel-Arrington, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the use of Internet online polling at a suburban junior high school as a means for decision makers to systematically acquire student perceptions about local conditions of learning. Federal and state mandates result in curricular, instructional, evaluative, and organizational changes that affect students' conditions of learning.…

  12. Difficulty in Understanding Statistics: Medical Students' Perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PURPOSE: The study was conducted to examine the characteristics of medical students vis-à-vis difficulty in understanding statistics and to explore the perceived causes of this difficulty among those affected. METHODS: In a descriptive cross-sectional questionnairebased survey, 293 consenting final year medical students ...

  13. Grammar and Syntax: The Student's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavra, Ed

    1987-01-01

    Argues that problems in teaching grammar stem from failure to help students develop, as opposed to memorize, grammatical concepts. Recommends discussion of style and vocabulary, student stylistic analysis of their own writing, and deciphering syntactic use, not just definition, of parts of speech. Suggests that such training should begin in…

  14. Students' Perspectives of an EAP Pathway Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooey, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of overseas students are applying to study at universities in Australia. Many students who meet all of the university's academic entry requirements except English language proficiency are offered pathway programs which prepare them for their tertiary studies. To date, much of the research relating to international students…

  15. Students' Perspectives on LGBTQ-Inclusive Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Shannon D.; Burdge, Hilary; Licona, Adela C.; Moody, Raymond L.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Implementing curriculum that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) people has the potential to create an equitable learning environment. In order to learn more about students' experiences of LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum, 26 high school students with diverse racial/ethnic, sexual, and gender identities…

  16. What does originality in research mean? A student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mandy

    2014-07-01

    To provide a student's perspective of what it means to be original when undertaking a PhD. A review of the literature related to the concept of originality in doctoral research highlights the subjective nature of the concept in academia. Although there is much literature that explores the issues concerning examiners' views of originality, there is little on students' perspectives. A snowballing technique was used, where a recent article was read, and the references cited were then explored. Given the time constraints, the author recognises that the literature review was not as extensive as a systematic literature review. It is important for students to be clear about what is required to achieve a PhD. However, the vagaries associated with the formal assessment of the doctoral thesis and subsequent performance at viva can cause considerable uncertainty and anxiety for students. Originality in the PhD is a subjective concept and is not the only consideration for examiners. Of comparable importance is the assessment of the student's ability to demonstrate independence of thought and increasing maturity so they can become independent researchers. This article expresses a different perspective on what is meant when undertaking a PhD in terms of originality in the doctoral thesis. It is intended to help guide and reassure current and potential PhD students.

  17. International Doctoral Students' Becoming: A Dialogic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linlin; Grant, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper takes up Bakhtin's dialogic perspective to explore the becoming of one Chinese international doctoral student's voices. We investigate how a single participant (from a wider study) assimilates the most transformative but "alien" voice of critical thinking in her supervision space by participating in dialogues with key speaking…

  18. Academic Perspectives on the Outcomes of Outward Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Kath

    2015-01-01

    This research project was commissioned by the UK Higher Education International Unit (IU) and the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in June 2014 to explore academic perspectives on the outcomes of outward mobility at undergraduate, postgraduate and research levels for UK domiciled students, and to consider how best to facilitate the take up as well…

  19. Infusing Creativity into Eastern Classrooms: Evaluations from Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Vivian M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Infusing creativity elements into regular classroom was an important movement in recent Asian educational reforms. A large-scale research study was conducted in Hong Kong to explore the possibilities, outcomes and difficulties of this kind of curriculum change from students' perspectives. Based mainly on Western creativity literature, this study…

  20. Primary Student Teachers' Perspectives of the Teaching of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas Basturk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary student teachers' perspectives of the teaching of fractions, i.e. their PCK of fractions. The research design used for the study was a descriptive survey method. As data collection instrument, we conducted a questionnaire composing of 14 open and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was…

  1. Designing Usable Interventions: Bringing Student Perspectives to the Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary examines the rationale behind the use of participatory approaches to the design and development of educational interventions, particularly with respect to the inclusion of students in the process. The perspectives and claims put forth in this special issue are examined against an emerging approach to designing more usable…

  2. The Hybrid Advantage: Graduate Student Perspectives of Hybrid Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah; Villareal, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid courses combine online and face-to-face learning environments. To organize and teach hybrid courses, instructors must understand the uses of multiple online learning tools and face-toface classroom activities to promote and monitor the progress of students. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the perspectives of…

  3. Diversity Education across the Undergraduate Curriculum: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study uses narrative inquiry methodologies informed by Indigenous research methods to examine the changes in students' perspectives of diversity, including race, ethnicity, gender, religion, politics, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, physical and cultural diversity, as they are exposed to the "other" in their…

  4. Students' Perspectives on Raising Achievement through Inclusion in Essunga, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julie; Persson, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    A Swedish municipality that has transformed its position at the bottom of the national school league tables to top within three years--through inclusive education--has attracted much attention both in Sweden and internationally. This article offers the students' perspectives on the transformation and how they have experienced success. A social…

  5. International and Local Student Satisfaction: Resources and Capabilities Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavondo, Felix T.; Tsarenko, Yelena; Gabbott, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a conceptual model for assessing student satisfaction with universities and the likelihood of students recommending their institutions to other prospective students. Student satisfaction is conceptualised as a mediator between resources and capabilities and recommendation. The resources and capabilities that contribute to…

  6. Virtual Learning Environments: the students' perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Turnock, Chris; Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) are used extensively within higher education, primarily as an educational tool, but they can also have additional functionality. There has been considerable debate, both internal to the university and in the external academic community about the value of a VLE. The need to undertake a detailed examination of how students use a VLE has been a recurring theme in this debate. The purpose of this study was to ascertain how students used the university's VLE. T...

  7. Mature students' perspectives of studying radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.; Decker, S.

    2009-01-01

    The study set out to explore the experiences of all final year mature students on a diagnostic radiography course, in one United Kingdom University. The aims were to identify any difficulties they may have had and to make recommendations to improve mature students' learning experiences with the hope of lowering attrition rates in this group. A qualitative study involving one-to-one audio recorded interviews was utilised. Analysis of the transcripts of interviews suggested that the group believed that their maturity and previous experiences helped them in the clinical environment and put them in a good position, when asked, to counsel younger students. However for some of the mature students these experiential skills did not extend fully into seeking appropriate support for themselves. The mature students were found to be highly motivated but there was a conflict between balancing clinical and academic aspects of studying as well as balancing studying with home life. The group was found to be unprepared for the volume of academic work and its detrimental effect on family life as they sacrificed other aspects of their lives in order to complete the course. It is recommended that forewarning and forearming prospective mature students be considered by radiography education providers. Setting up and utilising an on-line forum providing a 24/7 peer support environment would aid in coping with academic, clinical or personal problems

  8. Experiential Learning in Kinesiology: A Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Mary; Alexander, Kisha; Culp, Brian; Keith, NiCole

    2015-09-01

    Service learning is a form of experiential learning that pairs academic educational experiences and community organizations to promote training, civic engagement, and meaningful service by students to their community. Kinesiology programs have moved toward increasing experiential and service learning options in health promotion for their students, but few have evaluated the student perceptions of these programs. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of a service learning course for Kinesiology majors located in a low-income urban area. Ten recent graduates of a department of Kinesiology were enrolled in focus groups, stratified by gender, facilitated by a graduate research assistant not affiliated with their school. Focus group discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for themes. Nine themes were identified including: (1) Personal and professional experience, (2) decision to participate, (3) location decision, (4) self-efficacy, (5) perceptions of program members, (6) social interaction, (7) personal and program communication, (8) physical facilities and (9) program outcomes. Students positively evaluated the learning experience as valuable to their personal and professional development; noted changes in their perceptions of low-income communities and increases to self-efficacy and skill acquisition from the beginning to the end of the course; and observed significant needs and improvements in physical, emotional and social outcomes of community members. This study demonstrated multiple and varied benefits of a service learning program for Kinesiology students. On-going evaluation of service learning programs in health promotion is needed to enhance student and community outcomes.

  9. Nursing Students' Perspectives on Assisting Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapucu, Sevgisun; Bulut, Hulya Deniz

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the experiences of student nurses who have provided care to cancer patients. A mixed method approach consisting of semistructured focus groups ( n = 61) and a survey questionnaire ( n = 129) was used in the study. Student nurses were first interviewed, and then, a questionnaire was developed for them to answer. Following the content analysis, three themes and 19 subthemes were identified. Frequency and percent were used for qualitative data. Among the student nurses, 80.6% reported that working with cancer patients was "difficult." Difficulties experienced by the student nurses included patients rejecting their care, a large number of problems cases encountered when providing care to cancer patients, communication problems (38.0%), working with patients and attendants who fear death, and problems arising from family attendants who obstruct care. The majority of students experienced patients fearing death (28.7%) and felt feelings such as pity (71.1%), sadness (50.0%), and fear of cancer (41.9%) during their internships in oncology clinics. Students should be supported by instructors and oncology nurses, and nursing curricula should contain topics on how to best approach cancer patients.

  10. Nursing students' perspectives on assisting cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgisun Kapucu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the experiences of student nurses who have provided care to cancer patients. Methods: A mixed method approach consisting of semistructured focus groups (n = 61 and a survey questionnaire (n = 129 was used in the study. Student nurses were first interviewed, and then, a questionnaire was developed for them to answer. Following the content analysis, three themes and 19 subthemes were identified. Frequency and percent were used for qualitative data. Results: Among the student nurses, 80.6% reported that working with cancer patients was “difficult.” Difficulties experienced by the student nurses included patients rejecting their care, a large number of problems cases encountered when providing care to cancer patients, communication problems (38.0%, working with patients and attendants who fear death, and problems arising from family attendants who obstruct care. The majority of students experienced patients fearing death (28.7% and felt feelings such as pity (71.1%, sadness (50.0%, and fear of cancer (41.9% during their internships in oncology clinics. Conclusions: Students should be supported by instructors and oncology nurses, and nursing curricula should contain topics on how to best approach cancer patients.

  11. Smile esthetics from odontology students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Pilar; Tarazona, Beatriz; Paredes, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    To analyze the perception of smile esthetics and its alterations in dental degree students; to determine whether there are differences in that perception among students in different study years on those courses and between genders; and to determine if the circumstance of having received prior orthodontic treatment could influence that perception. Students (n = 192) in different study years of the dental degree course at the University of Valencia, Spain, analyzed two photographs of a patient in which, by means of computer software, midline diastema, upper and lower midlines, crown length of the maxillary right central incisor, occlusal cant, and "gummy" smile were altered. Students assessed the photographs on a scale from 1 to 10. Statistical analyses for assessing each group's level of perception were carried out. After checking the validity of the study, it was observed that the students' ability to detect alterations in smile esthetics did not improve over their degree courses, given that the differences do not present a linear development. There were no differences between genders and between those who had or had not undergone an orthodontic treatment. There are no statistically significant differences between the results of students in different study years or between genders. The circumstance of having undergone prior orthodontic treatment is not a determining factor in the ability to perceive such anomalies.

  12. [Medical student-patient relationship: the students' perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beca I, Juan Pablo; Browne L, Francisca; Repetto L, Paula; Ortiz P, Armando; Salas A, Camila

    2007-12-01

    The relationship between medical students and patients has special characteristics that require to be well understood to prepare both students and tutors. To learn about medical students' thoughts and experiences once they start working with patients, how do they solve difficulties or problems and their perceptions about professional roles and patient rights. Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews applied to 30 volunteer third year medical students who were beginning their clinical practice. The answers to open questions were transcribed and then analysed and grouped by topics and categories. Helping others was the main motivation to go to medical school. Other reasons were scientific interest and social status. Students felt prepared to communicate with patients. However they felt anxious, stressful and fearful of not being competent or not being able to answer patients' questions. There were some differences between male and female students' feelings. Nevertheless students declared that they had rewarding experiences with patients. They all recognized that patients have the right to reject being treated by students. The answers also showed that the first clinical experiences led to significant changes in their views of the medical profession. Students are aware of their trainee condition, the benefits that they obtain being in contact with patients and of their limitations. Patients must voluntarily accept to be subject of the students' training program and informed consent procedures need to be developed.

  13. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise N. Burgoyne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a gauge students’ awareness of research activities, (b compare students’ perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c determine students’ motivation for research and (d obtain students’ personal views on doing research. Methods: Undergraduate medical students (N=317 completed a research skills questionnaire developed by the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Applied Undergraduate Research Skills (CETL-AURS at Reading University. The questionnaire assessed students’ transferable skills, research-specific skills (e.g., study design, data collection and data analysis, research experience and attitude and motivation towards doing research. Results: The majority of students are motivated to pursue research. Graduate entrants and male students appear to be the most confident regarding their research skills competencies. Although all students recognise the role of research in medical practice, many are unaware of the medical research activities or successes within their university. Of those who report no interest in a career incorporating research, a common perception was that researchers are isolated from patients and clinical practice. Discussion: Students have a narrow definition of research and what it entails. An explanation for why research competence does not align more closely with research motivation is derived from students’ lack of understanding of the concept of translational research, as well as a lack of awareness of the research activity being undertaken by their teachers and mentors. We plan to address this with specific research awareness initiatives.

  14. The contribution of student affairs: A student leader perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    being a student activist. It was the time post the mergers in higher education; it was a very charged atmosphere I think on both sides, on the management side and on the other side as a student leader. So I decided to run for Students' Representative Council (SRC). I got in as vice-president and in the second year I ran again ...

  15. Experiential Learning in Kinesiology: A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Mary; Alexander, Kisha; Culp, Brian; Keith, NiCole

    2015-01-01

    Overview Service learning is a form of experiential learning that pairs academic educational experiences and community organizations to promote training, civic engagement, and meaningful service by students to their community. Kinesiology programs have moved toward increasing experiential and service learning options in health promotion for their students, but few have evaluated the student perceptions of these programs. Purpose The purpose of the current study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of a service learning course for Kinesiology majors located in a low-income urban area. Methods Ten recent graduates of a department of Kinesiology were enrolled in focus groups, stratified by gender, facilitated by a graduate research assistant not affiliated with their school. Focus group discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for themes. Results Nine themes were identified including: (1) Personal and professional experience, (2) decision to participate, (3) location decision, (4) self-efficacy, (5) perceptions of program members, (6) social interaction, (7) personal and program communication, (8) physical facilities and (9) program outcomes. Students positively evaluated the learning experience as valuable to their personal and professional development; noted changes in their perceptions of low-income communities and increases to self-efficacy and skill acquisition from the beginning to the end of the course; and observed significant needs and improvements in physical, emotional and social outcomes of community members. Conclusions This study demonstrated multiple and varied benefits of a service learning program for Kinesiology students. On-going evaluation of service learning programs in health promotion is needed to enhance student and community outcomes. PMID:26613104

  16. Land-surface modelling in hydrological perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Rosbjerg, Dan; Butts, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the different types of energy-based land-surface models (LSMs) and discuss some of the new possibilities that will arise when energy-based LSMs are combined with distributed hydrological modelling. We choose to focus on energy-based approaches......, and the difficulties inherent in various evaluation procedures are presented. Finally, the dynamic coupling of hydrological and atmospheric models is explored, and the perspectives of such efforts are discussed....

  17. Student Research Projects Inhibiting Factors from the Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Nikrooz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Identifying the research barriers and assess the ability of students to use the university services and facilities is crucial to promote research activities. Present study was carried out to determine the inhibiting factors influencing the student's research projects from the view point of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students in 2008. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 96 students of Yasuj Medical University were selected by stratified random sampling. The data were collected by validate & reliable questionnaire, containing demographic information, inhibiting factors related to students (personal and organization. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores against the personal barriers and the organizational barriers questions were 43.23±12.96 and 62.58±12.08 respectively. There was a significant difference between personal and organizational barriers (P<0.001 and personal barriers were more important. According to the results, the student's inadequate skills & knowledge of research methodology and lack of awareness of research topics were the most prevalent personal barriers. The most prevalent organizational barriers were unavailability of research consulters, inadequate research skills of consulter, insufficient facilities & equipment and lack of motivating staff & faculties. Other variables such as gender, subject of study and research experience are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: This study showed that the personal barriers were more important than organizational barriers which interfere with the student's research projects. This can be corrected and controlled by teachers, faculty members, university officials and students, themselves.

  18. Making Meaning of Student Activism: Student Activist and Administrator Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Laura M.; Mather, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    College campuses have experienced a recent resurgence of student activism, particularly in response to some of President Donald Trump's executive orders as well as controversial speakers like Ann Coulter and Milo Yiannopoulous. Student activism presents both challenges and opportunities for higher education leaders seeking to engage productively…

  19. Enticing Students to Careers in Gerontology: Faculty and Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Recognition of the increasing demand for gerontologically trained social work professionals prompted an investigation of the factors that attract undergraduate students to a career of working with older adults. Faculty (n = 10) and students (n = 10) from the disciplines of social work, nursing, consumer and family sciences, psychology, recreation,…

  20. The VSEPR Challenge: A Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Ashley S.

    2010-01-01

    To solve the challenge of learning VSEPR molecules in three dimensions, a high school student leverages her passion for 3D computer animation to develop a creative solution. This article outlines the process and story behind the creation of her unique video. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Another Perspective: Teaching Music to Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In an increasingly connected world, our students are listening to and making music outside the school context. As music educators, we need to better understand the media they use and incorporate this technology in our daily teaching to enhance music literacy in our classrooms.

  2. Evaluating students' perspectives about virtual classrooms with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assesses the quality of distance learning (DL) in higher education assessed by considering the Seven Principles of Good Practice (SPGP). The participants were 77 second year students from the Computer and Instructional Technologies Program (CEIT) of a Faculty of Education in Turkey. A questionnaire was ...

  3. Chinese Graduate Students' Perspectives on Home Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Although an established alternative form of American education, the concept of home schooling is just beginning to surface in China. Few Chinese have knowledge of home schooling yet alone consider this form of education. However, graduate students studying in the field of education are aware of this unusual alternative to traditional schooling,…

  4. International Nursing Students: A Phenomenological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pross, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Results of a survey of 16 nursing students and interviews with 11 regarding international education experience were distilled into 4 themes--preparing, adjusting, caring, and transforming--that were influenced by culture, values, and ethics. All participants experienced shock related to culture or to the poverty they encountered. (Contains 19…

  5. Use of assistive technology devices in mainstream schools: students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsson, Helena; Lidström, Helene; Nygård, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The use and nonuse of assistive technology devices in school by students with physical disabilities was investigated, and the students' experiences in using these devices is described. We used a mixed-methods approach with predominantly qualitative methods to collect and analyze data, which included observations of and interviews with 20 students with physical disabilities and the number and type of assistive technology devices provided. It is vital that devices be integrated into educational practice and that students experience immediate benefits for their function in everyday school activities without detrimental effects on their social participation. The latter was often more important than being able to perform activities independently. The students adopted both a functional and a psychosocial perspective of their devices, and providers should neglect neither. Children and youth need both verbal information and practical experience using devices to be able to make informed decisions.

  6. Sleep Disturbances among Medical Students: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J.; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have been identified as causative factors, but other potential mechanisms are incompletely understood. A better understanding about the etiology of sleep problems in medical trainees is essential if we hope to improve the overall quality of medical students' lives, including their academic performance. Sleep self-awareness and general knowledge appear insufficient in many studied cohorts, so increasing education for students might be one beneficial intervention. We conclude that there is ample evidence for a high prevalence of the problem, and research in this area should now expand towards initiatives to improve general sleep education for medical students, identify students at risk, and target them with programs to improve sleep. Citation: Azad MC, Fraser K, Rumana N, Abdullah AF, Shahana N, Hanly PJ, Turin TC. Sleep disturbances among medical students: a global perspective. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(1):69–74. PMID:25515274

  7. Examining the Influence of Selected Factors on Perceived Co-Op Work-Term Quality from a Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewery, David; Nevison, Colleen; Pretti, T. Judene; Cormier, Lauren; Barclay, Sage; Pennaforte, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses and tests a conceptual model of co-op work-term quality from a student perspective. Drawing from an earlier exploration of co-op students' perceptions of work-term quality, variables related to role characteristics, interpersonal dynamics, and organizational elements were used in a multiple linear regression analysis to…

  8. Emergent core values: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Ben

    2016-12-01

    Certain moral and ethical values are expected of doctors, and these values are usually formed and consolidated at medical school. The efficacy of didactic teaching of values such as compassion and empathy has been disputed. Additionally, it is not clear if the values that students actually develop during undergraduate training are concordant with those outlined by national legislative and governing bodies. A total of 24 final-year medical students participated in semi-structured interviews, which explored the values that they recognise in themselves and in their colleagues. The resultant data were thematically analysed to establish core themes. These themes represent the values that students hold in the highest regard. Analysis yielded three overarching themes: personal fortitude, which relates to the nurturing of the inner strength of the trainee; establishment of the ego, which pertains to the developing sense of self as a doctor; and striving for professional maturity, which refers to the cultivation of humane and compassionate care and interpersonal communication. The efficacy of didactic teaching of values such as compassion and empathy has been disputed FINDINGS: The moral values that are constructed in undergraduates centre around maintaining personal well-being, establishing an identity as a medical professional and delivering compassionate care as part of a team. Most values align with those described by professional bodies and educators, but a minority are new findings, and relate to student welfare. Although there are validated assessment tools that measure the trainees' emotional intelligence and adherence to universally approved values, this study delineates the core principles valued by the students themselves. Understanding these principles grants teachers the opportunity to facilitate personal and professional development, and to foster humane and caring values. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quince T

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Thelma Quince, Pia Thiemann, John Benson, Sarah Hyde Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients’ satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have

  10. Alleviating Mathematics Anxiety of Elementary School Students: A Situated Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of the situated learning and effortful control on mathematics anxiety of school students. Participants were 99 seventh graders who studied in two schools. Students in one of these were given instruction through the situated learning model, and the students of other school were treated as a control group.…

  11. TA Professional Development: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are essential for teaching large introductory physics classes. In such courses, undergraduates spend approximately half of their in-class contact time in instructional environments (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by GTAs, which means GTAs can have a large impact on student learning. Therefore it is crucial to adequately prepare GTAs before they first enter the classroom, and to offer them continued support throughout. Since many of the skills required to become effective teachers will also be relevant to their future research careers, it is useful for a GTA preparation program to also include professional development strategies. But what exactly do GTAs get out of these programs? The School of Physics at Georgia Tech runs a preparation and mentoring program for GTAs that focuses on pedagogical knowledge, physics content, and professional development, as well as their intersections. Nearly seventy graduate students have gone through this program in the three years since it was established. Here we discuss the impact this program has had on our GTAs, from their own point of view: the program's effect on their teaching abilities, how it has influenced their attitudes towards teaching, what elements they have found useful, and what changes they have suggested to its curriculum. We find that, in general, GTAs are more receptive when the curriculum is more hands-on and they are presented with frequent opportunities for practice and feedback.

  12. Culturally and linguistically diverse student and family perspectives of AAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Saili S; Parmar, Jessica

    2017-09-01

    Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices are important for nonverbal students with disabilities to communicate with the verbal world. AAC devices provide access to academic and social opportunities for students with disabilities. With the changing demographics of schools and an emphasis on meaningful, culturally relevant instruction for all students, it is important to consider how AAC devices are utilized and perceived by individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds and their families. This paper reviewed empirical studies that addressed the perspectives and use of AAC devices by CLD students with disabilities and their families. A total of N = 11 studies were selected spanning almost two decades of research related to AAC use in culturally and linguistically diverse populations internationally. Discussions and implications highlight the need for a deeper understanding of culture and race as they inform instruction for AAC users with disabilities and additional current studies related to this critical topic within the field.

  13. Student perspectives on their school trips to zoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Susan Kay

    This dissertation aimed to explore students' perspectives on their school trips to informal education sites. In particular, what did students think they learned, what did they want to do, what was fun or boring, and how did their trip relate to classroom activities? The two case studies presented here explore these ideas with 11-12-year olds in New Zealand and their class trips to zoos, in contrasting situations: one is a class in which the teacher thoughtfully and explicitly linked the trip to classroom learning both before and after the trip; the other classroom teacher did not. These differences impacted how students thought about their learning and how they valued the trip. Despite the differences, students had similarities in some of their perspectives, particularly in their focus on social interactions with peers and their desire to see the animals at the zoos. This study concludes with recommendations for informal and classroom educators, especially to find out what students are interested in, give them choices, and connect trips to classroom activities.

  14. Relationships with undergraduate nursing exchange students--a tutor perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2003-03-01

    Student exchange has been used increasingly in nursing education throughout Europe as a method of learning intercultural sensitivity. In the host country, each foreign student is assigned a personal tutor to enhance learning. The aim of this study was to describe tutor-student relationships between Finnish nurse teachers and British exchange students from the tutors' perspective. The researcher's close relationship with the study context and participants caused some ethical concerns, which will be discussed. The data consisted of tutorial session observations, research diary notes, group interviews and background questionnaires. They were analysed using Spradley's developmental research sequence method for ethnographic data. The tutoring relationship was pastoral and clinical rather than academic. The pastoral aspect of the relationship was essential in assisting the students to adjust to the stress of studying in a foreign country. On the other hand, tutors were unable to support all the students to overcome their culture shock. Tutors were uncertain about their role and did not integrate Finnish culture or practice into theory, but found their role pleasant. A dialogic tutor-student relationship is important for learning intercultural sensitivity. Tutoring strategies should be developed to assist students' adjustment to the differences in the host culture and to encourage their reflection on personal, experiential and scientific cultural knowledge during their study abroad.

  15. A student's perspective: are medical students adequately trained in BLS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewole T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobi Oyewole,1 Folashade Oyewole2 1University of Liverpool – The School of Medicine, Liverpool, 2Imperial College London, London, UK We read with great interest the article by Lami et al regarding improving basic life support (BLS training for medical students.1 We agree that BLS skills are vital for junior doctors. The days of trial by fire have long gone away, and junior doctors and medical students need to feel that they are adequately trained to handle emergency situations they may face in hospital.  Read the original article

  16. Cloud forcing: A modeling perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, G.L.; Mobely, R.L.; Drach, R.S.; Corsetti, T.G.; Williams, D.N.; Slingo, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    Radiation fields from a perpetual July integration of a T106 version of the ECMWF operational model are used as surrogate observations of the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere to illustrate various difficulties that modellers might face when trying to reconcile cloud radiation forcings derived from satellite observations with model-generated ones. Differences between the so-called Methods 1 and 2 of Cess and Potter (1987) and a variant Method 3 are addressed. Method 1 is shown to be the least robust of all methods, due to potential uncertainties related to persistent cloudiness, length of the period over which clear-sky conditions are looked for, biases in retrieved clear-sky quantities due to an insufficient sampling of the diurnal cycle. We advocate the use of Method 2 as the only unambiguous one to produce consistent radiative diagnostics for intercomparing model results. Impact of the three methods on the derived sensitivities and cloud feedbacks following an imposed change in sea surface temperature (used as a surrogate climate change) is discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  17. The contribution of student affairs: A student leader perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in as vice-president and in the second year I ran again. I was supposed to become the SRC president but “politics happen” and it happened and I stayed as Vice-President (VP). Luescher-Mamashela: How did you get involved in the Higher Education Quality. Committee (HEQC) as a student leader? Ledwaba: I was a ...

  18. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  19. Using Laptop Computers in Class: A Student Motivation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Philip A.; Reed, Diana; Vaughan, Amy Grace; Clayton, Suzanne R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the reasons why students choose to take laptop computers into college classes. The model involved the individual student choice involving opportunity, ability and motivation. The resulting model demonstrated how some (primary) factors, such as effective learning, directly impact the laptop usage choice, and other factors…

  20. Modelling Student Misconceptions Using Nested Logit Item Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Student misconceptions have been studied for decades from a curricular/instructional perspective and from the assessment/test level perspective. Numerous misconception assessment tools have been developed in order to measure students' misconceptions relative to the correct content. Often, these tools are used to make a variety of educational…

  1. Mathematical modeling a chemical engineer's perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Aris

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is the art and craft of building a system of equations that is both sufficiently complex to do justice to physical reality and sufficiently simple to give real insight into the situation. Mathematical Modeling: A Chemical Engineer's Perspective provides an elementary introduction to the craft by one of the century's most distinguished practitioners.Though the book is written from a chemical engineering viewpoint, the principles and pitfalls are common to all mathematical modeling of physical systems. Seventeen of the author's frequently cited papers are reprinted to illus

  2. AIDS in Thailand: a medical student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, D C

    1994-12-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has become the biggest problem facing the health profession of Thailand today. The Ministry of Public Health reports that there are 400,000 individuals in Thailand already infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and is predicting that 4 million will be infected by the year 2000. This explosive epidemic first occurred among intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) and subsequently spread to other high risk groups, especially prostitutes. The heterosexual population was next affected. The AIDS problem in Thailand was seen close-up by this writer, then a fourth year medical student, studying during an international health elective. At all three hospitals where I worked, I encountered large numbers of AIDS related admissions. Ten percent of medical beds at a Bangkok hospital were occupied by patients with AIDS related problems. In comparison, two hospitals located in the northern province of Chiang Mai had 15-20% and 30-40% of their beds occupied by patients with AIDS complications. Opportunistic infections were the primary reason for admissions. This paper describes the current AIDS epidemic in Thailand and the preventive measures being undertaken to combat it. Strategies to combat AIDS focus on preventive measures. The current program in Thailand emphasizes AIDS education and awareness, the promotion of condom usage, decreasing needle sharing, the screening of donated blood, and the development of the GP160 vaccine. The program, however, has been undermined by the country's well organized sex industry. Without a clear commitment from the Thai government, Thailand faces serious health and economic consequences from this epidemic in the coming decade.

  3. Occupational therapy students' perspectives regarding international cross-cultural experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Tamera Keiter; Burket, Allison; Deveney, Rebecca; Kennedy, Katelyn

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspectives of occupational therapy students who have engaged in international, cross-cultural learning and service experiences. This study utilized a qualitative, phenomenological design. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with students who engaged in international learning opportunities. The interviews were coded and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis approach. Three central themes emerged from the data analysis. Connectedness is the process of forming relationships with others while engaging in cross-cultural experiences. Students formed relationships with faculty, other students, and people within the community. Cultural awareness is the recognition and understanding of a different culture and responding to those differences. Students attempted to understand the new culture in comparison to their own lived experiences. Complexity portrays cross-cultural opportunities as dynamic, multi-faceted and intricate. This was demonstrated as the students raised additional questions about the conflict between their own culture and the new culture they entered. Students also identified limited orientation, support and structure with such experiences and the conflicting roles between volunteer, student, and team member. The ability to connect with others when building relationships in diverse cultural contexts held meaning for the students; however, the students also expressed conflict in trying to make sense of the new culture as it often challenged personal beliefs and constructs. The complexity and challenges of engaging in these opportunities needs to be recognized and further explored to assess how curricula and faculty best supports culturally responsive care. © 2011 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Peer-assisted learning: a medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallaha MA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Amre Fallaha, Aalia Pagarkar, Nicholas LucasFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read the paper by Kazzazi et al1 with great interest. The original paper was informative, and as penultimate year medical students at Imperial College, we want to share our unique perspective regarding student learning and the benefits of peer-assisted learning (PAL. We find that many subjects, including embryology as outlined in the paper,1 are complex and typically taught through lecture-based formats. While this may be understandable to readers of respective specialties, students may find certain concepts abstract and not easily grasped through lectures alone.View the original paper by Kazzazi and Bartlett.

  5. Student Perspectives on Intercultural Learning from an Online Teacher Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on intercultural learning during telecollaboration from the perspective of student participants in a five-country online teacher education partnership. The student perspectives reported here were drawn from one intact class in the partnership, five students who completed this partnership as part of a sociolinguistics course in a…

  6. Benefits and Drawbacks of Computer-Based Assessment and Feedback Systems: Student and Educator Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuse, Justin C. W.; Lawley, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Providing students with high quality feedback is important and can be achieved using computer-based systems. While student and educator perspectives of such systems have been investigated, a comprehensive multidisciplinary study has not yet been undertaken. This study examines student and educator perspectives of a computer-based assessment and…

  7. Time Perspectives and Boredom Coping Strategies of Undergraduate Students from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay; Coskun, Hamit

    2015-01-01

    Using person-centered and variable-centered analyses, this study examined the relationships between undergraduate students' time perspectives and boredom coping strategies. A total of 719 undergraduate students voluntarily participated in the study. Results of the study showed that undergraduate students' time perspectives can be reliably defined…

  8. Clinical anxiety among final year dental students: The trainers and students perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Obarisiagbon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The dental clinical setting, which is a significant learning environment for undergraduate dental students, may induce anxiety, which may adversely affect the clinical performance. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the factors provoking clinical anxiety in dental students from the trainers and students perspectives. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 6 th (final year dental students of University of Benin and their clinical trainers between January and March 2012 using the 38-item modified Moss and McManus clinical anxiety questionnaire. Results: Of the 67 participants, 32 (47.8% were 6 th year dental students while 35 (52.2% were clinical trainers. According to the students, the top clinical anxiety provoking situations were inability to meet requirements before exams, inability to pass the final exams, dealing with psychiatric patients, coping with uncooperative children, getting infected by patients, fracturing a tooth during extraction, extracting the wrong tooth, discovering calculus by the supervisor after scaling, accidental pulp exposure, inadvertently hurting patients and using the high speed hand piece. There existed concordance on the top two clinical anxiety provoking situations reported by the students and their clinical trainers. However, measuring blood pressure, taking pulse, presenting in the clinic, handling a syncopal attack, and accidental pulp exposure were statistically significant contrasting clinical anxiety provoking situations from dental students and trainers perspectives. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed that clinical trainers share largely the same perspectives with the dental students on the clinical anxiety provoking situations with slight variations. Fostering a supportive learning environment conducive to dental student learning by strengthen efforts to minimize clinical anxiety is a necessity.

