WorldWideScience

Sample records for model state drug

  1. Solid state drug-polymer miscibility studies using the model drug ABT-102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Rajan; Gokhale, Rajeev; Burgess, Diane J

    2016-07-25

    Amorphous solid dispersions typically suffer storage stability issues due to: their amorphous nature, high drug loading, uneven drug:stabilizer ratio and plasticization effects as a result of hygroscopic excipients. An extensive solid state miscibility study was conducted to aid in understanding the mechanisms involved in drug/stabilizer interactions. ABT-102 (model drug) and nine different polymers with different molecular weights and viscosities were selected to investigate drug/polymer miscibility. Three different polymer:drug ratios (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1, w/w) were analyzed using: DSC, FTIR and PXRD. Three different techniques were used to prepare the amorphous solid dispersions: serial dilution, solvent evaporation and spray drying. Spray drying was the best method to obtain amorphous solid dispersions. However, under certain conditions amorphous formulations could be obtained using solvent evaporation. Melting point depression was used to calculate interaction parameters and free energy of mixing for the various drug polymer mixtures. The spray dried solid dispersions yielded a negative free energy of mixing which indicated strong drug-polymer miscibility compared to the solvent evaporation and serial dilution method. Soluplus was the best stabilizer compared to PVP and HPMC, which is probably a consequence of strong hydrogen bonding between the two CO moieties of soluplus and the drug NH moieities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. An explanatory model for state Medicaid per capita prescription drug expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sanjoy; Madhavan, S Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Rising prescription drug expenditure is a growing concern for publicly funded drug benefit programs like Medicaid. To be able to contain drug expenditures in Medicaid, it is important that cause(s) for such increases are identified. This study attempts to establish an explanatory model for Medicaid prescription drugs expenditure based on the impacts of key influencers/predictors identified using a comprehensive framework of drug utilization. A modified Andersen's behavior model of health services utilization is employed to identify potential determinants of pharmaceutical expenditures in state Medicaid programs. Level of federal matching funds, access to primary care, severity of diseases, unemployment, and education levels were found to be key influencers of Medicaid prescription drug expenditure. Increases in all, except education levels, were found to result in increases in drug expenditures. Findings from this study could better inform intervention policies and cost-containment strategies for state Medicaid drug benefit programs.

  3. State Drug Control and Illicit Drug Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Saffer; Frank Chaloupka

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the effect of state criminal justice expenditures and state public health expenditures on deterring illicit drug use. The empirical model is based on a demand and supply model of drug markets. The effect of a given expenditure on criminal justice or public health programs is dependent on the magnitude of the resulting shifts in the two functions and the demand price elasticity. A reduced form of the demand and supply model is also estimated. The data e...

  4. Kinetics of drug action in disease states: towards physiology-based pharmacodynamic (PBPD) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhof, Meindert

    2015-10-01

    Gerhard Levy started his investigations on the "Kinetics of Drug Action in Disease States" in the fall of 1980. The objective of his research was to study inter-individual variation in pharmacodynamics. To this end, theoretical concepts and experimental approaches were introduced, which enabled assessment of the changes in pharmacodynamics per se, while excluding or accounting for the cofounding effects of concomitant changes in pharmacokinetics. These concepts were applied in several studies. The results, which were published in 45 papers in the years 1984-1994, showed considerable variation in pharmacodynamics. These initial studies on kinetics of drug action in disease states triggered further experimental research on the relations between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Together with the concepts in Levy's earlier publications "Kinetics of Pharmacologic Effects" (Clin Pharmacol Ther 7(3): 362-372, 1966) and "Kinetics of pharmacologic effects in man: the anticoagulant action of warfarin" (Clin Pharmacol Ther 10(1): 22-35, 1969), they form a significant impulse to the development of physiology-based pharmacodynamic (PBPD) modeling as novel discipline in the pharmaceutical sciences. This paper reviews Levy's research on the "Kinetics of Drug Action in Disease States". Next it addresses the significance of his research for the evolution of PBPD modeling as a scientific discipline. PBPD models contain specific expressions to characterize in a strictly quantitative manner processes on the causal path between exposure (in terms of concentration at the target site) and the drug effect (in terms of the change in biological function). Pertinent processes on the causal path are: (1) target site distribution, (2) target binding and activation and (3) transduction and homeostatic feedback.

  5. State Drug Utilization Data 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  6. State Drug Utilization Data 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  7. State Drug Utilization Data 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  8. State Drug Utilization Data 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  9. State Drug Utilization Data 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  10. State Drug Utilization Data 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  11. State Drug Utilization Data 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  12. State Drug Utilization Data 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  13. State Drug Utilization Data 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  14. State Drug Utilization Data 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  15. State Drug Utilization Data 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  16. State Drug Utilization Data 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  17. State Drug Utilization Data 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  18. State Drug Utilization Data 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  19. State Drug Utilization Data 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  20. State Drug Utilization Data 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  1. State Drug Utilization Data 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  2. State Drug Utilization Data 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  3. State Drug Utilization Data 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  4. State Drug Utilization Data 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  5. State Drug Utilization Data 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  6. State Drug Utilization Data 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  7. State Drug Utilization Data 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  8. State Drug Utilization Data 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  9. State Drug Utilization Data 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  10. State Drug Utilization Data 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  11. State Drug Utilization Data 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug utilization data are reported by states for covered outpatient drugs that are paid for by state Medicaid agencies since the start of the Medicaid Drug Rebate...

  12. In vitro blood-brain barrier models for drug research: state-of-the-art and new perspectives on reconstituting these models on artificial basement membrane platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jayati; Shi, Yejiao; Azevedo, Helena S

    2016-09-01

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are indispensable screening tools for obtaining early information about the brain-penetrating behaviour of promising drug candidates. Until now, in vitro BBB models have focused on investigating the interplay among cellular components of neurovascular units and the effect of fluidic sheer stress in sustaining normal BBB phenotype and functions. However, an area that has received less recognition is the role of the noncellular basement membrane (BM) in modulating BBB physiology. This review describes the state-of-the-art on in vitro BBB models relevant in drug discovery research and highlights their strengths, weaknesses and the utility potential of some of these models in testing the permeability of nanocarriers as vectors for delivering therapeutics to the brain. Importantly, our review also introduces a new concept of engineering artificial BM platforms for reconstituting BBB models in vitro.

  13. Drug models of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeds, Hannah; Carhart-Harris, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental health disorder with positive, negative and cognitive symptom domains. Approximately one third of patients are resistant to currently available medication. New therapeutic targets and a better understanding of the basic biological processes that drive pathogenesis are needed in order to develop therapies that will improve quality of life for these patients. Several drugs that act on neurotransmitter systems in the brain have been suggested to model aspects of schizophrenia in animals and in man. In this paper, we selectively review findings from dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic, cannabinoid, GABA, cholinergic and kappa opioid pharmacological drug models to evaluate their similarity to schizophrenia. Understanding the interactions between these different neurotransmitter systems and their relationship with symptoms will be an important step towards building a coherent hypothesis for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25653831

  14. Modeling attainment of steady state of drug concentration in plasma by means of a Bayesian approach using MCMC methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Paul; Brunschwig, Hadassa; Luedin, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The approach of Bayesian mixed effects modeling is an appropriate method for estimating both population-specific as well as subject-specific times to steady state. In addition to pure estimation, the approach allows to determine the time until a certain fraction of individuals of a population has reached steady state with a pre-specified certainty. In this paper a mixed effects model for the parameters of a nonlinear pharmacokinetic model is used within a Bayesian framework. Model fitting by means of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods as implemented in the Gibbs sampler as well as the extraction of estimates and probability statements of interest are described. Finally, the proposed approach is illustrated by application to trough data from a multiple dose clinical trial.

  15. Moisture and drug solid-state monitoring during a continuous drying process using empirical and mass balance models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonteyne, Margot; Gildemyn, Delphine; Peeters, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    was chosen as model formulation. For the development of the NIR-based moisture determination model, 15 calibration experiments in the fluid bed dryer were performed. Six test experiments were conducted afterwards, and the product was monitored in-line with NIR and Raman spectroscopy during drying......Classically, the end point detection during fluid bed drying has been performed using indirect parameters, such as the product temperature or the humidity of the outlet drying air. This paper aims at comparing those classic methods to both in-line moisture and solid-state determination by means...... of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tools (Raman and NIR spectroscopy) and a mass balance approach. The six-segmented fluid bed drying system being part of a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet production line (ConsiGma™-25) was used for this study. A theophylline:lactose:PVP (30:67.5:2.5) blend...

  16. Animal models of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Pardo, María Pilar; Roger Sánchez, Concepción; De la Rubia Ortí, José Enrique; Aguilar Calpe, María Asunción

    2017-01-12

    The development of animal models of drug reward and addiction is an essential factor for progress in understanding the biological basis of this disorder and for the identification of new therapeutic targets. Depending on the component of reward to be studied, one type of animal model or another may be used. There are models of reinforcement based on the primary hedonic effect produced by the consumption of the addictive substance, such as the self-administration (SA) and intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigms, and there are models based on the component of reward related to associative learning and cognitive ability to make predictions about obtaining reward in the future, such as the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. In recent years these models have incorporated methodological modifications to study extinction, reinstatement and reconsolidation processes, or to model specific aspects of addictive behavior such as motivation to consume drugs, compulsive consumption or drug seeking under punishment situations. There are also models that link different reinforcement components or model voluntary motivation to consume (two-bottle choice, or drinking in the dark tests). In short, innovations in these models allow progress in scientific knowledge regarding the different aspects that lead individuals to consume a drug and develop compulsive consumption, providing a target for future treatments of addiction.

  17. Solid state NMR of sulfa-drugs

    CERN Document Server

    Portieri, A

    2001-01-01

    deducted. Exact positions of the hydrogen has proved to be essential as well in order to improve the calculations. Finally a case study for the REDOR pulse sequence has been carried out. Different attempts to understand the effects influencing this particular experiment have been carried out on 20% and 99% doubly enriched glycine, as well as on a particular sample, doubly enriched BRL55834, but the internuclear distances measured with this technique still displayed some uncertainties that made results not thoroughly reliable. This work has been a study of systems, mostly of sulfa-drugs, showing polymorphic behaviour. Using different means as solid state NMR, X-ray analysis, * and theoretical calculations, we have seen how it is possible to understand results obtained from the different techniques, proving how the study of polymorphic systems needs cooperative advice from the different techniques that are able to detect polymorphic differences. Within the sulfa-drugs I have been mostly concentrating on sulfani...

  18. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    OpenAIRE

    Lucreţia Udrescu; Laura Sbârcea; Alexandru Topîrceanu; Alexandru Iovanovici; Ludovic Kurunczi; Paul Bogdan; Mihai Udrescu

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection...

  19. A Multilevel Ecological Model of HIV Risk for People Who Are Homeless or Unstably Housed and Who Use Drugs in the Urban United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Elevated HIV prevalence has been observed among urban U.S. individuals who use drugs and who lack stable housing. This article synthesizes extant research on this population and situates it in a multilevel, ecologically based model of HIV risk. Based on a multidisciplinary review of the literature, the model applies social-ecological theory on human development to identify factors shaping the HIV risk context for individuals who use drugs and who are unstably housed at global, societal, neighborhood, household, and individual levels of influence. At the global level, the model includes neoliberal ideologies contributing to the social inequalities that frame the HIV epidemic. U.S. housing and drug policy, including urban renewal, HOPE VI, and the War on Drugs, is the focus of the societal level. At the neighborhood level, mechanisms of the built environment and psychosocial mechanisms are explored for their salience to HIV risk. Research on the association between housing instability and HIV risk is reviewed at the household level. At the last level, relevant individual differences in biology, psychology, and cognition are discussed. Modeling risk at multiple levels of the environment underscores the need to expand the focus of research, treatment, and prevention interventions for HIV/AIDS and addictions beyond individuals and their risk behaviors to address facets of structural violence and incorporate the broader social, political, and economic contexts of risk and health.

  20. Molecular modelling and drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E F; Swanson, S M; Williams, J A

    2000-03-01

    Drug design is a creative act of the same magnitude as composing, sculpting, or writing. The results can touch the lives of millions, but the creator is rarely one scientist and the rewards are distributed differently in the arts than in the sciences. The mechanisms of creativity are the same, i.e., incremental (plodding from darkness to dawn) or sudden (the "Eureka" effect) realization, but both are poorly understood. Creativity remains a human characteristic, but it is directly related to the tools available, especially computer software and hardware. While modelling software continues to mature, very little new has evolved in terms of hardware. Here, we discuss the history of molecular modelling and describe two novel modelling tools, a haptic device and a program, SCULPT, to generate solid molecular models at atomic resolution.

  1. Computational Analysis of Aqueous Drug Solubility – Influence of the Solid State

    OpenAIRE

    Wassvik, Carola

    2006-01-01

    Aqueous solubility is a key parameter influencing the bioavailability of drugs and drug candidates. In this thesis computational models for the prediction of aqueous drug solubility were explored. High quality experimental solubility data for drugs were generated using a standardised protocol and models were developed using multivariate data analysis tools and calculated molecular descriptors. In addition, structural features associated with either solid-state limited or solvation limited sol...

  2. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, Colleen E.; An, Gary; Cannon, William R.; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E.; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S.; Sluka, James P.; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M.

    2016-02-17

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multi-scale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multi-scale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multi-scale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical techniques employed for multi-scale modeling approaches used in pharmacology and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art regarding drug development for: Excitable Systems (Heart); Cancer (Metastasis and Differentiation); Cancer (Angiogenesis and Drug Targeting); Metabolic Disorders; and Inflammation and Sepsis. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multi-scale models.

  3. Multiscale Modeling in the Clinic: Drug Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Colleen E; An, Gary; Cannon, William R; Liu, Yaling; May, Elebeoba E; Ortoleva, Peter; Popel, Aleksander S; Sluka, James P; Su, Jing; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Eckmann, David M

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of length and time scales are relevant to pharmacology, especially in drug development, drug design and drug delivery. Therefore, multiscale computational modeling and simulation methods and paradigms that advance the linkage of phenomena occurring at these multiple scales have become increasingly important. Multiscale approaches present in silico opportunities to advance laboratory research to bedside clinical applications in pharmaceuticals research. This is achievable through the capability of modeling to reveal phenomena occurring across multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are not otherwise readily accessible to experimentation. The resultant models, when validated, are capable of making testable predictions to guide drug design and delivery. In this review we describe the goals, methods, and opportunities of multiscale modeling in drug design and development. We demonstrate the impact of multiple scales of modeling in this field. We indicate the common mathematical and computational techniques employed for multiscale modeling approaches used in pharmacometric and systems pharmacology models in drug development and present several examples illustrating the current state-of-the-art models for (1) excitable systems and applications in cardiac disease; (2) stem cell driven complex biosystems; (3) nanoparticle delivery, with applications to angiogenesis and cancer therapy; (4) host-pathogen interactions and their use in metabolic disorders, inflammation and sepsis; and (5) computer-aided design of nanomedical systems. We conclude with a focus on barriers to successful clinical translation of drug development, drug design and drug delivery multiscale models.

  4. Prescription drug monitoring programs in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Sausan El Burai; Mack, Karin

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Since the late 1990s, the number of opioid analgesic overdose deaths has quadrupled in the United States of America (from 4 030 deaths in 1999 to 16 651 in 2010). The objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the problem of prescription drug overdose in the United States and to discuss actions that could help reduce the problem, with particular attention to the characteristics of prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs). These programs consist of state-level databases that monitor controlled substances. The information compiled in the databases is at the disposal of authorized persons (e.g., physicians, pharmacists, and other health-care providers) and may be used only for professional purposes. Suppliers can use such information to prevent interaction with other drugs or therapeutic duplication, or to identify drug-search behavior. Law enforcement agencies can use these programs to identify improper drug prescription or dispensing patterns, or drug diversion. PMID:25563153

  5. A two-dimensional mathematical model of percutaneous drug absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubota K

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When a drug is applied on the skin surface, the concentration of the drug accumulated in the skin and the amount of the drug eliminated into the blood vessel depend on the value of a parameter, r. The values of r depend on the amount of diffusion and the normalized skin-capillary clearence. It is defined as the ratio of the steady-state drug concentration at the skin-capillary boundary to that at the skin-surface in one-dimensional models. The present paper studies the effect of the parameter values, when the region of contact of the skin with the drug, is a line segment on the skin surface. Methods Though a simple one-dimensional model is often useful to describe percutaneous drug absorption, it may be better represented by multi-dimensional models. A two-dimensional mathematical model is developed for percutaneous absorption of a drug, which may be used when the diffusion of the drug in the direction parallel to the skin surface must be examined, as well as in the direction into the skin, examined in one-dimensional models. This model consists of a linear second-order parabolic equation with appropriate initial conditions and boundary conditions. These boundary conditions are of Dirichlet type, Neumann type or Robin type. A finite-difference method which maintains second-order accuracy in space along the boundary, is developed to solve the parabolic equation. Extrapolation in time is applied to improve the accuracy in time. Solution of the parabolic equation gives the concentration of the drug in the skin at a given time. Results Simulation of the numerical methods described is carried out with various values of the parameter r. The illustrations are given in the form of figures. Conclusion Based on the values of r, conclusions are drawn about (1 the flow rate of the drug, (2 the flux and the cumulative amount of drug eliminated into the receptor cell, (3 the steady-state value of the flux, (4 the time to reach the steady-state

  6. A Profile of Substance Abuse, Gender, Crime, and Drug Policy in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Judith

    2009-01-01

    The climate of domestic drug policy in the United States as it pertains to both women and men at the beginning of the 21st century is the criminalization mode of regulation--a mode that is based on the model of addiction as a crime and one that is used to prohibit the use of illegal drugs. In Canada, drug policy is based mainly on the harm…

  7. Probability state modeling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, C Bruce; Hunsberger, Benjamin C; Herbert, Donald J; Munson, Mark E; Hill, Beth L; Bray, Chris M; Preffer, Frederic I

    2015-07-01

    As the technology of cytometry matures, there is mounting pressure to address two major issues with data analyses. The first issue is to develop new analysis methods for high-dimensional data that can directly reveal and quantify important characteristics associated with complex cellular biology. The other issue is to replace subjective and inaccurate gating with automated methods that objectively define subpopulations and account for population overlap due to measurement uncertainty. Probability state modeling (PSM) is a technique that addresses both of these issues. The theory and important algorithms associated with PSM are presented along with simple examples and general strategies for autonomous analyses. PSM is leveraged to better understand B-cell ontogeny in bone marrow in a companion Cytometry Part B manuscript. Three short relevant videos are available in the online supporting information for both of these papers. PSM avoids the dimensionality barrier normally associated with high-dimensionality modeling by using broadened quantile functions instead of frequency functions to represent the modulation of cellular epitopes as cells differentiate. Since modeling programs ultimately minimize or maximize one or more objective functions, they are particularly amenable to automation and, therefore, represent a viable alternative to subjective and inaccurate gating approaches.

  8. "War on drugs" continues in United States under new leadership.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorman, D M

    1993-01-01

    Criticism of the "war on drugs" pursued under Republican administrations has grown in the United States. With the election of Bill Clinton many experts expected a shift from law enforcement policies to an approach favouring treatment and prevention. The budget announced in April, however, revealed no such shift in allocation of resources. Although the war on drugs has apparently failed to reduce the supply of cheap heroin and cocaine to the United States, the prevention strategy favoured by i...

  9. State prescription drug price Web sites: how useful to consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ha T; Corey, Catherine G

    2008-02-01

    To aid consumers in comparing prescription drug costs, many states have launched Web sites to publish drug prices offered by local retail pharmacies. The current push to make retail pharmacy prices accessible to consumers is part of a much broader movement to increase price transparency throughout the health-care sector. Efforts to encourage price-based shopping for hospital and physician services have encountered widespread concerns, both on grounds that prices for complex services are difficult to measure and compare accurately and that quality varies substantially across providers. Experts agree, however, that prescription drugs are much easier to shop for than other, more complex health services. However, extensive gaps in available price information--the result of relying on Medicaid data--seriously hamper the effectiveness of state drug price-comparison Web sites, according to a new study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). An alternative approach--requiring pharmacies to submit price lists to the states--would improve the usefulness of price information, but pharmacies typically oppose such a mandate. Another limitation of most state Web sites is that price information is restricted to local pharmacies, when online pharmacies, both U.S. and foreign, often sell prescription drugs at substantially lower prices. To further enhance consumer shopping tools, states might consider expanding the types of information provided, including online pharmacy comparison tools, lists of deeply discounted generic drugs offered by discount retailers, and lists of local pharmacies offering price matches.

  10. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  11. Drugs Most Frequently Involved in Drug Overdose Deaths: United States, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Margaret; Trinidad, James P; Bastian, Brigham A; Minino, Arialdi M; Hedegaard, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Objectives-This report identifies the specific drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths in the United States from 2010 through 2014. Methods-The 2010-2014 National Vital Statistics System mortality files were linked to electronic files containing literal text information from death certificates. Drug overdose was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision underlying cause-of-death codes X40-X44 (unintentional), X60-X64 (suicide), X85 (homicide), and Y10-Y14 (undetermined intent). Among deaths with an underlying cause of death of drug overdose, the literal text in three fields of the death certificate (i.e., the cause of death from Part I, significant conditions contributing to death from Part II, and a description of how the injury occurred from Box 43) were searched to identify drug mentions. Search term lists were developed using existing drug classification systems as well as from manual review of the literal text. The search term list was then used to identify the specific drugs involved in overdose deaths. Descriptive statistics were reported for drug overdose deaths involving the 10 most frequently mentioned drugs on death certificates. Tables and figures presenting information on the specific drugs involved in deaths are based on deaths with mention of at least one specific drug on the death certificate. Results-From 2010 through 2014, the number of drug overdose deaths per year increased 23%, from 38,329 in 2010 to 47,055 in 2014. During this time period, the percentage of drug overdose deaths involving at least one specific drug increased, from 67% in 2010 to 78% in 2014. Among drug overdose deaths with at least one drug specified on the death certificate, the 10 drugs most frequently involved in overdose deaths included the following opioids: heroin, oxycodone, methadone, morphine, hydrocodone, and fentanyl; the following benzodiazepines: alprazolam and diazepam; and the following stimulants: cocaine and

  12. Modeling and Simulation of In Vivo Drug Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Jörg; Burghaus, Rolf; Kuepfer, Lars; Ploeger, Bart; Schaller, Stephan; Schmitt, Walter; Willmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) assessment of drug development candidates is well established in pharmaceutical research and development, and PK/PD modeling is common practice in all pharmaceutical companies. A recent analysis (Morgan et al., Drug Discov Today 17(9-10):419-424, 2012) revealed however that insufficient certainty in the integrity of the causal chain of fundamental pharmacological steps from drug dosing through systemic exposure, target tissue exposure, and engagement of molecular target to pharmacological response is still the major driver of failure in phase II of clinical drug development. Despite the rise of molecular biomarkers, ethical, scientific, and practical constraints very often still prevent a direct assessment of each necessary step ultimately leading to an intended drug effect or an unintended adverse reaction. Yet, incomplete investigation of the causality of drug responses is a major risk for translational assessments and the prediction of drug responses in different species or other populations. Mechanism-based modeling and simulation (M&S) offers a means to investigate complex physiological and pharmacological processes and to complement experimental data for non-accessible steps in the pharmacological causal chain. With the help of two examples, it is illustrated, what level of physiological detail, state-of-the-art models can represent, how predictive these models are and how mechanism-based approaches can be combined with empirical correlation-based concepts.

  13. Animal models in drug development for MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    One of the foremost challenges of drug discovery in any therapeutic area is that of solidifying the correlation between in vitro activity and clinical efficacy. Between these is the confirmation that affecting a particular target in vivo will lead to a therapeutic benefit. In antibacterial drug discovery, there is a key advantage from the start, since the targets are bacteria-therefore, it is simple to ascertain in vitro whether a drug has the desired effect, i.e., bacterial cell inhibition or killing, and to understand the mechanism by which that occurs. The downstream criteria, whether a compound reaches the infection site and achieves appropriately high levels to affect bacterial viability, can be evaluated in animal models of infection. In this way animal models of infection can be a highly valuable and predictive bridge between in vitro drug discovery and early clinical evaluation.The Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide variety of infections in humans (Archer, Clin Infect Dis 26:1179-1181, 1998) and has been said to be able to infect every tissue type. Fortunately, over the years a great deal of effort has been expended toward developing infection models in rodents using this organism, with good success. This chapter will describe the advantages, methods, and outcome measurements of the rodent models most used in drug discovery for S. aureus. Mouse models will be the focus of this chapter, as they are the most economical and thus most commonly used, but a rat infection model is included as well.

  14. Animal models of alcohol and drug dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleopatra S. Planeta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction has serious health and social consequences. In the last 50 years, a wide range of techniques have been developed to model specific aspects of drug-taking behaviors and have greatly contributed to the understanding of the neurobiological basis of drug abuse and addiction. In the last two decades, new models have been proposed in an attempt to capture the more genuine aspects of addiction-like behaviors in laboratory animals. The goal of the present review is to provide an overview of the preclinical procedures used to study drug abuse and dependence and describe recent progress that has been made in studying more specific aspects of addictive behavior in animals.

  15. Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grief, Andrew D. [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.grief@nottingham.ac.uk; Richardson, Giles [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giles.richardson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-05-15

    A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

  16. An invertebrate model for CNS drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Qadi, Sonia; Schiøtt, Morten; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ABC efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier (BBB), namely the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), restrain the development of central nervous system (CNS) drugs. Consequently, early screening of CNS drug candidates is pivotal to identify those affected by efflux activity. Therefore, simple,...... barriers. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest a conserved mechanism of brain efflux activity between insects and vertebrates, confirming that this model holds promise for inexpensive and high-throughput screening relative to in vivo models, for CNS drug discovery......., high-throughput and predictive screening models are required. The grasshopper (locust) has been developed as an invertebrate in situ model for BBB permeability assessment, as it has shown similarities to vertebrate models. METHODS: Transcriptome profiling of ABC efflux transporters in the locust brain......BACKGROUND: ABC efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier (BBB), namely the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), restrain the development of central nervous system (CNS) drugs. Consequently, early screening of CNS drug candidates is pivotal to identify those affected by efflux activity. Therefore, simple...

  17. Assessment of blood brain barrier penetration of drugs using a rat steady-state brain distribution model%大鼠稳态脑分布模型评价药物的血脑屏障通透性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原梅; 阳海鹰; 钟玉环; 庄笑梅; 李桦

    2015-01-01

    目的 建立大鼠稳态脑分布模型用于评价安替比林、阿替洛尔和ZZB 系列新药候选化合物的稳态脑分布和血脑屏障通透性.方法 大鼠静脉推注负荷剂量的药物后恒量输注使血药浓度达到稳态,取血和脑组织样品,LC-MS/MS 定量测定血浆和脑组织药物浓度,计算稳态脑血比值(Kp值).在Caco-2 单层细胞体外模型上评价受试药物的双向跨膜通透性,计算表观通透系数(Papp).结果 安替比林和阿替洛尔分别为已知的血脑屏障易通透和难通透药物.安替比林的平均稳态脑分布浓度为(2561±125)ng/g,Kp值为0.93±0.04.阿替洛尔则分别为(20.1±0.8)ng/g 和0.015±0.002.安替比林的Kp值约为阿替洛尔的60 倍.ZZB 系列化合物的结构相似,但Kp值的差异较大,从0.044 到6.41,并与Caco-2 细胞模型的Papp值不相关.结论 建立的大鼠稳态脑分布模型可快速形成稳态血浆浓度,适用于药物血脑屏障通透程度的评价,方法简单、可靠且经济.%Objective To develop a steady-state brain distribution model in rats and to assess the blood brain barrier(BBB) penetration of antipyrine, atenolol and a group of ZZB candidate compounds. Methods Antipyrine, atenolol and ZZB compounds were administered to rats by an initial iv bolus dose (loading dose) followed by iv infusion at a constant rate for 30-40 min to reach steady-state plasma kinetics. The blood and brain tissue samples were then collected. The steady-state concentrations of the samples were measured by LC-MS/MS. The steady-state ratio of brain to plasma concentration (Kp) was calculated. The drugs and candidate compounds were also tested with Caco-2 cell model and the apparent bidirectional transport permeability coefficient (Papp) was obtained. Results Antipyrine and atenolol were known as drugs with high and low BBB penetration properties respectively. The mean brain concentrations of antipyrine and atenolol at steady-state were(2561 ± 125) and(20.1

  18. From Product Models to Product State Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Holm

    1999-01-01

    A well-known technology designed to handle product data is Product Models. Product Models are in their current form not able to handle all types of product state information. Hence, the concept of a Product State Model (PSM) is proposed. The PSM and in particular how to model a PSM is the Research...... Object for this project. In the presentation, benefits and challenges of the PSM will be presented as a basis for the discussion....

  19. Variable Classification of Drug-Intoxication Suicides across US States: A Partial Artifact of Forensics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R H Rockett

    Full Text Available The 21st-century epidemic of pharmaceutical and other drug-intoxication deaths in the United States (US has likely precipitated an increase in misclassified, undercounted suicides. Drug-intoxication suicides are highly prone to be misclassified as accident or undetermined. Misclassification adversely impacts suicide and other injury mortality surveillance, etiologic understanding, prevention, and hence clinical and public health policy formation and practice.To evaluate whether observed variation in the relative magnitude of drug-intoxication suicides across US states is a partial artifact of the scope and quality of toxicological testing and type of medicolegal death investigation system.This was a national, state-based, ecological study of 111,583 drug-intoxication fatalities, whose manner of death was suicide, accident, or undetermined. The proportion of (nonhomicide drug-intoxication deaths classified by medical examiners and coroners as suicide was analyzed relative to the proportion of death certificates citing one or more specific drugs and two types of state death investigation systems. Our model incorporated five sociodemographic covariates. Data covered the period 2008-2010, and derived from NCHS's Multiple Cause-of-Death public use files.Across states, the proportion of drug-intoxication suicides ranged from 0.058 in Louisiana to 0.286 in South Dakota and the rate from 1 per 100,000 population in North Dakota to 4 in New Mexico. There was a low correlation between combined accident and undetermined drug-intoxication death rates and corresponding suicide rates (Spearman's rho = 0.38; p<0.01. Citation of 1 or more specific drugs on the death certificate was positively associated with the relative odds of a state classifying a nonhomicide drug-intoxication death as suicide rather than accident or undetermined, adjusting for region and type of state death investigation system (odds ratio, 1.062; 95% CI,1.016-1.110. Region, too, was a

  20. Quantitative investigation of the brain-to-cerebrospinal fluid unbound drug concentration ratio under steady-state conditions in rats using a pharmacokinetic model and scaling factors for active efflux transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Hiroshi; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Fuse, Eiichi; Ushiki, Junko; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2014-06-01

    A pharmacokinetic model was constructed to explain the difference in brain- and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-to-plasma and brain-to-CSF unbound drug concentration ratios (Kp,uu,brain, Kp,uu,CSF, and Kp,uu,CSF/brain, respectively) of drugs under steady-state conditions in rats. The passive permeability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), PS1, was predicted by two methods using log(D/molecular weight(0.5)) for PS1(1) or the partition coefficient in octanol/water at pH 7.4 (LogD), topologic van der Waals polar surface area, and van der Waals surface area of the basic atoms for PS1(2). The coefficients of each parameter were determined using previously reported in situ rat BBB permeability. Active transport of drugs by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) measured in P-gp- and Bcrp-overexpressing cells was extrapolated to in vivo by introducing scaling factors. Brain- and CSF-to-plasma unbound concentration ratios (Kp,uu,brain and Kp,uu,CSF, respectively) of 19 compounds, including P-gp and Bcrp substrates (daidzein, dantrolene, flavopiridol, genistein, loperamide, quinidine, and verapamil), were simultaneously fitted to the equations in a three-compartment model comprising blood, brain, and CSF compartments. The calculated Kp,uu,brain and Kp,uu,CSF of 17 compounds were within a factor of three of experimental values. Kp,uu,CSF values of genistein and loperamide were outliers of the prediction, and Kp,uu,brain of dantrolene also became an outlier when PS1(2) was used. Kp,uu,CSF/brain of the 19 compounds was within a factor of three of experimental values. In conclusion, the Kp,uu,CSF/brain of drugs, including P-gp and Bcrp substrates, could be successfully explained by a kinetic model using scaling factors combined with in vitro evaluation of P-gp and Bcrp activities.

  1. Beyond the drug-terror nexus: drug trafficking and state-crime relations in Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Danieli, Filippo

    2014-11-01

    In the wake of collapse of the Soviet Union, Central Asia has transformed into a key hub along the Afghan opiates trafficking routes. Around 30 percent of the heroin manufactured in Afghanistan is estimated to be smuggled through Central Asian republics in its way to booming drug markets in Russia and Eastern Europe. Building upon available evidence and extensive fieldwork research, the article seeks to confute mainstream analyses which emphasize connections between criminal and terrorist networks. The focus is on conducive factors for the establishment of drug routes in Central Asia, the characteristics of drug related networks, and the nature of political-criminal relations across the region. It is argued that in all five Central Asia republics strategic partnerships have formed between drug traffickers and state actors around the exploitation of drug rents and that mafias' influence on politics is stronger in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, the region's poorest countries. By moving the focus from narco-terror to the state-crime connections, the article provides a critical insight into political economy issues surrounding a complex and multifaceted phenomenon such as the drug trade. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Homology modeling: an important tool for the drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Tanos Celmar Costa

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, homology modeling has become a popular tool to access theoretical three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecular targets. So far several 3D models of proteins have been built by this technique and used in a great diversity of structural biology studies. But are those models consistent enough with experimental structures to make this technique an effective and reliable tool for drug discovery? Here we present, briefly, the fundamentals and current state-of-the-art of the homology modeling techniques used to build 3D structures of molecular targets, which experimental structures are not available in databases, and list some of the more important works, using this technique, available in literature today. In many cases those studies have afforded successful models for the drug design of more selective agonists/antagonists to the molecular targets in focus and guided promising experimental works, proving that, when the appropriate templates are available, useful models can be built using some of the several software available today for this purpose. Limitations of the experimental techniques used to solve 3D structures allied to constant improvements in the homology modeling software will maintain the need for theoretical models, establishing the homology modeling as a fundamental tool for the drug discovery.

  3. Inventory of state energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, A.G.; Gist, R.L.; Underwood, R.G.; Weber, J.C.

