WorldWideScience

Sample records for model student perspectives

  1. Student perspectives of assessment by TEMM model in physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Upadhya, Subramanya; Torke, Sharmila; Ramnarayan, K

    2005-06-01

    Assessment is the process by which the teacher and the student gain knowledge about student progress. Assessment systems should aim at evaluating the desired learning outcomes. In Melaka Manipal Medical College, (Manipal Campus), Manipal, India, the TEMM model (consisting of 4 assessment methods: Triple Jump Test, essay incorporating critical thinking questions, Multistation Integrated Practical Examination, and multiple choice questions) was introduced to 30 refresher students in the fourth block of the academic year. At the end of the block, a questionnaire was distributed to ask the students to rank the different assessments in the order of their preference with respect to seven items. Analysis of the results showed that not a single type of assessment was ranked highest for all the seven items, proving the earlier observation that a single assessment does not fulfill all aspects of assessment and that there is a need for an evaluating system with multiple ways of assessment.

  2. Correlation Between Blended Learning Model With The Perspective Of Learning Effectiveness For Nursing Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susila Sumartiningsih

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The learning model is one of the enabling factors that influence the achievement of students. That students have a good learning outcomes the lecturer must choose appropriate learning models. But in fact not all lecturers choose the most appropriate learning model with the demands of learning outcomes and student characteristics.The study design was descriptive quantitative correlation. Total population of 785 the number of samples are 202 were taken by purposive sampling. Techniques of data collection is done by cross-sectional and then processed through the Spearman test. The results showed no significant relationship between classroom lecture method in the context of blended learning models to study the effectiveness perspective the p value of 0.001. There is a significant relationship between e-learning methods in the context of blended learning models with perspective of activities study of nursing students the p value of 0.028. There is a significant relationship between learning model of blended learning with the perspective of nursing students learning effectiveness p value 0.167. Researchers recommend to future researchers conduct more research on the comparison between the effectiveness of the learning model based on student learning centers with the e-learning models and its impact on student achievement of learning competencies as well as to the implications for other dimensions of learning outcomes and others.

  3. Models and Modeling Perspectives on the Development of Students and Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, Richard; Lehrer, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Previews this special issue of "Mathematical Thinking and Learning," which describes models and modeling perspective toward mathematics problem solving, learning, and teaching. Discusses its characteristics and foundations and provides an example of a model-eliciting activity. (KHR)

  4. The perspective of medical students regarding the roles and characteristics of a clinical role model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmanbijari, Bahareh; Beigzadeh, Amin; Etminan, Abbas; Najarkolai, Atena Rahmati; Khodaei, Marzieh; Askari, Seyed Mostafa Seyed

    2017-04-01

    As medical students spend most of their time with their clinical teachers and imitate their roles and characteristics during the school year, it is important to identify the roles and characteristics that they find essential in their role models. These traits play a part in their future professions as doctors. The aim of this study was to determine the perspective of students, interns, and residents regarding the roles and characteristics of a clinical role model. In an analytical cross-sectional study, a structured and self-developed questionnaire was completed by 185 medical students at educational hospitals of Kerman University of Medical Sciences during April and May 2015. Participants were selected using convenience sampling method. For data analysis, we used descriptive and inferential statistics. SPSS software version 16 was used as needed. In total, 90 medical students (48.7%), 65 interns (35.1%), and 30 residents (16.2%) participated in this study. Male respondents (n=75) comprised 40.5% and female respondents (n=110) 59.5% of the study sample. The three most important roles of a clinical teacher were organizer role (99.7), teacher role (101.7), and supporter role (109.5) for students, interns, and residents respectively. On the other hand, supporter role (85.4), communicator role (86.4) and organizer role (83.4) were ranked as the least important for students, interns, and residents respectively. There was no significant association among the three batches and the roles of a clinical teacher (p>0.05). Conversely, Females rated the roles of a clinical teacher significantly higher than males (prole models in medical schools, great attention should be given to their roles. Teachers must be aware that their roles have an impact on students' professional development and performance.

  5. Constructivist-Based Teaching in Second Life from a Student's Perspective: A Model Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, Scott; Harmeyer, Dave

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides qualitative student-centered research from an online Research Methodology course taught partly within the immersive, 3-D environment of Second Life with fifty-eight graduate psychology students for the purpose of suggesting a constructivist-based instruction model for immersive environments. A qualitative method approach was…

  6. Perspectives on the Anorectic Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony; Bode, Jacquelyn

    1981-01-01

    Studies the anorectic student who is becoming more evident on the college campus, and who often evokes strong emotional response. Stresses that realistic perspectives be maintained by college counselors and administrators. Explains the characteristics of anorexia nervosa and provides guidelines for responding to the student. (Author)

  7. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  8. Cultural Models of Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Social Work and Anthropology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study employed a unique theoretical approach and a series of participant-based ethnographic interviewing techniques that are traditionally used in cognitive anthropology to examine and compare social work and anthropology students' cultural models of the causes of domestic violence. The study findings indicate that although social work…

  9. From Student to Student Affairs Colleague: Perspectives on Nurturing Untapped Potential in Graduate Assistants via the Empowerment Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Shuji; Cohen, Lori D.; Reifsteck, Jan; Wirkkula, Leanne M.

    The changing face of personnel in higher education amidst a competitive marketplace has inspired student affairs administrators to place greater emphasis on hiring practices in an effort to recruit future colleagues from existing resources. To that end, the attempt was made to (1) propose the Empowerment Model as a means by which future student…

  10. Student Participation: A Democratic Education perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2004-01-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health Promoting Schools, and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Network...... of Health Promoting Schools. Student participation is viewed as one of the main focal points of the conceptual framework and model of a health promoting school developed within the Macedonian context. This model, as well as the model distinguishing between two different qualities of participation - genuine...

  11. The structure of personality of a good teacher from students perspective according to the Big-Five model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genc Lajoš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the identification of desirable personality characteristics of teachers from students perspective in the Big-Five Model of personality from a phenomenological approach. The description of personality of a good teacher was obtained from students of the University of Novi Sad (n=443. The Big Five Inventory (BFI was applied with the instruction to respond to claims as a good teacher would answer. The students’ estimates indicate that a good teacher is expected to have lower emotional instability, but more pronounced extroversion, openness to experience, cooperativeness (pleasantness and consciousness with regard to referent values in general population. For the domain of neuroticism, the difference is either small or medium in size, for cooperativeness of a medium size, and for extroversion, consciousness and openness to experience the difference is large. The gender of students does not influence their expectations. Methodological dilemmas in this area of research and implications of the results for the selection and professional development of teachers are discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179010 i br. 47020

  12. New Perspectives to Study of Student Motivation and Self-Regulated Learning with Bayesian Network Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohotie, Pekka; Nokelainen, Petri; Tirri, Henry; Silander, Tomi

    This study examined the data selection process preceding multivariate analysis for a data set measuring student motivation and self-regulated learning. Data were 138 responses to a questionnaire on motivation and self-regulated learning, adapted for Finnish students. The first goal was to compare the results gained with "gentle" and…

  13. Using Feature Films to Teach Public Relations: An Assessment Model from Nonmajor Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Angela Ka Ying; Hutton, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching fundamental public relations courses to students from diverse backgrounds poses additional complexities in learning effectiveness. This exploratory study evaluated the effectiveness and identified the challenges of using films to teach public relations among nonmajor students. Results from an online survey and two focus groups found that…

  14. Using Feature Films to Teach Public Relations: An Assessment Model from Nonmajor Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Angela Ka Ying; Hutton, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching fundamental public relations courses to students from diverse backgrounds poses additional complexities in learning effectiveness. This exploratory study evaluated the effectiveness and identified the challenges of using films to teach public relations among nonmajor students. Results from an online survey and two focus groups found that…

  15. Dual Enrollment Participation from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanny, M. Allison

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the experiences of five high school students previously enrolled in dual enrollment courses, and discusses the perceived benefits and disadvantages of these experiences from the student perspective.

  16. Mobile Device Intervention for Student Support Services in Distance Education Context--FRAME Model Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalita S.; Jamatia, Biplab; Aggarwal, A. K.; Kannan, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study conducted to analyse the effect of mobile device intervention for student support services and to gauge its use for enhancing teaching--learning process as a future study in the context of offer of Distance Education programmes. The study was conducted with the learners of the coveted Post Graduate…

  17. Interprofessional education: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumague, Melodie; Morgan, Alisha; Mak, Diana; Hanna, Mary; Kwong, Joanne; Cameron, Colette; Zener, Dori; Sinclair, Lynne

    2006-06-01

    The Toronto Rehabilitation Institute (Toronto Rehab) is a current leader in the movement of interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives in Ontario, Canada. Nine students from seven different health care disciplines, including medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, social work, and speech language pathology participated in the second IPE clinical placement in the winter of 2005 on Toronto Rehab's Stroke inpatient unit. In an effort to increase interprofessional collaboration, improve communication skills, foster respect and enhance knowledge of the different roles each discipline plays on the health care team, these students met together over a five week period and participated in interprofessional group sessions led by different health care professional leaders from the unit. This paper discusses the students' perspectives on this IPE experience and the corresponding benefits and challenges. All participants in the study recognized the importance of interprofessional teamwork in patient care and agreed that all health care education should include opportunities enabling them to develop the skills, behaviours and attitudes needed for interprofessional collaboration.

  18. Understanding Students' Motivation in Sport and Physical Education: From the Expectancy-Value Model and Self-Efficacy Theory Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Amelia M.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the roles of individuals' expectancy beliefs and incentives (i.e., task value, outcome expectancy) in sport and physical education are examined from expectancy-value model and self-efficacy theory perspectives. Overviews of the two theoretical frameworks and the conceptual and measurement issues are provided, followed by a review…

  19. Understanding Students' Motivation in Sport and Physical Education: From the Expectancy-Value Model and Self-Efficacy Theory Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Amelia M.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the roles of individuals' expectancy beliefs and incentives (i.e., task value, outcome expectancy) in sport and physical education are examined from expectancy-value model and self-efficacy theory perspectives. Overviews of the two theoretical frameworks and the conceptual and measurement issues are provided, followed by a review…

  20. College Students' Perspectives on Their Career Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubany, Shawn T.; Krieshok, Thomas S.; Black, Michael D.; McKay, Robyn A.

    2008-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined how college student participants discussed their approach to making career decisions, with a focus on how their perspective may be consistent with various models of career decision making. Brief telephone interviews were conducted with 20 college students, and the narrative data were analyzed using qualitative…

  1. Assessing Student Presentations from Three Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Donna R.

    2008-01-01

    Analyzing student presentations from three perspectives--expert, peer, and self--provides extended feedback and opportunities to learn. All three of these are helpful and serve different purposes. The expert (teacher) feedback shows how the teacher views student work and often assigns a grade. Peer analysis provides students doing the analysis an…

  2. Student Perspectives on Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungblut, Jens; Vukasovic, Martina; Stensaker, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    The study provides an insight into student perspectives on quality in higher education, using Harvey and Green conceptualizations as the point of departure, and exploring the linkages between the views on quality, the developments of the Bologna Process and related national reforms, as well as students' motivation for and expectations from higher…

  3. Student Discipline: Legal, Empirical, and Educational Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. John, III, Ed.; Bennett, Christine, Ed.

    This book presents four perspectives on student discipline: legal and historical, empirical, educational, and futuristic. Part I examines the legal history of student discipline in papers by J. John Harris III, Richard E. Fields, and A. Reynaldo Contreras (Chapter 1); Richard E. Fields (Chapter 2); and David G. Carter, Sr. and Cynthia L. Jackson…

  4. Student Perspectives on Self-Directed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Carolinda; Morris, Sherrill R.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate student perspectives regarding specific factors associated with self-directed learning were collected through eight focus groups. A total of 80 upperclassmen provided input revealing three emergent themes in the focus groups responses: (1) Student-Controlled, (2) Faculty-Controlled, and (3) Administration-Controlled Facilitators and…

  5. Evaluation of the achievement of educational objectives of the Community Oral Health and Periodontics Departments using the CIPP model of evaluation–students' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakdaman A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Evaluation is a continuous process which is necessary for improvement of students learning and planning for required changes to obtain the educational objectives. The aim of the present study was to assess students' perspective on the achievement of the educational objectives of the Community Oral Health and Periodontology Departments using the CIPP model of evaluation."nMaterials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey has been conducted using a questionnaire consists of four domains as introduced in the CIPP model of evaluation (Context, Input, Process and Product. Two groups of senior dental students of the dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were approached. Data was collected anonymously and was analyzed with non-parametric Mann-Whitney test using the SPSS statistical package."nResults: The response rate was 67.7% for year 6 and 87.5% for the year 5 students. Respondents considered material presented in Periodontology Department more relevant and in need for their future career. However, teaching skills and motivation of the educators in Periodontology Department was considered inadequate. 67% of students reported having problem with material taught in Periodontology Department. Overall, significant difference in domains of Context and Process was observed between two departments (p<0.05. In the output domain students rated their clinical and theoretical ability "weak" in relation to splint, implant, management of acute gingivitis and electrosurgery compared with other topics which rated "good". Students considered their ability in using the principals of Evidence-Based Dentistry moderate."nConclusion: The evaluation of the educational achievements of the two departments (COH and Periodontics using CIPP model of evaluation showed that there is significant difference in two domains (Context and Process. In those topics which achievement was reported weak the revision of teaching methods is

  6. On the Training Model of China's Local Normal University Students during the Transitional Period from the Perspective of Happiness Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiwei, Huang

    2016-01-01

    As a theory based on the hypothesis of "happy man" about human nature, happiness management plays a significant guiding role in the optimization of the training model of local Chinese normal university students during the transitional period. Under the guidance of this theory, China should adhere to the people-oriented principle,…

  7. Students' perspectives on cyber bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatston, Patricia W; Kowalski, Robin; Limber, Susan

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of the impact of cyber bullying on students and the possible need for prevention messages targeting students, educators, and parents. A total of 148 middle and high school students were interviewed during focus groups held at two middle and two high schools in a public school district. The focus groups were approximately 45 minutes in length. Students were divided by gender and asked a series of scripted questions by a same-gender student assistance counselor. We found that students' comments during the focus groups suggest that students-particularly females-view cyber bullying as a problem, but one rarely discussed at school, and that students do not see the school district personnel as helpful resources when dealing with cyber bullying. Students are currently experiencing the majority of cyber bullying instances outside of the school day; however there is some impact at school. Students were able to suggest some basic strategies for dealing with cyber bullying, but were less likely to be aware of strategies to request the removal of objectionable websites, as well as how to respond as a helpful bystander when witnessing cruel online behavior. We conclude that school districts should address cyber bullying through a combination of policies and information that are shared with students and parents. Schools should include cyber bullying as part of their bullying prevention strategies and include classroom lessons that address reporting and bystander behavior.

  8. Perspective: adopting an asset bundles model to support and advance minority students' careers in academic medicine and the scientific pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-11-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in academic medicine, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics requires the adoption of a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students as they navigate the scientific pipeline. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support to continue toward careers in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, socioeconomic status). The authors define "asset bundles" as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach.

  9. Occupational therapy students' perspectives on the core ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... To explore the perspectives of final-year occupational therapy students with regard to the ... Methods. This explorative study used three focus groups to obtain the ... Information from the focus groups was transcribed and analysed thematically to determine the findings.

  10. Capturing Student Perspectives through a "Reggio" Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Diane; Bath, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This research considers the views and perspectives of a group of students on an Education Studies and Early Years course in an English university that took part in an arts project inspired by the philosophy and pedagogy of the Reggio Emilia preschools in Italy. This ethnographic study included semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire which…

  11. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  12. A Modeling Perspective on Interpreting Rates of Change in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ärlebäck, Jonas B.; Doerr, Helen M.; O'Neil, AnnMarie H.

    2013-01-01

    Functions provide powerful tools for describing change, but research has shown that students find difficulty in using functions to create and interpret models of changing phenomena. In this study, we drew on a models and modeling perspective to design an instructional approach to develop students' abilities to describe and interpret rates of…

  13. Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment (SHINE) Students - Student Representatives' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahud, D. M.; Niembro, T.

    2014-12-01

    The SHINE workshop is an annual meeting of solar and heliospheric scientists which, in addition to aiming to improve understanding of solar disturbances and their propagation to, and effect, on the Earth (shinecon.org), is dedicated to actively supporting students. This dedication is substantiated in part through the National Science Foundation (NSF) providing funding for student attendance to the workshop, which enables student participation. Another example of SHINE's commitment to its student members is the incorporation of a Student Day prior to the workshop since 2003, entirely organized and run by two student representatives. While there are variations in format from year to year, Student Day consists of tutorials and research talks exclusively by student volunteers to an audience of only students. The day is intended to provide a low-stress environment for students to learn about the various topics addressed during the workshop, to ask questions freely, and to engage in scientific discussion with other students which hopefully is a catalyst for collaboration. As a result of positive experiences, over the past decade student attendance and participation in the workshop have increased. At the SHINE 2014 workshop, nearly a third of attendees were students. SHINE student visibility has increased over the years, with student posters being advertised at breakfast, inclusion of a student day summary by the student representatives during a plenary session, and continued support from the steering committee. Students are also promoting a broader impact of SHINE sciences via increased social media presence. From a student representative's perspective, SHINE has built and fostered a healthy student community and encourages students to engage in shaping the future of the field.

  14. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Baily; Noah D. Finkelstein

    2011-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of physics concepts, and to inform how we might teach traditional content. Our previous investigations of student perspectives on quantum physics have indica...

  15. Designing informal learning spaces using student perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew David Riddle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the design of informal learning spaces at an Australian university that support students in the generation of knowledge. Recent learning space design projects at La Trobe have been informed by a number of pre-existing projects, including a small research project on student use of technologies, a national project on learning space design, and a significant curriculum renewal process at the university. It demonstrates the ways in which evidence based on student perspectives and principles developed through applied research in teaching and learning can inform real world learning space design projects in a higher education context.

  16. Validation of the IS Impact Model for Measuringthe Impact of e-Learning Systems in KSA Universities StudentPerspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alkhalaf, Steve Drew, Anne Nguyen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The IS-Impact Measurement Model, developed by Gable, Sedera and Chan in 2008, represents the to-date and expected stream of net profits from a given information system (IS, as perceived by all major user classes. Although this model has been stringently validated in previous studies, its generalisability and verified effectiveness are enhanced through this new application in e-learning. This paper focuses on the re-validation of the findings of the IS-Impact Model in two universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Among the users of 2 universities e-learning systems, 528 students were recruited. A formative validation measurement with SmartPLS, a graphical structural equation modelling tool was used to analyse the collected data. On the basis of the SmartPLS results, as well as with the aid of data-supported IS impact measurements and dimensions, we confirmed the validity of the IS-Impact Model for assessing the effect of e-learning systems in KSA universities. The newly constructed model is more understandable, its use was proved as robust and applicable to various circumstances.

  17. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of…

  18. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Charles; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2010-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of…

  19. physiotherapy student and client perspectives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    should primarily consider the client and family needs within the home setting. Students need to be able to adjust the goal and process of the intervention to ... academic learning and personal development, but also to an understanding of social ...

  20. Transportation challenges for urban students with disabilities: parent perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Benjamin C; Keys, Christopher B; McMahon, Susan D; Brubacher, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explored parent perspectives of the transportation difficulties students with disabilities experienced getting to and around school. Participants were parents of predominantly African American and Latino/a high school youth with disabilities from low income neighborhoods. Content analysis of 14 meetings with 5 to 12 parents sponsored by the school district revealed five primary themes concerning transportation: the role of aides, exclusion from school programming, scheduling problems, equipment problems, and physical safety issues. Findings are discussed in regard to students' social and emotional experiences at school. Implications for school policy include improving the integration of transportation within inclusion best practice models. Incorporating parent perspectives can help school administrators and staff enrich the quality of inclusive, socially just education for students with disabilities.

  1. The Definition of Community: A Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Link

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When designing service-learning programs, catch-words like ‘community engagement’ and ‘community partners’ comes to mind. As undergraduate students seeking funding for research-service projects abroad, we are told to work with and through ‘the community’ and to have ‘community-centered’ project design. The dominant rhetoric gives rise to a homogenizing and simplifying view of ‘community’ that is implicit to ‘community engagement’ initiatives. In June 2010, we traveled to Belize on a research grant with the goal of installing slow-sand water filters in a rural community. Our perceptions of ‘community’ profoundly shaped the way we designed and implemented our project, and we quickly found that our initial conception of the ‘community’ was incorrect. We saw that there is a large difference between how the ‘community’ is treated in service-learning discourse and actual on-the-ground realities. This paper offers a unique student perspective on the definition of ‘community.’ We hope that other students will learn from our experiences and that educators will be able to more critically examine how the concept of ‘community’ is presented to students. KEYWORDSservice-learning; community engagement; definition of community; student perspective

  2. When Patients Decline Medical Student Participation: The Preceptors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tricia S.; Skye, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    Patients' receptivity towards medical student participation has been examined predominantly from the patient and/or the medical student perspective. Few studies have investigated the preceptor's perspective. The study examined preceptors' experience with patients declining medical student participation in clinical care and identified…

  3. Multi-perspective modelling of complex phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seck, M.D.; Honig, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    This conceptual paper discusses the limitations of a single-perspective hierarchical approach to modelling and proposes multi-perspective modelling as a way to overcome them. As it turns out, multi-perspective modelling is primarily a new methodology, using existing modelling techniques but

  4. The piano teaching situation from a student perspective: A South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The piano teaching situation from a student perspective: A South African ... their music students, resulting in both parties experiencing the teaching situation as ... in the identification of preferences for certain learning processes in individuals.

  5. Refined characterization of student perspectives on quantum physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Baily

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of physics concepts, and to inform how we might teach traditional content. Our previous investigations of student perspectives on quantum physics have indicated they can be highly nuanced, and may vary both within and across contexts. In order to better understand the contextual and often seemingly contradictory stances of students on matters of interpretation, we interviewed 19 students from four introductory modern physics courses taught at the University of Colorado. We find that students have attitudes and opinions that often parallel the stances of expert physicists when arguing for their favored interpretations of quantum mechanics, allowing for more nuanced characterizations of student perspectives in terms of three key interpretive themes. We present a framework for characterizing student perspectives on quantum mechanics, and demonstrate its utility in interpreting the sometimes contradictory nature of student responses to previous surveys. We further find that students most often vacillate in their responses when what makes intuitive sense to them is not in agreement with what they consider to be a correct response, underscoring the need to distinguish between the personal and the public perspectives of introductory modern physics students.

  6. "When Teachers Collaborate, Good Things Happen": Teacher Candidate Perspectives of the Co-Teach Model for the Student Teaching Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darragh, Janine J.; Picanco, Kathryn E.; Tully, Debbie; Henning, A. Suzie

    2011-01-01

    The current demand for teacher candidates to prove a positive impact on student achievement and work collaboratively in a field that is perennially in change has called for a new paradigm for teacher preparation, one that focuses on clinical field experiences, culturally responsive teaching and reflective, collaborative pedagogy. The co-teach…

  7. Perspectives on multifield models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Multifield models for prediction of nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics are reviewed from the viewpoint of their structure and requirements for closure relationships. Their strengths and weaknesses are illustrated with examples, indicating that they are effective in predicting separated and distributed flow regimes, but have problems for flows with large oscillations. Needs for multifield models are also discussed in the context of reactor operations and accident simulations. The highest priorities for future developments appear to relate to closure relationships for three-dimensional multifield models with emphasis on those needed for calculations of phase separation and entrainment/de-entrainment in complex geometries.

  8. The academic environment: the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, K; Barlow, P J; Chendea, S A; Cheong, W S; Dounis, A; Dragan, I F; Hamlin, J; Hosseinzadeh, L; Kuin, D; Mitrirattanakul, S; Mo'nes, M; Molnar, N; Perryer, G; Pickup, J; Raval, N; Shanahan, D; Songpaisan, Y; Taneva, E; Yaghoub-Zadeh, S; West, K; Vrazic, D

    2008-02-01

    Dental education is regarded as a complex, demanding and often stressful pedagogical procedure. Undergraduates, while enrolled in programmes of 4-6 years duration, are required to attain a unique and diverse collection of competences. Despite the major differences in educational systems, philosophies, methods and resources available worldwide, dental students' views regarding their education appear to be relatively convergent. This paper summarizes dental students' standpoint of their studies, showcases their experiences in different educational settings and discusses the characteristics of a positive academic environment. It is a consensus opinion that the 'students' perspective' should be taken into consideration in all discussions and decisions regarding dental education. Moreover, it is suggested that the set of recommendations proposed can improve students' quality of life and well-being, enhance their total educational experience and positively influence their future careers as oral health physicians. The 'ideal' academic environment may be defined as one that best prepares students for their future professional life and contributes towards their personal development, psychosomatic and social well-being. A number of diverse factors significantly influence the way students perceive and experience their education. These range from 'class size', 'leisure time' and 'assessment procedures' to 'relations with peers and faculty', 'ethical climate' and 'extra-curricular opportunities'. Research has revealed that stress symptoms, including psychological and psychosomatic manifestations, are prevalent among dental students. Apparently some stressors are inherent in dental studies. Nevertheless, suggested strategies and preventive interventions can reduce or eliminate many sources of stress and appropriate support services should be readily available. A key point for the Working Group has been the discrimination between 'teaching' and 'learning'. It is suggested that

  9. Field Instructors' Perspectives on Foundation Year MSW Students' Preplacement Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal Gelman, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This study elicited 39 field instructors' perspectives on the anxiety that students experience as they begin field placements. Field instructors rated students as significantly more anxious than did students themselves, and although field instructors believed anxiety interferes with learning to a greater extent than did students, they did not…

  10. Refined Characterization of Student Perspectives on Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Baily, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The perspectives of introductory classical physics students can often negatively influence how those students later interpret quantum phenomena when taking an introductory course in modern physics. A detailed exploration of student perspectives on the interpretation of quantum physics is needed, both to characterize student understanding of physics concepts, and to inform how we might teach traditional content. Our previous investigations of student perspectives on quantum physics have indicated they can be highly nuanced, and may vary both within and across contexts. In order to better understand the contextual and often seemingly contradictory stances of students on matters of interpretation, we interviewed 19 students from four introductory modern physics courses taught at the University of Colorado. We find that students have attitudes and opinions that often parallel the stances of expert physicists when arguing for their favored interpretations of quantum mechanics, allowing for more nuanced characteriz...

  11. Automated Student Model Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedinger, Kenneth R.; McLaughlin, Elizabeth A.; Stamper, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Student modeling plays a critical role in developing and improving instruction and instructional technologies. We present a technique for automated improvement of student models that leverages the DataShop repository, crowd sourcing, and a version of the Learning Factors Analysis algorithm. We demonstrate this method on eleven educational…

  12. Evaluating the students' perspectives of a clinic mentoring programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, B; Saad, M N; Goldberg, D

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and examine the effectiveness of a mentoring program for third and fourth year clinical dental students. This is an educational intervention for the pre-doctoral students at the Schulich School of Dentistry. We have recently instituted this program and have developed a questionnaire to assess the student perspectives using a SWOT analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of this intervention by analyzing the quantitative and qualitative responses of the students towards their clinical education and patient management. Our findings, both quantitative and qualitative, indicated that the mentoring program was well received by most students who would like to see the program expanded. The majority of students felt that the mentoring program aligned well with comprehensive care of their patients while enhancing their clinical experience. One of the strongest areas of agreement involved the ability to discuss cases in a non-threatening environment. The SWOT analysis identified key areas for future improvements. We offer steps to successfully implement a similar program based on our findings. It is our hope that our results might be instrumental for other schools wishing to adopt a similar model which supports patient-based comprehensive care.

  13. Feedback in L2 writing: the students' perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Vokic, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Given the disparate views in L2 writing literature on what constitutes effective teacher feedback, this qualitative study approached this issue from the student???s perspective. In order to examine what constitutes effective teacher feedback from the student???s standpoint, fifty-four student responses to three drastically different feedback styles were analyzed. The results of this preliminary study are partially in line with Hyland (1998), since it was found that whethe...

  14. Urban and Rural High School Students' Perspectives of Productive Peer Culture for Mathematics Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Melva R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine students' perspectives about productive peer culture (PPC) in general and for mathematics learning. The urban and rural high school students in this study have participated for at least one year in either an Algebra Project Cohort Model (APCM) for daily mathematics instruction and/or worked as mathematics…

  15. Mobile Libraries: Librarians' and Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Noa

    2014-01-01

    This study which is based on the Technological Acceptance Model (TAM), seeks to explore whether librarians and LIS students are familiar with the newest technological innovations and whether they are ready to accept them. The research was conducted in Israel during the first and second semesters of the 2012 academic year and considered two…

  16. First-Year Students' Perspectives on Intercultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy; Williams, Rhiannon D.; Shaw, Marta A.; Jie, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    Faculty can play a critical role in supporting students' intercultural development, but studies indicate that instructors report a lack of formal understanding about how to maximize this opportunity. Through the investigation of 115 first-year students' written reflections, this study provides faculty with students' perspectives on intercultural…

  17. A CIT Investigation of Disruptive Student Behaviors: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K. Douglas; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2014-01-01

    This research focuses on gaining a better understanding of how students negatively impact other students' classroom experience. More specifically, this research develops a typology of disruptive student behavior, including frequency of occurrence and the perceived magnitude of the disruption from a student perspective. Students also provide…

  18. Pretoria medical students' perspectives on assessable attributes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pretoria medical students' perspectives on assessable attributes of ... in the New Millennium‿, was published by the Annals of Internal Medicine in February 2002. ... of this Charter's principles and responsibilities in the South African context.

  19. Perspectives of accounting students and teachers on the changing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perspectives of accounting students and teachers on the changing role of ... Southern African Business Review ... Recommendations are made for tertiary institutions to alleviate this information gap and for further research on this issue.

  20. Students' Perspectives on Navajo Language and Learning: Voices of the Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Marlena

    2012-01-01

    To determine if Navajo language classes made a difference in students' lives, thirty Navajo language and culture students were selected to be interviewed. The students selected were those who were in the language and culture programs in the elementary, middle and high school. The focus was to find out the students' perspectives on Navajo…

  1. Why Students Do Not Prepare for Math Placement Exams: Student Perspectives. CCRC Research Brief. Number 57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Maggie P.; Bickerstaff, Susan; Hodara, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Drawn from surveys completed by 122 students enrolled in developmental math at four community colleges and from seven student focus groups with a total of 34 developmental math students at those same colleges, this research brief illuminates student experiences with and perspectives on the math assessment and placement process. Findings suggest…

  2. Student perspectives on the value of rural electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Ian

    2015-06-26

    Medical students in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) in Johannesburg have the opportunity to do electives at the end of the first and third years of a four-year graduate-entry medical programme. Upon their return they are required to write a short portfolio report. Over the period 2005 to 2011, 402 students chose to do rural electives. AIM AND SETTING: To understand the value of rural electives from the perspective of medical students in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Wits, as derived from their assessment reports. A review was conducted of 402 elective reports. Common themes were identified through repeated reading of the reports, and then content analysis was undertaken using these themes. Major themes identified were the reasons for choosing a rural facility for the elective, including going to a home community; benefits of the elective, especially in terms of clinical skills and personal growth; relationship issues; the multiple roles of the rural doctor, who is often a role model working in difficult conditions; and the challenges of rural electives. The electives were overwhelmingly positive and affirming experiences for students, who developed clinical skills and also learnt about both themselves and their chosen career.

  3. Student perspectives on the value of rural electives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Couper

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits in Johannesburg have the opportunity to do electives at the end of the first and third years of a four-year graduate-entry medical programme. Upon their return they are required to write a short portfolio report. Over the period 2005 to 2011, 402 students chose to do rural electives.Aim and setting: To understand the value of rural electives from the perspective of medical students in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Wits, as derived from their assessment reports.Methods: A review was conducted of 402 elective reports. Common themes were identified through repeated reading of the reports, and then content analysis was undertaken using these themes.Results: Major themes identified were the reasons for choosing a rural facility for the elective, including going to a home community; benefits of the elective, especially in terms of clinical skills and personal growth; relationship issues; the multiple roles of the rural doctor, who is often a role model working in difficult conditions; and the challenges of rural electives.Conclusion: The electives were overwhelmingly positive and affirming experiences for students, who developed clinical skills and also learnt about both themselves and their chosen career.

  4. College Students' Perspectives on Dating a Person Who Stutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Robert; Mayo, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine college students' perspectives on dating a person who stutters (PWS). One hundred and thirty-two college students responded to a 19-item survey questionnaire. Survey items included questions about participants' familiarity with persons who stutter, family and/or personal history of stuttering, knowledge of…

  5. Students' Perspectives of Urban Middle School Physical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Ben; Coviello, Nicole; DiCesare, Emma; Dyson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and interpret students' perspectives of their experiences in four urban middle school physical education programs. Focus group interviews with 76 students were supported by field notes and researchers' reflective journals. Researchers used constant comparison methods (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) to identify seven…

  6. A Perspective on Student Learning Outcome Assessment at Qatar University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Shaikha Jabor; Abdelmoneim, Ali; Daoud, Khaled; Cherif, Adel; Moukarzel, Dalal

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a unique perspective on the student learning outcome assessment process as adopted and implemented at Qatar University from 2006 to 2012. The progress of the student learning outcome assessment and continuous improvement efforts at the university and the initiatives taken to establish a culture of assessment and evidence-based…

  7. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  8. Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students' Perspectives on Bullying and School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Mary T.; Day, Stefanie J.; Galvan, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Student perspectives reflect school climate. The study examined perspectives among deaf and hard of hearing students in residential and large day schools regarding bullying, and compared these perspectives with those of a national database of hearing students. The participants were 812 deaf and hard of hearing students in 11 U.S. schools. Data…

  9. Student teaching from the perspectives of cooperating teachers and pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Zülküf Altan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate student-teachers’ transition from internship to permanent positions, they are advised to meticulously learn from real experiences of practicum process as it might form their future teaching practices. To help promote the effectiveness of this process, investigating student-teaching from stakeholder perspectives could be enriching. Research on the cooperating teacher has mainly dealt with the perspective of student-teachers; however, this study focuses on student teaching process from the perspective of both cooperating teachers and the pupils in student-teacher’s classes of EFL in a Turkish teaching context. We administered open-ended questionnaires to 21 teachers and 114 pupils and carried out inductive qualitative content analysis to analyze the data. The study elaborates on the cooperating teachers’ and pupils’ perceptions of the student-teachers as well as the impact of their teaching. Results reveal that the arrival of student-teachers was highly welcomed by most of the students and some of the cooperating teachers even though some expectations from student-teachers were not met.

  10. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  11. Perceived value of student participation in the field of aerospace engineering from a student's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langen, van Sven Kevin; Bentum, Mark; Vries, de Rowan; Grootjans, Robert; Grootjans, Roelof; Brethouwer, Martijn F.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of student participation in space projects is well known. New students are needed to supplement the future workforce and both experience and enthusiasm are important factors to join any industry. Students can also offer fresh perspectives to existing problems in any field of engineeri

  12. Perceived value of student participation in the field of aerospace engineering from a student's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Langen, Sven Kevin; Bentum, Marinus Jan; de Vries, Rowan; Grootjans, Robert; Grootjans, Roelof; Brethouwer, Martijn F.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of student participation in space projects is well known. New students are needed to supplement the future workforce and both experience and enthusiasm are important factors to join any industry. Students can also offer fresh perspectives to existing problems in any field of

  13. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university.

  14. The Loyalty Model of Private University Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonnard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates Loyalty Model of Private University Student by using STIKOM London School of Public Relation as a study case. This study examined the model from service quality, college image, price, trust and satisfaction perspective. Thus, the objective of this study is to examine and analyze the effect of service quality, college image, tuition fee, trust and satisfaction towards students’ loyalty; the effect of service quality, college image, price and satisfaction towards trust; and the effect of service quality, college image and price towards satisfaction. This study used survey methodology with causal design. The samples of the study are 320 college students. The gathering of data is conducted by using questionnaire in likert scale. The analysis of the data used a Structural Equation Model (SEM approach. The implication of this study is portraying a full contextual description of loyalty model in private university by giving an integrated and innovated contribution to Student Loyalty Model in private university..