  9. Scientific Literacy and Student Attitudes: Perspectives from PISA 2006 science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger; McCrae, Barry

    2011-01-01

    International assessments provide important knowledge about science education and help inform decisions about policies, programmes, and practices in participating countries. In 2006, science was the primary domain for the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), supported by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and conducted by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER). Compared to the school curriculum orientation of Trends in International Math and Science Study (TIMSS), PISA provides a perspective that emphasises the application of knowledge to science and technology-related life situations. The orientation of PISA includes both knowledge and attitudes as these contribute to students' competencies that are central to scientific literacy. In addition to students' knowledge and competencies, the 2006 PISA survey gathered data on students' interest in science, support for scientific enquiry, and responsibility towards resources and environments. The survey used both a non-contextualised student questionnaire and contextualised questions. The latter is an innovative approach which embedded attitudinal questions at the conclusion of about two-thirds of the test units. The results presented in this article make connections between students' attitudes and interests in science and scientific literacy.

  10. What makes a quality occupational therapy practice placement? Students' and practice educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Fitzgerald, Cate; Davila, Wendy; Millar, Frances; Allison, Heather

    2011-06-01

    Practice placement experiences are crucial to enable students to integrate theory with practice, demonstrate professional and interpersonal skills and build confidence in their practice skills. This study addressed practice educators' and students' perspectives regarding quality practice placement experiences. In total 29 students, 41 practice educators and eight practice education staff members across three Queensland universities participated in focus groups or individual interviews (N=78) focusing on their views about quality learning experiences on placements. Key themes described university preparation and processes, a welcoming learning environment, detailed orientation and clear expectations, graded program of learning experiences, quality modelling and practice, consistent approach and expectations, quality feedback, open and honest relationships and supervisor experience and skills. These findings were consistent with research previously undertaken in Australia and Canada that had investigated either student or practice educator perspectives. This article synthesises the perspectives of these stakeholder groups and has led to the development of quality indicators across the phases of placement establishment, preparation, maintenance and review. Although having sufficient placements can be challenging for university programmes, ensuring that the experiences provided are of high quality is also important and requires significant attention by university academics and practice education staff, practice educators, managers and practice organisations alike. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Australian Association of Occupational Therapists.

  11. Heavy hadron spectroscopy: A quark model perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Caramés, T.F.; Garcilazo, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present recent results of hadron spectroscopy and hadron–hadron interaction from the perspective of constituent quark models. We pay special attention to the role played by higher order Fock space components in the hadron spectra and the connection of this extension with the hadron–hadron interaction. The main goal of our description is to obtain a coherent understanding of the low-energy hadron phenomenology without enforcing any particular model, to constrain its characteristics and learn about low-energy realization of the theory

  12. Encouraging engagement in enabling programs: The students perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Suzi Hellmundt; Dallas Baker

    2017-01-01

    Student retention is a key concern in tertiary education enabling programs with research showing that early engagement leads to higher completion rates (Hodges et al., 2013). But how do students new to university education learn how to engage effectively? This article outlines an engagement framework that foregrounds Guidance, Encouragement, Modelling and Structure (GEMS) as a holistic approach to facilitating effective student engagement. This framework was developed from qualitative data gl...

  13. Preventing a Leak: Two Perspectives on Creating Supportive Environment for Graduate Student Colleagues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lininger, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Debate continues about whether there exists a leaky pipeline for women in STEM fields within academia, as well as the causes of leaks - points in an individual's career where women are more likely than men to choose a non-academic pathway. Statistics on MS and PhD degrees awarded in STEM fields indicate that one of these leaks occurs during and immediately following graduate school. Here, we present two perspectives, that of a full professor and a graduate student, on how to create an environment in which geosciences graduate students can thrive psychologically and professionally. We recognize the challenges faced by many underrepresented groups, but here we focus specifically on gender diversity from the perspective of white women. From the perspective of a faculty advisor overseeing a research group, the goal is to treat each member of the group as an individual and to develop a mentoring relationship that most effectively fosters that individual's development as a scientist, while maintaining a cohesive, collegial group dynamic. Among the recommended ways to achieve this are: maintaining flexibility in the work schedule, with success evaluated by outcomes; consideration of work-life balance; respect for diverse approaches to problem solving; recognition that individuals can be most productive, satisfied, and engaged when their individual contributions are acknowledged and valued; and respect for different choices for a career path and for changes in those choices during graduate studies. From the perspective of a graduate student, it is important that an advisor demonstrates a clear commitment to treating each member of a research group as a valued individual with differing needs. In addition to the recommendations above for achieving a positive and supportive research group, as a graduate student it is useful to have multiple mentors and role models who have had different career tracks and can provide diverse perspectives and advice. Graduate students can also

  14. After-School Programs for Bilingual Students: Preservice Teachers' Perspectives and Students' Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk-Ross, Francine; Dealy, Ann; Porcelli, Justinna; Hammond, Jonna; Evans, Brian

    2017-01-01

    We studied the process and products of developing effective tutoring programs to support Tier 2 bilingual students with a focus on teachers' perspectives and students' achievement to assess and teach students based on need. With the understanding that young students require individual attention to resolve specific misunderstandings, optimally…

  15. Localisation and World Modelling: An Architectural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Micucci

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous robot world modelling is a “chicken-and-egg” problem: position estimation needs a model of the world, whereas world modelling needs the robot position. Most of the works dealing with this issue propose holistic solutions under an algorithmic perspective by neglecting software architecture issues. This results in huge and monolithic pieces of software where implementation details reify strategic decisions. An architectural approach founded on separation of concerns may help to break the loop. Localisation and modelling, acting on different time scales, are mostly independent of each other. Sometimes synchronisation is required. Whenever needed, an external strategy tunes the relative rates of the two activities. The paper introduces rationale, design, and implementation of such a system which relies on Real-Time Performers, a software architecture providing suitable architectural abstractions to observe and control the system's temporal behaviour.

  16. Localisation and World Modelling: an Architectural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico G. Sorrenti

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous robot world modelling is a "chicken-and-egg" problem: position estimation needs a model of the world, whereas world modelling needs the robot position. Most of the works dealing with this issue propose holistic solutions under an algorithmic perspective by neglecting software architecture issues. This results in huge and monolithic pieces of software where implementation details reify strategic decisions. An architectural approach founded on separation of concerns may help to break the loop. Localisation and modelling, acting on different time scales, are mostly independent of each other. Sometimes synchronisation is required. Whenever needed, an external strategy tunes the relative rates of the two activities. The paper introduces rationale, design, and implementation of such a system which relies on Real-Time Performers, a software architecture providing suitable architectural abstractions to observe and control the system's temporal behaviour.

  17. Student nurses' perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Lay Hwa; Creedy, Debra K; Chan, Moon Fai

    2013-06-01

    To investigate nursing students' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Spirituality is an essential part of holistic care but often neglected in practice. Barriers to spiritual care include limited educational preparation, negative attitudes towards spirituality, confusion about nurses' role, perceptions of incompetence and avoidance of spiritual matters. There is limited knowledge about students' perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care. Previous studies have predominantly focused on educational approaches to enhance spirituality. The next generation of clinicians may have different worldviews, cultural beliefs and values about spirituality and spiritual care from current nurses. There is a need to understand students' views and how their spiritual development is shaped in order to inform pre-registration education. A cross-sectional survey of final-year students from three educational institutions in Singapore was conducted from April to August 2010. Data included demographic details and responses on a new composite tool, the Spiritual Care Giving Scale (SCGS). A response rate of 61.9% (n=745 out of 1204) was achieved. The lowest mean score was item 9, "Without spirituality, a person is not considered whole". Highest mean was item 2, "Spirituality is an important aspect of human being". Factor 5 (Spiritual Care Values) had the lowest mean with Factor 2 (Spirituality Perspectives) the highest. Participants considered spirituality as essential to being human; developmental in nature; and vital for individuals' state of well-being. Attributes important for spiritual care were identified. Multivariate analyses showed positive association between participants' scores and institution but not with other variables. Participating student nurses reported a high level of spiritual awareness that was not constrained by age. Students affirmed the importance of spiritual awareness in order to address the spiritual needs of patients. There was some congruence

  18. Encouraging engagement in enabling programs: The students’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Hellmundt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student retention is a key concern in tertiary education enabling programs with research showing that early engagement leads to higher completion rates (Hodges et al., 2013. But how do students new to university education learn how to engage effectively? This article outlines an engagement framework that foregrounds Guidance, Encouragement, Modelling and Structure (GEMS as a holistic approach to facilitating effective student engagement. This framework was developed from qualitative data gleaned from students enrolled in the Preparing for Success Program at Southern Cross University, New South Wales, Australia. The findings from the students indicate that the GEMS framework activates student potential and enables them to use existing knowledge and experience to not only deepen and broaden their learning but also successfully prepare for further study.

  19. Exporting a Student-Centered Curriculum: A Home Institution's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterval, Dominique; Tinnemans-Adriaanse, Marjolijn; Meziani, Mohammed; Driessen, Erik; Scherpbier, Albert; Mazrou, Abdulrahman; Frambach, Janneke

    2017-07-01

    Numerous, mainly Anglo-Saxon, higher education institutions have agreements with foreign providers to deliver their curricula abroad. This trend is gradually making inroads into the medical domain, where foreign institutions undertake to offer their students learning experiences similar to those of the home institution. Not an easy feat, as the national health care contexts differ greatly between institutions. In a bid to export the curriculum, institutions risk compromising their financial resilience and reputation. This article presents an instrumental case study of a home institution's perspective on the establishment of a cross-border student-centered curriculum partnership. It provides the reader with a practical discourse on dimensions that need to be bridged between home and host contexts, and on new working processes that need to be integrated within the home institution's existing organizational structure. We describe the advantages and disadvantages based on our experiences with a centralized organizational approach, and advocate for a gradual move toward decentral interfaculty communities of practice.

  20. Nursing educators' perspectives of students with disabilities: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Terri Jo; Lutfiyya, Zana Marie

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to increase understanding of nursing educators' perspectives of students with disabilities. Seventeen educators from four nursing education programs in western Canada participated. The theory emerging from this data was "producing competent graduates". The central category was supporting students to become competent graduates. This paper focuses on the nursing educators' perspectives of students with disabilities, which influenced their efforts to support students with disabilities on that path. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  2. Reflective writing: the student nurse's perspective on reflective writing and poetry writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Dawn; Willis, Diane S

    2015-07-01

    Reflective writing is a mandatory part of nurse education but how students develop their skills and use reflection as part of their experiential learning remains relatively unknown. Understanding reflective writing in all forms from the perspective of a student nurse is therefore important. To explore the use of reflective writing and the use of poetry in pre-registered nursing students. A qualitative design was employed to explore reflective writing in pre-registered nursing students. A small university in Scotland. BSc (Hons) Adult and Mental Health Pre-registration Student Nurses. Two focus groups were conducted with 10 student nurses during March 2012. Data was analysed thematically using the framework of McCarthy (1999). Students found the process of reflective writing daunting but valued it over time. Current educational methods, such as assessing reflective accounts, often lead to the 'narrative' being watered down and the student feeling judged. Despite this, reflection made students feel responsible for their own learning and research on the topic. Some students felt the use of models of reflection constricting, whilst poetry freed up their expression allowing them to demonstrate the compassion for their patient under their care. Poetry writing gives students the opportunity for freedom of expression, personal satisfaction and a closer connection with their patients, which the more formal approach to reflective writing did not offer. There is a need for students to have a safe and supportive forum in which to express and have their experiences acknowledged without the fear of being judged. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Medical Student Mentorship in Plastic Surgery: The Mentee's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jenny C; Rendon, Juan; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Mentorship is a universal concept that has a significant impact on nearly every surgical career. Although frequently editorialized, true data investigating the value of mentorship are lacking in the plastic surgery literature. This study evaluates mentorship in plastic surgery from the medical student perspective. An electronic survey was sent to recently matched postgraduate year-1 integrated track residents in 2014, with a response rate of 76 percent. Seventy-seven percent of students reported a mentoring relationship. Details of the mentoring relationship were defined. Over 80 percent of students reported a mentor's influence in their decision to pursue plastic surgery, and nearly 40 percent of students expressed interest in practicing the same subspecialty as their mentor. Benefits of the relationship were also described. Mentees value guidance around career preparation and advice and prioritized "a genuine interest in their career and personal development" above all other mentor qualities (p ≤ 1.6 × 10). Mentees prefer frequent, one-on-one interactions over less frequent interaction or group activities. Students did not prefer "assigned" relationships (91 percent), but did prefer "facilitated exposure." Major barriers to mentorship included mentor time constraints and lack of exposure to plastic surgery. Indeed, significant differences in the presence of a mentoring relationship correlated with involvement of the plastic surgery department in the medical school curriculum. This study defines successes and highlights areas for improvement of mentorship of plastic surgery medical students. Successful mentorship may contribute to the future of plastic surgery, and a commitment toward this endeavor is needed at the local, departmental, and national leadership levels.

  4. Information-Theoretic Perspectives on Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey

    2016-04-01

    To test any hypothesis about any dynamic system, it is necessary to build a model that places that hypothesis into the context of everything else that we know about the system: initial and boundary conditions and interactions between various governing processes (Hempel and Oppenheim, 1948, Cartwright, 1983). No hypothesis can be tested in isolation, and no hypothesis can be tested without a model (for a geoscience-related discussion see Clark et al., 2011). Science is (currently) fundamentally reductionist in the sense that we seek some small set of governing principles that can explain all phenomena in the universe, and such laws are ontological in the sense that they describe the object under investigation (Davies, 1990 gives several competing perspectives on this claim). However, since we cannot build perfect models of complex systems, any model that does not also contain an epistemological component (i.e., a statement, like a probability distribution, that refers directly to the quality of of the information from the model) is falsified immediately (in the sense of Popper, 2002) given only a small number of observations. Models necessarily contain both ontological and epistemological components, and what this means is that the purpose of any robust scientific method is to measure the amount and quality of information provided by models. I believe that any viable philosophy of science must be reducible to this statement. The first step toward a unified theory of scientific models (and therefore a complete philosophy of science) is a quantitative language that applies to both ontological and epistemological questions. Information theory is one such language: Cox' (1946) theorem (see Van Horn, 2003) tells us that probability theory is the (only) calculus that is consistent with Classical Logic (Jaynes, 2003; chapter 1), and information theory is simply the integration of convex transforms of probability ratios (integration reduces density functions to scalar

  5. Kinesiology Career Club: Undergraduate Student Mentors' Perspectives on a Physical Activity-Based Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David S.; Veri, Maria J.; Willard, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present university student mentors' perspectives on the impact of a teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model youth program called the Kinesiology Career Club. Data sources in this qualitative case study included program observations, mentoring reflections, and semistructured interviews. Data…

  6. College Students' Perspectives on Parental Notification and Parent-Student Communication on Student Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Gauthier, Justin R.; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    College students' perceptions of parental notification (PN) were examined. Anonymous surveys were received from 72 students who had received a notification and 73 students who had not. Students reported that PN increased parent-student communication. While noting interference with their autonomy, students also reported more positive than negative…

  7. A Qualitative Study Examining the Spatial Ability Phenomenon from the Chinese Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Helen W.; Mohler, James L.; Choi, Soyoung; Chen, Yuehua; Zheng, Chunhui

    2011-01-01

    The authors used holistic and structured interviews to examine Chinese student perspectives on their own spatial ability. The results of this study were compared and contrast with a previous study that was conducted by Mohler (2008) of Caucasian student perspectives in United States. Findings of the current study agree with other literature that…

  8. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S. Nowacki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG. Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student’s perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  9. Education of nurse practitioners in academic nurse-managed centers: student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Clare L; Pohl, Joanne; Ward, Sheila; Dontje, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    Clinical experiences for advanced practice nurses are increasingly a challenge. Finding settings that demonstrate primary care nursing practice in its finest form can be difficult. This article reports on nurse practitioner (NP) student feedback on clinical placements in the academic nurse-managed centers (ANMCs) associated with four Michigan schools or colleges of nursing. Student feedback was solicited over three years through site and preceptor evaluation tools and focus groups. Students were overwhelmingly satisfied with their experience in ANMCs. Being mentored by an NP preceptor in an ANMC was a valuable experience for students. They valued the role modeling of the NP and the quality of their preceptors' instruction. Students stated that the nursing model of care to which they were exposed was congruent with classroom learning. They reported learning to apply an understanding of their patients' economic, social, and cultural situations to treatment decisions and patient-education efforts and learning to understand the role of community-based care. One limitation of ANMCs from the students' perspective was a relatively low volume of patients, particularly in the initial years. However, the benefit of having time to spend with clients and to reflect on clinical practice was also articulated.

  10. The Dynamics of Mobile Learning Utilization in Vocational Education: Frame Model Perspective Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahande, Ridwan Daud; Susanto, Adhi; Surjono, Herman Dwi

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the dynamics of content aspects, user aspects and social aspects of mobile learning utilization (m-learning) in vocational education from the FRAME Model perspective review. This study was quantitative descriptive research. The population in this study was teachers and students of state vocational school and private…

  11. Role Modeling for FNP Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jane Ehlinger

    1980-01-01

    A model is described in which student nurses' preceptors are the joint-appointee nurse practitioners, with physicians providing consultation and serving as team participants. Key points that are examined are program development at the University of Illinois, how the program actually operated, and some of the problems encountered. (CT)

  12. Finding the Evidence in CAM: a Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Ghassemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary offers a future health care provider's perspective on the role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Western (namely, in US medical education and practice. As a student of both public health and medicine in the United States, Jeffrey Ghassemi is interested in CAM's contribution to improving medical practice and teaching. The commentary highlights the ambiguous definitions of CAM to Westerners despite the rising popularity of and expenditures for alternative modalities of care. It then argues for collaboration between alternative and established medical communities to ascertain the scientific merits of CAM. It concludes by calling for a new medical paradigm that embraces the philosophies of both communities to advance education and patient care.

  13. Deaf and hard of hearing students' perspectives on bullying and school climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Mary T; Day, Stefanie J; Galvan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Student perspectives reflect school climate. The study examined perspectives among deaf and hard of hearing students in residential and large day schools regarding bullying, and compared these perspectives with those of a national database of hearing students. The participants were 812 deaf and hard of hearing students in 11 U.S. schools. Data were derived from the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire (Olweus, 2007b), a standardized self-reported survey with multiple-choice questions focusing on different aspects of bullying problems. Significant bullying problems were found in deaf school programs. It appears that deaf and hard of hearing students experience bullying at rates 2-3 times higher than those reported by hearing students. Deaf and hard of hearing students reported that school personnel intervened less often when bullying occurred than was reported in the hearing sample. Results indicate the need for school climate improvement for all students, regardless of hearing status.

  14. Multi-perspective workflow modeling for online surgical situation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Stefan; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Neumuth, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Surgical workflow management is expected to enable situation-aware adaptation and intelligent systems behavior in an integrated operating room (OR). The overall aim is to unburden the surgeon and OR staff from both manual maintenance and information seeking tasks. A major step toward intelligent systems behavior is a stable classification of the surgical situation from multiple perspectives based on performed low-level tasks. The present work proposes a method for the classification of surgical situations based on multi-perspective workflow modeling. A model network that interconnects different types of surgical process models is described. Various aspects of a surgical situation description were considered: low-level tasks, high-level tasks, patient status, and the use of medical devices. A study with sixty neurosurgical interventions was conducted to evaluate the performance of our approach and its robustness against incomplete workflow recognition input. A correct classification rate of over 90% was measured for high-level tasks and patient status. The device usage models for navigation and neurophysiology classified over 95% of the situations correctly, whereas the ultrasound usage was more difficult to predict. Overall, the classification rate decreased with an increasing level of input distortion. Autonomous adaptation of medical devices and intelligent systems behavior do not currently depend solely on low-level tasks. Instead, they require a more general type of understanding of the surgical condition. The integration of various surgical process models in a network provided a comprehensive representation of the interventions and allowed for the generation of extensive situation descriptions. Multi-perspective surgical workflow modeling and online situation models will be a significant pre-requisite for reliable and intelligent systems behavior. Hence, they will contribute to a cooperative OR environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The perspective awareness model - Eliciting multiple perspectives to formulate high quality decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Laurel

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of attention is given to the importance of communication in environmental remediation and radioactive waste management. However, very little attention is given to eliciting multiple perspectives so as to formulate high quality decisions. Plans that are based on a limited number of perspectives tend to be narrowly focused whereas those that are based on a wide variety of perspectives tend to be comprehensive, higher quality, and more apt to be put into application. In addition, existing methods of dialogue have built-in limitations in that they typically draw from the predominant thinking patterns which focus in some areas but ignore others. This can result in clarity but a lack of comprehensiveness. This paper presents a Perspective Awareness Model which helps groups such as partnering teams, interagency teams, steering committees, and working groups elicit a wide net of perspectives and viewpoints. The paper begins by describing five factors that makes cooperation among such groups challenging. Next, a Perspective Awareness Model that makes it possible to manage these five factors is presented. The two primary components of this model --- the eight 'Thinking Directions' and the 'Shared Documentation' --- are described in detail. Several examples are given to illustrate how the Perspective Awareness Model can be used to elicit multiple perspectives to formulate high quality decisions in the area of environmental remediation and radioactive waste management. (authors)

  16. Regional air quality modeling: North American and European perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyn, D.; Builtjes, P.; Schaap, M.; Yarwood, G.

    2013-01-01

    An overview of regional-scale quality modeling practices and perspectives in North America and Europe, highlighting the differences and commonalities in how regional-scale air quality modeling systems are being used and evaluated across both continents

  17. Understanding the racial perspectives of White student teachers who teach Black students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Trinna S.

    Statement of the problem. Most student teachers successfully complete their educational programs; however, some continue to express concern about becoming an actual practicing teacher. One of these concerns deals with White teachers interactions with Black students. This study investigated White student teachers' perceptions of teaching Black students. In particular, the study examined the racial perceptions student teachers expressed about being a White person in a racially diverse school and examined the student teachers' perceptions on race. The following questions guided the study: (1) What are the perceptions of White student teachers concerning being White? (2) What are the perceptions of White student teachers on teaching science to Black students in a racially diverse secondary school? (3) What recommendations can White student teachers give to teacher education programs concerning the teaching of Black students? Methods. Semi-structured interviews, personal profiles and reflective journals were used as the means for collecting data. All three sources of data were used to understand the racial perceptions of each student teacher. Analysis of the data began with the identification of codes and categories that later developed into themes. Cross analyses between the data sources, and cross analysis between participants' individual data were conducted. The use of semi-structured interview, personal profiles, and reflective journals provided in-depth descriptions of the participants' racial perceptions. These data sources were used to confirm data and to show how student teaching experiences helped to shape their racial perceptions. Results. Data analysis revealed three themes, various life experiences, variety of opinions related to teaching Black students, and limited recommendations to teacher education programs. Although all teachers remained at the contact stage of the White racial identity model (Helms, 1990), they were open to dialogue about race. The

  18. African-American Female Students and STEM: Principals' Leadership Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Kristin Morgan

    As the U.S. becomes more diverse, school leaders, major corporations, and areas of national defense continue to investigate science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education issues. African-American female students have historically been underrepresented in STEM fields, yet educational leadership research, examining this population is limited. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how principals support African-American female students in schools with a STEM program. The Critical Race Theory (CRT)was used as a theoretical framework to highlight the inadequacies to support educational inequalities. The application of the CRT in this study is due to the embedded inequality practices within the educational system, that have resulted in the underrepresentation of African-American female students in STEM. To complement CRT, the transformative leadership model was also utilized to examine the emancipatory leadership practices principals utilized. These theories framed the context of this study by recognizing the need to address how support is actualized to African-American female students in STEM by their principals. A case study approach was an appropriate method to answer the two research questions, 1) How do principals feel they support African-American female students in their STEM programs? and 2) What practices do principals engage in that support underrepresented students in STEM? This approach intended to uncover how a principal leads a multifaceted population of underrepresented students in STEM programs. Two principals of STEM schools, where more than 50% of the population were African-American, were interviewed and observed completing daily operations at community-wide events. The STEM Coordinators and a teacher were also interviewed, and test scores were examined to provide further information about the STEM program, and public records were obtained to analyze the principals' means of communication. I found that principals supported

  19. Student Teacher Activities--Are They Relevant? The University Supervisor's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Thomas H.; Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional student teaching experience includes a complex, triadic relationship between student teacher, cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor. Studies seeking to understand this experience from the perspectives of the student teacher and cooperating teacher are commonly found in the literature; yet research specific to the…

  20. Student and Teacher Perspectives on the Usefulness of Content Literacy Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the similarities and differences between high school students and their teachers' perspectives on the usefulness of content literacy strategies for learning. Based on 88 teacher surveys, 500 student surveys, 10 teacher interviews, 12 student interviews, and 30 classroom observations, we note the perceived…

  1. Viktor Hamburger's Department of Zoology in the 1940s: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, B S; Wenger, E

    2001-04-01

    Eleanor and Byron Wenger were graduate students in the Department of Zoology in the 1940s. Both took several courses with Viktor, and he was thesis advisor for both of us. We have attempted to provide a summary of life in the department from a student perspective as well as our impression of Viktor's style of mentoring and guiding student research and education.

  2. Chinese Postgraduate Students' Perspectives on Developing Critical Thinking on a UK Education Masters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakunle, Labake; Allison, Pete; Fordyce, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Statistics on enrolment of international students in higher education, and studies on limitations of their adaptation to other (usually Western) cultural and learning norms dominate literature. There is much less emphasis on a specific aspect of the student experience. This study examined Chinese postgraduate students' perspectives on how they…

  3. Social Media in Health Professional Education: A Student Perspective on User Levels and Prospective Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within…

  4. Developing Intercultural Understanding for Study Abroad: Students' and Teachers' Perspectives on Pre-Departure Intercultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, P.; Bavieri, L.; Ganassin, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on students' and teachers' perspectives on a programme designed to develop Erasmus students' intercultural understanding prior to going abroad. We aimed to understand how students and their teachers perceived pre-departure materials in promoting their awareness of key concepts related to interculturality (e.g., essentialism,…

  5. Students' Informal Inference about the Binomial Distribution of "Bunny Hops": A Dialogic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, Sibel; Fujita, Taro; Wegerif, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    The study explores the development of 11-year-old students' informal inference about random bunny hops through student talk and use of computer simulation tools. Our aim in this paper is to draw on dialogic theory to explain how students make shifts in perspective, from intuition-based reasoning to more powerful, formal ways of using probabilistic…

  6. Meeting the health and social care needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students' perspectives: part 3; "the pregnant woman within the global context"; an inclusive model for midwifery education to address the needs of asylum seeking women in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Bradshaw, Gwendolen

    2013-09-01

    to describe the conceptualisation and development of an inclusive educational model. The model is designed to facilitate pre-registration midwifery students' learning around the health and social care needs of pregnant women seeking asylum in the United Kingdom. current literature has identified a concern about the standard of maternity care experienced by asylum seeking women accessing maternity services in the United Kingdom. In response to this, a doctorate study was undertaken which focused on examining the way in which a group of midwifery students approached the provision of care for asylum seekers. This study revealed difficulties that these students had both in identifying these women's needs and also in the wider care issues in practice. Consequently, one of the recommendations was to ameliorate these difficulties through midwifery education. the key findings from this study were used together with relevant supporting literature to construct "the pregnant woman within the global context" model for midwifery education. The model is designed to facilitate a holistic assessment of need rather than focusing on the physical assessment at the expense of other aspects of care. It incorporates wider factors, on a global level, which could impact on the health and social care needs of a pregnant woman seeking asylum. It also prompts students to consider the influence of dominant discourses on perceptions of asylum seek;ing and is designed to encourage students' to question these discourses. this model can be used in midwifery education to prepare students in caring for pregnant women seeking asylum. It may be especially helpful when students have close contact with pregnant women seeking asylum, for example through caseloading. Further research is recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of this model in enhancing the care of asylum seeking women in the United Kingdom. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Students on Ice Arctic Youth Expedition 2008: outcomes, student perspectives and expected impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, E. H.; Codog, A.; Green, D.; Green, G.; Galbraith, E.; Conklin, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    How do we give a voice to youth to express their views on the importance of remote ecosystems and their response to global climate change? STUDENTS ON ICE is an International Polar Year-endorsed program bringing students from around the world together to learn about the world's polar regions. Students are budding environmental leaders and scientists in training. Besides traveling to incredibly beautiful areas and seeing polar animals in their natural habitat, students attend lectures, learn through hands-on activities and peer-teaching seminars. The expedition is chronicled by diary entries by the participants (see below). One premise of Students on Ice's Arctic program is that when youths are shown how Inuit adapted to the harsh living conditions and students are exposed to ways they could reduce their ecological footprint, they would become ambassadors of change. In this poster we present, from a student perspective, what was learned on a 2-week expedition to Baffin Island in August, 2008 and our follow-up activities. We have contacted our fellow students to see if the expedition has resulted in them reducing their carbon footprint. We have divided the responses into three categories: changing our lifestyle, becoming an ambassador for sustainability and considering a career in Earth or polar sciences. Preliminary responses are that it is difficult to change our lifestyles by ourselves but we think more carefully before we consume and most of us will probably not become polar scientists. Our overwhelming sentiment is that this is an awesome program and should be continued, and that we are trying to become ambassadors for the polar regions and sustainable lifestyles.

  8. Review of 'Education in Parapsychology: Student and Instructor Perspectives' by Harvey Irwin

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    Book review of Education in Parapsychology: Student and Instructor Perspectives by Harvey Irwin. Foreword by Nancy\\ud Zingrone. Gladesville, NSW, Australia: AIPR Mongraphs, 2013. Pp xv + 106. (paperback). ISBN 9780987077219.

  9. Students with Learning Disabilities Perspective on Reading Comprehension Instruction: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Dale Rennard

    2017-01-01

    The three article dissertation was a presentation of students' with learning disabilities perspectives on reading comprehension instruction. Article 1 set out to provide an historical perspective of reading and reading comprehension instruction. Topics covered in this research review included: reading comprehension, reading and learning…

  10. The Relationships among Imagination, Future Imagination Tendency, and Future Time Perspective of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study were to investigate the relationships among imagination, future imagination tendency, and future time perspective of junior high school students, then to explore the future time perspective which is predicted by background variables, imaginative qualities, and future imagination tendency. The subjects were 331 from…

  11. Employability development in Higher Education institutions: a tourism student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Wakelin-Theron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the world‟s largest and fastest-growing industry. The South African tourism industry (TI contributes to the creation of employment (National Department of Tourism (NDT 2011, and the development and growth of the country's economy. Yet, the South African TI experiences a critical skills shortage. This results from the fact that many tourism graduates do not possess the skills required by the world of work. Put another way, tourism graduates are not adequately prepared for absorption in the tourism industry. This, in turn, prevents them from participating effectively in the tourism industry. As Fallows and Steven (2000 put it, the knowledge of an academic subject is no longer enough in today's challenging work environment; as such, it is important for graduates to develop skills that will increase their chances of finding employment. In light of the above, it is imperative for higher educational institutions to include the development of employability skills in their tourism-related programmes. Hence, it becomes essential to explore ways in which higher education institutions could respond more effectively to the needs and expectations of the tourism industry in order to reduce youth unemployment in South Africa. In this regard, focus group interviews constitute the most suitable qualitative research technique to elicit valuable information on employability development, from multiple student perspectives. In other words, focus groups allow for open, flexible, and democratic discussions. The researcher took the necessary precautions to ensure the high quality and trustworthiness of the focus group interviews. By getting students together, to discuss their experiences and opinions, the researcher obtained valuable and insightful information on the development of tourism students‟ employability attributes.

  12. Time Perspective, Life Satisfaction and Social Comparison Orientation in University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Nazmiye ÇİVİTCİ; Hülya ŞAHİN BALTACI

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the predictive power of time perspective for the life satisfaction and social comparison in university students. The participants (n= 441; 321 female and 120 male) are undergraduate students at a state university. The data of the study were collected through the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, The Satisfaction with Life Scale and IOWA-Netherlands Social Comparison Orientation Measure. In order to determine the prediction power of the time ...

  13. What are the odds? Random drug testing of students: a practice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudlow, Rebecca

    2005-06-01

    Companion articles explore random drug testing programs in schools. The first article addresses random drug testing of students from a legal perspective. It describes legal issues and current case law regarding drug testing programs in schools and commonly asked questions regarding these programs. The second article addresses random drug testing of students from a practice perspective. It explores arguments for and against random drug testing programs and the role of the school nurse in policy and procedure development.