    1980-03-31

    These models address a variety of purposes, such as supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy, emergency management of energy, conservation in end uses of energy, and economic factors. Fifty-one models are briefly described as to: purpose; energy system; applications;status; validation; outputs by sector, energy type, economic and physical units, geographic area, and time frame; structure and modeling techniques; submodels; working assumptions; inputs; data sources; related models; costs; references; and contacts. Discussions in the report include: project purposes and methods of research, state energy modeling in general, model types and terminology, and Federal legislation to which state modeling is relevant. Also, a state-by-state listing of modeling efforts is provided and other model inventories are identified. The report includes a brief encylopedia of terms used in energy models. It is assumed that many readers of the report will not be experienced in the technical aspects of modeling. The project was accomplished by telephone conversations and document review by a team from the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute and the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines. A Technical Committee (listed in the report) provided advice during the course of the project.

  4. Variable Classification of Drug-Intoxication Suicides across US States: A Partial Artifact of Forensics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockett, Ian R H; Hobbs, Gerald R; Wu, Dan; Jia, Haomiao; Nolte, Kurt B; Smith, Gordon S; Putnam, Sandra L; Caine, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    The 21st-century epidemic of pharmaceutical and other drug-intoxication deaths in the United States (US) has likely precipitated an increase in misclassified, undercounted suicides. Drug-intoxication suicides are highly prone to be misclassified as accident or undetermined. Misclassification adversely impacts suicide and other injury mortality surveillance, etiologic understanding, prevention, and hence clinical and public health policy formation and practice. To evaluate whether observed variation in the relative magnitude of drug-intoxication suicides across US states is a partial artifact of the scope and quality of toxicological testing and type of medicolegal death investigation system. This was a national, state-based, ecological study of 111,583 drug-intoxication fatalities, whose manner of death was suicide, accident, or undetermined. The proportion of (nonhomicide) drug-intoxication deaths classified by medical examiners and coroners as suicide was analyzed relative to the proportion of death certificates citing one or more specific drugs and two types of state death investigation systems. Our model incorporated five sociodemographic covariates. Data covered the period 2008-2010, and derived from NCHS's Multiple Cause-of-Death public use files. Across states, the proportion of drug-intoxication suicides ranged from 0.058 in Louisiana to 0.286 in South Dakota and the rate from 1 per 100,000 population in North Dakota to 4 in New Mexico. There was a low correlation between combined accident and undetermined drug-intoxication death rates and corresponding suicide rates (Spearman's rho = 0.38; psuicide rather than accident or undetermined, adjusting for region and type of state death investigation system (odds ratio, 1.062; 95% CI,1.016-1.110). Region, too, was a significant predictor. Relative to the South, a 10% increase in drug citation was associated with 43% (95% CI,11%-83%), 41% (95% CI,7%-85%), and 33% (95% CI,1%-76%) higher odds of a suicide

  5. Drug-usage evaluation by disease state: developing protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, M L

    1996-07-01

    The Joint Commission definition of drug-usage evaluation (DUE) also applies to DUE by disease state. The criteria for disease process selection, key processes being evaluated, methods to develop initial DUE protocols, and DUE validation and approval processes are reviewed. The treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is a disease state DUE performed at Saint Joseph Health Center in Kansas City, Missouri. The preliminary protocol was developed by a collaborative network of clinical pharmacists in the metropolitan area. Outcome measures were included in the evaluation. The results were used as baseline data in the development of a pneumonia clinical pathway.

  6. A Probabilistic Model of Illegal Drug Trafficking Operations in the Eastern Pacific and Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Illicit drug - trafficking is a major concern of the United States and is a primary pillar of President Barack Obama’s Strategy to Combat Transnational...Organized Crime. In the eastern Pacific and Caribbean Sea, drug - trafficking organizations operate a variety of vessels to transit drugs from South...interdicts illegal drug - trafficking in this region. In this thesis, we develop a probability model based on intelligence inputs to generate a spatial

  7. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    This chapter covers the basic principles of steady state modelling and simulation using a number of case studies. Two principal approaches are illustrated that develop the unit operation models from first principles as well as through application of standard flowsheet simulators. The approaches i...

  8. New Hepatitis C Virus Drug Discovery Strategies and Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Snawar; Barretto, Naina; Uprichard, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Current treatment options are expensive, not effective in all patients and are associated with serious side effects. While pre-clinical anti-HCV drug screening is still hampered by the lack of readily infectable small animal models, the development of cell culture HCV experimental model systems has driven a promising new wave of HCV antiviral drug discovery. Areas covered This review contains a concise overview of current HCV treatment options and limitations with a subsequent in-depth focus on the available experimental models and novel strategies that have and continue to enable important advances in HCV drug development. Expert opinion With a large cohort of chronically HCV infected patients progressively developing liver disease that puts them at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic decompensation, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics that are well-tolerated and effective in all patients and against all HCV genotypes. Significant advances in HCV experimental model development have expedited drug discovery; however, additional progress is needed. Importantly, the current trends and momentum in the field suggests that we will continue to overcome critical experimental challenges to reach this end goal. PMID:22861052

  9. Modeling solid-state precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nebylov, AlexanderKozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, modeling and simulation of solid-state precipitation has attracted increased attention in academia and industry due to their important contributions in designing properties of advanced structural materials and in increasing productivity and decreasing costs for expensive alloying. In particular, precipitation of second phases is an important means for controlling the mechanical-technological properties of structural materials. However, profound physical modeling of precipitation is not a trivial task. This book introduces you to the classical methods of precipitation model

  10. Dreams, hallucinogenic drug states, and schizophrenia: a psychological and biological comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, L G

    1983-01-01

    Many observers have noted similarities between dreams, hallucinogenic drug states, and schizophrenia. In the present article, certain fundamental areas of convergence between the three states are described. Consideration is given to the hallucinogenic drug model of psychosis: the reasons for its initial attractiveness, and the reasons for its current disfavor. The concept of ego boundaries is defined, examined, and applied to the three states. In these states, the ego's capacity to average or synthesize various self-representations into a continuous, coherent self is compromised--leading to an impairment of the reality-oriented secondary process, and the emergence of the florid attributes of the primary process. This can account for many of the familiar characteristics of the three states. Current neurophysiological theories of dream and hallucinogenic drug states are presented, with emphasis upon serotonin neurotransmission. Serotonin appears to play a prominent role in the regulation of these states. The analogy contained in the present article suggests that serotonin may play a role in regulating schizophrenic states as well.

  11. Bayesian hierarchical modeling of drug stability data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhong, Jinglin; Nie, Lei

    2008-06-15

    Stability data are commonly analyzed using linear fixed or random effect model. The linear fixed effect model does not take into account the batch-to-batch variation, whereas the random effect model may suffer from the unreliable shelf-life estimates due to small sample size. Moreover, both methods do not utilize any prior information that might have been available. In this article, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical approach to modeling drug stability data. Under this hierarchical structure, we first use Bayes factor to test the poolability of batches. Given the decision on poolability of batches, we then estimate the shelf-life that applies to all batches. The approach is illustrated with two example data sets and its performance is compared in simulation studies with that of the commonly used frequentist methods. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Modelling Simple Experimental Platform for In Vitro Study of Drug Elution from Drug Eluting Stents (DES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalachev, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    We present a simple model of experimental setup for in vitro study of drug release from drug eluting stents and drug propagation in artificial tissue samples representing blood vessels. The model is further reduced using the assumption on vastly different characteristic diffusion times in the stent coating and in the artificial tissue. The model is used to derive a relationship between the times at which the measurements have to be taken for two experimental platforms, with corresponding artificial tissue samples made of different materials with different drug diffusion coefficients, to properly compare the drug release characteristics of drug eluting stents.

  13. Steady-State Process Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    illustrate the “equation oriented” approach as well as the “sequential modular” approach to solving complex flowsheets for steady state applications. The applications include the Williams-Otto plant, the hydrodealkylation (HDA) of toluene, conversion of ethylene to ethanol and a bio-ethanol process.......This chapter covers the basic principles of steady state modelling and simulation using a number of case studies. Two principal approaches are illustrated that develop the unit operation models from first principles as well as through application of standard flowsheet simulators. The approaches...

  14. A Learning Model for Drug Dependent Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremkamp, Steven

    1982-01-01

    Presents the complex factors, i.e., social determinants, drug types, personality characteristics, reasons for drug use and misuse, which characterize the drug experience. Defines awareness of these characteristics as a developmental approach to treatment and prevention of addiction. (RC)

  15. Challenges in modelling nanoparticles for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Amanda S.

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been significant advances in the fields of theoretical condensed matter and computational physics, when confronted with the complexity and diversity of nanoparticles available in conventional laboratories a number of modeling challenges remain. These challenges are generally shared among application domains, but the impacts of the limitations and approximations we make to overcome them (or circumvent them) can be more significant one area than another. In the case of nanoparticles for drug delivery applications some immediate challenges include the incompatibility of length-scales, our ability to model weak interactions and solvation, the complexity of the thermochemical environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and the role of polydispersivity in determining properties and performance. Some of these challenges can be met with existing technologies, others with emerging technologies including the data-driven sciences; some others require new methods to be developed. In this article we will briefly review some simple methods and techniques that can be applied to these (and other) challenges, and demonstrate some results using nanodiamond-based drug delivery platforms as an exemplar.

  16. Mathematical modelling of the release of drug from porous, nonswelling transdermal drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A J; King, J R; Hibberd, S

    1998-06-01

    A general model is presented for the release of drug from porous nonswelling, transdermal drug-delivery devices and it is shown to reduce to previously proposed models in suitable limits. The processes which govern the release of drug are considered to be diffusion of dissolved drug and dissolution of dispersed drug, both in the body of the device and in the device pores, and transfer of drug between the two domains. In the classical limit of large dissolution rates, the problem reduces to one of the moving-boundary type, and solution of this problem in the case where the initial drug loading is much greater than the drug solubility in the device yields expressions for the flux of drug to a perfect sink (modelling in vitro conditions). It is shown that behaviour greatly differing from the classical first-order drug delivery (alpha t 1/2) may be exhibited, depending upon the parameter regime. In some situations the dissolution rates may not be so large and solutions of the general model are derived in the case where the dispersed drug is considered to be undepleted and the diffusivity in the solvent-filled pores is much larger than in the body of the delivery device. Numerical studies are undertaken, and the coupling of delivery device and skin-diffusion models (in order to model the complete transdermal drug-delivery process) is also considered.

  17. Animal models of social contact and drug self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Smith, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Social learning theories of drug abuse propose that individuals imitate drug use behaviors modeled by social peers, and that these behaviors are selectively reinforced and/or punished depending on group norms. Historically, animal models of social influence have focused on distal factors (i.e., those factors outside the drug-taking context) in drug self-administration studies. Recently, several investigators have developed novel models, or significantly modified existing models, to examine the role of proximal factors (i.e., those factors that are immediately present at the time of drug taking) on measures of drug self-administration. Studies using these newer models have revealed several important conclusions regarding the effects of social learning on drug abuse: 1) the presence of a social partner influences drug self-administration, 2) the behavior of a social partner determines whether social contact will increase or decrease drug intake, and 3) social partners can model and imitate specific patterns of drug self-administration. These findings are congruent with those obtained in the human laboratory, providing support for the cross-species generality and validity of these preclinical models. This mini-review describes in detail some of the preclinical animal models used to study social contact and drug self-administration to guide future research on social learning and drug abuse.

  18. THE JUST DRUG DISTRIBUTION IN THE PERSPECTIVE OF WELFARE STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktieva Tri Tjitrawati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available States have obligations to improve equitability of welfare and prosperity of the community. Pharmaceutical is one of the important and strategic industries because of its vital role to support the development of health sector. Lack of regulation on pricing-products, and diversion of social aspects in the drugs trade, either by government or industry, are associated with the paradigm that underlies regulation of the distributions. Prospective policy analysis and functional approach of law are used to find a level of balance of various interest related to the subject, and to find concepts as a basis to construct new paradigm on drugs distribution. Negara berkewajiban untuk meningkatkan kesejahteraan dan kemakmuran masyarakat secara berkeadilan. Industri farmasi merupakan salah satu industri penting dan strategis karena perannya yang vital menunjang pembangunan bidang kesehatan.Terdapat kecenderungan kurangnya peran Pemerintah dalam pricing policy obat, serta diabaikannya aspek sosial dalam perdagangan produk farmasi, baik oleh Pemerintah maupun industri farmasi. Carut marut ini berkaitan dengan ketidakjelasan paradigma yang berujung pada ketidakjelasan kebijakan yang melandasi tatanan distribusi obat. Makalah ini menggunakan analisis kebijakan prospektif dan pendekatan fungsional hukum untuk mengkaji kebijakan distribusi obat yang bersifat multi disiplin dan menemukan konsep baru untuk menemukan titik keseimbangan dari berbagai kepentingan terkait.

  19. [Organization of the drug supply chain in state health services: potential consequences of the public-private mix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Sergio; Martínez-Ojeda, Rosa Haydeé; López-Arellano, Oliva; Jarillo-Soto, Edgar; Castro-Albarrán, Juan Manuel

    2011-01-01

    To assess the consequences of private outsourcing on the overall supply and filling of prescriptions in state health services. The research was conducted using quantitative and qualitative techniques in 13 states. The information was collected through interviews and direct observation. The interviews were carried on staff of state health services related to the drug supply chain and users of health services. The quantitative approach examined the percentage of stocked full recipes in a sample of users. States that have opted for the fully outsourced model, and properly monitored this choice, have increased the supply of drugs to their users and guaranteed the supply in the care units in charge. Other states with the outsourced model have multiple problems: direct purchase of drugs not included in the basic drugs catalogue, failure of suppliers and shortage of supplies in the laboratories that provide the company. The main disadvantages identified in all models were: the subordination of the medical criteria to administrative criteria, insufficient planning based on local care needs, heterogeneous procedures, insufficient knowledge of regulations and lack of normativity. The results indicate that the incorporation of private providers in the drug supply chain may not be the solution to bring down the shortage faced by health services, especially at the hospital level. The shift to outsourcing models has developed without incorporating evaluation mechanisms and the consequences that this transition can have on state health systems must be investigated more deeply.

  20. A Model for Random Student Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith A.; Rose, Nancy L.; Lutz, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to examine random student drug testing in one school district relevant to: (a) the perceptions of students participating in competitive extracurricular activities regarding drug use and abuse; (b) the attitudes and perceptions of parents, school staff, and community members regarding student drug involvement; (c)…

  1. Modeling solid-state precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Nebylov, AlexanderKozeschnik, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    Over recent decades, modeling and simulation of solid-state precipitation has attracted increased attention in academia and industry due to their important contributions in designing properties of advanced structural materials and in increasing productivity and decreasing costs for expensive alloying. In particular, precipitation of second phases is an important means for controlling the mechanical-technological properties of structural materials. However, profound physical modeling of precipitation is not a trivial task. This book introduces you to the classical methods of precipitation modeling and to recently-developed advanced, computationally-efficient techniques. If you're a research professional, academic, or student, you'll learn: nucleation theory, precipitate growth, calculation of interfacial energies. advanced techniques for technologically relevant multicomponent systems and complex thermo-mechanical treatments. numerical approaches using evolution equations and discrete particle size distribu...

  2. 14 CFR 120.123 - Drug testing outside the territory of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drug testing outside the territory of the... OPERATIONS DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAM Drug Testing Program Requirements § 120.123 Drug testing outside the territory of the United States. (a) No part of the testing process (including specimen collection...

  3. Drug-target interaction prediction: databases, web servers and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhang, Xu; Dai, Feng; Yin, Jian; Zhang, Yongdong

    2016-07-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions is an important process in drug discovery. Although high-throughput screening and other biological assays are becoming available, experimental methods for drug-target interaction identification remain to be extremely costly, time-consuming and challenging even nowadays. Therefore, various computational models have been developed to predict potential drug-target associations on a large scale. In this review, databases and web servers involved in drug-target identification and drug discovery are summarized. In addition, we mainly introduced some state-of-the-art computational models for drug-target interactions prediction, including network-based method, machine learning-based method and so on. Specially, for the machine learning-based method, much attention was paid to supervised and semi-supervised models, which have essential difference in the adoption of negative samples. Although significant improvements for drug-target interaction prediction have been obtained by many effective computational models, both network-based and machine learning-based methods have their disadvantages, respectively. Furthermore, we discuss the future directions of the network-based drug discovery and network approach for personalized drug discovery based on personalized medicine, genome sequencing, tumor clone-based network and cancer hallmark-based network. Finally, we discussed the new evaluation validation framework and the formulation of drug-target interactions prediction problem by more realistic regression formulation based on quantitative bioactivity data.

  4. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik;

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R......)-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers...... indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site...

  5. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Chuuk State Federated States of Micronesia, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred, D; Desai, M; Song, R; Bamrah, S; Pavlin, B I; Heetderks, A; Ekiek, M J

    2010-04-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) is a growing public health concern, particularly for the Pacific, where rates of tuberculosis infection are extremely high. In May 2008, a cluster of patients with MDR TB were identified in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia. A multi-agency investigation led to the eventual discovery of 21 cases, and over 100 latent TB infections. Incomplete implementation of Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) and contact investigation were major contributors to the outbreak. The problem of MDR TB in Chuuk was controlled only after a concerted effort on the part of multiple agencies coupled with the highest level of political commitment.

  6. Functional State Modelling of Cultivation Processes: Dissolved Oxygen Limitation State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Roeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new functional state, namely dissolved oxygen limitation state for both bacteria Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultivation processes is presented in this study. Functional state modelling approach is applied to cultivation processes in order to overcome the main disadvantages of using global process model, namely complex model structure and a big number of model parameters. Alongwith the newly introduced dissolved oxygen limitation state, second acetate production state and first acetate production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of E. coli, while mixed oxidative state and first ethanol production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of S. cerevisiae. For all mentioned above functional states both structural and parameter identification is here performed based on experimental data of E. coli and S. cerevisiae fed-batch cultivations.

  7. Drug discovery of antimicrobial photosensitizers using animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sulbha K; Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Huang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Liyi; De Arce, Vida J Bil; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) is an emerging alternative to antibiotics motivated by growing problems with multi-drug resistant pathogens. aPDT uses non-toxic dyes or photosensitizers (PS) in combination with harmless visible of the correct wavelength to be absorbed by the PS. The excited state PS can form a long-lived triplet state that can interact with molecular oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species such as singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical that kill the microbial cells. To obtain effective PS for treatment of infections it is necessary to use cationic PS with positive charges that are able to bind to and penetrate different classes of microbial cells. Other drug design criteria require PS with high absorption coefficients in the red/near infra-red regions of the spectrum where light penetration into tissue is maximum, high photostability to minimize photobleaching, and devising compounds that will selectively bind to microbial cells rather than host mammalian cells. Several molecular classes fulfill many of these requirements including phenothiazinium dyes, cationic tetrapyrroles such as porphyrins, phthalocyanines and bacteriochlorins, cationic fullerenes and cationic derivatives of other known PS. Larger structures such as conjugates between PS and cationic polymers, cationic nanoparticles and cationic liposomes that contain PS are also effective. In order to demonstrate in vivo efficacy it is necessary to use animal models of localized infections in which both PS and light can be effectively delivered into the infected area. This review will cover a range of mouse models we have developed using bioluminescent pathogens and a sensitive low light imaging system to non-invasively monitor the progress of the infection in real time. Effective aPDT has been demonstrated in acute lethal infections and chronic biofilm infections; in infections caused by Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi; in infections in wounds, third degree burns

  8. NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality, U.S. and State Trends: United States, 1999–2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drug poisoning deaths at the national and state levels by selected demographic characteristics, and depicts U.S. and state trends in age-adjusted death rates for...

  9. Intestinal Oxidative State Can Alter Nutrient and Drug Bioavailability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faria Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic cations (OCs are substances of endogenous (e.g., dopamine, choline or exogenous (e.g., drugs like cimetidine origin that are positively charged at physiological ph. since many of these compounds can not pass the cell membrane freely, their transport in or out of cells must be mediated by specific transport systems. Transport by organic cation transporters (OCTs can be regulated rapidly by altering their trafficking and/or affinities in response to stimuli. However, for example, a specific disease could lead to modifications in the expression of OCTs. Chronic exposure to oxidative stress has been suggested to alter regulation and functional activity of proteins through several pathways. According to results from a previous work, oxidation-reduction pathways were thought to be involved in intestinal organic cation uptake modulation. The present work was performed in order to evaluate the influence of oxidative stressors, especially glutathione, on the intestinal organic cation absorption. For this purpose, the effect of compounds with different redox potential (glutathione, an endogenous antioxidant, and procyanidins, diet antioxidants was assessed on MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide uptake in an enterocyte cell line (Caco-2. Caco-2 cells were subcultured with two different media conditions (physiological: 5 mM glucose, referred as control cells; and high-glucose: 25 mM glucose, referred as HG cells. In HG cells, the uptake was significantly lower than in control cells. Redox changing interventions affected Mpp+ uptake, both in control and in high-glucose Caco-2 cells. Cellular glutathione levels could have an important impact on membrane transporter activity. The results indicate that modifications in the cellular oxidative state modulate MPP+ uptake by Caco-2 cells. Such modifications may reflect in changes of nutrient and drug bioavailability.

  10. NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the county level by selected demographic characteristics and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug poisoning...

  11. The solid-state continuum: a perspective on the interrelationships between different solid-state forms in drug substance and drug product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, David P; Patterson, James E; Holm, René

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the review is to provide an overview of the nomenclature used in the solid-state continuum and relate these to the development of drug substances and drug products. The importance of a rational approach to solid-state form selection, including integrated decision making (ensuring equal weight is given to the needs of the drug substance and the drug product), is vital for the effective development of a drug candidate. For example, how do secondary processing considerations influence the selection of drug substance solid-state form and resulting formulation, and how can drug substance solid-state form be used to optimise secondary processing? Further, the potential use of 'crystal' engineering to optimise stability, purity and optical resolutions, and the linked regulatory requirements, will be discussed. The nomenclature used in the solid-state continuum, which contains a large number of different crystalline and non-crystalline forms, for example, amorphous systems, was reviewed. Further, the significant role of the drug substance within the solid oral dose form from a physicochemical perspective was covered. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Predict Drug-Drug Interactions with Efavirenz Involving Simultaneous Inducing and Inhibitory Effects on Cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolini, Catia; Rajoli, Rajith; Battegay, Manuel; Elzi, Luigia; Back, David; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Antiretroviral drugs are among the therapeutic agents with the highest potential for drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In the absence of clinical data, DDIs are mainly predicted based on preclinical data and knowledge of the disposition of individual drugs. Predictions can be challenging, especially when antiretroviral drugs induce and inhibit multiple cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes simultaneously. This study predicted the magnitude of the DDI between efavirenz, an inducer of CYP3A4 and inhibitor of CYP2C8, and dual CYP3A4/CYP2C8 substrates (repaglinide, montelukast, pioglitazone, paclitaxel) using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling approach integrating concurrent effects on CYPs. In vitro data describing the physicochemical properties, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of efavirenz and CYP3A4/CYP2C8 substrates as well as the CYP-inducing and -inhibitory potential of efavirenz were obtained from published literature. The data were integrated in a PBPK model developed using mathematical descriptions of molecular, physiological, and anatomical processes defining pharmacokinetics. Plasma drug-concentration profiles were simulated at steady state in virtual individuals for each drug given alone or in combination with efavirenz. The simulated pharmacokinetic parameters of drugs given alone were compared against existing clinical data. The effect of efavirenz on CYP was compared with published DDI data. The predictions indicate that the overall effect of efavirenz on dual CYP3A4/CYP2C8 substrates is induction of metabolism. The magnitude of induction tends to be less pronounced for dual CYP3A4/CYP2C8 substrates with predominant CYP2C8 metabolism. PBPK modeling constitutes a useful mechanistic approach for the quantitative prediction of DDI involving simultaneous inducing or inhibitory effects on multiple CYPs as often encountered with antiretroviral drugs.

  13. Drugging specific conformational states of GPCRs: challenges and opportunities for computational chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Solano, Maria; Schmidt, Denis; Kolb, Peter; Selent, Jana

    2016-04-01

    Current advances in structural biology for membrane proteins support the existence of multiple Gprotein-coupled receptor (GPCR) conformations. These conformations can be associated to particular receptor states with definite coupling and signaling capacities. Drugging such receptor states represents an opportunity to discover a new generation of GPCR drugs with unprecedented specificity. However, exploiting recently available structural information to develop these drugs is still challenging. In this context, computational structure-based approaches can inform such drug development. In this review, we examine the potential of these approaches and the challenges they will need to overcome to guide the rational discovery of drugs targeting specific GPCR states.

  14. Rhodamine/Nanodiamond as a System Model for Drug Carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, G; Orlanducci, S; Cairone, C; Tamburri, E; Lenti, S; Cianchetta, I; Rossi, M; Terranova, M L

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we present some strategies that are being developed in our labs towards enabling nanodiamond-based applications for drug delivery. Rhodamine B (RhB) has been choosen as model molecule to study the loading of nanodiamonds with active moieties and the conditions for their controlled release. In order to test the chemical/physical interactions between functionalized detonation nanodiamond (DND) and complex molecules, we prepared and tested different RhB@DND systems, with RhB adsorbed or linked by ionic bonding to the DND surface. The chemical state of the DND surfaces before conjugation with the RhB molecules, and the chemical features of the DND-RhB interactions have been deeply analysed by coupling DND with Au nanoparticles and taking advantage of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy SERS. The effects due to temperature and pH variations on the process of RhB release from the DND carrier have been also investigated. The amounts of released molecules are consistent with those required for effective drug action in conventional therapeutic applications, and this makes the DND promising nanostructured cargos for drug delivery applications.

  15. Predicting Anticancer Drug Responses Using a Dual-Layer Integrated Cell Line-Drug Network Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiqian Zhang

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the response of a cancer patient to a therapeutic agent is a major goal in modern oncology that should ultimately lead to personalized treatment. Existing approaches to predicting drug sensitivity rely primarily on profiling of cancer cell line panels that have been treated with different drugs and selecting genomic or functional genomic features to regress or classify the drug response. Here, we propose a dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model, which uses both cell line similarity network (CSN data and drug similarity network (DSN data to predict the drug response of a given cell line using a weighted model. Using the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE and Cancer Genome Project (CGP studies as benchmark datasets, our single-layer model with CSN or DSN and only a single parameter achieved a prediction performance comparable to the previously generated elastic net model. When using the dual-layer model integrating both CSN and DSN, our predicted response reached a 0.6 Pearson correlation coefficient with observed responses for most drugs, which is significantly better than the previous results using the elastic net model. We have also applied the dual-layer cell line-drug integrated network model to fill in the missing drug response values in the CGP dataset. Even though the dual-layer integrated cell line-drug network model does not specifically model mutation information, it correctly predicted that BRAF mutant cell lines would be more sensitive than BRAF wild-type cell lines to three MEK1/2 inhibitors tested.

  16. Modeling Transient States in Language Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, G.J.; Truswell, Robert; Mattieu, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Models of language change may include, apart from an initial state and a terminal state, an intermediate transient state T. Building further on they Failed Change Model (Postma 2010) that ties the dynamics of the transient state T to the dynamics of the overall change A → B, we present an generalize

  17. Negotiation Strategies for Antiretroviral Drug Purchasers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemayr, Sebastian; Ryan, Gery W; Karir, Veena; Liu, Jenny; Palar, Kartika

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment has transformed HIV from a death sentence to a chronic condition, allowing people with HIV to live longer and healthier lives. However, they face significant barriers to accessing and affording life-saving-but expensive-antiretroviral (ARV) medications. These barriers are particularly severe for low-income patients, and they disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minorities. High ARV prices create pressure for government insurers to contain costs either by rationing care or by restricting eligibility for public programs. Limited funding, coupled with a growing demand for HIV care and treatment, is likely to make programmatic decisions about who is covered become more difficult over time. Therefore, it is important to identify options for reducing the cost of providing ARVs to allow more people to receive treatment. This study examines a variety of options for negotiating lower ARV procurement costs in U.S. markets. A case-study approach is used to assess options that different stakeholders could use in negotiating ARV price discounts with drug manufacturers given the regulatory and market constraints that exist in the United States.

  18. A Molecular Communication System Model for Particulate Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahibi, Youssef; Pierobon, Massimiliano; Song, Sang Ok; Akyildiz, Ian F

    2013-12-01

    The goal of a drug delivery system (DDS) is to convey a drug where the medication is needed, while, at the same time, preventing the drug from affecting other healthy parts of the body. Drugs composed of micro- or nano-sized particles (particulate DDS) that are able to cross barriers which prevent large particles from escaping the bloodstream are used in the most advanced solutions. Molecular communication (MC) is used as an abstraction of the propagation of drug particles in the body. MC is a new paradigm in communication research where the exchange of information is achieved through the propagation of molecules. Here, the transmitter is the drug injection, the receiver is the drug delivery, and the channel is realized by the transport of drug particles, thus enabling the analysis and design of a particulate DDS using communication tools. This is achieved by modeling the MC channel as two separate contributions, namely, the cardiovascular network model and the drug propagation network. The cardiovascular network model allows to analytically compute the blood velocity profile in every location of the cardiovascular system given the flow input by the heart. The drug propagation network model allows the analytical expression of the drug delivery rate at the targeted site given the drug injection rate. Numerical results are also presented to assess the flexibility and accuracy of the developed model. The study of novel optimization techniques for a more effective and less invasive drug delivery will be aided by this model, while paving the way for novel communication techniques for Intrabody communication networks.

  19. Modelling Formation of a Drug Reservoir in the Stratum Corneum and Its Impact on Drug Monitoring Using Reverse Iontophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Paulley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse iontophoresis is a relatively new technique for non-invasive drug monitoring in the body. It involves a small electrical current being passed through the skin to facilitate the movement of small charged ions and polar molecules on the skin's surface where the amount of drug can then be measured and hence an accurate estimate of the blood concentration can be made. In vivo studies for several molecules show that initially large amounts of drug are extracted from the body, which are unrelated to the magnitude of the blood concentration; over time the fluxes of extraction decrease to a level proportional to the steady state blood concentration. This suggests that, at first, the drug is being extracted from some source other than the blood; one such candidate for this source is the dead cells which form the stratum corneum. In this paper, we construct two related mathematical models; the first describes the formation of the drug reservoir in the stratum corneum as a consequence of repeated drug intake and natural death of skin cells in the body. The output from this model provides initial conditions for the model of reverse iontophoresis in which charged ions from both the blood and the stratum corneum reservoir compete for the electric current. Model parameters are estimated from data collected for lithium monitoring. Our models will improve interpretation of reverse iontophoretic data by discriminating the subdermal from the skin contribution to the fluxes of extraction. They also suggest that analysis of the skin reservoir might be a valuable tool to investigate patients' exposure to chemicals including therapeutic drugs.

  20. Personalized drug administration for cancer treatment using Model Reference Adaptive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Naser; Salamci, Metin U

    2015-04-21

    A new Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) approach is proposed for the nonlinear regulation problem of cancer treatment via chemotherapy. We suggest an approach for determining an optimal anticancer drug delivery scenario for cancer patients without prior knowledge of nonlinear model structure and parameters by compounding State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) and MRAC which will lead to personalized drug administration. Several approaches have been proposed for eradicating cancerous cells in nonlinear tumor growth model. The main difficulty in these approaches is the requirement of nonlinear model parameters, which are unknown to physicians in reality. To cope with this shortage, we first determine the drug delivery scenario for a reference patient with known mathematical model and parameters via SDRE technique, and by using the proposed approach we adapt the drug administration scenario for another cancer patient despite unknown nonlinear model structure and model parameters. We propose an efficient approach to determine drug administration which will help physicians for prescribing a chemotherapy protocol for a cancer patient by regulating the drug delivery scenario of the reference patient. Stabilizing the tumor growth nonlinear model has been achieved via full state feedback techniques and yields a near optimal solution to cancer treatment problem. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for eradicating tumor lumps with different sizes in different patients.

  1. Mean Shift Detection for State Space Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, J.; Mandjes, M.; Taimre, T.; Weber, T.; McPhee, M.J.; Anderssen, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we develop and validate a procedure for testing against a shift in mean in the observations and hidden state sequence of state space models with Gaussian noise. State space models are popular for modelling stochastic networks as they allow to take into account that observations of the

  2. My Life with State Space Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    . The conceptual idea behind the state space model is that the evolution over time in the object we are observing and the measurement process itself are modelled separately. My very first serious analysis of a data set was done using a state space model, and since then I seem to have been "haunted" by state space...

  3. Drugs and Crime: An Empirically Based, Interdisciplinary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, James F.; Sneed, Zach

    2008-01-01

    This article synthesizes neuroscience findings with long-standing criminological models and data into a comprehensive explanation of the relationship between drug use and crime. The innate factors that make some people vulnerable to drug use are conceptually similar to those that predict criminality, supporting a spurious reciprocal model of the…

  4. Drugs and Crime: An Empirically Based, Interdisciplinary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, James F.; Sneed, Zach

    2008-01-01

    This article synthesizes neuroscience findings with long-standing criminological models and data into a comprehensive explanation of the relationship between drug use and crime. The innate factors that make some people vulnerable to drug use are conceptually similar to those that predict criminality, supporting a spurious reciprocal model of the…

  5. Spread of anti-malarial drug resistance: Mathematical model with implications for ACT drug policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dondorp Arjen M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most malaria-endemic countries are implementing a change in anti-malarial drug policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. The impact of different drug choices and implementation strategies is uncertain. Data from many epidemiological studies in different levels of malaria endemicity and in areas with the highest prevalence of drug resistance like borders of Thailand are certainly valuable. Formulating an appropriate dynamic data-driven model is a powerful predictive tool for exploring the impact of these strategies quantitatively. Methods A comprehensive model was constructed incorporating important epidemiological and biological factors of human, mosquito, parasite and treatment. The iterative process of developing the model, identifying data needed, and parameterization has been taken to strongly link the model to the empirical evidence. The model provides quantitative measures of outcomes, such as malaria prevalence/incidence and treatment failure, and illustrates the spread of resistance in low and high transmission settings. The model was used to evaluate different anti-malarial policy options focusing on ACT deployment. Results The model predicts robustly that in low transmission settings drug resistance spreads faster than in high transmission settings, and treatment failure is the main force driving the spread of drug resistance. In low transmission settings, ACT slows the spread of drug resistance to a partner drug, especially at high coverage rates. This effect decreases exponentially with increasing delay in deploying the ACT and decreasing rates of coverage. In the high transmission settings, however, drug resistance is driven by the proportion of the human population with a residual drug level, which gives resistant parasites some survival advantage. The spread of drug resistance could be slowed down by controlling presumptive drug use and avoiding the use of combination therapies containing drugs with

  6. Spread of anti-malarial drug resistance: mathematical model with implications for ACT drug policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongtavornpinyo, Wirichada; Yeung, Shunmay; Hastings, Ian M; Dondorp, Arjen M; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Nicholas J

    2008-11-02

    Most malaria-endemic countries are implementing a change in anti-malarial drug policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). The impact of different drug choices and implementation strategies is uncertain. Data from many epidemiological studies in different levels of malaria endemicity and in areas with the highest prevalence of drug resistance like borders of Thailand are certainly valuable. Formulating an appropriate dynamic data-driven model is a powerful predictive tool for exploring the impact of these strategies quantitatively. A comprehensive model was constructed incorporating important epidemiological and biological factors of human, mosquito, parasite and treatment. The iterative process of developing the model, identifying data needed, and parameterization has been taken to strongly link the model to the empirical evidence. The model provides quantitative measures of outcomes, such as malaria prevalence/incidence and treatment failure, and illustrates the spread of resistance in low and high transmission settings. The model was used to evaluate different anti-malarial policy options focusing on ACT deployment. The model predicts robustly that in low transmission settings drug resistance spreads faster than in high transmission settings, and treatment failure is the main force driving the spread of drug resistance. In low transmission settings, ACT slows the spread of drug resistance to a partner drug, especially at high coverage rates. This effect decreases exponentially with increasing delay in deploying the ACT and decreasing rates of coverage. In the high transmission settings, however, drug resistance is driven by the proportion of the human population with a residual drug level, which gives resistant parasites some survival advantage. The spread of drug resistance could be slowed down by controlling presumptive drug use and avoiding the use of combination therapies containing drugs with mismatched half-lives, together with reducing malaria

  7. Systems pharmacology modeling: an approach to improving drug safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jane P F; Fontana, Robert J; Price, Nathan D; Sangar, Vineet

    2014-01-01

    Advances in systems biology in conjunction with the expansion in knowledge of drug effects and diseases present an unprecedented opportunity to extend traditional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling/analysis to conduct systems pharmacology modeling. Many drugs that cause liver injury and myopathies have been studied extensively. Mitochondrion-centric systems pharmacology modeling is important since drug toxicity across a large number of pharmacological classes converges to mitochondrial injury and death. Approaches to systems pharmacology modeling of drug effects need to consider drug exposure, organelle and cellular phenotypes across all key cell types of human organs, organ-specific clinical biomarkers/phenotypes, gene-drug interaction and immune responses. Systems modeling approaches, that leverage the knowledge base constructed from curating a selected list of drugs across a wide range of pharmacological classes, will provide a critically needed blueprint for making informed decisions to reduce the rate of attrition for drugs in development and increase the number of drugs with an acceptable benefit/risk ratio.