  15. Source Code Plagiarism--A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, M.; Cosma, G.; Yau, J. Y.-K.; Sinclair, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of source code plagiarism by students within the computing disciplines and reports the results of a survey of students in Computing departments in 18 institutions in the U.K. This survey was designed to investigate how well students understand the concept of source code plagiarism and to discover what, if any,…

  16. Encouraging Undergraduate Class Participation: A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nichole S.; Gragg, Marcia N.; Cramer, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate classes typically involve a professor lecturing to 100 or more students. Too often, this results in minimal opportunities for student participation. Positive reinforcement was used to promote student participation (i.e., defined as relevant comments or questions) in a second-year psychology class (N = 97). Class participation was…

  17. International Student Mobility: European and US Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Hans; Ferencz, Irina; Rumbley, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    The most striking trend in international student mobility over the past forty years is the increase in the number of globally circulating students, from approximately 250,000 in 1965, up to an estimated 3.7 million at present (OECD 2011: 320, UNESCO 2006: 34). Perhaps as important as the growing numbers of students is the fact that the traditional…

  18. Source Code Plagiarism--A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, M.; Cosma, G.; Yau, J. Y.-K.; Sinclair, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of source code plagiarism by students within the computing disciplines and reports the results of a survey of students in Computing departments in 18 institutions in the U.K. This survey was designed to investigate how well students understand the concept of source code plagiarism and to discover what, if any,…

  19. Student Success: Institutional and Individual Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines measures of student success, with a focus on how they apply to community colleges. A conceptual framework is presented as a way of facilitating thinking about and accurately grounding discussions of student success. The article closes with an examination of emerging concepts related to the measurement of student success in…

  20. Mature students learning statistics: The activity theory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sue

    1993-09-01

    The concept of approach "stresses relationships between intention, process and outcome within a specified context as described by an individual" (Schmeck, 1988, p. 10). This paper explores the approaches to learning of a group of mature students from the theoretical perspective of activity theory in order to gain an insight into some of the ways statistics is learned. In this framework, learning, regarded as goal-directed behaviour, is analysed by exploring the socio-historical factors relating to students' self regulation of their cognitive activities. The material is derived from questionnaires and interviews with five students, and focuses on the students' own interpretations of the contexts affecting their approaches.

  1. ISLAMIC SCHOOLS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN INDONESIA: A Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihani R.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study explores how students of two different Islamic Senior Secondary Schools in Palangkaraya, Indonesia experience school practices in regards to social justice. Employing a qualitative approach, the researcher conducted ethnographic observations of the schools’ practices and events, and interviewed more than fifty students of the two schools individually and in groups to understand their feelings and perspectives about how the schools promote social justice among them. The findings suggest that several school structures including the subject stream selection, student groupings, the emergence of the model or international classroom were found to have been sources for social injustice. Students of the Social Sciences and Language groups, of low academic performance and economically disadvantaged admitted the feeling of unfair treatment because of this structuration. Confirming the theory of social reproduction, the schools failed to provide distributive, cultural and associational justices, and reasserted further inequalities among members of society.[Artikel ini menjelaskan bagaimana siswa pada dua Sekolah Menengah Atas di Palangkaraya, Indonesia merasakan praktek pendidikan di sekolah mereka, khususnya terkait dengan masalah keadilan sosial. Melalui studi kualitatif, penulis melakukan observasi etnografis terhadap praktek pendidikan dan kegiatan sekolah serta melakukan wawancara dengan lebih dari lima puluh orang siswa, baik secara individual maupun dalam kelompok, untuk mengetahui pandangan mereka mengenai bagaimana sekolah mereka mendorong pelaksanaan prinsip keadilan sosial. Artikel ini menemukan bahwa struktur pendidikan di sekolah tersebut, seperti pengelompokan kelas berdasarkan konsentrasi jurusan, pola keberkelompokan siswa, dan munculnya kelas-kelas internasional, menyebabkan ketidakadilan sosial di dalam institusi pendidikan. Siswa kelas Ilmu Sosial dan Bahasa cenderung minim dalam pencapaian akademik, dan secara ekonomi

  2. Role of a medical student: patient perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Owen, Stephanie; Green, John

    2017-08-01

    Medical students form an important part of the medical team; however, patients may not be fully aware of their role. Identifying students in the clinical setting is difficult because of their similar attire to other health care professionals. This parity may introduce unethical scenarios where patients may be speaking and consenting to individuals whom they do not recognise as students. A single-sided questionnaire was given to hospital in-patients during a 12-week period. Questions focused on the role of students. With their opinions, patients were given a list of clinical skills and asked whether or not they would allow a student to carry out these skills on themselves. The list included both required and non-required clinical skills by the General Medical Council (GMC). In total, 101 patients participated in the study: 34 males and 67 females. Age at admittance was 63.4 ± 18.0 years; 74.3 per cent of patients were able to identify a student, although 87.1 per cent believed that students should have a designated uniform. Patients were significantly more likely to allow a student to perform required skills on them, as opposed to non-required skills (p < 0.0001); however, previous contact with a medical student made no difference in the likelihood of consenting to a skill being performed. Identifying students in the clinical setting is difficult CONCLUSIONS: The apparent trade-off between patient safety and providing students with learning opportunities has been of long standing concern. Patients consider GMC-required skills as largely appropriate; however, patients feel that students should be more identifiable, and increasing the awareness of the role and capabilities of a student in patient care is important. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  3. Designing informal learning spaces using student perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew David Riddle; Kay Souter

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the design of informal learning spaces at an Australian university that support students in the generation of knowledge. Recent learning space design projects at La Trobe have been informed by a number of pre-existing projects, including a small research project on student use of technologies, a national project on learning space design, and a significant curriculum renewal process at the university. It demonstrates the ways in which evidence based on student perspectiv...

  4. Motivation for math in rural schools: student and teacher perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardré, Patricia L.

    2011-06-01

    Rural schools, students, teachers, administrators, families and community leaders face unique challenges from those of their urban and suburban counterparts. This paper investigates motivation in rural secondary schools, with a particular focus on mathematics, from teacher and student perspectives. It integrates recent research on math learning and motivation from the fields of educational psychology, human neuroscience and rural education, to present an integrated systemic view of motivation for learning math in rural schools.

  5. Deaf college students' perspectives on literacy portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    The study examined how literacy portfolios were used as tools in a college developmental English class in which deaf students assessed their reading comprehension as well as their writing processes and products. The students' reading and writing assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Immediate feedback was provided. The study was multidimensional, longitudinal, and ongoing. A variety of field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences of portfolios in regard to students' reading, writing, and reflective thinking. The results support the idea that the use of literacy portfolios can positively influence students who are deaf when they assess their reading and writing abilities.

  6. The student perspective of psychology practica training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Steven M

    2006-05-01

    Providing practicum training to graduate students is a valued activity of many mental health settings. Practica are also crucial to the training and socialization of future mental health practitioners. This research surveyed 321 doctoral psychology students about expectations of their practicum training sites versus what they actually received in fundamental domains including supervision, client contact, assessment, and research. While the majority of students reported receiving what they expected, a large minority did not; students also indicated that they were quite hesitant to provide feedback about shortfalls in training. Implications and recommendations for administrators of mental heath settings are presented.

  7. Methods and Ways of College Students' Participation in Student Affairs Management from the Perspective of Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺妍

    2013-01-01

    The view of dialogue is a philosophical world view based on the interaction agents. When we instruct col ege students' participation in student affairs management, we should identify the students’statuses and roles as the main bodies of management. From the perspective of dialogue, the construction of organizations, institution guarantee and project activities should be taken into consideration when col ege students participate in student affairs management.

  8. Academic Perspectives on the Outcomes of Outward Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Kath

    2015-01-01

    This research project was commissioned by the UK Higher Education International Unit (IU) and the Higher Education Academy (HEA) in June 2014 to explore academic perspectives on the outcomes of outward mobility at undergraduate, postgraduate and research levels for UK domiciled students, and to consider how best to facilitate the take up as well…

  9. Primary Student Teachers' Perspectives of the Teaching of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas Basturk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary student teachers' perspectives of the teaching of fractions, i.e. their PCK of fractions. The research design used for the study was a descriptive survey method. As data collection instrument, we conducted a questionnaire composing of 14 open and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was…

  10. Engagement with Electronic Portfolios: Challenges from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, David; Light, Tracy Penny; Fleming, Kele; Haywood, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Much of the evidence and research available on the use of e-portfolios focuses on faculty and institutional perspectives and/or consists mainly of anecdotes about how useful the e-portfolio has been to learners. While it is generally agreed that e­-portfolios have great potential to engage students and promote deep learning, the research that has…

  11. Health Rights in Secondary Schools: Student and Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anne B.; Gaffney, Michael; Nairn, Karen

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the perspectives of secondary school students and staff about the extent to which young people's health rights are catered for at school. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the concept of Health-Promoting Schools encourage the provision of healthy school environments. A postal survey of secondary…

  12. The Hybrid Advantage: Graduate Student Perspectives of Hybrid Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah; Villareal, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid courses combine online and face-to-face learning environments. To organize and teach hybrid courses, instructors must understand the uses of multiple online learning tools and face-toface classroom activities to promote and monitor the progress of students. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the perspectives of…

  13. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  14. Culturally Competent Counseling Psychology Students: Developmental Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Monique L.; Bronson, M. Kristine

    Four steps are critical in developing cultural competence in students: (1) a supportive training program; (2) a significant number or "critical mass" of culturally diverse students and allies; (3) opportunities to learn about diversity; and (4) development of racial identity. An appreciation of cultural diversity lies at the heart of any…

  15. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  16. Accepting the Utopian Challenge: A Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Breanna R.

    2013-01-01

    The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) allows institutions to achieve the goals required for student learning and success. The purpose of this paper is to address recommendations for the implementation of SoTL that should have relevant input from students. These include, but are not limited to, better communication, evaluation, continuing…

  17. Client Contact versus Paperwork: A Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Surveys master's level rehabilitation counseling students and examines percentage of time students spend involved in client contact and paperwork during their internship. Time spent in client contact was nearly double that spent doing paperwork for this group. Data from a number of settings are discussed. (Author)

  18. Students' Perspectives on LGBTQ-Inclusive Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Shannon D.; Burdge, Hilary; Licona, Adela C.; Moody, Raymond L.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Implementing curriculum that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) people has the potential to create an equitable learning environment. In order to learn more about students' experiences of LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum, 26 high school students with diverse racial/ethnic, sexual, and gender identities…

  19. Student Politics. Perspectives for the Eighties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbach, Philip G., Ed.

    The status of student political activism in the 1970s and 1980s in such nations as the United States, Britain, India, Japan, Italy, Canada, West Germany, Greece, Zambia and Latin America is examined. The volume consists of 13 chapters written by scholars who all agree that student activism is not now at peak levels of the 1960s, yet student…

  20. Students' Perspectives of an EAP Pathway Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooey, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of overseas students are applying to study at universities in Australia. Many students who meet all of the university's academic entry requirements except English language proficiency are offered pathway programs which prepare them for their tertiary studies. To date, much of the research relating to international students…

  1. Curriculum in Practice; The Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David D.; Peterson, Gary

    This paper introduces a research series recently initiated to begin to describe and interpret curriculum as practiced and experienced at the classroom and individual student levels. Curriculum is defined as whatever a student learns. A multi-year series of studies is planned to combine naturalistic and survey methods to generate theories about how…

  2. International Student Perspectives on Graduate Advising Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Choi, Chun-Chung; Zhang, Yanmei; Ye, Huan Jacqueline; Nesic, Aleksandra; Bigler, Monica; Anderson, Debra; Villegas, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    International graduate students experience a number of unique challenges as they transition through their training programs. Surprisingly, relatively little research has been conducted on perhaps one of the most crucial predictors of international students' retention and success within their graduate programs: the advising relationship. Using a…

  3. Primary care career advice: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddams, Jessica; Miller, Kathryn; Rushforth, Bruno

    2012-04-01

    In the UK, undergraduate curricula have evolved to include a greater proportion of community-based teaching. However, for most students it still remains predominantly a hospital-based training experience. With 50 per cent of all medical graduates in the UK now expected to work in the community, students need to be fully informed about career pathways and opportunities within primary care. A key driver for curriculum change in the UK has been the General Medical Council's guidance in Tomorrow's Doctors, which advocates experience in a variety of health care settings together with career advice at undergraduate level. However, the existing career guidance provision may be inadequate for the current needs of students. We explore what students are doing to combat the lack of primary care focused career guidance: from taking a year out to intercalate in primary care to setting up and running student-led primary care groups. We report on a new UK venture that we hope to launch in consultation with national primary care bodies to provide support and guidance for students considering a career in primary care. Primary care-focused career advice should be incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum. Student-led primary care groups can offer an alternative source of support and guidance. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  4. Mentoring in biomedical science graduate programs: a student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockter, J L

    1998-10-01

    The traditional model for the mentoring of graduate students has been for the student to receive all formal mentoring from the thesis advisor, the laboratory principal investigator (PI). While this continues to be a successful model for some students, other students find that they need or desire additional mentors during their graduate career. Graduate programs have a responsibility to provide their students with increased mentoring opportunities. Three means that graduate programs could use to serve the diverse needs of students are discussed as well as the potential benefits to the program and the students.

  5. Dental students' personality: a Jungian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, S L; Cain, M J; Mahan, J M

    1982-11-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was employed to measure the nature and strength of dental students' various basic preference in perceiving and making judgments. The MBTI yields four sets of scores--extrovert-introvert (E-l), sensing-intuitive (S-N), thinking-feeling (T-F), and judging-perceptive (J-P)--and represents 16 personality types that define these preferences. The sample consisted of five classes at the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry (n = 217). The data indicated that the largest group (32 students) was ESFJ, while the next largest (30) was ESTJ. The least frequently represented groups were the INTP (3), the INFP (7), the INTP (7), and the ENTP (7). Dental students exhibited characteristics different from those of students in business, engineering, social work, medicine, and other fields. These findings have implications for admissions committee decisions as well as for the organization and curriculum of the dental school.

  6. Student perspectives on rubric-referenced assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Andrade

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests that students use rubrics to support their own learning and academic..performance. In focus groups, fourteen undergraduate students discussed the ways in which..they used rubrics to plan an approach to an assignment, check their work, and guide or reflect..on feedback from others. The students said that using rubrics helped them focus their efforts,..produce work of higher quality, earn a better grade, and feel less anxious about an..assignment. Their comments also revealed that most of the students tend not to read a rubric..in its entirety, and that some may perceive of a rubric as a tool for satisfying a particular..teacher's demands rather than as a representation of the criteria and standards of a discipline.

  7. Engagement with Electronic Portfolios: Challenges from the Student Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    David Tosh; Tracy Penny Light; Kele Fleming; Jeff Haywood

    2005-01-01

    Much of the evidence and research available on the use of e-portfolios focuses on faculty and institutional perspectives and/or consists mainly of anecdotes about how useful the e-portfolio has been to learners. While it is generally agreed that e-portfolios have great potential to engage students and promote deep learning, the research that has been conducted to date focuses very little on student perceptions of value of the e-portfolio for their learning. If students do not accept the e-por...

  8. Accepting the Utopian Challenge: A Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenna R. Carman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL allows institutions to achieve the goals required for student learning and success. The purpose of this paper is to address recommendations for the implementation of SoTL that should have relevant input from students. These include, but are not limited to, better communication, evaluation, continuing education, and learning networks. With the proper implementation of these recommendations, professors can effectively teach the next generation of leaders.

  9. Smile esthetics from odontology students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España, Pilar; Tarazona, Beatriz; Paredes, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    To analyze the perception of smile esthetics and its alterations in dental degree students; to determine whether there are differences in that perception among students in different study years on those courses and between genders; and to determine if the circumstance of having received prior orthodontic treatment could influence that perception. Students (n = 192) in different study years of the dental degree course at the University of Valencia, Spain, analyzed two photographs of a patient in which, by means of computer software, midline diastema, upper and lower midlines, crown length of the maxillary right central incisor, occlusal cant, and "gummy" smile were altered. Students assessed the photographs on a scale from 1 to 10. Statistical analyses for assessing each group's level of perception were carried out. After checking the validity of the study, it was observed that the students' ability to detect alterations in smile esthetics did not improve over their degree courses, given that the differences do not present a linear development. There were no differences between genders and between those who had or had not undergone an orthodontic treatment. There are no statistically significant differences between the results of students in different study years or between genders. The circumstance of having undergone prior orthodontic treatment is not a determining factor in the ability to perceive such anomalies.

  10. Experiential Learning in Kinesiology: A Student Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Mary; Alexander, Kisha; Culp, Brian; Keith, NiCole

    2015-09-01

    Service learning is a form of experiential learning that pairs academic educational experiences and community organizations to promote training, civic engagement, and meaningful service by students to their community. Kinesiology programs have moved toward increasing experiential and service learning options in health promotion for their students, but few have evaluated the student perceptions of these programs. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of a service learning course for Kinesiology majors located in a low-income urban area. Ten recent graduates of a department of Kinesiology were enrolled in focus groups, stratified by gender, facilitated by a graduate research assistant not affiliated with their school. Focus group discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed for themes. Nine themes were identified including: (1) Personal and professional experience, (2) decision to participate, (3) location decision, (4) self-efficacy, (5) perceptions of program members, (6) social interaction, (7) personal and program communication, (8) physical facilities and (9) program outcomes. Students positively evaluated the learning experience as valuable to their personal and professional development; noted changes in their perceptions of low-income communities and increases to self-efficacy and skill acquisition from the beginning to the end of the course; and observed significant needs and improvements in physical, emotional and social outcomes of community members. This study demonstrated multiple and varied benefits of a service learning program for Kinesiology students. On-going evaluation of service learning programs in health promotion is needed to enhance student and community outcomes.

  11. Status and perspectives of nanoscale device modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macucci, M.; Lannaccone, G.; Greer, J.;

    2001-01-01

    and the future perspectives of nanoscale device modelling. The outcome of such a discussion is summarized in the present paper, outlining the major challenges for the future, such as the integration of nonequilibrium phenomena and of molecular scale properties. We believe that modelling has a growing importance...

  12. Medical student perspectives on geriatrics and geriatric education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Anita S; Tiberius, Richard

    2010-10-01

    To ascertain medical students' perspectives on geriatrics. Interpretative phenomenological analysis. An allopathic, Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited, former Donald W. Reynolds Foundation grant recipient, U.S. medical school. Thirty fourth-year medical students who completed geriatric educational activities in all 4 years of medical school. Two researchers independently reviewed verbatim transcripts from five focus groups and identified themes using the constant comparative method. Seventeen themes that elaborate on students' perspectives on geriatrics were identified. Students reported not feeling appropriately engaged in geriatrics, despaired at the futility of care, were depressed by the decline and death of their patients, were frustrated by low reimbursement rates and low prestige despite fellowship training, were concerned about patients' unrealistic expectations and opportunities for litigation, felt unsure how to handle ethical dilemmas, and found communicating with older adults to be enjoyable but time consuming and challenging. They felt they had too much exposure to geriatrics in medical school. Current attitude scales fail to capture some of the dimensions uncovered in this study, whereas students did not mention other dimensions commonly included in attitude scales. Regarding curriculum development, students may find an integrated preclinical geriatric curriculum to be more relevant to their careers than a stand-alone curriculum. Clinical clerkships might be in a better position to emphasize the positive aspects of geriatrics and develop strategies to address students' negative attitudes. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Examining the Influence of Selected Factors on Perceived Co-Op Work-Term Quality from a Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewery, David; Nevison, Colleen; Pretti, T. Judene; Cormier, Lauren; Barclay, Sage; Pennaforte, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    This study discusses and tests a conceptual model of co-op work-term quality from a student perspective. Drawing from an earlier exploration of co-op students' perceptions of work-term quality, variables related to role characteristics, interpersonal dynamics, and organizational elements were used in a multiple linear regression analysis to…

  14. Making Meaning of Student Activism: Student Activist and Administrator Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Laura M.; Mather, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    College campuses have experienced a recent resurgence of student activism, particularly in response to some of President Donald Trump's executive orders as well as controversial speakers like Ann Coulter and Milo Yiannopoulous. Student activism presents both challenges and opportunities for higher education leaders seeking to engage productively…

  15. Student Research Projects Inhibiting Factors from the Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Nikrooz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Identifying the research barriers and assess the ability of students to use the university services and facilities is crucial to promote research activities. Present study was carried out to determine the inhibiting factors influencing the student's research projects from the view point of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences students in 2008. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 96 students of Yasuj Medical University were selected by stratified random sampling. The data were collected by validate & reliable questionnaire, containing demographic information, inhibiting factors related to students (personal and organization. The data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean scores against the personal barriers and the organizational barriers questions were 43.23±12.96 and 62.58±12.08 respectively. There was a significant difference between personal and organizational barriers (P<0.001 and personal barriers were more important. According to the results, the student's inadequate skills & knowledge of research methodology and lack of awareness of research topics were the most prevalent personal barriers. The most prevalent organizational barriers were unavailability of research consulters, inadequate research skills of consulter, insufficient facilities & equipment and lack of motivating staff & faculties. Other variables such as gender, subject of study and research experience are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: This study showed that the personal barriers were more important than organizational barriers which interfere with the student's research projects. This can be corrected and controlled by teachers, faculty members, university officials and students, themselves.

  16. Enticing Students to Careers in Gerontology: Faculty and Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Recognition of the increasing demand for gerontologically trained social work professionals prompted an investigation of the factors that attract undergraduate students to a career of working with older adults. Faculty (n = 10) and students (n = 10) from the disciplines of social work, nursing, consumer and family sciences, psychology, recreation,…

  17. Automatic Student Plagiarism Detection: Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgovoy, Maxim; Kakkonen, Tuomo; Cosma, Georgina

    2010-01-01

    The availability and use of computers in teaching has seen an increase in the rate of plagiarism among students because of the wide availability of electronic texts online. While computer tools that have appeared in recent years are capable of detecting simple forms of plagiarism, such as copy-paste, a number of recent research studies devoted to…

  18. University Students' Perspective of Sexual Harassment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was a problem at UNZA and female students were more likely to be ... form of social control by men to 'keep women in. 1 ... project on Status and Education of Women of the. Association of ..... Pryor, J.B., DeSouza, Fitness, J (1997). Gender.

  19. Deaf College Students' Perspectives on Literacy Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Jane Freiburg

    2003-01-01

    This study examined use of literacy portfolios in a college developmental English class in which students who are deaf assessed their reading comprehension, writing processes, and products. Assignments involved reflective thinking and were grounded in authentic tasks. Various field research techniques were used to ascertain the uses and influences…

  20. Another Perspective: Teaching Music to Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In an increasingly connected world, our students are listening to and making music outside the school context. As music educators, we need to better understand the media they use and incorporate this technology in our daily teaching to enhance music literacy in our classrooms.

  1. Are Students Customers? TQM and Marketing Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Lynne; Brennan, Ross

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to evaluate the arguments for and against the proposition that students in higher education are "customers" and should be treated as such. Design/methodology/approach: A critical review of the relevant literature from the domains of total quality management and marketing. Findings: The debate is polarised, with advocates…

  2. Student-Centred Learning: A Humanist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangney, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The notion of student-centred learning is often not defined; within the pedagogic literature it is generally associated with constructivism or principles associated with a constructivist environment such as building on prior knowledge, purposeful active learning and sense-making. An informal enquiry into conceptions of university staff prior to…

  3. Are Students Customers? TQM and Marketing Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Lynne; Brennan, Ross

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to evaluate the arguments for and against the proposition that students in higher education are "customers" and should be treated as such. Design/methodology/approach: A critical review of the relevant literature from the domains of total quality management and marketing. Findings: The debate is polarised, with advocates…

  4. Another Perspective: Teaching Music to Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In an increasingly connected world, our students are listening to and making music outside the school context. As music educators, we need to better understand the media they use and incorporate this technology in our daily teaching to enhance music literacy in our classrooms.

  5. Automatic Student Plagiarism Detection: Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgovoy, Maxim; Kakkonen, Tuomo; Cosma, Georgina

    2010-01-01

    The availability and use of computers in teaching has seen an increase in the rate of plagiarism among students because of the wide availability of electronic texts online. While computer tools that have appeared in recent years are capable of detecting simple forms of plagiarism, such as copy-paste, a number of recent research studies devoted to…

  6. Land-surface modelling in hydrological perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Rosbjerg, Dan; Butts, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the different types of energy-based land-surface models (LSMs) and discuss some of the new possibilities that will arise when energy-based LSMs are combined with distributed hydrological modelling. We choose to focus on energy-based approaches, ......, and the difficulties inherent in various evaluation procedures are presented. Finally, the dynamic coupling of hydrological and atmospheric models is explored, and the perspectives of such efforts are discussed....

  7. Land-surface modelling in hydrological perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Rosbjerg, Dan; Butts, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the different types of energy-based land-surface models (LSMs) and discuss some of the new possibilities that will arise when energy-based LSMs are combined with distributed hydrological modelling. We choose to focus on energy-based approaches......, and the difficulties inherent in various evaluation procedures are presented. Finally, the dynamic coupling of hydrological and atmospheric models is explored, and the perspectives of such efforts are discussed....

  8. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quince T

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Thelma Quince, Pia Thiemann, John Benson, Sarah Hyde Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients’ satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy – Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have

  9. Cyberbullying 101: A Student Affairs Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    McKillop, Elizabeth D'Arcy

    2014-01-01

    Bullying and its negative effects within the K-12 educational sector are thoroughly researched problems. However, there is a relative lack of research on bullying and its most recent incarnation, cyberbullying, within United States higher education. The studies that do exist indicate that college-level cyberbullying is a problem on some U.S. campuses. The goal of my study was to explore the experiences of student affairs administrators in implementing policies and practices used to address c...

  10. Undergraduate medical students' empathy: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quince, Thelma; Thiemann, Pia; Benson, John; Hyde, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is important to patient care. It enhances patients' satisfaction, comfort, self-efficacy, and trust which in turn may facilitate better diagnosis, shared decision making, and therapy adherence. Empathetic doctors experience greater job satisfaction and psychological well-being. Understanding the development of empathy of tomorrow's health care professionals is important. However, clinical empathy is poorly defined and difficult to measure, while ways to enhance it remain unclear. This review examines empathy among undergraduate medical students, focusing upon three main questions: How is empathy measured? This section discusses the problems of assessing empathy and outlines the utility of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Student Version and Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Both have been used widely to assess medical students' empathy. Does empathy change during undergraduate medical education? The trajectory of empathy during undergraduate medical education has been and continues to be debated. Potential reasons for contrasting results of studies are outlined. What factors may influence the development of empathy? Although the influence of sex is widely recognized, the impact of culture, psychological well-being, and aspects of undergraduate curricula are less well understood. This review identifies three interrelated issues for future research into undergraduate medical students' empathy. First, the need for greater clarity of definition, recognizing that empathy is multidimensional. Second, the need to develop meaningful ways of measuring empathy which include its component dimensions and which are relevant to patients' experiences. Medical education research has generally relied upon single, self-report instruments, which have utility across large populations but are limited. Finally, there is a need for greater methodological rigor in investigating the possible determinants of clinical empathy in medical education. Greater specificity of context

  11. Sexual behaviour among Ugandan university students: A gender perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mehra, Devika

    2013-01-01

    Feminisation of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa is an important public health concern. Therefore, it is crucial that we understand the various risk factors that shape unsafe sexual behaviours among young people in Uganda. The overall aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of the various factors that have an association with risky sexual behaviours among Ugandan university students, focusing on a gender perspective. This knowledge can contribute to effective policy f...

  12. A perspective on modeling and simulation of complex dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, K. J.

    2011-09-01

    There has been an amazing development of modeling and simulation from its beginning in the 1920s, when the technology was available only at a handful of University groups who had access to a mechanical differential analyzer. Today, tools for modeling and simulation are available for every student and engineer. This paper gives a perspective on the development with particular emphasis on technology and paradigm shifts. Modeling is increasingly important for design and operation of complex natural and man-made systems. Because of the increased use of model based control such as Kalman filters and model predictive control, models are also appearing as components of feedback systems. Modeling and simulation are multidisciplinary, it is used in a wide variety of fields and their development have been strongly influenced by mathematics, numerics, computer science and computer technology.

  13. Considering Reflection From the Student Perspective in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arch Chee Keen Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of a project to reexamine reflection from the student perspective that took place after a major curriculum revision. The project used a hermeneutically inspired action research method that involved interviewing 17 undergraduate theology students after a two-semester practicum to ascertain the ways in which students understand and use reflection in practice and as a means of establishing identity. The data revealed key themes that surround students’ understanding of reflection: (a Students think and write about reflection in detached ways, (b there is a connection between reflection and self-understanding and self-definition, and (c crisis plays a role in reflection. The article concludes with further discussions of these themes and with recommendations for pedagogical practice.

  14. Alleviating Mathematics Anxiety of Elementary School Students: A Situated Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of the situated learning and effortful control on mathematics anxiety of school students. Participants were 99 seventh graders who studied in two schools. Students in one of these were given instruction through the situated learning model, and the students of other school were treated as a control group.…

  15. Enhancing student perspectives of humanism in medicine: reflections from the Kalaupapa service learning project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Winona K; Harris, Chessa C D; Mortensen, Kawika A; Long, Linsey M; Sugimoto-Matsuda, Jeanelle

    2016-05-09

    Service learning is endorsed by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) as an integral part of U.S. medical school curricula for future physicians. Service learning has been shown to help physicians in training rediscover the altruistic reasons for pursuing medicine and has the potential to enhance students' perspectives of humanism in medicine. The Kalaupapa service learning project is a unique collaboration between disadvantaged post-baccalaureate students with an underserved rural community. This study was conducted to determine whether the Kalaupapa service learning curricula enhanced student perspectives of humanism in medicine at an early stage of their medical training. Program participants between 2008 and 2014 (n = 41) completed written reflections following the conclusion of the service learning project. Four prompts guided student responses. Reflections were thematically analyzed. Once all essays were read, team members compared their findings to condense or expand themes and assess levels of agreement. Emerging themes of resilience and unity were prominent throughout the student reflections. Students expressed respect and empathy for the patients' struggles and strengths, as well as those of their peers. The experience also reinforced students' commitment to service, particularly to populations in rural and underserved communities. Students also gained a deeper understanding of the patient experience and also of themselves as future physicians. To identify and address underserved and rural patients' health care needs, training programs must prepare an altruistic health care workforce that embraces the humanistic element of medicine. The Kalaupapa service learning project is a potential curricular model that can be used to enhance students' awareness and perspectives of humanism in medicine.

  16. Relationships with undergraduate nursing exchange students--a tutor perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2003-03-01

    Student exchange has been used increasingly in nursing education throughout Europe as a method of learning intercultural sensitivity. In the host country, each foreign student is assigned a personal tutor to enhance learning. The aim of this study was to describe tutor-student relationships between Finnish nurse teachers and British exchange students from the tutors' perspective. The researcher's close relationship with the study context and participants caused some ethical concerns, which will be discussed. The data consisted of tutorial session observations, research diary notes, group interviews and background questionnaires. They were analysed using Spradley's developmental research sequence method for ethnographic data. The tutoring relationship was pastoral and clinical rather than academic. The pastoral aspect of the relationship was essential in assisting the students to adjust to the stress of studying in a foreign country. On the other hand, tutors were unable to support all the students to overcome their culture shock. Tutors were uncertain about their role and did not integrate Finnish culture or practice into theory, but found their role pleasant. A dialogic tutor-student relationship is important for learning intercultural sensitivity. Tutoring strategies should be developed to assist students' adjustment to the differences in the host culture and to encourage their reflection on personal, experiential and scientific cultural knowledge during their study abroad.

  17. TA Professional Development: A Graduate Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea-Munoz, Emily

    Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are essential for teaching large introductory physics classes. In such courses, undergraduates spend approximately half of their in-class contact time in instructional environments (e.g., labs and recitations) supervised by GTAs, which means GTAs can have a large impact on student learning. Therefore it is crucial to adequately prepare GTAs before they first enter the classroom, and to offer them continued support throughout. Since many of the skills required to become effective teachers will also be relevant to their future research careers, it is useful for a GTA preparation program to also include professional development strategies. But what exactly do GTAs get out of these programs? The School of Physics at Georgia Tech runs a preparation and mentoring program for GTAs that focuses on pedagogical knowledge, physics content, and professional development, as well as their intersections. Nearly seventy graduate students have gone through this program in the three years since it was established. Here we discuss the impact this program has had on our GTAs, from their own point of view: the program's effect on their teaching abilities, how it has influenced their attitudes towards teaching, what elements they have found useful, and what changes they have suggested to its curriculum. We find that, in general, GTAs are more receptive when the curriculum is more hands-on and they are presented with frequent opportunities for practice and feedback.

  18. Perspectives on modeling in cognitive science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffrin, Richard M

    2010-10-01

    This commentary gives a personal perspective on modeling and modeling developments in cognitive science, starting in the 1950s, but focusing on the author's personal views of modeling since training in the late 1960s, and particularly focusing on advances since the official founding of the Cognitive Science Society. The range and variety of modeling approaches in use today are remarkable, and for many, bewildering. Yet to come to anything approaching adequate insights into the infinitely complex fields of mind, brain, and intelligent systems, an extremely wide array of modeling approaches is vital and necessary.

  19. Nurse faculty members’ communication skills: From student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Keçeci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This research was conducted to evaluate nurse faculty members’ communication skills from students’ perspective in a nursing department of health school. Method: Descriptive research design included 167 students, and the research sample was 114 students with a response rate of 68%. A questionnaire included several socio-demographic characteristics and Çetinkanat (1998’s Teacher Communication Skills Scale (T.C.S.S, which has five sub-dimensions namely empathy, transparency, equality, efficiency and sufficiency. In its first use of this scale, the internal consistency was 0.81 whereas it is 0. 93 in this study. Findings and conclusion: The results of this study reveal that students evaluate nurse faculty members more on sufficiency and less on efficiency dimensions. Besides, statistically significant differences were determined among faculty members’ communication skills in terms of students’ class membership and gender. Female students and third year students have more positive and constructive evaluations than male and last year students do. It is suggested that carried out courses of measurement and evaluation methods for developing effectiveness dimension. In addition, it is suggested that are investigated in huge nursing student population about this subject.

  20. Nurse faculty members’ communication skills: From student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Keçeci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to evaluate nurse faculty members’ communication skills from students’ perspective in a nursing department of health school. Descriptive research design included 167 students, and the research sample was 114 students with a response rate of 68%. A questionnaire included several socio-demographic characteristics and Çetinkanat (1998’s Teacher Communication Skills Scale (T.C.S.S, which has five sub-dimensions namely empathy, transparency, equality, efficiency and sufficiency. In its first use of this scale the internal consistency was 0, 81 whereas it is 0, 93 in this study. The results of this study reveal that students evaluate nurse faculty members more on sufficiency and less on efficiency dimensions. Besides, statistically significant differences were determined among faculty members’ communication skills in terms of students’ class membership and gender. Female students and third year students have more positive and constructive evaluations than male and last year students. It is suggested that carried out courses of measurement and evaluation methods for devoloping effectiveness dimension. Also ıt is suggested that are investigated in huge nursing student population about this subject.