  14. What are the odds? Random drug testing of students: a legal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Charles A

    2005-06-01

    Companion articles explore random drug testing programs in schools. The first article addresses random drug testing of students from a legal perspective. It describes legal issues and current case law regarding drug testing programs in schools and commonly asked questions regarding these programs. The second article addresses random drug testing of students from a practice perspective. It explores arguments for and against random drug testing programs and the role of the school nurse in policy and procedure development.

  15. Analysis of Students' Conceptions of Basic Magnetism from a Complex Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Miriam; Kriek, Jeanne; Erasmus, Benita

    2018-03-01

    This study established whether 12 South African secondary school physics students had incorrect conceptions of basic magnetism and if they had, to what extent they consistently applied such conceptions. Different scenarios in the form of thought experiments were presented in a clinical interview approach. A complex systems perspective underpinned the study and was firstly used to analyze 12 students' conceptions in terms of intuitive fragments of knowledge elements, structured misconceptions, and theory-like system of knowledge elements. Secondly, coherence in each student's ideas expressed across ten themes using thought experiments was analyzed in an effort to determine variations or coherence in responses. Examples of student explanations and sketches are discussed in the paper to illustrate the conceptual structures they applied. Most of the students in this study used a variety of knowledge elements in accord with a complex systems perspective, but three students seemed to prefer a specific perspective. One student's ideas tended to be mainly fragmented, a second exposed a number of structured misconceptions, while another student's reasoning can be described as a theory-like system of knowledge elements. Accordingly, the emphasis of physics education research should no longer be on the compilation of a list of misconceptions that have to be remedied or replaced, but on the conceptual connections, students make and their associative reasoning patterns (i.e., knowledge systems revealed). It remains for the teacher to use the complex systems perspective as a framework to facilitate students' conceptual development and understanding, proceeding on their existing knowledge systems.

  16. Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: Perspectives from Canadian and Korean Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeran; Nielsen, Wendy; Woodruff, Earl

    2014-05-01

    This study examined and compared students' understanding of nature of science (NOS) with 521 Grade 8 Canadian and Korean students using a mixed methods approach. The concepts of NOS were measured using a survey that had both quantitative and qualitative elements. Descriptive statistics and one-way multivariate analysis of variances examined the quantitative data while a conceptually clustered matrix classified the open-ended responses. The country effect could explain 3-12 % of the variances of subjectivity, empirical testability and diverse methods, but it was not significant for the concepts of tentativeness and socio-cultural embeddedness of science. The open-ended responses showed that students believed scientific theories change due to errors or discoveries. Students regarded empirical evidence as undeniable and objective although they acknowledged experiments depend on theories or scientists' knowledge. The open responses revealed that national situations and curriculum content affected their views. For our future democratic citizens to gain scientific literacy, science curricula should include currently acknowledged NOS concepts and should be situated within societal and cultural perspectives.

  17. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  18. The Influences on Teaching Perspectives of Australian Physical Education Teacher Education Students: The First-Year Influences on Teaching Perspectives Exploratory (FIT-PE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Brendon P.; Pill, Shane

    2016-01-01

    There has been a paucity of literature investigating the teaching beliefs and intentions of Australian physical education teacher education (PETE) students that enter teacher training. The First-year Influences on Teaching Perspectives Exploratory (FIT-PE) study explores the teaching perspectives of first year PETE students; including teaching…

  19. Perceiving design as modelling: A cybernetic systems perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Wynn, David C.; Howard, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The creation and use of models is central to engineering design, to the extent that designing might be perceived as a propagation from model to model and modelling may be described as the language of the designer (the terms product model and artefact model are used synonymously throughout...... out to add value for a given purpose and context. Implications of a cybernetic perspective that could guide effective modelling in design are discussed....

  20. Patient Perspectives on EMS Alternate Destination Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjal, Kevin G; Shastry, Siri; Loo, George T; Reid, Daniel; Grudzen, Corita; Shah, Manish N; Chapin, Hugh H; First, Brandon; Sirirungruang, Sasilada; Alpert, Erin; Chason, Kevin; Richardson, Lynne D

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a large number of ambulance transports to emergency departments (ED) could have been safely treated in an alternative environment, prompting interest in the development of more patient-centered models for prehospital care. We examined patient attitudes, perspectives, and agreement/comfort with alternate destinations and other proposed innovations in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) care delivery and determined whether demographic, socioeconomic, acuity, and EMS utilization history factors impact levels of agreement. We conducted a cross-sectional study on a convenience sample of patients and caregivers presenting to an urban academic ED between July 2012 and May 2013. Respondents were surveyed on levels of agreement with 13 statements corresponding to various aspects of a proposed patient-centered emergency response system including increased EMS access to healthcare records, shared decision making with the patient and/or primary care physician, transport to alternative destinations, and relative importance of EMS assessment versus transportation. Information on demographic and socioeconomic factors, level of acuity, and EMS utilization history were also determined via survey and chart review. Responses were analyzed descriptively and compared across patient characteristics using chi-square and regression analyses. A total of 621 patients were enrolled. The percentage of patients who agreed or strongly agreed with each of the 13 statements ranged from 48.2 to 93.8%. About 86% agreed with increased EMS access to healthcare records; approximately 72% agreed with coordinating disposition decisions with a primary physician; and about 58% supported transport to alternative destinations for low acuity conditions. No association was found between levels of agreement and the patient's level of acuity or EMS utilization history. Only Black or Hispanic race showed isolated associations with lower rates of agreement with some aspects of an innovative

  1. The Honors College Experience Reconsidered: Exploring the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James H., III; Story, Lachel; Tarver, Samantha; Weinauer, Ellen; Keeler, Julia; McQuirter, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Often administrators overlook the student voice in developing strategic plans, mission and vision statements, marketing strategies, student services, and extracurricular programming. Engaging students in these areas may enhance students' cooperation, interactions, responsibility, and expectations. In order to assess honors students' perspectives…

  2. Student seminar on smoking: A novel way to introduce different perspectives on smoking to medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima P Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The respiratory module at Shifa College of Medicine (SCM is delivered in third year with emphasis on respiratory pathophysiology and respiratory medicine. Smoking as a topic was introduced to emphasize the preventive aspects of respiratory illnesses. An innovative approach to involve students in their learning was developed. To determine whether this innovation would be well received and effective for students′ learning about smoking, we carried out this study. Materials and Methods: This is a one group post-test quasi-experiment. Two days were assigned for a smoking seminar. The class of 106 students was divided into 10 batches, and each batch was assigned a theme related to smoking. These themes were developed by the faculty, and each theme was related to a different perspective on smoking. A post-test questionnaire was distributed at the end of the seminar for feedback to see what aspects of students′ learning were highlighted and what needed to be improved upon. Questions related to the usefulness of the activity were incorporated into the questionnaire and the students were asked to agree or disagree on a five-point Likert scale. Results: Most (68.3% students agreed that this activity improved their knowledge regarding smoking, and 54.8% agreed that it also helped in application of this knowledge. Improvement in presentation and counseling skills (59.8%, evidence-based medicine (47.6%, and softer skills, such as teamwork (72% and creativity (63.4%, were also reported to be enhanced. Conclusion: Seminars led by the students have shown to be effective in breaking the monotony and generating an interest of the topic. Such an activity serves as a small step to make our graduates more empathic, humane, competent, and skilful.

  3. Student and teacher perspectives on art-infused science education in an urban high school in south Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Debbie Lee Murray

    Over the past three decades there has been curricular and methodological integration of arts into core subjects. Existing literature illustrates a variety of factors inherent in art-integrated education which encourages a positive, effective, and successful learning experience. This process oriented study was initiated to gain the perspectives of students and teachers involved in traditional and art integrated biology classes teaching the concept of cells. The learning environments are contingent upon three different science instruction methods taught simultaneously (traditional, manual visualization and digital visualization). The study was done in an urban Charter High School in south Texas. Participants involved 58 high school biology students and two state certified science and art teachers. Three student focus groups, six student interviews, two teacher interviews as well as teacher journals was used to collect data. The framework utilized for this study was Hume's (2006) student engagement distinctions, school process and learning task. The resulting local conceptual model describes and compares the nature of each of the instruction-specific learning environments. Results indicated that students in art integrated biology classes benefited more than those involved in traditional class. Students are more engaged in art integrated instruction because they enjoyed a student-centered teacher-student interaction. Student outcomes with art infused methods show more active learning and had a higher chance of acquiring additional skills.

  4. Assessment of 6th Grade Elementary School Students, Their Parents' and Branch Teachers' Perspective on Physical Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Sirin; Ozbar, Nurper; Yetgin, Meral Kucuk; Koksalan, Burke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 437 volunteers including 54 teachers, 218 6th grade students and 102 parents from Beykoz Elementary Schools participated in this study to understand the perspectives of students, families and teachers on Physical Education classes. The perspectives of students, families and teachers of other branches are identified by survey method.…

  5. An aphasia mentoring program: perspectives of speech-language pathology students and of mentors with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Barbara A; Petersen, Jill; Puurveen, Gloria

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that was implemented as part of a speech-language pathology graduate program. Qualitative research methods with thematic analysis of interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and participant observation were used to develop a description of the mentoring program, including the experiences and perspectives of the participants-both mentors (people with chronic aphasia) and students. Five themes, including getting better, aphasia advocacy, group as versus for therapy, we're a team, and focus on mentoring, emerged from the mentors' data. Five themes, including shifting the power dynamic, getting to know the person, seeing members as mentors, making classroom learning real, and connecting with a community, emerged from the students' data. There were significant overlaps and intersections between the 2 data sets. Findings revealed how an aphasia mentoring program that positions people with aphasia as experts can make a significant contribution to student education while supporting mentors' own goals, with implications for improved quality of life.

  6. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  7. Design Students Perspectives on Assessment Rubric in Studio-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshun, Eric F.; Osei-Poku, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This study examined students' perspectives on the use of assessment criteria and rubrics in graphic design studio at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. This assessment strategy was introduced with the desire to improve students' participation and involvement in studio-based learning programme. At the end of the semester, a…

  8. Swedish Upper Secondary Students' Perspectives on the Typical Mathematics Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Paul; Larson, Niclas

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a group interview study of Swedish upper secondary students' perspectives on the typical mathematics lesson. Students, from four demographically different schools, constructed a collective synthesis of their many years' experience of mathematics classrooms. Transcriptions were subjected to a constant comparison analysis, which…

  9. Student Views on Assessment Activities: Perspectives from Their Experience on an Undergraduate Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Margaret; McCutcheon, Maeve; Doran, John

    2014-01-01

    Research on assessment activities has considered student responses to specific initiatives, but broader concerns underlying these responses have not been fully explored. Using a survey methodology, this paper explores how students view assessment activities, from the perspective of their experience on a four-year undergraduate programme,…

  10. Application of the Ecosystem Perspective to a Dean of Students Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; Ragle, John D.

    1979-01-01

    The continuing evolution of an application of the ecosystems perspective in a dean of students office holds promise for having a constructive impact not only within the office but on the division of student affairs and the university as well. (Author)

  11. Young Indigenous Students' Engagement with Growing Pattern Tasks: A Semiotic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jodie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of semiotics in assisting young Indigenous students to engage with and identify the general structure of growing patterns. The theoretical perspective of semiotics underpinned the study. Data are drawn from two Year 3 students, including analysis of pretest questions and two conjecture-driven…

  12. Students' Perspectives on Academic Writing in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study brings together three student comments and three theoretical constructs taken from Bakhtin's (1981) collection of essays "The Dialogic Imagination", written in the 1930s. Bakhtin's concepts of the chronotope, interanimation and the monologic provide lenses on a shifting student perspective on authoritative writing in…

  13. Toward Authentic IEPs and Transition Plans: Student, Parent, and Teacher Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavendish, Wendy; Connor, David

    2018-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined perspectives on factors that influence meaningful student and parent involvement in Individualized Education Program (IEP) transition planning. Survey data and open-ended qualitative interviews with urban high school students with a learning disability (LD; n = 16), their parents (n = 9), and their teachers (n =…

  14. Academics' Perspectives on the Challenges and Opportunities for Student-Generated Mobile Content in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Shamsul Arrieya; Malim, Tanjong

    2016-01-01

    In Malaysian universities, there is a scarcity of local content to support student learning. Mobile content is predominantly supplied by the United States and the United Kingdom. This research aims to understand the situation from the academic perspective, particularly in the field of local cultural studies. Student-generated multimedia is…

  15. Traditional and Flipped Classroom Approaches Delivered by Two Different Teachers: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limniou, Maria; Schermbrucker, Ian; Lyons, Minna

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was for students to express their views on teaching approaches delivered by two teachers under the perspectives of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) development, their preferences on learning material and learning activities. First year psychology students followed both the traditional and a flipped classroom…

  16. Canadian Campus Smoking Policies: Investigating the Gap between Intent and Outcome from a Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Lynne; Callaghan, Doris; Smith, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Young adults remain the earliest legal target for the tobacco industry. Against this, the existence of smoking policies would appear to offer some protection to students on campus. However, little research has been conducted into the outcomes of such policies from a student perspective. Methods: The authors conducted 8 focus groups at…

  17. Restorative Practices: Graduate Students' Perspectives Seen through a Transformative Learning Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Craig W.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores students' learning experiences in a newly accredited graduate school focused on Restorative Practices Theory, which enables people to restore and build community collectively. This exploration was conducted using a Transformative Adult Learning Theory lens in order to understand graduate students' perspectives regarding…

  18. Exploring Graduate Students' Perspectives towards Using Gamification Techniques in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbasi, Daniah

    2017-01-01

    Teachers and educational institutions are attempting to find an appropriate strategy to motivate as well as engage students in the learning process. Institutions are encouraging the use of gamification in education for the purpose of improving the intrinsic motivation as well as engagement. However, the students' perspective of the issue is…

  19. Do Prior Experience, Gender, or Level of Study Influence Music Students' Perspectives on Master Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marion; Hallam, Susan; Creech, Andrea; Gaunt, Helena; Robertson, Linnhe

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic process of self-regulated learning has been identified as a predictor of achievement in musical skill acquisition and musical performance. Meta-cognition, intrinsic to the self-regulation process, develops as the student takes greater responsibility for their own learning. From this perspective we consider music students' responses to a…

  20. Performance and Mastery Orientation of High School and University/College Students: A Rasch Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Debus, Raymond L.; Malmberg, Lars-Erik

    2008-01-01

    This investigation assesses performance and mastery orientation from a Rasch perspective among high school and university students and provides a complementary approach to the factor analytic methods typical in goal theory research. Data shows that both school and university students are high in mastery orientation relative to performance…

  1. What's the Story with Class Attendance? First-Year Students: Statistics and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, S.; Menkveld, H.; Ruiters, J.

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing concern among academics regarding the poor class attendance patterns of undergraduate students. The reasons why students choose to attend or not attend classes have been investigated from numerous perspectives. Many have sought to explore the relationship between class attendance and academic performance. While there is much…

  2. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  3. Orchestrating 21st Century Learning in Higher Education: A Perspective on Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Raija; Kiili, Carita; Smith, Blaine E.

    2017-01-01

    For universities to meet the 21st-century learning needs of today's students, it is important they allow students to take an active role in developing pedagogy and sharing their perspective. This paper introduces design-based research aiming to develop a pedagogic approach to support technology-enhanced learning practices at the university level…

  4. New to the Neighborhood:???? Community Perspectives on Off-Campus Student Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    A community impact study was conducted in the suburbs surrounding a large multicampus Australian university to explore community perspectives on student housing. A mixed methods approach was used to explore current perceptions and beliefs in the community about off-campus student housing. This consisted of a survey of community members and…

  5. Co-teaching Perspectives from Secondary Science Co-teachers and Their Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Sears, Margaret E.; Brawand, Anne Eichorn; Jenkins, Melissa C.; Preston-Smith, Shantha

    2014-10-01

    An in-depth case study of one team of co-teachers' practice from multiple perspectives is described. A high school science co-teaching team and their students with disabilities completed surveys about their perceptions of co-teaching. Additionally, observations of the two co-teachers occurred to determine roles and types of interactions for each co-teacher during science instruction. Observational data revealed effective teaching behaviors demonstrated by each co-teacher. Detailed descriptions of the co-teachers' instruction are provided. The science educator was observed interacting with the large group twice as often as the special educator. The science educator also presented new content nearly three times as often as the special educator. The co-teacher surveys were consistent with the observational data. Both educators disagreed that the special educator was primarily the lead for instruction. Both educators strongly agreed they had an effective co-teaching relationship, although the science educator indicated stronger agreement for parity in roles and responsibilities than the special educator noted. Forty-three percent of the students identified the science educator as in charge of lessons, while 43% identified both educators. Most students thought teaching was divided in half, and all students enjoyed having two teachers in science. Eighty-six percent of the students indicated team teaching was the most frequently used co-teaching model, and 14% indicated one teach, one drift. Implications for co-teachers' reflections on their collaboration, including the relevance of student perceptions (i.e., Who is the "real" teacher?), and the extent to which educators are prepared at preservice and inservice levels for co-teaching are discussed.

  6. Interprofessional training for nursing and medical students in Norway: Exploring different professional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aase, Ingunn; Hansen, Britt Sætre; Aase, Karina; Reeves, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an explorative case study focusing on interprofessional training for medical and nursing students in Norway. Based on interviews with, and observations of, multiple stakeholder groups--students, university faculty, and hospital staff--content analysis was applied to investigate their perspectives regarding the design of such educational training. The findings revealed a positive perspective amongst stakeholders while voicing some concerns related to how communication issues, collaboration, workflow, and professional role patterns should be reflected in such training. Based on our data analysis we derive three themes that must be considered for successful interprofessional training of nursing and medical students: clinical professionalism, team performance, and patient-centered perspective. These themes must be balanced contingent on the students' background and the learning objectives of future interprofessional training efforts.

  7. Examining the personal experience of student skill learning: a narrative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, D J

    1995-06-01

    Examining the meaning of student skill learning from the learner's perspective is a valued but understudied topic in physical education. This paper investigated the learner's perspective as a storied experience and used narrative theory to interpret the meanings students derived from their learning experiences. Four narrative accounts were presented involving university students enrolled in a beginning level bowling class. The narratives centered on describing student goals and the conflicts and resolution of conflicts experienced by these students during skill learning. Two sources of generating meaning from experience were delineated: (a) an individual's active construction of meaning and (b) the enculturing influence of the social context. These narratives provided an opportunity for teachers and researchers to examine the realities constructed by students as a result of their learning experiences.

  8. A Perspective on Student Evaluations, Teaching Techniques, and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Prashant; Krueger, Dale

    2016-01-01

    In the United States System of Education the growth of student evaluations from 1973 to 1993 has increased from 29% to 86% which in turn has increased the importance of student evaluations on faculty retention, tenure, and promotion. However, the impact student evaluations have had on student academic development generates complex educational…

  9. Nontraditional Student Withdrawal from Undergraduate Accounting Programmes: A Holistic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Anne; Sauvé, Louise; Viger, Chantal; Landry, France

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative project of several Quebec universities, this study investigates nontraditional student withdrawal from undergraduate accounting programmes. A nontraditional student is older than 24, or is a commuter or a part-time student, or combines some of these characteristics. Univariate and multivariate analyses of student dropout factors…

  10. Perspectives of patients towards medical students at the Queen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants mostly felt that medical students were compassionate, enthusiastic and helpful to them. The participants' who had been ever clerked by students felt motivated to be present for student learning for altruistic reasons as well as for mutual benefit between student and patient. Patients attending the QECH in Blantyre ...

  11. Social Phobia in College Students: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donald W.; Mandrusiak, Michael

    2007-01-01

    We used the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) to identify self-reported social phobia symptoms in 59 students presenting for intake at our counseling center and 119 students meeting a course requirement for research participation. We expected that students presenting for clinical service would have higher scores than the students not seeking such…

  12. Past Negative Time Perspective as a Predictor of Grade Point Average in Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat J. Precin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Time perspective is a fundamental dimension in psychological time, dividing human experiences into past, present, and future. Time perspective influences individuals’ functioning in all occupations, including education. Previous research has examined the relationship between time perspective and academic outcomes, but the same research has not been done, to date, with occupational therapy doctoral students. This quantitative, cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between time perspective and academic success in occupational therapy doctoral students across the United States. Data from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI and grade point averages (GPAs were collected from 50 participants via surveymonkey.com. Past Negative time perspective statistically predicted GPA in the negative direction (p = .001 for students in pre-professional OTD programs, but did not predict GPA for post-professional students. Age, gender, and learning environment did not significantly influence the prediction of GPA in either group. The method and results of this study demonstrate that the ZTPI, an instrument used in the field of psychology, may have value in the profession of occupational therapy and occupational therapy doctoral programs.

  13. Cyberbullying among University Students: Gendered Experiences, Impacts, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Faucher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is an emerging issue in the context of higher education as information and communication technologies (ICT increasingly become part of daily life in university. This paper presents findings from 1925 student surveys from four Canadian universities. The overall findings are broken down to determine gender similarities and differences that exist between male and female respondents’ backgrounds, ICT usage, experiences with cyberbullying, opinions about the issue, and solutions to the problem. We also examine the continuities between these findings and those of earlier studies on cyberbullying among younger students. Our findings also suggest that gender differences, which do emerge, provide some support for each of the three theoretical frameworks considered for understanding this issue, that is, relational aggression, cognitive-affective deficits, and power and control. However, none of these three models offers a full explanation on its own. The study thus provides information about cyberbullying behaviour at the university level, which has the potential to inform the development of more appropriate policies and intervention programs/solutions to address the gendered nature of this behaviour.

  14. E-learning readiness from perspectives of medical students: A survey in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obi, I E; Charles-Okoli, A N; Agunwa, C C; Omotowo, B I; Ndu, A C; Agwu-Umahi, O R

    2018-03-01

    Learning in the medical school of the study university is still by the traditional face-to-face approach with minimal e-communication. This paper assesses student's perspectives of E-learning readiness, its predictors and presents a model for assessing them. A descriptive cross-sectional study of medical students. By proportional quota sampling 284 students responded to a semi-structured self-administered questionnaire adapted from literature. Ethical issues were given full consideration. Analysis was with SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Spearman's correlation, and multiple regression. Statistical significance was considered at P E-learning (Mlr = 3.8 > Melr = 3.4), beyond reliance on the face-to-face approach (69.7%), expecting effective (51.1%), and quality improvement in their learning (73.1%). Having basic information and communications technology skills (68.9%) (Mict = 3.7 > Melr = 3.4), access to laptops (76.1%), ability to use web browsers confidently (91.8%) (Mwb = 4.3 > Melr = 3.4), with only few able to use asynchronous tools (45.5%), they consider content design important to attract users (75.6%), and agree they need training on E-learning content (71.4%). They however do not believe the university has enough information technology infrastructure (62.4%) (Mi = 2.7 E-learning. Predicted by their attitude, content, technological and cultural readiness. Further study with qualitative methodology will help in preparing for this evolution in learning.

  15. Caring for adolescent students: a grounded theory study of teachers' perspectives on their relationships with students in secondary schools.

    OpenAIRE

    Cullingworth, Erin

    2014-01-01

    This grounded theory study explored secondary teachers’ perspectives on their relationships with their adolescent students: the kinds of relationships they want to create, why they believe such relationships are important, and what obstacles they perceive to their construction. Teachers who felt they were able to create positive, effective relationships with their students tended to work in mini-school programs, to practice a kind of “authoritative” teaching similar to Baumrind’s (1978; 1991...

  16. CSR Model Implementation from School Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Suzannah

    2006-01-01

    Despite comprehensive school reform (CSR) model developers' best intentions to make school stakeholders adhere strictly to the implementation of model components, school stakeholders implementing CSR models inevitably make adaptations to the CSR model. Adaptations are made to CSR models because school stakeholders internalize CSR model practices…

  17. The financial accounting model from a system dynamics' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the foundation of the financial accounting model. We examine the properties of the accounting equation as the principal algorithm for the design and the development of a System Dynamics model. Key to the perspective is the foundational requirement that resolves the temporal

  18. Searching for better animal models of BPD: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Morty, Rory E

    2016-11-01

    There have been many efforts to develop good animal models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) to better understand the pathophysiology and mechanisms underlying development of BPD as well as to test potential strategies for its prevention and treatment. This Perspectives summarizes the features of common animal models of BPD and the strengths and limitations of such models. Potential optimal approaches to development of animal models are indicated, with the underlying concepts that require emphasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Value and Benefits of European Student Mobility for Romanian Students: Experiences and Perspectives of Participants in the ERASMUS Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajan, Florin D.; Chiper, Sorina

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the experiences and perspectives of Romanian students participating in the ERASMUS Programme, regarding the benefits and value of academic mobility. It situates their accounts in the framework of internationalization and Europeanization processes occurring in Romanian higher education. The study draws on primary data…

  20. The Value of Service-Learning: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspersz, Donella; Olaru, Doina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the value of service-learning to students. There currently exists a gap in this understanding. We apply mixed-methods research using a sample of higher education students to develop this discussion. We found that students valued service-learning for the opportunity that it provides to increase their personal…

  1. Student Privacy and Educational Data Mining: Perspectives from Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jennifer; Kosturko, Lucy; FitzGerald, Clare; McQuiggan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    While the field of educational data mining (EDM) has generated many innovations for improving educational software and student learning, the mining of student data has recently come under a great deal of scrutiny. Many stakeholder groups, including public officials, media outlets, and parents, have voiced concern over the privacy of student data…

  2. Student Engagement in Very Large Classes: The Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeter, Daniel J.; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Ratima, Matiu; Morton, Susan; Dickson, Martin; Hsu, Dennis; Jackson, Rod

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the student population observed in higher education over the past 10-15 years in some countries has coincided with an increased recognition of student engagement and its value in developing knowledge. Active learning approaches have the potential to promote student engagement with lectures, but this becomes more challenging as…

  3. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  4. Social Support in Inclusive Schools: Student and Teacher Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavri, Shireen; Monda-Amaya, Lisa

    2001-01-01

    Thirty students with learning disabilities (LD) in inclusive third-to fifth-grade classrooms and 60 educators were interviewed regarding social support at school. While students with LD felt part of a social network, many reported socially related loneliness. Results indicate a discrepancy between students' and teachers' choices of preferred…

  5. Intercultural Empathy among Norwegian Students: An Inclusive Citizenship Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhaug, Trond; Osler, Audrey

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, Norwegian schools have experienced increased cultural diversification among students. Growing heterogeneity in origin and culture may enhance the risk of student marginalisation, segregation and exclusion. In response to these challenges, this paper examines students' intercultural empathy and, particularly, how schools can…

  6. Understanding Physical Education Doctoral Students' Perspectives of Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, K. Andrew R.; McLoughlin, Gabriella M.; Ivy, Victoria Nicole; Gaudreault, Karen Lux

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Despite an abundance of research on doctoral student socialization in higher education, little attention has been paid to physical education doctoral students. This study sought to understand physical education doctoral students' perceptions of their socialization as preparation for faculty roles. Method: Participants included 32 physical…

  7. Inference: Perspectives on Literacy for Basic Skills Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Harvey S.

    1992-01-01

    Recommends treating basic skills students as if they have innate knowledge, not an intellectual disease. Underscores inference as a key activity in critical thinking. Suggests strategies for improving students' inferential powers. Argues that the strategies can help students recognize their inferential ability and learn to use it in writing. (SG)

  8. Perspectives of University Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Anastasia H.; Carter, Mark; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at heightened risk of post-secondary educational failure and account for approximately 1% of students in post-secondary education. Findings from an on-line survey of students with ASD attending university in Australian are reported in this study. Respondents indicated high rates of academic and…

  9. Home Education Transitions with Formal Schooling: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Glenda

    2007-01-01

    Home education is a well established phenomenon in Australia but little is known about the movement of students between home schooling and formal education and how students view and handle the transitions. A sociocultural theoretical framework has been used to explore student perceptions of their transition experiences between formal education and…

  10. The Integrated Model of Sustainability Perspective in Spermatophyta Learning Based on Local Wisdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartadiyati, E.; Rizqiyah, K.; Wiyanto; Rusilowati, A.; Prasetia, A. P. B.

    2017-09-01

    In present condition, culture is diminished, the change of social order toward the generation that has no policy and pro-sustainability; As well as the advancement of science and technology are often treated unwisely so as to excite local wisdom. It is therefore necessary to explore intra-curricular local wisdom in schools. This study aims to produce an integration model of sustainability perspectives based on local wisdom on spermatophyta material that is feasible and effective. This research uses define, design and develop stages to an integration model of sustainability perspectives based on local wisdom on spermatophyta material. The resulting product is an integration model of socio-cultural, economic and environmental sustainability perspective and formulated with preventive, preserve and build action on spermatophyta material consisting of identification and classification, metagenesis and the role of spermatophyta for human life. The integration model of sustainability perspective in learning spermatophyta based on local wisdom is considered proven to be effective in raising sustainability’s awareness of high school students.

  11. Millennial Students' Mental Models of Information Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examines first-year college students' online search habits in order to identify patterns in millennials' mental models of information retrieval. The study employed a combination of modified contextual inquiry and concept mapping methodologies to elicit students' mental models. The researcher confirmed previously observed…

  12. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  13. An Event Model of Student Departure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesJardins, S. L.; Ahlburg, D. A.; McCall, B. P.

    1999-01-01

    Employs event-history modeling to examine temporal dimensions of student departure from a large research university. Asian students are less likely to depart in year 1 than Whites. African-Americans are more likely to leave during junior and senior years. Dynamic models may presage sound dropout-intervention strategies. (54 references) (MLH)

  14. Digital Competence Model of Distance Learning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ketia Kellen A.; Behar, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the development of a digital competency model of Distance Learning (DL) students in Brazil called CompDigAl_EAD. The following topics were addressed in this study: Educational Competences, Digital Competences, and Distance Learning students. The model was developed between 2015 and 2016 and is being validated in 2017. It was…

  15. Exploring Plagiarism into Perspectives of Indonesian Academics and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Agustina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism has been done by students from around the globes. There has been a heated discussion of finding reasons why plagiarism occurred in academic world and Eastern students in particular. This research wants to explore how actually students perceive plagiarism in their academic writing as well as how lecturers coped with plagiarism in the students’ assignments. The research participants were taken from 2 different majors, 32 English Education students and 10 Psychology students as well as 5 lecturers from English Education Department and 3 lecturers from Psychology Faculty in one of private universities in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Questionnaires were distributed to those respondents and also interviews were conducted to several lecturers and students. The results of questionnaire and interview showed that both students and lecturers knew and understand the essence of plagiarism, however, students admitted that they still plagiarised in their assignment. Lecturers, on the other hand, revealed that they could figure out when students plagiarised others’ works. However, it was limited to crossing over assignments between students. In other words, detecting plagiarism was done manually and restricted to students’ written works only. In conclusion, despite comprehending the meaning of plagiarism, student still plagiarised since there was not any real action from lecturers to encounter it.

  16. Teaching Pharmacology at a Nepalese Medical School: The Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR, ,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal conducts problem-basedpharmacology learning during small-group practical sessions.The present study was carried out to obtain student feedbackregarding the sessions and suggestions for improvement.MethodThe questionnaire-based study was carried out among firstyear medical students during July 2009. Respondents wereenrolled after explaining the aims and objectives of the studyand obtaining written, informed consent. Basic demographicinformation and student agreement with a set of 30statements using a modified Likert-type scale was noted.ResultsSixty-four of the 75 students (86% participated. The mediantotal score was 107 (maximum score 150 and was higheramong males, students from within the Kathmandu valley andself-financing students. The differences were not statisticallysignificant. The suggestions for improvement were improvingthe physical infrastructure of the lab and providing more timefor the practical exercises.ConclusionStudent opinion was favourable. The findings would be ofinterest to medical educators especially in developingcountries.

  17. Student perspective on using a virtual radiography simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanahan, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Virtual radiography allows students to practice a range of radiographic techniques in a safe learning environment. The aim of this pilot study was to introduce Projection VR™, a software simulation, into the academic environment and harvest user feedback about the application. Methods: Purposefully designed worksheets were developed to support the implementation of Projection VR™ into the laboratory component of an undergraduate diagnostic radiography course. Following completion of the course, all enrolled students (N = 86) were invited to complete an online survey to ascertain student perceptions on technical issues and educational value of the software. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied. Results: Responses were received from 84 students (response rate 98%). The student cohort had a range of confidence levels in their computer technology ability, with significant relationships observed for gender (p = 0.025) and age group (p = 0.016). Few students (19) had previously used simulation software. Overall students were positive regarding ease of use (83%) and ability to control the equipment as needed (89%). Primary benefits of using the simulation included allowing students to repeat activities until satisfied with the results (95%) and being able to quickly see images and understand if changes needed to be made (94%). Students reported the simulation positively developed their technical (78%), image evaluation (85%), problem solving (85%) and self-evaluation (88%) abilities. Conclusion: Student feedback indicates that virtual radiography simulation has a valuable role to play developing technical and cognitive skills. Future work will extend the implementation of this software across multiple courses. - Highlights: • With Virtual Radiography™ students produce images without using ionising radiation. • Students can repeat activities until satisfied with the results. • Students can quickly see images and understand if changes

  18. THE STRATEGIES TO COPE WITH EFL STUDENTS‟ SPEAKING ANXIETY IN CLASSROOM CONVERSATION: STUDENTS AND TEACHER PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikah Wati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with students‘ anxiety and the strategies to cope with those anxieties from the perspective of students and teacher. Anxiety is important area to be analyze because of: firstly, the research suggests that ―anxiety... may affect the quality of an individual‘s communication or willingness to communicate‖ (Young 1990:58, but also because it affects a large number of students in higher institutions (Campbell & Ortiz 1991:159. Secondly, Students with anxiety disorder exhibit a passive attitude in their studies such as lack of interest in learning, poor performance in exams, and do poorly on assignments. The third, A student with high anxiety can fall behind academically because he or she is distracted and has impaired verbal working memory skills when anxious (Hopko et al., 2005. The common anxiety among university students has been acknowledgement by students and educators. However, the study of anxiety is a real phenomena, the importance of study anxiety is particularly related to the sources of anxiety and how to handle them so that the students can involve the classroom communication smoothly and improve their performance and exam academically. That‘s why this study will reveal the students speaking anxiety in classroom conversation and how to cope with students‘ speaking anxiety based on students and teacher perspective. The result will be gathered from questionnaire to the students and interview to the English teachers.