  8. Discovery of Drug Synergies in Gastric Cancer Cells Predicted by Logical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flobak, Åsmund; Baudot, Anaïs; Remy, Elisabeth; Thommesen, Liv; Thieffry, Denis; Kuiper, Martin; Lægreid, Astrid

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of efficient anti-cancer drug combinations is a major challenge, since experimental testing of all possible combinations is clearly impossible. Recent efforts to computationally predict drug combination responses retain this experimental search space, as model definitions typically rely on extensive drug perturbation data. We developed a dynamical model representing a cell fate decision network in the AGS gastric cancer cell line, relying on background knowledge extracted from literature and databases. We defined a set of logical equations recapitulating AGS data observed in cells in their baseline proliferative state. Using the modeling software GINsim, model reduction and simulation compression techniques were applied to cope with the vast state space of large logical models and enable simulations of pairwise applications of specific signaling inhibitory chemical substances. Our simulations predicted synergistic growth inhibitory action of five combinations from a total of 21 possible pairs. Four of the predicted synergies were confirmed in AGS cell growth real-time assays, including known effects of combined MEK-AKT or MEK-PI3K inhibitions, along with novel synergistic effects of combined TAK1-AKT or TAK1-PI3K inhibitions. Our strategy reduces the dependence on a priori drug perturbation experimentation for well-characterized signaling networks, by demonstrating that a model predictive of combinatorial drug effects can be inferred from background knowledge on unperturbed and proliferating cancer cells. Our modeling approach can thus contribute to preclinical discovery of efficient anticancer drug combinations, and thereby to development of strategies to tailor treatment to individual cancer patients.

  9. Hydrodynamic modeling of ferrofluid flow in magnetic targeting drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Han-dan; XU Wei; WANG Shi-gang; KE Zun-ji

    2008-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific locations within human body, magnetic drug targeting prevails due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Magnetic targeting drug delivery is a method of carrying drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles to a target tissue target under the applied magnetic field. This method increases the drug concentration in the target while reducing the adverse side-effects. Although there have been some theoretical analyses for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel. A mathematical model is presented to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. In this model, magnetic force and asymmetrical force are added, and an angular momentum equation of magnetic nanoparticles in the applied magnetic field is modeled. Engineering approximations are achieved by retaining the physically most significant items in the model due to the mathematical complexity of the motion equations. Numerical simulations are performed to obtain better insight into the theoretical model with computational fluid dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the important parameters leading to adequate drug delivery to the target site depending on the magnetic field intensity, which coincident with those of animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide important information and suggest strategies for improving delivery in clinical application.

  10. Revealing kinetics and state-dependent binding properties of IKur-targeting drugs that maximize atrial fibrillation selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinwood, Nicholas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora

    2017-09-01

    The KV1.5 potassium channel, which underlies the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur) and is predominantly expressed in atria vs. ventricles, has emerged as a promising target to treat atrial fibrillation (AF). However, while numerous KV1.5-selective compounds have been screened, characterized, and tested in various animal models of AF, evidence of antiarrhythmic efficacy in humans is still lacking. Moreover, current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs heavily rely on steady-state concentration-response curves or IC50 values, which can overlook adverse cardiotoxic effects. We sought to investigate the effects of kinetics and state-dependent binding of IKur-targeting drugs on atrial electrophysiology in silico and reveal the ideal properties of IKur blockers that maximize anti-AF efficacy and minimize pro-arrhythmic risk. To this aim, we developed a new Markov model of IKur that describes KV1.5 gating based on experimental voltage-clamp data in atrial myocytes from patient right-atrial samples in normal sinus rhythm. We extended the IKur formulation to account for state-specificity and kinetics of KV1.5-drug interactions and incorporated it into our human atrial cell model. We simulated 1- and 3-Hz pacing protocols in drug-free conditions and with a [drug] equal to the IC50 value. The effects of binding and unbinding kinetics were determined by examining permutations of the forward (kon) and reverse (koff) binding rates to the closed, open, and inactivated states of the KV1.5 channel. We identified a subset of ideal drugs exhibiting anti-AF electrophysiological parameter changes at fast pacing rates (effective refractory period prolongation), while having little effect on normal sinus rhythm (limited action potential prolongation). Our results highlight that accurately accounting for channel interactions with drugs, including kinetics and state-dependent binding, is critical for developing safer and more effective pharmacological anti

  11. Integrating Multiscale Modeling with Drug Effects for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangfang L; Oduola, Wasiu O; Qian, Lijun; Dougherty, Edward R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we review multiscale modeling for cancer treatment with the incorporation of drug effects from an applied system's pharmacology perspective. Both the classical pharmacology and systems biology are inherently quantitative; however, systems biology focuses more on networks and multi factorial controls over biological processes rather than on drugs and targets in isolation, whereas systems pharmacology has a strong focus on studying drugs with regard to the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) relations accompanying drug interactions with multiscale physiology as well as the prediction of dosage-exposure responses and economic potentials of drugs. Thus, it requires multiscale methods to address the need for integrating models from the molecular levels to the cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is a common belief that tumorigenesis and tumor growth can be best understood and tackled by employing and integrating a multifaceted approach that includes in vivo and in vitro experiments, in silico models, multiscale tumor modeling, continuous/discrete modeling, agent-based modeling, and multiscale modeling with PK/PD drug effect inputs. We provide an example application of multiscale modeling employing stochastic hybrid system for a colon cancer cell line HCT-116 with the application of Lapatinib drug. It is observed that the simulation results are similar to those observed from the setup of the wet-lab experiments at the Translational Genomics Research Institute.

  12. The Impact of an Indiana (United States Drug Court on Criminal Recidivism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Gallagher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated a drug court located in a metropolitan area of Indiana (United States, focusing specifically on identifying variables that predicted recidivism among drug court participants and comparing criminal recidivism patterns among drug court and probation participants. Drug court participants were most likely to recidivate if they were younger, had a violation within the first 30 days of the program, had a previous criminal record, and were terminated unsuccessfully from the program. Furthermore, drug court participants were less likely to recidivate than probationers who had similar offense and demographic characteristics. Implications for drug court practice, policy advocacy, and future research are discussed.

  13. Strategies that delay or prevent the timely availability of affordable generic drugs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory H; Carrier, Michael A; Silver, Richard T; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-03-17

    High cancer drug prices are influenced by the availability of generic cancer drugs in a timely manner. Several strategies have been used to delay the availability of affordable generic drugs into the United States and world markets. These include reverse payment or pay-for-delay patent settlements, authorized generics, product hopping, lobbying against cross-border drug importation, buying out the competition, and others. In this forum, we detail these strategies and how they can be prevented.

  14. Forecasting state-level premature deaths from alcohol, drugs, and suicides using Google Trends data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jason; Cuthbertson, Courtney; Loveridge, Scott; Skidmore, Mark; Dyar, Will

    2017-04-15

    Vital statistics on the number of, alcohol-induced death (AICD) drug-induced death (DICD), and suicides at the local-level are only available after a substantial lag of up to two years after the events occur. We (1) investigate how well Google Trends search data explain variation in state-level rates in the US, and (2) use this method to forecast these rates of death for 2015 as official data are not yet available. We tested the degree to which Google Trends data on 27 terms can be fit to CDC data using L1-regularization on AICD, DICD, and suicide. Using Google Trends data, we forecast 2015 AICD, DICD, and suicide rates. L1-regularization fit the pre-2015 data much better than the alternative model using state-level unemployment and income variables. Google Trends data account for substantial variation in growth of state-level rates of death: 30.9% for AICD, 23.9% for DICD, and 21.8% for suicide rates. Every state except Hawaii is forecasted to increase in all three of these rates in 2015. The model predicts state, not local or individual behavior, and is dependent on continued availability of Google Trends data. The method predicts state-level AICD, DICD, and suicide rates better than the alternative model. The study findings suggest that this methodology can be developed into a public health surveillance system for behavioral health-related causes of death. State-level predictions could be used to inform state interventions aimed at reducing AICD, DICD, and suicide. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. THE MODEL IN PREVENTING AND SOLVING DRUGS IN THE THAI-LAO BORDER VILLAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattana Puttichart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A drug issue is a problem at both national and international levels. The root causes of the problems lie inside and outside the humans. To solve the problems in a sustainable way, it is essential to get cooperation from many parties. The research aimed to study the situations and prevention and solution of drugs in the border villages, to construct the model to prevent and solve the drug issues and to evaluate the model for preventing and solving the drugs prevalent in the border villages. The work was a qualitative research. It analyzed documentary data and those from the field study gained by surveying, observing, interviewing, focus group and workshop. Twenty border villages in Khemarat district were used as the samples which derived by a specific random sampling. The research found that (1 as regards the drug situations, the drugs were prevalent in Khemarat. There were two guidelines to deal with the situation: Internal factor or participation from all; external factors or the cooperation between the state and the community residents. (2 Considering the guidelines for constructing the model for preventing drugs, there were four types of measures: (1 Integration from all sectors, (2 objectives in constructing the model which consisted of two items: 2.1 promotion and support for the state officials’ performance, 2.2 observation and protection of the community members from drugs. (3 The process of constructing the model was composed of the following: Finding a leader, communication to effect changes, multilateral communication in society, community participation in solving the problems, linking ideas from a variety of people, public forum to exchange the ideas, feedback on problems, turning burdens into energy, progress in people’s participation. (4 evaluation of the state officials’ and the community’s participation. (3 Given the suitability and practicality of the model, the model in question was found to be suitable and also found to

  16. Prospects for United States-Mexican cooperation in the war on drug trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Thomas A.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Drug control policy on the Southwest U.S. border requires an exceptional level of cooperation between Mexico and the United States. This thesis examines the formulation and evolution of drug control policies in both countries, and analyzes the mutual interests and the unique constraints facing them. The thesis recommends eight proposals for improving cooperation between Mexico and the United States in the war on drugs, which include: ...

  17. Association between unemployment rates and prescription drug utilization in the United States, 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background While extensive evidence suggests that the economic recession has had far reaching effects on many economic sectors, little is known regarding its impact on prescription drug utilization. The purpose of this study is to describe the association between state-level unemployment rates and retail sales of seven therapeutic classes (statins, antidepressants, antipsychotics, angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitors, opiates, phosphodiesterase [PDE] inhibitors and oral contraceptives) in the United States. Methods Using a retrospective mixed ecological design, we examined retail prescription sales using IMS Health Xponent™ from September 2007 through July 2010, and we used the Bureau of Labor Statistics to derive population-based rates and mixed-effects modeling with state-level controls to examine the association between unemployment and utilization. Our main outcome measure was state-level utilization per 100,000 people for each class. Results Monthly unemployment levels and rates of use of each class varied substantially across the states. There were no statistically significant associations between use of ACE inhibitors or SSRIs/SNRIs and average unemployment in analyses across states, while for opioids and PDE inhibitors there were small statistically significant direct associations, and for the remaining classes inverse associations. Analyses using each state as its own control collectively exhibited statistically significant positive associations between increases in unemployment and prescription drug utilization for five of seven areas examined. This relationship was greatest for statins (on average, a 4% increase in utilization per 1% increased unemployment) and PDE inhibitors (3% increase in utilization per 1% increased unemployment), and lower for oral contraceptives and atypical antipsychotics. Conclusion We found no evidence of an association between increasing unemployment and decreasing prescription utilization, suggesting that any

  18. Thermosensitive liposomal drug delivery systems: state of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kneidl B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Kneidl,1,2 Michael Peller,3 Gerhard Winter,2 Lars H Lindner,1 Martin Hossann11Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Munich, 2Department of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, 3Institute for Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Thermosensitive liposomes are a promising tool for external targeting of drugs to solid tumors when used in combination with local hyperthermia or high intensity focused ultrasound. In vivo results have demonstrated strong evidence that external targeting is superior over passive targeting achieved by highly stable long-circulating drug formulations like PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Up to March 2014, the Web of Science listed 371 original papers in this field, with 45 in 2013 alone. Several formulations have been developed since 1978, with lysolipid-containing, low temperature-sensitive liposomes currently under clinical investigation. This review summarizes the historical development and effects of particular phospholipids and surfactants on the biophysical properties and in vivo efficacy of thermosensitive liposome formulations. Further, treatment strategies for solid tumors are discussed. Here we focus on temperature-triggered intravascular and interstitial drug release. Drug delivery guided by magnetic resonance imaging further adds the possibility of performing online monitoring of a heating focus to calculate locally released drug concentrations and to externally control drug release by steering the heating volume and power. The combination of external targeting with thermosensitive liposomes and magnetic resonance-guided drug delivery will be the unique characteristic of this nanotechnology approach in medicine.Keywords: thermosensitive liposomes, phosphatidyloligoglycerol, hyperthermia, high intensity focused ultrasound, drug delivery, drug targeting

  19. Characteristics of Suicides Caused by Drug Overdose in the State of Maryland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal drug overdose is a major public health issue. In the United States, every year more than 33,000 people commit suicides. Our study focused on the characteristics of suicide victims in the state of Maryland. Material and methods: This study was a retrospective review of autopsy cases of all suicide deaths caused by drug (s or drug (s with alcohol intoxication investigated by the OCME in Maryland over a 7-year period from January 2004 to December 2011. All deaths investigated by the OCME that require autopsy examination are subject to comprehensive toxicology testing for drugs and alcohol. The screen tests were performed using gas chromatography (GC and radioimmunoassay techniques. All detected drugs and/or metabolites were confirmed using GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Results: From 2004 to 2011, 434 deaths were certified as suicide. Of the 434 suicidal overdose deaths, 84% were white, 11% were African-American, and about 5% were either Hispanic or Asian. The male and female ratio was almost equal. Their ages ranged 15-82 years. Of the 434 suicidal drug overdose deaths, 277 victims (63.8% consumed a single drug type and 157 (36.2% consumed more than one type of drug. Of the 277 single-drug overdose cases, 71.1% suicides were due to prescription drugs, 23.5% due to over-the-counter drugs, and 5.4% due to street/recreational drugs. Among single-type prescription drugs, analgesic (N = 76, antidepressant (N = 45, and neuroleptic (N = 35 classes were the three leading type of drugs used in suicidal deaths. Oxycodone, morphine, quetiapine, and amitriptyline were the most common prescription drugs in suicidal overdose. Diphenhydramine was the leading over-the-counter drug. Of the 157 victims who consumed more than one drug, combined prescription drugs were present in 54.1%, mixed prescription and over-the-counter drugs in 29.3%, and prescription drugs/over-the-counter drugs and street drugs in 16.6% of cases. Of the multiple-drug overdose suicides

  20. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    9/2012 - 4/30/2017 2.40 calendar NCI Anticancer Drug Pharmacology in Very Young Children The proposed studies will use pharmacokinetic... anticancer drugs . DOD W81XWH-14-1-0103 CA130396 (Stewart) 9/1/2014 - 8/31/2016 .60 calendar DOD-DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Tumor Growth Model with PK... anticancer drugs . .60 calendar V Foundation Translational (Stewart) 11/1/2012-10/31/2015 THE V FDN FOR CA RES Identification & preclinical testing

  1. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov; Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-06-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.

  2. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A model for the testing of novel anti-migraine drugs should preferably use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity...... drug testing....

  3. A Mathematical Model for HIV Drug-Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Ivan; Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of the transmission of HIV infection here the individuals receive antiretroviral drugs but may not respond to treatment. In such case the latter can be changed to a different therapy, and individuals may or may not respond also to this second set of drugs.

  4. Modeling Per Capita State Health Expenditure Variat...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Modeling Per Capita State Health Expenditure Variation State-Level Characteristics Matter, published in Volume 3, Issue 4, of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  5. Dosage and Dose Schedule Screening of Drug Combinations in Agent-Based Models Reveals Hidden Synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros de Andrade E Sousa, Lisa C; Kühn, Clemens; Tyc, Katarzyna M; Klipp, Edda

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the most common causative agent of human fungal infections and better drugs or drug combination strategies are urgently needed. Here, we present an agent-based model of the interplay of C. albicans with the host immune system and with the microflora of the host. We took into account the morphological change of C. albicans from the yeast to hyphae form and its dynamics during infection. The model allowed us to follow the dynamics of fungal growth and morphology, of the immune cells and of microflora in different perturbing situations. We specifically focused on the consequences of microflora reduction following antibiotic treatment. Using the agent-based model, different drug types have been tested for their effectiveness, namely drugs that inhibit cell division and drugs that constrain the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Applied individually, the division drug turned out to successfully decrease hyphae while the transition drug leads to a burst in hyphae after the end of the treatment. To evaluate the effect of different drug combinations, doses, and schedules, we introduced a measure for the return to a healthy state, the infection score. Using this measure, we found that the addition of a transition drug to a division drug treatment can improve the treatment reliability while minimizing treatment duration and drug dosage. In this work we present a theoretical study. Although our model has not been calibrated to quantitative experimental data, the technique of computationally identifying synergistic treatment combinations in an agent based model exemplifies the importance of computational techniques in translational research.

  6. Mathematical modeling of drug release from bioerodible microparticles: effect of gamma-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisant, N; Siepmann, J; Richard, J; Benoit, J P

    2003-09-01

    Bioerodible polymers used in controlled drug delivery systems, such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) undergo radiolytic degradation during gamma-irradiation. In spite of the considerable practical importance, yet only little knowledge is available on the consequences of this sterilization method on the resulting drug release patterns in a quantitative way. The major objectives of the present study were: (i) to monitor the effects of different gamma-irradiation doses on the physicochemical properties of drug-free and drug-loaded, PLGA-based microparticles; (ii) to analyze the obtained experimental results using adequate mathematical models; (iii) to get further insight into the occurring physical and chemical phenomena; and (iv) to relate the applied gamma-irradiation dose in a quantitative way to the resulting drug release rate. 5-Fluorouracil-loaded, PLGA-based microparticles were prepared with an oil-in-water solvent extraction method and exposed to gamma-irradiation doses ranging from 0 to 33 kGy. Size exclusion chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, particle size analysis, determination of the actual drug loading and in vitro drug release kinetics were used to study the effects of the gamma-irradiation dose on the physicochemical properties of the microparticles. Two mathematical models-a simplified and a more comprehensive one-were used to analyze the experimental results. The simplified model considers drug diffusion based on Fick's second law for spherical geometry and a Higuchi-like pseudo-steady-state approach. The complex model combines Monte Carlo simulations (describing polymer erosion) with partial differential equations quantifying drug diffusion with time-, position- and direction-dependent diffusivities. Interestingly, exponential relationships between the gamma-irradiation dose and the initial drug diffusivity within the microparticles could be established. Based on this knowledge both models were

  7. Dosage and dose schedule screening of drug combinations in agent-based models reveals hidden synergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Corina Barros de Andrade e Sousa1

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Candida albicans is the most common causative agent of human fungal infections and better drugs or drug combination strategies are urgently needed. Here, we present an agent-based model of the interplay of C. albicans with the host immune system and with the microflora of the host. We took into account the morphological change of C. albicans from the yeast to hyphae form and its dynamics during infection. The model allowed us to follow the dynamics of fungal growth and morphology, of the immune cells and of microflora in different perturbing situations. We specifically focused on the consequences of microflora reduction following antibiotic treatment. Using the agent-based model, different drug types have been tested for their effectiveness, namely drugs that inhibit cell division and drugs that constrain the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Applied individually, the division drug turned out to successfully decrease hyphae while the transition drug leads to a burst in hyphae after the end of the treatment. To evaluate the effect of different drug combinations, doses, and schedules, we introduced a measure for the return to a healthy state, the infection score. Using this measure, we found that the addition of a transition drug to a division drug treatment can improve the treatment reliability while minimizing treatment duration and drug dosage. In this work we present a theoretical study. Although our model has not been calibrated to quantitative experimental data, the technique of computationally identifying synergistic treatment combinations in an agent based model exemplifies the importance of computational techniques in translational research.

  8. Probing kinetic drug binding mechanism in voltage-gated sodium ion channel: open state versus inactive state blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics of open state and inactive state drug binding mechanisms have been studied here using different voltage protocols in sodium ion channel. We have found that for constant voltage protocol, open state block is more efficient in blocking ionic current than inactive state block. Kinetic effect comes through peak current for mexiletine as an open state blocker and in the tail part for lidocaine as an inactive state blocker. Although the inactivation of sodium channel is a free energy driven process, however, the two different kinds of drug affect the inactivation process in a different way as seen from thermodynamic analysis. In presence of open state drug block, the process initially for a long time remains entropy driven and then becomes free energy driven. However in presence of inactive state block, the process remains entirely entropy driven until the equilibrium is attained. For oscillating voltage protocol, the inactive state blocking is more efficient in damping the oscillation of ionic current. From the pulse train analysis it is found that inactive state blocking is less effective in restoring normal repolarisation and blocks peak ionic current. Pulse train protocol also shows that all the inactive states behave differently as one inactive state responds instantly to the test pulse in an opposite manner from the other two states.

  9. On Friedrichs Model with Two Continuum States

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    The Friedrichs model with one discrete state coupled to more than one continuum is studied. The exact eigenstates for the full Hamiltonian can be solved explicitly. The discrete state is found to generate more than one virtual state pole or more than one pair of resonance poles in different Riemann sheets in different situations. The form factors could also generate new states on different sheets. All these states can appear in the generalized completeness relation.

  10. The Øie-Tozer model of drug distribution and its suitability for drugs with different pharmacokinetic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepensky, David

    2011-10-01

    Drug distribution is a major pharmacokinetic process that affects the time course of drug concentrations in tissues, biological fluids and the resulting pharmacological activities. Drug distribution may follow different pathways and patterns, and is governed by the drug's physicochemical properties and the body's physiology. The classical Øie-Tozer model is frequently used for predicting volume of drug distribution and for pharmacokinetic calculations. In this review, the suitability of the Øie-Tozer model for drugs that exhibit different distribution patterns is critically analyzed and illustrated. The method used is a pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation approach. It is demonstrated that the major limitation of the Øie-Tozer model stems from its focus on the total drug concentrations and not on the active (unbound) concentrations. Moreover, the Øie-Tozer model may be inappropriate for drugs with nonlinear or complex pharmacokinetic behavior, such as biopharmaceuticals, drug conjugates or for drugs incorporated into drug delivery systems. Distribution mechanisms and alternative distribution models for these drugs are discussed. The Øie-Tozer model can serve for predicting unbound volume of drug distribution for 'classical' small molecular mass drugs with linear pharmacokinetics. However, more detailed mechanism-based distribution models should be used in preclinical and clinical settings for drugs that exhibit more complex pharmacokinetic behavior.

  11. A graph theoretical perspective of a drug abuse epidemic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyabadza, F.; Mukwembi, S.; Rodrigues, B. G.

    2011-05-01

    A drug use epidemic can be represented by a finite number of states and transition rules that govern the dynamics of drug use in each discrete time step. This paper investigates the spread of drug use in a community where some users are in treatment and others are not in treatment, citing South Africa as an example. In our analysis, we consider the neighbourhood prevalence of each individual, i.e., the proportion of the individual’s drug user contacts who are not in treatment amongst all of his or her contacts. We introduce parameters α∗, β∗ and γ∗, depending on the neighbourhood prevalence, which govern the spread of drug use. We examine how changes in α∗, β∗ and γ∗ affect the system dynamics. Simulations presented support the theoretical results.

  12. Pharmacological modeling and biostatistical analysis of a new drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revathi Ananthakrishnan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Revathi Ananthakrishnan1, Philimon Gona21Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Boston University, Mathematics and Statistics Department, 111 Cummington St, Boston, MA-02215, USAAbstract: Clinical research and clinical trials of experimental drugs to treat human diseases have gained greater importance in recent years. Phase I–IV clinical trials offer patients the opportunity to gain access to a new, more efficacious and safer medication to alleviate or cure their disease. There are potential side effects of every new drug; however, such trials and studies are crucial for drug development and testing in humans. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA regulated process of evaluating a new drug for treating a particular disease in humans is long, rigorous, and includes the stages starting from preclinical research through the entire human clinical trials process. This review synthesizes results from the above stages and describes the entire mechanism of the clinical study of a new drug for human disease. It emphasizes the associated mathematical modeling and statistical analyses, and bridges pharmacological modeling and biostatistics in clinical research and also provides a basic theoretical overview to biomedical experimentalists. The modern trend in clinical research involves a unified approach among several biomedical subspecialties and it is hoped that even more integrated studies of new drugs will continue to be carried out, leading to novel drugs that are highly effective in curing the associated condition.Keywords: PK/PD pharmacological modeling, biostatistical analyses of clinical trials data, clinical trials, phases of clinical trials, types and designs of clinical trials

  13. Teratogenic Potential of Antiepileptic Drugs in the Zebrafish Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hak Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish model is an attractive candidate for screening of developmental toxicity during early drug development. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs arouse concern for the risk of teratogenicity, but the data are limited. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of seven AEDs (carbamazepine (CBZ, ethosuximide (ETX, valproic acid (VPN, lamotrigine (LMT, lacosamide (LCM, levetiracetam (LVT, and topiramate (TPM in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to AEDs from initiation of gastrula (5.25 hours post-fertilization (hpf to termination of hatching (72 hpf which mimic the mammalian teratogenic experimental design. The lethality and teratogenic index (TI of AEDs were determined and the TI values of each drug were compared with the US FDA human pregnancy categories. Zebrafish model was useful screening model for teratogenic potential of antiepilepsy drugs and was in concordance with in vivo mammalian data and human clinical data.

  14. Model Checking Multivariate State Rewards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Friis; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2010-01-01

    We consider continuous stochastic logics with state rewards that are interpreted over continuous time Markov chains. We show how results from multivariate phase type distributions can be used to obtain higher-order moments for multivariate state rewards (including covariance). We also generalise ...... the treatment of eventuality to unbounded path formulae. For all extensions we show how to obtain closed form definitions that are straightforward to implement and we illustrate our development on a small example.......We consider continuous stochastic logics with state rewards that are interpreted over continuous time Markov chains. We show how results from multivariate phase type distributions can be used to obtain higher-order moments for multivariate state rewards (including covariance). We also generalise...

  15. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Clemente, Riccardo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  16. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    CERN Document Server

    Di Clemente, Riccardo; 10.1038/srep00532

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  17. Comparing Generic Drug Markets in Europe and the United States: Prices, Volumes, and Spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J; Kanavos, Panos G; McKEE, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Policy Points: Our study indicates that there are opportunities for cost savings in generic drug markets in Europe and the United States. Regulators should make it easier for generic drugs to reach the market. Regulators and payers should apply measures to stimulate price competition among generic drugmakers and to increase generic drug use. To meaningfully evaluate policy options, it is important to analyze historical context and understand why similar initiatives failed previously. Rising drug prices are putting pressure on health care budgets. Policymakers are assessing how they can save money through generic drugs. We compared generic drug prices and market shares in 13 European countries, using data from 2013, to assess the amount of variation that exists between countries. To place these results in context, we reviewed evidence from recent studies on the prices and use of generics in Europe and the United States. We also surveyed peer-reviewed studies, gray literature, and books published since 2000 to (1) outline existing generic drug policies in European countries and the United States; (2) identify ways to increase generic drug use and to promote price competition among generic drug companies; and (3) explore barriers to implementing reform of generic drug policies, using a historical example from the United States as a case study. The prices and market shares of generics vary widely across Europe. For example, prices charged by manufacturers in Switzerland are, on average, more than 2.5 times those in Germany and more than 6 times those in the United Kingdom, based on the results of a commonly used price index. The proportion of prescriptions filled with generics ranges from 17% in Switzerland to 83% in the United Kingdom. By comparison, the United States has historically had low generic drug prices and high rates of generic drug use (84% in 2013), but has in recent years experienced sharp price increases for some off-patent products. There are policy

  18. Use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to simulate drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic and antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltó, José; Rajoli, Rajith; Back, David; Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Owen, Andrew; Clotet, Bonaventura; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Co-administration of antineoplastics with ART is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, trials specifically assessing such DDIs are lacking. Our objective was to simulate DDIs between the antineoplastics erlotinib and gefitinib with key antiretroviral drugs and to predict dose adjustments using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. In vitro data describing chemical properties and pharmacokinetic processes of each drug and their effect on cytochrome P450 isoforms were obtained from the literature. Plasma drug-concentration profiles were simulated in a virtual population of 50 individuals receiving erlotinib or gefitinib alone or with darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz or etravirine. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs (midazolam, maraviroc) were compared with literature values. Erlotinib and gefitinib pharmacokinetics with and without antiretrovirals were compared and dose-adjustment strategies were evaluated. Simulated parameters of each drug and the magnitude of DDIs with probe drugs were in agreement with reference values. Darunavir/ritonavir increased erlotinib and gefitinib exposure, while efavirenz and etravirine decreased erlotinib and gefitinib concentrations. Based on our predictions, dose-adjustment strategies may consist of once-daily dosing erlotinib at 25 mg and gefitinib at 125 mg with darunavir/ritonavir; or erlotinib at 200 mg and gefitinib at 375 mg with etravirine. The interaction with efavirenz was not overcome even after doubling erlotinib or gefitinib doses. PBPK models predicted the in vivo pharmacokinetics of erlotinib, gefitinib and the antiretrovirals darunavir/ritonavir, efavirenz and etravirine, and the DDIs between them. The simulated dose-adjustments may represent valuable strategies to optimize antineoplastic therapy in HIV-infected patients.

  19. PBPK modeling and simulation in drug research and development

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaomei Zhuang; Chuang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling and simulation can be used to predict the pharmacokinetic behavior of drugs in humans using preclinical data. It can also explore the effects of various physiologic parameters such as age, ethnicity, or disease status on human pharmacokinetics, as well as guide dose and dose regiment selection and aid drug–drug interaction risk assessment. PBPK modeling has developed rapidly in the last decade within both the field of academia and the phar...

  20. Drug discovery and development for neglected diseases: the DNDi model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Chatelain

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eric Chatelain, Jean-Robert IosetDrugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi, Geneva, SwitzerlandAbstract: New models of drug discovery have been developed to overcome the lack of modern and effective drugs for neglected diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, which have no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry. With the purpose of combining the skills and research capacity in academia, pharmaceutical industry, and contract researchers, public–private partnerships or product development partnerships aim to create focused research consortia that address all aspects of drug discovery and development. These consortia not only emulate the projects within pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, eg, identification and screening of libraries, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, formulation development, and manufacturing, but also use and strengthen existing capacity in disease-endemic countries, particularly for the conduct of clinical trials. The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi has adopted a model closely related to that of a virtual biotechnology company for the identification and optimization of drug leads. The application of this model to the development of drug candidates for the kinetoplastid infections of HAT, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis has already led to the identification of new candidates issued from DNDi’s own discovery pipeline. This demonstrates that the model DNDi has been implementing is working but its DNDi, neglected diseases sustainability remains to be proven.Keywords: R&D, screening, lead optimization, human African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, product development partnerships

  1. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Despite the successful commercialization of several LBDDS products over the years, a large discrepancy exists between the number of poorly water-soluble drugs displaying suboptimal in vivo performances and the application of LBDDS to mitigate their various delivery challenges. Conventional LBDDS, including lipid solutions and suspensions, emulsions, and self-emulsifying formulations, suffer from various drawbacks limiting their widespread use and commercialization. Accordingly, solid-state LBDDS, fabricated by adsorbing LBDDS onto a chemically inert solid carrier material, have attracted substantial interest as a viable means of stabilizing LBDDS whilst eliminating some of the various limitations. This review describes the impact of solid carrier choice on LBDDS performance and highlights the importance of appropriate solid carrier material selection when designing hybrid solid-state LBDDS. Specifically, emphasis is placed on discussing the ability of the specific solid carrier to modulate drug release, control lipase action and lipid digestion, and enhance biopharmaceutical performance above the original liquid-state LBDDS. To encourage the interested reader to consider their solid carrier choice on a higher level, various novel materials with the potential for future use as solid carriers for LBDDS are described. This review is highly significant in guiding future research directions in the solid-state LBDDS field and fostering the translation of these delivery systems to the pharmaceutical marketplace.

  2. Beltrami States for Plasma Dynamics Models

    OpenAIRE

    Shivamoggi, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    The various plasma models - incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, compressible MHD model, incompressible Hall MHD model, compressible Hall MHD model, electron MHD model, compressible Hall MHD with electron inertia model - notwithstanding the diversity of the underlying physics, are shown to exhibit some common features in the Beltrami states like certain robustness with respect to the plasma compressibility effects (albeit in the barotropy assumption) and the {\\it Bernoulli} conditi...