  1. Time Perspectives and Boredom Coping Strategies of Undergraduate Students from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay; Coskun, Hamit

    2015-01-01

    Using person-centered and variable-centered analyses, this study examined the relationships between undergraduate students' time perspectives and boredom coping strategies. A total of 719 undergraduate students voluntarily participated in the study. Results of the study showed that undergraduate students' time perspectives can be reliably defined…

  2. Student Perspectives on Intercultural Learning from an Online Teacher Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on intercultural learning during telecollaboration from the perspective of student participants in a five-country online teacher education partnership. The student perspectives reported here were drawn from one intact class in the partnership, five students who completed this partnership as part of a sociolinguistics course in a…

  3. Occupational therapy students' perspectives regarding international cross-cultural experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Tamera Keiter; Burket, Allison; Deveney, Rebecca; Kennedy, Katelyn

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspectives of occupational therapy students who have engaged in international, cross-cultural learning and service experiences. This study utilized a qualitative, phenomenological design. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with students who engaged in international learning opportunities. The interviews were coded and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis approach. Three central themes emerged from the data analysis. Connectedness is the process of forming relationships with others while engaging in cross-cultural experiences. Students formed relationships with faculty, other students, and people within the community. Cultural awareness is the recognition and understanding of a different culture and responding to those differences. Students attempted to understand the new culture in comparison to their own lived experiences. Complexity portrays cross-cultural opportunities as dynamic, multi-faceted and intricate. This was demonstrated as the students raised additional questions about the conflict between their own culture and the new culture they entered. Students also identified limited orientation, support and structure with such experiences and the conflicting roles between volunteer, student, and team member. The ability to connect with others when building relationships in diverse cultural contexts held meaning for the students; however, the students also expressed conflict in trying to make sense of the new culture as it often challenged personal beliefs and constructs. The complexity and challenges of engaging in these opportunities needs to be recognized and further explored to assess how curricula and faculty best supports culturally responsive care. © 2011 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Student nurse mentoring: an evaluative study of the mentor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylance, Rebecca; Barrett, Julie; Sixsmith, Pam; Ward, Donna

    2017-04-13

    An evaluative study aimed to capture the 'mentor voice' and provide an insight into the mentoring role from the perspective of the nurse mentor. Participants from each of the four fields of nursing practice were asked to comment on the satisfying and frustrating aspects of their mentoring role. The narrative data gleaned from the evaluation were qualitatively analysed and subsequently organised into key themes around the student-mentor relationship and the clinical environment. Given that the landscape of nurse education is set to change, in terms of new standards from the professional bodies and the political drivers, not to mention the changing profile of the student nurse, it is hoped that the findings may help to shape the relationship between the mentor, the student and the higher education institution.

  5. Future of mental health occupational therapy: student perspective and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Sarah; Bunger, Theresa; Courchesne, Kim; Smith, Katie A; Willoughby, M Marie

    2007-01-01

    Occupational therapy has been gradually slipping away from its foundation in mental health practice. In order to provide the best services to individuals with mental health disorders, the occupational therapy profession must maintain and expand its involvement in this area of practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the threats and opportunities to promote education and practice in mental health from a student perspective. The authors reviewed the literature, distributed questionnaires, and conducted focus groups with occupational therapy students at a southeastern university. Based on findings in the literature and of the focus groups with students, the authors have drawn a list of suggestions to improve the visibility of occupational therapy in mental health care. These suggestions are for occupational therapy educational programs, mental health practitioners, AOTA, and state associations.

  6. Using Perspective to Model Complex Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsey, R.L.; Bisset, K.R.

    1999-04-04

    The notion of perspective, when supported in an object-based knowledge representation, can facilitate better abstractions of reality for modeling and simulation. The object modeling of complex physical and chemical processes is made more difficult in part due to the poor abstractions of state and phase changes available in these models. The notion of perspective can be used to create different views to represent the different states of matter in a process. These techniques can lead to a more understandable model. Additionally, the ability to record the progress of a process from start to finish is problematic. It is desirable to have a historic record of the entire process, not just the end result of the process. A historic record should facilitate backtracking and re-start of a process at different points in time. The same representation structures and techniques can be used to create a sequence of process markers to represent a historic record. By using perspective, the sequence of markers can have multiple and varying views tailored for a particular user's context of interest.

  7. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  8. High school teachers' perspectives on effective approaches for teaching biology to students with special needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Agnieszka

    The demands of national educational reforms require high school biology teachers to provide high quality instruction to students with and without special needs. The reforms, however, do not provide teachers with adequate teaching strategies to meet the needs of all students in the same context. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to understand high school biology teachers' perspectives, practices, and challenges in relation to teaching students with special needs. This approach was used to develop a substantive model for high school biology teachers who are challenged with teaching students with and without special needs. Data were collected via in-depth interviews with 15 high school teachers in a Midwestern school district. The data were analyzed using open coding, axial coding, and selective coding procedures in accordance with the grounded theory approach. Essential model components included skills and training for teachers, classroom management strategies, teaching strategies, and student skills. The emergent substantive theory indicated that that teacher preparation and acquired skills greatly influence the effectiveness of inclusion implementation. Key findings also indicated the importance of using of a variety of instructional strategies and classroom management strategies that address students' special needs and their learning styles. This study contributes to social change by providing a model for teaching students and effectively implementing inclusion in regular science classrooms. Following further study, this model may be used to support teacher professional development and improve teaching practices that in turn may improve science literacy supported by the national educational reforms.

  9. Mathematical modeling a chemical engineer's perspective

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    Rutherford, Aris

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical modeling is the art and craft of building a system of equations that is both sufficiently complex to do justice to physical reality and sufficiently simple to give real insight into the situation. Mathematical Modeling: A Chemical Engineer's Perspective provides an elementary introduction to the craft by one of the century's most distinguished practitioners.Though the book is written from a chemical engineering viewpoint, the principles and pitfalls are common to all mathematical modeling of physical systems. Seventeen of the author's frequently cited papers are reprinted to illus

  10. Preventing a Leak: Two Perspectives on Creating Supportive Environment for Graduate Student Colleagues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lininger, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Debate continues about whether there exists a leaky pipeline for women in STEM fields within academia, as well as the causes of leaks - points in an individual's career where women are more likely than men to choose a non-academic pathway. Statistics on MS and PhD degrees awarded in STEM fields indicate that one of these leaks occurs during and immediately following graduate school. Here, we present two perspectives, that of a full professor and a graduate student, on how to create an environment in which geosciences graduate students can thrive psychologically and professionally. We recognize the challenges faced by many underrepresented groups, but here we focus specifically on gender diversity from the perspective of white women. From the perspective of a faculty advisor overseeing a research group, the goal is to treat each member of the group as an individual and to develop a mentoring relationship that most effectively fosters that individual's development as a scientist, while maintaining a cohesive, collegial group dynamic. Among the recommended ways to achieve this are: maintaining flexibility in the work schedule, with success evaluated by outcomes; consideration of work-life balance; respect for diverse approaches to problem solving; recognition that individuals can be most productive, satisfied, and engaged when their individual contributions are acknowledged and valued; and respect for different choices for a career path and for changes in those choices during graduate studies. From the perspective of a graduate student, it is important that an advisor demonstrates a clear commitment to treating each member of a research group as a valued individual with differing needs. In addition to the recommendations above for achieving a positive and supportive research group, as a graduate student it is useful to have multiple mentors and role models who have had different career tracks and can provide diverse perspectives and advice. Graduate students can also

  11. Where the Rubber Meets the Road: A Principal's Perspective on the Schoolwide Enrichment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nora

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a principal's perspective on how the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) has the power to change a school in amazing ways! The faculty and staff, the parents, and the students will perform beyond expectation when embarking on the SEM's enriched approach to learning and teaching. The model will become the catalyst for producing…

  12. Veterinary Students' Perspectives on Resilience and Resilience-Building Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Jenny E; Bartram, David J

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, resilience has been lauded as a valuable, even necessary, facet of an effective veterinary practitioner. This study describes a mixed-methods research exploration of the impact of a self-care and mental well-being teaching intervention on the self-reported resilience of 105 first-year veterinary students enrolled at the School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, UK. Quantitative data were obtained through a questionnaire, the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC 10), which students completed before and after the teaching intervention. The median total score on the scale increased from 27 (IQR=25-30) to 29 (IQR=26-32) (pveterinary students build greater awareness of resilience, and potentially support their development of a more resilient approach in their personal and professional lives. In this study, veterinary students felt that resilience training was a valuable addition to the veterinary curriculum, and that resilience likely plays an important role in achieving a successful veterinary career. The study also suggested that veterinary students utilize a variety of different resilience-building strategies, including drawing on past experiences, seeking help from support networks, and developing an ability to change their perspectives.

  13. Dietitians' Perspectives on Teaching Nutrition to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Emily; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Ray, Sumantra; Ball, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The provision of nutrition care by health professionals can facilitate improved patient nutrition behaviors. Some education institutions include nutrition in their medical curriculum; however, doctors and medical students continue to lack competence in providing nutrition care. Dietitians are increasingly teaching nutrition to medical students, yet evidence on the topic remains anecdotal. It is important to understand the experiences of these dietitians to support improvements in undergraduate medical nutrition education. The aim of this study was to explore dietitians' perspectives of teaching nutrition to medical students. A qualitative study was conducted in collaboration with the Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme (NNEdPro). Twenty-four dietitians who had provided nutrition education to medical students participated in individual semistructured interviews. Participants were from Australia (n = 5), New Zealand (n = 1), the United States (n = 6), Canada (n = 5), the United Kingdom (n = 5), Germany (n = 1), and Finland (n = 1). Data analysis was conducted using a constant comparative approach to thematic analysis. The dietitians expressed confidence in their ability to teach medical students and believed that they were the most appropriate professionals to administer the education. However, they were not confident that medical students graduate with sufficient nutrition competence and attributed this to poor curriculum planning for nutrition. Dietitians had access to useful resources and tools to support education, with opportunity to contribute further to integration of nutrition throughout medical curricula. This study suggests that dietitians are likely appropriate nutrition teachers in medical education. However, optimizing dietitians' role requires their further involvement in curriculum planning and development. Including dietitians as members of medical faculty would facilitate their input on nutrition throughout the curriculum, which could

  14. Student participation: a democratic education perspective--experience from the health-promoting schools in Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simovska, V

    2004-04-01

    The paper addresses the issue of student participation from the perspective of the health-promoting schools initiative. It draws on experience from the Macedonian Network of Health-Promoting Schools and its collaboration with the Danish as well as other country networks within the European Network of Health-Promoting Schools. Student participation is viewed as one of the main focal points of the conceptual framework and model of a health-promoting school developed within the Macedonian context. This model and the model distinguishing between two different qualities of participation-genuine and token participation-are presented and discussed in the paper. Underpinning values that these models endorse as important for the processes of health promotion in schools include self-determination, participation, democracy, diversity and equity.

  15. Localisation and World Modelling: an Architectural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico G. Sorrenti

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous robot world modelling is a "chicken-and-egg" problem: position estimation needs a model of the world, whereas world modelling needs the robot position. Most of the works dealing with this issue propose holistic solutions under an algorithmic perspective by neglecting software architecture issues. This results in huge and monolithic pieces of software where implementation details reify strategic decisions. An architectural approach founded on separation of concerns may help to break the loop. Localisation and modelling, acting on different time scales, are mostly independent of each other. Sometimes synchronisation is required. Whenever needed, an external strategy tunes the relative rates of the two activities. The paper introduces rationale, design, and implementation of such a system which relies on Real-Time Performers, a software architecture providing suitable architectural abstractions to observe and control the system's temporal behaviour.

  16. A Multilevel Modelling Approach to Investigating Factors Impacting Science Achievement for Secondary School Students: PISA Hong Kong Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Letao; Bradley, Kelly D.; Akers, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized data from the 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment Hong Kong sample to investigate the factors that impact the science achievement of 15-year-old students. A multilevel model was used to examine the factors from both student and school perspectives. At the student level, the results indicated that male students,…

  17. Medical Student Perspectives of Active Learning: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Istas, Kathryn; Bonaminio, Giulia A; Paolo, Anthony M; Fontes, Joseph D; Davis, Nancy; Berardo, Benito A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Medical student perspectives were sought about active learning, including concerns, challenges, perceived advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate role in the educational process. Focus groups were conducted with students from all years and campuses of a large U.S. state medical school. Students had considerable experience with active learning prior to medical school and conveyed accurate understanding of the concept and its major strategies. They appreciated the potential of active learning to deepen and broaden learning and its value for long-term professional development but had significant concerns about the efficiency of the process, the clarity of expectations provided, and the importance of receiving preparatory materials. Most significantly, active learning experiences were perceived as disconnected from grading and even as impeding preparation for school and national examinations. Insights: Medical students understand the concepts of active learning and have considerable experience in several formats prior to medical school. They are generally supportive of active learning concepts but frustrated by perceived inefficiencies and lack of contribution to the urgencies of achieving optimal grades and passing United States Medical Licensing Examinations, especially Step 1.

  18. Kinesiology Career Club: Undergraduate Student Mentors' Perspectives on a Physical Activity-Based Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David S.; Veri, Maria J.; Willard, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present university student mentors' perspectives on the impact of a teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model youth program called the Kinesiology Career Club. Data sources in this qualitative case study included program observations, mentoring reflections, and semistructured interviews. Data…

  19. Kinesiology Career Club: Undergraduate Student Mentors' Perspectives on a Physical Activity-Based Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David S.; Veri, Maria J.; Willard, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present university student mentors' perspectives on the impact of a teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model youth program called the Kinesiology Career Club. Data sources in this qualitative case study included program observations, mentoring reflections, and semistructured interviews. Data…

  20. Reflective writing: the student nurse's perspective on reflective writing and poetry writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Dawn; Willis, Diane S

    2015-07-01

    Reflective writing is a mandatory part of nurse education but how students develop their skills and use reflection as part of their experiential learning remains relatively unknown. Understanding reflective writing in all forms from the perspective of a student nurse is therefore important. To explore the use of reflective writing and the use of poetry in pre-registered nursing students. A qualitative design was employed to explore reflective writing in pre-registered nursing students. A small university in Scotland. BSc (Hons) Adult and Mental Health Pre-registration Student Nurses. Two focus groups were conducted with 10 student nurses during March 2012. Data was analysed thematically using the framework of McCarthy (1999). Students found the process of reflective writing daunting but valued it over time. Current educational methods, such as assessing reflective accounts, often lead to the 'narrative' being watered down and the student feeling judged. Despite this, reflection made students feel responsible for their own learning and research on the topic. Some students felt the use of models of reflection constricting, whilst poetry freed up their expression allowing them to demonstrate the compassion for their patient under their care. Poetry writing gives students the opportunity for freedom of expression, personal satisfaction and a closer connection with their patients, which the more formal approach to reflective writing did not offer. There is a need for students to have a safe and supportive forum in which to express and have their experiences acknowledged without the fear of being judged. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Like Shadows under a Door: Bullying from the Perspectives of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Jayme N.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand and describe bullying from the perspective of students who are living with a disability and who have been bullied. The overall research question that guided this study was: What are the perspectives of students with disabilities who have been bullied based on their experiences? A…

  2. Student Perspectives on the Impact of Service Learning on the Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colleen A.; Kemeny, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perspectives on service learning during the TRAIL to Wellness program, a four-week leisure education program for veterans being treated for substance abuse. The research explored the students perspectives on their own learning at the end of 15 weeks. Based upon the content analysis of open-ended questions…

  3. Student Perspectives on the Impact of Service Learning on the Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Colleen A.; Kemeny, M. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perspectives on service learning during the TRAIL to Wellness program, a four-week leisure education program for veterans being treated for substance abuse. The research explored the students perspectives on their own learning at the end of 15 weeks. Based upon the content analysis of open-ended questions…

  4. Validation of the Electronic Portfolio Student Perspective Instrument (EPSPI): Conditions under a Different Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert D.; Ndoye, Abdou; Parker, Michele A.

    2010-01-01

    With the explosive growth of e-portfolios in teacher preparation programs, it is essential for administration and other relevant stakeholders to understand the student perspective of e-portfolios' organizational uses. This article describes the validation of the modified Electronic Portfolio Student Perspective Instrument (EPSPI). The analysis…

  5. Examining the Relationship between Intercultural Engagement and Undergraduate Students' Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, Mark E.; Davidson, Lisa M.; Manderino, Mark; Jourian, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between intercultural engagement and undergraduate students' global perspective. Utilizing a cross-sectional design, six global perspective outcomes were regressed on an intercultural engagement scale and its component parts, controlling for student background characteristics and other forms of on- and…

  6. A developmental perspective on the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Dewey G

    2011-01-01

    The Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines were developed to help multidisciplinary school-based teams use a decision tree to evaluate student threats and take appropriate preventive action. A main goal of this approach is to allow school-based teams to recognize and respond to the developmental complexities of children and adolescents without resorting to the use of zero tolerance discipline. The model takes a triage approach that involves progressively more extensive assessment and intervention according to the severity of the threat and the student's intentions. The article summarizes two field test studies of the model, a study of training effects on staff attitudes and knowledge about violence prevention, and a quasi-experimental study showing that secondary schools using the model enjoyed a more positive school climate characterized by less bullying and greater willingness among students to seek help for threats of violence.

  7. Medical Student Mentorship in Plastic Surgery: The Mentee's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jenny C; Rendon, Juan; Janis, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-01

    Mentorship is a universal concept that has a significant impact on nearly every surgical career. Although frequently editorialized, true data investigating the value of mentorship are lacking in the plastic surgery literature. This study evaluates mentorship in plastic surgery from the medical student perspective. An electronic survey was sent to recently matched postgraduate year-1 integrated track residents in 2014, with a response rate of 76 percent. Seventy-seven percent of students reported a mentoring relationship. Details of the mentoring relationship were defined. Over 80 percent of students reported a mentor's influence in their decision to pursue plastic surgery, and nearly 40 percent of students expressed interest in practicing the same subspecialty as their mentor. Benefits of the relationship were also described. Mentees value guidance around career preparation and advice and prioritized "a genuine interest in their career and personal development" above all other mentor qualities (p ≤ 1.6 × 10). Mentees prefer frequent, one-on-one interactions over less frequent interaction or group activities. Students did not prefer "assigned" relationships (91 percent), but did prefer "facilitated exposure." Major barriers to mentorship included mentor time constraints and lack of exposure to plastic surgery. Indeed, significant differences in the presence of a mentoring relationship correlated with involvement of the plastic surgery department in the medical school curriculum. This study defines successes and highlights areas for improvement of mentorship of plastic surgery medical students. Successful mentorship may contribute to the future of plastic surgery, and a commitment toward this endeavor is needed at the local, departmental, and national leadership levels.

  8. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Amy S

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P) students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG) students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG). Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student's perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade) reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  9. Making the grade in a portfolio-based system: student performance and the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S. Nowacki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a graduate education setting. Studied were 33 medical students at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, a program utilizing a portfolio-based system. The students may elect to simultaneously enroll in a Masters program; however, these programs employ traditional letter grades. Thus creating a unique opportunity to assess 25 portfolio only (P students and 8 portfolio and grade (PG students concurrently taking a course that counts for both programs. Classroom performance was measured via a comprehensive evaluation where the PG students scored modestly better (median total scores, 72% P vs. 76% PG. Additionally, a survey was conducted to gain insight into student’s perspective on how assessment method impacts the learning experience. The students in the PG group (those receiving a grade reported increased stress but greater affirmation and self-assurance regarding their knowledge and skill mastery. Incorporation of such affirmation remains a challenge for portfolio-based systems and an area for investigation and improvement.

  10. Showing Automatically Generated Students' Conceptual Models to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Marin, Diana; Pascual-Nieto, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A student conceptual model can be defined as a set of interconnected concepts associated with an estimation value that indicates how well these concepts are used by the students. It can model just one student or a group of students, and can be represented as a concept map, conceptual diagram or one of several other knowledge representation…

  11. Engagement with Electronic Portfolios: Challenges from the Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Tosh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Much of the evidence and research available on the use of e-portfolios focuses on faculty and institutional perspectives and/or consists mainly of anecdotes about how useful the e-portfolio has been to learners. While it is generally agreed that e-portfolios have great potential to engage students and promote deep learning, the research that has been conducted to date focuses very little on student perceptions of value of the e-portfolio for their learning. If students do not accept the e-portfolio as a holistic means with which to document their learning in different contexts and more importantly, agree or wish to use the e-portfolio as an integral part of their educational experience, then the potential impact the e-portfolio will have on learning will not be realised. This paper highlights four themes arising out of research that is underway within an international framework of collaboration between the University of Edinburgh, the University of British Columbia and the University of Waterloo.

  12. Information-Theoretic Perspectives on Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearing, Grey

    2016-04-01

    To test any hypothesis about any dynamic system, it is necessary to build a model that places that hypothesis into the context of everything else that we know about the system: initial and boundary conditions and interactions between various governing processes (Hempel and Oppenheim, 1948, Cartwright, 1983). No hypothesis can be tested in isolation, and no hypothesis can be tested without a model (for a geoscience-related discussion see Clark et al., 2011). Science is (currently) fundamentally reductionist in the sense that we seek some small set of governing principles that can explain all phenomena in the universe, and such laws are ontological in the sense that they describe the object under investigation (Davies, 1990 gives several competing perspectives on this claim). However, since we cannot build perfect models of complex systems, any model that does not also contain an epistemological component (i.e., a statement, like a probability distribution, that refers directly to the quality of of the information from the model) is falsified immediately (in the sense of Popper, 2002) given only a small number of observations. Models necessarily contain both ontological and epistemological components, and what this means is that the purpose of any robust scientific method is to measure the amount and quality of information provided by models. I believe that any viable philosophy of science must be reducible to this statement. The first step toward a unified theory of scientific models (and therefore a complete philosophy of science) is a quantitative language that applies to both ontological and epistemological questions. Information theory is one such language: Cox' (1946) theorem (see Van Horn, 2003) tells us that probability theory is the (only) calculus that is consistent with Classical Logic (Jaynes, 2003; chapter 1), and information theory is simply the integration of convex transforms of probability ratios (integration reduces density functions to scalar

  13. Modelling Immune System: Principles, Models,Analysis and Perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-hua Li; Zheng-xuan Wang; Tian-yang Lu; Xiang-jiu Che

    2009-01-01

    The biological immune system is a complex adaptive system. There are lots of benefits for building the model of the immune system. For biological researchers, they can test some hypotheses about the infection process or simulate the responses of some drugs. For computer researchers, they can build distributed, robust and fault tolerant networks inspired by the functions of the immune system. This paper provides a comprehensive survey of the literatures on modelling the immune system. From the methodology perspective, the paper compares and analyzes the existing approaches and models, and also demonstrates the focusing research effort on the future immune models in the next few years.

  14. Teachers' perspectives on factors affecting the inclusion of ADHD students in Greek mainstream classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Lilikaki, Styliani

    2015-01-01

    Within a huge debate regarding the issue of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), teachers are the ones responsible to promote the inclusion of ADHD students which is supported by the latest Greek law. However, their perspectives and experiences have never been asked so far. This study aims to explore Greek teachers’ perspectives (N=7) considering the factors that affect the inclusion of ADHD students through semi-structured interviews. Regarding students with ADHD the term inclus...

  15. Teachers' perspectives on factors affecting the inclusion of ADHD students in Greek mainstream classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Lilikaki, Styliani

    2015-01-01

    Within a huge debate regarding the issue of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), teachers are the ones responsible to promote the inclusion of ADHD students which is supported by the latest Greek law. However, their perspectives and experiences have never been asked so far. This study aims to explore Greek teachers’ perspectives (N=7) considering the factors that affect the inclusion of ADHD students through semi-structured interviews. Regarding students with ADHD the term inclus...

  16. Perspective orientation and time dimension in student motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Pavelková

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientating oneself to time and work for the future is considered a substantive component of the autoregulative process. It is also important to students´ mental regulation, which is closely related to academic success. The factor of time in human life has been approached in psychology in a variety of ways. We will focus primarily on those concepts which study time and detect time patterns in motivational dynamics of personality. The concepts of Joel O. Raynor, Torgrim Gjesme, Joseph R. Nuttin and Philip G. Zimbardo will be mentioned. Of Czech authors, the “perspective orientation” by Isabella Pavelková is presented. We will discuss diagnostic methods used in the measurement of time perspective, especially the Motivation Induction Method (MIM – J.R. Nuttin. Secondly, we will present selected researches that have been carried out in this field in the Czech Republic. These studies are focused primarily on issues related to the identification, development, and opportunities of internal assumptions conditioning the character and quality of an individual´s future. Keywords: ; ; ;

  17. Finding the Evidence in CAM: a Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Ghassemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary offers a future health care provider's perspective on the role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Western (namely, in US medical education and practice. As a student of both public health and medicine in the United States, Jeffrey Ghassemi is interested in CAM's contribution to improving medical practice and teaching. The commentary highlights the ambiguous definitions of CAM to Westerners despite the rising popularity of and expenditures for alternative modalities of care. It then argues for collaboration between alternative and established medical communities to ascertain the scientific merits of CAM. It concludes by calling for a new medical paradigm that embraces the philosophies of both communities to advance education and patient care.

  18. What Global Perspective Does Our University Foster in Our Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Kerry; Bourk, Michael; Mirosa, Miranda; Dulgar, Pete

    2017-01-01

    We used a modified circuit of culture enquiry to explore processes of production, representation and consumption of global perspective at our university, in the context of fostering this perspective as a graduate attribute. We identified four frame packages by which this perspective is understood and communicated. Global perspective is framed…

  19. Multicultural Training Experiences as Predictors of Multicultural Competencies: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ginger L.; Jepsen, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors surveyed a national sample of master's-level counseling students regarding their multicultural training experiences and their multicultural counseling competencies. A series of hierarchical regression models tested the prediction of inventoried competencies from measures of selected training experiences: (a) program cultural ambience…

  20. An Ecological Perspective of Latina/o College Student Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertz Gonzalez, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Although Latinos are the largest minority population in the United States and the largest minority population on American campuses, there is little research concerning Latino college student ethnic identity. This study incorporates an ecological model to examine the levels of influence of different settings and backgrounds of Latino college…

  1. Social Media in Health Professional Education: A Student Perspective on User Levels and Prospective Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within…

  2. Silence in Teaching and Learning: Perspectives of a Nepalese Graduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    The nature of silence is complex in any classroom with international or domestic students. Instructors sometimes fail to recognize that the classroom silence of foreign students is unlike their native counterparts. With an insider perspective, this article explores the concept of silence among international students by examining the existing body…

  3. Social Media in Health Professional Education: A Student Perspective on User Levels and Prospective Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within…

  4. Viktor Hamburger's Department of Zoology in the 1940s: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, B S; Wenger, E

    2001-04-01

    Eleanor and Byron Wenger were graduate students in the Department of Zoology in the 1940s. Both took several courses with Viktor, and he was thesis advisor for both of us. We have attempted to provide a summary of life in the department from a student perspective as well as our impression of Viktor's style of mentoring and guiding student research and education.

  5. "This is Kind of Giving a Secret Away...": Students' Perspectives on Effective Class Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, Donetta J.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Garrahy, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    Examined students' perspectives on teachers' behaviors that impeded or contributed to effective class management. Data from interviews with 182 secondary school students from 14 U.S. schools indicated that despite widely varying school contexts, students provided consistent reports that effective managers set early, consistent standards, developed…

  6. Developing Intercultural Understanding for Study Abroad: Students' and Teachers' Perspectives on Pre-Departure Intercultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, P.; Bavieri, L.; Ganassin, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on students' and teachers' perspectives on a programme designed to develop Erasmus students' intercultural understanding prior to going abroad. We aimed to understand how students and their teachers perceived pre-departure materials in promoting their awareness of key concepts related to interculturality (e.g., essentialism,…

  7. Students' Informal Inference about the Binomial Distribution of "Bunny Hops": A Dialogic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, Sibel; Fujita, Taro; Wegerif, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    The study explores the development of 11-year-old students' informal inference about random bunny hops through student talk and use of computer simulation tools. Our aim in this paper is to draw on dialogic theory to explain how students make shifts in perspective, from intuition-based reasoning to more powerful, formal ways of using probabilistic…

  8. Role Modeling for FNP Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Jane Ehlinger

    1980-01-01

    A model is described in which student nurses' preceptors are the joint-appointee nurse practitioners, with physicians providing consultation and serving as team participants. Key points that are examined are program development at the University of Illinois, how the program actually operated, and some of the problems encountered. (CT)

  9. A Cultural Perspective on the Structure of Student Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainley, Mary; Ainley, John

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the nature of interest in science as represented in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 data. We discuss the interconnections between measures of knowledge, affect, and value as components of interest in science. Working from a perspective acknowledging that many of the models of motivation represented in the literature have been developed in Western countries, we investigated whether the ways that knowledge, affect, and value combine in the structure of students' interest in science might vary in line with historical and cultural traditions. Four countries were chosen to represent contrasting cultural values as defined in analyses of the World Values Surveys and the European Values Surveys-Colombia, Estonia, USA, and Sweden. Models are described showing variations in fit across the four countries. Efforts to increase the attractiveness of science to students should take heed of the fact that all models indicated a central role for enjoyment of science in the paths linking personal value, interest, and current science activities with intentions for future participation in science. Differences in the strength of the associations between science knowledge and interest in science support the proposition that the interconnections between knowledge, affect, and value need to be understood in relation to students' broader historical and cultural context.

  10. Regional air quality modeling: North American and European perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyn, D.; Builtjes, P.; Schaap, M.; Yarwood, G.

    2013-01-01

    An overview of regional-scale quality modeling practices and perspectives in North America and Europe, highlighting the differences and commonalities in how regional-scale air quality modeling systems are being used and evaluated across both continents

  11. A model for community physiotherapy from the perspective of newly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model for community physiotherapy from the perspective of newly graduated physiotherapists as a guide to curriculum revision. ... To develop a model of community service physiotherapy to guide curriculum reform. Methods ... Article Metrics.

  12. Students on Ice Arctic Youth Expedition 2008: outcomes, student perspectives and expected impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, E. H.; Codog, A.; Green, D.; Green, G.; Galbraith, E.; Conklin, M. H.

    2008-12-01

    How do we give a voice to youth to express their views on the importance of remote ecosystems and their response to global climate change? STUDENTS ON ICE is an International Polar Year-endorsed program bringing students from around the world together to learn about the world's polar regions. Students are budding environmental leaders and scientists in training. Besides traveling to incredibly beautiful areas and seeing polar animals in their natural habitat, students attend lectures, learn through hands-on activities and peer-teaching seminars. The expedition is chronicled by diary entries by the participants (see below). One premise of Students on Ice's Arctic program is that when youths are shown how Inuit adapted to the harsh living conditions and students are exposed to ways they could reduce their ecological footprint, they would become ambassadors of change. In this poster we present, from a student perspective, what was learned on a 2-week expedition to Baffin Island in August, 2008 and our follow-up activities. We have contacted our fellow students to see if the expedition has resulted in them reducing their carbon footprint. We have divided the responses into three categories: changing our lifestyle, becoming an ambassador for sustainability and considering a career in Earth or polar sciences. Preliminary responses are that it is difficult to change our lifestyles by ourselves but we think more carefully before we consume and most of us will probably not become polar scientists. Our overwhelming sentiment is that this is an awesome program and should be continued, and that we are trying to become ambassadors for the polar regions and sustainable lifestyles.

  13. Faculty Mentors' Perspectives on E-Mentoring Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Nancy; Jacobs, Karen; Ryan, Cathryn

    2016-12-01

    E-mentoring is a viable option for mentoring students in occupational therapy educational programs. The objective of this study was to investigate faculty perspectives of faculty-to-student e-mentoring in an online post-professional doctor of occupational therapy program. In a retrospective mixed-method design, nine faculty members described features and outcomes of e-mentoring 48 doctoral students. Online survey results were analysed quantitatively for descriptive statistics; transcripts from structured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that successful, satisfactory e-mentoring is student-centered, flexible, frequent, academically and psychosocially supportive; faculty members must be skilled in adapting e-mentoring to the needs and objectives of each mentee; e-mentoring provides opportunities for faculty members and students to achieve academic and professional objectives and growth. The findings suggest that implementation of e-mentoring may be a useful model in other occupational therapy programs. There is a need for future studies with broader participant pool, observable measures of e-mentoring, standardized measures of satisfaction and success and comparison between e-mentoring with and without web camera. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Relations between Self Regulation, Future Time Perspective and the Delay of Gratification in University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Suleyman

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted on 508 (331 female, 144 male) first grade university students in order to investigate the relations between self regulation, the future time perspectives, and the delay of gratification in the academic field. A future time perspective scale, an academic delay of gratification scale and a motivational strategies for…

  15. A Multi-Perspective Collaborative on Teacher Learning for Teachers of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Elizabeth A.; Jones, Phyllis; Chambers, Dianne; Whitehurst, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this multi-perspective collaborative research activity was to analyze moments of teacher learning as perceived by a group of teachers who educate students with the label of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The researchers in this project acknowledge the value of hearing teachers' perspectives on what works for them in their…

  16. The Development of Japanese Identity among Middle School Students in Japan: From the Perspectives of the State and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Marika Suziki

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the issues related to the development of national identity amongst middle school students in Japan, from both macro and micro perspectives of the state's educational policy and the students' conception. While it is impossible to understand a national education without placing it in the larger context, the concept of…

  17. The Lived Experiences of Successful ELL Student Regarding Second Language Acquisition from the Perspective of Students, Parents, and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohensky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study investigated the perspectives of successful Limited English Proficient (LEP) students along with their parents and teachers. Narrative inquiry was used to collect data and template analysis was used to triangulate trends. A purposeful snowball sample of six 4 th grade students that have been identified as…

  18. The Development of Japanese Identity among Middle School Students in Japan: From the Perspectives of the State and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Marika Suziki

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation explores the issues related to the development of national identity amongst middle school students in Japan, from both macro and micro perspectives of the state's educational policy and the students' conception. While it is impossible to understand a national education without placing it in the larger context, the concept of…

  19. Modelling biological complexity: a physical scientist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, Peter V; Fowler, Philip W

    2005-09-22

    We discuss the modern approaches of complexity and self-organization to understanding dynamical systems and how these concepts can inform current interest in systems biology. From the perspective of a physical scientist, it is especially interesting to examine how the differing weights given to philosophies of science in the physical and biological sciences impact the application of the study of complexity. We briefly describe how the dynamics of the heart and circadian rhythms, canonical examples of systems biology, are modelled by sets of nonlinear coupled differential equations, which have to be solved numerically. A major difficulty with this approach is that all the parameters within these equations are not usually known. Coupled models that include biomolecular detail could help solve this problem. Coupling models across large ranges of length- and time-scales is central to describing complex systems and therefore to biology. Such coupling may be performed in at least two different ways, which we refer to as hierarchical and hybrid multiscale modelling. While limited progress has been made in the former case, the latter is only beginning to be addressed systematically. These modelling methods are expected to bring numerous benefits to biology, for example, the properties of a system could be studied over a wider range of length- and time-scales, a key aim of systems biology. Multiscale models couple behaviour at the molecular biological level to that at the cellular level, thereby providing a route for calculating many unknown parameters as well as investigating the effects at, for example, the cellular level, of small changes at the biomolecular level, such as a genetic mutation or the presence of a drug. The modelling and simulation of biomolecular systems is itself very computationally intensive; we describe a recently developed hybrid continuum-molecular model, HybridMD, and its associated molecular insertion algorithm, which point the way towards the

  20. Meeting the health and social care needs of pregnant asylum seekers; midwifery students' perspectives: part 3; "the pregnant woman within the global context"; an inclusive model for midwifery education to address the needs of asylum seeking women in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Bradshaw, Gwendolen

    2013-09-01

    to describe the conceptualisation and development of an inclusive educational model. The model is designed to facilitate pre-registration midwifery students' learning around the health and social care needs of pregnant women seeking asylum in the United Kingdom. current literature has identified a concern about the standard of maternity care experienced by asylum seeking women accessing maternity services in the United Kingdom. In response to this, a doctorate study was undertaken which focused on examining the way in which a group of midwifery students approached the provision of care for asylum seekers. This study revealed difficulties that these students had both in identifying these women's needs and also in the wider care issues in practice. Consequently, one of the recommendations was to ameliorate these difficulties through midwifery education. the key findings from this study were used together with relevant supporting literature to construct "the pregnant woman within the global context" model for midwifery education. The model is designed to facilitate a holistic assessment of need rather than focusing on the physical assessment at the expense of other aspects of care. It incorporates wider factors, on a global level, which could impact on the health and social care needs of a pregnant woman seeking asylum. It also prompts students to consider the influence of dominant discourses on perceptions of asylum seek;ing and is designed to encourage students' to question these discourses. this model can be used in midwifery education to prepare students in caring for pregnant women seeking asylum. It may be especially helpful when students have close contact with pregnant women seeking asylum, for example through caseloading. Further research is recommended to evaluate the effectiveness of this model in enhancing the care of asylum seeking women in the United Kingdom. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Research on Teaching Models for College Students ’ Personalized Learning from the Perspective of New Constructivism%新建构主义视角下大学生个性化学习的教学模式探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑云翔

    2015-01-01

    个性化学习是信息时代的学习趋势,能让每位学生的个性获得充分发展,获得个性化学习体验。新建构主义理论的核心理念是情境、搜索、选择、写作、交流、创新和意义建构,是网络时代的学习理论。在新建构主义学习理论视角下探讨个性化学习的理论基础、基本特征和框架体系,通过学习者特征分析、学习环境、学习资源与工具、学习活动和学习评价等五个方面对大学生个性化学习的教学设计进行了深入讨论,提出并详细论述了五种典型的个性化学习的教学模式,强调利用不同的信息技术手段通过对碎片化知识的积件式写作和个性化改写,从而实现个人知识体系的创造性重构。并通过初步试用验证了其有效性,希望有利于同行专家进一步开展相关研究。%Personalized learning, a learning trend of information age, maximally helps stimulate students ’ individual potential and obtain personalized learning experience. New Constructivism Theory is the learning theory of network era, with seven core ideas:context, searching, selecting, writing, communicating, innovating and meaning construction. This paper first discusses the theoretical foundation, basic features and framework of personalized learning from perspective of New Constructivism Learning Theory, then ex-plores its instructional design in detail from five aspects: feature analysis of learners, learning environment design, learning resources and tools design, learning activities design and learning assessment design. On this basis, five teaching models for college students ’ personalized learning are proposed, highlighting the importance of creative reconstruction of personal knowledge hierarchy through“Integrableware Writing”and “Personalized Rewriting”on fragmented knowledge in different ways supported by information technolo-gy, and then an initial practice is followed to show its

  2. Students' Conceptions of the Nature of Science: Perspectives from Canadian and Korean Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeran; Nielsen, Wendy; Woodruff, Earl

    2014-05-01

    This study examined and compared students' understanding of nature of science (NOS) with 521 Grade 8 Canadian and Korean students using a mixed methods approach. The concepts of NOS were measured using a survey that had both quantitative and qualitative elements. Descriptive statistics and one-way multivariate analysis of variances examined the quantitative data while a conceptually clustered matrix classified the open-ended responses. The country effect could explain 3-12 % of the variances of subjectivity, empirical testability and diverse methods, but it was not significant for the concepts of tentativeness and socio-cultural embeddedness of science. The open-ended responses showed that students believed scientific theories change due to errors or discoveries. Students regarded empirical evidence as undeniable and objective although they acknowledged experiments depend on theories or scientists' knowledge. The open responses revealed that national situations and curriculum content affected their views. For our future democratic citizens to gain scientific literacy, science curricula should include currently acknowledged NOS concepts and should be situated within societal and cultural perspectives.