  19. Student perspectives on diversity and the cultural climate at a U.S. medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Robert; McClendon, Jennifer; Henderson, Anita; Evans, Yolanda; Colquitt, Rosa; Saha, Somnath

    2007-02-01

    To obtain the perspectives of medical students at one school on racial/ethnic campus diversity and cultural competence and to gain their perceptions of the institutional climate around diversity at their university and of reasons for minority underrepresentation at their medical school. A student-driven survey of all medical students (N = 398) at a single medical school in the spring of 2003, supplemented by four focus groups from all racial and ethnic groups on the campus. A large majority of the responding students (n = 216; 54%) endorsed the value of campus diversity and the importance of cultural competence to the process of becoming a clinician. Most students felt their university had achieved a positive cultural climate, characterized by openness to diverse perspectives and attention to equity. Most students also felt that the university's programs and policies reflected a commitment to diversity, but fewer students--those from underrepresented minorities (URMs) in particular--felt that the university truly valued having a diverse student body and faculty. Most students felt that the lack of diversity on campus was a barrier to recruiting and retaining minority candidates. Some minority students also blamed the medical school's limited social, academic, and financial support, as well as inadequate efforts to recruit minority students. Medical students generally place a high value on campus diversity and cultural competence. URM students in particular felt that their university could do more to implement its commitment to diversity, including making greater efforts to recruit and retain URM students. These views constitute a barometer for medical schools to gauge and track their efforts to enhance campus diversity, incorporate cultural competence education, and create an inclusive and welcoming climate for students of all backgrounds.

  20. Modelling in life insurance a management perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Norberg, Ragnar; Planchet, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Focussing on life insurance and pensions, this book addresses various aspects of modelling in modern insurance: insurance liabilities; asset-liability management; securitization, hedging, and investment strategies. With contributions from internationally renowned academics in actuarial science, finance, and management science and key people in major life insurance and reinsurance companies, there is expert coverage of a wide range of topics, for example: models in life insurance and their roles in decision making; an account of the contemporary history of insurance and life insurance mathematics; choice, calibration, and evaluation of models; documentation and quality checks of data; new insurance regulations and accounting rules; cash flow projection models; economic scenario generators; model uncertainty and model risk; model-based decision-making at line management level; models and behaviour of stakeholders. With author profiles ranging from highly specialized model builders to decision makers at chief ex...

  1. Analysis of ehealth search perspectives among female college students in the health professions using Q methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-04-27

    The current "Millennial Generation" of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants' objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0

  2. Topics in Bioethics: A Development of Student Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A. Johnson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposing students to current biotechnological and medical issues is eye-opening for many students in a way that is not always achieved through lecture-based learning. Lecture or investigative teaching styles provide a tremendous knowledge base for the students, but sometimes these teaching styles do not allow the student to fully develop, especially personal attitudes to issues in bioethics. Through online videos, Hollywood movies, guided readings and classroom discussions, students in this course are informed of some bioethical topics, encouraged to learn about other topics, and use this gained knowledge to develop personal positions regarding the value and/or risk of the issues. This course has been well-received by previous students as a favorite in terms of both topics covered and style.

  3. On being dyslexic: Student radiographers' perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Fred, E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.u [Directorate of Radiography, School of Health Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Salford, Greater Manchester, M6 6PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    The purpose of this paper was to provide an insight into life as a dyslexic student radiographer, identify barriers and risks in clinical training, and develop recommendations for the support of students with dyslexia. The paucity of research into dyslexia within the radiography profession is worrying, with attention focused only on the support provided by Higher Education Institutions (HEI) or inferences drawn from the experiences of other healthcare students. The impact and significance of dyslexia for student radiographers in clinical practice has never been investigated. Results: On a self-reporting scale of clinical tasks there was little or no difference between dyslexic students and non-dyslexics. Some minor traits commonly associated with dyslexics were also reported by students with no learning disabilities and an inclusion support plan for all students was advocated. In-depth interviews of 10 student radiographers revealed six distinct themes of visualising the disability, self-protection, strengths and talents, time, the badge of disability and adjustments and support. Like other healthcare students, some radiography students reported significant difficulties and prejudices and very little structured support in the clinical environment. Despite the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act being in place for several years, the support in clinical departments fell significantly short of that provided in the universities. The dyslexic students took extra responsibility for their own learning and some had developed complex coping strategies to overcome any difficulties. Conclusion: Several inclusive recommendations were developed as a result of this study that could be used to support all students on clinical placement.

  4. Collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings: The students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkala, Arja; Kivelä, Eeva; Käyhkö, Pirjo

    2016-03-01

    This study deals with student nurses' experiences of collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings where aged people are involved as age-experts in students' learning processes. The data were collected in 2012 using the contents of students' reflective writing assignments concerning elderly persons' life history interviews and the students' own assessments of their learning experiences in authentic elder care settings. The results, analyzed using qualitative content analysis, revealed mostly positive learning experiences. Interaction and collaborative learning activities in genuine gerontological clinical settings contributed to the students' understanding of the multiple age-related and disease-specific challenges as well as the issues of functional decline that aged patients face. Three types of factors influenced the students' collaborative learning experiences in gerontological clinical settings: student-related, patient-related and learning environment-related factors. According to the results, theoretical studies in combination with collaboration, in an authentic clinical environment, by student nurses, elderly patients, representatives of the elder care staff and nurse educators provide a feasible method for helping students transform their experiences with patients into actual skills. Their awareness of and sensitivity to the needs of the elderly increase as they learn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sleep disturbances among medical students: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Muhammad Chanchal; Fraser, Kristin; Rumana, Nahid; Abdullah, Ahmad Faris; Shahana, Nahid; Hanly, Patrick J; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury

    2015-01-15

    Medical students carry a large academic load which could potentially contribute to poor sleep quality above and beyond that already experienced by modern society. In this global literature review of the medical students' sleep experience, we find that poor sleep is not only common among medical students, but its prevalence is also higher than in non-medical students and the general population. Several factors including medical students' attitudes, knowledge of sleep, and academic demands have been identified as causative factors, but other potential mechanisms are incompletely understood. A better understanding about the etiology of sleep problems in medical trainees is essential if we hope to improve the overall quality of medical students' lives, including their academic performance. Sleep self-awareness and general knowledge appear insufficient in many studied cohorts, so increasing education for students might be one beneficial intervention. We conclude that there is ample evidence for a high prevalence of the problem, and research in this area should now expand towards initiatives to improve general sleep education for medical students, identify students at risk, and target them with programs to improve sleep. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Students perspective on attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamania P

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prashant Bamania, Nicholas J BurstowFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, Kensington, UKWe read with great interest the article by Deane and Murphy1 regarding student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology (OBG. We agree with the findings of this cross-sectional survey, which show that attendance monitoring was acceptable to both staff and students.1 Student attendance is considered a vital aspect to professional development. Furthermore, studies have demonstrated a positive correlation between student attendance and academic performance in both clinical- and tutorial-based learning environments.2View the original paper by Deane and Murphy.

  7. Queering Student Perspectives: Gender, Sexuality and Activism in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kathleen O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the work of a gay-straight alliance and the ways in which members use elements of queer theory to understand their own and others' identities, both to make sense of their experiences and to support their activist efforts. The analysis identifies queer perspectives on gender and sexual identity as useful tools for supporting…

  8. Perspectives of Turkish Intern and Non-Intern Students towards Sport Management Internship within the Context of Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coknaz, Dilsad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences between intern and non-intern students in terms of their perspectives on sport management internship within the context of field experience. The subjects of the study were a total of 189 students. They were 4th year students who completed their internship and 3rd year students who were yet to…

  9. Using the Artistic Pedagogical Technology of Photovoice to Promote Interaction in the Online Post-Secondary Classroom: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Margaret; Perry, Beth; Janzen, Katherine; Menzies, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the effect of the artistic pedagogical technology (APT) called photovoice (PV) on interaction in the online post-secondary classroom. More specifically, this paper focuses on students' perspectives regarding the effect of PV on student to student and student to instructor interactions in online courses. Artistic pedagogical…

  10. What are the Perspectives of Indonesian Students to Japanese Ritual during Solar Eclipse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haristiani, N.; Rusli, A.; Wiryani, A. S.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Purnamasari, A.; Sucahya, T. N.; Permatasari, N.

    2018-02-01

    In this globalization era, many people still believe the myths about solar eclipse. The myths about solar eclipse are different between one country or are to another. In this context, the aim of this study was to investigate the perspective of Indonesian students in viewing how the Japanese people face their believing myths in solar eclipse. This research also investigated the student belief on several mythical stories in Indonesia, their understanding of the Islamic view, and their knowledge based on science concept relating to the solar eclipse phenomenon. To understand the Indonesian students’ perspective about the solar eclipse myths in Japanese, we took a survey to Indonesian students which are studying Japanese culture and language. Based on the results, the Indonesian student think that there is no significant difference between Indonesian and Japanese people in facing the solar eclipse.

  11. Automated expert modeling for automated student evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    The 8th International Conference on Intelligent Tutoring Systems provides a leading international forum for the dissemination of original results in the design, implementation, and evaluation of intelligent tutoring systems and related areas. The conference draws researchers from a broad spectrum of disciplines ranging from artificial intelligence and cognitive science to pedagogy and educational psychology. The conference explores intelligent tutoring systems increasing real world impact on an increasingly global scale. Improved authoring tools and learning object standards enable fielding systems and curricula in real world settings on an unprecedented scale. Researchers deploy ITS's in ever larger studies and increasingly use data from real students, tasks, and settings to guide new research. With high volumes of student interaction data, data mining, and machine learning, tutoring systems can learn from experience and improve their teaching performance. The increasing number of realistic evaluation studies also broaden researchers knowledge about the educational contexts for which ITS's are best suited. At the same time, researchers explore how to expand and improve ITS/student communications, for example, how to achieve more flexible and responsive discourse with students, help students integrate Web resources into learning, use mobile technologies and games to enhance student motivation and learning, and address multicultural perspectives.

  12. Modelling stable water isotopes: Status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stable water isotopes H2 18O and HDO within various parts of the Earth’s hydrological cycle has clearly improved our understanding of the interplay between climatic variations and related isotope fractionation processes. In this article key principles and major research results of stable water isotope modelling studies are described. Emphasis is put on research work using explicit isotope diagnostics within general circulation models as this highly complex model setup bears many resemblances with studies using simpler isotope modelling approaches.

  13. Winkler's single-parameter subgrade model from the perspective of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tensor are taken into consideration, whereas the shear stresses are intentionally dropped with the purpose of providing a useful perspective, with which Winkler's model and its associated coefficient of subgrade reaction can be viewed. The formulation takes into account the variation of the elasticity modulus with depth.

  14. Student perspectives on sexual health: implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Wilson, Christina K; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Valvano, Abbey K; Waller, Jennifer L; West, Lindsey M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration requires that health professionals think holistically about presenting concerns, particularly for multimodal problems like sexual dysfunction. However, health professions students appear to receive relatively little sexual health education, and generally none is offered on an interprofessional basis. To assess current degree of interprofessional thinking in sexual health care, 472 health professions students in Georgia, United States, were presented with a sexual dysfunction vignette and asked to rate the relevance of, and their familiarity with, interventions offered by several professionals. They also were asked to identify the most likely cause of the sexual dysfunction. Students rated relevance and familiarity with interventions as highest for physicians and lowest for dentists, with higher ratings of nurses by nursing students. More advanced students reported greater familiarity with mental health, physician, and physical therapy interventions. Finally, nursing students were less likely to attribute the dysfunction to a physical cause. These findings indicate that students may prioritize biomedical approaches in their initial assessment and may need additional supports to consider the spectrum of biopsychosocial factors contributing to sexual functioning. To encourage interprofessional critical thinking and prepare students for interprofessional care, sexual health curricula may be improved with the inclusion of interprofessional training. Specific recommendations for curriculum development are offered.

  15. Asynchronous Threaded Discussions and Intercultural Learning: Student Sojourner Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This paper centers on student perceptions of a fully-online course that was designed to enhance their intercultural learning during study abroad. By way of a post-course questionnaire survey and interview, 22 international exchange students from a Hong Kong university divulged their views about this mode of learning. Although many lamented the…

  16. Causes of Gender Differences in Accounting Performance: Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wally-Dima, Lillian; Mbekomize, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    This study employs the survey method to investigate the factors that cause academic differences between female and male students at the largest university in Botswana. The population of this research was the students of the last three years of the 4 year Bachelor of Accountancy degree programme at the University of Botswana. Anchored on the prior…

  17. Parents' Perspectives on Parental Notification of College Students' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Although many colleges and universities use "parental notification" to inform parents of students' alcohol use, the impact of this intervention on student and parent behavior is unclear. Surveys were obtained from 326 parents of university undergraduates, 56 of whom had received a notification. Parent responses to the notification were…

  18. Re-Framing Student Academic Freedom: A Capability Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The scholarly debate about academic freedom focuses almost exclusively on the rights of academic faculty. Student academic freedom is rarely discussed and is normally confined to debates connected with the politicisation of the curriculum. Concerns about (student) freedom of speech reflect the dominant role of negative rights in the analysis of…

  19. Sustainability: Perspectives of Students as Stakeholders in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, Krista Karyn

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly engaged in sustainability efforts, both in classrooms and on the campus. Yet, little is known about what students really know and believe about sustainability issues. Using Lattuca and Stark's (2009) curricular frame and a single case study approach, this research explored student and non-student…

  20. Student Evaluation of Teaching from the Actors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, Ingrid Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses obstacles that higher education institutions may need to surmount when introducing quality assurance measures such as student evaluation of teaching. It is based on a research study of how student evaluation of one-to-one instrumental tuition is perceived, experienced and practiced by instrumental teachers and their students…

  1. Does Entrepreneurship Education Matter? Business Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerová, Dana; Eger, Ludvík; Micík, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the findings of a mixed-methods study investigating the perceptions of business students in the Czech Republic towards entrepreneurship education, and examining the factors influencing their level of intention to be entrepreneurs. The results indicate that family background significantly influences the student's entrepreneurial…

  2. University Students' Unions: Changing Functions, a UK and Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lu; Cole, Michael; Worthington, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the functions of students' unions (SUs) through a UK case study. First, a functional classification of educational representation; wider representation; delivery of commercial services and faciliating a student community is outlined. Second, we specify a theoretical framework in terms of neo-liberalism and therapeutic…

  3. Understanding the Characteristics of Effective Professors: The Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thorsten; Reppel, Alexander; Voss, Roediger

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education institutions are realising that higher education could be regarded as a business-like service industry and they are beginning to focus more on meeting or even exceeding the needs of their students. Recent research findings suggest that the factors that create student satisfaction with teaching ("teaching…

  4. Student Engagement: Stakeholder Perspectives on Course Representation in University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement has become a key feature of UK higher education policy and analysis. At the core of this is a notion of engagement characterised by dialogue and joint venture. The article explores this by considering the role of student representation in university governance. It focuses on the system of course representation that is a feature…

  5. Parental Influence on Chinese Students' Achievement: A Social Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how social capital formed by effective parental practices within Chinese families influences student achievement. Survey responses from 266 students from Grades 4 to 6 in a suburban elementary school in China were analysed to identify their perceptions of parental practices (support, pressure, help, monitoring and…

  6. Fifth-year medical students' perspectives on rural training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Botswana includes rural community exposure for students throughout their 5 years of training. In addition to community exposure during the first 2 years, students complete 16 weeks of family medicine and 8 weeks of public health medicine. However ...

  7. Political Correctness: Background, Perspective, and Implications for Student Affairs Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forney, Deanna S.

    1996-01-01

    Provides background information about the Political Correctness debate, encourages student affairs administrators to reflect on their own perceptions and actions, offers ideas and suggestions about the debate, and explores the debate's implications for student affairs staff. Is intended to promote both individual reflection and group discussions…

  8. Accent, Identity, and a Fear of Loss? ESL Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrocklin, Shannon; Link, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Because many theorists propose a connection between accent and identity, some theorists have justifiably been concerned about the ethical ramifications of L2 pronunciation teaching. However, English-as-a-second-language (ESL) students often state a desire to sound like native speakers. With little research into ESL students' perceptions of links…

  9. Taiwanese University Students' Perspectives on Experiential Learning and Psychosocial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-Nii; Lai, Pi-Hui; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yueh-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This study described the relations of experiential learning and psychosocial development of Taiwanese university students through the qualitative method of phenomenology. Thirty-six students, age ranged from 19 to 25 years, from three research-oriented universities in northern Taiwan were interviewed. Seven themes were delineated: (1) discovering…

  10. Using Aplia in Finance Classes: Student Perspectives and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, R. Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The author, an early adopter of Aplia, describes the use of Aplia both pre- and post-acquisition by Cengage Learning. Students improve their exam scores (by 5 to 7 percent) and are receptive to using Aplia. Students report despite spending between 7 and 9 hours a week on Aplia assignments, they would gravitate to future offerings that included…

  11. Internationalization for Quality in Chinese Research Universities: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanhua; Yue, Yun

    2015-01-01

    China's rapidly expanding university system aims to balance quantity and quality through a variety of measures, including internationalization. This paper employs data from a survey of 1264 students from 39 higher education institutions in order to understand students' view on institutional approaches to internationalization. The data show that…

  12. Home-School Collaboration for Students with ASDs: Parents' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Mary A.; Spoede, John

    2015-01-01

    Parent-teacher collaboration for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has become increasingly important due to the rise of students being diagnosed with ASDs. Today's schools are being challenged with creating educational programs to best meet the need of this rising special needs population. This paper explores parent and special…

  13. The Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities: International Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Charles J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1948 when the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all students have been declared the right to education. The rights of disabled students have not been explicitly addressed, however, and each country has developed their own rules and regulations. Although similarities exist among the different countries,…

  14. Perspectives of patients towards medical students at the Queen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lmboera

    Department of Public Health, Division of Community Health, University of Malawi, College of Medicine,. Private Bag 360 ... students felt motivated to be present for student learning for altruistic reasons as well as for mutual ..... 'It is good if they sit in their office and discuss amongst themselves in a confined place. They.

  15. Student Activism within Christian College Cultures: A Symbolic Interactionist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of the structural and cultural influences of Christian college environments on student activism through the framework of symbolic interactionism (Blumer, 1969; Mead, 1934). The goal of this research was to examine how the students at Christian institutions understand and engage in activism within their…

  16. Cooperating Teachers' Perspectives of Student Teaching Skills and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which cooperating teachers deem required student teaching skills and activities relevant to the agricultural education student teaching experience. The population for this descriptive study consisted of individuals who served as cooperating teachers in Iowa and South Dakota during the last 5…

  17. Medical students' perspectives on the anatomy course at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional survey comprising a matrix questionnaire was performed among selected 1st-year - 5th-year medical students, using stratified random sampling. The students were requested to select a score between 0 and 5 to represent the fit between the learning outcome and the teaching method, with 0 being no fit ...

  18. The Teacher-Student Relationship from a Gramscian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Trentin Silveira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to analyze the teacher-student relationship in light of Gramscian categories. To do so, a Gramsci’s newspaper article published in 1915; some notes from the Prison Notebooks; and a letter to his brother Carlo, written in 1930, are used as references. It is intended to demonstrate that the author argues in favour of a friendly relationship between teacher and student, which would exclude pedagogic spontaneity as much as authoritarianism, psittacism and dilettantism. In short, to Gramsci, the nature of the teacher-student relationship is dialectic, in such a way that “every teacher is always a student and every student is a teacher” (Gramsci, 2001, p. 399. This conception is articulated with the author’s ideas on the relationship between intellectuals and the masses and about the question of hegemony.

  19. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion education: Malaysian perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-peng Tey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students' attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. METHODS AND RESULTS: A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students' pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students' attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights.

  20. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion education: Malaysian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai-peng; Yew, Siew-yong; Low, Wah-yun; Su'ut, Lela; Renjhen, Prachi; Huang, M S L; Tong, Wen-ting; Lai, Siow-li

    2012-01-01

    Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students' attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students' pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students' attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights.

  1. Medical student perspectives of what makes a high-quality teaching practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macallan, Jennifer; Pearson, David

    2013-05-01

    Primary care has seen increasing involvement in undergraduate medical education following recommendation from the GMC in Tomorrow's Doctors. This is also influenced by an increasing number of medical students and changing patterns of health care. The variety of practices involved in delivering undergraduate primary care placements poses a challenge for the quality of these placements. The variety of learners in primary care may also affect this. To reflect this, Cotton et al in 2009 produced a national consensus list of quality criteria for community-based education using a variety of medical education stakeholders. This paper seeks to explore the medical student perspective of what makes a high-quality teaching practice. This study uses focus group interviewing to explore student perspectives of the range of factors that can contribute towards the quality of a primary care placement. Previous research into student perspectives of teaching in primary care has revealed a strong focus on tutor quality. Students in this study again highlighted the important of good GP tutors and organisation of placements. However, one novel finding was the emphasis that students placed on involving patients in teaching and the vital role that they play in this.

  2. Perspectives on instructor modeling in mathematics teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Cassondra

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' instructional practices are greatly shaped by their own learning experiences as students in K-12 and college classrooms, which for most teachers was traditional, teacher-centered instruction. One of the challenges facing mathematics education reform is that, traditional teaching is in contrast to reform student- centered instruction. If teachers learn from their experiences as mathematics students, mathematics teacher educators are encouraged to model practices they would like teach...

  3. Creating meaningful learning experiences: Understanding students' perspectives of engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, Richard James Chung Mun

    There is a societal need for design education to prepare holistic engineers with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to innovate and compete globally. Design skills are paramount to the espoused values of higher education, as institutions of higher learning strive to develop in students the cognitive abilities of critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity. To meet these interests from industry and academia, it is important to advance the teaching and learning of engineering design. This research aims to understand how engineering students learn and think about design, as a way for engineering educators to optimize instructional practice and curriculum development. Qualitative research methodology was used to investigate the meaning that engineering students' ascribe to engineering design. The recruitment of participants and corresponding collection of data occurred in two phases using two different data collection techniques. The first phase involved the distribution of a one-time online questionnaire to all first year, third year, and fourth year undergraduate engineering students at three Canadian Universities. After the questionnaire, students were asked if they would be willing to participate in the second phase of data collection consisting of a personal interview. A total of ten students participated in interviews. Qualitative data analysis procedures were conducted on students' responses from the questionnaire and interviews. The data analysis process consisted of two phases: a descriptive phase to code and categorize the data, followed by an interpretative phase to generate further meaning and relationships. The research findings present a conceptual understanding of students' descriptions about engineering design, structured within two educational orientations: a learning studies orientation and a curriculum studies orientation. The learning studies orientation captured three themes of students' understanding of engineering design: awareness

  4. Student Difficulties in Learning Density: A Distributed Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Clarke, David

    2012-08-01

    Density has been reported as one of the most difficult concepts for secondary school students (e.g. Smith et al. 1997). Discussion about the difficulties of learning this concept has been largely focused on the complexity of the concept itself or student misconceptions. Few, if any, have investigated how the concept of density was constituted in classroom interactions, and what consequences these interactions have for individual students' conceptual understanding. This paper reports a detailed analysis of two lessons on density in a 7th Grade Australian science classroom, employing the theory of Distributed Cognition (Hollan et al. 1999; Hutchins 1995). The analysis demonstrated that student understanding of density was shaped strongly by the public classroom discussion on the density of two metal blocks. It also revealed the ambiguities associated with the teacher demonstration and the student practical work. These ambiguities contributed to student difficulties with the concept of density identified in this classroom. The results of this study suggest that deliberate effort is needed to establish shared understanding not only about the purpose of the activities, but also about the meaning of scientific language and the utility of tools. It also suggests the importance of appropriate employment of instructional resources in order to facilitate student scientific understanding.

  5. Role of Skill Laboratory Training in Medical Education - Students Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, R.; Qamar, K.; Rehman, S.; Khan, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the perceptions of medical students regarding their training utilizing facilities provided in the skill laboratory of a public sector medical college. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from October to December 2014. Methodology: Students of final year MBBS who had underwent skill laboratory training were recruited through convenience purposive sampling. Students not exposed to skill laboratory training were excluded. Data collection tool was a questionnaire having 23 questions with responses on Likert Scale as strongly disagree, disagree, agree and strongly agree coded as 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Data was analysed on SPSS version 22. Results: There were 78 (57 percent) male and 59 (43 percent) female students out of 137, with mean age of 22.59 ± 0.74 years. The response rate was 68.5 percent. Cronbach's Alpha test was 0.84 showing high reliability. The mean of sum of all the 23 items was 63.85 ± 8.71, whereas item means was 2.78 ± 0.38, reflecting a high inclination of students towards skill laboratory training. Frequency of students responding in favour of skill laboratory training was significantly high (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Medical students perceived skill laboratory training as a favoured learning strategy as compared to practising on real patients for acquisition of various aspects of clinical skills, knowledge and attitude. (author)

  6. The Perspective of Six Malaysian Students on Playing Video Games: Beneficial or Detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Roselan; Yee Leng, Eow; Wan Ali, Wan Zah; Mahmud, Rosnaini; Hamzah, Mohd. Sahandri Gani

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a glimpse into understanding the potential benefits as well as harm of playing video games from the perspective of six Malaysian secondary school students, aged 16-17 years old. The rationale of the study is to enable parents, educators, administrators and policy makers to develop a sound understanding on the impact of playing…

  7. Web 2.0 Technologies and Parent Involvement of ELL Students: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-shin; Seger, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how ELL students' parents participated in a blog-mediated English language arts curriculum in a second grade classroom at a U.S. urban school, and how they supported their children's learning of school-based writing. Adopting ecological perspectives on technological affordances, this study views digital literacy as discursive…

  8. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  9. Academically Resilient, Low-Income Students' Perspectives of How School Counselors Can Meet Their Academic Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph; Steen, Sam; Albert, Tracy; Dely, Betty; Jacobs, Brian; Nagel, Chelsea; Irick, Anese

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological, qualitative study examined a national sample of academically resilient, low-income middle school students' (N = 24) perspectives of what school counselors can do to promote their academic achievement. Three main themes and nine subthemes were identified: build meaningful relationships, build on the cultural wealth of…

  10. Opportunities and Barriers of Practicum from the Perspectives of English Language Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Thouqan Saleem Yakoub

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the perspectives of student teachers regarding the opportunities provided by Practicum course, in addition to the barriers that potentially inhibited their performance as teachers. The descriptive approach was used to identify these opportunities and barriers. Participants were (27) females and (31) males. They were all…

  11. Relationships between Students' Mental Health and Their Perspectives of Life at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships between students' self-reported mental health and their perspectives about life at school in metropolitan Adelaide, South Australia. Design/methodology/approach: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and a purpose designed Living and Learning at School Questionnaire (LLSQ)…

  12. Multiple Intelligences Theory and Foreign Language Education: Perspectives of College Students in a German Immersion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Segler, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore and comprehend the role of Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (MI) in foreign language learning by analyzing the perspectives of college students in a German immersion program at a liberal arts college in the Midwest. Data collection included 10 in-depth student…

  13. Students' Views and Qualification Policy Development: Perspectives on Failed Vocationally Related Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that students are often articulate about qualifications policy matters, their perspectives are rarely listened to. This is because governments shape qualifications policy according to pre-set beliefs and are unwilling to countenance dissonant or outsider views. Using the Diploma qualification and inclusion of vocational…

  14. Moral Values Education in Terms of Graduate University Students' Perspectives: A Jordanian Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Amani

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on how moral values differ and vary according to variants such as education, culture, thoughts, religion, gender and family relations. It handles the issue of moral education in Jordan, from the perspective of graduate students in Petra University. Since we are facing new challenges in this era and region of the world, we are…

  15. Strategies Used to Teach Mathematics to Special Education Students from the Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Desline A.

    2016-01-01

    The perspectives of special education teachers on the strategies used to teach mathematics to special education students were examined in this dissertation. Three central research questions that guided the study are: (a) What were New York special education teachers' opinions about the methods they use to teach mathematics to special education…

  16. Urban Service Providers' Perspectives on School Responses to Gay, Lesbian, and Questioning Students: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varjas, Kris; Graybill, Emily; Mahan, Will; Meyers, Joel; Dew, Brian; Marshall, Megan; Singh, Anneliese; Birckbichler, Lamar

    2007-01-01

    Perspectives regarding bullying of gay, lesbian, and questioning (GLQ) students were obtained from 16 school and community service providers in this exploratory study. Insights were gained regarding in-school responses to homophobic bullying threats beyond traditional punishments (e.g., suspension). Barriers to developing safe schools for GLQ…

  17. Integrating Cultural Perspectives of First Generation Latino Students and Families into the College Admissions Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Ryan R.

    2011-01-01

    First generation college-bound Latino students and their families are placed at a disadvantage in the college admissions process for a variety of reasons. Their cultural perspectives in relation to education and family combined with the increasingly widening gap between the working class and professional middle class has left many Latino families…

  18. Teachers' Perspectives of Students with ADHD in Korea and the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, SeokYoung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' perspectives of working with students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) with two hundred twenty-eight K-12th grade teachers in Korea and the U.S. by using a concept mapping methodology. The four research questions were: (1) How do teachers in two different cultures (Korea and…

  19. University Students' Views on Bullying from the Perspective of Different Participant Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Carrie-Anne; Cowie, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Sixty university students in three different participant roles--perpetrator, the target and the bystander--took part in a role-play incident of bullying. Participants were asked to describe (i) their perspective on the incident; (ii) their views of the target and the perpetrator and (iii) their solution to the problem. The findings suggest that…

  20. "Why Didn't They Ask Me?": Student Perspectives on a School Improvement Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will examine the results of a qualitative, longitudinal study of school improvement initiatives from the perspective of school stakeholders. The article captures the responses of students from a low socio-economic status school in NSW, Australia to a school initiative that restructured the learning…

  1. An Analysis of Chinese Students' Perception and Production of Paired English Fricatives: From an ELF Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Xiao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    English has assumed a new role in international communication in recent decades, that is, as a Lingua Franca (ELF) among speakers with different first languages. This study attempts to investigate and analyze Chinese university students' perception and production of paired English fricatives from the perspective of ELF. By using a listening…

  2. Exploring Students' Experiences in First-Year Learning Communities from a Situated Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Kerry L.; Saucier, Donald A.; Eiselein, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This study looked to situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991) in order to explore students' participation in the social practices of first-year learning communities. Wenger's (1998) elaboration on "communities of practice" provides insight into how such participation transforms learners. These perspectives frame learning as a…

  3. Is Twitter an Effective Pedagogical Tool in Higher Education? Perspectives of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the perspectives of education graduate students of using Twitter as a pedagogical tool for 15 weeks as a required social media activity in class. The results indicated that participants in each course reported a positive learning experience of using Twitter. Although this was their first experience with Twitter, participants…

  4. Why Do Chinese Students Perform Well on Spatial Tasks? Chinese Teachers' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chieh

    This study assessed Chinese teachers' perspectives on why Chinese students perform well on spatial tasks. The study interviewed 17 male and 12 female teachers of Chinese language, math, science, and 6 other subjects, from elementary schools, high schools, and colleges of Beijing, China. The responses indicated that the Chinese teachers perceived…

  5. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  6. Perspectives of South Korean Undergraduate Exchange Students Attending a University in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lishu; Huang, Li-Ching; Hare, Dwight

    2010-01-01

    This in-depth study examined the perspectives of 17 Korean undergraduate exchange students attending a U.S. southern university during the 2005-2006 school year. The struggles and frustrations they experienced; the difficulties they encountered socially, culturally, and academically; their contributions to the American academic community; and…

  7. Perspectives from Japanese Staff in Canadian ESL Schools regarding Japanese Students' Groupism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoko

    2006-01-01

    The present study, which stems from a critical approach to common perceptions about ESL learners in the TESOL community, examines the perspectives of Japanese-speaking staff in Canadian ESL institutions on their students' school performance. From September 2003 to April 2004, qualitative data were gathered from 11 staff members through mail…

  8. Enhancing student motivation: a longitudinal intervention study based on future time perspective theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitema, J.; Peetsma, T.; van der Veen, I.