  3. Computational modeling in melanoma for novel drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Marzio; Russo, Giulia; Di Salvatore, Valentina; Candido, Saverio; Libra, Massimo; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing body of evidence highlighting the applications of computational modeling in the field of biomedicine. It has recently been applied to the in silico analysis of cancer dynamics. In the era of precision medicine, this analysis may allow the discovery of new molecular targets useful for the design of novel therapies and for overcoming resistance to anticancer drugs. According to its molecular behavior, melanoma represents an interesting tumor model in which computational modeling can be applied. Melanoma is an aggressive tumor of the skin with a poor prognosis for patients with advanced disease as it is resistant to current therapeutic approaches. This review discusses the basics of computational modeling in melanoma drug discovery and development. Discussion includes the in silico discovery of novel molecular drug targets, the optimization of immunotherapies and personalized medicine trials. Mathematical and computational models are gradually being used to help understand biomedical data produced by high-throughput analysis. The use of advanced computer models allowing the simulation of complex biological processes provides hypotheses and supports experimental design. The research in fighting aggressive cancers, such as melanoma, is making great strides. Computational models represent the key component to complement these efforts. Due to the combinatorial complexity of new drug discovery, a systematic approach based only on experimentation is not possible. Computational and mathematical models are necessary for bringing cancer drug discovery into the era of omics, big data and personalized medicine.

  4. Transition-state-guided drug design for treatment of parasitic neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murkin, A S; Moynihan, M M

    2014-01-01

    Many of the deadliest neglected tropical diseases are caused by protozoan and helminthic parasites. These organisms have evolved several enzymes to exploit their host's metabolic resources and evade immune responses. Because these essential proteins are absent in humans, they are targets for antiparasitic drug development. Despite decades of investigation, no therapy has been successful in the eradication of these diseases, so new approaches are desired. Chemically stable analogues of the transition states of enzymatic reactions are often potent inhibitors, and several examples of clinically effective compounds are known for other diseases. The design of transition-state analogues is aided by structural models of the transition state, which are obtained by complementing experimental measurement of kinetic isotope effects with theoretical calculations. Such transition-state-guided inhibitor design has been demonstrated for human, bovine, malarial, and trypanosomal enzymes of the purine salvage pathway, including purine nucleoside phosphorylase, nucleoside hydrolases, and adenosine deaminase. Cysteine proteases, trans-sialidase, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase, and trypanothione synthetase are presented as additional candidates for application of transition-state analysis with the goal of identifying new leads for the treatment of parasitic neglected tropical diseases.

  5. Estimating time to steady state using the effective rate of drug accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Deborah L; Maes, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Unless all of a drug is eliminated during each dosing interval, the plasma concentrations within a dosing interval will increase until the time course of change in plasma concentrations becomes invariant from one dosing interval to the next, resulting in steady state. A simple method for estimating drug concentration time to steady state based on multiple dose area under the plasma concentration-time curve and effective rate of drug accumulation is presented. Several point estimates and confidence intervals for time to 90% of steady state are compared, and a recommendation is made on how to summarize and present the results. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Rural Adolescent Alcohol, Tobacco, and Illicit Drug Use: A Comparison of Students in Victoria, Australia, and Washington State, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber, Kerri; Toumbourou, John W.; Miller, Peter; Staiger, Petra K.; Hemphill, Sheryl A.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There are inconsistent research findings regarding the impact of rurality on adolescent alcohol, tobacco, and illicit substance use. Therefore, the current study reports on the effect of rurality on alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use among adolescents in 2 state representative samples in 2 countries, Washington State (WA) in the…

  7. Chemical genetics and drug screening in Drosophila cancer models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara Gladstone; Tin Tin Su

    2011-01-01

    Drug candidates often fail in preclinical and clinical testing because of reasons of efficacy and/or safety.It would be time- and cost-efficient to have screening models that reduce the rate of such false positive candidates that appear promising at first but fail later.In this regard,it would be particularly useful to have a rapid and inexpensive whole animal model that can pre-select hits from high-throughput screens but before testing in costly rodent assays.Drosophila melanogaster has emerged as a potential whole animal model for drug screening.Of particular interest have been drugs that must act in the context of multi-cellularity such as those for neurological disorders and cancer.A recent review provides a comprehensive summary of drug screening in Drosophila,but with an emphasis on neurodegenerative disorders.Here,we review Drosophila screens in the literature aimed at cancer therapeutics.

  8. A novel evolutionary drug scheduling model in cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yong; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Mok, Tony Shu Kam

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a modified optimal control model of drug scheduling in cancer chemotherapy and a new adaptive elitist-population-based genetic algorithm (AEGA) to solve it. Working closely with an oncologist, we first modify the existing model, because its equation for the cumulative drug toxicity is inconsistent with medical knowledge and clinical experience. To explore multiple efficient drug scheduling policies, we propose a novel variable representation--a cycle-wise representation, and modify the elitist genetic search operators in the AEGA. The simulation results obtained by the modified model match well with the clinical treatment experiences, and can provide multiple efficient solutions for oncologists to consider. Moreover, it has been shown that the evolutionary drug scheduling approach is simple, and capable of solving complex cancer chemotherapy problems by adapting multimodal versions of evolutionary algorithms.

  9. Modelling and enhanced molecular dynamics to steer structure-based drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyaanamoorthy, Subha; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2014-05-01

    The ever-increasing gap between the availabilities of the genome sequences and the crystal structures of proteins remains one of the significant challenges to the modern drug discovery efforts. The knowledge of structure-dynamics-functionalities of proteins is important in order to understand several key aspects of structure-based drug discovery, such as drug-protein interactions, drug binding and unbinding mechanisms and protein-protein interactions. This review presents a brief overview on the different state of the art computational approaches that are applied for protein structure modelling and molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems. We give an essence of how different enhanced sampling molecular dynamics approaches, together with regular molecular dynamics methods, assist in steering the structure based drug discovery processes.

  10. Animal Migraine Models for Drug Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Olesen, Jes

    2013-01-01

    responses are likely to be behavioral, allowing multiple experiments in each individual animal. Distinction is made between acute and prophylactic models and how to validate each of them. Modern insight into neurobiological mechanisms of migraine is so good that it is only a question of resources...... for headache has almost come to a standstill partly because of a lack of valid animal models. Here we review previous models with emphasis on optimal characteristics of a future model. In addition to selection of animal species, the method of induction of migraine-like changes and the method of recording...

  11. Operationalizing resilience using state and transition models

    Science.gov (United States)

    In management, restoration, and policy contexts, the notion of resilience can be confusing. Systematic development of conceptual models of ecological state change (state transition models; STMs) can help overcome semantic confusion and promote a mechanistic understanding of resilience. Drawing on ex...

  12. Drug-loaded electrospun mats of poly(vinyl alcohol) fibres and their release characteristics of four model drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taepaiboon, Pattama; Rungsardthong, Uracha; Supaphol, Pitt

    2006-05-01

    Mats of PVA nanofibres were successfully prepared by the electrospinning process and were developed as carriers of drugs for a transdermal drug delivery system. Four types of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with varying water solubility property, i.e. sodium salicylate (freely soluble in water), diclofenac sodium (sparingly soluble in water), naproxen (NAP), and indomethacin (IND) (both insoluble in water), were selected as model drugs. The morphological appearance of the drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats depended on the nature of the model drugs. The 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance results confirmed that the electrospinning process did not affect the chemical integrity of the drugs. Thermal properties of the drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The molecular weight of the model drugs played a major role on both the rate and the total amount of drugs released from the as-prepared drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats, with the rate and the total amount of the drugs released decreasing with increasing molecular weight of the drugs. Lastly, the drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats exhibited much better release characteristics of the model drugs than drug-loaded as-cast films.

  13. Computational modeling of drug response with applications to neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    The development of novel high-throughput technologies has opened up the opportunity to deeply characterize patient tissues at various molecular levels and has given rise to a paradigm shift in medicine towards personalized therapies. Computational analysis plays a pivotal role in integrating the various genome data and understanding the cellular response to a drug. Based on that data, molecular models can be constructed that incorporate the known downstream effects of drug-targeted receptor molecules and that predict optimal therapy decisions. In this article, we describe the different steps in the conceptual framework of computational modeling. We review resources that hold information on molecular pathways that build the basis for constructing the model interaction maps, highlight network analysis concepts that have been helpful in identifying predictive disease patterns, and introduce the basic concepts of kinetic modeling. Finally, we illustrate this framework with selected studies related to the modeling of important target pathways affected by drugs.

  14. Combat Drug Zone 2010: The United States Southwest Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    become highly successful. The support resources and mechanisms are already in place throughout the country. Most US cities and towns 15 now...other violent crimes. The mechanism to support such a strategy of legalization would be revolutionary. Far ranging statue reforms would have to be...manufactures of the drug Ecstasy in Europe. This has forced government officials to combat this trend with law enforcement methods. 19 use is

  15. Drug discovery and development for neglected diseases: the DNDi model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Eric; Ioset, Jean-Robert

    2011-03-16

    New models of drug discovery have been developed to overcome the lack of modern and effective drugs for neglected diseases such as human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness), leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, which have no financial viability for the pharmaceutical industry. With the purpose of combining the skills and research capacity in academia, pharmaceutical industry, and contract researchers, public-private partnerships or product development partnerships aim to create focused research consortia that address all aspects of drug discovery and development. These consortia not only emulate the projects within pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, eg, identification and screening of libraries, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, formulation development, and manufacturing, but also use and strengthen existing capacity in disease-endemic countries, particularly for the conduct of clinical trials. The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has adopted a model closely related to that of a virtual biotechnology company for the identification and optimization of drug leads. The application of this model to the development of drug candidates for the kinetoplastid infections of HAT, Chagas disease, and leishmaniasis has already led to the identification of new candidates issued from DNDi's own discovery pipeline. This demonstrates that the model DNDi has been implementing is working but its DNDi, neglected diseases sustainability remains to be proven.

  16. San Diego State U. Defends Its Role in Federal Drug Sting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Sara

    2008-01-01

    When a freshman at San Diego State University (SDSU) died of a cocaine overdose last May, the campus police chief decided to pursue a full-scale investigation. In December, he summoned undercover agents from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration to pose as students and roam the campus in search of illegal drugs. According to college…

  17. Is there a role for generic antiretroviral drugs in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormser, Gary P; Lappas, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The high cost of antiretroviral drugs has limited access to treatment for some HIV-infected patients in the United States and strained public resources. With the introduction of much cheaper generic versions of some of these agents, and with more to come in the next few years, the need increases to define the role of generic antiretroviral drugs in patient management.

  18. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  19. Approximate Methods for State-Space Models

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Kass, Robert E; 10.1198/jasa.2009.tm08326

    2010-01-01

    State-space models provide an important body of techniques for analyzing time-series, but their use requires estimating unobserved states. The optimal estimate of the state is its conditional expectation given the observation histories, and computing this expectation is hard when there are nonlinearities. Existing filtering methods, including sequential Monte Carlo, tend to be either inaccurate or slow. In this paper, we study a nonlinear filter for nonlinear/non-Gaussian state-space models, which uses Laplace's method, an asymptotic series expansion, to approximate the state's conditional mean and variance, together with a Gaussian conditional distribution. This {\\em Laplace-Gaussian filter} (LGF) gives fast, recursive, deterministic state estimates, with an error which is set by the stochastic characteristics of the model and is, we show, stable over time. We illustrate the estimation ability of the LGF by applying it to the problem of neural decoding and compare it to sequential Monte Carlo both in simulat...

  20. Modeling Illicit Drug Use Dynamics and Its Optimal Control Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steady Mushayabasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of death and disability attributable to illicit drug use, remains a significant threat to public health for both developed and developing nations. This paper presents a new mathematical modeling framework to investigate the effects of illicit drug use in the community. In our model the transmission process is captured as a social “contact” process between the susceptible individuals and illicit drug users. We conduct both epidemic and endemic analysis, with a focus on the threshold dynamics characterized by the basic reproduction number. Using our model, we present illustrative numerical results with a case study in Cape Town, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Durban communities of South Africa. In addition, the basic model is extended to incorporate time dependent intervention strategies.

  1. A Cooperative Model to Improve Hospital Equipments and Drugs Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffo, Ilaria; Confessore, Giuseppe; Liotta, Giacomo; Stecca, Giuseppe

    The cost of services provided by public and private healthcare systems is nowadays becoming critical. This work tackles the criticalities of hospital equipments and drugs management by emphasizing its implications on the whole healthcare system efficiency. The work presents a multi-agent based model for decisional cooperation in order to address the problem of integration of departments, wards and personnel for improving equipments, and drugs management. The proposed model faces the challenge of (i) gaining the benefits deriving from successful collaborative models already used in industrial systems and (ii) transferring the most appropriate industrial management practices to healthcare systems.

  2. Preclinical models for interrogating drug action in human cancers using Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In this review we compare the advantages and disadvantages of different model biological systems for determining the metabolic functions of cells in complex environments, how they may change in different disease states, and respond to therapeutic interventions. Background All preclinical drug-testing models have advantages and drawbacks. We compare and contrast established cell, organoid and animal models with ex vivo organ or tissue culture and in vivo human experiments in the context of metabolic readout of drug efficacy. As metabolism reports directly on the biochemical state of cells and tissues, it can be very sensitive to drugs and/or other environmental changes. This is especially so when metabolic activities are probed by stable isotope tracing methods, which can also provide detailed mechanistic information on drug action. We have developed and been applying Stable Isotope-Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) to examine metabolic reprogramming of human lung cancer cells in monoculture, in mouse xenograft/explant models, and in lung cancer patients in situ (Lane et al. 2011; T. W. Fan et al. 2011; T. W-M. Fan et al. 2012; T. W. Fan et al. 2012; Xie et al. 2014b; Ren et al. 2014a; Sellers et al. 2015b). We are able to determine the influence of the tumor microenvironment using these models. We have now extended the range of models to fresh human tissue slices, similar to those originally described by O. Warburg (Warburg 1923), which retain the native tissue architecture and heterogeneity with a paired benign versus cancer design under defined cell culture conditions. This platform offers an unprecedented human tissue model for preclinical studies on metabolic reprogramming of human cancer cells in their tissue context, and response to drug treatment (Xie et al. 2014a). As the microenvironment of the target human tissue is retained and individual patient's response to drugs is obtained, this platform promises to transcend current limitations of drug selection

  3. Numerical modelling and experimental investigation of drug release from layered silicone matrix systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snorradóttir, Bergthóra S; Jónsdóttir, Fjóla; Sigurdsson, Sven Th; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Másson, Már

    2013-07-16

    Medical devices and polymeric matrix systems that release drugs or other bioactive compounds are of interest for a variety of applications. The release of the drug can be dependent on a number of factors such as the solubility, diffusivity, dissolution rate and distribution of the solid drug in the matrix. Achieving the goal of an optimal release profile can be challenging when relying solely on traditional experimental work. Accurate modelling complementing experimentation is therefore desirable. Numerical modelling is increasingly becoming an integral part of research and development due to the significant advances in computer simulation technology. This work focuses on numerical modelling and investigation of multi-layered silicone matrix systems. A numerical model that can be used to model multi-layered systems was constructed and validated by comparison with experimental data. The model could account for the limited dissolution rate and effect of the drug distribution on the release profiles. Parametric study showed how different factors affect the characteristics of drug release. Multi-layered medical silicone matrices were prepared in special moulds, where the quantity of drug in each layer could be varied, and release was investigated with Franz-diffusion cell setup. Data for long-term release was fitted to the model and the full depletion of the system predicted. The numerical model constructed for this study, whose input parameters are the diffusion, effective dissolution rate and dimensional solubility coefficients, does not require any type of steady-state approximation. These results indicate that numerical model can be used as a design tool for development of controlled release systems such as drug-loaded medical devices.

  4. Rat gingival model for testing drugs influencing inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaju P Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical drug testing is an important areain new drug development where animals are used.An ideal animal model for this is one which is simple,reliable and can be extrapolated to humans. Topicaldrugs for inflammation are conventionally tested onthe skin of animals after induction of inflammation.A gingival model would be simple as inflammation canbe induced naturally by the action of plaque. Rats area popular animal model for testing drugs as well as tostudy various diseases of the periodontium. Periodontaldisease including gingival inflammation develops inrats in relation to indigenous plaque or experimentallyinduced bacterial products. A number of features ofrats ranging from anatomy, histology and response tobacterial insult can be seen mirrored to a great extentin humans. There is a lot similarity in the developmentand resolution of inflammation as well as the gingivalwound healing of rats and humans. This paper tries toexplore the feasibility of using the rat gingival modelfor preclinical testing of drugs acting on or influencinginflammation and concludes by identifying potentialareas of research using this model. The addition of sucha simple and inexpensive model for preclinical testing ofdrugs will be welcomed by the drug developers.

  5. PBPK modeling and simulation in drug research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Zhuang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK modeling and simulation can be used to predict the pharmacokinetic behavior of drugs in humans using preclinical data. It can also explore the effects of various physiologic parameters such as age, ethnicity, or disease status on human pharmacokinetics, as well as guide dose and dose regiment selection and aid drug–drug interaction risk assessment. PBPK modeling has developed rapidly in the last decade within both the field of academia and the pharmaceutical industry, and has become an integral tool in drug discovery and development. In this mini-review, the concept and methodology of PBPK modeling are briefly introduced. Several case studies were discussed on how PBPK modeling and simulation can be utilized through various stages of drug discovery and development. These case studies are from our own work and the literature for better understanding of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME of a drug candidate, and the applications to increase efficiency, reduce the need for animal studies, and perhaps to replace clinical trials. The regulatory acceptance and industrial practices around PBPK modeling and simulation is also discussed.

  6. Atomic level insights into realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes through MD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vaibhav; Maiti, Prabal K.; Bharatam, Prasad V.

    2016-09-01

    Computational studies performed on dendrimer-drug complexes usually consider 1:1 stoichiometry, which is far from reality, since in experiments more number of drug molecules get encapsulated inside a dendrimer. In the present study, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were implemented to characterize the more realistic molecular models of dendrimer-drug complexes (1:n stoichiometry) in order to understand the effect of high drug loading on the structural properties and also to unveil the atomistic level details. For this purpose, possible inclusion complexes of model drug Nateglinide (Ntg) (antidiabetic, belongs to Biopharmaceutics Classification System class II) with amine- and acetyl-terminated G4 poly(amidoamine) (G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac)) dendrimers at neutral and low pH conditions are explored in this work. MD simulation analysis on dendrimer-drug complexes revealed that the drug encapsulation efficiency of G4 PAMAM(NH2) and G4 PAMAM(Ac) dendrimers at neutral pH was 6 and 5, respectively, while at low pH it was 12 and 13, respectively. Center-of-mass distance analysis showed that most of the drug molecules are located in the interior hydrophobic pockets of G4 PAMAM(NH2) at both the pH; while in the case of G4 PAMAM(Ac), most of them are distributed near to the surface at neutral pH and in the interior hydrophobic pockets at low pH. Structural properties such as radius of gyration, shape, radial density distribution, and solvent accessible surface area of dendrimer-drug complexes were also assessed and compared with that of the drug unloaded dendrimers. Further, binding energy calculations using molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach revealed that the location of drug molecules in the dendrimer is not the decisive factor for the higher and lower binding affinity of the complex, but the charged state of dendrimer and drug, intermolecular interactions, pH-induced conformational changes, and surface groups of dendrimer do play an

  7. Fed-state gastric media and drug analysis techniques: Current status and points to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxevanis, Fotios; Kuiper, Jesse; Fotaki, Nikoletta

    2016-10-01

    Gastric fed state conditions can have a significant effect on drug dissolution and absorption. In vitro dissolution tests with simple aqueous media cannot usually predict drugs' in vivo response, as several factors such as the meal content, the gastric emptying and possible interactions between food and drug formulations can affect drug's pharmacokinetics. Good understanding of the effect of the in vivo fed gastric conditions on the drug is essential for the development of biorelevant dissolution media simulating the gastric environment after the administration of the standard high fat meal proposed by the FDA and the EMA in bioavailability/bioequivalence (BA/BE) studies. The analysis of drugs in fed state media can be quite challenging as most analytical protocols currently employed are time consuming and labour intensive. In this review, an overview of the in vivo gastric conditions and the biorelevant media used for their in vitro simulation are described. Furthermore an analysis of the physicochemical properties of the drugs and the formulations related to food effect is given. In terms of drug analysis, the protocols currently used for the fed state media sample treatment and analysis and the analytical challenges and needs emerging for more efficient and time saving techniques for a broad spectrum of compounds are being discussed.

  8. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MunJu eKim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  9. Modelling end-pumped solid state lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhardi, E.H.; Bollig, C.; Forbes, A.; Esser, M.J.D.; Wörhoff, K.; Agazzi, L.; Ismail, N.; Leijtens, X.

    2008-01-01

    The operation dynamics of end-pumped solid-state lasers are investigated by means of a spatially resolved numerical rate-equation model and a time-dependent analytical thermal model. The rate-equation model allows the optimization of parameters such as the output coupler transmission and gain medium

  10. State-oriented models in software specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Luiz Bonifácio

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available These techniques can be formal or not according to the developing system. In this work, a formal modeling technique is applied in a case study. The Finite State Machine model is used to specify the calculator functionalities, which models the basic arithmetical operations.

  11. Detection of drug-drug interactions by modeling interaction profile fingerprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vilar

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs constitute an important problem in postmarketing pharmacovigilance and in the development of new drugs. The effectiveness or toxicity of a medication could be affected by the co-administration of other drugs that share pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. For this reason, a great effort is being made to develop new methodologies to detect and assess DDIs. In this article, we present a novel method based on drug interaction profile fingerprints (IPFs with successful application to DDI detection. IPFs were generated based on the DrugBank database, which provided 9,454 well-established DDIs as a primary source of interaction data. The model uses IPFs to measure the similarity of pairs of drugs and generates new putative DDIs from the non-intersecting interactions of a pair. We described as part of our analysis the pharmacological and biological effects associated with the putative interactions; for example, the interaction between haloperidol and dicyclomine can cause increased risk of psychosis and tardive dyskinesia. First, we evaluated the method through hold-out validation and then by using four independent test sets that did not overlap with DrugBank. Precision for the test sets ranged from 0.4-0.5 with more than two fold enrichment factor enhancement. In conclusion, we demonstrated the usefulness of the method in pharmacovigilance as a DDI predictor, and created a dataset of potential DDIs, highlighting the etiology or pharmacological effect of the DDI, and providing an exploratory tool to facilitate decision support in DDI detection and patient safety.

  12. The State Space Models Toolbox for MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ying Peng

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available State Space Models (SSM is a MATLAB toolbox for time series analysis by state space methods. The software features fully interactive construction and combination of models, with support for univariate and multivariate models, complex time-varying (dy- namic models, non-Gaussian models, and various standard models such as ARIMA and structural time-series models. The software includes standard functions for Kalman fil- tering and smoothing, simulation smoothing, likelihood evaluation, parameter estimation, signal extraction and forecasting, with incorporation of exact initialization for filters and smoothers, and support for missing observations and multiple time series input with com- mon analysis structure. The software also includes implementations of TRAMO model selection and Hillmer-Tiao decomposition for ARIMA models. The software will provide a general toolbox for time series analysis on the MATLAB platform, allowing users to take advantage of its readily available graph plotting and general matrix computation capabilities.

  13. Bound States in Boson Impurity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tao; Wu, Ying-Hai; González-Tudela, A.; Cirac, J. I.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of bound states involving multiple particles underlies many interesting quantum physical phenomena, such as Efimov physics or superconductivity. In this work, we show the existence of an infinite number of such states for some boson impurity models. They describe free bosons coupled to an impurity and include some of the most representative models in quantum optics. We also propose a family of wave functions to describe the bound states and verify that it accurately characterizes all parameter regimes by comparing its predictions with exact numerical calculations for a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian. For that model, we also analyze the nature of the bound states by studying the scaling relations of physical quantities, such as the ground-state energy and localization length, and find a nonanalytical behavior as a function of the coupling strength. Finally, we discuss how to test our theoretical predictions in experimental platforms, such as photonic crystal structures and cold atoms in optical lattices.

  14. Testing a fall risk model for injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Goldberg, Allon

    2012-01-01

    Fall risk is a critical component of clinical assessment and has not been examined for persons who have injected illicit drugs and are aging. The aim of this study was to test and develop the Fall Risk Model for Injection Drug Users by examining the relationships among injection drug use, chronic venous insufficiency, lower extremity impairments (i.e., decreased ankle range of motion, reduced calf muscle endurance, and leg pain), age and other covariates, and the Tinetti balance and gait total score as a measure of fall risk. A cross-sectional comparative design was used with four crossed factors. Standardized instruments were used to assess the variables. Moderated multiple regression with linear and quadratic trends in age was used to examine the nature of the relationship between the Tinetti balance and gait total and age and the potential moderating role of injection drug use. A prespecified series of models was tested. Participants (n = 713) were men (46.9%) and women with a mean age of 46.26 years and primarily African American (61.7%) in methadone treatment centers. The fall risk of a 48-year-old leg injector was comparable with the fall risk of a 69-year-old who had not injected drugs. Variables were added to the model sequentially, resulting in some lost significance of some when they were explained by subsequent variables. Final significant variables in the model were employment status, number of comorbidities, ankle range of motion, leg pain, and calf muscle endurance. Fall risk was associated with route of drug use. Lower extremity impairments accounted for the effects of injection drug use and chronic venous insufficiency on risk for falls. Further understanding of fall risk in injection users is necessary as they age, attempt to work, and participate in activities.

  15. Bioresorbable polymer coated drug eluting stent: a model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Filippo; Casalini, Tommaso; Raffa, Edoardo; Masi, Maurizio; Perale, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    In drug eluting stent technologies, an increased demand for better control, higher reliability, and enhanced performances of drug delivery systems emerged in the last years and thus offered the opportunity to introduce model-based approaches aimed to overcome the remarkable limits of trial-and-error methods. In this context a mathematical model was studied, based on detailed conservation equations and taking into account the main physical-chemical mechanisms involved in polymeric coating degradation, drug release, and restenosis inhibition. It allowed highlighting the interdependence between factors affecting each of these phenomena and, in particular, the influence of stent design parameters on drug antirestenotic efficacy. Therefore, the here-proposed model is aimed to simulate the diffusional release, for both in vitro and the in vivo conditions: results were verified against various literature data, confirming the reliability of the parameter estimation procedure. The hierarchical structure of this model also allows easily modifying the set of equations describing restenosis evolution to enhance model reliability and taking advantage of the deep understanding of physiological mechanisms governing the different stages of smooth muscle cell growth and proliferation. In addition, thanks to its simplicity and to the very low system requirements and central processing unit (CPU) time, our model allows obtaining immediate views of system behavior.

  16. An analytical solution for the model of drug distribution and absorption in small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyu, Xu

    1990-11-01

    According to the physiological and anatomical characteristics of small intestine, neglecting the effect of its motility on the distribution and absorption of drug and nutrient, Y. Miyamoto et al.[1] proposed a model of two-dimensional laminar flow in a circular porous tube with permeable wall and calculated the concentration profile of drug by numerical analysis. In this paper, we give a steady state analytical solution of the above model including deactivation term. The obtained results are in agreement with the results of their numerical analysis. Moreover the analytical solution presented in this paper reveals the relation among the physiological parameters of the model and describes the basic absorption rule of drug and nutrient through the intestinal wall and hence provides a theoretical basis for determining the permeability and reflection coefficient through in situ experiments.

  17. Recent Applications of Mesoscale Modeling to Nanotechnology and Drug Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A; Wescott, J; Kung, P; Goldbeck-Wood, G

    2005-02-11

    Mesoscale simulations have traditionally been used to investigate structural morphology of polymer in solution, melts and blends. Recently we have been pushing such modeling methods to important areas of Nanotechnology and Drug delivery that are well out of reach of classical molecular dynamics. This paper summarizes our efforts in three important emerging areas: (1) polymer-nanotube composites; (2) drug diffusivity through cell membranes; and (3) solvent exchange in nanoporous membranes. The first two applications are based on a bead-spring-based approach as encoded in the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) module. The last application used density-based Mesoscale modeling as implemented in the Mesodyn module.

  18. SLN, NLC, LDC: state of the art in drug and active delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attama, Anthony A

    2011-09-01

    Drug delivery system focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, in order to improve the effectiveness and safety of the incorporated drugs by use of novel drug formulation technologies. Lipids such as fatty acids, triglycerides, vegetable oils and their derivatives, used for developing multiparticulate dosage forms, may be available in solid, semi-solid or liquid state. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) and lipid drug conjugate (LDCs) nanoparticles are novel lipid drug delivery systems. They were devised to address some of the challenges of conventional drug delivery systems ranging from low drug encapsulation efficiency to low bioavailability of Biopharmaceutical Classification Systems (BCS) class II and class IV drugs. SLNs are based on melt-emulsified lipids, which are solid at room temperature and consist of physiologically well tolerated ingredients often generally recognised as safe. NLCs are colloidal carriers characterized by a solid lipid core consisting of a mixture of solid and liquid lipids, and having a mean particle size in the nanometer range. LDC are nanoparticles contain drugs linked to lipid particles. This minireview highlights these three different but related technologies in lipid drug delivery. The objectives of their introduction, current applications, major challenges and some patented formulations are highlighted. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers

  19. Modeling of transdermal drug delivery with a microneedle array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y.-G.; Liu, J.; Gao, Y.-H.; Xu, B.

    2006-11-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is generally limited by the extraordinary barrier properties of the stratum corneum, the outer 10-15 µm layer of skin. A conventional needle inserted across this barrier and into deeper tissues could effectively deliver drugs. However, it would lead to infection and cause pain, thereby reducing patient compliance. In order to administer a frequent injection of insulin and other therapeutic agents more efficiently, integrated arrays with very short microneedles were recently proposed as very good candidates for painless injection or extraction. A variety of microneedle designs have thus been made available by employing the fabrication tools of the microelectronics industry and using materials such as silicon, metals, polymers and glass with feature sizes ranging from sub-micron to nanometers. At the same time, experiments were also made to test the capability of the microneedles to inject drugs into tissues. However, due to the difficulty encountered in measurement, a detailed understanding of the spatial and transient drug delivery process still remains unclear up to now. To better grasp the mechanisms involved, quantitative theoretical models were developed in this paper to simultaneously characterize the flow and drug transport, and numerical solutions were performed to predict the kinetics of dispersed drugs injected into the skin from a microneedle array. Calculations indicated that increasing the initial injection velocity and accelerating the blood circulation in skin tissue with high porosity are helpful to enhance the transdermal drug delivery. This study provides the first quantitative simulation of fluid injection through a microneedle array and drug species transport inside the skin. The modeling strategy can also possibly be extended to deal with a wider range of clinical issues such as targeted nanoparticle delivery for therapeutics or molecular imaging.

  20. Outlier Rejecting Multirate Model for State Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Wavelet transform was introduced to detect and eliminate outliers in time-frequency domain. The outlier rejection and multirate information extraction were initially incorporated by wavelet transform, a new outlier rejecting multirate model for state estimation was proposed. The model is applied to state estimation with interacting multiple model, as the outlier is eliminated and more reasonable multirate information is extracted, the estimation accuracy is greatly enhanced. The simulation results prove that the new model is robust to outliers and the estimation performance is significantly improved.

  1. What Characterise the Nordic Welfare State Model

    OpenAIRE

    Bent Greve

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the main distinctive characteristics of the Nordic welfare states. These include, for example, full employment, high degree of equality, a high level of taxes and a high level of public spending on welfare. The article further presents data, which enables the reader to a comparison with welfare states in Europe and to analyse whether we are witnessing convergence in Europe and/or the withering away of the Nordic Model. The conclusion being that the Nordic Model is here t...

  2. Process Modeling of Ferrofluids Flowfor Magnetic Targeting Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Handan; WANG Shigang; XU Wei

    2009-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific sites within the human body, magnetic targeting drug delivery surpasses due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Although there have been some analyses theoretically for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel of human body. This paper presents a mathematical model to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. A 3D flow field of magnetic particles in a blood vessel model is numerically simulated in order to further understand clinical application of magnetic targeting drug delivery. Simulation results show that magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a target region depending on the applied magnetic field intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging conftrms the enrichment of ferrofluids in a desired body tissue of Sprague-Dawley rats. The simulation results coincide with those animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide the important information and can suggest strategies for improving delivery in favor of the clinical application.

  3. Animal models of drug relapse and craving: From drug priming-induced reinstatement to incubation of craving after voluntary abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venniro, Marco; Caprioli, Daniele; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    High rates of relapse to drug use during abstinence is a defining feature of drug addiction. In abstinent drug users, drug relapse is often precipitated by acute exposure to the self-administered drug, drug-associated cues, stress, as well as by short-term and protracted withdrawal symptoms. In this review, we discuss different animal models that have been used to study behavioral and neuropharmacological mechanisms of these relapse-related phenomena. In the first part, we discuss relapse models in which abstinence is achieved through extinction training, including the established reinstatement model, as well as the reacquisition and resurgence models. In the second part, we discuss recent animal models in which drug relapse is assessed after either forced abstinence (e.g., the incubation of drug craving model) or voluntary (self-imposed) abstinence achieved either by introducing adverse consequences to ongoing drug self-administration (e.g., punishment) or by an alternative nondrug reward using a discrete choice (drug vs. palatable food) procedure. We conclude by briefly discussing the potential implications of the recent developments of animal models of drug relapse after voluntary abstinence to the development of medications for relapse prevention.

  4. The STAMP Software for State Space Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Mendelssohn

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of STAMP (Structural Time Series Analyser, Modeler and Predictor for modeling time series data using state-space methods with unobserved components. STAMP is a commercial, GUI-based program that runs on Windows, Linux and Macintosh computers as part of the larger OxMetrics System. STAMP can estimate a wide-variety of both univariate and multivariate state-space models, provides a wide array of diagnostics, and has a batch mode capability. The use of STAMP is illustrated for the Nile river data which is analyzed throughout this issue, as well as by modeling a variety of oceanographic and climate related data sets. The analyses of the oceanographic and climate data illustrate the breadth of models available in STAMP, and that state-space methods produce results that provide new insights into important scientific problems.

  5. Modeling mass drug treatment and resistant filaria disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuady, A. M.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.; Tasman, H.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    It has been indicated that a long term application of combined mass drug treatment may contribute to the development of drug resistance in lymphatic filariasis. This phenomenon is not well understood due to the complexity of filaria life cycle. In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for the spread of mass drug resistant in a filaria endemic region. The model is represented in a 13-dimensional Host-Vector system. The basic reproductive ratio of the system which is obtained from the next generation matrix, and analysis of stability of both the disease free equilibrium and the coexistence equilibria are shown. Numerical simulation for long term dynamics for possible field conditions is also shown.

  6. Photoexcited triplet state provides a quantitative measure of intercalating drug-DNA binding energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, August H.; Alfredson, T. V.; Waring, M. J.