  3. The Influences on Teaching Perspectives of Australian Physical Education Teacher Education Students: The First-Year Influences on Teaching Perspectives Exploratory (FIT-PE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Brendon P.; Pill, Shane

    2016-01-01

    There has been a paucity of literature investigating the teaching beliefs and intentions of Australian physical education teacher education (PETE) students that enter teacher training. The First-year Influences on Teaching Perspectives Exploratory (FIT-PE) study explores the teaching perspectives of first year PETE students; including teaching…

  4. Modeling protein synthesis from a physicist's perspective: a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, A; Basu, Aakash; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are polymers of amino acids. These macromolecules are synthesized by intracellular machines called {\\it ribosome}. Although, traditionally, the experimental investigation of protein synthesis has been an active area of research in molecular cell biology, important quantitative models of this phenomenon have been reported mostly in the research journals devoted to statistical physics and related interdisciplinary topics. From the perspective of a physicist, protein synthesis is a phenomenon of {\\it classical transport of interacting ribosomes on a messenger RNA (mRNA) template} that dictates the sequence of the amino acids on the protein. Here we bring this frontier area of contemporary research into the classroom by appropriate simplification of the models and methods. In particular, we develope a simple toy model and analyze it by some elementary techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics to predict the average rate of protein synthesis and their spatial organization in the steady-state.

  5. A New Approach to Modelling Student Retention through an Application of Complexity Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Jonas; Linder, Cedric; Moll, Rachel; Fraser, Duncan; Andersson, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Complexity thinking is relatively new to education research and has rarely been used to examine complex issues in physics and engineering education. Issues in higher education such as student retention have been approached from a multiplicity of perspectives and are recognized as complex. The complex system of student retention modelling in higher…

  6. Neuropsychological Perspectives in Pupil Services: Practical Application of Luria's Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrzut, John E.; Obrzut, Ann

    1982-01-01

    The rationale and guidelines for incorporating a neuropsychological perspective in the educational process are presented. Luria's (1973) model is most pertinent for "neuroeducators" because it describes the concept of functional systems interacting to produce behavior. (CJ)

  7. Assessment of 6th Grade Elementary School Students, Their Parents' and Branch Teachers' Perspective on Physical Education Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyraz, Sirin; Ozbar, Nurper; Yetgin, Meral Kucuk; Koksalan, Burke

    2015-01-01

    A total of 437 volunteers including 54 teachers, 218 6th grade students and 102 parents from Beykoz Elementary Schools participated in this study to understand the perspectives of students, families and teachers on Physical Education classes. The perspectives of students, families and teachers of other branches are identified by survey method.…

  8. Time perspective and early-onset substance use: a model based on stress-coping theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, T A; Sandy, J M; Yaeger, A M

    2001-06-01

    This research tested the relation of time perspective to early-onset substance use (tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana) with a sample of 454 elementary school students with a mean age of 11.8 years. An adaptation of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (P. G. Zimbardo & J. N. Boyd, 1999) was administered with measures derived from stress-coping theory. Independent effects showed future orientation inversely related to substance use and present orientation positively related to substance use. Structural modeling analysis indicated that the relation of time perspective measures to substance use was indirect, mediated through behavioral coping and anger coping. Proximal factors for substance use were negative affect, peer substance use, and resistance efficacy. Results are discussed with respect to epigenetic models and the role of executive functions in self-control ability.

  9. Perceiving design as modelling: A cybernetic systems perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Anja; Wynn, David C.; Howard, Thomas J.;

    2014-01-01

    this chapter). Given this, how should design activities be co-ordinated and how should the design process be regulated? This chapter suggests that a cybernetic perspective may help to understand designing as a self-regulated modelling system and help to reach a better understanding of the effectiveness...... out to add value for a given purpose and context. Implications of a cybernetic perspective that could guide effective modelling in design are discussed....

  10. Reading Perspective: Can It Improve Middle School Students' Comprehension of Informational Text?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Crystal M.; Sperling, Rayne A.

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments the authors investigated whether assigning a perspective to middle school students prior to reading a long informational text would improve their reading comprehension. Pretest-posttest control group designs were employed in both experiments, in Experiment 1 (n = 146 fifth- and sixth-grade students) and in Experiment 2 (n = 83…

  11. Using Web 2.0 Technologies: Exploring Perspectives of Students, Teachers and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingmei; Yuen, Allan H. K.; Park, Jae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to explore the perspectives of students, teachers, and parents in using Web 2.0 technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on the focus group interview data collected from two groups of students, two groups of teachers, and one group of parents in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Findings:…

  12. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  13. ADHD and Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders: Adult Student Perspectives on Learning Needs and Academic Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is to understand, from their own perspective, the learning needs of adult college students with comorbid attention deficits and psychiatric disabilities, and to identify services and practices that support their success in the college environment. Adult students with comorbid attention deficits and psychiatric disorders…

  14. Canadian Campus Smoking Policies: Investigating the Gap between Intent and Outcome from a Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Lynne; Callaghan, Doris; Smith, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Young adults remain the earliest legal target for the tobacco industry. Against this, the existence of smoking policies would appear to offer some protection to students on campus. However, little research has been conducted into the outcomes of such policies from a student perspective. Methods: The authors conducted 8 focus groups at…

  15. Students' Perspectives on Academic Writing in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study brings together three student comments and three theoretical constructs taken from Bakhtin's (1981) collection of essays "The Dialogic Imagination", written in the 1930s. Bakhtin's concepts of the chronotope, interanimation and the monologic provide lenses on a shifting student perspective on authoritative writing in…

  16. Understanding Middle School Students' Difficulties in Explaining Density Differences from a Language Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Lay Hoon; Clarke, David; Hart, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how a class of Grade 7 students employed linguistic resources to explain density differences. Drawing from the same data-set as a previous study by, we take a language perspective to investigate the challenges students face in learning the concept of density. Our study thus complements previous research on learning about…

  17. Weaving the Tapestry: A Student Affairs Perspective on the Leadership Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    The tapestry of leadership development has a long history in American higher education. As a faculty member for the last 26 years of my career teaching the history of student affairs and higher education and studying college student leadership, I enjoyed examining perspectives on the evolution of leadership development and how it grew from being…

  18. Challenges Experienced by Korean Medical Students and Tutors during Problem-Based Learning: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Tae-Lee, Jong

    2016-01-01

    How people learn is influenced by the cultural contexts in which their learning occurs. This qualitative case study explored challenges Korean medical students and tutors experienced during their PBL sessions from a cultural perspective using Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Twelve preclinical medical students and nine tutors from a large Korean…

  19. Design Students Perspectives on Assessment Rubric in Studio-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshun, Eric F.; Osei-Poku, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    This study examined students' perspectives on the use of assessment criteria and rubrics in graphic design studio at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. This assessment strategy was introduced with the desire to improve students' participation and involvement in studio-based learning programme. At the end of the semester, a…

  20. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  1. The Promise of Social Perspective Taking to Facilitate Teacher-Student Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Hunter; Brinkworth, Maureen E.; Harris, Anna D.

    2011-01-01

    Quality teacher-student relationships are linked with numerous valued student outcomes. Yet, questions remain about how to best facilitate these relationships. Social perspective taking--the process of discerning others' thoughts, feelings, and motivations--is critical to relationships; yet, its promise as a facilitator of teacher-student…

  2. Students' Interpersonal Perspectives on, Conceptions of and Approaches to Learning in Online Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to qualitatively explore students' interpersonal perspectives (i.e., "psychological safety," "value diversity," "trust" and "social interdependence") on, conceptions of and approaches to learning in an online peer assessment activity required for creating digital artistic works. Twenty-three college students in Taiwan…

  3. Development of the Electronic Portfolio Student Perspective Instrument: An ePortfolio Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzhaupt, Albert Dieter; Singh, Oma; Seyferth, Thelma; Dedrick, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    With the proliferation of eportfolios and their organizational uses in higher education, it is important for educators and other relevant stakeholders to understand the student perspective. The way students view and use ePortfolios are revealing elements to aid educators in the successful integration of ePortfolio systems. This research describes…

  4. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  5. Do Prior Experience, Gender, or Level of Study Influence Music Students' Perspectives on Master Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marion; Hallam, Susan; Creech, Andrea; Gaunt, Helena; Robertson, Linnhe

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic process of self-regulated learning has been identified as a predictor of achievement in musical skill acquisition and musical performance. Meta-cognition, intrinsic to the self-regulation process, develops as the student takes greater responsibility for their own learning. From this perspective we consider music students' responses to a…

  6. Students' Perspectives on Academic Writing in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study brings together three student comments and three theoretical constructs taken from Bakhtin's (1981) collection of essays "The Dialogic Imagination", written in the 1930s. Bakhtin's concepts of the chronotope, interanimation and the monologic provide lenses on a shifting student perspective on authoritative writing in…

  7. Student seminar on smoking: A novel way to introduce different perspectives on smoking to medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima P Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The respiratory module at Shifa College of Medicine (SCM is delivered in third year with emphasis on respiratory pathophysiology and respiratory medicine. Smoking as a topic was introduced to emphasize the preventive aspects of respiratory illnesses. An innovative approach to involve students in their learning was developed. To determine whether this innovation would be well received and effective for students′ learning about smoking, we carried out this study. Materials and Methods: This is a one group post-test quasi-experiment. Two days were assigned for a smoking seminar. The class of 106 students was divided into 10 batches, and each batch was assigned a theme related to smoking. These themes were developed by the faculty, and each theme was related to a different perspective on smoking. A post-test questionnaire was distributed at the end of the seminar for feedback to see what aspects of students′ learning were highlighted and what needed to be improved upon. Questions related to the usefulness of the activity were incorporated into the questionnaire and the students were asked to agree or disagree on a five-point Likert scale. Results: Most (68.3% students agreed that this activity improved their knowledge regarding smoking, and 54.8% agreed that it also helped in application of this knowledge. Improvement in presentation and counseling skills (59.8%, evidence-based medicine (47.6%, and softer skills, such as teamwork (72% and creativity (63.4%, were also reported to be enhanced. Conclusion: Seminars led by the students have shown to be effective in breaking the monotony and generating an interest of the topic. Such an activity serves as a small step to make our graduates more empathic, humane, competent, and skilful.

  8. An aphasia mentoring program: perspectives of speech-language pathology students and of mentors with aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Barbara A; Petersen, Jill; Puurveen, Gloria

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that was implemented as part of a speech-language pathology graduate program. Qualitative research methods with thematic analysis of interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, and participant observation were used to develop a description of the mentoring program, including the experiences and perspectives of the participants-both mentors (people with chronic aphasia) and students. Five themes, including getting better, aphasia advocacy, group as versus for therapy, we're a team, and focus on mentoring, emerged from the mentors' data. Five themes, including shifting the power dynamic, getting to know the person, seeing members as mentors, making classroom learning real, and connecting with a community, emerged from the students' data. There were significant overlaps and intersections between the 2 data sets. Findings revealed how an aphasia mentoring program that positions people with aphasia as experts can make a significant contribution to student education while supporting mentors' own goals, with implications for improved quality of life.

  9. A Q-methodological study to explore student nurse perspectives of effective mentor qualities in different years of training

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study explores student nurse perspectives of effective mentor qualities, in different years of training. Despite numerous research articles outlining evidence to support good mentoring, gaps in the literature were identified as there is very little "robust evaluation" and research that measures the effectiveness of mentoring from the student nurse perspective (Chandan and Watts 2012 pg1). The majority of the current research that has explored student perspectives of ment...

  10. IS CHC student surface learner A cross-cultural perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李佩绮

    2008-01-01

    In the past decades, the "CH"(Confucian Heritage Culture)learner phenomenon had aroused the interest of sociologists, educators and psychologists. Examination orientation, achievement orientation, use of repetitive learning, synthesis of memorization and understanding, and the use of recitation to bring about sharp focus for better understanding were some of the themes of these researches. This paper will explain what the general paradox of CHC learners is and how cultural difference can affect students' motivation for learning according to Chen and Stevenson's model of cultural influence, and discuss the major misconception of CHC learners' study approach.

  11. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  12. Past Negative Time Perspective as a Predictor of Grade Point Average in Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat J. Precin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Time perspective is a fundamental dimension in psychological time, dividing human experiences into past, present, and future. Time perspective influences individuals’ functioning in all occupations, including education. Previous research has examined the relationship between time perspective and academic outcomes, but the same research has not been done, to date, with occupational therapy doctoral students. This quantitative, cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between time perspective and academic success in occupational therapy doctoral students across the United States. Data from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI and grade point averages (GPAs were collected from 50 participants via surveymonkey.com. Past Negative time perspective statistically predicted GPA in the negative direction (p = .001 for students in pre-professional OTD programs, but did not predict GPA for post-professional students. Age, gender, and learning environment did not significantly influence the prediction of GPA in either group. The method and results of this study demonstrate that the ZTPI, an instrument used in the field of psychology, may have value in the profession of occupational therapy and occupational therapy doctoral programs.

  13. Developing students' understanding of scientific modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Christine Virginia

    Teaching students to create and use scientific models as well as to understand their nature has become an increasingly important goal in science education. This thesis reports on the evaluation of the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum, a ten and a half week physics curriculum designed to develop students' understanding of scientific modeling. In the curricular trials, eight classes of seventh grade students participated in model-oriented activities such as creating non-Newtonian computer microworlds to embody their conceptual models of force and motion, evaluating the accuracy and plausibility of their models, and reflecting on the nature of models. Analysis of pre- and post-curricular assessments as well as student research books, project reports, and in-depth interviews indicate that students had a significantly better understanding of the nature and utility of models after completing the Model-Enhanced ThinkerTools curriculum. Students also gained an understanding of a number of processes for developing and evaluating models. While interacting with the software and engaging in reflective discussions about the nature of models, students learned that models can include abstract representations and that models are useful for predicting events and testing ideas. Students also demonstrated sophisticated understanding of models in their interviews several months after the curriculum, particularly about the nature and. utility of models. Further, the curriculum developed students' conceptual models of force and motion as well as their inquiry skills and epistemological beliefs about the nature of scientific knowledge and learning. Correlations among the four pre/post curricular assessments suggest that modeling knowledge may play a role in the acquisition of the other types of knowledge. These results indicate that, while modeling knowledge may be difficult to develop, progress can be made by engaging students in generating and reflecting on the nature of models

  14. Challenges and Opportunities in Analysing Students Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Anaya, Paloma; Justi, Rosária; Díaz de Bustamante, Joaquín

    2017-01-01

    Modelling-based teaching activities have been designed and analysed from distinct theoretical perspectives. In this paper, we use one of them--the model of modelling diagram (MMD)--as an analytical tool in a regular classroom context. This paper examines the challenges that arise when the MMD is used as an analytical tool to characterise the…

  15. A Perspective on Student Evaluations, Teaching Techniques, and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Prashant; Krueger, Dale

    2016-01-01

    In the United States System of Education the growth of student evaluations from 1973 to 1993 has increased from 29% to 86% which in turn has increased the importance of student evaluations on faculty retention, tenure, and promotion. However, the impact student evaluations have had on student academic development generates complex educational…

  16. Feeling at hospitals: perspective-taking, empathy and personal distress among professional nurses and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Belén; Ambrona, Tamara; Gregory, Jennifer; Stocks, Eric; Oceja, Luis

    2013-04-01

    When facing a person in need, professional nurses will tend to adopt an objective perspective compared to nursing students who, instead, will tend to adopt an imagine-other perspective. Consequently, professional nurses will show lower vicarious emotional reaction such as empathy and distress. Using samples from Spain (Studies 1 and 2) and United states (Study 3), we compared perspective taking strategies and the emotional responses of nurses and nursing students when perceiving a sick child (Study 1) and a sick adult (Studies 2 and 3). Taken together, the results supported our hypotheses. We discuss the applied value of considering the relationship between perspective-taking and its emotional consequences for the nursing profession.

  17. A learning based model for career guidance of students with disabilites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræby, Anders

    The session aims at presenting a 4 stage model for career guidance for students with disabilities. In order to enable and empower the disa bled students regarding their employability and employability competencies at the labour market, the presentation shows how career guidance of these students...... must address their resources, challenges, potentialities and barriers regarding their employability from a learning based perspective. The objective of this session is to broaden the awareness of the particular challenges that career guidance for people with disabilities constitute....

  18. Cyberbullying among University Students: Gendered Experiences, Impacts, and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Faucher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is an emerging issue in the context of higher education as information and communication technologies (ICT increasingly become part of daily life in university. This paper presents findings from 1925 student surveys from four Canadian universities. The overall findings are broken down to determine gender similarities and differences that exist between male and female respondents’ backgrounds, ICT usage, experiences with cyberbullying, opinions about the issue, and solutions to the problem. We also examine the continuities between these findings and those of earlier studies on cyberbullying among younger students. Our findings also suggest that gender differences, which do emerge, provide some support for each of the three theoretical frameworks considered for understanding this issue, that is, relational aggression, cognitive-affective deficits, and power and control. However, none of these three models offers a full explanation on its own. The study thus provides information about cyberbullying behaviour at the university level, which has the potential to inform the development of more appropriate policies and intervention programs/solutions to address the gendered nature of this behaviour.

  19. Students' perspectives on the fourth year of medical school: a mixed-methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen J; Lockspeiser, Tai M; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the purpose and value of the fourth year of medical school from the perspective of medical students. In this study, the authors systematically explored the year's purpose and value as determined by students. In April 2011, the authors conducted semistructured focus groups with graduating fourth-year students at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to understand their perspectives on the purpose of the fourth year. Using results of a thematic analysis of the focus group data, the authors developed and administered a 10-item questionnaire to all graduating fourth-year medical students in May 2011. Questionnaire data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. A total of 17 students participated in two focus groups. Six themes related to the purpose of the fourth year emerged from the focus group data: career development and preparation, pursuing personal interests, career identification, exploration of diverse practice settings, influence of emotion, and flexibility and individualization. The questionnaire was completed by 134 of 148 students (91% response rate). Factor analysis of the questionnaire data identified five factors: strengthening one's residency application, developing skills, pursuing personal interests, exploring diverse practice settings, and identifying a career. Medical students uniformly identified the fourth year of medical school as having purpose and value, but their views on the fourth year's purpose differed. This finding underscores the importance of the individualization of the fourth year. Students' perspectives should inform any decisions made about modifying fourth-year curricula and structure.

  20. Student Success: Approaches to Modeling Student Matriculation and Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jien-Jou

    2013-01-01

    Every year a group of graduates from high schools enter the engineering programs across this country with remarkable academic record. However, as reported in numerous studies, the number of students switching out of engineering majors continues to be an important issue. Previous studies have suggested various factors as predictors for student retention in engineering. To assist the engineering students with timely advising early in their program, an effective prediction model of matriculation...

  1. The financial accounting model from a system dynamics' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the foundation of the financial accounting model. We examine the properties of the accounting equation as the principal algorithm for the design and the development of a System Dynamics model. Key to the perspective is the foundational requirement that resolves the temporal

  2. The financial accounting model from a system dynamics' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the foundation of the financial accounting model. We examine the properties of the accounting equation as the principal algorithm for the design and the development of a System Dynamics model. Key to the perspective is the foundational requirement that resolves the temporal confl

  3. The financial accounting model from a system dynamics' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the foundation of the financial accounting model. We examine the properties of the accounting equation as the principal algorithm for the design and the development of a System Dynamics model. Key to the perspective is the foundational requirement that resolves the temporal confl

  4. Retention and Progression of Postgraduate Business Students: An Australian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David; Ng, Eric; Birch, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an exploratory case study that investigated factors affecting the retention and progression of postgraduate business students at a major Australian distance education university. The majority of prior research addressing student retention focuses on undergraduate on-campus students, while this research…

  5. Supervision--The Most Variable of Variables: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Lynn; McKinnon, Margot

    2013-01-01

    The supervision literature often conceptualizes the supervisor as the primary person in doctoral students' progress. Yet, there is growing evidence that the supervisor is but one of many resources that students draw on. Our study takes up this idea in answering the question: What is students' experience of their supervisory relationships over…

  6. Student Privacy and Educational Data Mining: Perspectives from Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Jennifer; Kosturko, Lucy; FitzGerald, Clare; McQuiggan, Scott

    2015-01-01

    While the field of educational data mining (EDM) has generated many innovations for improving educational software and student learning, the mining of student data has recently come under a great deal of scrutiny. Many stakeholder groups, including public officials, media outlets, and parents, have voiced concern over the privacy of student data…

  7. The Value of Service-Learning: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspersz, Donella; Olaru, Doina

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the value of service-learning to students. There currently exists a gap in this understanding. We apply mixed-methods research using a sample of higher education students to develop this discussion. We found that students valued service-learning for the opportunity that it provides to increase their personal…

  8. Using Mobile Device for Learning: From Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Norazah Mohd; Suki, Norbayah Mohd

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine students' acceptance of mobile technology usage for learning. A questionnaire designed with five open-ended questions was distributed to 20 students from the Faculty of Industrial Art and Design Technology of Unisel (Universiti Industri Selangor), Malaysia. Results construes that students were not keen on m-learning…

  9. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  10. Exploring College Students' Cultural View from a Knowledge Creation Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Guo-Tsai; Hong, Huang-Yao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate college students' cultural views. To this end, an exploratory study was implemented, and data mainly came from students' essay writing (via individual reflective activities) and focused group discussion (via collective reflective activities). The participants were 176 college students taking a…

  11. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  12. Using Podcasting to Facilitate Student Learning: A Constructivist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'ambi, Dick; Lombe, Annette

    2012-01-01

    The paper employs two case studies to develop an approach for using podcasts to enhance student learning. The case studies involve two cohorts of postgraduate students enrolled on a blended course, over two years. In both cases, the institutional learning management system was used as a server to host the podcasts, giving students discretion on…

  13. What Knowledge Is of Most Worth? Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, John G.

    Researchers generally seek to improve student motivation without input from students concerning subject matter and teaching methods. Yet students make conceptual distinctions among different forms of knowledge, concerns, and contexts regarding knowledge. One distinction is between intellectual conventions (such as spelling) and matters of…

  14. Student Engagement in Very Large Classes: The Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeter, Daniel J.; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Ratima, Matiu; Morton, Susan; Dickson, Martin; Hsu, Dennis; Jackson, Rod

    2010-01-01

    The rapid growth in the student population observed in higher education over the past 10-15 years in some countries has coincided with an increased recognition of student engagement and its value in developing knowledge. Active learning approaches have the potential to promote student engagement with lectures, but this becomes more challenging as…

  15. Students Conceptualizing Transcription and Translation from a Cellular Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James; Buzzetta, Maegan

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult for students to conceptualize biochemical processes that are portrayed as two-dimensional figures in a textbook. Instead of relying on overheads, PowerPoint, or textbook figures, the authors have students imagine themselves actually being inside a cell. Students have a specific role in the cell: helping with the transcription and…

  16. Student Engagement and Departure Intention: An Australian University Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackling, Beverley; Natoli, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the departure intentions of an Australian university business student cohort that is characterised by high levels of diversity in pre-entry attributes. The study investigates the level of student engagement using the academic and social integration components of the Student Engagement Questionnaire (SEQ) based on Tinto's model…

  17. Classical trajectory perspective of atomic ionization in strong laser fields semiclassical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is an active field in modern physics and has versatile applications in such as attosecond physics, X-ray generation, inertial confined fusion (ICF), medical science and so on. Classical Trajectory Perspective of Atomic Ionization in Strong Laser Fields covers the basic concepts in this field and discusses many interesting topics using the semiclassical model of classical trajectory ensemble simulation, which is one of the most successful ionization models and has the advantages of a clear picture, feasible computing and accounting for many exquisite experiments quantitatively. The book also presents many applications of the model in such topics as the single ionization, double ionization, neutral atom acceleration and other timely issues in strong field physics, and delivers useful messages to readers with presenting the classical trajectory perspective on the strong field atomic ionization. The book is intended for graduate students and researchers...

  18. Learning Written English: The Perspective of Chinese ESL Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wailan Ng; Grace Zhang

    2007-01-01

    This study intends to identify the perceived difficulties of Chinese ESL students writing in English and their possible solutions. In particular, it aims to study the similarities and differences between the perceptions of Chinese ESL students and their ESL teachers. A total of 20 informants,consisting of ten Chinese ESL students and ten ESL teachers, evaluated three compositions written by Chinese ESL students. Both Student Evaluators and Teacher Evaluators were interviewed in order to have an in-depth understanding of their perceptions.

  19. Teaching Pharmacology at a Nepalese Medical School: The Student Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar PR, ,

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal conducts problem-basedpharmacology learning during small-group practical sessions.The present study was carried out to obtain student feedbackregarding the sessions and suggestions for improvement.MethodThe questionnaire-based study was carried out among firstyear medical students during July 2009. Respondents wereenrolled after explaining the aims and objectives of the studyand obtaining written, informed consent. Basic demographicinformation and student agreement with a set of 30statements using a modified Likert-type scale was noted.ResultsSixty-four of the 75 students (86% participated. The mediantotal score was 107 (maximum score 150 and was higheramong males, students from within the Kathmandu valley andself-financing students. The differences were not statisticallysignificant. The suggestions for improvement were improvingthe physical infrastructure of the lab and providing more timefor the practical exercises.ConclusionStudent opinion was favourable. The findings would be ofinterest to medical educators especially in developingcountries.

  20. Understanding Student Computational Thinking with Computational Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Aiken, John M; Douglas, Scott S; Burk, John B; Scanlon, Erin M; Thoms, Brian D; Schatz, Michael F

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the National Research Council's framework for next generation science standards highlighted "computational thinking" as one of its "fundamental practices". Students taking a physics course that employed the Arizona State University's Modeling Instruction curriculum were taught to construct computational models of physical systems. Student computational thinking was assessed using a proctored programming assignment, written essay, and a series of think-aloud interviews, where the students produced and discussed a computational model of a baseball in motion via a high-level programming environment (VPython). Roughly a third of the students in the study were successful in completing the programming assignment. Student success on this assessment was tied to how students synthesized their knowledge of physics and computation. On the essay and interview assessments, students displayed unique views of the relationship between force and motion; those who spoke of this relationship in causal (rather than obs...

  1. Student perspectives of an online module for teaching physical assessment skills for dentistry, dental hygiene, and pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Christine; Louizos, Christopher; Currie, Chelsea; Glassford, Lorraine; Davies, Neal M; Brothwell, Douglas; Renaud, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The integration of web-based learning into the curriculum of healthcare education has significantly increased over the past decade. This article aims to describe the student perspectives of an online module to teach physical assessment skills for pharmacy, dentistry, and dental hygiene students. A total of 103 students completed the online module: 48 third-year pharmacy students, 29 first-year dentistry students, and 26 first-year dental hygiene students. Students were asked to rate a list of 10 statements on a 5-point Likert scale on the relevance, impact, and overall satisfaction of the online module. Eighty-four of the 103 students (81.6% response rate) completed the questionnaire. While most students responded positively to the online content, pharmacy students responded more favorably compared with students from Dentistry and Dental Hygiene. These findings provide useful information to identify areas in which the web-based module can be improved for teaching skills in physical assessment across multiple healthcare programs.

  2. Student perspectives on diversity and the cultural climate at a U.S. medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Robert; McClendon, Jennifer; Henderson, Anita; Evans, Yolanda; Colquitt, Rosa; Saha, Somnath

    2007-02-01

    To obtain the perspectives of medical students at one school on racial/ethnic campus diversity and cultural competence and to gain their perceptions of the institutional climate around diversity at their university and of reasons for minority underrepresentation at their medical school. A student-driven survey of all medical students (N = 398) at a single medical school in the spring of 2003, supplemented by four focus groups from all racial and ethnic groups on the campus. A large majority of the responding students (n = 216; 54%) endorsed the value of campus diversity and the importance of cultural competence to the process of becoming a clinician. Most students felt their university had achieved a positive cultural climate, characterized by openness to diverse perspectives and attention to equity. Most students also felt that the university's programs and policies reflected a commitment to diversity, but fewer students--those from underrepresented minorities (URMs) in particular--felt that the university truly valued having a diverse student body and faculty. Most students felt that the lack of diversity on campus was a barrier to recruiting and retaining minority candidates. Some minority students also blamed the medical school's limited social, academic, and financial support, as well as inadequate efforts to recruit minority students. Medical students generally place a high value on campus diversity and cultural competence. URM students in particular felt that their university could do more to implement its commitment to diversity, including making greater efforts to recruit and retain URM students. These views constitute a barometer for medical schools to gauge and track their efforts to enhance campus diversity, incorporate cultural competence education, and create an inclusive and welcoming climate for students of all backgrounds.

  3. Analysis of ehealth search perspectives among female college students in the health professions using Q methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-04-27

    The current "Millennial Generation" of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants' objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0

  4. Evaluating medical student communication/professionalism skills from a patient's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E. Davis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate medical student's communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Methods: Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patient, using understandable language, and grooming. For students who had completed one year of residency these professionalism ratings were compared with those from their residency director. Results: Seven hundred forty-two questionnaires for 165 clerkship students from 2007 to 2009 were analyzed. Eighty-three percent of forms were returned with an average of 5 per student. In 64% of questionnaires, patients rated students very good in all five categories; in 35% patients selected either very good or good ratings; and <1% rated any student fair. No students were rated poor or very poor. Sixty-two percent of patients wrote complimentary comments about the students. From the Class of 2008, 52% of students received "better than their peers professionalism ratings from their PGY1 residency directors and only one student was rated "below their peers". Conclusions: This questionnaire allowed patient perceptions of their students' communication/professionalism skills to be evaluated in a systematic manner. Residency director ratings of professionalism of the same students at the end of their first year of residency confirms continued professional behavior.

  5. CSR Model Implementation from School Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Suzannah

    2006-01-01

    Despite comprehensive school reform (CSR) model developers' best intentions to make school stakeholders adhere strictly to the implementation of model components, school stakeholders implementing CSR models inevitably make adaptations to the CSR model. Adaptations are made to CSR models because school stakeholders internalize CSR model practices…

  6. Perspectives of Turkish Intern and Non-Intern Students towards Sport Management Internship within the Context of Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coknaz, Dilsad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences between intern and non-intern students in terms of their perspectives on sport management internship within the context of field experience. The subjects of the study were a total of 189 students. They were 4th year students who completed their internship and 3rd year students who were yet to…

  7. Perspectives of Turkish Intern and Non-Intern Students towards Sport Management Internship within the Context of Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coknaz, Dilsad

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences between intern and non-intern students in terms of their perspectives on sport management internship within the context of field experience. The subjects of the study were a total of 189 students. They were 4th year students who completed their internship and 3rd year students who were yet to…

  8. Mental models students hold of zoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Patricia Gail

    The purpose of this study was to depict the mental models high school students, ages 14-18, hold of zoos. This study also examined how students define conservation and the role of zoos in conservation. This study examined the differences in mental models of 84 students (1) 21 students who had visited a zoo with their teacher in the same semester in which the study was conducted, (2) 21 students who had visited a zoo during another school year with their teacher, (3) 21 students who had visited the zoo without a teacher, and (4) 21 students who had never visited a zoo. It also examined the mental models of students of different ethnicities and examined differences in mental models of young men and women. This study was conducted and the data analyzed using a qualitative methodology research design. All 84 students completed a demographic questionnaire, a concept map, and a ranking concepts exercise. Twenty-four students were interviewed. The findings indicated that: (1) students who had visited a zoo have a richer mental model of zoos than students who have never visited a zoo, (2) students who had visited a zoo with their teacher provided a deeper richer understanding of the roles of zoos in conservation and education, (3) students who have never visited a zoo do have mental models of zoos, (4) students do not mention conservation with respect to zoos unless specifically asked about the role of zoos in conservation, and (5) students did not mention the zoo's connection to species survival nor did they view zoos as a source of information for conservation-related topics. The data indicated that the mental models student hold of zoos consist of seven themes: (1) organisms, (2) people, (3) amenities, (4) descriptive terms, (5) habitats, (6) education, and (7) conservation. The seven themes were defined and used to create the Zoo Acuity Model. The central constructs of the Zoo Acuity Model are the Observation Framework, the Interaction Framework, and the Information

  9. Students' Precollege Engagement and the Development of a Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, Mark E.; Davidson, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing emphasis on internationalization and the requisite intercultural skills and temperament necessary in a global society, this study examines the relationship between precollege engagement and entering dispositions on a developmentally based set of global perspective outcomes. Based on a multi-institutional sample of 3,131 entering,…

  10. Topics in Bioethics: A Development of Student Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith A. Johnson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposing students to current biotechnological and medical issues is eye-opening for many students in a way that is not always achieved through lecture-based learning. Lecture or investigative teaching styles provide a tremendous knowledge base for the students, but sometimes these teaching styles do not allow the student to fully develop, especially personal attitudes to issues in bioethics. Through online videos, Hollywood movies, guided readings and classroom discussions, students in this course are informed of some bioethical topics, encouraged to learn about other topics, and use this gained knowledge to develop personal positions regarding the value and/or risk of the issues. This course has been well-received by previous students as a favorite in terms of both topics covered and style.