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of an intervention developed to enhance student motivation in the first years of secondary education. The intervention, based on future time perspective (FTP) theory, has been found to be effective in prevocational secondary education (T. T. D. Peetsma & I. Van

  9. Are Sojourners Natural Comparativists? Critical Perspectives on the Learning Experiences of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweisfurth, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Students who spend a period of time studying outside of their own national systems have a number of advantages in terms of developing a comparative perspective on education. The experience of living and studying abroad provides them with the opportunity to act as participant observers of at least two different systems, and the natural…

  10. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Awad, Abdelmoneim I; Schwinghammer, Terry L; Kombian, Samuel B

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients' quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. To investigate pharmacy students' attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126) was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD) were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%), lack of pharmacist time (83.3%), organizational obstacles (82.6%), and pharmacists' physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%). Pharmacy students' attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University understand and advocate implementation of pharmaceutical care while also

  11. Strategies to Support Students' Mathematical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyunyi

    2015-01-01

    An important question for mathematics teachers is this: "How can we help students learn mathematics to solve everyday problems, rather than teaching them only to memorize rules and practice mathematical procedures?" Teaching students using modeling activities can help them learn mathematics in real-world problem-solving situations that…

  12. Are Universities Role Models for Communities? A Gender Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE; Octavian MOLDOVAN

    2012-01-01

    The present paper explores the degree in which universities could/should serve as role models for communities from the perspective of gender integration. Although the theoretical/ moral answer would be affirmative (universities should be in such a position that would allow local communities to regard them as role models of gender integration), the primary empirical analysis leads to another conclusion. A brief theoretical review (that connects gender discrimination, sustainable development, u...

  13. Students' Perspectives on Interprofessional Teamwork Before and After an Interprofessional Pain Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Lynn Coletta; Rhodes, Diane C; McGinnis, Kathleen A; Fiedor, Jaclyn

    2017-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate changes in pharmacy and nursing student perspectives before and after completion of an interprofessional education (IPE) course. Methods. A pre- and post-perception scale descriptive prospective study design utilizing Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) and Collaboration and Satisfaction about Care Decisions (CSACD) with self-reported statements of knowledge and importance of professional roles was used. Results. Significant improvement was shown for IEPS and CSACD overall and for both pharmacy and nursing students. Post-scores improved from 2013 to 2014, with significant improvements for IEPS. Pharmacy student findings show an increase in knowledge and importance of their roles and those of nursing students. Nursing students grew significantly in their knowledge of the pharmacist's role only. Conclusion. An IPE course for nursing and pharmacy students, taught by diverse health professionals with a care plan and simulation assignments, fosters the Interprofessional Education Collaborative panel's competencies for IPE.

  14. Factors affecting the performance of undergraduate medical students: A perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Performance of medical students in developing nations like India is perceived to have largely declined. Aims: We attempted to assess the reasons behind such trends. Settings and Design: Students in their third year of medical study were given a predesigned, pretested structured and validated questionnaire that they filled in anonymously. The key areas assessed were concentration, interest and understanding of the subject and other perceived causes of poor performance. Tests for descriptive statistics were applied for evaluation. Results and Conclusions: One hundred and fifty students participated in the study. Fifty-five (36.66% students performed poorly. Male gender, inability to clear the previous professional examination at the first attempt, difficulty in understanding medium of instruction, self-assessed depression, sleep disorders and perceived parental and peer pressure and dissatisfaction with career choice were significantly linked with poor performance (P<0.05 for each factor. Socioeconomic status and regularity in class were not linked to academic performance.

  15. The investor perspective on business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Disclosure of information on strategies, business models, critical success factors, risk factors and value drivers in general has gained importance in recent years. Both policy makers and academics have argued that the demand for external communication of new types of value drivers is rising...... as companies increasingly base their competitive strengths and thus the value of the company on know-how, patents, skilled employees and other intangibles. In parallel with the focus on disclosure of value drivers, the concept of business models has gained popularity. However, business models in terms of “ways...... of doing business” have always existed. The business model reflects the way of competing of the specific company, whether it concerns being unique or being the most cost-efficient company in the industry....

  16. Lecturer and Student Perspective Regarding Teaching Public Aministration in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Georgiana PROFIROIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available considerable progress in developing public administration teaching. However the need to increase student interest and involvement in the learning process is a largely widespread issue in all Romanian universities, which impacts on both teaching/learning methodology and student assessment methods. The present study aims to analyze (1 teaching practices, (2 students’ preferences and perceptions regarding these practices, and (3 the relationship between these preferences and real practices. I focused on teaching of public administration (or administrative sciences as a discipline and the possible variations in students’ preferences as opposed to teachers’ beliefs and real practices. Moreover, I was concerned with educational effectiveness in terms of acquired competencies and aspects that could increase the effectiveness of students’ learning. In respect of these objectives I designed two questionnaires: one for students in public administration enrolled in undergraduate programs and another for the teaching staff. The two questionnaires addressed comparable research questions. Some questions were similar in order to allow the comparison of responses for both categories of respondents. Seven public universities were selected through a convenience sampling method from more than 32 Romanian universities which have developed accredited public administration programs. I have chosen the seven most important programs according to student numbers, from all geographic areas of the country. The last part shows that the three hypotheses were not fully validated and for a further research, I should investigate the problem of poor results of my students by a qualitative research among the students with poor attendance and lower thanaverage academic performance.

  17. COMMUNICATION STRATEGY ABOUT BUSINESS MODELS: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojoagă Alexandru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations inform stakeholders about their current and future activities, processes, created value, strategic intentions, and other information that may influence the established relationships. Organizations choose to communicate with stakeholders by different means and in varied ways. The annual report represents a way of communicating between companies and their stakeholders, and it is offering comprehensive information about how companies operates and creates value. The business model is an emerging concept in management literature and practice. The concept describes the logic by which a organization creates, maintains and delivers value for its stakeholders. Through annual reports organisations can communicate to stakeholders information about their business models.We investigated how information about business models is explicitly communicated through annual reports, and how this information is reffering to stakeholders. Our paper aims to reveal which stakeholders are more often mentioned when organizations are communicating about business models through annual reports. This approach shows the attention degree given by organizations to stakeholders. We perceived this from a strategic point of view, as a strategic signal. Thus, we considered if the stakeholder is mentioned more frequent in the communicated message it has a greater role in communication strategy about business model. We conducted an exploratory research and have realized a content analysis.The analysed data consist in over a thousand annual reports from 96 organizations. We analysed the informations transmitted by organizations through annual reports. The annual reports were for a time period of 12 years. Most of the selected companies are multi-business, and are operating in different industries. The results show the stakeholder’s hierarchy based on how often they were mentioned in the communicated messages about business models through annual reports. Based on our

  18. Modeling Concept Evolution: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Flavio; Velegrakis, Yannis; Mylopoulos, John; Bykau, Siarhei

    The world is changing, and so must the data that describes its history. Not surprisingly, considerable research effort has been spent in Databases along this direction, covering topics such as temporal models and schema evolution. A topic that has not received much attention, however, is that of concept evolution. For example, Germany (instance-level concept) has evolved several times in the last century as it went through different governance structures, then split into two national entities that eventually joined again. Likewise, a caterpillar is transformed into a butterfly, while a mother becomes two (maternally-related) entities. As well, the concept of Whale (a class-level concept) changed over the past two centuries thanks to scientific discoveries that led to a better understanding of what the concept entails. In this work, we present a formal framework for modeling, querying and managing such evolution. In particular, we describe how to model the evolution of a concept, and how this modeling can be used to answer historical queries of the form "How has concept X evolved over period Y". Our proposal extends an RDF-like model with temporal features and evolution operators. Then we provide a query language that exploits these extensions and supports historical queries.

  19. SLS Model Based Design: A Navigation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, T. Emerson; Anzalone, Evan; Park, Thomas; Geohagan, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    The SLS Program has implemented a Model-based Design (MBD) and Model-based Requirements approach for managing component design information and system requirements. This approach differs from previous large-scale design efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center where design documentation alone conveyed information required for vehicle design and analysis and where extensive requirements sets were used to scope and constrain the design. The SLS Navigation Team is responsible for the Program-controlled Design Math Models (DMMs) which describe and represent the performance of the Inertial Navigation System (INS) and the Rate Gyro Assemblies (RGAs) used by Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C). The SLS Navigation Team is also responsible for navigation algorithms. The navigation algorithms are delivered for implementation on the flight hardware as a DMM. For the SLS Block 1B design, the additional GPS Receiver hardware model is managed as a DMM at the vehicle design level. This paper describes the models, and discusses the processes and methods used to engineer, design, and coordinate engineering trades and performance assessments using SLS practices as applied to the GN&C system, with a particular focus on the navigation components.

  20. A modeling perspective on cloud radiative forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, G.L.; Corsetti, L.; Slingo, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    Radiation fields from a perpetual July integration of a T106 version of the ECM-WF operational model are used to identify the most appropriate way to diagnose cloud radiative forcing in a general circulation model, for the purposes of intercomparison between models. Differences between the Methods I and II of Cess and Potter (1987) and a variant method are addressed. Method I is shown to be the least robust of all methods, due to the potential uncertainties related to persistent cloudiness, length of the sampling period and biases in retrieved clear-sky quantities due to insufficient sampling of the diurnal cycle. Method II is proposed as an unambiguous way to produce consistent radiative diagnostics for intercomparing model results. The impact of the three methods on the derived sensitivities and cloud feedbacks following an imposed change in sea surface temperature is discussed. The sensitivity of the results to horizontal resolution is considered by using the diagnostics from parallel integrations with T21 version of the model

  1. Nursing Students' Readiness for the Numeracy Needs of Their Program: Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Linda; Frederiks, Anita; Wandel, Andrew P.; Robinson, Clare; Abdulla, Shahab; Hussain, Zanubia

    2017-01-01

    Numeracy needs of nursing students are often underestimated by students when they enter university. Even when students are aware of the mathematics required, students underestimate or overestimate the skills they have. Research has highlighted the mathematics and numeracy skills required of nurses and nursing students and numerous studies have…

  2. Country brand equity model: Sustainability perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Milivoj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model of country brand equity that incorporates the issue of sustainability in determining destination brand equity. In particular, the model includes elements of sustainability as its core dimensions and promotes the concept of the country sustainability promise that transforms destination resources into the positive perception and experience. The theoretical model is empirically tested using global secondary data confirming that country image is the most important element followed by sustainability and loyalty. Also, the analysis suggests the existence of the higher order construct confirming the country brand equity concept. Based on the research findings, the article offers some implications to the destination managers by suggesting the direction for further development and strategy implementation.

  3. Arts-based learning in medical education: the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Croix, Anne; Rose, Catharine; Wildig, Emma; Willson, Suzy

    2011-11-01

    Arts subjects are often included in medical school curricula to facilitate the exploration of non-scientific elements of medicine, such as communication, social, political, emotional and spiritual issues. However, little research has reported on students' experience of arts teaching. Performing Medicine is a programme created by the Clod Ensemble theatre company in collaboration with Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, and the Department of Drama at Queen Mary University, London. Professional artists run a range of workshops exploring issues relating to health care and work to develop students' professional skills in self-presentation, observation, communication, self-care and their understanding of difference. This article presents an analysis of student-written material about Performing Medicine. A dataset of written student materials (reflections and feedback), drawn from three academic years (2006-2009), was analysed using the qualitative methods of thematic analysis and word frequency analysis. Five prevalent themes were identified: (i) Acting like a doctor; (ii) Developing broader awareness of others; (iii) The self in focus; (iv) The art of communication, and (v) A place for arts-based teaching within the medical curriculum. The corpus linguistic analysis confirmed and elaborated on the five themes found in the thematic analysis. Students generally felt that arts teaching made a valuable contribution to the medical curriculum. Many felt the training would reduce 'performance anxiety' in situations such as examinations, presentations and new placements. Group work developed camaraderie and students enjoyed the opportunity to learn new skills through creative writing, theatre and movement sessions. Some sessions developed students' ability to engage with and relate to people from very different backgrounds than their own. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  4. Exploring Graduate Students' Perspectives towards Using Gamification Techniques in Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniah ALABBASI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Teachers and educational institutions are attempting to find an appropriate strategy to motivate as well as engage students in the learning process. Institutions are encouraging the use of gamification in education for the purpose of improving the intrinsic motivation as well as engagement. However, the students’ perspective of the issue is under-investigated. The purpose of this research study was to explore graduate students’ perspectives toward the use of gamification techniques in online learning. The study used exploratory research and survey as the data collection tool. Forty-seven graduate students (n = 47 enrolled in an instructional technology program studied in a learning management system that supports gamification (TalentLMS. The average total percentages were calculated for each survey section to compose the final perspective of the included students. The results showed a positive perception toward the use of gamification tools in online learning among graduate students. Students require effort-demanding, challenging, sophisticated learning systems that increase competency, enhance recall memory, concentration, attentiveness, commitment, and social interaction. Limitations of the study are identified, which highlights the need for further research on the subject matter.

  5. An ethnographic approach to studying the student experience: The student perspective through free form video diaries. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Cashmore

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a longitudinal project, in its third year, involving free-form video diaries by undergraduate students, reflecting on aspects of their experience that are significant to them. Sixty four students, from three cohorts, have been given video cameras and they return regular (weekly short videos covering whatever is important to them. Focus group sessions enable discussion of specific issues. We have coded video data so that we, and others, will be able to draw on it. The data provides insight, from the student perspective, into many issues including friendships, induction, assessment, modes of study, teamwork etc. As an example, we will present some of our findings in relation to academic and social transitions experienced by students throughout their first year. However, a key question is how can we make this rich resource of video data available so that it can inform a wider range of studies across the international higher education community?

  6. Gender Differences in Graduate Students' Perspectives on the Culture of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria M.

    In this study, gender differences in graduate students' perspectives on the culture of science were examined in two graduate departments (biology and chemistry) at a large research university. Data from a survey questionnaire from 170 students and interviews with 32 of them indicated that the culture of science as experienced by the participants of this study was characterized by competition, a narrow focus, and a belief in objectivity. These perspectives were particularly common among the female students, who also perceived a role conflict between a successful career in science and having a family. The study shows that although women have greater access to careers in science, the culture of the scientific enterprise continues to be based on the masculine ideals of 17th-century England.

  7. TEAM TEACHING IN JAPAN FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ALTs, THE JTEs, AND THE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ann Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This case study explores team teaching in Japan from the perspectives of JTEs (Japanese English Teachers, ALTs (Assistant Language Teachers, and students. Special focus is attributed to teachers and students’ perceptions of ALT and JTE roles. To determine the perspectives of all three participants, 112 students, 4 JTES and 2 ALTs from a Japanese high school in Chiba Prefecture were surveyed. Fieldwork was conducted over a ten-day period at the research site in 2009 to collect data in the form of questionnaires, interviews, and class observations. The findings indicate more of a mismatch between students’ perceptions of their teachers’ roles than between teachers. The results also reveal the students prefer a combination of both teachers and find team-taught classes more beneficial to developing their English skills.

  8. Ontological perspective in metamodeling for model transformations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göknil, Arda; Topaloglu, N.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Model Driven Engineering (MDE) aims to facilitate building larger and more complex, reliable software systems by introducing a higher abstraction level than the code level. The technical space concept discusses how the basic MDE principles may be mapped onto modern platform support and several

  9. Status and perspectives of nanoscale device modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macucci, M.; Lannaccone, G.; Greer, J.

    2001-01-01

    During the meetings of the theory and modelling working group, within the MEL-ARI (Microelectronics Advanced Research Initiative) and NID-FET (Nanotechnology information Devices-Future and Emerging Technologies) initiatives of the European Commission, we have been discussing the current status...

  10. Designing experiments and analyzing data a model comparison perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Through this book's unique model comparison approach, students and researchers are introduced to a set of fundamental principles for analyzing data. After seeing how these principles can be applied in simple designs, students are shown how these same principles also apply in more complicated designs. Drs. Maxwell and Delaney believe that the model comparison approach better prepares students to understand the logic behind a general strategy of data analysis appropriate for various designs; and builds a stronger foundation, which allows for the introduction of more complex topics omitt

  11. Understanding Middle School Students' Difficulties in Explaining Density Differences from a Language Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Lay Hoon; Clarke, David; Hart, Christina

    2015-09-01

    This study examines how a class of Grade 7 students employed linguistic resources to explain density differences. Drawing from the same data-set as a previous study by, we take a language perspective to investigate the challenges students face in learning the concept of density. Our study thus complements previous research on learning about density which has mostly focussed on the conceptual challenges. The data consist of transcripts of lessons on density and students' written assignments. Using selected analytical categories from the Systemic Functional Linguistics framework, we first examined students' use of linguistic resources in their written reports of a practical activity. We then compared the language employed by the students with the instructional language, identifying possible links. Our analysis identified specific aspects of language that the students need to appropriate in order to express an understanding of density that aligns with a scientific perspective. The findings from this study illuminate ways by which teachers could assist students in overcoming the linguistic challenges in explaining density differences, which complement those made by existing studies that focus on conceptual challenges.

  12. Baccalaureate nursing students' information technology competence--agency perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    Baccalaureate nurses must meet information technology (IT) competencies expectations for employment and future professional development. Unfortunately, educational programs and accrediting groups have not identified specific outcomes, and IT is not integrated formally into many undergraduate program curricula. Meanwhile, nursing students and faculty are practicing in clinical agencies undergoing an informatics and technology revolution. Adding courses and content, hardware, software, and strategies such as distance learning and simulation have been recommended to improve competency development. However, little is known regarding nursing students' experiences with IT in clinical practice. Agencies used as sites for one undergraduate program were surveyed and asked to identify barriers and facilitators to students' IT competencies attainment. Ten agency, program, and policy factors affecting the quality of the learning experience in clinical agencies were identified. Results underscored that leadership to improve collaboration and communication between nursing practice, education, and policy groups is necessary to improve clinical environments for IT learning.

  13. Heterotic particle models from various perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszczyk, Michael I.

    2012-10-15

    We consider the compactification of heterotic string theory on toroidal orbifolds and their resolutions. In the framework of gauged linear sigma models we develop realizations of such spaces, allowing to continously vary the moduli and thus smoothly interpolate between different corners of the theory. This way all factorizable orbifold resolutions as well as some non-factorizable ones can be obtained. We find that for a given geometry there are many model which realize it as a target space, differing in their complexity. We explore regions of moduli space which otherwise would not be accessible. In particular we are interested in the orbifold regime, where exact string calculations are possible, and the large volume regime, where techniques of supergravity compactification can be applied. By comparing these two theories and matching the spectra we find evidence for non-perturbative effects which interpolate between these regimes.

  14. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  15. The Perspectives of Students and Teachers in the English Department in the College of Basic Education on the Student Evaluation of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqi, Hanan A.; Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Dashti, Abdulmuhsin A.; Shuqair, Khaled M.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of students' evaluation of teachers in higher education, this paper examines the perspectives of students and faculty members in the English Department in the college of Basic education (CBE) in the State of Kuwait. The study is based on a survey that covered 320 students and 19 members of staff in the English department. The study…

  16. Challenges and motivators influencing the academic performance of English as an additional language (EAL) nursing students: the perspectives of the students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; McKiel, Elaine; Hwang, Jihye Jasmine

    2009-09-01

    Canada's rising immigrant population has led to an increasing number of nursing students for whom English is an"additional language" (EAL). Although many of these students are successful academically, there is a persistent small number who struggle due to their limited English-language skills and their different cultural knowledge and practices. Despite the difficulties they experience, the students' desire to enter the nursing profession remains strong. A qualitative study was undertaken to identify factors that influence these students' academic performance from the perspectives of the students themselves and their instructors. Fourteen EAL nursing students were interviewed. Analysis of the interview data revealed factors that influenced the students' experiences in their nursing programs.The authors describe the students' perspectives on the challenges and motivators they encountered in their nursing programs. They also recommend strategies that could help EAL students to achieve success in their nursing studies.

  17. PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kanowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors that students should consider prior to adopting this approach, in terms of university requirements, supervisors' attitudes, the research subject matter, intellectual property, capacity and working style, and issues of co-authorship. It then outlines our perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of undertaking a PhD by publication. We suggest that, in general, the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. We conclude by reflecting on how the first author's experiences relate to current discussions about fostering publications by doctoral students.

  18. Experiencing Beach in Australia: Study Abroad Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshifumi; Payne, Phillip G.

    2011-01-01

    The current "Australian-"ness"" of outdoor environmental education is an evolving "set" of socio-cultural constructions. These constructions can be interpreted within the circumstances of an empirical study of tertiary study abroad students' participation in an undergraduate semester long unit "Experiencing the…

  19. K-12 Students with Concussions: A Legal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Brown, Brenda Eagan

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a multipart analysis of the public schools' responsibility for students with concussions. The first part provides the prevailing diagnostic definitions of concussions and postconcussive syndrome. The second and central part provides (a) the legal framework of the two overlapping federal laws--the Individuals with Disabilities…

  20. "Settling In": Postgraduate Research Student Experiences; An International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Christine; Mussi, Eveline

    2012-01-01

    International student cohorts continue to be increasingly vital to higher education institutions in Australia; currently, they account for 20 percent of enrolments. However, there is concern that over the past few years, enrolment numbers have been dropping. Reasons for this decrease may vary from: tuition fee increases, new overseas universities…

  1. Social Responsibility in Advertising: A Marketing Communications Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Alice; Fullerton, Jami A.; Kim, Yeo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although advertising has played a key role in bringing corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the public agenda on behalf of agency clients, little effort has been made to define what social responsibility means in advertising. A national survey of 1,045 advertising and marketing communications students from 176 colleges and universities were…

  2. Success of Student Internship in Engineering Industry: A Faculty Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, B. Vittaldasa; Kudva S., Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Student internship plays a major role in transforming the engineering interns to ready-to-use professionals. Learning at the workplace has become a challenge for the interns due to several issues. A knowledge gap analysis has been depicted considering all stakeholders of the internship, including the intern, faculty, institution and the industrial…

  3. Perspectives and Trends of Tracking among Students' Abilities on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abilities and academic competence. As a position paper it tries to empower the teachers on the need to apply tracking among students in order to maximize their potentials even within the already and existed legal framework. It however stated the ...

  4. Perceptions of medical students undergoing cadaveric training: a sociocognitive perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. C. O. Njoku

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The emotional and sociocognitive aspects of human dissection are important aspects of professionalism in medical training and so should be critically evaluated in the present day changing society. Medical students of Ebonyi State University, Nigeria completed 390 questionnaires. The questionnaires included questions seeking demographic information; open-ended questions on their first experience of dissection and suggestions on improvements in training. The Visual analogue scale (VAS was used to assess anxiety and satisfaction levels. The questionnaires were analyzed statistically with P<0.05 indicating level of significance. Majority (35.7% of the students was excited/fulfilled after their first experience and 41.5% were of the opinion that life in humans is more appreciated by dissection. Their mean anxiety level was 3.42 while satisfaction rating was 7.13 on a scale of 1-10. A greater number of students suggested that conducive learning environment and improved preservation techniques would improve satisfaction (30.3% and 33.1% respectively. A Conducive environment and better preservation of cadavers are the major factors that improve satisfaction. Psychosocial factors should be assessed constantly to ascertain attitudinal changes of students, which will be helpful in quality of professional formation.

  5. Student and Parent Perspectives on Fipping the Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Tracey

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, the domain of higher education, the 'flipped classroom' is gaining in popularity in secondary school settings. In the flipped classroom, digital technologies are used to shift direct instruction from the classroom to the home, providing students with increased autonomy over their learning. While advocates of the approach believe it…

  6. Educational Reform from the Perspective of the Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Felipe; Cardona-Toro, Jose-Gerardo; Díaz-Renteria, María-Guadalupe; Alvarez, Maria-Ines; Rendon, Hector; Valero, Isabel; Morfin, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Educational policies are tools that the state prepares to generate conditions that allow access to and retention in schools, with the consequent reduction in school failure, increasing the external yield and fulfilling the expectations of the internal agents (teachers, students, school managers), external users (families, society, employers,…

  7. Self-Directed Learning: Pedagogical Influences on Graduate Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzow, Jeannine; Bledsoe, T. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL), while essential to graduate student success and continued professional development beyond the degree, is rarely addressed intentionally in the college curriculum. In this mixed-method study with 91 participants from two counseling-related degree programs, researchers examined the impact of integrating a unit focused…

  8. Value Types in Higher Education--Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewanowska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to propose the service-dominant logic in marketing as a framework for analysing the value co-creation process in the higher education sector and present the results of a quantitative study (a survey) conducted among business students from four Polish public universities. The results of the study led to identification of…

  9. The International Mobility of Chinese Students: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anyone hoping to understand China and Chinese people's behaviour in the present day must examine China's long history and culture, as these often have crystallized into current behavioural patterns. This paper discusses one important push-out factor for Chinese students' outbound mobility, and an element that is ignored in many futuristic…

  10. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  11. Scientific Literacy and Student Attitudes: Perspectives from PISA 2006 Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger; McCrae, Barry

    2011-01-01

    International assessments provide important knowledge about science education and help inform decisions about policies, programmes, and practices in participating countries. In 2006, science was the primary domain for the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), supported by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development…

  12. Career Choice Factors for BSW Students: A 10-Year Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, James G.; McCullagh, James G.

    1995-01-01

    A 10-year study of the major career choice factors of social work undergraduates (n=746) found that, although altruism remains important, students are motivated by both service to others and job self-interest. Dimensions of motivation for choosing social work have not changed significantly over this period. (Author/MSE)

  13. Inequalities and Agencies in Workplace Learning Experiences: International Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; Soejatminah, Sri

    2017-01-01

    National systems of vocational education and training around the globe are facing reform driven by quality, international mobility, and equity. Evidence suggests that there are qualitatively distinctive challenges in providing and sustaining workplace learning experiences to international students. However, despite growing conceptual and empirical…

  14. Medical Students' Perspective Towards Their Future Medical Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives:To evaluate the influencing factors towards choice of the medical profession and attitude towards future medical practice. Subjects and methods: One hundred thirty four students of the Gondar College of Medical Sciences were included in the study. Data was collected by using self-administered questionnaires.

  15. Generational Perspective of Higher Education Online Student Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Chad James

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether students associated with a generational group exhibit similar learning styles as identified by the Felder and Soloman Index of Learning Styles instrument. The secondary purpose was to determine to what degree these generational groups rate their satisfaction with online education through the use…

  16. Arts-based learning in medical education: the students' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Croix, Anne; Rose, Catharine; Wildig, Emma; Willson, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT Arts subjects are often included in medical school curricula to facilitate the exploration of non-scientific elements of medicine, such as communication, social, political, emotional and spiritual issues. However, little research has reported on students' experience of arts teaching.

  17. Pretoria medical students' perspectives on the assessable attributes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Physician's Charter, 'Medical Professionalism in the New Millennium”, was published by the. Annals of Internal Medicine in February 2002. ... assessing and monitoring attitude de- velopment, and for sensitising staff and students to ...... Tapper-Jones L, Houston H. Assessment of professional attitude and conduct in medi-.

  18. Online Learning and Students with Disabilities: Parent Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Paula J.; Greer, Diana L.

    2014-01-01

    While research has been conducted on parental involvement in K-12 online learning, none of this research relates specifically to the parents of students with disabilities. Thus, researchers developed a survey around the following constructs: parental roles, instruction and assessment, communication and support from the school, and parental…

  19. Pretoria medical students' perspectives on assessable attributes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The attributes used to describe professionalism were grouped under four main domains: attitude and personal conduct, teamwork, patient care and professional competence. These correspond, to some extent, with the Charter. Most of the students, however, stressed the humanistic attributes of professional behaviour, ...

  20. Challenges of International Students in a Japanese University: Ethnographic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Seong

    2017-01-01

    The author investigates what challenges four international students (Vietnamese, Filipino, Brazilian, and Chinese) faced and how they coped with these dilemmas in a Japanese language program during the first semester in 2014. Multiple apparatuses (e.g., field notes, face-to-face oral interviews, focal group conversations, and semi-structured…

  1. Social Support for Online Learning: Perspectives of Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munich, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify supports beyond the educator that contributed to undergraduate and graduate nursing students' ability and motivation to learn online. Case study methodology similar to Stake (2000) was bounded or contained by undergraduate and graduate online courses. Twenty-nine undergraduate and graduate nursing…

  2. A perspective on methodological issues in research on adult student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The important role of analytical thinking is demonstrated in this article by means of examples of research on student attrition rates. The article shows how various points of departure regarding the aims of a study influence (sometimes unqualified) assumptions of causation. Researchers should distinguish between necessary ...

  3. Teaching Writing in the Disciplines: Student Perspectives on Learning Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Writing in the Disciplines curricula can both challenge and reinforce assumptions that writing is a general skill that students will already have learned prior to doing the specialized writing in their chosen field of study. Rhetorical genre studies, however, tends to emphasize the situated nature of writing expertise, and thus supports the…

  4. Student Perspectives of Imaging Anatomy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Jorge Americo Dinis; Barbosa, Joselina Maria Pinto; Ferreira, Maria Amelia Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Radiological imaging is gaining relevance in the acquisition of competencies in clinical anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of medical students on teaching/learning of imaging anatomy as an integrated part of anatomical education. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the perceptions of second-year students…

  5. Towards Entrepreneurial Learning Competencies: The Perspective of Built Environment Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Kissi; Matthew, Somiah K.; Samuel, Ansah K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper sought to discuss entrepreneurial learning competencies by determining the outcome of entrepreneurial learning on the views of built environment students in the university setting. In this study, three relevant competencies were identified for entrepreneurial learning through literature, namely: entrepreneurial attitude, entrepreneurial…

  6. Student and Teacher Perspectives on a Close Reading Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Close reading is an instructional practice that has gained attention of late. It involves reading a complex text, annotation, and repeatedly reading to answer text-dependent questions. Although there are a number of recommendations for the use of close reading, there has not been a systematic analysis of student or teacher perceptions of this…

  7. Medical student's perspective of problem based learning (PBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Transkei has completed the first 5 years of its problem-based community oriented teaching curriculum. The use of SWOT analysis to evaluate current and future directions can lead to the successful evolution of any organization. The aim of this study was to obtain a students' ...

  8. Student's Perspectives on Taking Courses Online, Blended, or a Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifter, Catherine C.; Ifenthaler, Dirk; White, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Online education has a relatively short history in the grand history of education. With options for online delivery modes developed over the last two decades, understanding student motivations for choosing one option over another will be helpful to any institution of higher education planning new offerings. This reflective paper presents the…

  9. "Facebook" for Informal Language Learning: Perspectives from Tertiary Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, Antonie

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of "Facebook" for out-of-class, informal language learning. 190 New Zealand university language students (Chinese, German, French, Japanese and Spanish) completed an anonymous online questionnaire on (1) their perceptions of "Facebook" as a multilingual environment, (2) their online writing…

  10. Perspectives: Using Critical Incidents to Understand ESL Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John

    2015-01-01

    In a marketized environment, ESL providers, in common with other postcompulsory educational institutions, canvass student satisfaction with their services. While the predominant method is likely to be based on tick-box questionnaires using Likert scales that measure degrees of satisfaction, qualitative methodology is an option when rich data is…

  11. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  12. Perspectives of peaceful school on vocational school Students: A narrative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Susanto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explore the school of peace in the perspective of students in vocational schools. School peace suspected as one of the factors that will determine the formation and behavior of student achievement in school. The narrative method chosen in this study whereas the focus of the study follows the excavation methods offered by Mishler. The study conducted showed that every student has no experience of peace in schools. However, students can receive no peace until he lost condition at meal time. The findings further that there are three things that make students not peaceful, the rules of the school, peer relationships, and the demands of parents and schools.