    1992-04-01

    A linear correlation between spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of systems is rarely encountered. In triplet state ODMR studies of various DNA complexes of echinomycin, a quinoxaline-containing cyclic depsipeptide bis-intercalating antibiotic, and its biosynthesized quinoline analogs, such correlations are observed. The zero field splitting D-parameter of the intercalated quinoxaline or quinoline residue varies linearly with the free energy of drug-DNA complexing. From previous work, the DNA sequence specificity of echinomycin analogs is known to be influenced by the identity of the intercalating residue (e.g., quinoxaline vs. quinoline). The present results strongly suggest that the DNA sequence-specificity of these drugs is controlled largely by the intercalated residue, and that the energetics of the peptide- DNA interaction, although considerable, are relatively sequence independent. These conclusions run counter to the generally accepted idea that DNA recognition by sequence- seeking proteins is controlled by specific hydrogen bonding interactions. The high degree of N-methylation of the echinomycin peptide portion severely restricts these interactions, however. A simple theoretical model is presented to support the experimentally observed linear correlation between (Delta) D and (Delta) G.

  7. In silico ADME/T modelling for rational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yulan; Xing, Jing; Xu, Yuan; Zhou, Nannan; Peng, Jianlong; Xiong, Zhaoping; Liu, Xian; Luo, Xiaomin; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Kaixian; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME), and toxicity (T) modelling as a tool for rational drug design has received considerable attention from pharmaceutical scientists, and various ADME/T-related prediction models have been reported. The high-throughput and low-cost nature of these models permits a more streamlined drug development process in which the identification of hits or their structural optimization can be guided based on a parallel investigation of bioavailability and safety, along with activity. However, the effectiveness of these tools is highly dependent on their capacity to cope with needs at different stages, e.g. their use in candidate selection has been limited due to their lack of the required predictability. For some events or endpoints involving more complex mechanisms, the current in silico approaches still need further improvement. In this review, we will briefly introduce the development of in silico models for some physicochemical parameters, ADME properties and toxicity evaluation, with an emphasis on the modelling approaches thereof, their application in drug discovery, and the potential merits or deficiencies of these models. Finally, the outlook for future ADME/T modelling based on big data analysis and systems sciences will be discussed.

  8. Toward a pragmatic migraine model for drug testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Guo, Song; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A model for the testing of novel antimigraine drugs should ideally use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Cilostazol provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity. Therefore, this headache...

  9. Cell and small animal models for phenotypic drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabo M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mihaly Szabo,1 Sara Svensson Akusjärvi,1 Ankur Saxena,1 Jianping Liu,2 Gayathri Chandrasekar,1 Satish S Kitambi1 1Department of Microbiology Tumor, and Cell Biology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden Abstract: The phenotype-based drug discovery (PDD approach is re-emerging as an alternative platform for drug discovery. This review provides an overview of the various model systems and technical advances in imaging and image analyses that strengthen the PDD platform. In PDD screens, compounds of therapeutic value are identified based on the phenotypic perturbations produced irrespective of target(s or mechanism of action. In this article, examples of phenotypic changes that can be detected and quantified with relative ease in a cell-based setup are discussed. In addition, a higher order of PDD screening setup using small animal models is also explored. As PDD screens integrate physiology and multiple signaling mechanisms during the screening process, the identified hits have higher biomedical applicability. Taken together, this review highlights the advantages gained by adopting a PDD approach in drug discovery. Such a PDD platform can complement target-based systems that are currently in practice to accelerate drug discovery. Keywords: phenotype, screening, PDD, discovery, zebrafish, drug

  10. A thermal analogy for modelling drug elution from cardiovascular stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hose, D R; Narracott, A J; Griffiths, B; Mahmood, S; Gunn, J; Sweeney, D; Lawford, P V

    2004-10-01

    Restriction of blood flow by the narrowing or occlusion of arteries is one of the most common presentations of cardiovascular disease. One treatment involves the introduction of a metal scaffold, or stent, designed to prevent recoil and to provide structural stability to the vessel. On the occasions that this treatment is ineffective, failure is usually associated with re-invasion of tissue. This can be prevented by local delivery of drugs which inhibit tissue growth. The drug might be delivered locally in a polymer coating on the stent. This paper develops and explores the use of a thermal analogue of the drug delivery process and the associated three-dimensional convection-diffusion equation to model the spatial and temporal distribution of drug concentration within the vessel wall. This allows the routine use of commercial finite element analysis software to investigate the dynamics of drug distribution, assist in the understanding of the treatment process and develop improved delivery systems. Two applications illustrate how the model might be used to investigate the effects of controllable or measurable parameters on the progression of the process. It is demonstrated that the geometric characteristics of the stent can have significant impact on the homogeneity of the dosing in the vessel wall.

  11. Review: US Spelling Colorectal cancer models for novel drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Daniel; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Yilmaz, Omer H.; Roper, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite increased screening rates and advances in targeted therapy, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality. CRC models that recapitulate key features of human disease are essential to the development of novel and effective therapeutics. Classic methods of modeling CRC such as human cell lines and xenograft mice, while useful for many applications, carry significant limitations. Recently developed in vitro and in vivo models overcome some of these deficiencies and thus can be utilized to better model CRC for mechanistic and translational research. Areas Covered The authors review established models of in vitro cell culture and describe advances in organoid culture for studying normal and malignant intestine. They also discuss key features of classic xenograft models and describe other approaches for in vivo CRC research, including patient-derived xenograft, carcinogen-induced, orthotopic transplantation, and transgenic mouse models. We also describe mouse models of metastatic CRC. Expert opinion No single model is optimal for drug discovery in CRC. Genetically engineered models overcome many limitations of xenograft models. Three-dimensional organoids can be efficiently derived from both normal and malignant tissue for large-scale in vitro and in vivo (transplantation) studies, and are thus a significant advance in CRC drug discovery. PMID:26295972

  12. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers....... This demonstrates that the cell model can be a useful tool for the design of effective lysosome-targeting drugs with minimal off-target interactions....

  13. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  14. Drug Policy and the Ultima Ratio in A Social and Democratic State, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Alison Hogg; Xabier Arana

    2013-01-01

    As a Member State of the UN and the EU, Spain's drug policy is heavily conditioned by these external superior ‘legal personalities’. Although, the Spanish legislature has enacted amendments to legislation on illicit substances over the last ten years to attenuate excessively punitive law, their interpretation and internal application of conventions on drug legislation has by in large overlooked the ultima ratio principle i.e. minimum intervention (Arana 2012). Spain’s crimin...

  15. Modern state of the assortment drugs for the treatment of vaginal candidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Юлия Валентиновна Левачкова; Татьяна Григорьевна Ярных; Валентина Николаевна Чушенко; Снежана Николаевна Пушок

    2015-01-01

    Today the problem of treatment of vaginal candidosis and creation of effective drugs for the treatment of this disease is actual for modern gynecology and pharmacy.Aim: to explore the structure of the assortment of drugs for the treatment of vaginal candidosis, presented in the Ukrainian pharmaceutical market.Methods: Statistical and marketing methods of investigation of electronic and paper sources of information. Implemented analysis assortment based on the materials of the State Register d...

  16. INVESTIGATION ON EFFECT OF DRUG DOSING REGIMENTS ON DRUG DELIVERY IN SOLID TUMOR VIA LUMPED PARAMETER MODELING AND ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ci-xiu; XU Shi-xiong; JIANG Yu-ping; TU Jiang-long

    2009-01-01

    This work aims to investigate the effects of dosing regiments on drug delivery in solid tumors and to validate them with experiments on rats.The lumped parameter models of pharmacokinetics and of drug delivery in tumor were developed to simulate time courses of average drug concentration(Ct)of tumor interstitium in two types of dosing regiments(i.e.,single-shot and triple-shot ones).The two regiments were performed via antitumor drug,hydroxycamptothecin(HCPT),on rats,to measure the drug concentration in the tumor.The simulations of the drug concentration in the tumor of the two dosing regiments were conducted and compared with the experimental data on rats.The coefficients in the models were investigated.It is concluded that the triple-shot method is more effective than that of single-shot injection.The present lumped-parameter model is quantitatively competent for drug delivery in solid tumor.

  17. Reinforcement, dopamine and rodent models in drug development for ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Gail; Wickens, Jeff

    2012-07-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) presents special challenges for drug development. Current treatment with psychostimulants and nonstimulants is effective, but their mechanism of action beyond the cellular level is incompletely understood. We review evidence suggesting that altered reinforcement mechanisms are a fundamental characteristic of ADHD. We show that a deficit in the transfer of dopamine signals from established positive reinforcers to cues that predict such reinforcers may underlie these altered reinforcement mechanisms, and in turn explain key symptoms of ADHD. We argue that the neural substrates controlling the excitation and inhibition of dopamine neurons during the transfer process are a promising target for future drug development. There is a need to develop animal models and behavioral paradigms that can be used to experimentally investigate these mechanisms and their effects on sensitivity to reinforcement. More specific and selective targeting of drug development may be possible through this approach.

  18. Optimal Control of Drug Therapy in a Hepatitis B Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Forde

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Combination antiviral drug therapy improves the survival rates of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus by controlling viral replication and enhancing immune responses. Some of these drugs have side effects that make them unsuitable for long-term administration. To address the trade-off between the positive and negative effects of the combination therapy, we investigated an optimal control problem for a delay differential equation model of immune responses to hepatitis virus B infection. Our optimal control problem investigates the interplay between virological and immunomodulatory effects of therapy, the control of viremia and the administration of the minimal dosage over a short period of time. Our numerical results show that the high drug levels that induce immune modulation rather than suppression of virological factors are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus.

  19. Modeling energy intake by adding homeostatic feedback and drug intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennemark, Peter; Hjorth, Stephan; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2015-02-01

    Energy intake (EI) is a pivotal biomarker used in quantification approaches to metabolic disease processes such as obesity, diabetes, and growth disorders. Eating behavior is however under both short-term and long-term control. This control system manifests itself as tolerance and rebound phenomena in EI, when challenged by drug treatment or diet restriction. The paper describes a model with the capability to capture physiological counter-regulatory feedback actions triggered by energy imbalances. This feedback is general as it handles tolerance to both increases and decreases in EI, and works in both acute and chronic settings. A drug mechanism function inhibits (or stimulates) EI. The deviation of EI relative to a reference level (set-point) serves as input to a non-linear appetite control signal which in turn impacts EI in parallel to the drug intervention. Three examples demonstrate the potential usefulness of the model in both acute and chronic dosing situations. The model shifts the predicted concentration-response relationship rightwardly at lower concentrations, in contrast to models that do not handle functional adaptation. A fourth example further shows that the model may qualitatively explain differences in rate and extent of adaptation in observed EI and its concomitants in both rodents and humans.

  20. Approximate Methods for State-Space Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Pérez-Bolde, Lucia Castellanos; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Kass, Robert E

    2010-03-01

    State-space models provide an important body of techniques for analyzing time-series, but their use requires estimating unobserved states. The optimal estimate of the state is its conditional expectation given the observation histories, and computing this expectation is hard when there are nonlinearities. Existing filtering methods, including sequential Monte Carlo, tend to be either inaccurate or slow. In this paper, we study a nonlinear filter for nonlinear/non-Gaussian state-space models, which uses Laplace's method, an asymptotic series expansion, to approximate the state's conditional mean and variance, together with a Gaussian conditional distribution. This Laplace-Gaussian filter (LGF) gives fast, recursive, deterministic state estimates, with an error which is set by the stochastic characteristics of the model and is, we show, stable over time. We illustrate the estimation ability of the LGF by applying it to the problem of neural decoding and compare it to sequential Monte Carlo both in simulations and with real data. We find that the LGF can deliver superior results in a small fraction of the computing time.

  1. A Model for Predicting the Interindividual Variability of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tod, M; Bourguignon, L; Bleyzac, N; Goutelle, S

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are frequently characterized and quantified by an AUC ratio (Rauc). The typical value of the AUC ratio in case of cytochrome-mediated interactions may be predicted by several approaches, based on in vitro or in vivo data. Prediction of the interindividual variability of Rauc would help to anticipate more completely the consequences of a drug-drug interaction. We propose and evaluate a simple approach for predicting the standard deviation (sd) of Ln(Rauc), a metric close to the interindividual coefficient of variation of Rauc. First, a model was derived to link sd(Ln Rauc) with the substrate fraction metabolized by each cytochrome and the potency of the interactors, in case of induction or inhibition. Second, the parameters involved in these equations were estimated by a Bayesian hierarchical model, using the data from 56 interaction studies retrieved from the literature. Third, the model was evaluated by several metrics based on the fold prediction error (PE) of sd(Ln Rauc). The median PE was 0.998 (the ideal value is 1) and the interquartile range was 0.96-1.03. The PE was in the acceptable interval (0.5 to 2) in 52 cases out of 56. Fourth, a surface plot of sd(Ln Rauc) as a function of the characteristics of the substrate and the interactor has been built. The minimal value of sd(Ln Rauc) was about 0.08 (obtained for Rauc = 1) while the maximal value, 0.7, was obtained for interactions involving highly metabolized substrates with strong interactors.

  2. A Two-Layer Mathematical Modelling of Drug Delivery to Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Chakravarty, Koyel

    2016-01-01

    Local drug delivery has received much recognition in recent years, yet it is still unpredictable how drug efficacy depends on physicochemical properties and delivery kinetics. The purpose of the current study is to provide a useful mathematical model for drug release from a drug delivery device and consecutive drug transport in biological tissue, thereby aiding the development of new therapeutic drug by a systemic approach. In order to study the complete process, a two-layer spatio-temporal model depicting drug transport between the coupled media is presented. Drug release is described by considering solubilisation dynamics of drug particle, diffusion of the solubilised drug through porous matrix and also some other processes like reversible dissociation / recrystallization, drug particle-receptor binding and internalization phenomena. The model has led to a system of partial differential equations describing the important properties of drug kinetics. This model contributes towards the perception of the roles...

  3. Animal models for testing anti-prion drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Elezgarai, Saioa R; Eraña, Hasier; Castilla, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases belong to a group of fatal infectious diseases with no effective therapies available. Throughout the last 35 years, less than 50 different drugs have been tested in different experimental animal models without hopeful results. An important limitation when searching for new drugs is the existence of appropriate models of the disease. The three different possible origins of prion diseases require the existence of different animal models for testing anti-prion compounds. Wild type, over-expressing transgenic mice and other more sophisticated animal models have been used to evaluate a diversity of compounds which some of them were previously tested in different in vitro experimental models. The complexity of prion diseases will require more pre-screening studies, reliable sporadic (or spontaneous) animal models and accurate chemical modifications of the selected compounds before having an effective therapy against human prion diseases. This review is intended to put on display the more relevant animal models that have been used in the search of new antiprion therapies and describe some possible procedures when handling chemical compounds presumed to have anti-prion activity prior to testing them in animal models.

  4. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  5. Modeling the Effects of Drug Binding on the Dynamic Instability of Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Hinow, Peter; Lopus, Manu; Jordan, Mary Ann; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2010-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin. Both experimentally and theoretically we study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. We find that to be an effective suppressor of microtubule dynamics a drug must primarily suppress the loss of GDP tubulin from the microtubule tip.

  6. A Model of Mental State Transition Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Hua; Jiang, Peilin; Xiao, Shuang; Ren, Fuji; Kuroiwa, Shingo

    Emotion is one of the most essential and basic attributes of human intelligence. Current AI (Artificial Intelligence) research is concentrating on physical components of emotion, rarely is it carried out from the view of psychology directly(1). Study on the model of artificial psychology is the first step in the development of human-computer interaction. As affective computing remains unpredictable, creating a reasonable mental model becomes the primary task for building a hybrid system. A pragmatic mental model is also the fundament of some key topics such as recognition and synthesis of emotions. In this paper a Mental State Transition Network Model(2) is proposed to detect human emotions. By a series of psychological experiments, we present a new way to predict coming human's emotions depending on the various current emotional states under various stimuli. Besides, people in different genders and characters are taken into consideration in our investigation. According to the psychological experiments data derived from 200 questionnaires, a Mental State Transition Network Model for describing the transitions in distribution among the emotions and relationships between internal mental situations and external are concluded. Further more the coefficients of the mental transition network model were achieved. Comparing seven relative evaluating experiments, an average precision rate of 0.843 is achieved using a set of samples for the proposed model.

  7. Animal models in therapeutic drug discovery for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Aymeric; Simonelig, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late onset disease which affects specific muscles. No pharmacological treatments are currently available for OPMD. In recent years, genetically tractable models of OPMD – Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans – have been generated. Although these models have not yet been used for large-scale primary drug screening, they have been very useful in candidate approaches for the identification of potential therapeutic compounds for OPMD. In this brief review, we summarize the data that validated active molecules for OPMD in animal models including Drosophila, C. elegans and mouse.

  8. Optimized Markov State Models for Metastable Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Guarnera, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed to identify target states that optimize a metastability index amongst a set of trial states and use these target states as milestones to build Markov State Models. If the optimized metastability index is small, this automatically guarantees the accuracy of the MSM in the sense that the transitions between the target milestones is indeed approximately Markovian. The method is simple to implement and use, it does not require that the dynamics on the trial milestones be Markovian, and it also offers the possibility to partition the system's state-space by assigning every trial milestone to the target milestones it is most likely to visit next and to identify transition state regions. Here the method is tested on the Gly-Ala-Gly peptide, where it shown to correctly identify the known metastable states in the dihedral angle space of the molecule without a priori information about these states. It is also applied to analyze the folding landscape of the Beta3s min-protein, where it is shown to i...

  9. Strategy for the Prediction of Steady-State Exposure of Digoxin to Determine Drug-Drug Interaction Potential of Digoxin With Other Drugs in Digitalization Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-01-20

    Digoxin, a narrow therapeutic index drug, is widely used in congestive heart failure. However, the digitalization therapy involves dose titration and can exhibit drug-drug interaction. Ctrough versus area under the plasma concentration versus time curve in a dosing interval of 24 hours (AUC0-24h) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h for digoxin were established by linear regression. The predictions of digoxin AUC0-24h values were performed using published Ctrough or Cmax with appropriate regression lines. The fold difference, defined as the quotient of the observed/predicted AUC0-24h values, was evaluated. The mean square error and root mean square error, correlation coefficient (r), and goodness of the fold prediction were used to evaluate the models. Both Ctrough versus AUC0-24h (r = 0.9215) and Cmax versus AUC0-24h models for digoxin (r = 0.7781) showed strong correlations. Approximately 93.8% of the predicted digoxin AUC0-24h values were within 0.76-fold to 1.25-fold difference for Ctrough model. In sharp contrast, the Cmax model showed larger variability with only 51.6% of AUC0-24h predictions within 0.76-1.25-fold difference. The r value for observed versus predicted AUC0-24h for Ctrough (r = 0.9551; n = 177; P < 0.001) was superior to the Cmax (r = 0.6134; n = 275; P < 0.001) model. The mean square error and root mean square error (%) for the Ctrough model were 11.95% and 16.2% as compared to 67.17% and 42.3% obtained for the Cmax model. Simple linear regression models for Ctrough/Cmax versus AUC0-24h were derived for digoxin. On the basis of statistical evaluation, Ctrough was superior to Cmax model for the prediction of digoxin AUC0-24h and can be potentially used in a prospective setting for predicting drug-drug interaction or lack of it.

  10. Biomembrane models and drug-biomembrane interaction studies: Involvement in drug design and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pignatello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact with many different biological membranes goes along the destiny of a drug after its systemic administration. From the circulating macrophage cells to the vessel endothelium, to more complex absorption barriers, the interaction of a biomolecule with these membranes largely affects its rate and time of biodistribution in the body and at the target sites. Therefore, investigating the phenomena occurring on the cell membranes, as well as their different interaction with drugs in the physiological or pathological conditions, is important to exploit the molecular basis of many diseases and to identify new potential therapeutic strategies. Of course, the complexity of the structure and functions of biological and cell membranes, has pushed researchers toward the proposition and validation of simpler two- and three-dimensional membrane models, whose utility and drawbacks will be discussed. This review also describes the analytical methods used to look at the interactions among bioactive compounds with biological membrane models, with a particular accent on the calorimetric techniques. These studies can be considered as a powerful tool for medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology, in the steps of designing new drugs and optimizing the activity and safety profile of compounds already used in the therapy.

  11. A Quantitative Model to Estimate Drug Resistance in Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazier N. Baker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP is an opportunistic infection that occurs in humans and other mammals with debilitated immune systems. These infections are caused by fungi in the genus Pneumocystis, which are not susceptible to standard antifungal agents. Despite decades of research and drug development, the primary treatment and prophylaxis for PCP remains a combination of trimethoprim (TMP and sulfamethoxazole (SMX that targets two enzymes in folic acid biosynthesis, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS, respectively. There is growing evidence of emerging resistance by Pneumocystis jirovecii (the species that infects humans to TMP-SMX associated with mutations in the targeted enzymes. In the present study, we report the development of an accurate quantitative model to predict changes in the binding affinity of inhibitors (Ki, IC50 to the mutated proteins. The model is based on evolutionary information and amino acid covariance analysis. Predicted changes in binding affinity upon mutations highly correlate with the experimentally measured data. While trained on Pneumocystis jirovecii DHFR/TMP data, the model shows similar or better performance when evaluated on the resistance data for a different inhibitor of PjDFHR, another drug/target pair (PjDHPS/SMX and another organism (Staphylococcus aureus DHFR/TMP. Therefore, we anticipate that the developed prediction model will be useful in the evaluation of possible resistance of the newly sequenced variants of the pathogen and can be extended to other drug targets and organisms.

  12. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  13. Tuning HERG out: antitarget QSAR models for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Rodolpho C; Alves, Vinicius M; Silva, Meryck F B; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Tropsha, Alexander; Andrade, Carolina H

    2014-01-01

    Several non-cardiovascular drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to their inhibition of hERG K+ channels that can potentially lead to severe heart arrhythmia and death. As hERG safety testing is a mandatory FDArequired procedure, there is a considerable interest for developing predictive computational tools to identify and filter out potential hERG blockers early in the drug discovery process. In this study, we aimed to generate predictive and well-characterized quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for hERG blockage using the largest publicly available dataset of 11,958 compounds from the ChEMBL database. The models have been developed and validated according to OECD guidelines using four types of descriptors and four different machine-learning techniques. The classification accuracies discriminating blockers from non-blockers were as high as 0.83-0.93 on external set. Model interpretation revealed several SAR rules, which can guide structural optimization of some hERG blockers into non-blockers. We have also applied the generated models for screening the World Drug Index (WDI) database and identify putative hERG blockers and non-blockers among currently marketed drugs. The developed models can reliably identify blockers and non-blockers, which could be useful for the scientific community. A freely accessible web server has been developed allowing users to identify putative hERG blockers and non-blockers in chemical libraries of their interest (http://labmol.farmacia.ufg.br/predherg).

  14. Multi-state modeling of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-state modeling of biomolecules refers to a series of techniques used to represent and compute the behavior of biological molecules or complexes that can adopt a large number of possible functional states. Biological signaling systems often rely on complexes of biological macromolecules that can undergo several functionally significant modifications that are mutually compatible. Thus, they can exist in a very large number of functionally different states. Modeling such multi-state systems poses two problems: the problem of how to describe and specify a multi-state system (the "specification problem" and the problem of how to use a computer to simulate the progress of the system over time (the "computation problem". To address the specification problem, modelers have in recent years moved away from explicit specification of all possible states and towards rule-based formalisms that allow for implicit model specification, including the κ-calculus, BioNetGen, the Allosteric Network Compiler, and others. To tackle the computation problem, they have turned to particle-based methods that have in many cases proved more computationally efficient than population-based methods based on ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Given current computing technology, particle-based methods are sometimes the only possible option. Particle-based simulators fall into two further categories: nonspatial simulators, such as StochSim, DYNSTOC, RuleMonkey, and the Network-Free Stochastic Simulator (NFSim, and spatial simulators, including Meredys, SRSim, and MCell. Modelers can thus choose from a variety of tools, the best choice depending on the particular problem. Development of faster and more powerful methods is ongoing, promising the ability to simulate ever more complex signaling processes in the future.

  15. Forecasting Models in the State Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintautas DZEMYDA

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents model-based assessment and forecasting of the Lithuanian education system in the period of 2001-2010. In order to obtain satisfactory forecasting results, constructing of models used for these aims should be grounded on some interactive data mining. Data mining of data stored in the system of the Lithuanian teacher's database and of data from other sources representing the state of education system and the demographic changes in Lithuania was used. The models cover the estimation of data quality in the databases, the analysis of flow of teachers and pupils, the clustering of schools, the model of dynamics of pedagogical staff and pupils, and the quality analysis of teachers. The main results of forecasting and integrated analysis of the Lithuanian teachers' database with other data reflecting the state of the education system and demographic changes in Lithuania are presented.

  16. Secondary Prevention Services for Clients Who Are Low Risk in Drug Court: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, David S.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The drug court model assumes that most drug offenders are addicts, and that drug use fuels other criminal activity. As a result, drug court clients must satisfy an intensive regimen of treatment and supervisory obligations. However, research suggests that roughly one third of drug court clients do not have a clinically significant substance use…

  17. Commercial importation of prescription drugs in the United States: short-run implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzon, Patricia M; Johnson, Scott J; Long, Genia; Furukawa, Michael F

    2011-04-01

    The option of legalizing the commercial importation of prescription drugs is of continued policy interest as a way to reduce U.S. drug spending. Using IMS data, we estimate potential savings from commercial drug importation under assumptions about percentage of drugs likely to attract imports; potential supply from foreign countries; and share of savings passed on to payers. Our base case estimate is that $1.7 billion per year, or 0.6 percent of total drug spending, would be saved by payers; sensitivity analyses range from 0.2 to 2.5 percent under plausible assumptions and up to 17.4 percent under unrealistic assumptions about unlimited foreign supply, costless trade, and zero profits for intermediaries. Estimated savings to payers are less than the average price differentials between the United States and foreign countries because proposed legislation exempts certain drugs from importation; foreign markets are small relative to the United States; regulatory and other constraints may limit the volume of exports; trade is costly; and intermediaries will retain some savings. Although savings to U.S. payers/consumers would likely be small and have minimal impact on total U.S. health care spending, costs to other countries could be significant, due to reduced access and possibly higher prices. In the long run, reduced investment in R&D could adversely affect consumers globally.

  18. Drug histories and criminality of inmates of local jails in the United States (1978): implications for treatment and rehabilitation of the drug abuser in a jail setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, W I

    1982-04-01

    A survey by the Department of Justice in 1978 of inmates of local jails in the United States found that 68% had ever used drugs like heroin, cocaine, marijuana, amphetamines, or barbiturates outside a treatment program, and without a doctor's prescription. Offenses for which relatively larger proportions of inmates reported drug use included robbery, burglary, auto theft, larceny, and drug offenses. During the month prior to jail, 44% of inmates reported using drugs. Some 21% of convicted inmates reported being under the influence of drugs at the time of an offense for which convicted. One-fourth of inmates reporting drug use had ever been enrolled in drug treatment. Treatment and rehabilitation of the drug abuser in a jail setting is discussed.

  19. Drug use and service utilization among Hispanics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Michael A; Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Vaughn, Michael G

    2015-11-01

    To examine illicit drug use and service utilization patterns of US-born and foreign-born Hispanics in the United States. Hispanic respondents 18 years and older in the NESARC were categorized as being of Mexican (n = 3,556), Puerto Rican (n = 785), Cuban (n = 346), Central American (n = 513), or South American (n = 381) origin. We examined lifetime prevalence of drug use and substance abuse treatment utilization patterns for US-born and Hispanic immigrants across subgroups. Lifetime prevalence of drug use was greater among US-born Hispanics than Hispanic immigrants after controlling for age, gender, income, education, urbanicity, parental history of drug use problems and lifetime DSM-IV mood/anxiety disorders. Both US-born and immigrant Hispanic drug users were less likely than non-Hispanic white drug users to have utilized any form of substance abuse treatment (US-born AOR = 0.89, immigrant AOR = 0.64) and more likely to have utilized family or social services (US-born AOR = 1.17, immigrant AOR = 1.19). Compared to US-born Hispanic drug users, Hispanic immigrant drug users were less likely to have used any form of substance abuse treatment (AOR = 0.81) and were more likely to have utilized family or social services (AOR = 1.22). Strategies to increase engagement and retention of Hispanic drug users in substance abuse treatment include increasing access to linguistically and culturally competent programs that address unmet family and social needs. Further studies examining differences in drug use and service utilization patterns within Hispanic subgroups are needed.

  20. What Characterise the Nordic Welfare State Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2007-01-01

    The main distinctive characteristics of the Nordic welfare states are presented. These include full employment, high degree of equality, a high level of taxes and public sector spending. The Nordic countries are compared to other European countries. The conclusion being that the Nordic Model...

  1. State-of-the-art technology in modern computer-aided drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalkas, Georgios A; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Kastania, Anastasia; Kossida, Sophia

    2013-11-01

    The quest for small drug-like compounds that selectively inhibit the function of biological targets has always been a major focus in the pharmaceutical industry and in academia as well. High-throughput screening of compound libraries requires time, cost and resources. Therefore, the use of alternative methods is necessary for facilitating lead discovery. Computational techniques that dock small molecules into macromolecular targets and predict the affinity and activity of the small molecule are widely used in drug design and discovery, and have become an integral part of the industrial and academic research. In this review, we present an overview of some state-of-the-art technologies in modern drug design that have been developed for expediting the search for novel drug candidates.

  2. Impulsivity in Animal Models for Drug Abuse Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jentsch, J. David

    2008-01-01

    Different conceptual frameworks have been generated to explain substance abuse; of relevance to this article, dysfunction of impulse control systems that are required for avoiding or stopping drug-seeking and –taking may play a key role in addiction. This review summarizes work in animal models that explains the pervasive association between impulse control and substance abuse. It further underscores the concept that impulse control may be a critical target for pharmacological intervention in...

  3. Steady state modeling of desiccant wheels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellemo, Lorenzo; Elmegaard, Brian; Kærn, Martin Ryhl

    2014-01-01

    Desiccant wheels are rotary desiccant dehumidifiers used in air conditioning and drying applications. The modeling of simultaneous heat and mass transfer in these components is crucial for estimating their performances, as well as for simulating and optimizing their implementation in complete sys...... be taken into account in a future version of the model. More experimental data have to be gathered to implement eventual missing phenomena and validate the model for all input parameters....... systems. A steady state two-dimensional model is formulated and implemented aiming to obtain good accuracy and short computational times. Comparison with experimental data from the literature shows that the model reproduces the physical behavior of desiccant wheels. Mass diffusion in the desiccant should......Desiccant wheels are rotary desiccant dehumidifiers used in air conditioning and drying applications. The modeling of simultaneous heat and mass transfer in these components is crucial for estimating their performances, as well as for simulating and optimizing their implementation in complete...

  4. Primary drug resistance among pulmonary treatment-naïve tuberculosis patients in Amazonas State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Garrido, M; Ramasawmy, R; Perez-Porcuna, T M; Zaranza, E; Chrusciak Talhari, A; Martinez-Espinosa, F E; Bührer-Sékula, S

    2014-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is the main indicator of previous treatment in tuberculosis (TB) patients. MDR-TB among treatment-naïve patients indicates infection with drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, and such cases are considered primary drug-resistant cases. To estimate the prevalence of drug resistance in pulmonary TB (PTB) treatment-naïve patients and to identify the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of the resistant population. A total of 205 treatment-naïve PTB patients from Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil, were enrolled. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed on all positive mycobacterial cultures using the 1% proportion method. Positive M. tuberculosis cultures were obtained from only 175 patients for DST. The prevalence of primary MDR-TB was 1.7% (3/175); 14.3% (25/175) of the cultures presented resistance to at least one of the drugs. Resistance to streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol was respectively 8.6%, 6.9%, 3.4% and 2.3%. An association between TB patients with resistance to more than one drug and known previous household contact with a TB patient was observed (P= 0.008, OR 6.7, 95%CI 1.2-67.3). Although the prevalence of primary MDR-TB currently is relatively low, it may become a major public health problem if tailored treatment is not provided, as resistance to more than one drug is significantly associated with household contact.

  5. Mouse models for pre-clinical drug testing in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanil; Daschkey, Svenja; Lang, Franziska; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hauer, Julia

    2016-11-01

    The development of novel drugs which specifically target leukemic cells, with the overall aim to increase complete remission and to reduce toxicity and morbidity, is the most important prerequisite for modern leukemia treatment. In this regard, the current transition rate of potential novel drugs from bench to bedside is remarkably low. Although many novel drugs show promising data in vitro and in vivo, testing of these medications in clinical phase I trials is often sobering with intolerable toxic side effects leading to failure in FDA approval. Areas covered: In this review, the authors discuss the development of murine model generation in the context of targeted therapy development for the treatment of childhood leukemia, aiming to decrease the attrition rate of progressively complex targeted therapies ranging from small molecules to cell therapy. As more complex therapeutic approaches develop, more complex murine models are needed, to recapitulate closely the human phenotype. Expert opinion: Combining xenograft models for efficacy testing and GEMMs for toxicity testing will be a global approach for pre-clinical testing of complex therapeutics and will contribute to the clinical approval of novel compounds. Finally, this approach is likely to increase clinical approval of novel compounds.

  6. Assessment of disease profiles and drug prescribing patterns of health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehijie F.O. Enato

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have systematically characterized drug-prescribing patterns, particularly at the primary care level in Nigeria, a country disproportionately burdened with disease. The aim of this study was to assess the disease profiles and drug-prescribing pattern in two health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria. The medical records of 495 patients who attended a primary or secondary health care facility in Owan-East Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria, between June and November 2009 were reviewed. Disease profiles and drug prescribing patterns were assessed. Data were analyzed based on the World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification system, and core drug prescribing indicators. Five hundred and twelve clinical conditions were identified. Infectious disease was most prevalent (38.3%, followed by disorder of the alimentary tract (16.4%. Malaria was responsible for 55.6% of the infectious diseases seen, and 21.3% (109/512 of the total clinical conditions managed at the two health facilities during the study period. Consequently, anti-infective medications were the most frequently prescribed medicines (21.5%, followed by vitamins (18.2%. Use of artesunate monotherapy at both facilities (15.7%, and chloroquine at the primary health facility (24.9% were common. Paracetamol (41.8% and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (24.9% were the most frequently used analgesic/antipyretic. At the primary health care facility, dipyrone was used in 21.6% of cases. The core drug prescribing use indicators showed inappropriate prescribing, indicating poly-pharmacy, overuse of antibiotics and injectio. Inappropriate drug use patterns were identified at both health care facilities, especially with regard to the use of ineffective antimalarial drugs and the use of dipyrone.

  7. 78 FR 9589 - Disclosures To Participate in State Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... substance'' as a substance identified by United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) regulations (21... Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning the sharing of certain patient information in order... through http://www.regulations.gov ; by mail or hand-delivery to Director, Regulations Management (02REG...