  11. New diploma in emergency medicine in France: the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehours, Emilie; Vallé, Baptiste; Concina, François; Bounes, Vincent; Ducassé, Jean-Louis; Lauque, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    French emergency medicine (EM) has undergone rapid changes with the establishment of a diploma in emergency medicine (DES). We aimed to question medicine students on their knowledge of and apprehensions regarding this new DES. We conducted an email cross-sectional survey among second-cycle medical students before their choice of resident speciality. This included a demographic study and an evaluation of the willingness to choose emergency specialization. Two thousand and three fully completed questionnaires were analysed. Twenty-six per cent of the students (n=524) planned to choose emergency specialization and 54% of the students (n=1084) knew that emergency specialization would be proposed as a full speciality. Seventy-six per cent of students considered it tough to practice as an entire career. This study clearly shows that EM represents an attractive option for medical students. The establishment of DES represents a major step in the improvement of EM.

  12. Topics in bioethics: a development of student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A

    2014-12-01

    Exposing students to current biotechnological and medical issues is eye-opening for many students in a way that is not always achieved through lecture-based learning. Lecture or investigative teaching styles provide a tremendous knowledge base for the students, but sometimes these teaching styles do not allow the student to fully develop, especially personal attitudes to issues in bioethics. Through online videos, Hollywood movies, guided readings and classroom discussions, students in this course are informed of some bioethical topics, encouraged to learn about other topics, and use this gained knowledge to develop personal positions regarding the value and/or risk of the issues. This course has been well-received by previous students as a favorite in terms of both topics covered and style.

  13. On being dyslexic: Student radiographers' perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Fred, E-mail: f.j.murphy@salford.ac.u [Directorate of Radiography, School of Health Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Salford, Greater Manchester, M6 6PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    The purpose of this paper was to provide an insight into life as a dyslexic student radiographer, identify barriers and risks in clinical training, and develop recommendations for the support of students with dyslexia. The paucity of research into dyslexia within the radiography profession is worrying, with attention focused only on the support provided by Higher Education Institutions (HEI) or inferences drawn from the experiences of other healthcare students. The impact and significance of dyslexia for student radiographers in clinical practice has never been investigated. Results: On a self-reporting scale of clinical tasks there was little or no difference between dyslexic students and non-dyslexics. Some minor traits commonly associated with dyslexics were also reported by students with no learning disabilities and an inclusion support plan for all students was advocated. In-depth interviews of 10 student radiographers revealed six distinct themes of visualising the disability, self-protection, strengths and talents, time, the badge of disability and adjustments and support. Like other healthcare students, some radiography students reported significant difficulties and prejudices and very little structured support in the clinical environment. Despite the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act being in place for several years, the support in clinical departments fell significantly short of that provided in the universities. The dyslexic students took extra responsibility for their own learning and some had developed complex coping strategies to overcome any difficulties. Conclusion: Several inclusive recommendations were developed as a result of this study that could be used to support all students on clinical placement.

  14. Medical Students' Perspectives on Implementing Curriculum Change at One Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Baker, Courtney E; Lomis, And Kimberly D

    2017-04-01

    Training physicians to be effective practitioners throughout their careers begins in undergraduate medical education with particular focus on self-directed inquiry, professional and interprofessional development, and competency-based assessment. A select number of medical schools are restructuring their curricula by placing the student at the center of content delivery to enhance the learning experience. While this restructuring may benefit the adult learner, administrators often make assumptions about how students will perceive and respond to such innovative and unfamiliar educational concepts. This can create a disconnect between students and their curriculum. Administrative mindfulness of student experiences is needed to ensure successful implementation of curricular change, facilitate the transition from old to new modalities, and train competent physician graduates.Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM) recently completed a curriculum update, and student representatives have been essential participants in the transition, from the earliest stages in preplanning to rapid-cycle feedback as the curriculum runs. Two of the authors are members of VUSM's Student Curriculum Committee, which facilitates gathering and relaying student feedback to the administration. Drawing from their experiences, five specific considerations to address and manage when implementing student-centered curricular change are presented: (1) Communicate the rationale, (2) acknowledge anxiety, (3) adjust extracurricular leadership roles, (4) manage "The Bulge" of learners in the clinical environment, and (5) foster ongoing collaboration of students and administrators. For each consideration, examples and proposed solutions are provided.

  15. Collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings: The students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suikkala, Arja; Kivelä, Eeva; Käyhkö, Pirjo

    2016-03-01

    This study deals with student nurses' experiences of collaborative learning in gerontological clinical settings where aged people are involved as age-experts in students' learning processes. The data were collected in 2012 using the contents of students' reflective writing assignments concerning elderly persons' life history interviews and the students' own assessments of their learning experiences in authentic elder care settings. The results, analyzed using qualitative content analysis, revealed mostly positive learning experiences. Interaction and collaborative learning activities in genuine gerontological clinical settings contributed to the students' understanding of the multiple age-related and disease-specific challenges as well as the issues of functional decline that aged patients face. Three types of factors influenced the students' collaborative learning experiences in gerontological clinical settings: student-related, patient-related and learning environment-related factors. According to the results, theoretical studies in combination with collaboration, in an authentic clinical environment, by student nurses, elderly patients, representatives of the elder care staff and nurse educators provide a feasible method for helping students transform their experiences with patients into actual skills. Their awareness of and sensitivity to the needs of the elderly increase as they learn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Hidden-Removal Model of Dam Perspective Drawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zi-ru; ZHOU Hui-cheng; LI Ming-qiu

    2011-01-01

    Aming at water conservancy project visualization, a hidden-removal method of dam perspective drawings is realized by building a hidden-removal mathematical model for overlapping points location to set up the hidden relationship among point and plane, plane and plane in space. On this basis, as an example of panel rockfill dam, a dam hidden-removal perspective drawing is generated in different directions and different visual angles through adapting VC++ and OpenGL visualizing technology. The results show that the data construction of the model is simple which can overcome the disadvantages of considerable and complicated calculation. This method also provides the new means to draw hidden-removal perspective drawings for those landforms and ground objects.

  17. Millennial Students' Mental Models of Information Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examines first-year college students' online search habits in order to identify patterns in millennials' mental models of information retrieval. The study employed a combination of modified contextual inquiry and concept mapping methodologies to elicit students' mental models. The researcher confirmed previously observed…

  18. Medical student perspectives of what makes a high-quality teaching practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macallan, Jennifer; Pearson, David

    2013-05-01

    Primary care has seen increasing involvement in undergraduate medical education following recommendation from the GMC in Tomorrow's Doctors. This is also influenced by an increasing number of medical students and changing patterns of health care. The variety of practices involved in delivering undergraduate primary care placements poses a challenge for the quality of these placements. The variety of learners in primary care may also affect this. To reflect this, Cotton et al in 2009 produced a national consensus list of quality criteria for community-based education using a variety of medical education stakeholders. This paper seeks to explore the medical student perspective of what makes a high-quality teaching practice. This study uses focus group interviewing to explore student perspectives of the range of factors that can contribute towards the quality of a primary care placement. Previous research into student perspectives of teaching in primary care has revealed a strong focus on tutor quality. Students in this study again highlighted the important of good GP tutors and organisation of placements. However, one novel finding was the emphasis that students placed on involving patients in teaching and the vital role that they play in this.

  19. Lecturer Perspectives on Dyslexia and Dyslexic Students within One Faculty at One University in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Harriet; Nunkoosing, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore lecturers' experiences with and perspectives on dyslexia and dyslexic students to inform the wider debate about the issues of dyslexia support in higher education. Data were collected and analysed using an abbreviated constructivist grounded theory method. Participants were categorised as "positive",…

  20. Lending Student Voice to Latino ELL Migrant Children's Perspectives on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Stephanie; Williams, Sherie

    2013-01-01

    Migrant workers in the United States have a well-documented history of struggle. This research explored the perspectives of a select group of middle school Latino migrant students in terms of their education in the United States. The research used qualitative and quantitative data gathered from a focus group session and a survey that explored the…

  1. Perspectives of South Korean Undergraduate Exchange Students Attending a University in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lishu; Huang, Li-Ching; Hare, Dwight

    2010-01-01

    This in-depth study examined the perspectives of 17 Korean undergraduate exchange students attending a U.S. southern university during the 2005-2006 school year. The struggles and frustrations they experienced; the difficulties they encountered socially, culturally, and academically; their contributions to the American academic community; and…

  2. Teacher-student relationships from a motivational perspective : The importance of involved and supportive teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, M. C. J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, teacher-student relationships are approached from a motivational perspective. Theoretical underpinnings come from Self-determination theory. Basic assumptions and central concepts of this theory are discussed. The meaning of this theory to the educational context, here teacher-stude

  3. Web 2.0 Technologies and Building Online Learning Communities: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalak, Mariam Mousa Matta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this action research was to explore students' perspectives regarding using Web 2.0 technologies to develop a community of learners. The course described in this study was a fully online course in an Educational Learning Technologies master's program at a medium-sized university in the U.S. Southwest. A variety of Web 2.0 tools…

  4. Web 2.0 Technologies and Parent Involvement of ELL Students: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-shin; Seger, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how ELL students' parents participated in a blog-mediated English language arts curriculum in a second grade classroom at a U.S. urban school, and how they supported their children's learning of school-based writing. Adopting ecological perspectives on technological affordances, this study views digital literacy as discursive…

  5. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  6. Exposure to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for Medical Students: Are There Optimal "Teaching Perspectives"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Barrett, Rowland; Grapentine, W. Lex; Liguori, Gina; Trivedi, Harsh K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The ability to develop quality medical student exposures in child and adolescent psychiatry is critical to the professional development of these future physicians and to the growth of recruitment efforts into the field. This study identifies teaching perspectives among child and adolescent psychiatry faculty to determine whether there…

  7. Teacher-student relationships from a motivational perspective : The importance of involved and supportive teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, M. C. J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, teacher-student relationships are approached from a motivational perspective. Theoretical underpinnings come from Self-determination theory. Basic assumptions and central concepts of this theory are discussed. The meaning of this theory to the educational context, here teacher-stude

  8. Creativity and Learning in the Virtual Sphere: Perspectives from Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Thalia M.; Swaminathan, Raji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the perspectives of doctoral students on creativity and learning in the virtual environment. The researchers investigated the following central research question: to what extent is creative thinking fostered in virtual environments? In addition, the paper also examined how creativity is practiced in…

  9. Perspectives on Inclusion: Students with LD, Their Parents, and Their Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiliar, Linda

    2009-01-01

    One of the most significant changes in education over the last few decades is the movement toward inclusive education. Many schools have adopted an inclusive approach of educating students with learning disabilities (LD) in the regular classroom. The present study utilized a multiple case study approach to examine the perspectives of stakeholders…

  10. Addressing the Needs of Students with Autism and Other Disabilities in China: Perspectives from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dorothy; Spencer, Vicky G.

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a developmental disability that has gained increasing attention during the past several decades in China. The two case studies presented in this article examined the perspectives of two school leaders on educating students with autism in China. Two school principals, one from a public school and one from a private school, were…

  11. National Board Certified Teachers' Perspectives on Using Growth Measures of Student Learning for Teacher Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James H.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examined the perspectives of twenty National Board Certified Teachers toward the use of growth measures of student learning for teacher evaluation. An analysis of responses from four focus groups that included elementary and secondary teachers, showed that there is much concern about the validity and efficiency of current…

  12. Flip or Flop? Students' Perspectives of a Flipped Lecture in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Julia; Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Evans, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes students' perspectives of a one-off flipped lecture in a large undergraduate mathematics service course. The focus was on calculating matrix determinants and was designed specifically to introduce debate and argumentation into a mathematics lecture. The intention was to promote a deeper learning and understanding through…

  13. The Perspectives of Secondary School Students with Special Needs in Spain during the Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitburn, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a situational analysis of inclusive schooling in Spain from the perspective of students with special educational needs. The purpose of this work was to learn how young people collectively considered their experiences of school inclusion. The participants--aged 12-19 years who attended six different…

  14. Moral Values Education in Terms of Graduate University Students' Perspectives: A Jordanian Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Amani

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on how moral values differ and vary according to variants such as education, culture, thoughts, religion, gender and family relations. It handles the issue of moral education in Jordan, from the perspective of graduate students in Petra University. Since we are facing new challenges in this era and region of the world, we are…

  15. Is Twitter an Effective Pedagogical Tool in Higher Education? Perspectives of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the perspectives of education graduate students of using Twitter as a pedagogical tool for 15 weeks as a required social media activity in class. The results indicated that participants in each course reported a positive learning experience of using Twitter. Although this was their first experience with Twitter, participants…

  16. Enhancing student motivation: a longitudinal intervention study based on future time perspective theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitema, J.; Peetsma, T.; van der Veen, I.

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of an intervention developed to enhance student motivation in the first years of secondary education. The intervention, based on future time perspective (FTP) theory, has been found to be effective in prevocational secondary education (T. T. D. Peetsma & I. Van

  17. Students' Interpersonal Perspectives on, Conceptions of and Approaches to Learning in Online Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to qualitatively explore students' interpersonal perspectives (i.e., "psychological safety," "value diversity," "trust" and "social interdependence") on, conceptions of and approaches to learning in an online peer assessment activity required for creating digital artistic works.…

  18. The Perspectives of Twelfth-Grade Students toward the Acquisition of Algebraic Skills throughout High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Melloney W. A.

    2017-01-01

    Too many students do not learn algebra and therefore do not graduate from high school. This basic qualitative study conducted in a large suburban public school district explored the perspectives of high school seniors who were at least 18 years old and at risk for not graduating from high school because they had not demonstrated an adequate…

  19. Lecturer Perspectives on Dyslexia and Dyslexic Students within One Faculty at One University in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Harriet; Nunkoosing, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore lecturers' experiences with and perspectives on dyslexia and dyslexic students to inform the wider debate about the issues of dyslexia support in higher education. Data were collected and analysed using an abbreviated constructivist grounded theory method. Participants were categorised as "positive", "neutral";…

  20. Theoretical Borderlands: Using Multiple Theoretical Perspectives to Challenge Inequitable Power Structures in Student Development Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abes, Elisa S.

    2009-01-01

    This article is an exploration of possibilities and methodological considerations for using multiple theoretical perspectives in research that challenges inequitable power structures in student development theory. Specifically, I explore methodological considerations when partnering queer theory and constructivism in research on lesbian identity…

  1. Investigating Students' Negotiation of Religious Faiths in ELT Contexts: A Critical Spiritual Pedagogy Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambu, Joseph Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Based on a larger case study project at an English language teacher education program in Indonesia, this article demonstrates how Christian and non-Christian students negotiate their religious faiths in English-language-teaching (ELT) settings. In view of the critical spiritual pedagogy perspective, the current study defies dichotomizing religious…

  2. Perspectives on Peer-Mentoring from Taiwanese Science and Engineering Master's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-nii

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the peer-mentoring experience from the perspective of 16 master's students majoring in science or engineering at a research-oriented university in Taiwan. Utilizing a qualitative method of phenomenology, these mentees shared their views about their peer-mentors through in-depth interviews. Participants…

  3. Adult ESOL Students and Service-Learning: Voices, Experiences, and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bippus, Sharon L.; Eslami, Zohreh R.

    2013-01-01

    This multiple-case study examined the unique perspectives of six adult English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) students who participated as the givers of a service in a semester-long service learning community college ESOL course. Their ages ranged from 19 to 45 and they hailed from five different countries (Colombia, Mexico, South Korea,…

  4. Strategies Used to Teach Mathematics to Special Education Students from the Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Desline A.

    2016-01-01

    The perspectives of special education teachers on the strategies used to teach mathematics to special education students were examined in this dissertation. Three central research questions that guided the study are: (a) What were New York special education teachers' opinions about the methods they use to teach mathematics to special education…

  5. Exposure to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry for Medical Students: Are There Optimal "Teaching Perspectives"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jeffrey; Barrett, Rowland; Grapentine, W. Lex; Liguori, Gina; Trivedi, Harsh K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The ability to develop quality medical student exposures in child and adolescent psychiatry is critical to the professional development of these future physicians and to the growth of recruitment efforts into the field. This study identifies teaching perspectives among child and adolescent psychiatry faculty to determine whether there…

  6. College Student Retention: A Self-Determination Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Jules

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to identify the relationship between a student's level of self-determination towards aspiring to receive a college degree and student retention from the first to second year. Deci & Ryan's (2000) self-determination theory served as the conceptual framework for this study. The fundamental assumption of…

  7. An Agency Theory Perspective on Student Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael E.; Zsidisin, George A.; Adams, Laural L.

    2005-01-01

    The emphasis in recent research on the responsibility of college and university business instructors to prepare students for future employment underscores a need to refine the evaluation of student performance. In this article, an agency theory framework is used to understand the trade-offs that may be involved in the selection of various…

  8. Students' Perceptions of Their Own Victimization: A Youth Voice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby, Emma-Kate; Campbell, Marilyn; Spears, Barbara; Slee, Phillip; Butler, Des; Kift, Sally

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the perceptions of 156 students who were victims of both traditional and cyberbullying (117 female, 45 male), ages 10 to 17 years, as to which form of bullying was more hurtful. Overall, students perceived traditional victimization to be more hurtful than cyber victimization. Reasons identified in the data to explain the…

  9. Asynchronous Threaded Discussions and Intercultural Learning: Student Sojourner Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jane

    2016-01-01

    This paper centers on student perceptions of a fully-online course that was designed to enhance their intercultural learning during study abroad. By way of a post-course questionnaire survey and interview, 22 international exchange students from a Hong Kong university divulged their views about this mode of learning. Although many lamented the…

  10. Accent, Identity, and a Fear of Loss? ESL Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrocklin, Shannon; Link, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Because many theorists propose a connection between accent and identity, some theorists have justifiably been concerned about the ethical ramifications of L2 pronunciation teaching. However, English-as-a-second-language (ESL) students often state a desire to sound like native speakers. With little research into ESL students' perceptions of links…

  11. Re-Framing Student Academic Freedom: A Capability Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The scholarly debate about academic freedom focuses almost exclusively on the rights of academic faculty. Student academic freedom is rarely discussed and is normally confined to debates connected with the politicisation of the curriculum. Concerns about (student) freedom of speech reflect the dominant role of negative rights in the analysis of…

  12. Expectations and Experiences of Inbound Students: Perspectives from Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores expectations and outcomes for inbound students at Umeå University, Sweden, comparing their expectations with what they actually experienced. Based on an initial sample of 296 students, 116 answered surveys before and after experiencing of studying abroad. The same individuals have been followed. Most of the respondents'…

  13. Unravelling Secondary Students' Challenges in Digital Literacy: A Gender Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argelagós, Esther; Pifarré, Manoli

    2017-01-01

    The use of the Internet to learn involves complex cognitive activities. Educational researchers claim more attention in studying the nature of students' challenges when using digital information for learning purposes. Our research investigated in depth the challenges that secondary students face when solving web information-problem tasks. We…

  14. University Students' Perspectives on Diagnostic Testing in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat; Bhaird, Ciarán Macan; Nolan, Brien

    2014-01-01

    Many universities issue mathematical diagnostic tests to incoming first-year students, covering a range of the basic concepts with which they should be comfortable from secondary school. As far as many lecturers are concerned, the purpose of this test is to determine the students' mathematical knowledge on entry. It should also provide an…

  15. Internationalization for Quality in Chinese Research Universities: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanhua; Yue, Yun

    2015-01-01

    China's rapidly expanding university system aims to balance quantity and quality through a variety of measures, including internationalization. This paper employs data from a survey of 1264 students from 39 higher education institutions in order to understand students' view on institutional approaches to internationalization. The data show that…

  16. School, Parent, and Student Perspectives of School Drug Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Whipp, Tracy J.; Bond, Lyndal; Toumbourou, John W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Schools use a number of measures to reduce harmful tobacco, alcohol, and drug use by students. One important component is the school's drug policy, which serves to set normative values and expectations for student behavior as well as to document procedures for dealing with drug-related incidents. There is little empirical evidence of…

  17. Parental Influence on Chinese Students' Achievement: A Social Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how social capital formed by effective parental practices within Chinese families influences student achievement. Survey responses from 266 students from Grades 4 to 6 in a suburban elementary school in China were analysed to identify their perceptions of parental practices (support, pressure, help, monitoring and…

  18. Students' Perceptions of Their Own Victimization: A Youth Voice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corby, Emma-Kate; Campbell, Marilyn; Spears, Barbara; Slee, Phillip; Butler, Des; Kift, Sally

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the perceptions of 156 students who were victims of both traditional and cyberbullying (117 female, 45 male), ages 10 to 17 years, as to which form of bullying was more hurtful. Overall, students perceived traditional victimization to be more hurtful than cyber victimization. Reasons identified in the data to explain the…

  19. University Students' Unions: Changing Functions, a UK and Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Lu; Cole, Michael; Worthington, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the functions of students' unions (SUs) through a UK case study. First, a functional classification of educational representation; wider representation; delivery of commercial services and faciliating a student community is outlined. Second, we specify a theoretical framework in terms of neo-liberalism and therapeutic…

  20. Parental Influence on Chinese Students' Achievement: A Social Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how social capital formed by effective parental practices within Chinese families influences student achievement. Survey responses from 266 students from Grades 4 to 6 in a suburban elementary school in China were analysed to identify their perceptions of parental practices (support, pressure, help, monitoring and…

  1. Taiwanese University Students' Perspectives on Experiential Learning and Psychosocial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yii-Nii; Lai, Pi-Hui; Chiu, Yi-Hsing Claire; Hsieh, Hui-Hsing; Chen, Yueh-Hua

    2016-01-01

    This study described the relations of experiential learning and psychosocial development of Taiwanese university students through the qualitative method of phenomenology. Thirty-six students, age ranged from 19 to 25 years, from three research-oriented universities in northern Taiwan were interviewed. Seven themes were delineated: (1) discovering…

  2. Student perspectives on sexual health: implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Wilson, Christina K; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Valvano, Abbey K; Waller, Jennifer L; West, Lindsey M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration requires that health professionals think holistically about presenting concerns, particularly for multimodal problems like sexual dysfunction. However, health professions students appear to receive relatively little sexual health education, and generally none is offered on an interprofessional basis. To assess current degree of interprofessional thinking in sexual health care, 472 health professions students in Georgia, United States, were presented with a sexual dysfunction vignette and asked to rate the relevance of, and their familiarity with, interventions offered by several professionals. They also were asked to identify the most likely cause of the sexual dysfunction. Students rated relevance and familiarity with interventions as highest for physicians and lowest for dentists, with higher ratings of nurses by nursing students. More advanced students reported greater familiarity with mental health, physician, and physical therapy interventions. Finally, nursing students were less likely to attribute the dysfunction to a physical cause. These findings indicate that students may prioritize biomedical approaches in their initial assessment and may need additional supports to consider the spectrum of biopsychosocial factors contributing to sexual functioning. To encourage interprofessional critical thinking and prepare students for interprofessional care, sexual health curricula may be improved with the inclusion of interprofessional training. Specific recommendations for curriculum development are offered.

  3. A CIT Investigation of Disruptive Faculty Behaviors: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K. Douglas; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recent focus on disruptive student behaviors in the classroom, little attention has been given to disruptive faculty behaviors. Utilizing theoretical concepts developed in the services-marketing literature, this study empirically explores student perceptions of disruptive faculty behaviors in the classroom. More specifically, this…

  4. Student Difficulties in Learning Density: A Distributed Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Clarke, David

    2012-01-01

    Density has been reported as one of the most difficult concepts for secondary school students (e.g. Smith et al. 1997). Discussion about the difficulties of learning this concept has been largely focused on the complexity of the concept itself or student misconceptions. Few, if any, have investigated how the concept of density was constituted in…

  5. In Their Words: Student Preparation and Perspectives on US Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    US universities are admitting higher percentages of international students, bringing into focus concerns with how to best support them once they are at the university. However, less attention has been paid to the preparation they undertake before matriculation. This study looks at how students are prepared before arrival and how this preparation…

  6. Pedagogy in Practice: School Pedagogy from Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Linor Lea; Hotam, Yotam

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of "pedagogy in practice" (PiP), referring to the immediate interaction between students' learning experiences and school's pedagogy and distinct from the pedagogy advocated "from above" by the school. We bring the concept of PiP into focus by analysing students' open-ended discourse about…

  7. Re-Framing Student Academic Freedom: A Capability Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The scholarly debate about academic freedom focuses almost exclusively on the rights of academic faculty. Student academic freedom is rarely discussed and is normally confined to debates connected with the politicisation of the curriculum. Concerns about (student) freedom of speech reflect the dominant role of negative rights in the analysis of…

  8. Causes of Gender Differences in Accounting Performance: Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wally-Dima, Lillian; Mbekomize, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    This study employs the survey method to investigate the factors that cause academic differences between female and male students at the largest university in Botswana. The population of this research was the students of the last three years of the 4 year Bachelor of Accountancy degree programme at the University of Botswana. Anchored on the prior…

  9. Enquiry-Based Learning and Formative Assessment Environments: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambell, Kay

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines case study research into first-year students' experiences of enquiry-based learning (EBL) on a year-long introductory theory module. Students were supported to carry out a series of authentic small-scale enquiries involving: (1) working in research teams; (2) gathering, disseminating and analysing data from the field; (3)…

  10. Parents' Perspectives on Parental Notification of College Students' Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosden, Merith; Hughes, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Although many colleges and universities use "parental notification" to inform parents of students' alcohol use, the impact of this intervention on student and parent behavior is unclear. Surveys were obtained from 326 parents of university undergraduates, 56 of whom had received a notification. Parent responses to the notification were…

  11. Understanding the Characteristics of Effective Professors: The Student's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thorsten; Reppel, Alexander; Voss, Roediger

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education institutions are realising that higher education could be regarded as a business-like service industry and they are beginning to focus more on meeting or even exceeding the needs of their students. Recent research findings suggest that the factors that create student satisfaction with teaching ("teaching…

  12. Student Perspectives on Oncology Curricula at United States Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Brandon C; Golden, Daniel W; Brower, Jeffrey V; Braunstein, Steve E; Hirsch, Ariel E; Mattes, Malcolm D

    2017-08-07

    Delivering a cohesive oncology curriculum to medical students is challenging due to oncology's multidisciplinary nature, predominantly outpatient clinical setting, and lack of data describing effective approaches to teaching it. We sought to better characterize approaches to oncology education at US medical schools by surveying third and fourth year medical students who serve on their institution's curriculum committee. We received responses from students at 19 schools (15.2% response rate). Key findings included the following: (1) an under-emphasis of cancer in the curriculum relative to other common diseases; (2) imbalanced involvement of different clinical subspecialists as educators; (3) infrequent requirements for students to rotate through non-surgical oncologic clerkships; and (4) students are less confident in their knowledge of cancer treatment compared to basic science/natural history or workup/diagnosis. Based on these findings, we provide several recommendations to achieve robust multidisciplinary curriculum design and implementation that better balances the clinical and classroom aspects of oncology education.

  13. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion education: Malaysian perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-peng Tey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students' attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. METHODS AND RESULTS: A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students' pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students' attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights.

  14. Medical students' attitudes toward abortion education: Malaysian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai-peng; Yew, Siew-yong; Low, Wah-yun; Su'ut, Lela; Renjhen, Prachi; Huang, M S L; Tong, Wen-ting; Lai, Siow-li

    2012-01-01

    Abortion is a serious public health issue, and it poses high risks to the health and life of women. Yet safe abortion services are not readily available because few doctors are trained to provide such services. Many doctors are unaware of laws pertaining to abortion. This article reports survey findings on Malaysian medical students' attitudes toward abortion education and presents a case for including abortion education in medical schools. A survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward abortion among medical students was conducted in two public universities and a private university in Malaysia in 2011. A total of 1,060 students returned the completed questionnaires. The survey covered about 90% of medical students in Years 1, 3, and 5 in the three universities. About 90% of the students wanted more training on the general knowledge and legal aspects of abortion, and pre-and post-abortion counseling. Overall, 75.9% and 81.0% of the students were in favor of including in medical education the training on surgical abortion techniques and medical abortion, respectively. Only 2.4% and 1.7% were opposed to the inclusion of training of these two methods in the curriculum. The remaining respondents were neutral in their stand. Desire for more abortion education was associated with students' pro-choice index, their intention to provide abortion services in future practice, and year of study. However, students' attitudes toward abortion were not significantly associated with gender, type of university, or ethnicity. Most students wanted more training on abortion. Some students also expressed their intention to provide abortion counseling and services in their future practice. Their desire for more training on abortion should be taken into account in the new curriculum. Abortion education is an important step towards making available safe abortion services to enable women to exercise their reproductive rights.

  15. Creating meaningful learning experiences: Understanding students' perspectives of engineering design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, Richard James Chung Mun

    There is a societal need for design education to prepare holistic engineers with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to innovate and compete globally. Design skills are paramount to the espoused values of higher education, as institutions of higher learning strive to develop in students the cognitive abilities of critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity. To meet these interests from industry and academia, it is important to advance the teaching and learning of engineering design. This research aims to understand how engineering students learn and think about design, as a way for engineering educators to optimize instructional practice and curriculum development. Qualitative research methodology was used to investigate the meaning that engineering students' ascribe to engineering design. The recruitment of participants and corresponding collection of data occurred in two phases using two different data collection techniques. The first phase involved the distribution of a one-time online questionnaire to all first year, third year, and fourth year undergraduate engineering students at three Canadian Universities. After the questionnaire, students were asked if they would be willing to participate in the second phase of data collection consisting of a personal interview. A total of ten students participated in interviews. Qualitative data analysis procedures were conducted on students' responses from the questionnaire and interviews. The data analysis process consisted of two phases: a descriptive phase to code and categorize the data, followed by an interpretative phase to generate further meaning and relationships. The research findings present a conceptual understanding of students' descriptions about engineering design, structured within two educational orientations: a learning studies orientation and a curriculum studies orientation. The learning studies orientation captured three themes of students' understanding of engineering design: awareness

  16. Modelling in life insurance a management perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Norberg, Ragnar; Planchet, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Focussing on life insurance and pensions, this book addresses various aspects of modelling in modern insurance: insurance liabilities; asset-liability management; securitization, hedging, and investment strategies. With contributions from internationally renowned academics in actuarial science, finance, and management science and key people in major life insurance and reinsurance companies, there is expert coverage of a wide range of topics, for example: models in life insurance and their roles in decision making; an account of the contemporary history of insurance and life insurance mathematics; choice, calibration, and evaluation of models; documentation and quality checks of data; new insurance regulations and accounting rules; cash flow projection models; economic scenario generators; model uncertainty and model risk; model-based decision-making at line management level; models and behaviour of stakeholders. With author profiles ranging from highly specialized model builders to decision makers at chief ex...

  17. Student Difficulties in Learning Density: A Distributed Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Clarke, David

    2012-08-01

    Density has been reported as one of the most difficult concepts for secondary school students (e.g. Smith et al. 1997). Discussion about the difficulties of learning this concept has been largely focused on the complexity of the concept itself or student misconceptions. Few, if any, have investigated how the concept of density was constituted in classroom interactions, and what consequences these interactions have for individual students' conceptual understanding. This paper reports a detailed analysis of two lessons on density in a 7th Grade Australian science classroom, employing the theory of Distributed Cognition (Hollan et al. 1999; Hutchins 1995). The analysis demonstrated that student understanding of density was shaped strongly by the public classroom discussion on the density of two metal blocks. It also revealed the ambiguities associated with the teacher demonstration and the student practical work. These ambiguities contributed to student difficulties with the concept of density identified in this classroom. The results of this study suggest that deliberate effort is needed to establish shared understanding not only about the purpose of the activities, but also about the meaning of scientific language and the utility of tools. It also suggests the importance of appropriate employment of instructional resources in order to facilitate student scientific understanding.

  18. Automated expert modeling for automated student evaluation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    The 8th International Conference on Intelligent Tutoring Systems provides a leading international forum for the dissemination of original results in the design, implementation, and evaluation of intelligent tutoring systems and related areas. The conference draws researchers from a broad spectrum of disciplines ranging from artificial intelligence and cognitive science to pedagogy and educational psychology. The conference explores intelligent tutoring systems increasing real world impact on an increasingly global scale. Improved authoring tools and learning object standards enable fielding systems and curricula in real world settings on an unprecedented scale. Researchers deploy ITS's in ever larger studies and increasingly use data from real students, tasks, and settings to guide new research. With high volumes of student interaction data, data mining, and machine learning, tutoring systems can learn from experience and improve their teaching performance. The increasing number of realistic evaluation studies also broaden researchers knowledge about the educational contexts for which ITS's are best suited. At the same time, researchers explore how to expand and improve ITS/student communications, for example, how to achieve more flexible and responsive discourse with students, help students integrate Web resources into learning, use mobile technologies and games to enhance student motivation and learning, and address multicultural perspectives.

  19. A Student-Centered Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihyar Hesson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the authors experience in applying different approaches of active learning and student-centered teaching, the main problem that prevented the achievement of the full advantages of these approaches is the lack of motivation of students for self-centered learning. A new model for a student-centered learning is presented in this work. This model is of teaching integrative thinking, based on existing models of creativity and synthesis. In this model, the student is put at the heart of a bigger learning process that includes instructors, specialists and the public. Usually students who are in the final year of their study will be the target of the application of this model as a part of a capstone course or final year project. This model promotes the research and thinking skills of the students as well as the gained motivation of self-learning as a result of being in contact with the specialists who might be their potential future employers. A proto-type web-based system based on this model was developed. Although it is applied on a sample of students from the Biology department, the system is readily expandable to any number of other disciplines without any complications or programming overheads. The results achieved from the application of this model were very encouraging.

  20. The perspectives of Caribbean high school students' experiences in American science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Renae Luenell

    The purpose of this study was to describe the perspectives of Caribbean high school students' experiences in American science classrooms. Research suggests that psychological, cultural, and socioeconomic perspectives influence the science experiences of African Americans or Blacks; the result of which is under-representation (Lewis et al., 2000). Nonetheless, what is uncertain is if these and other perspectives are similar to the science experiences of Caribbeans who also are majority black by race and rank as the 3 rd largest immigrant population in America's schools (Suarez-Orozco, 2000). Questions guiding this study were: (1) What are the perspectives of Caribbean high school students' experiences in American science classrooms? (2) What can we learn from the perspectives of Caribbean high school students' science experiences that may address issues of participation and interest; consequently, influencing the overall performance of ethnic minorities in school science? Sociocultural theory provides the framework for the analysis of the study. Four Caribbean born students in an American high school participated in this naturalistic qualitative research. A constant comparative method was used to categorize and analyze the data and uncover meaningful patterns that emerged from the four interviews and written documents. Although there were similarities between African Americans' science experiences as documented in the literature and that of Caribbeans in this study, the Caribbean participants relied on prior native experiences to dictate their perspectives of their science experiences in America. According to Caribbean students, American science high schools classrooms utilize an objective style of assessments; are characterized by a lack of teacher support; allow behavioral problems in the classroom; and function through different communication styles than the native Caribbean science classroom environment. This study implies science educators should be sensitive

  1. Modelling stable water isotopes: Status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stable water isotopes H2 18O and HDO within various parts of the Earth’s hydrological cycle has clearly improved our understanding of the interplay between climatic variations and related isotope fractionation processes. In this article key principles and major research results of stable water isotope modelling studies are described. Emphasis is put on research work using explicit isotope diagnostics within general circulation models as this highly complex model setup bears many resemblances with studies using simpler isotope modelling approaches.

  2. Inclusion Through Exclusion: Teachers’ Perspectives on Teaching Students with Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lozic

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today the number of Swedish students attending schools for students in the need of special educational support, due to their difficulties to reach intended learning outcomes, has increased. The article describes some challenges teachers working with children with high functioning autism face. The study is based on interviews with six-form colleges teachers working in a Swedish school for students with high functioning autism. Questions that are raised in this study are: How do teachers interpret students’ needs and experiences? Which educational considerations dominate teachers’ reflections about educational practices? In which ways their school contributes to the implementation of ‘education for all’? The analysis shows that teachers advocate personalised teaching solutions, extra resources and methodological clarity. Teachers are expected to be highly adaptable and their work centres on students’ social skills, behavioural training and socialization of youth, rather than only helping students to achieve learning outcomes. Educational policies of inclusion are partly based on exclusionary processes.