  13. New geological perspectives on earthquake recurrence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    In most areas of the world the record of historical seismicity is too short or uncertain to accurately characterize the future distribution of earthquakes of different sizes in time and space. Most faults have not ruptured once, let alone repeatedly. Ultimately, the ability to correctly forecast the magnitude, location, and probability of future earthquakes depends on how well one can quantify the past behavior of earthquake sources. Paleoseismological trenching of active faults, historical surface ruptures, liquefaction features, and shaking-induced ground deformation structures provides fundamental information on the past behavior of earthquake sources. These studies quantify (a) the timing of individual past earthquakes and fault slip rates, which lead to estimates of recurrence intervals and the development of recurrence models and (b) the amount of displacement during individual events, which allows estimates of the sizes of past earthquakes on a fault. When timing and slip per event are combined with information on fault zone geometry and structure, models that define individual rupture segments can be developed. Paleoseismicity data, in the form of timing and size of past events, provide a window into the driving mechanism of the earthquake engine--the cycle of stress build-up and release

  14. Understanding nursing students' perspectives on the grading of group work assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Morgan; Rogers, John

    2014-03-01

    Grading group work assessments so that students perceive the grade to be fair to all group members is sometimes challenging. This is particularly important in a higher education environment that is increasingly concerned with student perceptions of teaching quality and satisfaction. This article reports on research that compared undergraduate nursing students perceptions of two different approaches to the grading of group work assessment. A survey design was used to identify students' perspectives and preferences for different group work assessment methods. Participants were undergraduate bachelor of nursing students from a large, metropolitan university in Australia. Data analysis indicated that the perceptions of students around group work assessments changed little as they progressed across the program, although students who had experienced the calculation of individual grades for a group assessment preferred this approach. Many believed the grading of group assessments penalised good students and were less reliable than individual assessments. Students maintained the belief that teamwork skills were essential for the registered nurse role. In conclusion group work assessment should only be used when it is the best assessment method to demonstrate student learning of specific objectives. The weighted mark approach is the group work assessment grading approach of choice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Audiology Students' Perspectives of Enacting and Learning Clinical Communication: A Qualitative Interview and Video Reflexivity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Samantha; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Barr, Caitlin

    2018-03-27

    Effective clinical communication is pivotal to the provision of quality hearing health care. To date, audiology students reportedly felt ill-prepared when counseling patients about their hearing impairment, yet there is a paucity of studies exploring how clinical communication is taught and learned in audiology programs. Thus, the aims of the study were (a) to explore final year audiology students' perspectives of their own clinical communication skills during an in-house university clinical placement and (b) to explore students' perceptions of their clinical communication education. Using a qualitative description approach, students were asked to coview their filmed clinical encounter using video reflexivity during a semistructured interview on clinical communication education. Fifteen final year graduate audiology students from The University of Melbourne, Australia, participated in the study. The interviews were audio-recorded and analyzed thematically. The overarching themes of striving to be patient-centered, assessment shapes behavior, and power relations emerged from students' reflection of their own clinical encounter. In addition, the theme what students want described the perceived teaching methods that assisted students' clinical communication practices. The findings of this study highlight the challenges that students perceived during their clinical placement as they strive to enact a patient-centered interaction. An assessment rubric that incorporates communication skills can provide greater opportunities for feedback and self-reflection. Additionally, clinical communication education that adopts experiential learning and is longitudinally integrated into the curriculum can further reinforce students' communication learning needs.

  16. [Returning students' perspectives on adjusting to medical graduate school in Korea: an interview study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Youn; Kwon, Oh Young; Yoon, Tai Young

    2015-03-01

    The recent trend of switching from medical graduate school to medical school in Korea raises questions about the adjustments that students must make in medical education. We examined the perceptions of medical graduate students with regard to their adaptation in medical education. Sixteen semistructured, in-depth interviews were administered to medical graduate students who received their first degrees in foreign countries. The interviews addressed their perceptions of their experience in medical graduate school and on how well they adjusted to medical education. Students perceived their adaptation to medical graduate school in two dimensions: academic achievement and cultural adjustment. In academic achievement, a limited student-teacher relationship was recognized by students. Students tended to be passive in the classroom due to an uncomfortable atmosphere. They also reported witnessing culture shock in relation to the paucity of information on entrance into medical graduate school. Freshmen voiced many difficulties in adjusting to the unique culture in medical graduate school, in contrast to upper classmen. However, only 32% of students experienced helpful mentoring for their problems. Students' perspectives should guide all decisions made about medical education in an altered educational system.Self-regulated learning and a good mentoring program can help prepare students for medical education and professional life.

  17. Integrative vs. Traditional Learning from the Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, Guni; Schmidt, Jan; De Cono, Nicola; Kadmon, Martina

    2011-01-01

    The interdisciplinary surgery block of the reformed undergraduate curriculum HeiCuMed includes daily cycles of interactive case-based seminars, problem-based tutorials, case presentation by students, skills and communication training, and bedside teaching. The teaching doctors receive didactic training. In contrast, the previous traditional course was based on lectures with only two weekly hours of bedside teaching. Didactic training was not available. The present work aims at analysing the importance of active participation of students and the didactic components of the reformed and traditional curricula, which contribute to successful learning as evaluated by the students. Differentiated student evaluations of the undergraduate surgical courses between 1999 and 2008 were examined by correlation and regression analyses. The evaluation scores for organisation, dedication of the teaching staff, their ability to make lessons interesting and complex topics easily understandable, and the subjective gain of knowledge were significantly better in HeiCuMed than in the traditional curriculum. However, the dependence of knowledge gain on the didactic quality was the same in both curricula. The quality of discussions and the ability of the teaching doctors to promote active student participation were important to the subjective gain of knowledge in both seminars and practical courses of the reformed curriculum as well as for the overall evaluation of the practical courses but not the gain of knowledge in the traditional curriculum. The findings confirm psychological-educational perceptions, that competent implementation of integrative didactical methods is more important to successful teaching and the subjective gain of knowledge than knowledge transfer by traditional classroom teaching.

  18. "It's a Different Way of Thinking about History, Isn't It?" Student Perspectives on Learning Dance History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers student perspectives on the learning of dance history in a British University. The investigation focuses on the student experience. Recent researches into student learning and the idea of history provide a context for the study. A pedagogic research project in a British University sought, captured and analysed the views of…

  19. Monitoring issues from a modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlman, Jerry D.

    1993-01-01

    Recognition that earth's climate and biogeophysical conditions are likely changing due to human activities has led to a heightened awareness of the need for improved long-term global monitoring. The present long-term measurement efforts tend to be spotty in space, inadequately calibrated in time, and internally inconsistent with respect to other instruments and measured quantities. In some cases, such as most of the biosphere, most chemicals, and much of the ocean, even a minimal monitoring program is not available. Recently, it has become painfully evident that emerging global change issues demand information and insights that the present global monitoring system simply cannot supply. This is because a monitoring system must provide much more than a statement of change at a given level of statistical confidence. It must describe changes in diverse parts of the entire earth system on regional to global scales. It must be able to provide enough input to allow an integrated physical characterization of the changes that have occurred. Finally, it must allow a separation of the observed changes into their natural and anthropogenic parts. The enormous policy significance of global change virtually guarantees an unprecedented level of scrutiny of the changes in the earth system and why they are happening. These pressures create a number of emerging challenges and opportunities. For example, they will require a growing partnership between the observational programs and the theory/modeling community. Without this partnership, the scientific community will likely fall short in the monitoring effort. The monitoring challenge before us is not to solve the problem now, but rather to set appropriate actions in motion so as to create the required framework for solution. Each individual piece needs to establish its role in the large problem and how the required interactions are to take place. Below, we emphasize some of the needs and opportunities that could and should be

  20. Relevance of Student Teaching Skills and Activities from the Perspective of the Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the extent to which student teachers deem traditional student teaching skills and activities relevant as part of the capstone student teaching experience. The study population consisted of all (N = 140) fall 2012 and spring 2013 agricultural education student teachers in the North…

  1. A dynamic perspective in Freeman’s stakeholder model

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN

    2011-01-01

    Stakeholder literature has acknowledged the need to complement the extant theory on stakeholder management by more dynamic perspectives. This article makes use of the recent terminology of stakewatcher and stakeseeker to illustrate the dynamic aspect of stakeholder theory transposed in the graphical representation of Freeman’s stakeholder model. Presenting a few selected case studies, it applies the scheme on the concept of value responsibility chain; it exemplifies the role of stakeseekers i...

  2. Introducing Systems Biology to Bioscience students through mathematical modelling. A practical module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor V. Torres Darias

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Systems Biology, one of the current approaches to the understanding of living things, aims to understand the behaviour of living systems through the creation of mathematical models that integrate the available knowledge of the system’s component parts and the relations among them. Accordingly, model building should play a central part in any biology degree program. One difficulty that we face when confronted with this task, however, is that the mathematical background of undergraduate students is very often deficient in essential concepts required for dynamic mathematical modelling. In this practical module, students are introduced to the basic techniques of mathematical modelling and computer simulation from a Systems Biology perspective.

  3. Library of Congress Model, Perspective View

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) has produced the first high-resolution, near-global elevation dataset of Earth. In recognition of this achievement, and as an illustration of the data, the United States Library of Congress now displays a 'solid terrain model' of Los Angeles and adjacent mountainous terrain. The model was created by carving a high-density foam block using computer-guided drills that referenced the SRTM dataset. The block was then covered with a Landsat satellite image using computer-guided paint guns that referenced both the Landsat image and the SRTM dataset. The view shown here mimics the actual model on display at the Library of Congress and was generated from the same satellite image and elevation data sets. The model shows the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica Mountains along the Malibu Coast (lower left), San Fernando Valley (left center), downtown Los Angeles (bottom center), San Gabriel and Pomona Valleys (lower right), San Gabriel Mountains (right center to far right), and part of the Mojave Desert (upper right). Colors are enhanced true color with added topographic shading, and elevation differences are exaggerated 1.5 times. The view is toward the north-northwest. The Los Angeles region was chosen for the Library of Congress model because it illustrates so many ways that topography affects the daily lives of people. The region consists of a coastal plain, inland valleys, mountains up to 3068 meters (10,064 feet), and a desert interior. Topography blocks the landward influence of marine airmasses here such that summer temperatures often differ by 40 degrees Fahrenheit (22 C) across this region at a given moment even at similar elevations. Temperatures also typically cool with rising elevation, and winter storms drop most of their moisture in the mountains, leaving little rainfall for areas further inland, thus creating the deserts. Topography also controls the land use pattern. The mountains are mostly very rugged, which greatly

  4. Practice Perspectives of Left-Handed Clinical Dental Students in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Shivam; Puranik, Manjunath P; Uma, S R

    2016-10-01

    Handedness becomes important for students during their training period. Limited literature is available regarding the same. The purpose of this study was to assess the dental practice perspectives and determine the hand preference and discomfort level among the Left-Handed (LH) clinical dental students. A 30-item survey tool was used to conduct a cross-sectional survey among four successive LH cohorts (third and final year undergraduates, dental interns and postgraduates) in all the dental colleges of Bengaluru, Karnataka, India, during the year 2014. A total of 84 students completed the survey, response rate being 100%. About one-third (37%) reported that their institution was not properly equipped to accommodate LH students. Majority felt that LH dentists were at a higher risk of developing musculoskeletal complications. Mouth mirror handling showed equal distribution for handedness as compared to the other dental activities, whereas discomfort levels were negligible ("without any difficulty"). Dental practice perspective scores significantly correlated with the difficulty levels (r=-0.333, pleft-handers had a right dental practice perspective and their responses indicate a need to address their issues empathetically.

  5. Evaluation of Student's Environment by DEA Models

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    F. Moradi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The important question here is, is there real evaluation in educational advance? In other words, if a student has been successful in mathematics or has been unsuccessful in mathematics, is it possible to find the reasons behind his advance or, is it possible to find the reasons behind his advance or weakness? If we want to respond to this significant question, it should be said that factors of educational advance must be divided into 5 main groups. 1-family, 2-teacher, 3- students 4-school and 5-manager of 3 schools It can then be said that a student's score does not just depend on a factor that people have imaged From this, it can be concluded that by using the DEA and SBM models, each student's efficiency must be researched and the factors of the student's strengths and weaknesses must be analyzed.

  6. Developing Automatic Student Motivation Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destarianto, P.; Etikasari, B.; Agustianto, K.

    2018-01-01

    Achievement motivation is one of the internal factors in encouraging a person to perform the best activity in achieving its goals. The importance of achievement motivation must be possessed as an incentive to compete so that the person will always strive to achieve success and avoid failure. Based on this, the system is developed to determine the achievement motivation of students, so that students can do self-reflection in improving achievement motivation. The test results of the system using Naïve Bayes Classifier showed an average rate of accuracy of 91,667% in assessing student achievement motivation. By modeling the students ‘motivation generated by the system, students’ achievement motivation level can be known. This class of motivation will be used to determine appropriate counseling decisions, and ultimately is expected to improve student achievement motivation.

  7. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical instructors' effective teaching strategies: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Moridi, Glorokh; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Garibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    An important factor contributing to the quality of clinical education is instructors' teaching performance. The aim of this study was to identify clinical instructors' most effective teaching strategies from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All third- and fourth-year bachelor's nursing and midwifery students studying at the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences were recruited to the study by using the census method. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire and the self-report 30-item Clinical Instructors' Effective Teaching Strategies Inventory. The SPSS v.16.0 was used for data analysis. The most effective teaching strategies of clinical instructors from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives were respectively 'treating students, clients, and colleagues with respect' and 'being eager for guiding students and manage their problems'. Clinical instructors need to be eager for education and also be able to establish effective communication with students. Empowering clinical instructors in specialized and technical aspects of clinical education seems necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Understanding the Language Demands on Science Students from an Integrated Science and Language Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Lay Hoon; Clarke, David John; Hart, Christina Eugene

    2014-04-01

    This case study of a science lesson, on the topic thermal expansion, examines the language demands on students from an integrated science and language perspective. The data were generated during a sequence of 9 lessons on the topic of 'States of Matter' in a Grade 7 classroom (12-13 years old students). We identify the language demands by comparing students' writings with the scientific account of expansion that the teacher intended the students to learn. The comparison involved both content analysis and lexicogrammatical (LG) analysis. The framework of Systemic Functional Linguistics was adopted for the LG analysis. Our analysis reveals differences in the meaning and the way LG resources were employed between the students' writings and the scientific account. From these differences, we found the notion of condition-of-use for LG resources to be a significant aspect of the language that students need to appropriate in order to employ the language of school science appropriately. This notion potentially provides a means by which teachers could concurrently address the conceptual and representational demands of science learning. Finally, we reflect on how the complementary use of content analysis and LG analysis provides a way for integrating the science and language perspectives in order to understand the demands of learning science through language.

  9. Problem-based learning in medical school: A student's perspective

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    Bliss J. Chang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL has been a concept in existence for decades yet its implementation in medical student education is limited. Considering the nature of a physician's work, PBL is a logical step towards developing students' abilities to synthesize and integrate foundational concepts into clinical medicine. Harvard's recently redesigned Pathways curriculum has shifted almost exclusively towards PBL in its one-year preclinical curriculum. This piece provides my thoughts, both derived from my own reflections as well as conversations and observations of my peers, on the effectiveness, advantages, and disadvantages of a PBL curriculum. All in all, the feelings of my peers and I regarding PBL has been overwhelmingly positive despite potential areas of improvement and continued fine-tuning.

  10. Students' understanding of density: A cognitive linguistics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southey, Philip; Allie, Saalih; Demaree, Dedra

    2013-01-01

    Density is an important, multifaceted concept that occurs at many levels of physics education. Previous research has shown that a primary instantiation of the concept, mass density, is not well understood by high school or university students. This study seeks to determine how students understand the broad concept of density, and whether particular aspects of their understanding are helpful in structuring the concept of charge density. Qualitative data were gathered in the form of questionnaires distributed to 172 freshmen comprising three different academic groups. Broad, open ended questions prompted for responses involving free writing and drawn diagrams. The data were analysed by an approach suggested by Grounded Theory. Using the theoretical lens of Conceptual Metaphor Theory, six underlying (foothold) concepts were identified in terms of which density was conceptualised: `filled container'; `packing'; `weight/heaviness'; `intensive property'; `floating/sinking'; `impenetrability/solidity'. The foothold concept of `packing' proved to be the most productive for conceptualising `charge density'.

  11. Over dental anxiety problems among university students: perspective from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Masood Ali; Kamal, Anila

    2011-04-01

    Oral health seeking behavior is compromised by dental anxiety, and affects quality of life. This preliminary study using convenience sampling was conducted among university students in the cities of Islamabad, Rawalpindi, and Multan, Pakistan, using standardized, valid and reliable scales to determine the prevalence and correlates of dental anxiety. Cumulatively 503 students including 278 males and 225 females, completed the questionnaire. High to severe anxiety on Dental Anxiety Scale-Revised was reported by 60 (21.6%) males and 54 (24%) females. Seventy-five (27%) males and 62 (27.6%) females reported being quite afraid to very afraid on Dental Anxiety Question. Results underline the need for population-based representative studies to determine the prevalence and correlates of dental anxiety for better dental health in Pakistan.

  12. Medical Students? Attitudes toward Abortion Education: Malaysian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tey, Nai-peng; Yew, Siew-yong; Low, Wah-yun; Su?ut, Lela; Renjhen, Prachi; Huang, M. S. L.; Tong, Wen-ting; Lai, Siow-li

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students' attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. METHODS AND RESULTS: A survey on knowled...

  13. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Pooja; Barai, Ishani; Prasad, Sunila; Gadhvi, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  14. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  15. Cyberbullying among University Students: Gendered Experiences, Impacts, and Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chantal Faucher; Margaret Jackson; Wanda Cassidy

    2014-01-01

    Cyberbullying is an emerging issue in the context of higher education as information and communication technologies (ICT) increasingly become part of daily life in university. This paper presents findings from 1925 student surveys from four Canadian universities. The overall findings are broken down to determine gender similarities and differences that exist between male and female respondents’ backgrounds, ICT usage, experiences with cyberbullying, opinions about the issue, and solutions t...

  16. Market Positioning of Public and Private Universities:Students Perspective

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    Abdul-Kahar ADAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on universities strategies for admitting students and the rate at which private sector universities expand in today’s higher educational setups. This paper answers the following question: to what extend are the public universities different from the private universities? In an attempt to find the answers, the whole study is developedtowards students’ perception of the universities positioning in terms of what they are offering to the customers, through what they prompt people to apply for admission? Therefore, thispaper looks at the prevailing admission strategies and potential students’ entry requirements at both public and private universities to determine the theoretical systems that are used by these universities in competition for customers (students. A quantitative survey of students in both public and private universities in Ghana was undergone In all, a total number of 255 questionnaires were printed. Only 187 were answered and returned out of 200 distributed questionnaires to the public sector universities whereas 55 questionnaires were distributed to the private sector students and 51 were answered and returned. This research was based on sampling data collection methods. The findings show that there are three categories of universities such as Publicly/Fully Independent Chartered Universities, Privately Owned Universities and Personal/Sole Proprietorship University Colleges. All these affect students’ choices for admission application. The findings clearly indicate that both public and private universitiespurposes are related using Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient formulae to that of the sole proprietorship colleges. Also, the admission requirement strategies differ between public and private universities.

  17. Alcohol use among college students: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Elie; Kypri, Kypros; Salamoun, Mariana

    2007-05-01

    The present review of published articles during 2005-2006 on alcohol use among college students in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe and South America assesses the prevalence of alcohol use, hazardous drinking and related problems, and reviews the effectiveness of intervention methods and implications for future research. Research on alcohol use and related problems in college students is lacking in many regions of the world. We identified 26 papers in peer-reviewed journals, from Australia, Brazil, Ecuador, Egypt, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Lebanon, New Zealand, Nigeria, Sweden, The Netherlands and Turkey. More comprehensive studies with systematic methodologies in the world regions reviewed here are needed to yield representative results on alcohol use and related risk and protective factors in college settings. College students in many countries are at elevated risk for heavy drinking, with serious immediate health risks, such as drink-driving and other substance use; and longer term risks, such as alcohol dependence. The prevalence of hazardous drinking in Australasia, Europe and South America appears similar to that in North America, but is lower in Africa and Asia. Alcohol policies should be reviewed and prevention programmes initiated in light of research evidence, for this high-risk population.

  18. CROSS-BORDER ROMANIAN STUDENTS MOBILITY IN A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

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    Andreea Vass

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Strategic management and greater policy coherence of Romania’s human resources is needed taking into account the interlinkages between demographic, education, labour market and migration flows changes. We focus in this paper on the high need of strengthening incentives for circular and repetitive migration of Romanian students. They represent the most relevant pool of the future-be skilled labour force. Overviewing the realities, it may come to no surprise that Romania has less higher education graduates than in EU. Nor that the expenses for the higher education represent nearly the same amount per capita as in the other EU countries, when adjusted with GDP. Nor that, according to international university rankings, Romanian universities score one of the lowest performance in Europe. Above all, today we risk that our best students migrate to western higher education schools without returning to their home country. A deep analysis of this phenomenon reveals an even harsher reality: the propensity of Romanian students to study abroad is even lower than in other neighbouring countries.

  19. The Doctoral Thesis and Supervision: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguwa, Peace; Langa, Malose

    2009-01-01

    The doctoral thesis constitutes both a negotiation of the supervision relationship as well as mastery and skill in participating in a specific community of practice. Two models of supervision are discussed: the technical rationality model with its emphasis on technical aspects of supervision, and the negotiated order model with an emphasis on…

  20. Comfort and utility of school-based weight screening: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houser Robert F

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight screening in schools has been proposed as one strategy to address childhood obesity. Students' response to such screening is unexplored, however. In this study we evaluated the perceived comfort, utility and impact of school-based weight screening from the perspective of middle school-aged students. Methods A cross-sectional study of 852 ethnically diverse 5th–8th grade students. Associations were investigated between measured height and weight screening data and responses to a self-administered questionnaire completed immediately following weight screening in physical education class. BMI categories were based on the revised 2000 CDC growth chart and definitions: 5th–85th BMI percentile = healthy weight, 85th–95th BMI percentile = at risk for overweight, and >95th percentile BMI = overweight. Results Overall, students' comfort level with weight screening varied depending on the student's own weight status. More overweight students (38.1% reported being uncomfortable than healthy weight students (8.1% (p Conclusion Overall, the majority of the middle school students did not report discomfort with school-based weight screening, did report that receiving height and weight information was useful, and generally report appropriate weight control intentions. These proportions varied across weight status categories, however, with students who were at risk for overweight or overweight reporting higher levels of discomfort. For schools that conduct weight screening, it is essential that they also provide comfortable and private settings as well as education or counseling regarding healthy weight control practices.

  1. Studying cancer metastasis: Existing models, challenges and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marion, Denise M S; Domanska, Urszula M; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Walenkamp, Annemiek M E

    2016-01-01

    Cancer metastasis causes most cancer-related deaths. Several model systems to study the complex and multi step process of metastasis exist, including in vitro systems, ex-vivo organ slices, Drosophila Melanogaster and zebrafish models and the use of the chorio allantoic membrane (CAM) of fertilized chicken eggs. These models are relatively easy and cheap but often lack the opportunity to study the complete metastasis cascade. More complex but also more expensive is the use of animal models including the more recently developed patient derived tumor xenografts (PDTX). In this review, we give an overview of the existing metastatic models, discuss the challenges of improving current models to enhance translation from the preclinical to the clinical setting and consider future perspectives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of the Students in the CLIL Classroom A New Perspective to Identify Types of Tasks

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    David González Gándara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A good deal of authors have spotted the crucial factors to get into account in order to classify tasks for their study. Although the role of the student in the task has been studied before, it has not been considered as a key factor in some of the most influential models. I propose a new perspective to describe it. It consists in a combination of the participation of the students in the input of tasks and their participation in the output. A case study has been carried out to address the statistical effects of the factor proposed in two variables: the amount of As-units (Foster, Tonkyn, & Wigglesworth, 2000 in the L2 produced in the classroom, and among them, the amount of initiating moves (Leech & Weisser, 2003. Transcripts of the audio and video recordings taken during eight CLIL Science lessons taught to an intact class of ten students of grades 1 and 2 were analysed. The results showed that the role of the students in the input had a significant effect on the variables measured. The teacher produced more As-units in general and initiating moves in particular, while the students produced less As-units while still producing more initiating moves.

  3. Modeling, simulation and visual analysis of crowds a multidisciplinary perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Saad; Manocha, Dinesh; Shah, Mubarak

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several years there has been a growing interest in developing computational methodologies for modeling and analyzing movements and behaviors of 'crowds' of people. This interest spans several scientific areas that includes Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, and Pedestrian Evacuation Dynamics. Despite the fact that these different scientific fields are trying to model the same physical entity (i.e. a crowd of people), research ideas have evolved independently. As a result each discipline has developed techniques and perspectives that are characteristically their own.

  4. Modelling students' knowledge organisation: Genealogical conceptual networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Nousiainen, Maija

    2018-04-01

    Learning scientific knowledge is largely based on understanding what are its key concepts and how they are related. The relational structure of concepts also affects how concepts are introduced in teaching scientific knowledge. We model here how students organise their knowledge when they represent their understanding of how physics concepts are related. The model is based on assumptions that students use simple basic linking-motifs in introducing new concepts and mostly relate them to concepts that were introduced a few steps earlier, i.e. following a genealogical ordering. The resulting genealogical networks have relatively high local clustering coefficients of nodes but otherwise resemble networks obtained with an identical degree distribution of nodes but with random linking between them (i.e. the configuration-model). However, a few key nodes having a special structural role emerge and these nodes have a higher than average communicability betweenness centralities. These features agree with the empirically found properties of students' concept networks.

  5. Facebook for informal language learning: Perspectives from tertiary language students

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    Antonie Alm

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the use of Facebook for out-of-class, informal language learning. 190 New Zealand university language students (Chinese, German, French, Japanese and Spanish completed an anonymous online questionnaire on (1 their perceptions of Facebook as a multilingual environment, (2 their online writing practices and (3 their views on the educational value of their experiences. Findings indicate that language students are using a range of Facebook features to expose themselves to the languages they study (L2 and to communicate in their L2 with native speaker Facebook friends. The use of the social networking site varied according to proficiency-levels of the participants (beginner, intermediate and advanced levels, strength of social ties with native speaker Facebook friends and personal attitudes towards the site. Learning experiences on Facebook were not perceived as useful for the formal language learning context which suggests the need for bridging strategies between informal and formal learning environments.

  6. Digital games and learning mathematics: Student, teacher and parent perspectives

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    Su Ting Yong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the potential use of digital games in learning mathematics at secondary school level in Malaysia. Three secondary school students, three mathematics teachers and three parents were interviewed in this study. All the participants were asked for their views and experiences in mathematics, technology usage and the use of digital games in learning mathematics. The results suggested that students were supportive and positive towards the use of computer games in learning mathematics. Nevertheless, parents preferred conventional teaching approach, in which they recognized personal communication and socialization as a significant component in learning. Although the teachers did not go on to oppose the idea of using computer games for teaching mathematics, they still perceived the use of discursive approaches as the best teaching approach for learning mathematics with digital technologies at best a possible additional complementary feature. In view of that, the combination of classroom teaching and computer games might the best mathematics pedagogy. 

  7. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  8. Factors Influencing the Application of a Biopsychosocial Perspective in Clinical Judgement of Chronic Pain: Interactive Management with Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Christopher P; McKenna-Plumley, Phoebe E; Durand, Hannah; Gormley, Emer M; Slattery, Brian W; Harney, Owen M; MacNeela, Padraig; McGuire, Brian E

    2017-09-01

    Though there is wide support for the application of biopsychosocial perspectives in clinical judgement of chronic pain cases, such perspectives are often overlooked due to either inadequate training or attitudes favoring a biomedical approach. Recent research has indicated that despite such explanations, both established general practitioners (GP) and medical students account for some psychosocial factors when making clinical judgements regarding chronic pain cases, but report not being likely to apply these in real-world, clinical settings due to numerous factors, including available time with patients. Thus, it is evident that a greater understanding of clinical judgement-making processes and the factors that affect application of these processes is required, particularly regarding chronic pain. The aims of the current study were to investigate medical students' conceptualizations of the factors that influence application of a biopsychosocial approach to clinical judgement-making in cases of chronic pain using interactive management (IM), model the relationships among these factors, and make recommendations to chronic pain treatment policy in light of the findings. The current study used IM to identify and model factors that influence the application of a biopsychosocial approach to clinical judgement-making in cases of chronic pain, based on medical students' conceptualizations of these factors. Two university classrooms. IM is a systems thinking and action mapping strategy used to aid groups in developing outcomes regarding complex issues, through integrating contributions from individuals with diverse views, backgrounds, and perspectives. IM commonly utilizes the nominal group technique and interpretive structural modeling, which in this context were employed to help medical students identify, clarify, and model influences on the application of biopsychosocial perspectives in treating chronic pain patients. Results of IM group work revealed 7 core

  9. A medical student's perspective of participation in an interprofessional education placement: an autoethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallé, Jennifer; Lingard, Lorelei

    2010-11-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has emerged as a critical pedagogy for promoting interprofessional collaboration (IPC) within healthcare. However, the literature includes few reports of students' perspectives on IPE experiences. Understanding students' experiences is critical, as they are the crux of IPE's culture change agenda. This paper presents an autoethnographic account of my experiences as a medical student participating in an IPE placement within a Canadian academic hospital. During the five-week placement, I collected data using participant observation and reflective journaling on all placement experiences. I expanded my notes using the emotional recall technique and conducted thematic analysis. Using a series of narrative vignettes, this paper explores the relationships between my personal experience and the cultural and educational issues underpinning IPE. The first vignette explores the relationship between students' patient access and our status in tutorial discussion. The second vignette considers the impact of shadowing on my appreciation of another professional's practice. The last vignette portrays my experience learning about the complex politics that shape IPC. The conclusion suggests that the IPE placements incorporate reflexive activities (i.e., journaling and interviewing) to enhance the students' appreciation and understanding of roles, responsibilities and professional perspectives, and to promote critical thinking and professional growth.

  10. Fieldwork Educators' Perspectives: Professional Behavior Attributes of Level II Fieldwork Students

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    Marcie K. Campbell

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature revealed a lack of consistent expectations for professional behaviors required of level II fieldwork students. This study sought to obtain a consensus of perspectives of level II fieldwork educators by asking, “What are the essential professional behavior attributes for level II fieldwork students?” Delphi methodology was used to collect data in two rounds of surveys. In the first, 49 fieldwork educators listed professional behavior attributes they believed to be important for fieldwork students. The data was synthesized into themes for distribution in the second survey, which were identified as essential, non-essential, or site-specific by 53 participants. The 218 different professional behavior attributes provided by Survey 1 respondents were categorized into 22 attribute themes. In Survey 2, 20 of the 22 attribute themes reached a consensus level of at least 75% and five reached 100% agreement. These results show a current perspective of what fieldwork educators value in level II fieldwork students and may be informative to occupational therapy faculty, students, and fieldwork educators.

  11. Baccalaureate nursing students' perspectives of peer tutoring in simulation laboratory, a Q methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Petrini, Marcia A; Stone, Teresa E

    2018-02-01

    The study aim was to identify the perceived perspectives of baccalaureate nursing students toward the peer tutoring in the simulation laboratory. Insight into the nursing students' experiences and baseline data related to their perception of peer tutoring will assist to improve nursing education. Q methodology was applied to explore the students' perspectives of peer tutoring in the simulation laboratory. A convenience P-sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students was used. Fifty-eight selected Q statements from each participant were classified into the shape of a normal distribution using an 11-point bipolar scale form with a range from -5 to +5. PQ Method software analyzed the collected data. Three discrete factors emerged: Factor I ("Facilitate or empower" knowledge acquisition), Factor II ("Safety Net" Support environment), and Factor III ("Mentoring" learn how to learn). The findings of this study support and indicate that peer tutoring is an effective supplementary strategy to promote baccalaureate students' knowledge acquisition, establishing a supportive safety net and facilitating their abilities to learn in the simulation laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of Students' Satisfaction of Service Quality in Takoradi Polytechnic: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwowie, Samuel; Amoako, Joseph; Abrefa, Amma Adomaa

    2015-01-01

    Higher educational institutions are increasingly placing greater emphasis on meeting students' expectations and needs as student perceptions of higher educational facilities and services are becoming more important. To investigate students' satisfaction of service quality at the Takoradi Polytechnic, a study was conducted using the SERVQUAL…

  13. Teacher’s role model ingender education of students

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    Elvira Dode

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gender education as an important part of education, affects by the role and attitudes of teachers. Including gender perspective in schools is a prerequisite in alienable of human development, instead insuring gender equality it is considered as respecting human rights. Elimination of the gender stereotypes has a two-fold significance since itemsurest gender equality not only in the school system but even in the society as a whole. Gender stereotype messages, regardless by hidden or displayed form, unilaterally influence the development of the personality in its appearance as well as the formation of the individual. Children learn about gender identity simply by observing what happens in different circumstances around. In education exist gender disparities, which can be assessed by means of measurable indicators. So, the content of the curricula and instructive texts, the interactive relationships teacher-students, the institutional ambiance, etc. play an important role into the preservation and transmission of the gender disparity stereotypes through the messages they convey. The purpose of thestudy is to perform a systematic research in order to show the scale and shape in which gender stereotypes are portrayed and shown in social life, even through the role model of teacher and their affecting the education for a democratic society. To achieve this goal, we use the method of studying the existing literature; a detailed analysis of the questionnaires and interviews content with school directors and teachers of pre-university education in city: Shkodër, Tiranë, Elbasan, Pogradec, Korçë. Parents and teachers attitudes, seems to be a role model and affect the education of students. Therefore it is necessary before to teach students about gender equality, teachers need to be careful in their behavior about gender equality as an integral part of thinking. Need to have successful teacher, to get successful students otherwise should be successful

  14. Internet Users’ Perspective towards Facebook Use by Physicians and Medical Students

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    Tiyarat Kayankit, M.D.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to understand the internet users’ perspectives towards doctors’ and medical students’ Facebook use. Methods: This was a cross-sectional online survey among internet users conducted from December 2015 to March 2016 to understand their perspectives towards doctors’ and medical students’ Facebook use. The author-constructed questionnaires were in Thai and included the participants’ online activities, their witness to inappropriate Facebook posts by doctors or medical students in the past month, and 39 mock public Facebook post screenshots. The participants were asked to rate the appropriateness of each mock post on a 5-point-Likert scale. Results: Among all participants (n=1,200, 63.4% had searched through Facebook profiles of physicians or medical students before and 53.7% had seen or heard of inappropriate contents. The characteristics of doctors’ and medical students’ Facebook posts which were rated as inappropriate or less appropriate by most participants were related to patients’ privacy, including de-identified patients’ data, substance use behaviours, negative criticism of patients, colleagues, hospitals or universities, and advertisement of their own private practice. Conclusion: Doctors and medical students should be aware of the public view towards their social media posts and be mindful of what they post and the potential negative consequences because they can impact the public image of medical professions. Considering professionalism guidelines and public’s perspectives may obviate the potential negative consequences of social media use.