  8. Geneesmiddelengebruik en verkeersveiligheid : covernota bij het state-of-the-art onderzoek Geneesmiddelen en drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesemann, P. Twisk, D.A.M. & Vis, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    A state of the art report on the use of medicines and drugs and traffic safety (based on three other reports see B 26479, 29954 and 29960) is presented. Policy recommendations are discussed. It is argued that a large scale epidemiological study to determine the relative risk is not indicated. Instea

  9. Tracking Ecstasy Trends in the United States with Data from Three National Drug Surveillance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoubian, George S., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Anecdotal reports have suggested that the use of 3,4-methylenedioxymeth-amphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") is a prodigious problem across the United States. Unfortunately, no longitudinal evidence exists to support this contention. In the current study, data from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), Monitoring the Future (MTF), and National…

  10. Sites of action of sleep and wake drugs: insights from model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihel, Jason; Schier, Alexander F

    2013-10-01

    Small molecules have been used since antiquity to regulate our sleep. Despite the explosion of diverse drugs to treat problems of too much or too little sleep, the detailed mechanisms of action and especially the neuronal targets by which these compounds alter human behavioural states are not well understood. Research efforts in model systems such as mouse, zebrafish and fruit fly are combining conditional genetics and optogenetics with pharmacology to map the effects of sleep-promoting drugs onto neural circuits. Recent studies raise the possibility that many small molecules alter sleep and wake via specific sets of critical neurons rather than through the global modulation of multiple brain targets. These findings also uncover novel brain areas as sleep/wake regulators and indicate that the development of circuit-selective drugs might alleviate sleep disorders with fewer side effects. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Prescription Opioid Usage and Abuse Relationships: An Evaluation of State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Reisman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The dramatic rise in the use of prescription opioids to treat non-cancer pain has been paralleled by increasing prescription opioid abuse. However, detailed analyses of these trends and programs to address them are lacking.Objective: To study the association between state shipments of prescription opioids for medical use and prescription opioid abuse admissions and to assess the effects of state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs on prescription opioid abuse admissions.Design and Setting: A retrospective ecological cohort study comparing state prescription opioid shipments (source: Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders Systems database and inpatient admissions for prescription opioid abuse (source: Treatment Episode Data Set in 14 states with PDMPs (intervention group and 36 states without PDMPs (control group for the period 1997–2003.Results: From 1997 to 2003, oxycodone, morphine, and hydrocodone shipments increased by 479%, 100%, and 148% respectively. Increasing prescription oxycodone shipments were significantly associated with increasing prescription opioid admission rates (p 0.001. PDMP states had significantly lower oxycodone shipments than the control group. PDMP states had less increase in prescription opioid admissions per year (p = 0.063. A patient admitted to an inpatient drug abuse rehabilitation program in a PDMP state was less likely to be admitted for prescription opioid drug abuse (Odds ratio = 0.775, 95% Confidence Interval 0.764–0.785.Conclusions: PDMPs appear to decrease the quantity of oxycodone shipments and the prescription opioid admission rate for states with these programs. Overall, opioid shipments rose significantly in PDMP states during the study period indicating a negligible “chilling effect” on physician prescribing.

  12. Application of PK/PD Modeling in Veterinary Field: Dose Optimization and Drug Resistance Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijaz Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among veterinary drugs, antibiotics are frequently used. The true mean of antibiotic treatment is to administer dose of drug that will have enough high possibility of attaining the preferred curative effect, with adequately low chance of concentration associated toxicity. Rising of antibacterial resistance and lack of novel antibiotic is a global crisis; therefore there is an urgent need to overcome this problem. Inappropriate antibiotic selection, group treatment, and suboptimal dosing are mostly responsible for the mentioned problem. One approach to minimizing the antibacterial resistance is to optimize the dosage regimen. PK/PD model is important realm to be used for that purpose from several years. PK/PD model describes the relationship between drug potency, microorganism exposed to drug, and the effect observed. Proper use of the most modern PK/PD modeling approaches in veterinary medicine can optimize the dosage for patient, which in turn reduce toxicity and reduce the emergence of resistance. The aim of this review is to look at the existing state and application of PK/PD in veterinary medicine based on in vitro, in vivo, healthy, and disease model.

  13. Dose correction for the Michaelis-Menten approximation of the target-mediated drug disposition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2012-04-01

    The Michaelis-Menten (M-M) approximation of the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) pharmacokinetic (PK) model was derived based on the rapid binding (RB) or quasi steady-state (QSS) assumptions that implied that the target and drug binding and dissociation were in equilibrium. However, the initial dose for an IV bolus injection for the M-M model did not account for a fraction bound to the target. We postulated a correction to an initial condition that was consistent with the assumptions underlying the M-M approximation. We determined that the difference between the injected dose and one that should be used for the initial condition is equal to the amount of drug bound to the target upon reaching the equilibrium. We also observed that the corrected initial condition made the internalization rate constant an identifiable parameter that was not for the original M-M model. Finally, we performed a simulation exercise to check if the correction will impact the model performance and the bias of the M-M parameter estimates. We used literature data to simulate plasma drug concentrations described by the RB/QSS TMDD model. The simulated data were refitted by both models. All the parameters estimated from the original M-M model were substantially biased. On the other hand, the corrected M-M is able to accurately estimate these parameters except for equilibrium constant K(m). Weighted sum of square residual and Akaike information criterion suggested a better performance of the corrected M-M model compared with the original M-M model. Further studies are necessary to determine the importance of this correction for the M-M model applications to analysis of TMDD driven PK data.

  14. Dose correction for the Michaelis–Menten approximation of the target-mediated drug disposition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu

    2012-01-01

    The Michaelis–Menten (M–M) approximation of the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) pharmacokinetic (PK) model was derived based on the rapid binding (RB) or quasi steady-state (QSS) assumptions that implied that the target and drug binding and dissociation were in equilibrium. However, the initial dose for an IV bolus injection for the M–M model did not account for a fraction bound to the target. We postulated a correction to an initial condition that was consistent with the assumptions underlying the M–M approximation. We determined that the difference between the injected dose and one that should be used for the initial condition is equal to the amount of drug bound to the target upon reaching the equilibrium. We also observed that the corrected initial condition made the internalization rate constant an identifiable parameter that was not for the original M–M model. Finally, we performed a simulation exercise to check if the correction will impact the model performance and the bias of the M–M parameter estimates. We used literature data to simulate plasma drug concentrations described by the RB/QSS TMDD model. The simulated data were refitted by both models. All the parameters estimated from the original M–M model were substantially biased. On the other hand, the corrected M–M is able to accurately estimate these parameters except for equilibrium constant Km. Weighted sum of square residual and Akaike information criterion suggested a better performance of the corrected M–M model compared with the original M–M model. Further studies are necessary to determine the importance of this correction for the M–M model applications to analysis of TMDD driven PK data. PMID:22215144

  15. A dynamic extraversion model. The brain's response to a single dose of a stimulant drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, Salvador; Caselles, Antonio; Micó, Joan C

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a mathematical dynamic modelling of the effect a stimulant drug has on different people which, at the same time, can be a useful tool for future brain studies. To this end, a dynamic model of the evolution of extraversion (considering its tonic and phasic aspects) has been constructed taking into account the unique personality trait theory and the general modelling methodology. This model consists of a delayed differential equation which, on one hand, considers that the active stimulus, a consequence of a single intake, is not constant; on the other hand, it contemplates that the state variable representing the phasic extraversion also represents the brain activation. The derivative of this state variable is calculated as the sum of the homeostatic control flow, the excitatory effect flow and the inhibitor effect flow. The solutions of this equation relate the tonic activation of an individual (that characterizes his or her personality) with his or her phasic activation level, whose evolution over time describes the organism's response to a single drug intake. These solutions quantitatively reproduce the predictions of current personality theories and anticipate vulnerability to drug misuse and addiction development.

  16. Alcohol involvement in opioid pain reliever and benzodiazepine drug abuse-related emergency department visits and drug-related deaths - United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Paulozzi, Leonard J; Mack, Karin A

    2014-10-10

    The abuse of prescription drugs has led to a significant increase in emergency department (ED) visits and drug-related deaths over the past decade. Opioid pain relievers (OPRs) and benzodiazepines are the prescription drugs most commonly involved in these events. Excessive alcohol consumption also accounts for a significant health burden and is common among groups that report high rates of prescription drug abuse. When taken with OPRs or benzodiazepines, alcohol increases central nervous system depression and the risk for overdose. Data describing alcohol involvement in OPR or benzodiazepine abuse are limited. To quantify alcohol involvement in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse and drug-related deaths and to inform prevention efforts, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC analyzed 2010 data for drug abuse-related ED visits in the United States and drug-related deaths that involved OPRs and alcohol or benzodiazepines and alcohol in 13 states. The analyses showed alcohol was involved in 18.5% of OPR and 27.2% of benzodiazepine drug abuse-related ED visits and 22.1% of OPR and 21.4% of benzodiazepine drug-related deaths. These findings indicate that alcohol plays a significant role in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse. Interventions to reduce the abuse of alcohol and these drugs alone and in combination are needed.

  17. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crum Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57 were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R, and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions.

  18. A state-based model of prevention: Indiana's example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agley, Jon; Gassman, Ruth

    2008-04-01

    Public health officials in the United States have battled alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among adolescents for the past few decades, but only in 2002 did they begin to see a decline in rates of use. ATOD use and abuse are associated with numerous problems, including criminal behavior and increased adolescent morbidity and mortality rates. Researchers have sought to identify best-practice procedures for ATOD prevention; the state of Indiana has a strong ATOD prevention system in place that has the potential to serve as a model for other U.S. localities because of its best-practice approach to public health services. This article outlines the activities of the Indiana Prevention Resource Center to provide an example to strengthen public health professionals' ability to prevent ATOD use and abuse and to provide for a healthy adolescent population.

  19. Molecular modeling study of chiral drug crystals: lattice energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z J; Ojala, W H; Grant, D J

    2001-10-01

    The lattice energies of a number of chiral drugs with known crystal structures were calculated using Dreiding II force field. The lattice energies, including van der Waals, Coulombic, and hydrogen-bonding energies, of homochiral and racemic crystals of some ephedrine derivatives and of several other chiral drugs, are compared. The calculated energies are correlated with experimental data to probe the underlying intermolecular forces responsible for the formation of racemic species, racemic conglomerates, or racemic compounds, termed chiral discrimination. Comparison of the calculated energies among ephedrine derivatives reveals that a greater Coulombic energy corresponds to a higher melting temperature, while a greater van der Waals energy corresponds to a larger enthalpy of fusion. For seven pairs of homochiral and racemic compounds, correlation of the differences between the two forms in the calculated energies and experimental enthalpy of fusion suggests that the van der Waals interactions play a key role in the chiral discrimination in the crystalline state. For salts of the chiral drugs, the counter ions diminish chiral discrimination by increasing the Coulombic interactions. This result may explain why salt forms favor the formation of racemic conglomerates, thereby facilitating the resolution of racemates.

  20. Modeling the transport of drugs eluted from stents: physical phenomena driving drug distribution in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozsak, Franz; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Barakat, Abdul I

    2014-04-01

    Despite recent data that suggest that the overall performance of drug-eluting stents (DES) is superior to that of bare-metal stents, the long-term safety and efficacy of DES remain controversial. The risk of late stent thrombosis associated with the use of DES has also motivated the development of a new and promising treatment option in recent years, namely drug-coated balloons (DCB). Contrary to DES where the drug of choice is typically sirolimus and its derivatives, DCB use paclitaxel since the use of sirolimus does not appear to lead to satisfactory results. Since both sirolimus and paclitaxel are highly lipophilic drugs with similar transport properties, the reason for the success of paclitaxel but not sirolimus in DCB remains unclear. Computational models of the transport of drugs eluted from DES or DCB within the arterial wall promise to enhance our understanding of the performance of these devices. The present study develops a computational model of the transport of the two drugs paclitaxel and sirolimus eluted from DES in the arterial wall. The model takes into account the multilayered structure of the arterial wall and incorporates a reversible binding model to describe drug interactions with the constituents of the arterial wall. The present results demonstrate that the transport of paclitaxel in the arterial wall is dominated by convection while the transport of sirolimus is dominated by the binding process. These marked differences suggest that drug release kinetics of DES should be tailored to the type of drug used.

  1. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Shaolie S.

    2011-08-20

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A threedimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  2. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shaolie S.; Hossainy, Syed F. A.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Calo, Victor M.; Hughes, Thomas J. R.

    2012-02-01

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A three-dimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate.

  3. Xenograft model for therapeutic drug testing in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Julie; Bishop, Justin A; Akpeng, Belinda; Pai, Sara I; Best, Simon R A

    2015-02-01

    Identifying effective treatment for papillomatosis is limited by a lack of animal models, and there is currently no preclinical model for testing potential therapeutic agents. We hypothesized that xenografting of papilloma may facilitate in vivo drug testing to identify novel treatment options. A biopsy of fresh tracheal papilloma was xenografted into a NOD-scid-IL2Rgamma(null) (NSG) mouse. The xenograft began growing after 5 weeks and was serially passaged over multiple generations. Each generation showed a consistent log-growth pattern, and in all xenografts, the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histopathologic analysis demonstrated that the squamous architecture of the original papilloma was maintained in each generation. In vivo drug testing with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly for 3 weeks) showed a dramatic therapeutic response compared to saline control. We report here the first successful case of serial xenografting of a tracheal papilloma in vivo with a therapeutic response observed with drug testing. In severely immunocompromised mice, the HPV genome and squamous differentiation of the papilloma can be maintained for multiple generations. This is a feasible approach to identify therapeutic agents in the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  5. Teaching Note--No Peace without Justice: Addressing the United States' War on Drugs in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Elizabeth A.; Redmond, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The United States' War on Drugs encompasses a body of legislation characterized by punitive approaches to drug control. These policies have resulted in escalating incarceration rates and have extracted a particularly harsh toll on low-income people of color. This article argues that education on the War on Drugs is essential for effective practice…

  6. Teaching Note--No Peace without Justice: Addressing the United States' War on Drugs in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Elizabeth A.; Redmond, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The United States' War on Drugs encompasses a body of legislation characterized by punitive approaches to drug control. These policies have resulted in escalating incarceration rates and have extracted a particularly harsh toll on low-income people of color. This article argues that education on the War on Drugs is essential for effective practice…

  7. Applications and limitations of in silico models in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacan, Ahmet; Ekins, Sean; Kortagere, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Drug discovery in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century has witnessed a myriad of changes that were adopted to predict whether a compound is likely to be successful, or conversely enable identification of molecules with liabilities as early as possible. These changes include integration of in silico strategies for lead design and optimization that perform complementary roles to that of the traditional in vitro and in vivo approaches. The in silico models are facilitated by the availability of large datasets associated with high-throughput screening, bioinformatics algorithms to mine and annotate the data from a target perspective, and chemoinformatics methods to integrate chemistry methods into lead design process. This chapter highlights the applications of some of these methods and their limitations. We hope this serves as an introduction to in silico drug discovery.

  8. Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Impact Biopharmaceutics and Formulation Strategies in Drug Development-Industry Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Chung, John; van Asperen, Judith; Heimbach, Tycho

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models in drug development and regulatory applications. Although most of the published examples have focused on aspects such as first-in-human (FIH) dose predictions or drug-drug interactions, several publications have highlighted the application of these models in the biopharmaceutics field and their use to inform formulation development. In this report, we present 5 case studies of use of such models in this biopharmaceutics/formulation space across different pharmaceutical companies. The case studies cover different aspects of biopharmaceutics or formulation questions including (1) prediction of absorption prior to FIH studies; (2) optimization of formulation and dissolution method post-FIH data; (3) early exploration of a modified-release formulation; (4) addressing bridging questions for late-stage formulation changes; and (5) prediction of pharmacokinetics in the fed state for a Biopharmaceutics Classification System class I drug with fasted state data. The discussion of the case studies focuses on how such models can facilitate decisions and biopharmaceutic understanding of drug candidates and the opportunities for increased use and acceptance of such models in drug development and regulatory interactions.

  9. A critical appraisal of Markov state models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Ch.; Sarich, M.

    2015-09-01

    Markov State Modelling as a concept for a coarse grained description of the essential kinetics of a molecular system in equilibrium has gained a lot of attention recently. The last 10 years have seen an ever increasing publication activity on how to construct Markov State Models (MSMs) for very different molecular systems ranging from peptides to proteins, from RNA to DNA, and via molecular sensors to molecular aggregation. Simultaneously the accompanying theory behind MSM building and approximation quality has been developed well beyond the concepts and ideas used in practical applications. This article reviews the main theoretical results, provides links to crucial new developments, outlines the full power of MSM building today, and discusses the essential limitations still to overcome.

  10. Multivariable Wind Modeling in State Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Pedersen, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence of the incoming wind field is of paramount importance to the dynamic response of wind turbines. Hence reliable stochastic models of the turbulence should be available from which time series can be generated for dynamic response and structural safety analysis. In the paper an empirical...... cross-spectral density function for the along-wind turbulence component over the rotor plane is taken as the starting point. The spectrum is spatially discretized in terms of a Hermitian cross-spectral density matrix for the turbulence state vector which turns out not to be positive definite. Since...... the succeeding state space and ARMA modeling of the turbulence rely on the positive definiteness of the cross-spectral density matrix, the problem with the non-positive definiteness of such matrices is at first addressed and suitable treatments regarding it are proposed. From the adjusted positive definite cross...

  11. Comparative release studies of two cationic model drugs from different cellulose nanocrystal derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Seyedeh Parinaz; Tiong, Daryl; Berry, Richard M; Tam, Kam Chiu

    2014-09-01

    Native cellulose nanocrystal (CNC), oxidized CNC (CNC-OX) and chitosan oligosaccharide grafted CNC (CNC-CSOS) were evaluated as potential drug delivery carriers for two model drug compounds, procaine hydrochloride (PrHy) and imipramine hydrochloride (IMI). The loading of PrHy and IMI was performed at pH 8 and 7, respectively. IMI displayed higher binding to CNC derivatives than PrHy. Drug selective membranes were prepared for each model drug and a drug selective electrode system was used to measure the drug concentration in the filtrate and release medium. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was used to elucidate the types of interactions between model drugs and CNC and its derivatives. The complexation between model drugs and CNC derivatives was confirmed by zeta potential and transmittance measurements. The binding and release of these drugs correlated with the nature and types of interactions that exist between the CNC and drug molecules.

  12. Architecture of the Product State Model Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm Larsen, Michael; Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of using product models to support product lifecycle activities withparticular focus on the production phase. The motivation of the research is that products are producedmore costly and with longer lead-time than necessary.The paper provides a review of product...... modelling technologies and approaches, and the overallarchitecture for the Product State Model (PSM) Environment as a basis for quality monitoring.Especially, the paper focuses on the circumstances prevailing in a one-of-a-kind manufacturingenvironment like the shipbuilding industry, where product modelling...... technologies already haveproved their worth in the design and engineering phases of shipbuilding and in the operation phase.However, the handling of product information on the shop floor is not yet equally developed.The paper reports from the Brite-Euram project (No. BE97-4510) QualiGlobe focusing...

  13. Multimedia Mapping using Continuous State Space Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a system that transforms speech waveforms to animated faces are proposed. The system relies on continuous state space models to perform the mapping, this makes it possible to ensure video with no sudden jumps and allows continuous control of the parameters in 'face space'. Simulations...... are performed on recordings of 3-5 sec. video sequences with sentences from the Timit database. The model is able to construct an image sequence from an unknown noisy speech sequence fairly well even though the number of training examples are limited....

  14. Challenges for models with composite states

    CERN Document Server

    Cline, James M; Moore, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    Composite states of electrically charged and QCD-colored hyperquarks (HQs) in a confining SU(N_HC) hypercolor gauge sector are a plausible extension of the standard model at the TeV scale, and have been widely considered as an explanation for the tentative LHC diphoton excess. Additional new physics is required to avoid a stable charged hyperbaryon in such theories. We classify renormalizable models allowing the decay of this unwanted relic directly into standard model states, showing that they are significantly restricted if the new scalar states needed for UV completion are at the TeV scale. Alternatively, if hyperbaryon number is conserved, the charged relic can decay into a neutral hyperbaryon. Such theories are strongly constrained by direct detection, if the neutral constituent hyperquark carries color or weak isospin, and by LHC searches for leptoquarks if it is a color singlet. We show that the neutral hyperbaryon can have the observed relic abundance if the confinement scale and the hyperquark mass a...

  15. Challenges for models with composite states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, James M.; Huang, Weicong; Moore, Guy D.

    2016-09-01

    Composite states of electrically charged and QCD-colored hyperquarks (HQs) in a confining SU (NHC) hypercolor gauge sector are a plausible extension of the standard model at the TeV scale and have been widely considered as an explanation for the tentative LHC diphoton excess. Additional new physics is required to avoid a stable charged hyperbaryon in such theories. We classify renormalizable models allowing the decay of this unwanted relic directly into standard model states, showing that they are significantly restricted if the new scalar states needed for UV completion are at the TeV scale. Alternatively, if hyperbaryon number is conserved, the charged relic can decay into a neutral hyperbaryon. Such theories are strongly constrained by direct detection, if the neutral constituent hyperquark carries color or weak isospin, and by LHC searches for leptoquarks if it is a color singlet. We show that the neutral hyperbaryon can have the observed relic abundance if the confinement scale and the hyperquark mass are above TeV scale, even in the absence of any hyperbaryon asymmetry.

  16. Stigma, sexual risks, and the war on drugs: Examining drug policy and HIV/AIDS inequities among African Americans using the Drug War HIV/AIDS Inequities Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jelani; Jackson, Trinidad

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between drug policy and HIV vulnerability is well documented. However, little research examines the links between racial/ethnic HIV disparities via the Drug War, sexual risk, and stigma. The Drug War HIV/AIDS Inequities Model has been developed to address this dearth. This model contends that inequitable policing and sentencing promotes sexual risks, resource deprivation, and ultimately greater HIV risk for African-Americans. The Drug War also socially marginalizes African Americans and compounds stigma for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated persons living with HIV/AIDS. This marginalization has implications for sexual risk-taking, access to health-promoting resources, and continuum of care participation. The Drug War HIV/AIDS Inequities Model may help illuminate mechanisms that promote increased HIV vulnerability as well as inform structural intervention development and targeting to address racial/ethnic disparities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Scaling predictive modeling in drug development with cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Alvarsson, Jonathan; Holm, Marcus; Eklund, Martin; Carlsson, Lars; Spjuth, Ola

    2015-01-26

    Growing data sets with increased time for analysis is hampering predictive modeling in drug discovery. Model building can be carried out on high-performance computer clusters, but these can be expensive to purchase and maintain. We have evaluated ligand-based modeling on cloud computing resources where computations are parallelized and run on the Amazon Elastic Cloud. We trained models on open data sets of varying sizes for the end points logP and Ames mutagenicity and compare with model building parallelized on a traditional high-performance computing cluster. We show that while high-performance computing results in faster model building, the use of cloud computing resources is feasible for large data sets and scales well within cloud instances. An additional advantage of cloud computing is that the costs of predictive models can be easily quantified, and a choice can be made between speed and economy. The easy access to computational resources with no up-front investments makes cloud computing an attractive alternative for scientists, especially for those without access to a supercomputer, and our study shows that it enables cost-efficient modeling of large data sets on demand within reasonable time.

  18. Dynamics of an HIV Model with Multiple Infection Stages and Treatment with Different Drug Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Song, Xinyu; Tang, Sanyi; Rong, Libin

    2016-02-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy can effectively control HIV replication in infected individuals. Some clinical and modeling studies suggested that viral decay dynamics may depend on the inhibited stages of the viral replication cycle. In this paper, we develop a general mathematical model incorporating multiple infection stages and various drug classes that can interfere with specific stages of the viral life cycle. We derive the basic reproductive number and obtain the global stability results of steady states. Using several simple cases of the general model, we study the effect of various drug classes on the dynamics of HIV decay. When drugs are assumed to be 100% effective, drugs acting later in the viral life cycle lead to a faster or more rapid decay in viremia. This is consistent with some patient and experimental data, and also agrees with previous modeling results. When drugs are not 100% effective, the viral decay dynamics are more complicated. Without a second population of long-lived infected cells, the viral load decline can have two phases if drugs act at an intermediate stage of the viral replication cycle. The slopes of viral load decline depend on the drug effectiveness, the death rate of infected cells at different stages, and the transition rate of infected cells from one to the next stage. With a second population of long-lived infected cells, the viral load decline can have three distinct phases, consistent with the observation in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy containing the integrase inhibitor raltegravir. We also fit modeling prediction to patient data under efavirenz (a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor) and raltegravir treatment. The first-phase viral load decline under raltegravir therapy is longer than that under efavirenz, resulting in a lower viral load at initiation of the second-phase decline in patients taking raltegravir. This explains why patients taking a raltegravir-based therapy were faster to achieve

  19. Sufficient conditions for optimality for a mathematical model of drug treatment with pharmacodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Leszczyński

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider an optimal control problem for a general mathematical model of drug treatment with a single agent. The control represents the concentration of the agent and its effect (pharmacodynamics is modelled by a Hill function (i.e., Michaelis-Menten type kinetics. The aim is to minimize a cost functional consisting of a weighted average related to the state of the system (both at the end and during a fixed therapy horizon and to the total amount of drugs given. The latter is an indirect measure for the side effects of treatment. It is shown that optimal controls are continuous functions of time that change between full or no dose segments with connecting pieces that take values in the interior of the control set. Sufficient conditions for the strong local optimality of an extremal controlled trajectory in terms of the existence of a solution to a piecewise defined Riccati differential equation are given.

  20. Metabolomics and systems pharmacology: why and how to model the human metabolic network for drug discovery☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Douglas B.; Goodacre, Royston

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism represents the ‘sharp end’ of systems biology, because changes in metabolite concentrations are necessarily amplified relative to changes in the transcriptome, proteome and enzyme activities, which can be modulated by drugs. To understand such behaviour, we therefore need (and increasingly have) reliable consensus (community) models of the human metabolic network that include the important transporters. Small molecule ‘drug’ transporters are in fact metabolite transporters, because drugs bear structural similarities to metabolites known from the network reconstructions and from measurements of the metabolome. Recon2 represents the present state-of-the-art human metabolic network reconstruction; it can predict inter alia: (i) the effects of inborn errors of metabolism; (ii) which metabolites are exometabolites, and (iii) how metabolism varies between tissues and cellular compartments. However, even these qualitative network models are not yet complete. As our understanding improves so do we recognise more clearly the need for a systems (poly)pharmacology. PMID:23892182

  1. Modeling Bivariate Longitudinal Hormone Profiles by Hierarchical State Space Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyue; Cappola, Anne R; Crofford, Leslie J; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is crucial in coping with stress and maintaining homeostasis. Hormones produced by the HPA axis exhibit both complex univariate longitudinal profiles and complex relationships among different hormones. Consequently, modeling these multivariate longitudinal hormone profiles is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a bivariate hierarchical state space model, in which each hormone profile is modeled by a hierarchical state space model, with both population-average and subject-specific components. The bivariate model is constructed by concatenating the univariate models based on the hypothesized relationship. Because of the flexible framework of state space form, the resultant models not only can handle complex individual profiles, but also can incorporate complex relationships between two hormones, including both concurrent and feedback relationship. Estimation and inference are based on marginal likelihood and posterior means and variances. Computationally efficient Kalman filtering and smoothing algorithms are used for implementation. Application of the proposed method to a study of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia reveals that the relationships between adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in the patient group are weaker than in healthy controls.

  2. Parametric time-to-onset models were developed to improve causality assessment of adverse drug reactions from antidiabetic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholl, Joep H G; van de Ven, Peter M; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the time to onset (TTO) of common adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of antidiabetic drugs could be modeled using parametric distributions and whether these TTO distributions were dependent on patient characteristics. Furthermore, information r

  3. [Zebrafish model for the study on drug ototoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Tong, Jun-Wei; Zhang, Jing-Pu; You, Xue-Fu; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Hu, Chang-Qin

    2011-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, due to their strong antibacterial effects and broad antimicrobial spectra, have been very commonly used in clinical practice in the past half century. However, aminoglycoside antibiotics manifest severe ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, and are one of top factors in hearing loss. In this study, three members of the aminoglycoside antibiotics family, gentamycin, neomycin and streptomycin, were chosen as the representatives to be investigated for their toxicity to the embryonic development and the larva hair cells in zebrafish, and also to their target genes associated with hearing-related genes. The results showed that: (1) the lethal effect of all three drugs demonstrated a significant dependence on concentration, and the severity order of the lethal effect was streptomycin > neomycin > gentamycin; (2) all the three drugs caused the larva trunk bending in resting state at 5 dpf (day past fertilization), probably due to their ototoxicity in the physical imbalance and postural abnormalities; (3) impairment and reducing of the hair cells were observed in all three cases of drug treatment; (4) four genes, eya1, val, otx2 and dlx6a, which play an important role in the development of hearing organs, showed differential and significant decrease of gene expression in a drug concentration-dependent manner. This study for the first time reports the relevance between the expression of hearing genes and the three ototoxic antibiotics and also proved the feasibility of establishing a simple, accurate, intuitive and fast model with zebrafish for the detection of drug ototoxicity.

  4. “Hare Krishna vs. Shiva Shiva”: Swami Agehananda Bharati, Drugs, and the Mystical State in Hindusim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Christopher Jason

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will form an overview of Swami Agehananda Bharati’s views about drugs as a catalyst for achieving the mystical state (in both a Hindu and general context, as well as his observations of the perception of drugs throughout the Hindu community, inside and outside South Asia. It will demonstrate that Bharati considered drugs a valid means toward achieving the mystical state, both as a scholar of Hinduism and as a practicing sannyasin.

  5. MR imaging of model drug distribution in simulated vitreous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Sandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro and in vivo characterization of intravitreal injections plays an important role in developing innovative therapy approaches. Using the established vitreous model (VM and eye movement system (EyeMoS the distribution of contrast agents with different molecular weight was studied in vitro. The impact of the simulated age-related vitreal liquefaction (VL on drug distribution in VM was examined either with injection through the gel phase or through the liquid phase. For comparison the distribution was studied ex vivo in the porcine vitreous. The studies were performed in a magnetic resonance (MR scanner. As expected, with increasing molecular weight the diffusion velocity and the visual distribution of the injected substances decreased. Similar drug distribution was observed in VM and in porcine eye. VL causes enhanced convective flow and faster distribution in VM. Confirming the importance of the injection technique in progress of VL, injection through gelatinous phase caused faster distribution into peripheral regions of the VM than following injection through liquefied phase. VM and MR scanner in combination present a new approach for the in vitro characterization of drug release and distribution of intravitreal dosage forms.

  6. Parameter and State Estimator for State Space Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a parameter and state estimator for canonical state space systems from measured input-output data. The key is to solve the system state from the state equation and to substitute it into the output equation, eliminating the state variables, and the resulting equation contains only the system inputs and outputs, and to derive a least squares parameter identification algorithm. Furthermore, the system states are computed from the estimated parameters and the input-output data. Convergence analysis using the martingale convergence theorem indicates that the parameter estimates converge to their true values. Finally, an illustrative example is provided to show that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  7. Parameter and state estimator for state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ruifeng; Zhuang, Linfan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a parameter and state estimator for canonical state space systems from measured input-output data. The key is to solve the system state from the state equation and to substitute it into the output equation, eliminating the state variables, and the resulting equation contains only the system inputs and outputs, and to derive a least squares parameter identification algorithm. Furthermore, the system states are computed from the estimated parameters and the input-output data. Convergence analysis using the martingale convergence theorem indicates that the parameter estimates converge to their true values. Finally, an illustrative example is provided to show that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  8. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral (ARV drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009-2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2% of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15% in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7% in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1-4 drugs/sample. These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals.

  9. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Iris; Clarke, William; Ou, San-San; Marzinke, Mark A.; Breaud, Autumn; Emel, Lynda M.; Wang, Jing; Hughes, James P.; Richardson, Paul; Haley, Danielle F.; Lucas, Jonathan; Rompalo, Anne; Justman, Jessica E.; Hodder, Sally L.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009–2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2%) of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15%) in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7%) in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1–4 drugs/sample). These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals. PMID:26445283

  10. HIV-1 genetic diversity and antiretroviral drug resistance among individuals from Roraima state, northern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Renato Augusto Carvalho; Granja, Fabiana; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2017-01-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has spread towards the Northern country region, but little is known about HIV-1 subtypes and prevalence of HIV strains with resistance mutations to antiretrovirals in some of the Northern states. HIV-1 protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) sequences were obtained from 73 treatment-naive and -experienced subjects followed between 2013 and 2014 at a public health reference unit from Roraima, the northernmost Brazilian state. The most prevalent HIV-1 clade observed in the study population was the subtype B (91%), followed by subtype C (9%). Among 12 HIV-1 strains from treatment-naïve patients, only one had a transmitted drug resistance mutation for NNRTI. Among 59 treatment-experienced patients, 12 (20%) harbored HIV-1 strains with acquired drug resistance mutations (ADRM) that reduce the susceptibility to two classes of antiretroviral drugs (NRTI and NNRTI or NRTI and PI), and five (8%) harbored HIV-1 strains with ADRM that reduced susceptibility to only one class of antiretroviral drugs (NNRTI or PI). No patients harboring HIV strains with reduced susceptibility to all three classes of antiretroviral drugs were detected. A substantial fraction of treatment-experienced patients with (63%) and without (70%) ADRM had undetectable plasma viral loads (<40 copies/ml) at the time of sampling. Among treatment-experienced with plasma viral loads above 2,000 copies/ml, 44% displayed no ADRM. This data showed that the HIV-1 epidemic in Roraima displayed a much lower level of genetic diversity and a lower prevalence of ADRM than that described in other Brazilian states. PMID:28301548

  11. Resurgence of alcohol seeking produced by discontinuing non-drug reinforcement as an animal model of drug relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Shahan, Timothy A

    2006-06-01

    Findings from basic behavioral research suggest that simply discontinuing reinforcement for a recently reinforced operant response can cause the recurrence (i.e. resurgence) of a different previously reinforced response. The present experiment examined resurgence as an animal model of drug relapse. Initially, rats pressed levers to self-administer alcohol during baseline conditions. Next, alcohol self-administration was discontinued and non-drug reinforcers (food pellets) were presented contingent on an alternative response (chain pulling). Finally, when the non-drug reinforcer was discontinued, alcohol seeking recurred even though alcohol was still unavailable for lever pressing. These results suggest that simply discontinuing non-drug reinforcement for a behavior may be sufficient to produce relapse to drug seeking. The resurgence procedure could provide a method to examine environmental, pharmacological, and neurobiological factors that lead to relapse following the loss of a non-drug source of reinforcement.