  3. Factors affecting the performance of undergraduate medical students: A perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Mandal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Performance of medical students in developing nations like India is perceived to have largely declined. Aims: We attempted to assess the reasons behind such trends. Settings and Design: Students in their third year of medical study were given a predesigned, pretested structured and validated questionnaire that they filled in anonymously. The key areas assessed were concentration, interest and understanding of the subject and other perceived causes of poor performance. Tests for descriptive statistics were applied for evaluation. Results and Conclusions: One hundred and fifty students participated in the study. Fifty-five (36.66% students performed poorly. Male gender, inability to clear the previous professional examination at the first attempt, difficulty in understanding medium of instruction, self-assessed depression, sleep disorders and perceived parental and peer pressure and dissatisfaction with career choice were significantly linked with poor performance (P<0.05 for each factor. Socioeconomic status and regularity in class were not linked to academic performance.

  4. Client confidentiality: Perspectives of students in a healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [4] The legal approach to confidentiality is based on an individualistic perception of patient ... Although students understand what respecting confidentiality means, as laid .... practice in order to build trust and strong interpersonal relationships.

  5. Exploring Graduate Students' Perspectives towards Using Gamification Techniques in Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniah ALABBASI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Teachers and educational institutions are attempting to find an appropriate strategy to motivate as well as engage students in the learning process. Institutions are encouraging the use of gamification in education for the purpose of improving the intrinsic motivation as well as engagement. However, the students’ perspective of the issue is under-investigated. The purpose of this research study was to explore graduate students’ perspectives toward the use of gamification techniques in online learning. The study used exploratory research and survey as the data collection tool. Forty-seven graduate students (n = 47 enrolled in an instructional technology program studied in a learning management system that supports gamification (TalentLMS. The average total percentages were calculated for each survey section to compose the final perspective of the included students. The results showed a positive perception toward the use of gamification tools in online learning among graduate students. Students require effort-demanding, challenging, sophisticated learning systems that increase competency, enhance recall memory, concentration, attentiveness, commitment, and social interaction. Limitations of the study are identified, which highlights the need for further research on the subject matter.

  6. Enquiry-based learning and formative assessment environments: student perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Sambell, Kay

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines case study research into first-year students’ experiences of enquiry based learning (EBL) on a year-long introductory theory module. Students were supported to carry out a series of authentic small-scale enquiries involving: • working in research teams; • gathering, disseminating and analysing data from the field; • sharing their interim findings as ‘work-in-progress’ reports; and • becoming involved in peer communities via a student conference. Semi-structured interviews ...

  7. TEAM TEACHING IN JAPAN FROM THE PERSPECTIVES OF THE ALTs, THE JTEs, AND THE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ann Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This case study explores team teaching in Japan from the perspectives of JTEs (Japanese English Teachers, ALTs (Assistant Language Teachers, and students. Special focus is attributed to teachers and students’ perceptions of ALT and JTE roles. To determine the perspectives of all three participants, 112 students, 4 JTES and 2 ALTs from a Japanese high school in Chiba Prefecture were surveyed. Fieldwork was conducted over a ten-day period at the research site in 2009 to collect data in the form of questionnaires, interviews, and class observations. The findings indicate more of a mismatch between students’ perceptions of their teachers’ roles than between teachers. The results also reveal the students prefer a combination of both teachers and find team-taught classes more beneficial to developing their English skills.

  8. Network Modeling and Simulation A Practical Perspective

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    Guizani, Mohsen; Khan, Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Network Modeling and Simulation is a practical guide to using modeling and simulation to solve real-life problems. The authors give a comprehensive exposition of the core concepts in modeling and simulation, and then systematically address the many practical considerations faced by developers in modeling complex large-scale systems. The authors provide examples from computer and telecommunication networks and use these to illustrate the process of mapping generic simulation concepts to domain-specific problems in different industries and disciplines. Key features: Provides the tools and strate

  9. The Perspectives of Students and Teachers in the English Department in the College of Basic Education on the Student Evaluation of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqi, Hanan A.; Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Dashti, Abdulmuhsin A.; Shuqair, Khaled M.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of students' evaluation of teachers in higher education, this paper examines the perspectives of students and faculty members in the English Department in the college of Basic education (CBE) in the State of Kuwait. The study is based on a survey that covered 320 students and 19 members of staff in the English department. The study…

  10. Understanding Middle School Students' Difficulties in Explaining Density Differences from a Language Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Lay Hoon; Clarke, David; Hart, Christina

    2015-09-01

    This study examines how a class of Grade 7 students employed linguistic resources to explain density differences. Drawing from the same data-set as a previous study by, we take a language perspective to investigate the challenges students face in learning the concept of density. Our study thus complements previous research on learning about density which has mostly focussed on the conceptual challenges. The data consist of transcripts of lessons on density and students' written assignments. Using selected analytical categories from the Systemic Functional Linguistics framework, we first examined students' use of linguistic resources in their written reports of a practical activity. We then compared the language employed by the students with the instructional language, identifying possible links. Our analysis identified specific aspects of language that the students need to appropriate in order to express an understanding of density that aligns with a scientific perspective. The findings from this study illuminate ways by which teachers could assist students in overcoming the linguistic challenges in explaining density differences, which complement those made by existing studies that focus on conceptual challenges.

  11. Examination about the effects of future career choice on time perspective in Japanese high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Manabu

    2015-03-30

    This study investigated types of career choice in high school students and examined the effects of career paths on time perspective development. The participants were 4,756 third grade students from nine public high schools in Tokyo. The high school questionnaire survey was conducted throughout autumn of 2008, 2009, and 2010. One year later, 962 graduates participated in the follow-up questionnaire survey by post. Distinguishing gender difference among career paths was found. Girls tend to choose significantly shorter learning careers (p college or vocational school in comparison to boys. Career indecision, i.e., students who could not set a concrete future career in high school, had significantly more negative time perspective than other groups (p school to school transition" and "school to work transition". It is suggested that the "school to work transition" tends to be more critical for adolescents and has negative effects on time perspective. These results suggest that the goal content in careers may promote or inhibit the formation of time perspectives during the graduation transition.

  12. Cyberpsychology: a human-interaction perspective based on cognitive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emond, Bruno; West, Robert L

    2003-10-01

    This paper argues for the relevance of cognitive modeling and cognitive architectures to cyberpsychology. From a human-computer interaction point of view, cognitive modeling can have benefits both for theory and model building, and for the design and evaluation of sociotechnical systems usability. Cognitive modeling research applied to human-computer interaction has two complimentary objectives: (1) to develop theories and computational models of human interactive behavior with information and collaborative technologies, and (2) to use the computational models as building blocks for the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive technologies. From the perspective of building theories and models, cognitive modeling offers the possibility to anchor cyberpsychology theories and models into cognitive architectures. From the perspective of the design and evaluation of socio-technical systems, cognitive models can provide the basis for simulated users, which can play an important role in usability testing. As an example of application of cognitive modeling to technology design, the paper presents a simulation of interactive behavior with five different adaptive menu algorithms: random, fixed, stacked, frequency based, and activation based. Results of the simulation indicate that fixed menu positions seem to offer the best support for classification like tasks such as filing e-mails. This research is part of the Human-Computer Interaction, and the Broadband Visual Communication research programs at the National Research Council of Canada, in collaboration with the Carleton Cognitive Modeling Lab at Carleton University.

  13. Modeling of Past Climates: Some Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzbach, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Important new ideas related to modeling of past climates go hand in hand with new observations, with advances in our understanding and ability to represent physical and biogeochemical processes, and with advances in computer capacity and speed. Important first steps in quantitative climate modeling using energy balance models were underway in the early 20th century. Dynamical climate models began to be used to study past climates in the 1970s and 1980s, with a focus first on the atmosphere, and then on coupled models of atmosphere and upper ocean. In the past decades, coupled dynamical models include atmosphere, global ocean, vegetation, cryosphere and carbon cycle components. This astonishingly rapid development in modeling potential has been greatly facilitated by the rapid increase in computational power. Equally important is the rapid development of more diverse, accurate and worldwide observations of present and past environments from land, lakes, oceans and ice. The topics of early, more recent, and current research on modeling of past climates come from a diverse range of ideas about the mechanisms that might force fundamental changes in climate - for example: changes in greenhouse gases, changes in insolation caused by orbital changes, changes in land-sea distribution, changes in orography, and changes in ocean gateways. Past and current research on these topics, using climate models, illustrates the process and the progress. Certain fundamental principles of modeling and analysis have been important in the past, are important now, and most likely will continue to be important. These principles will be enumerated. Looking toward the future, new observations, improved models and even faster computers are to be expected. But there will also be new challenges: intermodel comparisons and analysis and correction of model bias, understanding feedback processes, understanding non-linear responses, understanding the response to combinations of forcing, and studying

  14. Problem based learning in midwifery--the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Catherine J; McCourt, Christine; Beake, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been adopted in many settings for the education of health professionals. It has generally been evaluated well by students although much of the literature comes from medical education. The aim of this study was to ascertain the views of student midwives at the beginning and at the end of their programme and three months after graduation about the use of a PBL based programme in midwifery. Eight focus groups were conducted with students whilst undertaking a PBL programme from both a shortened and three year programme across two sites. A questionnaire was sent 3 months after graduation to midwives who had completed the programme. Key themes which emerged from this study were that although students gained skills in information retrieval and critique some did not always feel well prepared for practice. The focus on individual presentations in the tutorial tended to be interpreted as performance rather than discussion in a spirit of enquiry. Students reported being particularly anxious at the beginning of their programme about their learning. They felt that their experience was dependent upon the participation and motivation of the group members.

  15. Bidirectional associations between future time perspective and substance use among continuation high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elizabeth; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Unger, Jennifer B; Rohrbach, Louise Ann; Sun, Ping; Sussman, Steve

    2013-06-01

    We examined whether a bidirectional, longitudinal relationship exists between future time perspective (FTP), measured with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, and any past 30-day use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, or hard drugs among continuation high school students (N = 1,310, mean age 16.8 years) in a large urban area. We found increased FTP to be protective against drug use for all substances except alcohol. While any baseline use of substances did not predict changes in FTP 1 year later. The discussion explores why alcohol findings may differ from other substances. Future consideration of FTP as a mediator of program effects is explored.

  16. Student Modelling for Second Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Describes the student model of an intelligent computer-assisted language learning (CALL) system that is based on current theories in the field of second-language acquisition. Highlights include acquisition order of the target rules; language learning strategies; language transfer; language awareness; and student reactions. (Contains seven…

  17. Baccalaureate nursing students' information technology competence--agency perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    Baccalaureate nurses must meet information technology (IT) competencies expectations for employment and future professional development. Unfortunately, educational programs and accrediting groups have not identified specific outcomes, and IT is not integrated formally into many undergraduate program curricula. Meanwhile, nursing students and faculty are practicing in clinical agencies undergoing an informatics and technology revolution. Adding courses and content, hardware, software, and strategies such as distance learning and simulation have been recommended to improve competency development. However, little is known regarding nursing students' experiences with IT in clinical practice. Agencies used as sites for one undergraduate program were surveyed and asked to identify barriers and facilitators to students' IT competencies attainment. Ten agency, program, and policy factors affecting the quality of the learning experience in clinical agencies were identified. Results underscored that leadership to improve collaboration and communication between nursing practice, education, and policy groups is necessary to improve clinical environments for IT learning.

  18. Research into Cyberbullying: Student Perspectives on Cybersafe Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth STACEY

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a qualitative study designed to investigate the issues of cybersafety and cyberbullying and report how students are coping with them. Through discussion with 74 students, aged from 10 to 17, in focus groups divided into three age levels, data were gathered in three schools in Victoria, Australia, where few such studies had been set. Social networking sites and synchronous chat sites were found to be the places where cyberbullying most commonly occurred, with email and texting on mobile phones also used for bullying. Grades 8 and 9 most often reported cyberbullying and also reported behaviours and internet contacts that were cybersafety risks. Most groups preferred to handle these issues themselves or with their friends rather then alert parents and teachers who may limit their technology access. They supported education about these issues for both adults and school students and favoured a structured mediation group of their peers to counsel and advise victims.

  19. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  20. Developing Students Communicative Competence from a Stylistic Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕婷婷

    2016-01-01

    With the development of internationalization, English plays an increasingly significant role in people's daily life and work. Using English to transmit information and exchange ideas has become an indispensable means of communication. Therefore, developing students' ability to use language has gradually become the main purpose of oral English teaching. Stylistics studies how to use language appropriately in appropriate situations so that we can achieve the best effect of expression in verbal communication. It provides a new way of teaching English. This paper trying to analyze how to improve college students' communication competence by using stylistics theories from the aspects of teaching English culture, role relationship and communicative strategies.

  1. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  2. Developing Intercultural Understanding for Study Abroad: Students' and Teachers' Perspectives on Pre-Departure Intercultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, P.; Bavieri, L.; Ganassin, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on students' and teachers' perspectives on a programme designed to develop Erasmus students' intercultural understanding prior to going abroad. We aimed to understand how students and their teachers perceived pre-departure materials in promoting their awareness of key concepts related to interculturality (e.g.,…

  3. Emotions and Emotion Regulation in Undergraduate Studying: Examining Students' Reports from a Self-Regulated Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Elizabeth A.; Hadwin, Allyson F.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined undergraduate students' reports of emotions and emotion regulation during studying from a self-regulated learning (SRL) perspective. Participants were 111 university students enrolled in a first-year course designed to teach skills in SRL. Students reflected on their emotional experiences during goal-directed studying episodes…

  4. "It's a Different Way of Thinking about History, Isn't It?" Student Perspectives on Learning Dance History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxley, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers student perspectives on the learning of dance history in a British University. The investigation focuses on the student experience. Recent researches into student learning and the idea of history provide a context for the study. A pedagogic research project in a British University sought, captured and analysed the views of…

  5. Quantitative magnetospheric models: results and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Gombosi, T.; Csem Team

    Global magnetospheric models are indispensable tool that allow multi-point measurements to be put into global context Significant progress is achieved in global MHD modeling of magnetosphere structure and dynamics Medium resolution simulations confirm general topological pictures suggested by Dungey State of the art global models with adaptive grids allow performing simulations with highly resolved magnetopause and magnetotail current sheet Advanced high-resolution models are capable to reproduced transient phenomena such as FTEs associated with formation of flux ropes or plasma bubbles embedded into magnetopause and demonstrate generation of vortices at magnetospheric flanks On the other hand there is still controversy about the global state of the magnetosphere predicted by MHD models to the point of questioning the length of the magnetotail and the location of the reconnection sites within it For example for steady southwards IMF driving condition resistive MHD simulations produce steady configuration with almost stationary near-earth neutral line While there are plenty of observational evidences of periodic loading unloading cycle during long periods of southward IMF Successes and challenges in global modeling of magnetispheric dynamics will be addessed One of the major challenges is to quantify the interaction between large-scale global magnetospheric dynamics and microphysical processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites Possible solutions to controversies will be discussed

  6. Understanding nursing students' perspectives on the grading of group work assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Morgan; Rogers, John

    2014-03-01

    Grading group work assessments so that students perceive the grade to be fair to all group members is sometimes challenging. This is particularly important in a higher education environment that is increasingly concerned with student perceptions of teaching quality and satisfaction. This article reports on research that compared undergraduate nursing students perceptions of two different approaches to the grading of group work assessment. A survey design was used to identify students' perspectives and preferences for different group work assessment methods. Participants were undergraduate bachelor of nursing students from a large, metropolitan university in Australia. Data analysis indicated that the perceptions of students around group work assessments changed little as they progressed across the program, although students who had experienced the calculation of individual grades for a group assessment preferred this approach. Many believed the grading of group assessments penalised good students and were less reliable than individual assessments. Students maintained the belief that teamwork skills were essential for the registered nurse role. In conclusion group work assessment should only be used when it is the best assessment method to demonstrate student learning of specific objectives. The weighted mark approach is the group work assessment grading approach of choice.

  7. Authentic research projects: Students' perspectives on the process, ownership, and benefits of doing research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Warren

    2005-11-01

    Authentic research projects are one type of inquiry activity as defined by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1993) and are a core component in science education reform movements. The purpose of this study was to examine high school students' perspectives of an authentic research project. The context for this study was a local Science and Engineering Fair (SEF) that involved students from a Metro-Atlanta public high school. This study provided information about this type of activity from the student's perspective, an emic viewpoint. In this qualitative study, demographic information was used for the purposeful selection of fourteen students making up the study sample. In this descriptive ethnography, data were collected via an open-ended survey, three individual interviews, a web log, and a group interview. Interviews were audio taped and conducted according to the protocol established by Lincoln and Guba (1998). Transcripts of the interviews, web logs, and survey responses were coded and analyzed by the constant comparative method as described by Glaser and Strauss (1965). Reliability and validity were achieved through member checks and triangulation. Using Gowin's Vee diagram (1981) as a theoretical framework for analysis, themes emerged describing the students' research experience. The themes included the students' initial reactions, difficulty getting started, accepting ownership of their project, growing interest, acknowledged benefits of the research experience, and a reflective look back at their experience. Overall, students described the authentic research experience as a worthwhile activity. The implications of the study are two-fold. At the practitioner level, teachers should engage students in research, but should do so in a manner that maximizes authenticity. Examples may include having students present a formal prospectus and work with a scientist mentor. For Science Educators in teacher preparation programs, there should be an

  8. COMMUNICATION STRATEGY ABOUT BUSINESS MODELS: STAKEHOLDERS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojoagă Alexandru

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations inform stakeholders about their current and future activities, processes, created value, strategic intentions, and other information that may influence the established relationships. Organizations choose to communicate with stakeholders by different means and in varied ways. The annual report represents a way of communicating between companies and their stakeholders, and it is offering comprehensive information about how companies operates and creates value. The business model is an emerging concept in management literature and practice. The concept describes the logic by which a organization creates, maintains and delivers value for its stakeholders. Through annual reports organisations can communicate to stakeholders information about their business models.We investigated how information about business models is explicitly communicated through annual reports, and how this information is reffering to stakeholders. Our paper aims to reveal which stakeholders are more often mentioned when organizations are communicating about business models through annual reports. This approach shows the attention degree given by organizations to stakeholders. We perceived this from a strategic point of view, as a strategic signal. Thus, we considered if the stakeholder is mentioned more frequent in the communicated message it has a greater role in communication strategy about business model. We conducted an exploratory research and have realized a content analysis.The analysed data consist in over a thousand annual reports from 96 organizations. We analysed the informations transmitted by organizations through annual reports. The annual reports were for a time period of 12 years. Most of the selected companies are multi-business, and are operating in different industries. The results show the stakeholder’s hierarchy based on how often they were mentioned in the communicated messages about business models through annual reports. Based on our

  9. Social Responsibility in Advertising: A Marketing Communications Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Alice; Fullerton, Jami A.; Kim, Yeo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although advertising has played a key role in bringing corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the public agenda on behalf of agency clients, little effort has been made to define what social responsibility means in advertising. A national survey of 1,045 advertising and marketing communications students from 176 colleges and universities were…

  10. Student Perspectives of Imaging Anatomy in Undergraduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Jorge Americo Dinis; Barbosa, Joselina Maria Pinto; Ferreira, Maria Amelia Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Radiological imaging is gaining relevance in the acquisition of competencies in clinical anatomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of medical students on teaching/learning of imaging anatomy as an integrated part of anatomical education. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the perceptions of second-year students…

  11. Student Mobility and Internationalisation in Higher Education: Perspectives from Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Paloma; Woodin, Jane; Lundgren, Ulla; Byram, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Internationalisation is high on the agenda of higher education institutions across the world. Previous research on national and local policies surrounding this phenomenon has identified different discourses of internationalisation which may have an effect on practices such as student mobility. In order to understand better the role of student…

  12. Student Perspectives of Computer Literacy Education in an International Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilache, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Computer literacy education is an integral part of early university education (it often starts at the high school level). A wide variety of university course structures and teaching styles exist and, at the same time, the knowledge levels of incoming students are varied. This issue is even more pressing in an international environment. This paper…

  13. K-12 Students with Concussions: A Legal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Brown, Brenda Eagan

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a multipart analysis of the public schools' responsibility for students with concussions. The first part provides the prevailing diagnostic definitions of concussions and postconcussive syndrome. The second and central part provides (a) the legal framework of the two overlapping federal laws--the Individuals with Disabilities…

  14. Perception and Awareness of Islamic Accounting: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswantoro, Dodik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perception and awareness of Islamic accounting of undergraduate accounting students at Universitas Indonesia. The Indonesian Institute of Accountants has an Islamic Accounting Certification and a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) test, meaning that the course's competency should satisfy both…

  15. Group Composition Affecting Student Interaction and Achievement: Instructors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Simon A.; Kuestermeyer, Bailey N.; Westmeyer, Kara A.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple research studies have been conducted that focus on various uses of collaborative learning in and out of the classroom in higher education institutions. The purpose of this article is to review previously published literature regarding group composition and how it affects student interaction and achievement. Group composition research has…

  16. The International Mobility of Chinese Students: A Cultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Anyone hoping to understand China and Chinese people's behaviour in the present day must examine China's long history and culture, as these often have crystallized into current behavioural patterns. This paper discusses one important push-out factor for Chinese students' outbound mobility, and an element that is ignored in many futuristic…

  17. Student Mobility and Internationalisation in Higher Education: Perspectives from Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Paloma; Woodin, Jane; Lundgren, Ulla; Byram, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Internationalisation is high on the agenda of higher education institutions across the world. Previous research on national and local policies surrounding this phenomenon has identified different discourses of internationalisation which may have an effect on practices such as student mobility. In order to understand better the role of student…

  18. Challenges of International Students in a Japanese University: Ethnographic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Seong

    2017-01-01

    The author investigates what challenges four international students (Vietnamese, Filipino, Brazilian, and Chinese) faced and how they coped with these dilemmas in a Japanese language program during the first semester in 2014. Multiple apparatuses (e.g., field notes, face-to-face oral interviews, focal group conversations, and semi-structured…

  19. Examining Students' Generalizations of the Tangent Concept: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çekmez, Erdem; Baki, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a tangent is important in understanding many topics in mathematics and science. Earlier studies on students' understanding of the concept of a tangent have reported that they have various misunderstandings and experience difficulties in transferring their knowledge about the tangent line from Euclidean geometry into calculus. In…

  20. Social Responsibility in Advertising: A Marketing Communications Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Alice; Fullerton, Jami A.; Kim, Yeo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Although advertising has played a key role in bringing corporate social responsibility (CSR) to the public agenda on behalf of agency clients, little effort has been made to define what social responsibility means in advertising. A national survey of 1,045 advertising and marketing communications students from 176 colleges and universities were…

  1. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students' language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of…

  2. Student Leaders at Women's Postsecondary Institutions: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Kristen A.; Lytle, Jesse H.

    2010-01-01

    The single-sex higher education sector is growing worldwide as more women seek access to postsecondary education. Although positive learning outcomes--including leadership development--of women's colleges are well documented in the United States, less is known internationally. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study of 46 student leaders…

  3. Generational Perspective of Higher Education Online Student Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Chad James

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether students associated with a generational group exhibit similar learning styles as identified by the Felder and Soloman Index of Learning Styles instrument. The secondary purpose was to determine to what degree these generational groups rate their satisfaction with online education through the use…

  4. Inequalities and Agencies in Workplace Learning Experiences: International Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; Soejatminah, Sri

    2017-01-01

    National systems of vocational education and training around the globe are facing reform driven by quality, international mobility, and equity. Evidence suggests that there are qualitatively distinctive challenges in providing and sustaining workplace learning experiences to international students. However, despite growing conceptual and empirical…

  5. Experiencing Beach in Australia: Study Abroad Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yoshifumi; Payne, Phillip G.

    2011-01-01

    The current "Australian-"ness"" of outdoor environmental education is an evolving "set" of socio-cultural constructions. These constructions can be interpreted within the circumstances of an empirical study of tertiary study abroad students' participation in an undergraduate semester long unit "Experiencing the Australian Landscape" (EAL) as an…

  6. Factors Influencing Knowledge Sharing among Undergraduate Students: A Malaysian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hway-Boon; Yeap, Peik-Foong; Tan, Siow-Hooi; Chong, Lee-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge sharing can enhance learning and help to build the knowledge workforce. This paper reports on a study of knowledge sharing behaviour among undergraduate students in Malaysia. Knowledge sharing was found to be influenced by the mechanisms used, various barriers to communication and the motivations behind knowledge sharing. The mechanisms…

  7. PhD by Publication: A Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kanowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the first author's experiences as an Australian doctoral student undertaking a PhD by publication in the arena of the social sciences. She published nine articles in refereed journals and a peer-reviewed book chapter during the course of her PhD. We situate this experience in the context of current discussion about doctoral publication practices, in order to inform both postgraduate students and academics in general. The article discusses recent thinking about PhD by publication and identifies the factors that students should consider prior to adopting this approach, in terms of university requirements, supervisors' attitudes, the research subject matter, intellectual property, capacity and working style, and issues of co-authorship. It then outlines our perceptions of the advantages and disadvantages of undertaking a PhD by publication. We suggest that, in general, the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. We conclude by reflecting on how the first author's experiences relate to current discussions about fostering publications by doctoral students.

  8. Student's Perspectives on Taking Courses Online, Blended, or a Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifter, Catherine C.; Ifenthaler, Dirk; White, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Online education has a relatively short history in the grand history of education. With options for online delivery modes developed over the last two decades, understanding student motivations for choosing one option over another will be helpful to any institution of higher education planning new offerings. This reflective paper presents the…

  9. Educational Reform from the Perspective of the Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez-Martinez, Claudio-Rafael; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Felipe; Cardona-Toro, Jose-Gerardo; Díaz-Renteria, María-Guadalupe; Alvarez, Maria-Ines; Rendon, Hector; Valero, Isabel; Morfin, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Educational policies are tools that the state prepares to generate conditions that allow access to and retention in schools, with the consequent reduction in school failure, increasing the external yield and fulfilling the expectations of the internal agents (teachers, students, school managers), external users (families, society, employers,…

  10. The Benefits of Learning Social Welfare: Lessons from Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Melissa E.; Cnaan, Ram A.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely assumed that most entering MSW students exhibit a primary interest in individual clinical practice but minimal understanding of or interest in welfare policy knowledge. However, this assumption is mostly based on attitudes before and at the beginning of encountering social welfare courses. Using a mixed-methods approach of both…

  11. Perspectives on Personal Learning Environments Held by Vocational Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, Teemu; Hacklin, Stina; Dillon, Patrick; Vesisenaho, Mikko; Kukkonen, Jari; Hietanen, Aija

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on personal learning environments (PLEs). The idea with PLEs is to put students in a more central position in the learning process by allowing them to design their own learning environments and by emphasising the self-regulated nature of the learning. This study describes the structure, functions and challenges of PLEs made by…

  12. Student Interactions at a College Canteen: A Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Much has been written about the style of lecturing that is adopted by lecturers in institutions of further and higher education. However, little has been written about interactions that take place in the informal settings of college and university campuses. Using an ethnographic approach, this paper presents an exploration of how students at the…

  13. Creativity and Giftedness in Culturally Diverse Students. Perspectives on Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Giselle B., Ed.; Houtz, John C., Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this text address issues concerned with identification and educational intervention with gifted students who are from culturally diverse backgrounds. Chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "The Culturally and Linguistically Diverse School Population in the United States" (Angela Reyes-Carrasquillo); (2) "Culturally…

  14. Value Types in Higher Education--Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewanowska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to propose the service-dominant logic in marketing as a framework for analysing the value co-creation process in the higher education sector and present the results of a quantitative study (a survey) conducted among business students from four Polish public universities. The results of the study led to identification of…

  15. K-12 Students with Concussions: A Legal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.; Brown, Brenda Eagan

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a multipart analysis of the public schools' responsibility for students with concussions. The first part provides the prevailing diagnostic definitions of concussions and postconcussive syndrome. The second and central part provides (a) the legal framework of the two overlapping federal laws--the Individuals with Disabilities…

  16. Identifying Good Student Teaching Placements: A Programmatic Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBoskey, Vicki Kubler; Richert, Anna Ershler

    2002-01-01

    Describes Mills College's graduate-level teacher credential program, addressing the appropriateness of student teaching placements in relation to the aims and ideology of the teacher education program and examining the four dimensions of fieldwork as a learning context (nested learning, blending principles, safety, and reflective focus).…

  17. "Facebook" for Informal Language Learning: Perspectives from Tertiary Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alm, Antonie

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of "Facebook" for out-of-class, informal language learning. 190 New Zealand university language students (Chinese, German, French, Japanese and Spanish) completed an anonymous online questionnaire on (1) their perceptions of "Facebook" as a multilingual environment, (2) their online writing…

  18. Geographic Perspectives with Elementary Students: The Silk Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate elementary students' explanations of how physical features of the land influence the location of humanly defined structures including trade routes, such as the silk routes. The silk routes were a series of caravan trade routes that extended from Turkey to China and were located as far south as India and…

  19. Synthesis and modeling perspectives of rhizosphere priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weixin; Parton, William J; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A; Phillips, Richard; Asao, Shinichi; McNickle, Gordon G; Brzostek, Edward; Jastrow, Julie D

    2014-01-01

    The rhizosphere priming effect (RPE) is a mechanism by which plants interact with soil functions. The large impact of the RPE on soil organic matter decomposition rates (from 50% reduction to 380% increase) warrants similar attention to that being paid to climatic controls on ecosystem functions. Furthermore, global increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration and surface temperature can significantly alter the RPE. Our analysis using a game theoretic model suggests that the RPE may have resulted from an evolutionarily stable mutualistic association between plants and rhizosphere microbes. Through model simulations based on microbial physiology, we demonstrate that a shift in microbial metabolic response to different substrate inputs from plants is a plausible mechanism leading to positive or negative RPEs. In a case study of the Duke Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiment, performance of the PhotoCent model was significantly improved by including an RPE-induced 40% increase in soil organic matter decomposition rate for the elevated CO2 treatment--demonstrating the value of incorporating the RPE into future ecosystem models. Overall, the RPE is emerging as a crucial mechanism in terrestrial ecosystems, which awaits substantial research and model development. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Modeling Concept Evolution: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Flavio; Velegrakis, Yannis; Mylopoulos, John; Bykau, Siarhei

    The world is changing, and so must the data that describes its history. Not surprisingly, considerable research effort has been spent in Databases along this direction, covering topics such as temporal models and schema evolution. A topic that has not received much attention, however, is that of concept evolution. For example, Germany (instance-level concept) has evolved several times in the last century as it went through different governance structures, then split into two national entities that eventually joined again. Likewise, a caterpillar is transformed into a butterfly, while a mother becomes two (maternally-related) entities. As well, the concept of Whale (a class-level concept) changed over the past two centuries thanks to scientific discoveries that led to a better understanding of what the concept entails. In this work, we present a formal framework for modeling, querying and managing such evolution. In particular, we describe how to model the evolution of a concept, and how this modeling can be used to answer historical queries of the form "How has concept X evolved over period Y". Our proposal extends an RDF-like model with temporal features and evolution operators. Then we provide a query language that exploits these extensions and supports historical queries.

  1. Country brand equity model: Sustainability perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Milivoj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a model of country brand equity that incorporates the issue of sustainability in determining destination brand equity. In particular, the model includes elements of sustainability as its core dimensions and promotes the concept of the country sustainability promise that transforms destination resources into the positive perception and experience. The theoretical model is empirically tested using global secondary data confirming that country image is the most important element followed by sustainability and loyalty. Also, the analysis suggests the existence of the higher order construct confirming the country brand equity concept. Based on the research findings, the article offers some implications to the destination managers by suggesting the direction for further development and strategy implementation.

  2. Electric vehicle business models global perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Beeton, David

    2014-01-01

    This contributed volume collects insights from industry professionals, policy makers and researchers on new and profitable business models in the field of electric vehicles (EV) for the mass market. This book includes approaches that address the optimization of total cost of ownership. Moreover, it presents alternative models of ownership, financing and leasing. The editors present state-of-the-art insights from international experts, including real-world case studies. The volume has been edited in the framework of the International Energy Agency's Implementing Agreement for Cooperation on Hy

  3. Nursing students' perspectives on clinical instructors' effective teaching strategies: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiee, Sina; Moridi, Glorokh; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Garibi, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    An important factor contributing to the quality of clinical education is instructors' teaching performance. The aim of this study was to identify clinical instructors' most effective teaching strategies from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All third- and fourth-year bachelor's nursing and midwifery students studying at the Nursing and Midwifery Faculty of Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences were recruited to the study by using the census method. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire and the self-report 30-item Clinical Instructors' Effective Teaching Strategies Inventory. The SPSS v.16.0 was used for data analysis. The most effective teaching strategies of clinical instructors from nursing and midwifery students' perspectives were respectively 'treating students, clients, and colleagues with respect' and 'being eager for guiding students and manage their problems'. Clinical instructors need to be eager for education and also be able to establish effective communication with students. Empowering clinical instructors in specialized and technical aspects of clinical education seems necessary.

  4. Understanding the Language Demands on Science Students from an Integrated Science and Language Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Lay Hoon; Clarke, David John; Hart, Christina Eugene

    2014-04-01

    This case study of a science lesson, on the topic thermal expansion, examines the language demands on students from an integrated science and language perspective. The data were generated during a sequence of 9 lessons on the topic of 'States of Matter' in a Grade 7 classroom (12-13 years old students). We identify the language demands by comparing students' writings with the scientific account of expansion that the teacher intended the students to learn. The comparison involved both content analysis and lexicogrammatical (LG) analysis. The framework of Systemic Functional Linguistics was adopted for the LG analysis. Our analysis reveals differences in the meaning and the way LG resources were employed between the students' writings and the scientific account. From these differences, we found the notion of condition-of-use for LG resources to be a significant aspect of the language that students need to appropriate in order to employ the language of school science appropriately. This notion potentially provides a means by which teachers could concurrently address the conceptual and representational demands of science learning. Finally, we reflect on how the complementary use of content analysis and LG analysis provides a way for integrating the science and language perspectives in order to understand the demands of learning science through language.

  5. Externalising Students' Mental Models through Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Nu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use concept maps as an "expressed model" to investigate students' mental models regarding the homeostasis of blood sugar. The difficulties in learning the concept of homeostasis and in probing mental models have been revealed in many studies. Homeostasis of blood sugar is one of the themes in junior high school…

  6. The investor perspective on business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Disclosure of information on strategies, business models, critical success factors, risk factors and value drivers in general has gained importance in recent years. Both policy makers and academics have argued that the demand for external communication of new types of value drivers is rising...

  7. Animal models of anxiety: an ethological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodgers R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of anxiety research, animal models are used as screening tools in the search for compounds with therapeutic potential and as simulations for research on mechanisms underlying emotional behaviour. However, a solely pharmacological approach to the validation of such tests has resulted in distinct problems with their applicability to systems other than those involving the benzodiazepine/GABAA receptor complex. In this context, recent developments in our understanding of mammalian defensive behaviour have not only prompted the development of new models but also attempts to refine existing ones. The present review focuses on the application of ethological techniques to one of the most widely used animal models of anxiety, the elevated plus-maze paradigm. This fresh approach to an established test has revealed a hitherto unrecognized multidimensionality to plus-maze behaviour and, as it yields comprehensive behavioural profiles, has many advantages over conventional methodology. This assertion is supported by reference to recent work on the effects of diverse manipulations including psychosocial stress, benzodiazepines, GABA receptor ligands, neurosteroids, 5-HT1A receptor ligands, and panicolytic/panicogenic agents. On the basis of this review, it is suggested that other models of anxiety may well benefit from greater attention to behavioural detail

  8. Relevance of Student Teaching Skills and Activities from the Perspective of the Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the extent to which student teachers deem traditional student teaching skills and activities relevant as part of the capstone student teaching experience. The study population consisted of all (N = 140) fall 2012 and spring 2013 agricultural education student teachers in the North…

  9. Designing experiments and analyzing data a model comparison perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Through this book's unique model comparison approach, students and researchers are introduced to a set of fundamental principles for analyzing data. After seeing how these principles can be applied in simple designs, students are shown how these same principles also apply in more complicated designs. Drs. Maxwell and Delaney believe that the model comparison approach better prepares students to understand the logic behind a general strategy of data analysis appropriate for various designs; and builds a stronger foundation, which allows for the introduction of more complex topics omitt

  10. Heterotic particle models from various perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaszczyk, Michael I.

    2012-10-15

    We consider the compactification of heterotic string theory on toroidal orbifolds and their resolutions. In the framework of gauged linear sigma models we develop realizations of such spaces, allowing to continously vary the moduli and thus smoothly interpolate between different corners of the theory. This way all factorizable orbifold resolutions as well as some non-factorizable ones can be obtained. We find that for a given geometry there are many model which realize it as a target space, differing in their complexity. We explore regions of moduli space which otherwise would not be accessible. In particular we are interested in the orbifold regime, where exact string calculations are possible, and the large volume regime, where techniques of supergravity compactification can be applied. By comparing these two theories and matching the spectra we find evidence for non-perturbative effects which interpolate between these regimes.