  15. Pedagogical supervision in physical education- the perspective of student interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Albuquerque

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aims to locate the subjective thinking between students physical education trainees during teaching practice. Set in the format of the study and interpretation of a descriptive nature, can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of the repertoire of experiential trainees Physical Education. The instrument used consisted of question relating to the quantitative and qualitative analysis and focused on five dimensions: Social and Emotional Aspects; Vocational Aspects; Learning and Professional Development; Supervision; Professional and Institutional Socialization. The sample consisted of 118 trainees, from two higher education institutions, one private and one public. The personal growth associated with the placement experience focuses on aspects related to professional competence. The professional skills of the stage are directly related to the organization and management of teaching and learning.

  16. A Graduate Student's Experience and Perspective on a Student-Teacher-Researcher Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, J.; Stylinski, C.; Doty, C.

    2017-12-01

    Teachers and their K-12 students lack firsthand experience in science research and often harbor misconceptions about science practices and the nature of science. To address this challenge, the NOAA-funded Student-Teacher-Researcher (STAR) partnership that provides rural high school students with authentic research experiences investigating the amount and sources of nitrate in schoolyard runoff. Teachers received training, guiding curricular materials aligned with NGSS and in-classroom support. With a focus on evidence-based reasoning skills, students actively participate in the research process through sample collection, data analysis, and an in-person discussion of conclusions and implications with our scientist team. As a member of this team, I assisted with refining the study design, analyzing nitrate isotope runoff samples, and sharing insights and feedback with students during the in-person discussion session. Assessment results indicate student gained an understanding of nitrate pollution and of science practices. As a graduate student, young scientist, and possessor of a B.S. in Science Education, I already recognized the value of involving K-12 students and teachers in authentic research experiences, as these experiences expose students to the nature of science while also improving content knowledge. During the STAR partnership, I learned firsthand some of the obstacles presented during outreach involving partnerships between a research institution and schools, such as inflexibility of school scheduling and the need for flexibility with research questions requiring complex lab analysis. Additionally, I discovered the challenge of working systemically across a school district, which can have broad impact but limit student experiences. Highlights of my experience included interactions with students and teachers, especially when students have unexpected answers to my questions, providing novel explanations for patterns observed in the data. Despite the

  17. A learning based model for career guidance of students with disabilites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræby, Anders

    must address their resources, challenges, potentialities and barriers regarding their employability from a learning based perspective. The objective of this session is to broaden the awareness of the particular challenges that career guidance for people with disabilities constitute.......The session aims at presenting a 4 stage model for career guidance for students with disabilities. In order to enable and empower the disa bled students regarding their employability and employability competencies at the labour market, the presentation shows how career guidance of these students...

  18. Meeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers, midwifery students' perspectives: part 1; dominant discourses and midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Bradshaw, Gwendolen

    2013-09-01

    Current literature has indicated a concern about standards of maternity care experienced by pregnant women who are seeking asylum. As the next generation of midwives, it is important that students are educated in a way that prepares them to effectively care for these women. To understand how this can be achieved, it is important to explore what asylum seeking means to midwifery students. This article is the first of three parts and reports on one objective from a wider doctorate study. It identifies dominant discourses that influenced the perceptions of a group of midwifery students' about the pregnant asylum seeking woman. The study was designed from a social constructivist perspective, with contextual knowledge being constructed by groups of people, influenced by underpinning dominant discourses, depending on their social, cultural and historical positions in the world. In a United Kingdom University setting, during year two of a pre-registration midwifery programme, eleven midwifery students participated in the study. Two focus group interviews using a problem based learning scenario as a trigger for discussion were conducted. In addition, three students were individually interviewed to explore issues in more depth and two students' written reflections on practice were used to generate data. Following a critical discourse analysis, dominant discourses were identified which appeared to influence the way in which asylum seekers were perceived. The findings suggested an underpinning ideology around the asylum seeker being different and of a criminal persuasion. Although the pregnant woman seeking asylum was considered as deserving of care, the same discourses appeared to influence the way in which she was constructed. However, as the study progressed, through reading alternative sources of literature, some students appeared to question these discourses. These findings have implications for midwifery education in encouraging students to challenge negative discourses

  19. Pharmacy faculty members' perspectives on the student/faculty relationship in online social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Anne H; Finley, Kristen N; Ulbrich, Timothy R; McAuley, James W

    2010-12-15

    To describe pharmacy faculty members' use of the online social network Facebook and compare the perspectives of faculty members with and without Facebook profiles regarding student/faculty relationships. An electronic survey instrument was sent to full-time faculty members (n = 183) at 4 colleges of pharmacy in Ohio seeking their opinions on student/faculty relationships on Facebook. If respondents answered "yes" to having a Facebook profile, they were asked 14 questions on aspects of being "friends" with students. If respondents answered "no," they were asked 4 questions. Of the 95 respondents (52%) to the survey instrument, 44 faculty members (46%) had a Facebook profile, while 51 faculty members (54%) did not. Those who had a profile had been faculty members for an average of 8.6 years, versus 11.4 years for those who did not have a Facebook profile. Seventy-nine percent of faculty members who used Facebook were not "friends" with their students. The majority of respondents reported that they would decline/ignore a "friend" request from a student, or decline until after the student graduated. Although a limited number of faculty members had used Facebook for online discussions, teaching purposes, or student organizations, the majority of universities did not have policies on the use of social networking sites. Online social network sites are used widely by students and faculty members, which may raise questions regarding professionalism and appropriate faculty/student relationships. Further research should address the student/preceptor relationship, other online social networking sites, and whether students are interested in using these sites within the classroom and/or professional organizations.

  20. A Student Perspective on ELAM and its Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Holloway

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The health of the world’s population is divided into two groups, those who have access to health care services and those who do not. The effects of this divide can be seen on the international level where life expectancy in Switzerland averages 80 years as opposed to 38 years in Zambia. Infant mortality rates are often used as a general indicator of health and socioeconomic conditions since rates are affected by factors such as access to prenatal health care. A direct relationship has been shown between higher income and education level and lower rates of infant mortality. This may explain in part an infant mortality rate of 4.5 per 1,000 live births in Connecticut in comparison with 12.2 in the Washington, D.C. area. A major influence in access to services is the availability of trained health care workers. The World Health Organization estimates that the world will need at least 4,250,000 additional health workers to address these health disparities3. In the face of this work force crisis we are left wondering how to fill in the gaps left by the mass exodus of health workers from developing nations to industrialized ones. Cuba has tried to address these problems by sending thousands of healthcare professionals to work in some of the most impoverished and medically underserved regions in the world. Over the years, their attempts have evolved to include training professionals from underserved areas to provide enduring sources of health care for their populations. Perhaps the most valiant of efforts was the creation of the Latin American School of Medicine in Cuba (called ELAM, Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina, which currently is training over 10,000 students from at least 27 countries, including the United States. Despite ELAM’s impressive numbers, its founders recognized that solutions to what has become a global health care crisis depend not only on the number of physicians produced but also on how they are trained to be providers of

  1. Criminalizing rape within marriage: perspectives of Ghanaian university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinkrah, Mensah

    2011-09-01

    Forcing sexual intercourse on an unwilling marital partner, or marital rape, is not a crime in many societies around the world, because of a marital exemption rule that prohibits the prosecution of husbands who rape their wives. Concurrently, marital rape is one of the least studied phenomena in sexual violence research. This is particularly true for societies in the non-Western world. The current study examined the general attitudes of a sample of university students in Ghana, a West African country, toward marital rape. Respondents were also asked whether an ongoing legislative effort to criminalize marital rape in the country was warranted. The results indicated strong opposition toward criminalization. The results also indicated no marked differences between male and female respondents in attitudes toward marital rape and the need for a legislative response to the phenomenon. Patriarchal ideologies such as wifely submission to the husband and an implicit duty to provide sex in marriage provided some of the justifications furnished for why marital rape should remain noncriminalized. Advocates of criminalization mentioned the social, physical, and psychological effects of rape and how the enactment of marital rape legislation and the imposition of severe criminal sanctions would help prevent the incidence of marital rape and other forms of violence against women in the society.

  2. Exploring the Dynamics of Directed Studies Courses: Student, Instructor, and Administrator Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Hvenegaard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available North American universities are encouraged to increase opportunities for undergraduate research experiences (UREs. To this end, many universities offer directed studies courses (DSCs which are 1-2 semester long courses involving one-on-one instruction, with a focus on student-led independent research. Building on the understanding of dynamics generally related to UREs, this paper seeks to compare the motivations, benefits, and barriers specifically related to DSCs from student, instructor, and administrator perspectives. Based on a set of qualitative focus group discussions at a small undergraduate liberal arts institution, we present the similarities and differences in these perspectives and recommend a set of best practices for DSCs. All three groups reported motivations for engaging in a DSC that addressed working with a particular student or instructor, assistance with graduate school preparation, and meeting program requirements. In terms of perceived benefits of DSCs, both students and instructors indicated the mentoring relationship and practical outcomes arising from DSCs. Students recognized the benefits of developing research skills, but stressed the motivation and benefit of independent learning more than was found in other studies. Instructors focused on benefits of research engagement and relationship building. The major challenges to participating in DSCs were workload and time (all groups, unprepared students and lack of guidelines (instructors and administrators, and the oral presentation requirement and lack of information about DSCs (students. Based on these results, we suggest increased clarity in DSC expectations, consistent standards of quality, and promoting research processes common to the DSC’s home discipline.

  3. Modeling Environmental Literacy of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teksoz, Gaye; Sahin, Elvan; Tekkaya-Oztekin, Ceren

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposed an Environmental Literacy Components Model to explain how environmental attitudes, environmental responsibility, environmental concern, and environmental knowledge as well as outdoor activities related to each other. A total of 1,345 university students responded to an environmental literacy survey (Kaplowitz and Levine…

  4. School Improvement Model to Foster Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2011-01-01

    Many classroom teachers are still using the traditional teaching methods. The traditional teaching methods are one-way learning process, where teachers would introduce subject contents such as language arts, English, mathematics, science, and reading separately. However, the school improvement model takes into account that all students have…

  5. Mathematical Modeling Projects: Success for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Therese

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical modeling allows flexibility for a project-based experience. We share details of our regular capstone course, successful for virtually 100% of our math majors for almost two decades. Our research-like approach in this course accommodates a variety of student backgrounds and interests, and has produced some award-winning student…

  6. Educational justice from the perspective of Kermanshah paramedical students in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m jalalvandi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Equity in education is meant providing equal educational opportunities for students that often included the equality in professors' behaviors with their students. This form of justice can improve students' performance. So, considering the importance of educational equity and the its special position in medical education, this study was performed to investigate the situation of educational justice from the perspective of paramedical students in Kermanshah Faculty of Paramedical Sciences. Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, which was performed by stratified sampling method in 2014, the required information was collected by educational justice questionnaire. The reliability and validity of this questionnaire was confirmed. Then, the data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 21 and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results: The average score of education justice was 53/48 ± 15/24. A significant relationship was found between the average scores of students educational justice with gender and their field of study (P<0.05. Conclusion: The research findings showed that the students' demographic characteristics are the influencing factors on the situation of education justice in Kermanshah Faculty of Paramedical Sciences. Therefore, the need to creating equal opportunities in education in a way that all students have access to the same facilities in the same environment, must be considered through the university and especially the professors.

  7. Exploration of the academic lives of students with disabilities at South African universities: Lecturers’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Mutanga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A decade has passed since South Africa signed and ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a human rights treaty that protects the rights and dignity of people with disabilities. However, not much have changed for students with disabilities. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore lecturers’ experiences with, and perspectives on, disability as well as with students with disabilities. It was hoped that this would contribute to the ongoing policy debates about diversity, inclusion and support for students with disabilities at universities.Methods: In an effort to understand the lives of students with disabilities better, a study which included students with disabilities, lecturers and disability supporting staff was conducted at two South African universities – University of the Free State and University of Venda. The paper takes a snapshot view of four lecturers and their perceptions of the lives of students with disabilities at their respective universities. Results and Conclusion: Although most disability literature report students with disabilities blaming lecturers for their failure to advance their needs, this paper highlights that the education system needs to be supportive to lecturers for the inclusive agenda to be realised. An argument is made for a more comprehensive approach towards a national disability policy in higher education involving many stakeholders. Without a broader understanding of disability, it will be difficult to engage with the complex ways in which inequalities emerge and are sustained.

  8. A Graduate Student's Perspective on Engaging High School Students in Research Outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, A. B.; Horton, R. A., Jr.; Andrews, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The southern San Joaquin basin is one of the United States' most prolific oil producing regions but also one facing numerous problems including low high school graduation rates, low college enrollments, high college dropout rates, low wages, and higher than average unemployment. Investment in STEM education experiences for high school students has been emphasized by California State University Bakersfield as a means to improving these metrics with programs such as the Research Experience Vitalizing Science-University Program (REVS-UP). Now in its seventh year, the REVS-UP (funded by Chevron) forms teams of high school students, a high school teacher, a CSUB graduate student, and a CSUB professor to work for four weeks on a research project. For the past two summers student-teacher teams investigated the diagenesis and mineralogy of the Temblor Formation sandstones in the subsurface of the San Joaquin basin oil fields that are potential CO2 sequestration sites. With a graduate student leading the teams in sample preparation and analysis by scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and cathode luminescence system (SEM-CL) data was gathered on diagenetic processes, detrital framework grains, and authigenic cements. Typically students are introduced to the project in a series of brief seminars by faculty and are then introduced to the techniques and samples. During the second week the students are usually capable of preparing samples and collecting data independently. The final week is focused on developing student-authored research posters which are independently presented by the students on the final day. This gives high school students the opportunity to learn advanced geologic topics and analytical techniques that they would otherwise not be exposed to as well as to gain research and presentation skills. These types of projects are equally important for the graduate students involved as it allows them the

  9. The Life Challenges of International Students : From the Perspectives of Developing Country Students in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Ciren, Bian Ba

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this age of globalization, internationalization has gradually turned into one of the most flourishing area of higher education worldwide. There is a movement where students travel across the globe to have better education than in their home country. International students while receiving higher education in a different cultural setting may suffer from challenges within their life abroad. The challenges of studying abroad which are experienced by international students at U...

  10. "Why bother so incredibly much?": student perspectives on PISA science assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serder, Margareta; Jakobsson, Anders

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale assessment, such as the Programme for International Assessment (PISA), plays an increasingly important role in current educational practice and politics. However, many scholars have questioned the validity and reliability of the tests and the extent to which they actually constitute trustworthy representations of students' knowledge. In the light of such critical voices the present article adopts a sociocultural perspective of human knowledge and action in order to explore the encounters between students and the science test assignments with which their knowledge is tested. Of particular interest in this study are the described "real-life situations" presented as the relevant background in which scientific literacy is assessed in PISA. According to the sociocultural theoretical onset the methodology used to approach the students' meaning making of the image of science as portrayed in the test were collaborative situations in which students work in small groups with units of PISA assignments, enabling a study of student-assignment encounters in action. The data we worked with consists of video-recordings from 71 Swedish 15-year-old students working with three released units from the PISA science test. According to our analysis, the "real-life situations" described in the test emerge as problematic in the students' meaning-making. This is demonstrated for instance by the students' positioning themselves as being different from and opposed to the fictional pictured students who appear in the backstories of the test. This article provides examples of how the scientific and academic language used by the fictional students in the assignments mediates distance and resistance among the students. The fictional students' use of strict scientific language and methods in day-to-day life situations leads them to be perceived as "little scientists" and as elite stereotypes of the scientific culture. We conclude that, by using assignments of this type, measurements of

  11. Interprofessional anatomy education in the United Kingdom and Ireland: Perspectives from students and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire F; Hall, Samuel; Border, Scott; Adds, Philip J; Finn, Gabrielle M

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of multiprofessional learning in anatomy and its role in medical and healthcare professions. This study utilized two components to investigate anatomy interprofessional education (AIPE) in the United Kingdom and Ireland. First, a survey involving qualitative and quantitative components asked Heads of Anatomy to report on their institutions' uptake of AIPE. Second, a series of case studies explored the experiences of students by using evaluation forms and an in-depth analysis of thematic concepts to understand the learners' perspectives on designing and delivering AIPE. Out of the 13 institutions that took part in the survey, eight did not offer an AIPE program. Between the remaining five institutions that deliver AIPE programs, 10 different modules are offered with the majority involving healthcare professions. The AIPE component is rated highly by students. The themes from the case studies highlight how valuable AIPE is from the student perspective both in terms of engaging them in anatomy as well as in the broader skills of teamwork and communication. The case studies also revealed how AIPE can be engaging for groups of students who might not have previously had access to cadaveric anatomy, for example, engineers and archeologists. The results of this study have implications for curriculum design in medicine and healthcare but also for further engagement of professional groups from non-healthcare backgrounds. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. The concept of reflection in nursing: qualitative findings on student and teacher perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, Chris; Lathlean, Judith; Gobbi, Mary

    2012-07-01

    This study sought to increase the understanding of the concept of reflection within nursing. The research focused on the social construction of reflection through a post-registration, palliative care programme in the United Kingdom (UK). An interpretive ethnographic approach was used to study reflection from the perspective of students and teachers, whilst paying attention to local organisational, contextual and cultural issues. Data collection included: observations of teaching and learning interactions, interviews, extracts from programme documentation and student reflective learning contracts (RLCs). Findings identified a learning culture committed to reflection as a valuable way of helping nurses make sense of their practice. Similar to Barnett's (1997) concept of 'critical being', students and teachers described reflection as a way of 'being' rather than simply 'thinking' or 'doing', since reflection intertwined propositional, affective and active elements. This process of reflective 'being' was connected with a humanistic approach to nursing, which emphasises the importance of actively using and expressing oneself in order to care for people. This paper contributes empirical knowledge on the meaning of reflection in nursing regarding: teachers' and students' perspectives, reflection as a way to make sense of practice, and reflection as a way of 'being' and its association with humanistic nursing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Local Balancing System from the Business Model Canvas Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusiak Bożena Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overall view of the business model (BM for the e-balance system for: balancing energy production and consumption in energy efficient, smart neighbourhoods (the e-balance project, FP7-SMARTCITIES-2013 along with its functionalities, based upon the Osterwalder’s canvas methodology. Additionally, this is the second, after two years of work, more incisive evaluation of the BM from the user’s and demo site’s perspective (Bronsbergen, the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is to present results and assess the above mentioned BM in the face its commercialisation and applicability to Europe.

  14. Student-Athletes in My Classroom: Australian Teachers' Perspectives of the Problems Faced by Student-Athletes Balancing School and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Maureen M.; Calder, Angela A.; Hinz, Beverley

    2017-01-01

    This paper emerged from a larger project about Australian high performance school age athletes self-identified problems in balancing their academic and sporting lives. Teachers of student-athletes are ideally placed to observe stresses faced by these students, but little is published about teacher perspectives on this topic. A qualitative analysis…

  15. Analysis of the Contribution to Professional Knowledge of the Job Training within the Student Perspective in the 3+1 Education Model--The Example of Honaz Vocational School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksit, Adnan; Arpat, Bulent; Kalfa, Veli Riza

    2017-01-01

    A well-educated and qualified workforce is one of the most important outputs in vocational and technical education. Vocational schools constitute the last circle in Turkey for the preparing students about the vocational and technical education in order to meet the need for the intermediate staff needed by the labor market. The educational model…

  16. E-governmental value chain models : E-government from a business (modelling) perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, Arjen

    2000-01-01

    The paper considers electronic governmental activities from a business perspective, resulting in a so-called governmental value chain model. This model aims to support practitioners for better understanding and realisation of joint organisational and information system innovations in the public

  17. Age replacement models: A summary with new perspectives and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xufeng; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa N.; Magid Hamouda, Abdel; Nakagawa, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Age replacement models are fundamental to maintenance theory. This paper summarizes our new perspectives and hods in age replacement models: First, we optimize the expected cost rate for a required availability level and vice versa. Second, an asymptotic model with simple calculation is proposed by using the cumulative hazard function skillfully. Third, we challenge the established theory such that preventive replacement should be non-random and only corrective replacement should be made for the unit with exponential failure. Fourth, three replacement policies with random working cycles are discussed, which are called overtime replacement, replacement first, and replacement last, respectively. Fifth, the policies of replacement first and last are formulated with general models. Sixth, age replacement is modified for the situation when the economical life cycle of the unit is a random variable with probability distribution. Finally, models of a parallel system with constant and random number of units are taken into considerations. The models of expected cost rates are obtained and optimal replacement times to minimize them are discussed analytically and computed numerically. Further studies and potential applications are also indicated at the end of discussions of the above models. - Highlights: • Optimization of cost rate for availability level is discussed and vice versa. • Asymptotic and random replacement models are discussed. • Overtime replacement, replacement first and replacement last are surveyed. • Replacement policy with random life cycle is given. • A parallel system with random number of units is modeled.

  18. [Teaching in Perspective - How Medical Students Assess Their Practical Clinical Training in Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsseler, M; Schill, A; Kalozoumi-Paisi, P; Ganzert, C; Arheilger, L; Sterz, J; Kollewe, T; Hoefer, S H; Adili, F

    2017-02-01

    Introduction: Practical clinical expertise is a crucial part of medical professionalism. Several studies have shown that medical students are poorly trained in practical skills during their undergraduate training. Even the students rated their own expertise in practical skills as poor. The amendments to the German Regulating Licenses in Practical Medicine are intended to strengthen practical clinical training. The aim of the present study is to use focus groups to analyse practical clinical training with respect to organisation, difficulties and problems from the learners' perspective. Methods: The present qualitative study uses the focus group approach. Each focus group was composed of a maximum of 6 students per group with the same level of training. Using a standardised interview manual, a total of 31 students and four first-year residents participated in the study. Data interpretation was performed using structured qualitative content analysis. Results: The present work demonstrates that students of all levels of training greatly value their training in practical clinical expertise, especially in clinical skills. Due to the lack of defined learning objectives for practical skills, students training in clinical internships and medical registrar positions are highly dependent on the motivation and interest of the individual clinical teacher and the learner himself. Students struggle to estimate their actual level of expertise due to the lack of defined learning objectives. This is exacerbated by the fact that students rarely receive feedback about their expertise. Students complain that many teachers do not know the level of training required of their students. Conclusion: The definition of basic and specific learning objectives and the communication of this between learners and teachers is an essential part of practical clinical training. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The Role of the Operating Room in Medical Student Education: Differing Perspectives of Learners and Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Rebecca; Shapiro, Michael; Merchant, Aziz

    The surgical clerkship is an integral part of third-year medical student education. The operating room (OR) is a heavily used setting, but it is unclear whether this setting is as effective as possible. To determine the role of the OR and potential improvements, it is necessary to analyze the perspectives of those involved, including surgeons, residents, and medical students. An electronic survey was distributed to the surgeons, surgical residents, and third-year medical students associated with Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. The questions were a combination of 5-point Likert scale questions and qualitative responses. The questions assessed the role of the OR, the information taught in the OR, the quality of the teaching and environment, and potential improvements. Attending surgeons and residents generally rated the OR more positively than medical students did. Medical students desired more hands-on participation and a greater focus on learning technical skills. In addition, most medical students rated the feedback and direct instruction in the OR as "poor." Furthermore, the attending surgeons and medical students disagreed about the main roles of the OR as well as the effectiveness of teaching in the OR. The medical students reported experiencing anxiety and intimidation in the OR and suggested several improvements, such as decreasing the length of the surgical clerkship. There is significant disagreement between the surgeons and residents and the medical students regarding the roles and effectiveness of learning in the OR. This may help explain the reported medical student dissatisfaction and frustrations with the surgical clerkship. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Perspective: Markov models for long-timescale biomolecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, C. R.; McGibbon, R. T.; Pande, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have the potential to provide atomic-level detail and insight to important questions in chemical physics that cannot be observed in typical experiments. However, simply generating a long trajectory is insufficient, as researchers must be able to transform the data in a simulation trajectory into specific scientific insights. Although this analysis step has often been taken for granted, it deserves further attention as large-scale simulations become increasingly routine. In this perspective, we discuss the application of Markov models to the analysis of large-scale biomolecular simulations. We draw attention to recent improvements in the construction of these models as well as several important open issues. In addition, we highlight recent theoretical advances that pave the way for a new generation of models of molecular kinetics

  1. Kolb's Experiential Learning Model: Critique from a Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsteiner, Harald; Avery, Gayle C.; Neumann, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Kolb's experiential learning theory has been widely influential in adult learning. The theory and associated instruments continue to be criticized, but rarely is the graphical model itself examined. This is significant because models can aid scientific understanding and progress, as well as theory development and research. Applying accepted…

  2. International electives in the final year of German medical school education--a student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Agrawal, Mridul; Wahlster, Lara

    2014-01-01

    The final year of medical school has a unique role for introducing students to their future responsibilities and challenges. At many medical schools, electives at an accredited institution abroad are a common part of the student's final year experience. International electives provide an opportunity for a personal and academic experience that will often create new perspectives on clinical medicine and research, medical education and healthcare policy. In this article the authors reflect on their experience as elective students abroad and discuss the contribution of international electives to the constant development and progress of local final year rotations. They identify key areas for improving final year electives and outline essential features for a valuable and successful final year elective.

  3. The Perspectives of New Franchising Models in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila A. Mikhailova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main goal of the article is to define the development perspectives of the new franchising models in Russia (specifically quasifranchising, freedom franchising and branchising. To achieve this the following tusks should be completed: to define the specific characteristics of the following models as well as the factors which influenced their occurrence; to question Russian franchisors in order to understand their desire to develop their business under the new franchising models; to identify the key development possibilities of the new franchising models in Russia based on the gathered data. Methods: the article was prepared with the help of theoretical as well as economic analysis. Moreover, the series of the formalized telephone interviews with the Russian businessmen were conducted by the author. Based on the results gathered the conclusions on the development perspectives of the new franchising models in Russia were drawn. Results: currently new franchising models are conquering the Russian market. In comparison to the classical franchising model new franchising models are riskier for the franchisor due to the certain freedom available to franchisees. Quasifranchising, which is based on the business model transfer without the brand transfer, is suitable for the young concepts and for the franchisors seeking for the increasing number of franchisees. Freedom franchising enabling assortment and outlook variety of the point of contact is a good alternative for the franchisees who struggle for individuality even in the boundaries of the franchise as well as for the franchisors looking for the franchisees of that kind. Finally, branchising, which means franchisor’s and franchisee’s co-investment, is applicable for the franchises with high level of investments needed. Conclusions and Relevance: the materials of the article show the certain place of the new franchising models on the Russian market. They make it possible to adjust the

  4. The perspectives of nonscience-major students on success in community college biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Rajab, Oriana Sharon

    With more than 36% of nonscience-major community college students unable to successfully complete their general life science courses, graduation and transfer rates to four-year universities are negatively affected. Many students also miss important opportunities to gain some level of science proficiency. In an effort to address the problem of poor science achievement, this research project determined which factors were most significantly related to student success in a community college biology course. It also aimed to understand the student perspectives on which modifications to the course would best help them in the pursuit of success. Drawing heavily on the educational psychology schools of thought on motivation and self-efficacy of science learning, this study surveyed and interviewed students on their perceptions of which factors were related to success in biology and the changes they believed were needed in the course structure to improve success. The data revealed that the primary factors related to student success are the students' study skills and their perceived levels of self-efficacy. The findings also uncovered the critical nature of the professor's role in influencing the success of the students. After assessing the needs of the community college population, meaningful and appropriate curriculum and pedagogical reforms could be created to improve student learning outcomes. This study offered recommendations for reforms that can be used by science practitioners to provide a more nurturing and inspiring environment for all students. These suggestions revolved around the role of the instructor in influencing the self-efficacy and study skills of students. Providing more opportunities for students to interact in class, testing more frequently, establishing peer assistance programs, managing better the course material, and making themselves more available to students were at the forefront of the list. Examples of the potential benefits of increasing

  5. Cracking the Student Aid Code: Parent and Student Perspectives on Paying for College

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Board Advocacy & Policy Center, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Paying for college is a challenge for many Americans and navigating the financial aid process can be very difficult, especially for low-income and first-generation college students. The College Board commissioned research to learn more about students' and parents' knowledge, beliefs and attitudes about the importance of a college education and how…

  6. University Students' Difficulties in Solving Application Problems in Calculus: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchuk, Sergiy; Zverkova, Tatyana; Gruenwald, Norbert; Sauerbier, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an observational parallel study conducted simultaneously at 2 universities--one each in New Zealand and Germany. It deals with university engineering students' difficulties in the formulation step of solving a typical application problem from a first-year calculus course. Two groups of students (54 in New…

  7. Need Support in Students with Visual Impairments: Comparing Teacher and Student Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Haakma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available According to self-determination theory (SDT, need-supportive teaching positively influences students’ engagement to learn. Need-supportive teaching involves teachers providing students with structure, autonomy support, and involvement. It enables teachers to support students’ psychological needs to feel competent, autonomous, and related. Supporting students’ needs consequently has a positive influence on students’ engagement to learn. Little is known about need-supportive teaching in the education of students with visual impairments. In this study, we used a questionnaire to assess the self-reported provision of need support by teachers of students with visual impairments, the students’ perceived need support, and the students’ behavioral and emotional engagement. Seven teachers and 48 students filled in questionnaires based on SDT. In general, mean scores were positive. The teachers’ mean scores for the need support they provided, the students’ mean scores for their perceived need support, and the students’ mean scores for engagement all ranged between 3 and 4 on a 5-point scale. The teachers and students scored highest on involvement, followed by structure, and then autonomy support. When looking at scores on an individual student level, we found large differences between students in the same class, which implies that need support requires an individualized approach. Hence, teachers need to be aware of their students’ individual needs for structure, autonomy support, and involvement and should adjust their need-supportive teaching accordingly, thereby enabling teachers to have a positive impact on the engagement of students with visual impairments.

  8. Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: Perspectives from Canadian and Korean Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeran; Nielsen, Wendy; Woodruff, Earl

    2014-01-01

    This study examined and compared students' understanding of nature of science (NOS) with 521 Grade 8 Canadian and Korean students using a mixed methods approach. The concepts of NOS were measured using a survey that had both quantitative and qualitative elements. Descriptive statistics and one-way multivariate analysis of variances examined the…

  9. From the Student Perspective: Experiences of Middle and High School Students in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Danna; Greer, Diana; Basham, James; Hu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to examine experiences and preferences of middle and high school students in online learning environments. An online questionnaire was supplied to administrators of online schools, who then distributed the questionnaire to students enrolled in their schools. Topics addressed in the questionnaire included involvement…

  10. Thai students' mental model of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawan, Supawadee; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This Research was finding the viewing about concept of chemical bonding is fundamental to subsequent learning of various other topics related to this concept in chemistry. Any conceptions about atomic structures that students have will be shown their further learning. The purpose of this study is to interviews conceptions held by high school chemistry students about metallic bonding and to reveal mental model of atomic structures show according to the educational level. With this aim, the questionnaire prepared making use of the literature and administered for analysis about mental model of chemical bonding. It was determined from the analysis of answers of questionnaire the 10th grade, 11th grade and 12th grade students. Finally, each was shown prompts in the form of focus cards derived from curriculum material that showed ways in which the bonding in specific metallic substances had been depicted. Students' responses revealed that learners across all three levels prefer simple, realistic mental models for metallic bonding and reveal to chemical bonding.