  12. A Dual-Process Discrete-Time Survival Analysis Model: Application to the Gateway Drug Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Patrick S.; Lamis, Dorian A.; Masyn, Katherine E.; Northrup, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The gateway drug model is a popular conceptualization of a progression most substance users are hypothesized to follow as they try different legal and illegal drugs. Most forms of the gateway hypothesis are that "softer" drugs lead to "harder," illicit drugs. However, the gateway hypothesis has been notably difficult to directly test--that is, to…

  13. A three states sleep-waking model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France)]. E-mail: comtejc@gmail.com; Schatzman, M. [MAPLY, Laboratoire de Mathematiques appliquees de Lyon, UMR5585, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, 21, Avenue Claude Bernard, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ravassard, P. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Luppi, P.H. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Salin, P.A. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France)

    2006-08-15

    The mechanisms underlying the sleep-states periodicity in animals are a mystery of biology. Recent studies identified a new neuronal population activated during the slow wave sleep (SWS) in the ventral lateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus. Interactions between this neuronal population and the others populations implicated in the vigilance states (paradoxical sleep (PS) and wake (W)) dynamics are not determined. Thus, we propose here a sleep-waking theoretical model that depicts the potential interactions between the neuronal populations responsible for the three vigilance states. First, we pooled data from previous papers regarding the neuronal populations firing rate time course and characterized statistically the experimental hypnograms. Then, we constructed a nonlinear differential equations system describing the neuronal populations activity time course. A simple rule playing the firing threshold role applied to the model allows to construct a theoretical hypnogram. A random modulation of the neuronal activity, shows that theoretical hypnograms present a dynamics close to the experimental observations. Furthermore, we show that the wake promoting neurons activity can predict the next SWS episode duration.

  14. Evaluation of the drug solubility and rush ageing on drug release performance of various model drugs from the modified release polyethylene oxide matrix tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, Saeed; Nokhodchi, Ali; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed

    2017-02-01

    Hydrophilic matrix systems are currently some of the most widely used drug delivery systems for controlled-release oral dosage forms. Amongst a variety of polymers, polyethylene oxide (PEO) is considered an important material used in pharmaceutical formulations. As PEO is sensitive to thermal oxidation, it is susceptible to free radical oxidative attack. The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of PEO based formulations containing different model drugs with different water solubility, namely propranolol HCl, theophylline and zonisamide. Both polyox matrices 750 and 303 grade were used as model carriers for the manufacture of tablets stored at 40 °C. The results of the present study suggest that the drug release from the matrix was affected by the length of storage conditions, solubility of drugs and the molecular weight of the polymers. Generally, increased drug release rates were prevalent in soluble drug formulations (propranolol) when stored at the elevated temperature (40 °C). In contrast, it was not observed with semi soluble (theophylline) and poorly soluble (zonisamide) drugs especially when formulated with PEO 303 polymer. This indicates that the main parameters controlling the drug release from fresh polyox matrices are the solubility of the drug in the dissolution medium and the molecular weight of the polymer. DSC traces indicated that that there was a big difference in the enthalpy and melting points of fresh and aged PEO samples containing propranolol, whereas the melting point of the aged polyox samples containing theophylline and zonisamide was unaffected. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  15. A hybrid Markov chain-von Mises density model for the drug-dosing interval and drug holiday distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Kelly; Rodriguez-Cruz, Vivian; Covelli, Jenna; Droopad, Alyssa; Alexander, Sheril; Ramanathan, Murali

    2015-03-01

    Lack of adherence is a frequent cause of hospitalizations, but its effects on dosing patterns have not been extensively investigated. The purpose of this work was to critically evaluate a novel pharmacometric model for deriving the relationships of adherence to dosing patterns and the dosing interval distribution. The hybrid, stochastic model combines a Markov chain process with the von Mises distribution. The model was challenged with electronic medication monitoring data from 207 hypertension patients and against 5-year persistence data. The model estimates distributions of dosing runs, drug holidays, and dosing intervals. Drug holidays, which can vary between individuals with the same adherence, were characterized by the patient cooperativity index parameter. The drug holiday and dosing run distributions deviate markedly from normality. The dosing interval distribution exhibits complex patterns of multimodality and can be long-tailed. Dosing patterns are an important but under recognized covariate for explaining within-individual variance in drug concentrations.

  16. Improving Detection of Arrhythmia Drug-Drug Interactions in Pharmacovigilance Data through the Implementation of Similarity-Based Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Vilar

    Full Text Available Identification of Drug-Drug Interactions (DDIs is a significant challenge during drug development and clinical practice. DDIs are responsible for many adverse drug effects (ADEs, decreasing patient quality of life and causing higher care expenses. DDIs are not systematically evaluated in pre-clinical or clinical trials and so the FDA U. S. Food and Drug Administration relies on post-marketing surveillance to monitor patient safety. However, existing pharmacovigilance algorithms show poor performance for detecting DDIs exhibiting prohibitively high false positive rates. Alternatively, methods based on chemical structure and pharmacological similarity have shown promise in adverse drug event detection. We hypothesize that the use of chemical biology data in a post hoc analysis of pharmacovigilance results will significantly improve the detection of dangerous interactions. Our model integrates a reference standard of DDIs known to cause arrhythmias with drug similarity data. To compare similarity between drugs we used chemical structure (both 2D and 3D molecular structure, adverse drug side effects, chemogenomic targets, drug indication classes, and known drug-drug interactions. We evaluated the method on external reference standards. Our results showed an enhancement of sensitivity, specificity and precision in different top positions with the use of similarity measures to rank the candidates extracted from pharmacovigilance data. For the top 100 DDI candidates, similarity-based modeling yielded close to twofold precision enhancement compared to the proportional reporting ratio (PRR. Moreover, the method helps in the DDI decision making through the identification of the DDI in the reference standard that generated the candidate.

  17. The Drug war: Diplomatic and Security Implications for Mexico and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    their labor from services provided by a functional state. Spillover Violence Spillover violence has the potential to become one of the most...and enjoy the fruits of their labor . As enforcement along the U.S. Southwest border improves the DTOs will continue to seek alternative methods to...August 2002), 5. 83 GLOSSARY Commission Nacional de Derechos Humanos (CNDH). Mexico’s National Commission on Human Rights. Counter-drug

  18. Sovereignty Under Siege: Drug Trafficking and State Capacity in the Caribbean and Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    associated with underdevelopment and armed violence are as follows: “weak institutions, economic inequality , exclusion of minority groups, unequal gender ...9. 18 Johan Engvall, “The State under Siege: The Drug Trade and Organised Crime in Tajikistan,” Europe -Asia Studies 58, no. 6 (2006): 831. 7...environment, criminal organizations can operate with a level of impunity supported by rampant corruption, violence, high inequality , and low law

  19. The entropic brain: a theory of conscious states informed by neuroimaging research with psychedelic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L; Leech, Robert; Hellyer, Peter J; Shanahan, Murray; Feilding, Amanda; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Chialvo, Dante R; Nutt, David

    2014-01-01

    Entropy is a dimensionless quantity that is used for measuring uncertainty about the state of a system but it can also imply physical qualities, where high entropy is synonymous with high disorder. Entropy is applied here in the context of states of consciousness and their associated neurodynamics, with a particular focus on the psychedelic state. The psychedelic state is considered an exemplar of a primitive or primary state of consciousness that preceded the development of modern, adult, human, normal waking consciousness. Based on neuroimaging data with psilocybin, a classic psychedelic drug, it is argued that the defining feature of "primary states" is elevated entropy in certain aspects of brain function, such as the repertoire of functional connectivity motifs that form and fragment across time. Indeed, since there is a greater repertoire of connectivity motifs in the psychedelic state than in normal waking consciousness, this implies that primary states may exhibit "criticality," i.e., the property of being poised at a "critical" point in a transition zone between order and disorder where certain phenomena such as power-law scaling appear. Moreover, if primary states are critical, then this suggests that entropy is suppressed in normal waking consciousness, meaning that the brain operates just below criticality. It is argued that this entropy suppression furnishes normal waking consciousness with a constrained quality and associated metacognitive functions, including reality-testing and self-awareness. It is also proposed that entry into primary states depends on a collapse of the normally highly organized activity within the default-mode network (DMN) and a decoupling between the DMN and the medial temporal lobes (which are normally significantly coupled). These hypotheses can be tested by examining brain activity and associated cognition in other candidate primary states such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and early psychosis and comparing these with

  20. Animal models of skin disease for drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Pinar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; De Melo, Wanessa CMA; Huang, Ying-Ying; Yin, Rui; Rakkiyappan, Chandran; Kumar, Raj; Otufowora, Ayodeji; Nyame, Theodore; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Discovery of novel drugs, treatments, and testing of consumer products in the field of dermatology is a multi-billion dollar business. Due to the distressing nature of many dermatological diseases, and the enormous consumer demand for products to reverse the effects of skin photodamage, aging, and hair loss, this is a very active field. Areas covered In this paper, we will cover the use of animal models that have been reported to recapitulate to a greater or lesser extent the features of human dermatological disease. There has been a remarkable increase in the number and variety of transgenic mouse models in recent years, and the basic strategy for constructing them is outlined. Expert opinion Inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases are all represented by a range of mouse models both transgenic and normal. Skin cancer is mainly studied in mice and fish. Wound healing is studied in a wider range of animal species, and skin infections such as acne and leprosy also have been studied in animal models. Moving to the more consumer-oriented area of dermatology, there are models for studying the harmful effect of sunlight on the skin, and testing of sunscreens, and several different animal models of hair loss or alopecia. PMID:23293893

  1. Generalised linear models for correlated pseudo-observations, with applications to multi-state models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Klein, John P.; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    Generalised estimating equation; Generalised linear model; Jackknife pseudo-value; Logistic regression; Markov Model; Multi-state model......Generalised estimating equation; Generalised linear model; Jackknife pseudo-value; Logistic regression; Markov Model; Multi-state model...

  2. Reconsidering GHB: orphan drug or new model antidepressant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Oliver G; Quednow, Boris B; Seifritz, Erich; Wetter, Thomas C

    2012-05-01

    For six decades, the principal mode of action of antidepressant drugs is the inhibition of monoamine re-uptake from the synaptic cleft. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the new generation of dual antidepressants all exert their antidepressant effects by this mechanism. In the early days of the monoaminergic era, other efforts have been made to ameliorate the symptoms of depression by pharmacological means. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system was and possibly still is one of the main alternative drug targets. Gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) was developed as an orally active GABA analogue. It was tested in animal models of depression and human studies. The effects on sleep, agitation, anhedonia and depression were promising. However, the rise of benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants brought GHB out of the scope of possible treatment alternatives. GHB is a GABA(B) and GHB receptor agonist with a unique spectrum of behavioural, neuroendocrine and sleep effects, and improves daytime sleepiness in various disorders such as narcolepsy, Parkinson's disease and fibromyalgia. Although it was banned from the US market at the end of the 1990s because of its abuse and overdose potential, it later was approved for the treatment of narcolepsy. New research methods and an extended view on other neurotransmitter systems as possible treatment targets of antidepressant treatment brought GHB back to the scene. This article discusses the unique neurobiological effects of GHB, its misuse potential and possible role as a model substance for the development of novel pharmacological treatment strategies in depressive disorders.

  3. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs...

  4. Granger causality for state-space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lionel; Seth, Anil K

    2015-04-01

    Granger causality has long been a prominent method for inferring causal interactions between stochastic variables for a broad range of complex physical systems. However, it has been recognized that a moving average (MA) component in the data presents a serious confound to Granger causal analysis, as routinely performed via autoregressive (AR) modeling. We solve this problem by demonstrating that Granger causality may be calculated simply and efficiently from the parameters of a state-space (SS) model. Since SS models are equivalent to autoregressive moving average models, Granger causality estimated in this fashion is not degraded by the presence of a MA component. This is of particular significance when the data has been filtered, downsampled, observed with noise, or is a subprocess of a higher dimensional process, since all of these operations-commonplace in application domains as diverse as climate science, econometrics, and the neurosciences-induce a MA component. We show how Granger causality, conditional and unconditional, in both time and frequency domains, may be calculated directly from SS model parameters via solution of a discrete algebraic Riccati equation. Numerical simulations demonstrate that Granger causality estimators thus derived have greater statistical power and smaller bias than AR estimators. We also discuss how the SS approach facilitates relaxation of the assumptions of linearity, stationarity, and homoscedasticity underlying current AR methods, thus opening up potentially significant new areas of research in Granger causal analysis.

  5. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases is to a large extent dependent on the availability of good experimental in vivo models in order to perform preclinical tests of new drugs and for the identification of novel drug targets. Here, we review a number of existing...... of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although one Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror...... the complexity of disease development, there exist a number of good animal models for Rheumatoid Arthritis, each defining some parts in disease development, which are useful for studies of drug response. We find that many of the established drugs were not tested in in vivo models before being used in the clinic...

  6. Skin models for the testing of transdermal drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd, Eman; Yousef, Shereen A; Pastore, Michael N; Telaprolu, Krishna; Mohammed, Yousuf H; Namjoshi, Sarika; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of percutaneous permeation of molecules is a key step in the evaluation of dermal or transdermal delivery systems. If the drugs are intended for delivery to humans, the most appropriate setting in which to do the assessment is the in vivo human. However, this may not be possible for ethical, practical, or economic reasons, particularly in the early phases of development. It is thus necessary to find alternative methods using accessible and reproducible surrogates for in vivo human skin. A range of models has been developed, including ex vivo human skin, usually obtained from cadavers or plastic surgery patients, ex vivo animal skin, and artificial or reconstructed skin models. Increasingly, largely driven by regulatory authorities and industry, there is a focus on developing standardized techniques and protocols. With this comes the need to demonstrate that the surrogate models produce results that correlate with those from in vivo human studies and that they can be used to show bioequivalence of different topical products. This review discusses the alternative skin models that have been developed as surrogates for normal and diseased skin and examines the concepts of using model systems for in vitro–in vivo correlation and the demonstration of bioequivalence. PMID:27799831

  7. [Classification models of structure - P-glycoprotein activity of drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, V Yu; Solodova, S L; Polianczyk, D E; Raevsky, O A

    2016-01-01

    Thirty three classification models of substrate specificity of 177 drugs to P-glycoprotein have been created using of the linear discriminant analysis, random forest and support vector machine methods. QSAR modeling was carried out using 2 strategies. The first strategy consisted in search of all possible combinations from 1÷5 descriptors on the basis of 7 most significant molecular descriptors with clear physico-chemical interpretation. In the second case forward selection procedure up to 5 descriptors, starting from the best single descriptor was used. This strategy was applied to a set of 387 DRAGON descriptors. It was found that only one of 33 models has necessary statistical parameters. This model was designed by means of the linear discriminant analysis on the basis of a single descriptor of H-bond (ΣC(ad)). The model has good statistical characteristics as evidenced by results to both internal cross-validation, and external validation with application of 44 new chemicals. This confirms an important role of hydrogen bond in the processes connected with penetration of chemical compounds through a blood-brain barrier.

  8. A 2-categorical state sum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratin, Aristide; Freidel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    It has long been argued that higher categories provide the proper algebraic structure underlying state sum invariants of 4-manifolds. This idea has been refined recently, by proposing to use 2-groups and their representations as specific examples of 2-categories. The challenge has been to make these proposals fully explicit. Here, we give a concrete realization of this program. Building upon our earlier work with Baez and Wise on the representation theory of 2-groups, we construct a four-dimensional state sum model based on a categorified version of the Euclidean group. We define and explicitly compute the simplex weights, which may be viewed a categorified analogue of Racah-Wigner 6j-symbols. These weights solve a hexagon equation that encodes the formal invariance of the state sum under the Pachner moves of the triangulation. This result unravels the combinatorial formulation of the Feynman amplitudes of quantum field theory on flat spacetime proposed in A. Baratin and L. Freidel [Classical Quantum Gravity 24, 2027-2060 (2007)] which was shown to lead after gauge-fixing to Korepanov's invariant of 4-manifolds.

  9. A 2-categorical state sum model

    CERN Document Server

    Baratin, Aristide

    2014-01-01

    It has long been argued that higher categories provide the proper algebraic structure underlying state sum invariants of 4-manifolds. This idea has been refined recently, by proposing to use 2-groups and their representations as specific examples of 2-categories. The challenge has been to make these proposals fully explicit. Here we give a concrete realization of this program. Building upon our earlier work with Baez and Wise on the representation theory of 2-groups, we construct a four-dimensional state sum model based on a categorified version of the Euclidean group. We define and explicitly compute the simplex weights, which may be viewed a categorified analogue of Racah-Wigner 6$j$-symbols. These weights solve an hexagon equation that encodes the formal invariance of the state sum under the Pachner moves of the triangulation. This result unravels the combinatorial formulation of the Feynman amplitudes of quantum field theory on flat spacetime proposed in [1], which was shown to lead after gauge-fixing to ...

  10. A 2-categorical state sum model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratin, Aristide, E-mail: abaratin@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Freidel, Laurent, E-mail: lfreidel@perimeterinstitute.ca [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Str. N, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    It has long been argued that higher categories provide the proper algebraic structure underlying state sum invariants of 4-manifolds. This idea has been refined recently, by proposing to use 2-groups and their representations as specific examples of 2-categories. The challenge has been to make these proposals fully explicit. Here, we give a concrete realization of this program. Building upon our earlier work with Baez and Wise on the representation theory of 2-groups, we construct a four-dimensional state sum model based on a categorified version of the Euclidean group. We define and explicitly compute the simplex weights, which may be viewed a categorified analogue of Racah-Wigner 6j-symbols. These weights solve a hexagon equation that encodes the formal invariance of the state sum under the Pachner moves of the triangulation. This result unravels the combinatorial formulation of the Feynman amplitudes of quantum field theory on flat spacetime proposed in A. Baratin and L. Freidel [Classical Quantum Gravity 24, 2027–2060 (2007)] which was shown to lead after gauge-fixing to Korepanov’s invariant of 4-manifolds.

  11. Markov state modeling of sliding friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, F.; Landes, François P.; Laio, A.; Prestipino, S.; Tosatti, E.

    2016-11-01

    Markov state modeling (MSM) has recently emerged as one of the key techniques for the discovery of collective variables and the analysis of rare events in molecular simulations. In particular in biochemistry this approach is successfully exploited to find the metastable states of complex systems and their evolution in thermal equilibrium, including rare events, such as a protein undergoing folding. The physics of sliding friction and its atomistic simulations under external forces constitute a nonequilibrium field where relevant variables are in principle unknown and where a proper theory describing violent and rare events such as stick slip is still lacking. Here we show that MSM can be extended to the study of nonequilibrium phenomena and in particular friction. The approach is benchmarked on the Frenkel-Kontorova model, used here as a test system whose properties are well established. We demonstrate that the method allows the least prejudiced identification of a minimal basis of natural microscopic variables necessary for the description of the forced dynamics of sliding, through their probabilistic evolution. The steps necessary for the application to realistic frictional systems are highlighted.

  12. Perspectives on Zebrafish Models of Hallucinogenic Drugs and Related Psychotropic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Among different classes of psychotropic drugs, hallucinogenic agents exert one of the most prominent effects on human and animal behaviors, markedly altering sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive responses. The growing clinical and preclinical interest in psychedelic, dissociative, and deliriant hallucinogens necessitates novel translational, sensitive, and high-throughput in vivo models and screens. Primate and rodent models have been traditionally used to study cellular mechanisms and neural circuits of hallucinogenic drugs’ action. The utility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) in neuroscience research is rapidly growing due to their high physiological and genetic homology to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, robust behaviors, and cost effectiveness. Possessing a fully characterized genome, both adult and larval zebrafish are currently widely used for in vivo screening of various psychotropic compounds, including hallucinogens and related drugs. Recognizing the growing importance of hallucinogens in biological psychiatry, here we discuss hallucinogenic-induced phenotypes in zebrafish and evaluate their potential as efficient preclinical models of drug-induced states in humans. PMID:23883191

  13. A critical subset model provides a conceptual basis for the high antiviral activity of major HIV drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Rabi, S Alireza; Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Shan, Liang; Lai, Jun; Xing, Sifei; Siliciano, Robert F

    2011-07-13

    Control of HIV-1 replication was first achieved with regimens that included a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a protease inhibitor (PI); however, an explanation for the high antiviral activity of these drugs has been lacking. Indeed, conventional pharmacodynamic measures like IC(50) (drug concentration causing 50% inhibition) do not differentiate NNRTIs and PIs from less active nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Drug inhibitory potential depends on the slope of the dose-response curve (m), which represents how inhibition increases as a function of increasing drug concentration and is related to the Hill coefficient, a measure of intramolecular cooperativity in ligand binding to a multivalent receptor. Although NNRTIs and PIs bind univalent targets, they unexpectedly exhibit cooperative dose-response curves (m > 1). We show that this cooperative inhibition can be explained by a model in which infectivity requires participation of multiple copies of a drug target in an individual life cycle stage. A critical subset of these target molecules must be in the unbound state. Consistent with experimental observations, this model predicts m > 1 for NNRTIs and PIs and m = 1 in situations where a single drug target/virus mediates a step in the life cycle, as is the case with NRTIs and integrase strand transfer inhibitors. This model was tested experimentally by modulating the number of functional drug targets per virus, and dose-response curves for modulated virus populations fit model predictions. This model explains the high antiviral activity of two drug classes important for successful HIV-1 treatment and defines a characteristic of good targets for antiviral drugs in general, namely, intermolecular cooperativity.

  14. Structured representation of drug indications: lexical and semantic analysis and object-oriented modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, C; Venot, A

    2000-03-01

    No standardized representation of drug indications is currently available that could be used in drug knowledge bases. We describe an object-oriented representation of indications that should make it possible to develop new tools for selecting drugs and checking prescriptions in computerized drug prescription systems. The model was developed using the results of a lexical and semantic analysis of drug indications, collected into a single file and processed using natural language processing software. It distinguishes both the diseases for which the drug may be given and the efficiency of the drug for a given indication. Two aspects of the model were evaluated: the differences if two independent evaluators filled the attributes independently and the loss of information induced by the use of the model. A system based on this model, making it possible for the physician to select all the drugs satisfying various criteria, is also presented.

  15. SVM Based Descriptor Selection and Classification of Neurodegenerative Disease Drugs for Pharmacological Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Shahzad Cheema, Muhammad; Klenner, Alexander; Younesi, Erfan; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Systems pharmacological modeling of drug mode of action for the next generation of multitarget drugs may open new routes for drug design and discovery. Computational methods are widely used in this context amongst which support vector machines (SVM) have proven successful in addressing the challenge of classifying drugs with similar features. We have applied a variety of such SVM-based approaches, namely SVM-based recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE). We use the approach to predict the pharmacological properties of drugs widely used against complex neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) and to build an in-silico computational model for the binary classification of NDD drugs from other drugs. Application of an SVM-RFE model to a set of drugs successfully classified NDD drugs from non-NDD drugs and resulted in overall accuracy of ∼80 % with 10 fold cross validation using 40 top ranked molecular descriptors selected out of total 314 descriptors. Moreover, SVM-RFE method outperformed linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based feature selection and classification. The model reduced the multidimensional descriptors space of drugs dramatically and predicted NDD drugs with high accuracy, while avoiding over fitting. Based on these results, NDD-specific focused libraries of drug-like compounds can be designed and existing NDD-specific drugs can be characterized by a well-characterized set of molecular descriptors.

  16. Design and Characterization of a Silk-Fibroin-Based Drug Delivery Platform Using Naproxen as a Model Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Dyakonov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this proof-of-concept study was to develop a platform for controlled drug delivery based on silk fibroin (SF and to explore the feasibility of using SF in oral drug delivery. The SF-containing matrixes were prepared via spray-drying and film casting, and the release profile of the model drug naproxen sodium was evaluated. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR has been used to observe conformational changes in SF- and drug-containing compositions. SF-based films, spray-dried microparticles, and matrixes loaded with naproxen were prepared. Both FTIR spectra and in vitro dissolution data demonstrated that SF β-sheet conformation regulates the release profile of naproxen. The controlled release characteristics of the SF-containing compositions were evaluated as a function of SF concentration, temperature, and exposure to dehydrating solvents. The results suggest that SF may be an attractive polymer for use in controlled drug delivery systems.

  17. Drug binding to the inactivated state is necessary but not sufficient for high-affinity binding to human ether-à-go-go-related gene channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Mark J; Kuchel, Philip W; Campbell, Terence J; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2008-11-01

    Drug block of the human ether-à-go-go-related gene K(+) channel (hERG) is the most common cause of acquired long QT syndrome, a disorder of cardiac repolarization that may result in ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. We investigated the open versus inactivated state dependence of drug block by using hERG mutants N588K and N588E, which shift the voltage dependence of inactivation compared with wild-type but in which the mutated residue is remote from the drug-binding pocket in the channel pore. Four high-affinity drugs (cisapride, dofetilide, terfenadine, and astemizole) demonstrated lower affinity for the inactivation-deficient N588K mutant hERG channel compared with N588E and wild-type hERG. Three of four low-affinity drugs (erythromycin, perhexiline, and quinidine) demonstrated no preference for N588E over N588K channels, whereas dl-sotalol was an example of a low-affinity state-dependent blocker. All five state-dependent blockers showed an even lower affinity for S620T mutant hERG (no inactivation) compared with N588K mutant hERG (greatly reduced inactivation). Computer modeling indicates that the reduced affinity for S620T compared with N588K and wild-type channels can be explained by the relative kinetics of drug block and unblock compared with the kinetics of inactivation and recovery from inactivation. We were also able to calculate, for the first time, the relative affinities for the inactivated versus the open state, which for the drugs tested here ranged from 4- to 70-fold. Our results show that preferential binding to the inactivated state is necessary but not sufficient for high-affinity binding to hERG channels.

  18. Comparative policy analysis for alcohol and drugs: Current state of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alison; Livingston, Michael; Chalmers, Jenny; Berends, Lynda; Reuter, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A central policy research question concerns the extent to which specific policies produce certain effects - and cross-national (or between state/province) comparisons appear to be an ideal way to answer such a question. This paper explores the current state of comparative policy analysis (CPA) with respect to alcohol and drugs policies. We created a database of journal articles published between 2010 and 2014 as the body of CPA work for analysis. We used this database of 57 articles to clarify, extract and analyse the ways in which CPA has been defined. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the CPA methods employed, the policy areas that have been studied, and differences between alcohol CPA and drug CPA are explored. There is a lack of clear definition as to what counts as a CPA. The two criteria for a CPA (explicit study of a policy, and comparison across two or more geographic locations), exclude descriptive epidemiology and single state comparisons. With the strict definition, most CPAs were with reference to alcohol (42%), although the most common policy to be analysed was medical cannabis (23%). The vast majority of papers undertook quantitative data analysis, with a variety of advanced statistical methods. We identified five approaches to the policy specification: classification or categorical coding of policy as present or absent; the use of an index; implied policy differences; described policy difference and data-driven policy coding. Each of these has limitations, but perhaps the most common limitation was the inability for the method to account for the differences between policy-as-stated versus policy-as-implemented. There is significant diversity in CPA methods for analysis of alcohol and drugs policy, and some substantial challenges with the currently employed methods. The absence of clear boundaries to a definition of what counts as a 'comparative policy analysis' may account for the methodological plurality but also appears to stand in the way

  19. Skin models for the testing of transdermal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd E

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Eman Abd,1 Shereen A Yousef,1 Michael N Pastore,2 Krishna Telaprolu,1 Yousuf H Mohammed,1 Sarika Namjoshi,1 Jeffrey E Grice,1 Michael S Roberts1,2 1Translational Research Institute, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, 2School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia Abstract: The assessment of percutaneous permeation of molecules is a key step in the evaluation of dermal or transdermal delivery systems. If the drugs are intended for delivery to humans, the most appropriate setting in which to do the assessment is the in vivo human. However, this may not be possible for ethical, practical, or economic reasons, particularly in the early phases of development. It is thus necessary to find alternative methods using accessible and reproducible surrogates for in vivo human skin. A range of models has been developed, including ex vivo human skin, usually obtained from cadavers or plastic surgery patients, ex vivo animal skin, and artificial or reconstructed skin models. Increasingly, largely driven by regulatory authorities and industry, there is a focus on developing standardized techniques and protocols. With this comes the need to demonstrate that the surrogate models produce results that correlate with those from in vivo human studies and that they can be used to show bioequivalence of different topical products. This review discusses the alternative skin models that have been developed as surrogates for normal and diseased skin and examines the concepts of using model systems for in vitro–in vivo correlation and the demonstration of bioequivalence. Keywords: percutaneous permeation, dermal delivery, transdermal, bioequivalence, ex vivo skin models, reconstructed skin

  20. Target-mediated drug disposition model for drugs with two binding sites that bind to a target with one binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2017-07-19

    The paper extended the TMDD model to drugs with two identical binding sites (2-1 TMDD). The quasi-steady-state (2-1 QSS), quasi-equilibrium (2-1 QE), irreversible binding (2-1 IB), and Michaelis-Menten (2-1 MM) approximations of the model were derived. Using simulations, the 2-1 QSS approximation was compared with the full 2-1 TMDD model. As expected and similarly to the standard TMDD for monoclonal antibodies (mAb), 2-1 QSS predictions were nearly identical to 2-1 TMDD predictions, except for times of fast changes following initiation of dosing, when equilibrium has not yet been reached. To illustrate properties of new equations and approximations, several variations of population PK data for mAbs with soluble (slow elimination of the complex) or membrane-bound (fast elimination of the complex) targets were simulated from a full 2-1 TMDD model and fitted to 2-1 TMDD models, to its approximations, and to the standard (1-1) QSS model. For a mAb with a soluble target, it was demonstrated that the 2-1 QSS model provided nearly identical description of the observed (simulated) free drug and total target concentrations, although there was some minor bias in predictions of unobserved free target concentrations. The standard QSS approximation also provided a good description of the observed data, but was not able to distinguish between free drug concentrations (with no target attached and both binding site free) and partially bound drug concentrations (with one of the binding sites occupied by the target). For a mAb with a membrane-bound target, the 2-1 MM approximation adequately described the data. The 2-1 QSS approximation converged 10 times faster than the full 2-1 TMDD, and its run time was comparable with the standard QSS model.

  1. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases is to a large extent dependent on the availability of good experimental in vivo models in order to perform preclinical tests of new drugs and for the identification of novel drug targets. Here, we review a number of existing rodent models for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the context of how these models have been utilized for developing established therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis and, furthermore, the present use of animal models for studies of novel drug candidates. We have studied the literature in the field for the use of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although a single Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror the complexity of disease development, there exist a number of good animal models for Rheumatoid Arthritis, each defining some parts in disease development, which are useful for studies of drug response. We find that many of the established drugs were not tested in in vivo models before being used in the clinic, but rather animal models have been subsequently used to find mechanisms for efficacy. Finally, we report a number of novel drugs, tested in preclinical in vivo models, presently in clinical trials.

  2. Functional state modelling approach validation for yeast and bacteria cultivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeva, Olympia; Pencheva, Tania

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the functional state modelling approach is validated for modelling of the cultivation of two different microorganisms: yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Based on the available experimental data for these fed-batch cultivation processes, three different functional states are distinguished, namely primary product synthesis state, mixed oxidative state and secondary product synthesis state. Parameter identification procedures for different local models are performed using genetic algorithms. The simulation results show high degree of adequacy of the models describing these functional states for both S. cerevisiae and E. coli cultivations. Thus, the local models are validated for the cultivation of both microorganisms. This fact is a strong structure model verification of the functional state modelling theory not only for a set of yeast cultivations, but also for bacteria cultivation. As such, the obtained results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of the functional state modelling approach. PMID:26740778

  3. Functional state modelling approach validation for yeast and bacteria cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeva, Olympia; Pencheva, Tania

    2014-09-03

    In this paper, the functional state modelling approach is validated for modelling of the cultivation of two different microorganisms: yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Based on the available experimental data for these fed-batch cultivation processes, three different functional states are distinguished, namely primary product synthesis state, mixed oxidative state and secondary product synthesis state. Parameter identification procedures for different local models are performed using genetic algorithms. The simulation results show high degree of adequacy of the models describing these functional states for both S. cerevisiae and E. coli cultivations. Thus, the local models are validated for the cultivation of both microorganisms. This fact is a strong structure model verification of the functional state modelling theory not only for a set of yeast cultivations, but also for bacteria cultivation. As such, the obtained results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of the functional state modelling approach.

  4. The entropic brain:A theory of conscious states informed by neuroimaging research with psychedelic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lester Carhart-Harris

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Entropy is a dimensionless quantity that is used for measuring uncertainty about the state of a system but it can also imply physical qualities, where high entropy is synonymous with high disorder. Entropy is applied here in the context of states of consciousness and their associated neural dynamics, with a particular focus on the psychedelic state. The psychedelic state is considered an exemplar of a primitive or primary state of consciousness that preceded the development of modern, adult, human, normal waking consciousness. Based on neuroimaging data with psilocybin, a classic psychedelic drug, it is argued that the defining feature of ‘primary states’ is elevated entropy in certain aspects of brain function, such as the repertoire of functional connectivity motifs that form and fragment across time. It is noted that elevated entropy in this sense, is a characteristic of systems exhibiting ‘self-organised criticality’, i.e., a property of systems that gravitate towards a ‘critical’ point in a transition zone between order and disorder in which certain phenomena such as power-law scaling appear. This implies that entropy is suppressed in normal waking consciousness, meaning that the brain operates just below criticality. It is argued that this entropy suppression furnishes consciousness with a constrained quality and associated metacognitive functions, including reality-testing and self-awareness. It is also proposed that entry into primary states depends on a collapse of the normally highly organised activity within the default-mode network (DMN and a decoupling between the DMN and the medial temporal lobes (which are normally significantly coupled. These hypotheses can be tested by examining brain activity and associated cognition in other candidate primary states such as REM sleep and early psychosis and comparing these with non-primary states such as normal waking consciousness and the anaesthetised state.

  5. International migration: concepts, models and state policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. A. Cebrián

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The intensification of international migratory flows in recent years has provoked much thinking as to what might be an appropriate national migratory policy. Following this tendency, in this article we present several considerations relating to the ethical implications of migratory policies. Our point of departure for this discussion consists in the analysis of two concepts, which we believe differ in meaning. We refer to the terms solidarity and citizenship, whose function and meaning in «politically correct» discourse (undefined and undefinable we study in this article. Following this we deal with the different models of the state in the Western world. In this way the understanding of the cultural and political factors of international migration which we analyse in the final section of the article is made easier.