  11. Students' understanding of density: A cognitive linguistics perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southey, Philip; Allie, Saalih; Demaree, Dedra

    2013-01-01

    Density is an important, multifaceted concept that occurs at many levels of physics education. Previous research has shown that a primary instantiation of the concept, mass density, is not well understood by high school or university students. This study seeks to determine how students understand the broad concept of density, and whether particular aspects of their understanding are helpful in structuring the concept of charge density. Qualitative data were gathered in the form of questionnaires distributed to 172 freshmen comprising three different academic groups. Broad, open ended questions prompted for responses involving free writing and drawn diagrams. The data were analysed by an approach suggested by Grounded Theory. Using the theoretical lens of Conceptual Metaphor Theory, six underlying (foothold) concepts were identified in terms of which density was conceptualised: `filled container'; `packing'; `weight/heaviness'; `intensive property'; `floating/sinking'; `impenetrability/solidity'. The foothold concept of `packing' proved to be the most productive for conceptualising `charge density'.

  12. Modeling Business Strategy: A Consumer Value Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Svee, Eric-Oluf; Giannoulis, Constantinos; Zdravkovic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Part 3: Business Modeling; International audience; Business strategy lays out the plan of an enterprise to achieve its vision by providing value to its customers. Typically, business strategy focuses on economic value and its relevant exchanges with customers and does not directly address consumer values. However, consumer values drive customers’ choices and decisions to use a product or service, and therefore should have a direct impact on business strategy. This paper explores whether and h...

  13. Fifth-grade students' perspectives of learning through a constructivist approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, Frederick Jibran

    The purpose of this study was to examine elementary students' perspectives of a constructivist approach to enhance their knowledge about stress. Participants were fifth grade students in an elementary school in the northeast. Data collection included a pretest-posttest, teacher reflective journal and student interviews. A multiple choice pre-test was administered to students to obtain information about students' knowledge of stress. The pre-test was followed by a four day unit that focused on the concept of stress employing a constructivist approach. The four day unit was monitored in two ways. First, a daily reflective journal was recorded by the teacher about each lesson. Second, students were interviewed at the end of the unit regarding their perceptions of learning through a constructivist approach. A post-test was administered to evaluate students' knowledge. Data analysis for the pre-test consisted of descriptive statistics. The teaching reflective journal and students' interviews were analyzed using constant-comparison. An overview of the results of the study indicates that students reported increased self awareness, appreciation, and understanding of the feelings of others, and enhanced appreciation of human relations from the unit. Other findings indicate that the females scored higher on the pre and post test than the males. Both the individual groups of males and females improved as a result of the unit. The implications of this study may provide educators with insights into the possible effectiveness of a constructivist approach to teaching various health concepts.

  14. The Role of the Students in the CLIL Classroom A New Perspective to Identify Types of Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David González Gándara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A good deal of authors have spotted the crucial factors to get into account in order to classify tasks for their study. Although the role of the student in the task has been studied before, it has not been considered as a key factor in some of the most influential models. I propose a new perspective to describe it. It consists in a combination of the participation of the students in the input of tasks and their participation in the output. A case study has been carried out to address the statistical effects of the factor proposed in two variables: the amount of As-units (Foster, Tonkyn, & Wigglesworth, 2000 in the L2 produced in the classroom, and among them, the amount of initiating moves (Leech & Weisser, 2003. Transcripts of the audio and video recordings taken during eight CLIL Science lessons taught to an intact class of ten students of grades 1 and 2 were analysed. The results showed that the role of the students in the input had a significant effect on the variables measured. The teacher produced more As-units in general and initiating moves in particular, while the students produced less As-units while still producing more initiating moves.

  15. Market Positioning of Public and Private Universities:Students Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Kahar ADAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrates on universities strategies for admitting students and the rate at which private sector universities expand in today’s higher educational setups. This paper answers the following question: to what extend are the public universities different from the private universities? In an attempt to find the answers, the whole study is developedtowards students’ perception of the universities positioning in terms of what they are offering to the customers, through what they prompt people to apply for admission? Therefore, thispaper looks at the prevailing admission strategies and potential students’ entry requirements at both public and private universities to determine the theoretical systems that are used by these universities in competition for customers (students. A quantitative survey of students in both public and private universities in Ghana was undergone In all, a total number of 255 questionnaires were printed. Only 187 were answered and returned out of 200 distributed questionnaires to the public sector universities whereas 55 questionnaires were distributed to the private sector students and 51 were answered and returned. This research was based on sampling data collection methods. The findings show that there are three categories of universities such as Publicly/Fully Independent Chartered Universities, Privately Owned Universities and Personal/Sole Proprietorship University Colleges. All these affect students’ choices for admission application. The findings clearly indicate that both public and private universitiespurposes are related using Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation Coefficient formulae to that of the sole proprietorship colleges. Also, the admission requirement strategies differ between public and private universities.

  16. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  17. CROSS-BORDER ROMANIAN STUDENTS MOBILITY IN A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Vass

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Strategic management and greater policy coherence of Romania’s human resources is needed taking into account the interlinkages between demographic, education, labour market and migration flows changes. We focus in this paper on the high need of strengthening incentives for circular and repetitive migration of Romanian students. They represent the most relevant pool of the future-be skilled labour force. Overviewing the realities, it may come to no surprise that Romania has less higher education graduates than in EU. Nor that the expenses for the higher education represent nearly the same amount per capita as in the other EU countries, when adjusted with GDP. Nor that, according to international university rankings, Romanian universities score one of the lowest performance in Europe. Above all, today we risk that our best students migrate to western higher education schools without returning to their home country. A deep analysis of this phenomenon reveals an even harsher reality: the propensity of Romanian students to study abroad is even lower than in other neighbouring countries.

  18. New geological perspectives on earthquake recurrence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, D.P. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    In most areas of the world the record of historical seismicity is too short or uncertain to accurately characterize the future distribution of earthquakes of different sizes in time and space. Most faults have not ruptured once, let alone repeatedly. Ultimately, the ability to correctly forecast the magnitude, location, and probability of future earthquakes depends on how well one can quantify the past behavior of earthquake sources. Paleoseismological trenching of active faults, historical surface ruptures, liquefaction features, and shaking-induced ground deformation structures provides fundamental information on the past behavior of earthquake sources. These studies quantify (a) the timing of individual past earthquakes and fault slip rates, which lead to estimates of recurrence intervals and the development of recurrence models and (b) the amount of displacement during individual events, which allows estimates of the sizes of past earthquakes on a fault. When timing and slip per event are combined with information on fault zone geometry and structure, models that define individual rupture segments can be developed. Paleoseismicity data, in the form of timing and size of past events, provide a window into the driving mechanism of the earthquake engine--the cycle of stress build-up and release.

  19. Perspectives in Quantum Physics: Epistemological, Ontological and Pedagogical. An investigation into student and expert perspectives on the physical interpretation of quantum mechanics, with implications for modern physics instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Baily, Charles

    2011-01-01

    A common learning goal for modern physics instructors is for students to recognize a difference between the experimental uncertainty of classical physics and the fundamental uncertainty of quantum mechanics. Our studies suggest this notoriously difficult task may be frustrated by the intuitively realist perspectives of introductory students, and a lack of ontological flexibility in their conceptions of light and matter. We have developed a framework for understanding and characterizing student perspectives on the physical interpretation of quantum mechanics, and demonstrate the differential impact on student thinking of the myriad ways instructors approach interpretive themes in their introductory courses. Like expert physicists, students interpret quantum phenomena differently, and these interpretations are significantly influenced by their overall stances on questions central to the so-called measurement problem: Is the wave function physically real, or simply a mathematical tool? Is the collapse of the wav...

  20. Perspectives on astronomy: probing Norwegian pre-service teachers and middle school students

    CERN Document Server

    Lindstrøm, Christine; Brendehaug, Morten; Engel, Megan C

    2016-01-01

    We report on ongoing work to gain insight into the astronomy knowledge and perspectives of pre-service teachers and middle school students in Norway. We carefully adapted and translated into Norwegian an existing instrument, the Introductory Astronomy Questionnaire (IAQ); we administered this adapted IAQ to (i) pre-service teachers at the largest teacher education institution in Norway, and (ii) students drawn from eight middle schools in Oslo, in both cases before and after astronomy instruction. Amongst our preliminary findings - based on an analysis of both free-response writing and multiple-choice responses - was that when prompted to provide responses to hypothetical students, the pre-service teachers exhibited a marked drop in pedagogical responses pre- to post-instruction, with corresponding shifts towards more authoritative responses. We also identified potentially serious issues relating to middle school students' conceptions of size and distances in the universe, with significant stratification alon...

  1. Learning portfolios--evidence of learning: an examination of students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Janet; Nicholson, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    There is a lack of evaluative literature on the use of learning portfolios in nursing. Many students are still unclear on the benefit of using a learning portfolio, and fulfilling the criteria for the portfolios remains low priority. Over a 5-year period, tutors on the Specialist Practitioner Qualification in Critical Care found that there was a wide variety of practice in portfolio use. There is comparatively little known about how the students perceive the use of portfolios. Therefore, a small descriptive survey took place in 2001/2002 involving 22 previous students, to identify the value of portfolios from the student perspective. Recommendations from this study are given on how to improve portfolio use.

  2. Students and Lecturers Perspectives on the Factors Influencing Ones Metaphor Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ienneke Indra Dewi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aimed to see the perspective of lecturers and students regarding the factors influencing peoples metaphor competence in daily life. Twenty-one students were interviewed and ten lecturers were sent a questionnaire asking about the factors that might influence the use of metaphors. The results show that both lecturers and students agree that language mastery is not the only one which determines the ability of people in comprehending and producing metaphors. Other non-linguistic factors such as habits, environment, personality, social network, logical thinking and general knowledge also influence people. The respondents propose that metaphors are to be taught to students not only in language subjects but also in other subjects such as Character Building or other social subjects.

  3. Annonaceae substitution rates: a codon model perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Willem Chatrou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annonaceae includes cultivated species of economic interest and represents an important source of information for better understanding the evolution of tropical rainforests. In phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data that are used to address evolutionary questions, it is imperative to use appropriate statistical models. Annonaceae are cases in point: Two sister clades, the subfamilies Annonoideae and Malmeoideae, contain the majority of Annonaceae species diversity. The Annonoideae generally show a greater degree of sequence divergence compared to the Malmeoideae, resulting in stark differences in branch lengths in phylogenetic trees. Uncertainty in how to interpret and analyse these differences has led to inconsistent results when estimating the ages of clades in Annonaceae using molecular dating techniques. We ask whether these differences may be attributed to inappropriate modelling assumptions in the phylogenetic analyses. Specifically, we test for (clade-specific differences in rates of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions. A high ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions may lead to similarity of DNA sequences due to convergence instead of common ancestry, and as a result confound phylogenetic analyses. We use a dataset of three chloroplast genes (rbcL, matK, ndhF for 129 species representative of the family. We find that differences in branch lengths between major clades are not attributable to different rates of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions. The differences in evolutionary rate between the major clades of Annonaceae pose a challenge for current molecular dating techniques that should be seen as a warning for the interpretation of such results in other organisms.

  4. A medical student's perspective of participation in an interprofessional education placement: an autoethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallé, Jennifer; Lingard, Lorelei

    2010-11-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has emerged as a critical pedagogy for promoting interprofessional collaboration (IPC) within healthcare. However, the literature includes few reports of students' perspectives on IPE experiences. Understanding students' experiences is critical, as they are the crux of IPE's culture change agenda. This paper presents an autoethnographic account of my experiences as a medical student participating in an IPE placement within a Canadian academic hospital. During the five-week placement, I collected data using participant observation and reflective journaling on all placement experiences. I expanded my notes using the emotional recall technique and conducted thematic analysis. Using a series of narrative vignettes, this paper explores the relationships between my personal experience and the cultural and educational issues underpinning IPE. The first vignette explores the relationship between students' patient access and our status in tutorial discussion. The second vignette considers the impact of shadowing on my appreciation of another professional's practice. The last vignette portrays my experience learning about the complex politics that shape IPC. The conclusion suggests that the IPE placements incorporate reflexive activities (i.e., journaling and interviewing) to enhance the students' appreciation and understanding of roles, responsibilities and professional perspectives, and to promote critical thinking and professional growth.

  5. Student Models of Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliaro, Susan G.; Shambaugh, Neal

    2006-01-01

    Mental models are one way that humans represent knowledge (Markman, 1999). Instructional design (ID) is a conceptual model for developing instruction and typically includes analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation (i.e., ADDIE model). ID, however, has been viewed differently by practicing teachers and instructional designers…

  6. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  7. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  8. Perspectives on educating pharmacy students about the science of safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warholak, Terri L; Holdford, David A; West, Donna; DeBake, Danielle L; Bentley, John P; Malone, Daniel C; Murphy, John E

    2011-09-10

    To identify opinions about pharmacy graduates' science of safety (SoS) educational needs. Semi-structured interviews were performed with 25 educators and researchers at US pharmacy colleges and schools and 5 individuals from associations engaged in drug safety-related issues. Themes that emerged from the 30 interviews with key informants included: pharmacists should meet minimum SoS requirements; medication safety education is inconsistent; and barriers exist to improving SoS curricula. Student deficiencies noted included the lack of: student acceptance of a "culture of safety": ability to effectively communicate verbally about medication safety; knowledge of the drug development process; and quality improvement skills. Key informants did not agree on how to address these gaps. While educators, researchers, and other leaders in drug safety-related issues thought that US colleges and schools of pharmacy covered portions of SoS well, there were perceived deficiencies. Minimum standards should be set to assist with curricular adoption of SoS.

  9. Digital games and learning mathematics: Student, teacher and parent perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Ting Yong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the potential use of digital games in learning mathematics at secondary school level in Malaysia. Three secondary school students, three mathematics teachers and three parents were interviewed in this study. All the participants were asked for their views and experiences in mathematics, technology usage and the use of digital games in learning mathematics. The results suggested that students were supportive and positive towards the use of computer games in learning mathematics. Nevertheless, parents preferred conventional teaching approach, in which they recognized personal communication and socialization as a significant component in learning. Although the teachers did not go on to oppose the idea of using computer games for teaching mathematics, they still perceived the use of discursive approaches as the best teaching approach for learning mathematics with digital technologies at best a possible additional complementary feature. In view of that, the combination of classroom teaching and computer games might the best mathematics pedagogy. 

  10. Intersectionality in Student Affairs: Perspective from a Senior Student Affairs Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneta, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The author draws upon over four decades of experience in student affairs administration to investigate how senior student affairs officers can incorporate intersectionality into comprehensive and targeted decision-making processes, strategic planning, and organizational considerations.

  11. Thoughts About Social Issues: A Neuman Systems Model Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Teri; Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2016-04-01

    The Neuman systems model includes social issues as a client system of interest. The other client systems of this conceptual model of nursing are individuals, families, other groups, and communities, about which exists a considerable amount of literature. However, social issues as a client system have not yet been defined or described, nor has any application of this client system been published. This essay is a discussion of the meaning of social issues as a client system from the perspective of the Neuman systems model, and offers examples from the literature, from the results of a survey of Neuman systems model trustees, including Betty Neuman, and from dialogue with participants at the 15th Biennial Neuman systems model symposium. This article was adapted from a paper presented at the 15(th) Biennial International Neuman Systems Model Symposium, Philadelphia, PA. June 19, 2015.

  12. Modelling of Microbiological Influenced Corrosion – Limitations and Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovhus, Torben Lund; Taylor, Christopher; Eckert, Rickard

    2017-01-01

    . Models can provide numerous benefits, e.g., guidance on MIC mitigation selection and prioritization, identification of data gaps, a scientific basis for risk-based inspections, and technical justification for asset design and life-extension. This paper describes trends in MIC modelling; different types......Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) research in the oil and gas industry has seen a revolution over the past decade with the increased application of molecular microbiological methods (MMM) and new industry standards; however, MIC modelling is an area that has not been fully developed...... of models, future needs, and the utility of MIC models from an end-user perspective. Microorganisms can initiate and promote corrosion different ways, e.g., affecting both charge and mass transfer in corrosion reactions. No mechanistic models currently exist that consider the influence of multiple...

  13. What Constitutes Effective Feedback to Postgraduate Research Students? The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Martin; Bitchener, John; Basturkmen, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Many Western universities are experiencing considerable growth in the numbers of postgraduate research students, both local and international. This increase and diversification bring with them challenges for how to make these students' research studies successful. In particular, what students may wish to receive by way of supervisor-student…

  14. Assessment of Students' Satisfaction of Service Quality in Takoradi Polytechnic: The Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwowie, Samuel; Amoako, Joseph; Abrefa, Amma Adomaa

    2015-01-01

    Higher educational institutions are increasingly placing greater emphasis on meeting students' expectations and needs as student perceptions of higher educational facilities and services are becoming more important. To investigate students' satisfaction of service quality at the Takoradi Polytechnic, a study was conducted using the SERVQUAL…

  15. Preclinical models of conduct disorder - principles and pharmacologic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Jozsef

    2016-05-26

    The translational value of preclinical research was recently enhanced by abnormal aggression models, which focus on deviant behaviors induced by the exposure of rodents to etiological factors of aggression-related psychopathologies. Prompted by similar trials in other psychiatric disorders, here we investigate models of abnormal aggression from the perspective of DSM5 criteria. After proposing principles based on which analogies can be established between psychopathology symptoms and rodent behavioral dysfunctions, we show that rodents submitted to abnormal aggression models fulfill basic criteria of aggression-related psychopathologies; moreover, some models can be considered specific to particular disorders e.g. conduct disorder. We also show that abnormal and species-typical aggressions differ in terms of both brain mechanisms and pharmacological responsiveness, which mimics differences observed in psychiatric disorders. We conclude that evaluating abnormal aggression models from a DSM5 perspective is not only possible but also worthwhile, and such models may contribute to the development of novel treatment strategies not only for aggression as a symptom but also for specific aggression-related disorders or multi-symptom clusters at least. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. College Student Values: An Historical and Conceptual Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William E.

    A historical survey of the literature and research on values and value measurement is presented. Various approaches to value study such as the Allport-Vernon-Lindsey model and the work of Adorno, et al in "The Authoritarian Personality" are discussed and analyzed. The author suggests that the models set forth in these works are not…

  17. Modeling, simulation and visual analysis of crowds a multidisciplinary perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Saad; Manocha, Dinesh; Shah, Mubarak

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several years there has been a growing interest in developing computational methodologies for modeling and analyzing movements and behaviors of 'crowds' of people. This interest spans several scientific areas that includes Computer Vision, Computer Graphics, and Pedestrian Evacuation Dynamics. Despite the fact that these different scientific fields are trying to model the same physical entity (i.e. a crowd of people), research ideas have evolved independently. As a result each discipline has developed techniques and perspectives that are characteristically their own.

  18. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Andrew C; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore dental and dental hygiene students' and faculty members' perceptions of student evaluations of teaching (SET) and determine whether dental vs. dental hygiene student, beginning vs. advanced student, and faculty vs. student responses differed. Perceived benefits, challenges, and suggestions for conducting SETs optimally were also assessed. Survey data were collected from 329 dental students (D1: 108; D2: 91; D3&4: 130) and 68 dental hygiene students (DH2: 26; DH3: 19; DH4: 23) (overall response rates 76%/92%) and 56 dental and eight dental hygiene faculty members (response rates 41%/100%). Faculty respondents were more positive about SETs than students (five-point scale with 1=disagree: 3.85 vs. 3.39; pstudents should complete SETs (3.87 vs. 3.61; p=0.068), with faculty agreeing more strongly than students that all courses should be evaluated (4.32/4.04; p=0.046). Students agreed more strongly than faculty that SETs should occur during regular class time (3.97/3.44; pstudents (4.03/3.57; p=0.002). Open-ended responses showed that students perceived more benefits of SETs for faculty members than for students and that the most frequently mentioned problem was that SETs do not result in changes. Faculty members were generally more positive than students (especially seniors) about SETs. These findings suggest that, according to these respondents, SETs should be completed by all students for all courses, be short, provide opportunities for open-ended comments, and be administered in class to improve response rate. In addition, SET results and how SETs are used to improve courses should be shared with students.

  19. Pedagogical supervision in physical education- the perspective of student interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Albuquerque

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aims to locate the subjective thinking between students physical education trainees during teaching practice. Set in the format of the study and interpretation of a descriptive nature, can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of the repertoire of experiential trainees Physical Education. The instrument used consisted of question relating to the quantitative and qualitative analysis and focused on five dimensions: Social and Emotional Aspects; Vocational Aspects; Learning and Professional Development; Supervision; Professional and Institutional Socialization. The sample consisted of 118 trainees, from two higher education institutions, one private and one public. The personal growth associated with the placement experience focuses on aspects related to professional competence. The professional skills of the stage are directly related to the organization and management of teaching and learning.

  20. High School Students' Meta-Modeling Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortus, David; Shwartz, Yael; Rosenfeld, Sherman

    2016-12-01

    Modeling is a core scientific practice. This study probed the meta-modeling knowledge (MMK) of high school students who study science but had not had any explicit prior exposure to modeling as part of their formal schooling. Our goals were to (A) evaluate the degree to which MMK is dependent on content knowledge and (B) assess whether the upper levels of the modeling learning progression defined by Schwarz et al. (2009) are attainable by Israeli K-12 students. Nine Israeli high school students studying physics, chemistry, biology, or general science were interviewed individually, once using a context related to the science subject that they were learning and once using an unfamiliar context. All the interviewees displayed MMK superior to that of elementary and middle school students, despite the lack of formal instruction on the practice. Their MMK was independent of content area, but their ability to engage in the practice of modeling was content dependent. This study indicates that, given proper support, the upper levels of the learning progression described by Schwarz et al. (2009) may be attainable by K-12 science students. The value of explicitly focusing on MMK as a learning goal in science education is considered.

  1. Meeting the health and social needs of pregnant asylum seekers, midwifery students' perspectives: part 1; dominant discourses and midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haith-Cooper, Melanie; Bradshaw, Gwendolen

    2013-09-01

    Current literature has indicated a concern about standards of maternity care experienced by pregnant women who are seeking asylum. As the next generation of midwives, it is important that students are educated in a way that prepares them to effectively care for these women. To understand how this can be achieved, it is important to explore what asylum seeking means to midwifery students. This article is the first of three parts and reports on one objective from a wider doctorate study. It identifies dominant discourses that influenced the perceptions of a group of midwifery students' about the pregnant asylum seeking woman. The study was designed from a social constructivist perspective, with contextual knowledge being constructed by groups of people, influenced by underpinning dominant discourses, depending on their social, cultural and historical positions in the world. In a United Kingdom University setting, during year two of a pre-registration midwifery programme, eleven midwifery students participated in the study. Two focus group interviews using a problem based learning scenario as a trigger for discussion were conducted. In addition, three students were individually interviewed to explore issues in more depth and two students' written reflections on practice were used to generate data. Following a critical discourse analysis, dominant discourses were identified which appeared to influence the way in which asylum seekers were perceived. The findings suggested an underpinning ideology around the asylum seeker being different and of a criminal persuasion. Although the pregnant woman seeking asylum was considered as deserving of care, the same discourses appeared to influence the way in which she was constructed. However, as the study progressed, through reading alternative sources of literature, some students appeared to question these discourses. These findings have implications for midwifery education in encouraging students to challenge negative discourses

  2. Teaching and learning about zoos and biodiversity conservation: Student, teacher, and zoo staff perspectives and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner-Winslow, Jennifer Anastasia

    This study is situated at the intersection of school science and zoo education programs. It seeks to contribute to the literature by focusing on the perspectives and experiences of students, teachers, and zoo staff. The research moves beyond focusing on a visit to the zoo to include a complementary unit of study in a science classroom. Using a case study research design (Yin, 1994), I engaged in a unit of study focusing on zoos and biodiversity conservation with a teacher and his Grade 11 biology class; conducted interviews with the teacher, 14 students, and 11 zoo staff; administered teacher and student surveys; and collected supporting documentation. The curricular context for this study aligned with STSE education emphases and strategies (Pedretti & Nazir, 2011). Significant themes were identified in the data using the constant comparative method (Lincoln & Guba, 1985) and formed the basis for six vignettes (Polkinghorne, 1995). It was found that the teacher and most students held mixed views (concurrently for and against zoos), except for one student who held a consistent against-zoos stance. The zoo staff held a predominately for-zoos stance, yet were concerned about poor public perception of zoos. Findings suggest that the complex nature of modern zoos in society (Hyson, 2004; Lindburg, 1999) was reflected in the participants' views. The teacher and zoo staff responded to these views in various ways, but educating the students about zoos was most common. The students stated that views against zoos did not impact their learning, although occasional tension over views occurred amongst students and the variable nature of zoos appeared to affect the students' willingness to learn in zoos. The students revealed that exposure to multiple perspectives influenced how they formed views on zoos, and educator positioning on zoos was noticed by the students. These findings suggest that the teacher and zoo staff faced pedagogical challenges when responding to multiple

  3. Exploring the Dynamics of Directed Studies Courses: Student, Instructor, and Administrator Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Hvenegaard

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available North American universities are encouraged to increase opportunities for undergraduate research experiences (UREs. To this end, many universities offer directed studies courses (DSCs which are 1-2 semester long courses involving one-on-one instruction, with a focus on student-led independent research. Building on the understanding of dynamics generally related to UREs, this paper seeks to compare the motivations, benefits, and barriers specifically related to DSCs from student, instructor, and administrator perspectives. Based on a set of qualitative focus group discussions at a small undergraduate liberal arts institution, we present the similarities and differences in these perspectives and recommend a set of best practices for DSCs. All three groups reported motivations for engaging in a DSC that addressed working with a particular student or instructor, assistance with graduate school preparation, and meeting program requirements. In terms of perceived benefits of DSCs, both students and instructors indicated the mentoring relationship and practical outcomes arising from DSCs. Students recognized the benefits of developing research skills, but stressed the motivation and benefit of independent learning more than was found in other studies. Instructors focused on benefits of research engagement and relationship building. The major challenges to participating in DSCs were workload and time (all groups, unprepared students and lack of guidelines (instructors and administrators, and the oral presentation requirement and lack of information about DSCs (students. Based on these results, we suggest increased clarity in DSC expectations, consistent standards of quality, and promoting research processes common to the DSC’s home discipline.

  4. Teacher’s role model ingender education of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Dode

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gender education as an important part of education, affects by the role and attitudes of teachers. Including gender perspective in schools is a prerequisite in alienable of human development, instead insuring gender equality it is considered as respecting human rights. Elimination of the gender stereotypes has a two-fold significance since itemsurest gender equality not only in the school system but even in the society as a whole. Gender stereotype messages, regardless by hidden or displayed form, unilaterally influence the development of the personality in its appearance as well as the formation of the individual. Children learn about gender identity simply by observing what happens in different circumstances around. In education exist gender disparities, which can be assessed by means of measurable indicators. So, the content of the curricula and instructive texts, the interactive relationships teacher-students, the institutional ambiance, etc. play an important role into the preservation and transmission of the gender disparity stereotypes through the messages they convey. The purpose of thestudy is to perform a systematic research in order to show the scale and shape in which gender stereotypes are portrayed and shown in social life, even through the role model of teacher and their affecting the education for a democratic society. To achieve this goal, we use the method of studying the existing literature; a detailed analysis of the questionnaires and interviews content with school directors and teachers of pre-university education in city: Shkodër, Tiranë, Elbasan, Pogradec, Korçë. Parents and teachers attitudes, seems to be a role model and affect the education of students. Therefore it is necessary before to teach students about gender equality, teachers need to be careful in their behavior about gender equality as an integral part of thinking. Need to have successful teacher, to get successful students otherwise should be successful

  5. Understanding your student: Using the VARK model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I J Prithishkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students have different preferences in the assimilation and processing of information. The VARK learning style model introduced by Fleming includes a questionnaire that identifies a person′s sensory modality preference in learning. This model classifies students into four different learning modes; visual (V, aural (A, read/write (R, and kinesthetic (K. Materials and Methods: The 16-point multiple choice VARK questionnaire version 7.1 was distributed to first year undergraduate medical students after obtaining permission for use.Results: Seventy-nine students (86.8% were multimodal in their learning preference, and 12 students (13.8% were unimodal. The highest unimodal preference was K-7.7%. Surprisingly, there were no visual unimodal learners. The commonest learning preference was the bimodal category, of which the highest percentage was seen in the AK (33% and AR (16.5% category. The most common trimodal preference was ARK (8.9%. The total individual scores in each category were V-371, A-588, R/W-432, and K-581; auditory and kinesthetic being the highest preference. Visual mode had the lowest overall score. There was no significant difference in preference between the sexes. Conclusion: Students possess a wide diversity in learning preferences. This necessitates teachers to effectively deliver according to the needs of the student. Multiple modalities of information presentation are necessary to keep the attention and motivation of our students requiring a shift from the traditional large-group teacher-centric lecture method to an interactive, student-centric multimodal approach.

  6. A Student Perspective on ELAM and its Educational Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Holloway

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The health of the world’s population is divided into two groups, those who have access to health care services and those who do not. The effects of this divide can be seen on the international level where life expectancy in Switzerland averages 80 years as opposed to 38 years in Zambia. Infant mortality rates are often used as a general indicator of health and socioeconomic conditions since rates are affected by factors such as access to prenatal health care. A direct relationship has been shown between higher income and education level and lower rates of infant mortality. This may explain in part an infant mortality rate of 4.5 per 1,000 live births in Connecticut in comparison with 12.2 in the Washington, D.C. area. A major influence in access to services is the availability of trained health care workers. The World Health Organization estimates that the world will need at least 4,250,000 additional health workers to address these health disparities3. In the face of this work force crisis we are left wondering how to fill in the gaps left by the mass exodus of health workers from developing nations to industrialized ones. Cuba has tried to address these problems by sending thousands of healthcare professionals to work in some of the most impoverished and medically underserved regions in the world. Over the years, their attempts have evolved to include training professionals from underserved areas to provide enduring sources of health care for their populations. Perhaps the most valiant of efforts was the creation of the Latin American School of Medicine in Cuba (called ELAM, Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina, which currently is training over 10,000 students from at least 27 countries, including the United States. Despite ELAM’s impressive numbers, its founders recognized that solutions to what has become a global health care crisis depend not only on the number of physicians produced but also on how they are trained to be providers of

  7. Educational justice from the perspective of Kermanshah paramedical students in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    m jalalvandi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Equity in education is meant providing equal educational opportunities for students that often included the equality in professors' behaviors with their students. This form of justice can improve students' performance. So, considering the importance of educational equity and the its special position in medical education, this study was performed to investigate the situation of educational justice from the perspective of paramedical students in Kermanshah Faculty of Paramedical Sciences. Methods: In this analytical cross-sectional study, which was performed by stratified sampling method in 2014, the required information was collected by educational justice questionnaire. The reliability and validity of this questionnaire was confirmed. Then, the data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 21 and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results: The average score of education justice was 53/48 ± 15/24. A significant relationship was found between the average scores of students educational justice with gender and their field of study (P<0.05. Conclusion: The research findings showed that the students' demographic characteristics are the influencing factors on the situation of education justice in Kermanshah Faculty of Paramedical Sciences. Therefore, the need to creating equal opportunities in education in a way that all students have access to the same facilities in the same environment, must be considered through the university and especially the professors.

  8. Interprofessional anatomy education in the United Kingdom and Ireland: Perspectives from students and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire F; Hall, Samuel; Border, Scott; Adds, Philip J; Finn, Gabrielle M

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of multiprofessional learning in anatomy and its role in medical and healthcare professions. This study utilized two components to investigate anatomy interprofessional education (AIPE) in the United Kingdom and Ireland. First, a survey involving qualitative and quantitative components asked Heads of Anatomy to report on their institutions' uptake of AIPE. Second, a series of case studies explored the experiences of students by using evaluation forms and an in-depth analysis of thematic concepts to understand the learners' perspectives on designing and delivering AIPE. Out of the 13 institutions that took part in the survey, eight did not offer an AIPE program. Between the remaining five institutions that deliver AIPE programs, 10 different modules are offered with the majority involving healthcare professions. The AIPE component is rated highly by students. The themes from the case studies highlight how valuable AIPE is from the student perspective both in terms of engaging them in anatomy as well as in the broader skills of teamwork and communication. The case studies also revealed how AIPE can be engaging for groups of students who might not have previously had access to cadaveric anatomy, for example, engineers and archeologists. The results of this study have implications for curriculum design in medicine and healthcare but also for further engagement of professional groups from non-healthcare backgrounds. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. Comparing Faculty and Student Perspectives of Graduate Teaching Assistants' Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriques, Romola A. Bernard; Bond-Robinson, Janet

    2006-02-01

    Assessments of teaching quality by undergraduates (UGs) and faculty are illustrated in this study of new graduate students training as TAs (GTAs). The GTAs' instructors (FAC) coached them while they taught labs, and coded teaching interactions on the valid and reliable ITAT instrument (Cronbach's a = 0.863). Interactions were documented by a remote audio-visual observational system. Audio-visual clips and ITAT feedback were used to foster GTAs' development in managing a chemical lab procedurally, and teaching chemical concepts. The UGs assessed their TA with the UGATA instrument (Cronbach's a = 0.953). Our research compared the FAC rating of GTAs to UGs' end-of-semester ratings. The UG and FAC ratings were similar on procedural management interactions, but not on concept teaching. The FAC saw significantly less quality in GTAs' interactions that linked concepts from lecture into lab and explained abstract concepts basic to the lab experiment. In fact, UG ratings failed to note significant differences between teaching of procedural knowledge and teaching of abstract concepts that were fundamental chemically to the lab experiment. While over 75% of GTAs executed management interactions well, only 30 40% of GTAs were actively attempting to teach concepts and to help UGs reason conceptually in chemistry.