  11. Perspectives of Using Internet on the Scientific Research among the Postgraduate Students at the University of Khartoum-Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hassan, Esam Idress K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the perspectives of using Internet on the scientific research among the Postgraduate Students at the University of Khartoum. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, the population consisted of all Postgraduate students at the University of Khartoum (Master & Ph.D.), registered during the…

  12. The Status of Corporal Punishment in Jordanian Primary Schools from the Perspectives Of: Teachers, Students, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateeb, Linda Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the status of corporal punishment in Jordanian Primary schools from the perspectives of: Teachers, students, and parents. The corpus of the study comprises (95) Male and female teachers, (135) male and female students form Jordanian primary schools. Two questionnaire forms were used in this study: one for teachers and…

  13. Employability Skills, Personal Qualities, and Early Employment Problems of Entry-Level Auditors: Perspectives from Employers, Lecturers, Auditors, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yet-Mee; Lee, Teck Heang; Yap, Ching Seng; Ling, Chui Ching

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the issue of employability of university accounting students from the perspectives of accounting firm employers, junior auditors, accounting lecturers, and accounting students. Areas of investigation include perceived importance of employability skills and desirable personal qualities; and early employment problems encountered…

  14. A Cultural Hybridization Perspective: Emerging Academic Subculture among International Students from East Asia in U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the emerging academic subculture of international students from East Asia in U.S. academics from the cultural hybridization perspective. In a knowledge-based economy, international education plays a pivotal role in the global educational environment. Advocacy of international student mobility is essential; international…

  15. Secondary Students' Attitudes to Animal Research: Examining the Potential of a Resource to Communicate the Scientist's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Birdsall, Sally

    2015-01-01

    A DVD resource that provided a scientist's perspective on the use of animals in research and teaching was evaluated with a questionnaire that asked students' views pre and post their access to the resource. Thirty-nine secondary students (Y10-Y13) took part in three different teaching programmes that provided information about animal research and…

  16. A Learning Patterns Perspective on Student Learning in Higher Education: State of the Art and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermunt, Jan D.; Donche, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the state of the art of research and theory development on student learning patterns in higher education and beyond. First, the learning patterns perspective and the theoretical framework are introduced. Second, research published since 2004 on student learning patterns is systematically identified and…

  17. Successful After-School Physical Activity Clubs in Urban High Schools: Perspectives of Adult Leaders and Student Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Alex C.; McCaughtry, Nate; Kulik, Noel L.; Kaseta, Michele; Maljak, Kim; Whalen, Laurel; Shen, Bo; Martin, Jeffrey J.; Fahlman, Mariane

    2014-01-01

    Grounded in social cognitive theory, the purpose of this study was to examine leaders' and students' perspectives of factors that contribute to effective voluntary after-school physical activity clubs. Data were collected over two-years via field observations (n= 115) and interviews with students (n= 278) and adult leaders (n= 126). Results…

  18. Technologies Used in the Study of Advanced Mathematics by Students Who Are Visually Impaired in Classrooms: Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePountis, Vicki M.; Pogrund, Rona L.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Lan, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This research examined the perspectives of teachers of students who are visually impaired regarding the use and effectiveness of high-tech assistive technology purported to assist visually impaired students in advanced mathematics. Methods: The data for this study were collected via a mixed-methods online survey distributed through…

  19. Digital Entrepreneurships and Business Models Canvas: Applied Research for Communication University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Montalvo-Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital economy requires other business models different to the ones present in the physical world; therefore, they should be studied from a particular perspective. In this research a variety of canvas formats or business model canvas are compared and analyzed. The entrepreneurial intention of Communication students from the University of Lima is also studied. The methodology included a survey among students and an educational experience within the subject: Advertising Creativity. The main result of this research is a proposal canvas to design digital entrepreneurships in Communication, whether commercial or social businesses.

  20. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%). Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (Pbarrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the hospital wards as a supportive environment for student learning.

  1. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  2. Why Everyday Experience? Interpreting Primary Students' Science Discourse from the Perspective of John Dewey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jiyeon; Song, Jinwoong

    2014-05-01

    The purposes of this study were, based on John Dewey's ideas on experience, to examine how primary students used their own everyday experience and were affected by own and others' experience in science discourse, and to illuminate the implications of experience in science education. To do these, science discourses by a group of six fourth-graders were observed, where they talked about their ideas related to thermal concepts. The data was collected through interviews and open-ended questions, analyzed based on Dewey's perspective, and depicted as the discourse map which was developed to illustrate students' transaction and changing process of students' ideas. The results of the analysis showed typical examples of Dewey's notions of experience, such as the principles of continuity and of transaction and of different types of experience, examples of `the expanded continuity and transaction', and science discourse as inquiry. It was also found that students' everyday experiences played several roles: as a rebuttal for changing their own ideas or others', backing for assurance of their own ideas in individual students' inner changes after discourse with others, and backing for other's ideas. Based on these observations, this study argues that everyday experience should be considered as a starting point for primary students' science learning because most of their experience comes from everyday, not school science, contexts. In addition, to evoke educative experience in science education, it is important for teachers to pay more attention to Dewey's notions of the principles of continuity and of transaction and to their educational implications.

  3. The use of electronic books in midwifery education: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are: (i) to illustrate the use of e-books by health studies students at a college of higher education; (ii) to provide a demonstration of how e-books may be facilitated by library and information services staff working across the health and academic sectors; (iii) to comment upon the experiences of health studies students, in using e-books. A focus group of 10 student midwives was used to gain insight into how e-books may be used in an academic context for health professionals. The findings of the student midwives' focus group are reported and discussed. In this instance, the student midwives were encouraged to use e-books as part of a structured information skills programme. The paper concentrates on how the e-books were used within this context and addresses the potential benefits and disadvantages from a student perspective. The results provide evidence of a largely positive experience of using e-books as an electronic information resource. The focus group reveals many benefits and advantages in the facilitation and use of e-books, as well as addressing areas for development. It is concluded that e-books have a place in health library and information resources, but further development of e-books and e-book collections is required and subsequent investigation into their most effective use.

  4. Facebook for Health Promotion: Female College Students' Perspectives on Sharing HPV Vaccine Information Through Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Tsark, JoAnn; Campo, Shelly; Teti, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Facebook, a social network site, has been widely used among young adults. However, its potential to be used as a health promotion medium has not been fully examined. This study explored Facebook's potential for sharing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine information among female college students in Hawai'i. Culturally tailored flyers and handouts were developed and distributed at one large university in Hawai'i to recruit female college students between the age of 18 and 26 having an active Facebook account. Three focus group meetings were conducted to gather student perspectives about how information about HPV vaccine may be best shared via Facebook. We found that students believed Facebook is a good awareness tool but they needed more knowledge about the HPV vaccine to feel comfortable sharing the information. Participants preferred forwarding information to chatting about HPV. Some participants expressed concern that their Facebook friends would think the HPV vaccine information they forwarded on Facebook is spam. Participants suggested prefacing the posted HPV vaccine information with a personal note in their own words to make the message more interesting and relevant to their Facebook friends. Future interventions using Facebook to promote HPV vaccine could provide students with HPV vaccine information from credible sources and ask students to attach personal testimonials or endorsements while forwarding the information on Facebook.

  5. Comfort and utility of school-based weight screening: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalich, Karrie A; Chomitz, Virginia; Peterson, Karen E; McGowan, Robert; Houser, Robert F; Must, Aviva

    2008-03-03

    Weight screening in schools has been proposed as one strategy to address childhood obesity. Students' response to such screening is unexplored, however. In this study we evaluated the perceived comfort, utility and impact of school-based weight screening from the perspective of middle school-aged students. A cross-sectional study of 852 ethnically diverse 5th-8th grade students. Associations were investigated between measured height and weight screening data and responses to a self-administered questionnaire completed immediately following weight screening in physical education class. BMI categories were based on the revised 2000 CDC growth chart and definitions: 5th-85th BMI percentile = healthy weight, 85th-95th BMI percentile = at risk for overweight, and >95th percentile BMI = overweight. Overall, students' comfort level with weight screening varied depending on the student's own weight status. More overweight students (38.1%) reported being uncomfortable than healthy weight students (8.1%) (p eating more fruits and vegetables (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.7, 4.1), and increasing physical activity (OR = 4.3, 95% CI = 2.7, 7.0). Overall, the majority of the middle school students did not report discomfort with school-based weight screening, did report that receiving height and weight information was useful, and generally report appropriate weight control intentions. These proportions varied across weight status categories, however, with students who were at risk for overweight or overweight reporting higher levels of discomfort. For schools that conduct weight screening, it is essential that they also provide comfortable and private settings as well as education or counseling regarding healthy weight control practices.

  6. Effective physiology teaching methods: from the perspective of first year MBBS students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagothu, Rajani Santhakumari; Reddy Indla, Yogananda; Paluru, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Students who took admission in first year MBBS course used to study physiology, anatomy and biochemistry for one and half years. Since a decade the first year course duration was reduced to one year unaltering the syllabus in the three basic subjects. So students are focusing on the easy ways to clear the university exams by accepting the concise books, which is dampening the real quality of the subject knowledge. This study is aimed at understanding the best methods of physiology teaching in the lecture gallery, from the student's perspective. The present study was undertaken at a private medical college in southern part of India in Telangana state, on 100 students who took admission in first year MBBS course, in the academic year 2015-2016. Out of 100, 36 are boys and 64 are girl students. Distributed a question paper which is having 2 sets of questions. First question is having three statements regarding the teaching methods namely; chalk and blackboard teaching, over head projection teaching and power point teaching. Students were asked to choose the best statement which they prefer. Second question is consisting of combination of teaching methods and they are; chalk and blackboard with over head projection teaching method, chalk and blackboard with power point presentation. Again the students were asked to choose one of the 2 statements in 2 nd question. Students preference of teaching methods for understanding of physiology in percentage; chalk and blackboard-54, over head projection teaching-4, power point presentation-32, chalk and blackboard with over head projection-26, chalk and blackboard with power point presentation-64. Majority of the students are in favor of a combination of chalk and blackboard with power point presentation for better understanding of physiology, next is chalk and blackboard teaching alone.

  7. Perspectives on a Learning-Model for Innovating Game-Based Movement in Sports and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbæk, Lars; Friis, Jørgen Jakob

    2017-01-01

    an active lifestyle. Such digitally supported movement promote health and underlines a need for students to understand that movement design incorporates many aspects: technology, gamification, motivation and understanding of health. To support this, a movement innovation program was needed at our sports...... science and health education. We therefore ask: Which learning approach and educational factors does a learning model need to provide, in order to establish the best foundation for learning innovation and the design of game-based movement solutions within sport and health education? This paper suggests...... a model that covers three approaches; design ‘for’, ‘with’ and ‘of’ movement. From an innovation perspective, it is essential to sense needs and identify future opportunities. This includes understanding technologies and the lives of potential users. Being able to transform core knowledge and insights...

  8. Using student generated blogs to create a global perspective on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Students in an introductory Global Climate Change college course develop a global perspective on climate change causes, impacts, and mitigation through the use of student generated content in the form of blogging. The students are from diverse backgrounds and mostly non-science majors. They each create a blog for an assigned country. They are immersed in active learning through daily activities that teach them to use numerical data to create and analyze graphs for their blogs. Students are familiarized with other science skills as well, such as how to critically evaluate their sources. This method of using student generated content and active learning encourages students to immerse themselves in the viewpoint of people living in other countries. This creates a tangible understanding of the global stakes of climate change and fosters an emotional involvement in what otherwise might have been an abstract or intimidating topic. The front page of the course blog opens with a world map and a feed from each student's blog. Upon clicking on a country on the world map, the reader is taken to the blog page created by the student in charge of that country. The United States is reserved as a sample page created by the instructor. Throughout the semester, students follow a series of assignments that build their knowledge of the geography, climate, and culture of their assigned country, and these appear as tabs, or informational pages, on their blog. Students are taught to use Excel and they each create temperature and precipitation graphs that compare the climate of a city in their assigned country to that of their home city. Students then write their first blog post on their country's contribution to climate change and how that compares to other countries in the world by importing carbon dioxide emissions data into Excel and creating their own graphs to be used as images in their blog post. The second blog post covers potential climate change impacts on their assigned country

  9. Refinement-Based Student Modeling and Automated Bug Library Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffes, Paul; Mooney, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of student modeling and intelligent tutoring systems focuses on the development of the ASSERT algorithm (Acquiring Stereotypical Student Errors by Refining Theories). Topics include overlay modeling; bug libraries (databases of student misconceptions); dynamic modeling; refinement-based modeling; and experimental results from tests at…

  10. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B.; Weick, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  11. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B.; Weick, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    In mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks we provide significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. Furthermore, a logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  12. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Aimone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  13. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  14. Need support in students with visual impairments : Comparing teacher and student perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haakma, Ineke; Janssen, Marleen; Minnaert, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    According to Self-Determination Theory, need-supportive teaching positively influences students’ engagement to learn. Need-supportive teaching involves teachers providing students with structure, autonomy support, and involvement. It enables teachers to support students’ psychological needs to feel

  15. Animal models of pulmonary emphysema: a stereologist's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fehrenbach

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A variety of animal models have been suggested as models of pulmonary emphysema; these are critically discussed in the present article from a stereologist's perspective. In addition, a stereological design for the quantification of experimentally induced emphysema is proposed. On the basis of the widely accepted definition of pulmonary emphysema being an "abnormal permanent enlargement of the airspaces distal to the terminal bronchioles, accompanied by destruction of their walls," quantitative morphology is the only method with which to reliably assess the presence of emphysema. Recognising this, careful inspection of animal models that are based on instillation of elastase, genetic alterations, inhalation of cigarette smoke or induction of apoptosis, reveals that both criteria of emphysema definition were demonstrated in surprisingly few of them. Several aspects are suggested to be critical for the understanding of animal models of human emphysema. For example, genetic models that rely on the inhibition of the formation of alveoli during post-natal alveolarisation should clearly be distinguished from models that rely on the loss of mature alveoli after alveolarisation is complete. Furthermore, inhalation models that are characterised by exposed animals exhibiting a severe loss of body weight should carefully examine the relative contribution of intervention and weight loss, respectively. Models that rely on the exposure of juvenile animals for several weeks or even months should take into account the effects of normal lung growth and ageing. Stereology offers appropriate tools with which to quantify the parameters relevant to assess development and the regeneration of emphysema. Stereologists continue to develop tools that will help ascertain the reliability of established and new models. If inappropriate parameters continue to be used for the evaluation of animal models of emphysema, thinking and resources are likely to be misdirected and the

  16. Shared mental models of integrated care: aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jenna M; Baker, G Ross

    2012-01-01

    Health service organizations and professionals are under increasing pressure to work together to deliver integrated patient care. A common understanding of integration strategies may facilitate the delivery of integrated care across inter-organizational and inter-professional boundaries. This paper aims to build a framework for exploring and potentially aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives of systems integration. The authors draw from the literature on shared mental models, strategic management and change, framing, stakeholder management, and systems theory to develop a new construct, Mental Models of Integrated Care (MMIC), which consists of three types of mental models, i.e. integration-task, system-role, and integration-belief. The MMIC construct encompasses many of the known barriers and enablers to integrating care while also providing a comprehensive, theory-based framework of psychological factors that may influence inter-organizational and inter-professional relations. While the existing literature on integration focuses on optimizing structures and processes, the MMIC construct emphasizes the convergence and divergence of stakeholders' knowledge and beliefs, and how these underlying cognitions influence interactions (or lack thereof) across the continuum of care. MMIC may help to: explain what differentiates effective from ineffective integration initiatives; determine system readiness to integrate; diagnose integration problems; and develop interventions for enhancing integrative processes and ultimately the delivery of integrated care. Global interest and ongoing challenges in integrating care underline the need for research on the mental models that characterize the behaviors of actors within health systems; the proposed framework offers a starting point for applying a cognitive perspective to health systems integration.

  17. Factors related to the nursing student-patient relationship: the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkala, Arja; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Katajisto, Jouko

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' perceptions of factors related to three types of student-patient relationship identified in an earlier study: mechanistic, authoritative and facilitative. Another aim was to identify which factors predict the type of relationship. A convenience sample of 310 Bachelor of Health Care students was recruited. The data were collected by using a questionnaire especially designed for this study. Data analysis used the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, one-way analysis of variance and multinomial logistic regression. Older age was the only significant predictor of a facilitative relationship, whereas fourth-year studies and support received from a person other than supervisor predicted an authoritative relationship. Furthermore, students in authoritative and facilitative relationships had a more positive perception of the patient's attributes as a patient and of patient's improved health and commitment to self-care than students in a mechanistic relationship. A positive perception of the atmosphere during collaboration was more common among students in an authoritative relationship than in a mechanistic relationship. The findings of this study offer useful clues for developing nursing education and empowering patients with a view to improving the quality of nursing care.

  18. Differential impact of student behaviours on group interaction and collaborative learning: medical students' and tutors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Maha; Velan, Gary M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Balasooriya, Chinthaka

    2016-08-22

    Collaboration is of increasing importance in medical education and medical practice. Students' and tutors' perceptions about small group learning are valuable to inform the development of strategies to promote group dynamics and collaborative learning. This study investigated medical students' and tutors' views on competencies and behaviours which promote effective learning and interaction in small group settings. This study was conducted at UNSW Australia. Five focus group discussions were conducted with first and second year medical students and eight small group tutors were interviewed. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Students and tutors identified a range of behaviours that influenced collaborative learning. The main themes that emerged included: respectfulness; dominance, strong opinions and openness; constructiveness of feedback; active listening and contribution; goal orientation; acceptance of roles and responsibilities; engagement and enthusiasm; preparedness; self- awareness and positive personal attributes. An important finding was that some of these student behaviours were found to have a differential impact on group interaction compared with collaborative learning. This information could be used to promote higher quality learning in small groups. This study has identified medical students' and tutors' perceptions regarding interactional behaviours in small groups, as well as behaviours which lead to more effective learning in those settings. This information could be used to promote learning in small groups.

  19. Student perspectives about mobile learning initiatives at Open University of Brazil: the mobile phone issue - doi: 10.4025/actascieduc.v32i2.11545

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otacilio Antunes Santana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} The objectives of this study were to verify if students of Open University of Brazil approve of mobile learning (m-learning initiatives, to identify the students' perspectives about m-learning, to develop a model of instructional design for m-learning environments, and to quantify student satisfaction with the presented model. 1,328 students agreed to participate in this study, all students of Open University of Brazil. They were questioned about their perspectives on m-learning at this university and if they agree with this educational model. The students agreed with the possible implementation of m-learning at this university, especially through mobiles phones. Collectively, the main ideas that the students offered to improve the efficiency of knowledge construction were classified into three groups: theory, practice, and interactivity. They also agreed with an instructional design model that was developed and shown to the three groups.  

  20. Assessment of students' perspectives about master of public health program in medical school of Shiraz University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahangiz, Saman; Salehi, Alireza; Rezaee, Rita; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Integration of public health and medical education has been thought to have an important role in medical students' training. Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has developed an MD/MPH dual degree educational program for the talented volunteer students. The aim of this study was to assess the students' viewpoints about various aspects of Shiraz MD/MPH program. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Shiraz undergraduate medical students, who were enrolled in MD/MPH program. A self-structured questionnaire in Persian consisting of 4 parts was used; it included demographic factors including 16 questions which evaluated the students' perspective of the goals, content, skill development, applicability and meeting their expectations; 7 questions evaluating the self-reported increase of knowledge; and 3 multiple choice questions to assess the students' motivations and opinions on the impact of the program on their future career. Descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. All MD/MPH students (89) with a mean age of 21.4±1.34 participated in this study. Forty one of the students (46.1%) were male and 48 (53.9%) female. Overall, 86.1% of them had positive views about the goals of the program; also, 83.5%, 81.2% and 81.9% of them reported a positive viewpoint about the contents, the applicability and development of specific skills, and meeting their expectations, respectively. The students' most frequent motivation was "learning how to research systematically" (73%). The majority of the students reported this program to be moderately to highly effective in increasing their knowledge in the provided courses. The students had a positive view about almost all of the aspects of the MD/MPH program; this may be indicative of the program being successful in delivering the goals, increasing the students' knowledge and skills, and meeting their expectations to date. Students' enthusiasm for the educational program may lead to their motivation for better learning and

  1. Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Dance education provides a language that allows students and teachers to express themselves in new ways and to think through ideas differently. All students deserve the opportunity to learn things in new ways, to internalize information and rephrase it, to understand their world and contribute to it. All students deserve the opportunity to…

  2. Engagement, identity building and reflection in innovative learning processes as a supplementary perspective on Student Bildung in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael Rene; Jensen, Tine Lynfort

    This research has revealed an interesting perspective on student’s learning processes that could be elaborated into a more general contribution to the discussion about the future of higher education. Innovation and entrepreneurship education seems to provide an opportunity for students to reflect...... of student Bildung that addresses the role of teaching innovation and entrepreneurship as well as how to engage students in their own learning processes at the universities....

  3. Analysis of eHealth Search Perspectives Among Female College Students in the Health Professions Using Q Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J. Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Background The current “Millennial Generation” of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. Objective To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHeal...

  4. Applied genre analysis: a multi-perspective model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K Bhatia

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Genre analysis can be viewed from two different perspectives: it may be seen as a reflection of the complex realities of the world of institutionalised communication, or it may be seen as a pedagogically effective and convenient tool for the design of language teaching programmes, often situated within simulated contexts of classroom activities. This paper makes an attempt to understand and resolve the tension between these two seemingly contentious perspectives to answer the question: "Is generic description a reflection of reality, or a convenient fiction invented by applied linguists?". The paper also discusses issues related to the nature and use of linguistic description in a genre-based educational enterprise, claiming that instead of using generic descriptions as models for linguistic reproduction of conventional forms to respond to recurring social contexts, as is often the case in many communication based curriculum contexts, they can be used as analytical resource to understand and manipulate complex inter-generic and multicultural realisations of professional discourse, which will enable learners to use generic knowledge to respond to novel social contexts and also to create new forms of discourse to achieve pragmatic success as well as other powerful human agendas.

  5. A qualitative study of student perspectives and experiences in an information technology education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heekyung

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to learn about students' perspectives of an undergraduate level information technology (IT) education program. The IT program is a recent effort to create a new educational opportunity for computing in college, with recognition that the recent IT developments have had a greater influence on various aspects of people's lives than ever. Students' perspectives are a necessary piece of information to develop this innovative IT education program into a sound educational opportunity. Data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews conducted with 28 undergraduate students, most of whom have taken one or more IT classes before. The interview data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. The analysis found that college students perceived that they were very competent in dealing with IT primarily due to their continued exposure to computers since youth. However, this perceived competency was not very stable. Students felt that they did not have sufficient IT competency when technical skills of dealing with IT came to attention. They also felt so when comparing their IT competency with that of their peers, examining it in a class context, and confronting a transition from education to the real world. In spite of their preference for and confidence in self-guided learning, students wanted to receive a formal instruction in IT when they needed to learn something difficult, something that they were not very interested in, and something important for their future lives. They also expressed a desire to gain a comprehensive understanding of computers without needing to learn fundamental computing principles. Students' various interests in IT education were dispersed around learning practical technical skills and understanding social implications of IT. Many participants' focus was a mix of the two factors, which was often expressed as an area that dealt with "how humans and computers interact." This blended interest suggested a

  6. Difficulties of bachelor of nursing students in clinical practice - teacher's perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Longo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on representations of teachers about the difficulties perceived or felt by students in clinical training. This is the partial result of a study in construction process, carried out under the PhD in Educational Sciences in the area of Teacher Education. This research aims to understand the formative effect of the practice in the workplace in terms of knowledge acquisitions, development of professional knowledge and skills, and also in identity construction of teachers and students. This study is framed in the area of initial teacher education in nursing, more specifically in its practical component, and it is designed to answer the question: what are the main difficulties encountered by students in the workplace in initial nursing education? And the goal: to understand to what extent these difficulties can be constraints of learning and personal and professional development of the student. This is a study based on a qualitative approach of descriptive and interpretative nature. The sample is intentional, consisting of sixty-eight teachers of thirteen Nursing / Health High Schools in Portugal. Data collection was carried out through focus group, and their examination was performed using the thematic content analysis according to Bardin[1]. The results show, according to the teaching perspective, that the difficulties experienced by students are polarized around six main categories: the reality shock; interact with the medical monitor; the self training process; interaction with the teacher; interaction with the patient / family, and also interaction with the nursing staff.

  7. Critical thinking instruction and technology enhanced learning from the student perspective: A mixed methods research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    Critical thinking is acclaimed as a valuable asset for graduates from higher education programs. Technology has advanced in quantity and quality; recognized as a requirement of 21st century learners. A mixed methods research study was undertaken, examining undergraduate nursing student engagement with critical thinking instruction, platformed on two technology-enhanced learning environments: a classroom response system face-to-face in-class and an online discussion forum out-of-class. The Community of Inquiry framed the study capturing constructivist collaborative inquiry to support learning, and facilitate critical thinking capability. Inclusion of quantitative and qualitative data sources aimed to gather a comprehensive understanding of students' development of critical thinking and engagement with technology-enhanced learning. The findings from the students' perspectives were positive toward the inclusion of technology-enhanced learning, and use in supporting their development of critical thinking. Students considered the use of two forms of technology beneficial in meeting different needs and preferences, offering varied means to actively participate in learning. They valued critical thinking instruction being intentionally aligned with subject-specific content facilitating understanding, application, and relevance of course material. While the findings are limited to student participants, the instructional strategies and technology-enhanced learning identified as beneficial can inform course design for the development of critical thinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Entrepreneurial Characteristics of Students in Different Fields of Study: a View from Entrepreneurship Education Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Holienka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our article is to examine the entrepreneurial characteristics of university students in different disciplines, and to develop implications and recommendations for entrepreneurship education programing according to the observed differences. The main research question is to identify whether students from different selected disciplines exhibit different rates of enterprising potential (i.e. tendency to start up and manage projects, and if so, which are the differentiating attributes. To answer this question we conducted a study using the General Enterprising Tendency v2 Test (GET2 test and analysed the enterprising potential of 370 university students in four different majors (business administration, applied informatics, psychology and pedagogy. The findings of our analysis suggest that there are significant differences in the general enterprising tendency levels, as well as in levels of three out of five its components (namely need for achievement, calculated risk taking and internal locus of control between the students in analysed majors. In other words, students in different disciplines exhibit different rates of entrepreneurial predispositions. In our article we present and further discuss these findings, especially from the entrepreneurship education perspective in its broadest sense.

  9. A 12-year comparison of students' perspectives on diversity at a Jesuit Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujawar, Imran; Sabatino, Matt; Ray Mitchell, Stephen; Walker, Benjamin; Weissinger, Peggy; Plankey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have assessed perspectives of medical students toward institutional diversity, but few of them have attempted to map changes in diversity climate over time. This study aims to investigate changes in diversity climate at a Jesuit medical institution over a 12-year period. In 1999, 334 medical students completed an anonymous self-administered online survey, and 12 years later, 406 students completed a comparable survey in 2011. Chi-square tests assessed the differences in percent responses to questions of the two surveys, related to three identities: gender, race, and sexual orientation. The 1999 versus 2011 samples were 46% versus 49% female, 61% versus 61% Caucasian, and 41% vs. 39% aged 25 years or older. Findings suggested improvements in medical students' perceptions surrounding equality 'in general' across the three identities (pschool curriculum, including course text content, professor's delivery and student-faculty interaction (pdiversity over the past 12 years may have been influenced by a generational acceptance of cultural diversity and, the inclusion of diversity training courses within the medical curriculum. Diversity training related to race and sexual orientation should be expanded, including a follow-up survey to assess the effectiveness of any intervention.

  10. College Freshmen Students' Perspectives on Weight Gain Prevention in the Digital Age: Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Larsen, Chelsea A; Magradey, Karen; Brandt, Heather M; Wilcox, Sara; Sundstrom, Beth; West, Delia Smith

    2017-10-12

    College freshmen are highly vulnerable to experiencing weight gain, and this phenomenon is associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases and mortality in older adulthood. Technology offers an attractive and scalable way to deliver behavioral weight gain prevention interventions for this population. Weight gain prevention programs that harness the appeal and widespread reach of Web-based technologies (electronic health or eHealth) are increasingly being evaluated in college students. Yet, few of these interventions are informed by college students' perspectives on weight gain prevention and related lifestyle behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess college freshmen students' concern about weight gain and associated topics, as well as their interest in and delivery medium preferences for eHealth programs focused on these topics. Web-based surveys that addressed college freshmen students' (convenience sample of N=50) perspectives on weight gain prevention were administered at the beginning and end of the fall 2015 semester as part of a longitudinal investigation of health-related issues and experiences in first semester college freshmen. Data on weight gain prevention-related concerns and corresponding interest in eHealth programs targeting topics of potential concern, as well as preferred program delivery medium and current technology use were gathered and analyzed using descriptive statistics. A considerable proportion of the freshmen sample expressed concern about weight gain (74%, 37/50) and both traditional (healthy diet: 86%, 43/50; physical activity: 64%, 32/50) and less frequently addressed (stress: 82%, 41/50; sleep: 74%, 37/50; anxiety and depression: 60%, 30/50) associated topics within the context of behavioral weight gain prevention. The proportion of students who reported interest in eHealth promotion programs targeting these topics was also generally high (ranging from 52% [26/50] for stress management to 70% [35/50] for eating a

  11. Ubuntu-Praxis: Re-Modelling the Balanced Scorecard Model at a University, an Afrocentric Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoda, Gladys Ruvimbo; Sikwila, Mike Nyamazana

    2014-01-01

    The authors design the innovation and learning perspective of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) of "Ubuntu and client service charter nexus." This article borrows and advances the research carried out by Khomba, Vermaak and Gouws (2011). The point of departure is on praxis of ubuntu/unhu as a holistic approach in the re-modelling of the BSC…

  12. Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education 2016: Mathematical Modeling and Modeling Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Christian R., Ed.; McDuffie, Amy Roth, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling plays an increasingly important role both in real-life applications--in engineering, business, the social sciences, climate study, advanced design, and more--and within mathematics education itself. This 2016 volume of "Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education" ("APME") focuses on this key topic from a…

  13. A Fuzzy Student Modeling with Two Intelligent Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jung

    1999-01-01

    A new fuzzy student modeling method with two intelligent agents, a diagnosis agent and a learning agent, are suggested by this article for several aspects of student modeling in Intelligent Tutoring Systems. Also integrated are fuzzy theories and Fuzzy-Hasse diagrams for student modeling. (Author/AEF)

  14. Seventh Grade Students' Mental Models of the Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepardson, Daniel P.; Choi, Soyoung; Niyogi, Dev; Charusombat, Umarporn

    2011-01-01

    This constructivist study investigates 225 student drawings and explanations from three different schools in the midwest in the US, to identify seventh grade students' mental models of the greenhouse effect. Five distinct mental models were derived from an inductive analysis of the content of the students' drawings and explanations: Model 1, a…

  15. The Determinants of Student Effort at Learning ERP: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; El-Masri, Mazen; Lane, Peggy L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a research model based on the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model (UTAUT) and Hofstede's cultural dimensions to explore factors that influence student effort at learning Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. A Structural Equation Model (SEM) using LISREL was utilized to validate the proposed research…

  16. Students and Libraries: The Perspectives of Faculty in a Pakistani University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore student library use from the perspective of the faculty. An already developed instrument was used to collect data from full-time faculty members working in a private university located in the province of Punjab, Pakistan. The faculty strongly supported the idea of library based learning, student library use, assigning library-based tasks, and the crucial role of librarians in promoting a library culture. The respondents were not satisfied with the students’ library use skills, availability of relevant and current data or the promotion of library use by the institution’s top management. The current research is first of its kind in Pakistan and is based on data collected from a single university. Future research might be extended to other universities in the Pakistani or South Asian higher education sector. The study could be helpful to higher education policy to design customerdriven marketing strategies while marketing libraries to stakeholders.

  17. International electives in the final year of German medical school education – a student's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] The final year of medical school has a unique role for introducing students to their future responsibilities and challenges. At many medical schools, electives at an accredited institution abroad are a common part of the student’s final year experience. International electives provide an opportunity for a personal and academic experience that will often create new perspectives on clinical medicine and research, medical education and healthcare policy. In this article the authors reflect on their experience as elective students abroad and discuss the contribution of international electives to the constant development and progress of local final year rotations. They identify key areas for improving final year electives and outline essential features for a valuable and successful final year elective.

  18. Nurse educators' perspectives on student development of reflection for psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpa, Jane V; Chernomas, Wanda M

    2013-08-24

    Psychiatric nursing, in various parts of the world, including regions of Canada, is recognized as a distinct nursing profession. In psychiatric mental health nursing practice, reflection is considered a foundational skill given the relational nature of nurses' therapeutic work. Communicating the significance of reflection for practice to students and teaching this intangible skill is challenging for educators. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore with psychiatric mental health nurse educators their views on how they develop reflective practitioners. Participants' perspectives and experiences in teaching reflective practice were captured in four themes: building the use of self as an agent of change, building skills of reflection/building the habit of reflection, building a bridge between theory and practice, and building a continuing reflective practice - from student to practitioner. Recommendations include a systematic incorporation of reflection into a curriculum and creating supportive learning environments that facilitate the development of reflective practitioners.

  19. (un) Disciplining the nurse writer: doctoral nursing students' perspective on writing capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Maureen M; Walker, Madeline; Scaia, Margaret; Smith, Vivian

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we offer a perspective into how Canadian doctoral nursing students' writing capacity is mentored and, as a result, we argue is disciplined. We do this by sharing our own disciplinary and interdisciplinary experiences of writing with, for and about nurses. We locate our experiences within a broader discourse that suggests doctoral (nursing) students be prepared as stewards of the (nursing) discipline. We draw attention to tensions and effects of writing within (nursing) disciplinary boundaries. We argue that traditional approaches to developing nurses' writing capacity in doctoral programs both shepherds and excludes emerging scholarly voices, and we present some examples to illustrate this dual role. We ask our nurse colleagues to consider for whom nurses write, offering an argument that nurses' writing must ultimately improve patient care and thus would benefit from multiple voices in writing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Jones, Bhavan Prasad Rai Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, UK Purpose: Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods: An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results: Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%. Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01. Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the