  10. Teaching safe prescribing to medical students: perspectives in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazar H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hamde Nazar,1 Mahdi Nazar,2 Charlotte Rothwell,1 Jane Portlock,3 Andrew Chaytor,1 Andrew Husband1 1School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, UK; 2Cumberland Infirmary, North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust, UK; 3School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, UK Abstract: Prescribing is a characteristic role of a medical practitioner. On graduating from medical school, students are presumed to have acquired the necessary pharmacology knowledge underpinning the therapeutics and developed their personal skills and behaviors in order to write a safe and effective prescription (The Four Ps. However, there are reports of errors in medical prescribing and dissatisfied feedback from recent graduates, which evidence potential flaws in the current training in the practice of prescribing. We examine the Four Ps from a systems approach and offer scope for educators and curriculum designers to review and reflect on their current undergraduate teaching, learning, and assessment strategies in a similar manner. We also adopt a national framework of common competencies required of all prescribers to remain effective and safe in their area of practice as a more objective layer to the broader learning outcomes of the General Medical Council Tomorrow's Doctors 2009. This exercise demonstrates where standard, recognized competencies for safe prescribing can be accommodated pedagogically within existing medical curricula.Keywords: prescribing, medical curriculum, clinical pharmacology teaching, therapeutics, education

  11. "Why bother so incredibly much?": student perspectives on PISA science assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serder, Margareta; Jakobsson, Anders

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale assessment, such as the Programme for International Assessment (PISA), plays an increasingly important role in current educational practice and politics. However, many scholars have questioned the validity and reliability of the tests and the extent to which they actually constitute trustworthy representations of students' knowledge. In the light of such critical voices the present article adopts a sociocultural perspective of human knowledge and action in order to explore the encounters between students and the science test assignments with which their knowledge is tested. Of particular interest in this study are the described "real-life situations" presented as the relevant background in which scientific literacy is assessed in PISA. According to the sociocultural theoretical onset the methodology used to approach the students' meaning making of the image of science as portrayed in the test were collaborative situations in which students work in small groups with units of PISA assignments, enabling a study of student-assignment encounters in action. The data we worked with consists of video-recordings from 71 Swedish 15-year-old students working with three released units from the PISA science test. According to our analysis, the "real-life situations" described in the test emerge as problematic in the students' meaning-making. This is demonstrated for instance by the students' positioning themselves as being different from and opposed to the fictional pictured students who appear in the backstories of the test. This article provides examples of how the scientific and academic language used by the fictional students in the assignments mediates distance and resistance among the students. The fictional students' use of strict scientific language and methods in day-to-day life situations leads them to be perceived as "little scientists" and as elite stereotypes of the scientific culture. We conclude that, by using assignments of this type, measurements of

  12. The Role of the Operating Room in Medical Student Education: Differing Perspectives of Learners and Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Rebecca; Shapiro, Michael; Merchant, Aziz

    2017-07-13

    The surgical clerkship is an integral part of third-year medical student education. The operating room (OR) is a heavily used setting, but it is unclear whether this setting is as effective as possible. To determine the role of the OR and potential improvements, it is necessary to analyze the perspectives of those involved, including surgeons, residents, and medical students. An electronic survey was distributed to the surgeons, surgical residents, and third-year medical students associated with Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. The questions were a combination of 5-point Likert scale questions and qualitative responses. The questions assessed the role of the OR, the information taught in the OR, the quality of the teaching and environment, and potential improvements. Attending surgeons and residents generally rated the OR more positively than medical students did. Medical students desired more hands-on participation and a greater focus on learning technical skills. In addition, most medical students rated the feedback and direct instruction in the OR as "poor." Furthermore, the attending surgeons and medical students disagreed about the main roles of the OR as well as the effectiveness of teaching in the OR. The medical students reported experiencing anxiety and intimidation in the OR and suggested several improvements, such as decreasing the length of the surgical clerkship. There is significant disagreement between the surgeons and residents and the medical students regarding the roles and effectiveness of learning in the OR. This may help explain the reported medical student dissatisfaction and frustrations with the surgical clerkship. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. ASPECT: A Survey to Assess Student Perspective of Engagement in an Active-Learning Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Benjamin L; Eddy, Sarah L; Wener-Fligner, Leah; Freisem, Karen; Grunspan, Daniel Z; Theobald, Elli J; Timbrook, Jerry; Crowe, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    The primary measure used to determine relative effectiveness of in-class activities has been student performance on pre/posttests. However, in today's active-learning classrooms, learning is a social activity, requiring students to interact and learn from their peers. To develop effective active-learning exercises that engage students, it is important to gain a more holistic view of the student experience in an active-learning classroom. We have taken a mixed-methods approach to iteratively develop and validate a 16-item survey to measure multiple facets of the student experience during active-learning exercises. The instrument, which we call Assessing Student Perspective of Engagement in Class Tool (ASPECT), was administered to a large introductory biology class, and student responses were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. The 16 items loaded onto three factors that cumulatively explained 52% of the variation in student response: 1) value of activity, 2) personal effort, and 3) instructor contribution. ASPECT provides a rapid, easily administered means to measure student perception of engagement in an active-learning classroom. Gaining a better understanding of students' level of engagement will help inform instructor best practices and provide an additional measure for comprehensively assessing the impact of different active-learning strategies. © 2017 B. L. Wiggins, S. L. Eddy, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. A Graduate Student's Perspective on Engaging High School Students in Research Outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, A. B.; Horton, R. A., Jr.; Andrews, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    The southern San Joaquin basin is one of the United States' most prolific oil producing regions but also one facing numerous problems including low high school graduation rates, low college enrollments, high college dropout rates, low wages, and higher than average unemployment. Investment in STEM education experiences for high school students has been emphasized by California State University Bakersfield as a means to improving these metrics with programs such as the Research Experience Vitalizing Science-University Program (REVS-UP). Now in its seventh year, the REVS-UP (funded by Chevron) forms teams of high school students, a high school teacher, a CSUB graduate student, and a CSUB professor to work for four weeks on a research project. For the past two summers student-teacher teams investigated the diagenesis and mineralogy of the Temblor Formation sandstones in the subsurface of the San Joaquin basin oil fields that are potential CO2 sequestration sites. With a graduate student leading the teams in sample preparation and analysis by scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and cathode luminescence system (SEM-CL) data was gathered on diagenetic processes, detrital framework grains, and authigenic cements. Typically students are introduced to the project in a series of brief seminars by faculty and are then introduced to the techniques and samples. During the second week the students are usually capable of preparing samples and collecting data independently. The final week is focused on developing student-authored research posters which are independently presented by the students on the final day. This gives high school students the opportunity to learn advanced geologic topics and analytical techniques that they would otherwise not be exposed to as well as to gain research and presentation skills. These types of projects are equally important for the graduate students involved as it allows them the

  15. The Convoy Model: Explaining Social Relations From a Multidisciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Toni C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Social relations are a key aspect of aging and the life course. In this paper, we trace the scientific origins of the study of social relations, focusing in particular on research grounded in the convoy model. Design and Methods: We first briefly review and critique influential historical studies to illustrate how the scientific study of social relations developed. Next, we highlight early and current findings grounded in the convoy model that have provided key insights into theory, method, policy, and practice in the study of aging. Results: Early social relations research, while influential, lacked the combined approach of theoretical grounding and methodological rigor. Nevertheless, previous research findings, especially from anthropology, suggested the importance of social relations in the achievement of positive outcomes. Considering both life span and life course perspectives and grounded in a multidisciplinary perspective, the convoy model was developed to unify and consolidate scattered evidence while at the same time directing future empirical and applied research. Early findings are summarized, current evidence presented, and future directions projected. Implications: The convoy model has provided a useful framework in the study of aging, especially for understanding predictors and consequences of social relations across the life course. PMID:24142914

  16. Students' Views of Scientific Models and Modeling: Do Representational Characteristics of Models and Students' Educational Levels Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Silvia Wen-Yu; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Hsin-Kai

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential impact of the representational characteristics of models and students' educational levels on students' views of scientific models and modeling (VSMM). An online multimedia questionnaire was designed to address three major aspects of VSMM, namely the "nature of models," the "nature…

  17. Opinions on age of marriage -- perspective from university students in Islamabad and Rawalpindi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Anila; Naqvi, Irum; Shaikh, Masood Ali

    2015-03-01

    Child marriages are more common in developing countries, including Pakistan. This study was conducted to determine the perspective of university students on marriageable age in Islamabad and Rawalpindi. Cumulatively, 1039 students participated in this cross-sectional survey based on convenience sampling. There were statistically significant differences between male and female students pertaining to opinions about what should be the legal age for women and men. Male respondents were more likely to accept 16 years of legal age at marriage for both males as well as females. Female respondents rejected 16 years as the legal age of marriage for girls on physical and emotional health grounds as well as on having negative impact on girl's education. Results stress the need for better understanding of socio-cultural norms in the country to more effectively address and discourage the practice of child marriage in the country.

  18. Practices of Teachers of Shobak University College Applied in Classroom Management from the Perspective of the Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawarah, Haroon Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the practices of Shobak University College applied in classroom management from the perspective of the students. The study sample consisted of (88) students from Shobak University College, (33) males and (55) females, for the academic year 2014/2015, and to achieve the objectives of the study, the researcher used a…

  19. Successful After-School Physical Activity Clubs in Urban High Schools: Perspectives of Adult Leaders and Student Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garn, Alex C.; McCaughtry, Nate; Kulik, Noel L.; Kaseta, Michele; Maljak, Kim; Whalen, Laurel; Shen, Bo; Martin, Jeffrey J.; Fahlman, Mariane

    2014-01-01

    Grounded in social cognitive theory, the purpose of this study was to examine leaders' and students' perspectives of factors that contribute to effective voluntary after-school physical activity clubs. Data were collected over two-years via field observations (n= 115) and interviews with students (n= 278) and adult leaders (n= 126).…

  20. A Cultural Hybridization Perspective: Emerging Academic Subculture among International Students from East Asia in U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the emerging academic subculture of international students from East Asia in U.S. academics from the cultural hybridization perspective. In a knowledge-based economy, international education plays a pivotal role in the global educational environment. Advocacy of international student mobility is essential; international…

  1. Language Teacher Education in Finland and the Cultural Dimension of Foreign Language Teaching--A Student Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzen-Ostermark, Eva

    2009-01-01

    The increasing importance attributed to the cultural dimension of foreign language (FL) education has entailed new demands for teachers and teacher educators. This paper explores the cultural agenda in Finnish language teacher education from a student teacher perspective. The focus is on the students' perceptions regarding how effectively cultural…

  2. A Learning Patterns Perspective on Student Learning in Higher Education: State of the Art and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermunt, Jan D.; Donche, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the state of the art of research and theory development on student learning patterns in higher education and beyond. First, the learning patterns perspective and the theoretical framework are introduced. Second, research published since 2004 on student learning patterns is systematically identified and…

  3. The Status of Corporal Punishment in Jordanian Primary Schools from the Perspectives Of: Teachers, Students, and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khateeb, Linda Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the status of corporal punishment in Jordanian Primary schools from the perspectives of: Teachers, students, and parents. The corpus of the study comprises (95) Male and female teachers, (135) male and female students form Jordanian primary schools. Two questionnaire forms were used in this study: one for teachers and…

  4. The Feedback Process: Perspectives of First and Second Year Undergraduate Students in the Disciplines of Education, Health Science and Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tracy; Salter, Susan; Iglesias, Miguel; Dowlman, Michele; Eri, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current perspectives of feedback from first and second year undergraduate students enrolled in blended units of study which incorporated both face-to-face and online components. Students enrolled in a unit of study taught by the School of Health Sciences at the University of Tasmania were surveyed to…

  5. Secondary Students' Attitudes to Animal Research: Examining the Potential of a Resource to Communicate the Scientist's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Birdsall, Sally

    2015-01-01

    A DVD resource that provided a scientist's perspective on the use of animals in research and teaching was evaluated with a questionnaire that asked students' views pre and post their access to the resource. Thirty-nine secondary students (Y10-Y13) took part in three different teaching programmes that provided information about animal research and…

  6. Employability Skills, Personal Qualities, and Early Employment Problems of Entry-Level Auditors: Perspectives from Employers, Lecturers, Auditors, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yet-Mee; Lee, Teck Heang; Yap, Ching Seng; Ling, Chui Ching

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the issue of employability of university accounting students from the perspectives of accounting firm employers, junior auditors, accounting lecturers, and accounting students. Areas of investigation include perceived importance of employability skills and desirable personal qualities; and early employment problems encountered…

  7. Student Teachers' Changes in Perspective on Education News Reports: A Framework for Reading, Dialogue, and Reflection on Education News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the changing perspectives of Taiwanese student teachers toward the news coverage of educational events by proposing a framework of reading, dialogue, and reflection on education-related news report. In this study, we enrolled 28 student teachers to participate in the framework, being practiced seven times. To validate the…

  8. Employability Skills, Personal Qualities, and Early Employment Problems of Entry-Level Auditors: Perspectives from Employers, Lecturers, Auditors, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yet-Mee; Lee, Teck Heang; Yap, Ching Seng; Ling, Chui Ching

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the issue of employability of university accounting students from the perspectives of accounting firm employers, junior auditors, accounting lecturers, and accounting students. Areas of investigation include perceived importance of employability skills and desirable personal qualities; and early employment problems encountered…

  9. Perspective and circumstance in making decisions:The 4D model of the world of enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo Borrego, Adolfo Oswaldo; UNMSM

    2014-01-01

    To understand and solve business problems, the decision maker has a basic orientation to any dimensión of the organization. The 4 dimensións model is based on the perspective to understand and manipulate the business world: technical perspective that manages things and human perspective that is responsible for directing people to the task and performance, integration of both perspectives defines the basic preference of decision maker. The circumstance, that represents the problematic situatio...

  10. The perspectives of nonscience-major students on success in community college biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Rajab, Oriana Sharon

    With more than 36% of nonscience-major community college students unable to successfully complete their general life science courses, graduation and transfer rates to four-year universities are negatively affected. Many students also miss important opportunities to gain some level of science proficiency. In an effort to address the problem of poor science achievement, this research project determined which factors were most significantly related to student success in a community college biology course. It also aimed to understand the student perspectives on which modifications to the course would best help them in the pursuit of success. Drawing heavily on the educational psychology schools of thought on motivation and self-efficacy of science learning, this study surveyed and interviewed students on their perceptions of which factors were related to success in biology and the changes they believed were needed in the course structure to improve success. The data revealed that the primary factors related to student success are the students' study skills and their perceived levels of self-efficacy. The findings also uncovered the critical nature of the professor's role in influencing the success of the students. After assessing the needs of the community college population, meaningful and appropriate curriculum and pedagogical reforms could be created to improve student learning outcomes. This study offered recommendations for reforms that can be used by science practitioners to provide a more nurturing and inspiring environment for all students. These suggestions revolved around the role of the instructor in influencing the self-efficacy and study skills of students. Providing more opportunities for students to interact in class, testing more frequently, establishing peer assistance programs, managing better the course material, and making themselves more available to students were at the forefront of the list. Examples of the potential benefits of increasing

  11. Learning styles of students: development of an eclectic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverly, D

    1994-10-01

    Many researchers have hypothesised that people have an affinity with one of two broadly opposite styles of learning. This paper uses a mainly psychological perspective to examine some teaching and learning styles. Much research into learning styles exhibits original and imaginative approaches to the issues identified by learners and educators, however there is also a degree of recycling of concepts. This paper reports the development of an eclectic model of learning styles designed by considering various concepts, from which four major bipolar theories are refined in the light of sources to identify the core concepts. The selections and exclusions made in the model-building may precipitate dispute. Robust debate is invited, though the eclectic model as it now stands may be thought to offer a serviceable framework for enhancing the sensitivity of nurse educators to students' individuality expressed in their learning styles. How the variety in students' learning styles can be addressed by differing teaching/learning strategies is also discussed. It is concluded that nurse education should strive to move towards matching teaching to learning styles.

  12. Local Balancing System from the Business Model Canvas Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusiak Bożena Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overall view of the business model (BM for the e-balance system for: balancing energy production and consumption in energy efficient, smart neighbourhoods (the e-balance project, FP7-SMARTCITIES-2013 along with its functionalities, based upon the Osterwalder’s canvas methodology. Additionally, this is the second, after two years of work, more incisive evaluation of the BM from the user’s and demo site’s perspective (Bronsbergen, the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is to present results and assess the above mentioned BM in the face its commercialisation and applicability to Europe.

  13. Leadership curriculum in undergraduate medical education: a study of student and faculty perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varkey, Prathibha; Peloquin, Joanna; Reed, Darcy; Lindor, Keith; Harris, Ilene

    2009-03-01

    Leaders in medicine have called for transformative changes in healthcare to address systems challenges and improve the health of the public. The purpose of this study was to elicit the perspectives of students, faculty physicians and administrators regarding the knowledge and competencies necessary in an undergraduate leadership curriculum. A mixed-methods study was conducted using focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews with faculty physicians and administrative leaders, as well as a written survey of medical student leaders. Twenty-two faculties participated in focus groups and interviews; 21 medical students responded to the written survey. Participants identified emotional intelligence, confidence, humility and creativity as necessary qualities of leaders; and teamwork, communication, management and quality improvement as necessary knowledge and skills. Students perceived themselves as somewhat or fully competent in communication (90%), conflict resolution (70%) and time management (65%), but reported minimal or no knowledge or competence in coding and billing (100%), writing proposals (90%), managed care (85%) and investment principles (85%). Both faculty and students believed that experiential training was the most effective for teaching leadership skills. Study participants identified the necessary qualities, knowledge and skills to serve as goals for an undergraduate leadership curriculum. Future studies should address optimal methods of teaching and assessing leadership skills among medical students.

  14. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  15. The use of electronic books in midwifery education: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are: (i) to illustrate the use of e-books by health studies students at a college of higher education; (ii) to provide a demonstration of how e-books may be facilitated by library and information services staff working across the health and academic sectors; (iii) to comment upon the experiences of health studies students, in using e-books. A focus group of 10 student midwives was used to gain insight into how e-books may be used in an academic context for health professionals. The findings of the student midwives' focus group are reported and discussed. In this instance, the student midwives were encouraged to use e-books as part of a structured information skills programme. The paper concentrates on how the e-books were used within this context and addresses the potential benefits and disadvantages from a student perspective. The results provide evidence of a largely positive experience of using e-books as an electronic information resource. The focus group reveals many benefits and advantages in the facilitation and use of e-books, as well as addressing areas for development. It is concluded that e-books have a place in health library and information resources, but further development of e-books and e-book collections is required and subsequent investigation into their most effective use.

  16. Using portfolios for clinical practice learning and assessment: the pre-registration nursing student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Miriam

    2008-10-01

    Portfolios have been introduced to help to integrate theory and practice and thereby address the issue of the theory-practice divide. Although there has been much theoretical discussion about portfolio use in clinical placements, few studies have focused on the students' perceptions regarding their use. To obtain adult branch pre-registration nursing students' perspectives on using portfolios for their clinical practice learning and assessment, postal questionnaires were sent to 253 diploma of nursing students with a reminder to all students three weeks later. The response rate was 69% (174/253). This paper reports on the qualitative findings of the study, which employed both quantitative and qualitative methods. Although students stated that portfolios helped them in their development of self-awareness and independent learning, they indicated that portfolios do not sufficiently address the assessment of their clinical skills and the integration of theory and practice. They considered that portfolios could be greatly improved in three areas, namely in the conflict between using portfolios for both assessment and learning, the amount of support and guidance students feel they receive with their portfolio use and the portfolio design.

  17. Facebook for Health Promotion: Female College Students' Perspectives on Sharing HPV Vaccine Information Through Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Tsark, JoAnn; Campo, Shelly; Teti, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Facebook, a social network site, has been widely used among young adults. However, its potential to be used as a health promotion medium has not been fully examined. This study explored Facebook's potential for sharing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine information among female college students in Hawai'i. Culturally tailored flyers and handouts were developed and distributed at one large university in Hawai'i to recruit female college students between the age of 18 and 26 having an active Facebook account. Three focus group meetings were conducted to gather student perspectives about how information about HPV vaccine may be best shared via Facebook. We found that students believed Facebook is a good awareness tool but they needed more knowledge about the HPV vaccine to feel comfortable sharing the information. Participants preferred forwarding information to chatting about HPV. Some participants expressed concern that their Facebook friends would think the HPV vaccine information they forwarded on Facebook is spam. Participants suggested prefacing the posted HPV vaccine information with a personal note in their own words to make the message more interesting and relevant to their Facebook friends. Future interventions using Facebook to promote HPV vaccine could provide students with HPV vaccine information from credible sources and ask students to attach personal testimonials or endorsements while forwarding the information on Facebook.

  18. A model of destination competitiveness/sustainability: Brazilian perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Brent Ritchie

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the understanding I have gained from several years of research, and from several more years of ongoing discussions with industry leaders regarding the nature of competitiveness among tourism destinations. This understanding has been captured, in summary form, in the model of Destination Competitiveness/Sustainability (Ritchie and Crouch, 2003. This model contains seven (7 components which we have found to play a major role, from a policy perspective, in determining the competitiveness/sustainability of a tourism destination. In addition to the valuable understanding which these seven components provide from a policy perspective, the specific elements of each the major components provide a more useful/practical guidance to those who are responsible for the ongoing management of a DMO (Destination Management Organization. With this overview in mind, this paper will provide a detailed review and explanation of the model that I have developed with colleague, Dr. Geoffrey I. Crouch of Latrobe University in Melbourne, Australia. Based on previous presentations throughout the world, it has proven very helpful to both academics and practitioners who seek to understand the complex nature of tourism destination competitiveness/sustainability.

  19. Final assessment of nursing students in clinical practice: Perspectives of nursing teachers, students and mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, Kristiina; Johnson, Martin; Isoaho, Hannu; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2017-03-30

    To describe the phenomenon of final assessment of the clinical practice of nursing students and to examine whether there were differences in assessments by the students and their teachers and mentors. Final assessment of students in clinical practice during their education has great importance for ensuring that enough high-quality nursing students are trained, as assessment tasks affect what the nursing student learns during the clinical practice. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional design. The population of this study comprised nursing students (n = 276) and their teachers (n = 108) in five universities of applied sciences in Finland as well as mentors (n = 225) who came from five partner hospitals. A questionnaire developed for this study contained questions about background variables as well as structured questions scored on a four-point scale, which also allowed the respondents to provide additional comments. When comparing the results related to nursing teachers' presence in the final assessment situation, it was found that teachers and mentors evaluated this as being carried out more often than nursing students suggested. Nursing students noted that fair and consistent assessment is carried out more often than nursing teachers thought. Mentors and teachers said that honest and direct criteria-based final assessment was carried out more often than nursing students evaluated. Nursing students and mentors need support from educational institutions and from nursing teachers in order to ensure the completion of a relevant assessment process. The findings of this study highlight an awareness of final assessment process. It is desirable to have a common understanding, for example, of how the assessment should be managed and what the assessment criteria are, as this will ensure a good quality process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effective physiology teaching methods: from the perspective of first year MBBS students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagothu, Rajani Santhakumari; Reddy Indla, Yogananda; Paluru, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Students who took admission in first year MBBS course used to study physiology, anatomy and biochemistry for one and half years. Since a decade the first year course duration was reduced to one year unaltering the syllabus in the three basic subjects. So students are focusing on the easy ways to clear the university exams by accepting the concise books, which is dampening the real quality of the subject knowledge. This study is aimed at understanding the best methods of physiology teaching in the lecture gallery, from the student's perspective. The present study was undertaken at a private medical college in southern part of India in Telangana state, on 100 students who took admission in first year MBBS course, in the academic year 2015-2016. Out of 100, 36 are boys and 64 are girl students. Distributed a question paper which is having 2 sets of questions. First question is having three statements regarding the teaching methods namely; chalk and blackboard teaching, over head projection teaching and power point teaching. Students were asked to choose the best statement which they prefer. Second question is consisting of combination of teaching methods and they are; chalk and blackboard with over head projection teaching method, chalk and blackboard with power point presentation. Again the students were asked to choose one of the 2 statements in 2(nd) question. Students preference of teaching methods for understanding of physiology in percentage; chalk and blackboard-54, over head projection teaching-4, power point presentation-32, chalk and blackboard with over head projection-26, chalk and blackboard with power point presentation-64. Majority of the students are in favor of a combination of chalk and blackboard with power point presentation for better understanding of physiology, next is chalk and blackboard teaching alone.

  1. Using student generated blogs to create a global perspective on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    Students in an introductory Global Climate Change college course develop a global perspective on climate change causes, impacts, and mitigation through the use of student generated content in the form of blogging. The students are from diverse backgrounds and mostly non-science majors. They each create a blog for an assigned country. They are immersed in active learning through daily activities that teach them to use numerical data to create and analyze graphs for their blogs. Students are familiarized with other science skills as well, such as how to critically evaluate their sources. This method of using student generated content and active learning encourages students to immerse themselves in the viewpoint of people living in other countries. This creates a tangible understanding of the global stakes of climate change and fosters an emotional involvement in what otherwise might have been an abstract or intimidating topic. The front page of the course blog opens with a world map and a feed from each student's blog. Upon clicking on a country on the world map, the reader is taken to the blog page created by the student in charge of that country. The United States is reserved as a sample page created by the instructor. Throughout the semester, students follow a series of assignments that build their knowledge of the geography, climate, and culture of their assigned country, and these appear as tabs, or informational pages, on their blog. Students are taught to use Excel and they each create temperature and precipitation graphs that compare the climate of a city in their assigned country to that of their home city. Students then write their first blog post on their country's contribution to climate change and how that compares to other countries in the world by importing carbon dioxide emissions data into Excel and creating their own graphs to be used as images in their blog post. The second blog post covers potential climate change impacts on their assigned country

  2. Metrics for Evaluation of Student Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelanek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Researchers use many different metrics for evaluation of performance of student models. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of commonly used metrics, to discuss properties, advantages, and disadvantages of different metrics, to summarize current practice in educational data mining, and to provide guidance for evaluation of student…

  3. Modeling Environmental Literacy of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teksoz, Gaye; Sahin, Elvan; Tekkaya-Oztekin, Ceren

    2012-01-01

    The present study proposed an Environmental Literacy Components Model to explain how environmental attitudes, environmental responsibility, environmental concern, and environmental knowledge as well as outdoor activities related to each other. A total of 1,345 university students responded to an environmental literacy survey (Kaplowitz and Levine…

  4. School Improvement Model to Foster Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulloda, Rudolfo Barcena

    2011-01-01

    Many classroom teachers are still using the traditional teaching methods. The traditional teaching methods are one-way learning process, where teachers would introduce subject contents such as language arts, English, mathematics, science, and reading separately. However, the school improvement model takes into account that all students have…

  5. The Gravity Model for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Paul; Mitchell, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The authors suggest ways in which the gravity model can be used in high school geography classes. Based on Newton's Law of Molecular Gravitation, the law states that gravitation is in direct ratio to mass and inverse ratio to distance. One activity for students involves determination of zones of influence of cities of various sizes. (Author/AV)

  6. A Predictive Model for MSSW Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Angela Michele

    2011-01-01

    This study tested a hypothetical model for predicting both graduate GPA and graduation of University of Louisville Kent School of Social Work Master of Science in Social Work (MSSW) students entering the program during the 2001-2005 school years. The preexisting characteristics of demographics, academic preparedness and culture shock along with…

  7. Business Model Innovation for Sustainability: Towards a Unified Perspective for Creation of Sustainable Business Models

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Stephen; Vladimirova, Doroteya Kamenova; Holgado, Maria; Van Fossen, Kirsten; Yang, Miying; Silva, Elisabete Manuela; Barlow, Claire Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Business model innovation has seen a recent surge in academic research and business practice. Changes to business models are recognised as a fundamental approach to realise innovations for sustainability. However little is known about the successful adoption of sustainable business models (SBMs). The purpose of this paper is to develop a unified theoretical perspective for understanding business model innovations that lead to better organizational economic, environmental and social performanc...

  8. Student perspectives about mobile learning initiatives at Open University of Brazil: the mobile phone issue - doi: 10.4025/actascieduc.v32i2.11545

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otacilio Antunes Santana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabela normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} The objectives of this study were to verify if students of Open University of Brazil approve of mobile learning (m-learning initiatives, to identify the students' perspectives about m-learning, to develop a model of instructional design for m-learning environments, and to quantify student satisfaction with the presented model. 1,328 students agreed to participate in this study, all students of Open University of Brazil. They were questioned about their perspectives on m-learning at this university and if they agree with this educational model. The students agreed with the possible implementation of m-learning at this university, especially through mobiles phones. Collectively, the main ideas that the students offered to improve the efficiency of knowledge construction were classified into three groups: theory, practice, and interactivity. They also agreed with an instructional design model that was developed and shown to the three groups.  

  9. Assessment of students' perspectives about master of public health program in medical school of Shiraz University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahangiz, Saman; Salehi, Alireza; Rezaee, Rita; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Integration of public health and medical education has been thought to have an important role in medical students' training. Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has developed an MD/MPH dual degree educational program for the talented volunteer students. The aim of this study was to assess the students' viewpoints about various aspects of Shiraz MD/MPH program. This cross-sectional study was conducted on Shiraz undergraduate medical students, who were enrolled in MD/MPH program. A self-structured questionnaire in Persian consisting of 4 parts was used; it included demographic factors including 16 questions which evaluated the students' perspective of the goals, content, skill development, applicability and meeting their expectations; 7 questions evaluating the self-reported increase of knowledge; and 3 multiple choice questions to assess the students' motivations and opinions on the impact of the program on their future career. Descriptive statistics was used for data analysis. All MD/MPH students (89) with a mean age of 21.4±1.34 participated in this study. Forty one of the students (46.1%) were male and 48 (53.9%) female. Overall, 86.1% of them had positive views about the goals of the program; also, 83.5%, 81.2% and 81.9% of them reported a positive viewpoint about the contents, the applicability and development of specific skills, and meeting their expectations, respectively. The students' most frequent motivation was "learning how to research systematically" (73%). The majority of the students reported this program to be moderately to highly effective in increasing their knowledge in the provided courses. The students had a positive view about almost all of the aspects of the MD/MPH program; this may be indicative of the program being successful in delivering the goals, increasing the students' knowledge and skills, and meeting their expectations to date. Students' enthusiasm for the educational program may lead to their motivation for better learning and

  10. Making the Grade in a Portfolio-Based System: Student Performance and the Student Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment is such an integral part of the educational system that we rarely reflect on its value and impact. Portfolios have gained in popularity, but much attention has emphasized the end-user and portfolio assessment. Here we focus on the portfolio creator (the student) and examine whether their educational needs are met with such an assessment method. This study aims to investigate how assessment practices influence classroom performance and the learning experience of the student in a gra...

  11. Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Dance education provides a language that allows students and teachers to express themselves in new ways and to think through ideas differently. All students deserve the opportunity to learn things in new ways, to internalize information and rephrase it, to understand their world and contribute to it. All students deserve the opportunity to…

  12. Differential impact of student behaviours on group interaction and collaborative learning: medical students' and tutors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Maha; Velan, Gary M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Balasooriya, Chinthaka

    2016-08-22

    Collaboration is of increasing importance in medical education and medical practice. Students' and tutors' perceptions about small group learning are valuable to inform the development of strategies to promote group dynamics and collaborative learning. This study investigated medical students' and tutors' views on competencies and behaviours which promote effective learning and interaction in small group settings. This study was conducted at UNSW Australia. Five focus group discussions were conducted with first and second year medical students and eight small group tutors were interviewed. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Students and tutors identified a range of behaviours that influenced collaborative learning. The main themes that emerged included: respectfulness; dominance, strong opinions and openness; constructiveness of feedback; active listening and contribution; goal orientation; acceptance of roles and responsibilities; engagement and enthusiasm; preparedness; self- awareness and positive personal attributes. An important finding was that some of these student behaviours were found to have a differential impact on group interaction compared with collaborative learning. This information could be used to promote higher quality learning in small groups. This study has identified medical students' and tutors' perceptions regarding interactional behaviours in small groups, as well as behaviours which lead to more effective learning in those settings. This information could be used to promote learning in small groups.

  13. On the Student-Orientation of Teachers’Beliefs from Cognitive Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婧

    2013-01-01

    At present, teachers’belief is an exploring topic to the linguists, educationists, and psychologists. Teachers’beliefs not only influence the teaching’s attitudes and methods but also the student’s interests, abilities and motivation. This thesis attempts to analyze the form, the development, the significance of teacher’s beliefs from cognitive perspective. It also analyzes the relation between teacher’s beliefs and class and the relation between teacher’s beliefs and students to improve the emphasis on teacher’s beliefs.

  14. A qualitative study of student perspectives and experiences in an information technology education program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heekyung

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to learn about students' perspectives of an undergraduate level information technology (IT) education program. The IT program is a recent effort to create a new educational opportunity for computing in college, with recognition that the recent IT developments have had a greater influence on various aspects of people's lives than ever. Students' perspectives are a necessary piece of information to develop this innovative IT education program into a sound educational opportunity. Data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews conducted with 28 undergraduate students, most of whom have taken one or more IT classes before. The interview data were analyzed using the grounded theory approach. The analysis found that college students perceived that they were very competent in dealing with IT primarily due to their continued exposure to computers since youth. However, this perceived competency was not very stable. Students felt that they did not have sufficient IT competency when technical skills of dealing with IT came to attention. They also felt so when comparing their IT competency with that of their peers, examining it in a class context, and confronting a transition from education to the real world. In spite of their preference for and confidence in self-guided learning, students wanted to receive a formal instruction in IT when they needed to learn something difficult, something that they were not very interested in, and something important for their future lives. They also expressed a desire to gain a comprehensive understanding of computers without needing to learn fundamental computing principles. Students' various interests in IT education were dispersed around learning practical technical skills and understanding social implications of IT. Many participants' focus was a mix of the two factors, which was often expressed as an area that dealt with "how humans and computers interact." This blended interest suggested a

  15. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B Aimone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  16. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B.; Weick, Jason P.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks has provided significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. A logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  17. Perspectives for computational modeling of cell replacement for neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aimone, James B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weick, Jason P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In mathematical modeling of anatomically-constrained neural networks we provide significant insights regarding the response of networks to neurological disorders or injury. Furthermore, a logical extension of these models is to incorporate treatment regimens to investigate network responses to intervention. The addition of nascent neurons from stem cell precursors into damaged or diseased tissue has been used as a successful therapeutic tool in recent decades. Interestingly, models have been developed to examine the incorporation of new neurons into intact adult structures, particularly the dentate granule neurons of the hippocampus. These studies suggest that the unique properties of maturing neurons, can impact circuit behavior in unanticipated ways. In this perspective, we review the current status of models used to examine damaged CNS structures with particular focus on cortical damage due to stroke. Secondly, we suggest that computational modeling of cell replacement therapies can be made feasible by implementing approaches taken by current models of adult neurogenesis. The development of these models is critical for generating hypotheses regarding transplant therapies and improving outcomes by tailoring transplants to desired effects.

  18. High school students' perspective on the features of consumer health information websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Zarea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of study was to identify the primary source of health information seeking among high school students and the characteristics of quality consumer health information from their perspective. A cross sectional descriptive survey was used to conduct the study utilizing a valid questionnaire. The first source of health information seeking for most of the high school student (79% was the Internet rather than books, journals or family members. Majority of boys (87% go to the Internet for pathology and definition of diseases, but the girls (82% usually search for life style, exercise, nutrition, mental health, maturity and then general health information such as physiology, anatomy, and calculations. All of the student recognize content accuracy, and believe that involvements of information specialists in management of websites may guarantee the quality criteria of website. It is concluded that development of a quality consumer health information website is essential to meet the health information needs of students and promotion of health literacy among high school students and adolescents in Iran.

  19. Critical thinking instruction and technology enhanced learning from the student perspective: A mixed methods research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Ruth

    2017-03-01

    Critical thinking is acclaimed as a valuable asset for graduates from higher education programs. Technology has advanced in quantity and quality; recognized as a requirement of 21st century learners. A mixed methods research study was undertaken, examining undergraduate nursing student engagement with critical thinking instruction, platformed on two technology-enhanced learning environments: a classroom response system face-to-face in-class and an online discussion forum out-of-class. The Community of Inquiry framed the study capturing constructivist collaborative inquiry to support learning, and facilitate critical thinking capability. Inclusion of quantitative and qualitative data sources aimed to gather a comprehensive understanding of students' development of critical thinking and engagement with technology-enhanced learning. The findings from the students' perspectives were positive toward the inclusion of technology-enhanced learning, and use in supporting their development of critical thinking. Students considered the use of two forms of technology beneficial in meeting different needs and preferences, offering varied means to actively participate in learning. They valued critical thinking instruction being intentionally aligned with subject-specific content facilitating understanding, application, and relevance of course material. While the findings are limited to student participants, the instructional strategies and technology-enhanced learning identified as beneficial can inform course design for the development of critical thinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Entrepreneurial Characteristics of Students in Different Fields of Study: a View from Entrepreneurship Education Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Holienka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our article is to examine the entrepreneurial characteristics of university students in different disciplines, and to develop implications and recommendations for entrepreneurship education programing according to the observed differences. The main research question is to identify whether students from different selected disciplines exhibit different rates of enterprising potential (i.e. tendency to start up and manage projects, and if so, which are the differentiating attributes. To answer this question we conducted a study using the General Enterprising Tendency v2 Test (GET2 test and analysed the enterprising potential of 370 university students in four different majors (business administration, applied informatics, psychology and pedagogy. The findings of our analysis suggest that there are significant differences in the general enterprising tendency levels, as well as in levels of three out of five its components (namely need for achievement, calculated risk taking and internal locus of control between the students in analysed majors. In other words, students in different disciplines exhibit different rates of entrepreneurial predispositions. In our article we present and further discuss these findings, especially from the entrepreneurship education perspective in its broadest sense.