  6. Drug-Alcohol Interactions Among Older Adults in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qato, Dima M.; Manzoor, Beenish S.; Lee, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The older adult population in the United States (U.S.) uses multiple medications and more than half of older adults drink alcohol regularly. In addition, older adults are more likely to experience adverse effects of medications and alcohol consumption may put them at higher risk. Our primary objective is to characterize the extent and nature of drug-alcohol interactions among older adults in the U.S. Design, Setting, Participants, Measurements We used a nationally-representative population-based sample of community-dwelling older adults in the U.S. Regular drinkers were defined as respondents that consumed alcohol at least weekly. Medication use was defined as the use of a prescription or non-prescription medication or dietary supplement at least daily or weekly. Micromedex was used to determine drug interactions with alcohol and their corresponding severity. Results Among the 2,975 older adults in the sample, more than 41% (N=1106) consume alcohol regularly and more than 20% (N=567) are at-risk for a drug-alcohol interaction because they are regular drinkers and concurrently using alcohol interacting medications. More than 90% of these interactions were of moderate or major severity. Antidepressants and analgesics were the most commonly used alcohol-interacting medications among regular drinkers. Older adult men with multiple chronic conditions had the highest prevalence of potential drug-alcohol interactions. Conclusion The potential for drug-alcohol interactions among the older adult population in the U.S. may have important clinical implications. Efforts to better understand and prevent the use of alcohol-interacting medications among regular drinkers, particularly heavy drinkers, are warranted in this population. PMID:26503899

  7. Drug supersaturation in simulated and human intestinal fluids representing different nutritional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Brouwers, Joachim; Clarysse, Sarah; Vertzoni, Maria; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    It was the purpose of this study to explore supersaturation of poorly soluble drugs in human intestinal fluids (HIF), and to assess potential food effects on the creation and maintenance of supersaturation. Duodenal fluids were collected from healthy volunteers and pooled according to three nutritional states (fasted-, fed-, and fat-enriched fed state). Supersaturation was created at a fixed degree of supersaturation (DS=20) using the solvent-shift method. Fasted- and fed-state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF and FeSSIF) were used as intestinal simulation media. Supersaturation in HIF showed to be stable up to a certain degree for different poorly soluble drugs. In HIF as well as in FaSSIF and FeSSIF, supersaturation appeared to be compound and medium specific. Supersaturation stability was found to be inversely proportional to the solubility in the corresponding media. Food intake affected itraconazole supersaturation positively. On the contrary, etravirine and loviride supersaturation decreased upon food intake. Supersaturation experiments in FaSSIF and FeSSIF showed similar results as in HIF for etravirine and loviride, whereas itraconazole supersaturation behaved differently in HIF versus simulation media. The present study illustrates, for the first time, that supersaturation can be created and maintained in HIF, even in the absence of excipients. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  8. An introduction to state space modeling (in Russian)

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Tsyplakov

    2011-01-01

    Many time series models, primarily various models with unobservable components, can be represented in a so called state space form. A state space model is a powerful tool that allows one to apply to the original model a wide range of standard procedures including estimation and forecasting. This essay provides a survey of this universal class of models and related procedures.

  9. The rewarding properties of methamphetamine in an invertebrate model of drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola; Adedeji, Adekunle; Huber, Robert; Nathaniel, Thomas I

    2016-01-01

    The rewarding properties of drugs in the mammalian system depend on their ability to activate appetitive motivational states. The associated underlying mechanism is strongly conserved in evolution and invertebrates have recently emerged as a powerful new model in addiction research. The natural reward system in crayfish has surprisingly proven sensitive to human drugs of abuse, providing a new model for research into the basic biological mechanisms of drug addiction. In this study, we examined the presence of natural reward systems in crayfish, and then characterized its sensitivity to 2.5 μg/g, 5.0 μg/g and 10.0 μg/g doses of methamphetamine (METH). Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm, we demonstrated that irrespective of the number of doses of METH injected into the pericardial system, crayfish seek out a particular tactile environment that had previously been paired with the METH. This study demonstrates that crayfish offer a comparative and complementary approach in addiction research. It contributes an evolutionary context to our understanding of a key component in learning and of natural reward as an important life-sustaining process. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations: A Threat to the United States National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    southern and northern borders of the U.S., to prevent DTOs from entering the U.S . . Background Mexican DTOs first entered the U.S. market in the mid...seek alternate routes into the U.S. The proximity of the U.S., one of the largest markets for illicit drugs, and the poor economic state of Mexico...Nuevo Laredo, the Zetas operate a parallel network in Reynosa and Miguel Aleman. 9 The Juare~ Cartel operates in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico

  11. Assessing the concordance between illicit drug laws on the books and drug law enforcement: Comparison of three states on the continuum from "decriminalised" to "punitive".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belackova, Vendula; Ritter, Alison; Shanahan, Marian; Hughes, Caitlin E

    2017-03-01

    Variations in drug laws, as well as variations in enforcement practice, exist across jurisdictions. This study explored the feasibility of categorising drug laws "on the books" in terms of their punitiveness, and the extent of their concordance with "laws in practice" in a cross-national comparison. "Law on the books", classified with respect to both cannabis and other drug offences in the Czech Republic, NSW (AU) and Florida (USA) were analysed in order to establish an ordinal relationship between the three states. Indicators to assess the "laws in practice" covered both police (arrests) and court (sentencing) activity between 2002 and 2013. Parametric and non-parametric tests of equality of means, tests of stationarity and correlation analysis were used to examine the concordance between the ordinal categorisation of "laws on the books" and "laws in practice", as well as trends over time. The Czech Republic had the most lenient drug laws; Florida had the most punitive and NSW was in-between. Examining the indicators of "laws in practice", we found that the population adjusted number of individuals sentenced to prison ranked across the three states was concordant with categorisation of "laws on the books", but the average sentence length and percentage of court cases sentenced to prison were not. Also, the de jure decriminalisation of drug possession in the Czech Republic yielded a far greater share of administrative offenses than the de facto decriminalisation of cannabis use / possession in NSW. Finally, the mean value of most "laws in practice" indicators changed significantly over time although the "laws on the books" didn't change. While some indicators of "laws in practice" were concordant with the ordinal categorisation of drug laws, several indicators of "laws in practice" appeared to operate independently from the drug laws as stated. This has significant implications for drug policy analysis and means that research should not assume they are

  12. Effectiveness of Cognitive-behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Iranian Male Drug Addicts at a State Rehabilitation Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parvizifard, Aliakbar; Haji Ahmad, Haji Jamaludin Bin; Sulaiman, Tajularipin; Binti Baba, Maznah; Sadeghi, Kheirollah; Parsa Moghadam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    .... An experimental research design was adopted in the current study in which the participants consisted of 75 male drug addicts who were consecutively admitted as outpatients at a state rehabilitation center...

  13. Scaling up access to antiretroviral drugs in a middle-income country: public sector drug delivery in the Free State, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Francois; Schneider, Helen; Engelbrecht, Michelle C; van Rensburg-Bonthuyzen, Ega Janse; Jacobs, Nandipha; van Rensburg, Dingie H C J

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the distribution and management of drugs and supplies in scaling up access to public sector antiretroviral treatment (ART) in a middle-income country. More specifically, a case study of the Free State Province of South Africa is presented focusing on: the mobilisation and training of pharmaceutical staff for ART, processes related to the ordering, distribution and storage of medicines, continuity of ART supplies and the impact of ART delivery on other drugs and supplies. Data were obtained from longitudinal research conducted between April 2004 and July 2006 comprising three surveys of the first 20 health facilities providing ART in the province, key informant interviews and observations made of provincial ART Task Team meetings. The supply of ART in the Province was managed through the existing drug supply system but with special mechanisms to ensure integrity of ART supplies and security of stock within the existing supply system. Initial hiccups in the procurement of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for South Africa (a national function) caused delays in putting patients on ART, although these supply problems were short-lived. At provincial level, not all pharmacist posts created for the programme were filled, and pharmacists working in the rest of the health system were subsequently trained to take on ART programme functions. Electronic systems were not established at all service sites, which in part contributed to delays in the delivery of drugs and supplies to more peripheral units. Adequate space to safely store ARV drugs remained problematic. The introduction of the ART programme did not create disruptions in the supply of non-ART essential drugs, which in fact improved over the period of observation. It is concluded that despite some process, human resource and infrastructural challenges, the drug management system in the Free State succeeded in incorporating public sector ART within its existing drug distribution network and functions, at

  14. Generalized Plasma Skimming Model for Cells and Drug Carriers in the Microvasculature

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tae-Rin; Yang, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    In microvascular transport, where both blood and drug carriers are involved, plasma skimming has a key role on changing hematocrit level and drug carrier concentration in capillary beds after continuous vessel bifurcation in the microvasculature. While there have been numerous studies on modeling the plasma skimming of blood, previous works lacked in consideration of its interaction with drug carriers. In this paper, a generalized plasma skimming model is suggested to predict the redistributions of both the cells and drug carriers at each bifurcation. In order to examine its applicability, this new model was applied on a single bifurcation system to predict the redistribution of red blood cells and drug carriers. Furthermore, this model was tested at microvascular network level under different plasma skimming conditions for predicting the concentration of drug carriers. Based on these results, the applicability of this generalized plasma skimming model is fully discussed and future works along with the model'...

  15. Multiscale modeling of drug-polymer nanoparticle assembly identifies parameters influencing drug encapsulation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, R; Booth, J; Alexander, C; Garnett, M C; Laughton, C A

    2015-06-09

    Using a multiscale (dual resolution) approach combining an atomistic (GROMOS96) and coarse-grain (MARTINI) force field, we have been able to simulate the process of drug-polymer nanoparticle assembly by nanoprecipitation from mixed solvents. Here, we present the development and application of this method to the interaction of three poly(glycerol adipate) polymer variants with the anticancer drug dexamethasone phosphate. Differences in encapsulation efficiency and drug loading between the polymers are in agreement with the experimental trend. Reference atomistic simulations at key points along the predicted aggregation pathway support the accuracy of the much more computationally efficient multiscale methodology.

  16. A Physiologically-Based Flow Network Model for Hepatic Drug Elimination I: Regular Lattice Lobule Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rezania, Vahid; Coombe, Dennis; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2011-01-01

    We develop a physiologically-based lattice model for the transport and metabolism of drugs in the functional unit of the liver, called the lobule. In contrast to earlier studies, we have emphasized the dominant role of convection in well-vascularized tissue with a given structure. Estimates of convective, diffusive and reaction contributions are given. We have compared drug concentration levels observed exiting the lobule with their predicted detailed distribution inside the lobule, assuming that most often the former is accessible information while the latter is not.

  17. Molecular Model of Anticonvulsant Drug Binding to the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Inner Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkind, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    The tricyclic anticonvulsant drugs phenytoin, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine block neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels, and their binding sites to domain IV-S6 in the channel's inner pore overlap with those of local anesthetic drugs. These anticonvulsants are neutral, in contrast to the mostly positively charged local anesthetics, but their open/inactivated-state blocking affinities are similar. Using a model of the open pore of the Na+ channel that we developed by homology with the crystal structures of potassium channels, we have docked these three anticonvulsants with residues identified by mutagenesis as important for their binding energy. The three drugs show a common pharmacophore, including an aromatic ring that has an aromatic-aromatic interaction with Tyr-1771 of NaV1.2 and a polar amide or imide that interacts with the aromatic ring of Phe-1764 by a low-energy amino-aromatic hydrogen bond. The second aromatic ring is nearly at a right angle to the pharmacophore and fills the pore lumen, probably interacting with the other S6 segments and physically occluding the inner pore to block Na+ permeation. Hydrophobic interactions with this second aromatic ring may contribute an important component to binding for anticonvulsants, which compensates energetically for the absence of positive charge in their structures. Voltage dependence of block, their important therapeutic property, results from their interaction with Phe-1764, which connects them to the voltage sensors. Their use dependence is modest and this results from being neutral, with a fast drug off-rate after repolarization, allowing a normal action potential rate in the presence of the drugs. PMID:20643904

  18. RESULTS OF INTERBANK EXCHANGE RATES FORECASTING USING STATE SPACE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the performance of three alternative models for forecasting daily interbank exchange rate of U.S. dollar measured in Pak rupees. The simple ARIMA models and complex models such as GARCH-type models and a state space model are discussed and compared. Four different measures are used to evaluate the forecasting accuracy. The main result is the state space model provides the best performance among all the models.

  19. Model-based drug development: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for broad application of pharmacometrics in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherington, Jeffrey D; Pfister, Marc; Banfield, Christopher; Stone, Julie A; Krishna, Rajesh; Allerheiligen, Sandy; Grasela, Dennis M

    2010-09-01

    Systematic implementation of model-based drug development (MBDD) to drug discovery and development has the potential to significantly increase the rate of medical breakthroughs and make available new and better treatments to patients. An analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (ie, SWOT) was conducted through focus group discussions that included 24 members representing 8 pharmaceutical companies to systematically assess the challenges to implementing MBDD into the drug development decision-making process. The application of the SWOT analysis to the successful implementation of MBDD yielded 19 strengths, 27 weaknesses, 34 opportunities, and 22 threats, which support the following conclusions. The shift from empirical drug development to MBDD requires a question-based mentality; early, proactive planning; dynamic access to multisource data; quantitative knowledge integration; multidisciplinary collaboration; effective communication and leadership skills; and innovative, impactful application of pharmacometrics focused on enhancing quantitative decision making. The ultimate goal of MBDD is to streamline discovery and development of innovative medicines to benefit patients.

  20. The drug-target residence time model: a 10-year retrospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    The drug-target residence time model was first introduced in 2006 and has been broadly adopted across the chemical biology, biotechnology and pharmaceutical communities. While traditional in vitro methods view drug-target interactions exclusively in terms of equilibrium affinity, the residence time model takes into account the conformational dynamics of target macromolecules that affect drug binding and dissociation. The key tenet of this model is that the lifetime (or residence time) of the binary drug-target complex, and not the binding affinity per se, dictates much of the in vivo pharmacological activity. Here, this model is revisited and key applications of it over the past 10 years are highlighted.

  1. Cyclophilin A inhibition: targeting transition-state-bound enzyme conformations for structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, Mulpuri; McGowan, Lauren C; Hamelberg, Donald

    2013-02-25

    Human Cyclophilin A (CypA) catalyzes cis-trans isomerization of the prolyl peptide ω-bond in proteins and is involved in many subcellular processes. CypA has, therefore, been identified as a potential drug target in many diseases, and the development of potent inhibitors with high selectivity is a key objective. In computer-aided drug design, selectivity is improved by taking into account the inherent flexibility of the receptor. However, the relevant receptor conformations to focus on in order to develop highly selective inhibitors are not always obvious from available X-ray crystal structures or ensemble of conformations generated using molecular dynamics simulations. Here, we show that the conformation of the active site of CypA varies as the substrate configuration changes during catalytic turnover. We have analyzed the principal modes of the active site dynamics of CypA from molecular dynamics simulations to show that similar ensembles of enzyme conformations recognize diverse inhibitors and bind the different configurations of the peptide substrate. Small nonpeptidomimetic inhibitors with varying activity are recognized by enzyme ensembles that are similar to those that tightly bind the transition state and cis configurations of the substrate. Our results suggest that enzyme-substrate ensembles are more relevant in structure-based drug design for CypA than free enzyme. Of the vast conformational space of the free enzyme, the enzyme conformations of the tightly bound enzyme-substrate complexes are the most important for catalysis. Therefore, functionalizing lead compounds to optimize their interactions with the enzyme's conformational ensemble bound to the substrate in the cis or the transition state could lead to more potent inhibitors.

  2. State-space size considerations for disease-progression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Eva D; Shechter, Steven M

    2013-09-30

    Markov models of disease progression are widely used to model transitions in patients' health state over time. Usually, patients' health status may be classified according to a set of ordered health states. Modelers lump together similar health states into a finite and usually small, number of health states that form the basis of a Markov chain disease-progression model. This increases the number of observations used to estimate each parameter in the transition probability matrix. However, lumping together observably distinct health states also obscures distinctions among them and may reduce the predictive power of the model. Moreover, as we demonstrate, precision in estimating the model parameters does not necessarily improve as the number of states in the model declines. This paper explores the tradeoff between lumping error introduced by grouping distinct health states and sampling error that arises when there are insufficient patient data to precisely estimate the transition probability matrix. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A mathematical model to predict the release of water-soluble drugs from HPMC matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X C; Wang, G P; Fu, C Y; Liang, W Q

    2004-09-01

    A mathematical model to predict the fraction of water-soluble drug released as a function of release time (t, h), HPMC concentration (CH, w/w), and volume of drug molecule (V, nm3) was derived with ranitidine hydrochloride, diltiazem hydrochloride, and ribavirin as model drugs. The model is log (M(t)/M(infinity)) = 0.5 log t-0.3322CH-0.2222V-0.2988 (n = 140, r = 0.9848), where M(t) is the amount of drug released at time t, M(infinity) is the amount of drug released over a very long time, which corresponds in principle to the initial loading, n is the number of samples, and r is the correlation coefficient. The model was validated using isoniazid and satisfactory results were obtained. The model can be used to predict the release fraction of various soluble drugs from HPMC matrices having different polymer levels.

  4. Predicting Drug Extraction in the Human Gut Wall: Assessing Contributions from Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporter Proteins using Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Jones, Christopher R; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Hatley, Oliver J D

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal metabolism can limit oral bioavailability of drugs and increase the risk of drug interactions. It is therefore important to be able to predict and quantify it in drug discovery and early development. In recent years, a plethora of models-in vivo, in situ and in vitro-have been discussed in the literature. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge in the quantitative prediction of gut-wall metabolism. As well as discussing the successes of current models for intestinal metabolism, the challenges in the establishment of good preclinical models are highlighted, including species differences in the isoforms; regional abundances and activities of drug metabolizing enzymes; the interplay of enzyme-transporter proteins; and lack of knowledge on enzyme abundances and availability of empirical scaling factors. Due to its broad specificity and high abundance in the intestine, CYP3A is the enzyme that is frequently implicated in human gut metabolism and is therefore the major focus of this review. A strategy to assess the impact of gut wall metabolism on oral bioavailability during drug discovery and early development phases is presented. Current gaps in the mechanistic understanding and the prediction of gut metabolism are highlighted, with suggestions on how they can be overcome in the future.

  5. Modeling diurnal hormone profiles by hierarchical state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyue; Guo, Wensheng

    2015-10-30

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) diurnal patterns contain both smooth circadian rhythms and pulsatile activities. How to evaluate and compare them between different groups is a challenging statistical task. In particular, we are interested in testing (1) whether the smooth ACTH circadian rhythms in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia patients differ from those in healthy controls and (2) whether the patterns of pulsatile activities are different. In this paper, a hierarchical state space model is proposed to extract these signals from noisy observations. The smooth circadian rhythms shared by a group of subjects are modeled by periodic smoothing splines. The subject level pulsatile activities are modeled by autoregressive processes. A functional random effect is adopted at the pair level to account for the matched pair design. Parameters are estimated by maximizing the marginal likelihood. Signals are extracted as posterior means. Computationally efficient Kalman filter algorithms are adopted for implementation. Application of the proposed model reveals that the smooth circadian rhythms are similar in the two groups but the pulsatile activities in patients are weaker than those in the healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Determination of the main solid-state form of albendazole in bulk drug, employing Raman spectroscopy coupled to multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Natalia L; Arias, Juan M; Altabef, Aída Ben; Maggio, Rubén M; Kaufman, Teodoro S

    2016-09-10

    Albendazole (ALB) is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic, which exhibits two solid-state forms (Forms I and II). The Form I is the metastable crystal at room temperature, while Form II is the stable one. Because the drug has poor aqueous solubility and Form II is less soluble than Form I, it is desirable to have a method to assess the solid-state form of the drug employed for manufacturing purposes. Therefore, a Partial Least Squares (PLS) model was developed for the determination of Form I of ALB in its mixtures with Form II. For model development, both solid-state forms of ALB were prepared and characterized by microscopic (optical and with normal and polarized light), thermal (DSC) and spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR, Raman) techniques. Mixtures of solids in different ratios were prepared by weighing and mechanical mixing of the components. Their Raman spectra were acquired, and subjected to peak smoothing, normalization, standard normal variate correction and de-trending, before performing the PLS calculations. The optimal spectral region (1396-1280cm(-1)) and number of latent variables (LV=3) were obtained employing a moving window of variable size strategy. The method was internally validated by means of the leave one out procedure, providing satisfactory statistics (r(2)=0.9729 and RMSD=5.6%) and figures of merit (LOD=9.4% and MDDC=1.4). Furthermore, the method's performance was also evaluated by analysis of two validation sets. Validation set I was used for assessment of linearity and range and Validation set II, to demonstrate accuracy and precision (Recovery=101.4% and RSD=2.8%). Additionally, a third set of spiked commercial samples was evaluated, exhibiting excellent recoveries (94.2±6.4%). The results suggest that the combination of Raman spectroscopy with multivariate analysis could be applied to the assessment of the main crystal form and its quantitation in samples of ALB bulk drug, in the routine quality control laboratory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  7. Mouse Models of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribault, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a fast-growing epidemic in industrialized countries, associated with obesity, lack of physical exercise, aging, family history, and ethnic background. Diagnostic criteria are elevated fasting or postprandial blood glucose levels, a consequence of insulin resistance. Early intervention can help patients to revert the progression of the disease together with lifestyle changes or monotherapy. Systemic glucose toxicity can have devastating effects leading to pancreatic beta cell failure, blindness, nephropathy, and neuropathy, progressing to limb ulceration or even amputation. Existing treatments have numerous side effects and demonstrate variability in individual patient responsiveness. However, several emerging areas of discovery research are showing promises with the development of novel classes of antidiabetic drugs.The mouse has proven to be a reliable model for discovering and validating new treatments for type 2 diabetes mellitus. We review here commonly used methods to measure endpoints relevant to glucose metabolism which show good translatability to the diagnostic of type 2 diabetes in humans: baseline fasting glucose and insulin, glucose tolerance test, insulin sensitivity index, and body type composition. Improvements on these clinical values are essential for the progression of a novel potential therapeutic molecule through a preclinical and clinical pipeline.

  8. Mathematical model of transmission network static state estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the characteristics and capabilities of the power transmission network static state estimator are presented. The solving process of the mathematical model containing the measurement errors and their processing is developed. To evaluate difference between the general model of state estimation and the fast decoupled state estimation model, the both models are applied to an example, and so derived results are compared.

  9. The application of antitumor drug-targeting models on liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yan; Chen, Ningbo; Wang, Yunbing; Wang, Ke

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocarcinoma animal models, such as the induced tumor model, transplanted tumor model, gene animal model, are significant experimental tools for the evaluation of targeting drug delivery system as well as the pre-clinical studies of liver cancer. The application of antitumor drug-targeting models not only furnishes similar biological characteristics to human liver cancer but also offers guarantee of pharmacokinetic indicators of the liver-targeting preparations. In this article, we have reviewed some kinds of antitumor drug-targeting models of hepatoma and speculated that the research on this field would be capable of attaining a deeper level and expecting a superior achievement in the future.

  10. Test of a model of antiarrhythmic drug action. Effects of quinidine and lidocaine on myocardial conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondeghem, L; Katzung, B G

    1980-06-01

    The effects of quinidine and lidocaine on the maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax) of the ventricular myocardial action potential were compared with the effects predicted by a model over a wide range of driving rates, rhythm disturbances and holding potentials. These rate-, rhythm- and voltage-dependent effects were accurately predicted by the proposed model. The model was also able to predict several previously undocumented properties of the drugs: 1) If lidocaine decreases Vmax of a pulse train, the steady state is reached within a few action potentials. 2) The poststimulation recovery of Vmax in the presence of lidocaine or quinidine can occur in a multiexponential fashion, if the membrane potential is kept at the potential where both the fast (operating mainly at more negative membrane potentials) and the slow (operating at more positive potentials) recovery processes are operative. 3) Hyperpolarization markedly attenuates the rate-dependent drug effects. 4) Combinations of lidocaine and quinidine have a superadditive effect on the Vmax of early extrasystoles.

  11. Advances in small animal mesentery models for in vivo flow cytometry, dynamic microscopy, and drug screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ekaterina I Galanzha; Vladimir P Zharov; Philips Classic

    2007-01-01

    Using animal mesentery with intravital optical microscopy is a well-established experimental model for studying blood and lymph microcirculation in vivo.Recent advances in cell biology and optical techniques provide the basis for extending this model for new applications, which should generate significantly improved experimental data. This review summarizes the achievements in this specific area, including in vivo label-free blood and lymph photothermal flow cytometry,super-sensitive fluorescence image cytometry, light scattering and speckle flow cytometry, microvessel dynamic microscopy, infrared (IR) angiography, and high-speed imaging of individual cells in fast flow. The capabilities of these techniques, using the rat mesentery model, were demonstrated in various studies; e.g., realtime quantitative detection of circulating and migrating individual blood and cancer cells, studies on vascular dynamics with a focus on lymphatics under normal conditions and under different interventions (e.g. lasers,drugs, nicotine), assessment of lymphatic disturbances from experimental lymphedema, monitoring cell traffic between blood and lymph systems, and highspeed imaging of cell transient deformability in flow.In particular, the obtained results demonstrated that individual cell transportation in living organisms depends on cell type (e.g., normal blood or leukemic cells), the cell's functional state (e.g., live, apoptotic, or necrotic),and the functional status of the organism. Possible future applications, including in vivo early diagnosis and prevention of disease, monitoring immune response and apoptosis, chemo- and radio-sensitivity tests, and drug screening, are also discussed.

  12. Neural mass model-based tracking of anesthetic brain states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Freestone, Dean R.; Manton, Jonathan H.; Heyse, Bjorn; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Lipping, Tarmo; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Liley, David T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural mass model-based tracking of brain states from electroencephalographic signals holds the promise of simultaneously tracking brain states while inferring underlying physiological changes in various neuroscientific and clinical applications. Here, neural mass model-based tracking of brain state

  13. Discontinuation of lipid modifying drugs among commercially insured United States patients in recent clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal-Bahl, Sachin J; Burke, Thomas; Watson, Douglas; Wentworth, Chuck

    2007-02-15

    Although several lipid-modifying drug (LMD) treatments and strategies are available to successfully manage patients at risk for cardiovascular events, the benefits of drug treatment can be realized only if these therapies are continued on a long-term basis. Previous observational studies examining rates of discontinuation with LMDs are not generalizable to current clinical practice in the United States. In this study, the discontinuation of newly initiated LMD classes in recent clinical practice was compared in a geographically diverse, commercially insured United States population. Administrative claims from the Ingenix Lab/Rx Database were used to identify patients aged >or=20 years who were newly prescribed statins, extended-release niacin, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants, or ezetimibe from January 1, 2001, to June 30, 2003. An LMD class was considered discontinued if a patient did not receive a prescription from the same LMD class within 180 days of the most recent prescription expiration date. The median time to discontinuation was 8.2 months in the bile acid sequestrant group, followed by 12 months in the extended-release niacin group, 17.4 months in the fibrate group, and 27.5 months in the statin group. By the end of 1 year, the adjusted cumulative incidence of discontinuation was 68.3% in bile acid sequestrant users, 55.4% in extended-release niacin users, 39.9% in fibrate users, 33.0% in ezetimibe users, and 28.9% in statin users (p LMD classes vs statins). In conclusion, despite the changes in lipid treatment paradigms and the importance of long-term lipid therapy, this study found high discontinuation rates of LMD classes in recent United States clinical practice.

  14. [Case reports of drug-induced liver injury in a reference hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengual-Moreno, Edgardo; Lizarzábal-García, Maribel; Ruiz-Soler, María; Silva-Suarez, Niniveth; Andrade-Bellido, Raúl; Lucena-González, Maribel; Bessone, Fernando; Hernández, Nelia; Sánchez, Adriana; Medina-Cáliz, Inmaculada

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with varied geographical differences. The aim of this prospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study was to identify and characterize cases of DILI in a hospital of Zulia state, Venezuela. Thirteen patients with a presumptive diagnosis of DILI attended by the Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Universitario, Zulia state, Venezuela, from December-2012 to December-2013 were studied. Ibuprofen (n = 3; 23.1%), acetaminophen (n = 3; 23.1), isoniazid (n = 2; 15.4%) and Herbalife products (n = 2; 15.4%) were the main drugs involved with DILI. Acetaminophen and ibuprofen showed a mixed pattern of liver injury (n = 3; 23.1%) and isoniazid presented a hepatocellular pattern (n = 2; 15.4%). The CIOMS/RUCAMS allowed the identification of possible (n = 7; 53.9%), probable (n = 4; 30.8%) and highly-probable cases (n = 2; 15.4%) of DILI. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, isoniazid, isotretinoin, methotrexate and Herbalife nutritional products were implicated as highly-probable and probable agents. The highest percentage of DILI corresponded to mild cases that recovered after the discontinuation of the agent involved (n = 9; 69.3%). The consumption of Herbalife botanical products is associated with probable causality and fatality (n = 1; 7.7%). In conclusion, the frequency of DILI cases controlled by the Department of Gastroenterology of the Hospital Universitario of Maracaibo was low, being ibuprofen, acetaminophen, isoniazid and products Herbalife the products most commonly involved. It is recommended to continue with the prospective registration of cases, with an extended follow up monitoring period and to facilitate the incorporation of other hospitals in the Zulia State and Venezuela.

  15. Predicting Drug Combination Index and Simulating the Network-Regulation Dynamics by Mathematical Modeling of Drug-Targeted EGFR-ERK Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Jiang, Yuyang; Chen, Yuzong

    2017-01-01

    Synergistic drug combinations enable enhanced therapeutics. Their discovery typically involves the measurement and assessment of drug combination index (CI), which can be facilitated by the development and applications of in-silico CI predictive tools. In this work, we developed and tested the ability of a mathematical model of drug-targeted EGFR-ERK pathway in predicting CIs and in analyzing multiple synergistic drug combinations against observations. Our mathematical model was validated against the literature reported signaling, drug response dynamics, and EGFR-MEK drug combination effect. The predicted CIs and combination therapeutic effects of the EGFR-BRaf, BRaf-MEK, FTI-MEK, and FTI-BRaf inhibitor combinations showed consistent synergism. Our results suggest that existing pathway models may be potentially extended for developing drug-targeted pathway models to predict drug combination CI values, isobolograms, and drug-response surfaces as well as to analyze the dynamics of individual and combinations of drugs. With our model, the efficacy of potential drug combinations can be predicted. Our method complements the developed in-silico methods (e.g. the chemogenomic profile and the statistically-inferenced network models) by predicting drug combination effects from the perspectives of pathway dynamics using experimental or validated molecular kinetic constants, thereby facilitating the collective prediction of drug combination effects in diverse ranges of disease systems.

  16. Clinical pharmacy services, pharmacy staffing, and adverse drug reactions in United States hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, C A; Raehl, Cynthia L

    2006-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were examined in 1,960,059 hospitalized Medicare patients in 584 United States hospitals in 1998. A database was constructed from the MedPAR database and the National Clinical Pharmacy Services survey. The 584 hospitals were selected because they provided specific information on 14 clinical pharmacy services and on pharmacy staffing; they also had functional ADR reporting systems. The study population consisted of 35,193 Medicare patients who experienced an ADR (rate of 1.8%). Of the 14 clinical pharmacy services, 12 were associated with reduced ADR rates. The most significant reductions occurred in hospitals offering pharmacist-provided admission drug histories (odds ratio [OR] 1.864, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.765-1.968), drug protocol management (OR 1.365, 95% CI 1.335-1.395), and ADR management (OR 1.360, 95% CI 1.328-1.392). Multivariate analysis, performed to further evaluate these findings, showed that nine variables were associated with ADR rate: pharmacist-provided in-service education (slope -0.469, p=0.018), drug information (slope -0.488, p=0.005), ADR management (slope -0.424, p=0.021), drug protocol management (slope -0.732, p=0.002), participation on the total parenteral nutrition team (slope 0.384, p=0.04), participation on the cardiopulmonary resuscitation team (slope -0.506, p=0.008), medical round participation (slope -0.422, p=0.037), admission drug histories (slope -0.712, p=0.008), and increased clinical pharmacist staffing (slope -4.345, p=0.009). As clinical pharmacist staffing increased from the 20th to the 100th percentile (from 0.93+/-0.77/100 to 5.16+/-4.11/100 occupied beds), ADRs decreased by 47.88%. In hospitals without pharmacist-provided ADR management, the following increases were noted: mean number of ADRs/100 admissions by 34.90% (OR 1.360, 95% CI 1.328-1.392), length of stay 13.64% (Mann-Whitney U test [U]=11047367, p=0.017), death rate 53.64% (OR 1.574, 95% CI 1.423-1.731), total Medicare

  17. On virtual states and generalized completeness relation in Friedrichs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    We study the well-known Friedrichs model, in which a discrete state is coupled to a continuum state. By examining the pole behaviors of the Friedrichs model in a specific form factor thoroughly, we find that, in general, when the bare discrete state is below the threshold of the continuum state, there should also be a virtual-state pole accompanying the bound-state pole originating from the bare discrete state as the coupling is turned on. There are also other second-sheet poles originating from the singularities of the form factor. We give a general argument for the existence of these two kinds of states. As the coupling is increased to a certain value, the second-sheet poles may merge and become higher-order poles. We then discuss the completeness relations incorporating bound states, virtual states, and resonant states corresponding to higher-order poles.

  18. Reliability of a Novel Model for Drug Release from 2D HPMC-Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiana Blagoeva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel model of drug release from 2D-HPMC matrices is considered. Detailed mathematical description of matrix swelling and the effect of the initial drug loading are introduced. A numerical approach to solution of the posed nonlinear 2D problem is used on the basis of finite element domain approximation and time difference method. The reliability of the model is investigated in two steps: numerical evaluation of the water uptake parameters; evaluation of drug release parameters under available experimental data. The proposed numerical procedure for fitting the model is validated performing different numerical examples of drug release in two cases (with and without taking into account initial drug loading. The goodness of fit evaluated by the coefficient of determination is presented to be very good with few exceptions. The obtained results show better model fitting when accounting the effect of initial drug loading (especially for larger values.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF ATTITUDE AND BEHAVIOR OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS TOWARDS PROVISION OF DRUG INFORMATION SERVICES IN ENUGU STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pharm. Adibe M.O

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Access to authoritative and independent information is fundamental for the rational and effective use of drugs. In Nigeria, there is currently very few drug information centres or other source for problem oriented drug information. Purpose: To assess the attitude and behaviour of health professionals (physicians and pharmacists in Enugu State, Nigeria towards provision of drug information services in the state. Methods: A self-completion questionnaire was administered to 37 doctors and 41 pharmacists in the included hospitals and faculty of pharmacy. A twenty-item question was added to assess the attitude and behaviour of the respondents towards provision of drug information services. Respondents were requested to rate necessity of each item by selecting among ??Not Important at all?? to ??Very Important?? (lowest to highest. The instrument was prefaced: ??Very important??, ??Important??, ??Less important??, and ??Not important at all??. Their attitude and behaviour were expressed in term of item-performance. The percentage item-performance was calculated to reflect the level of necessity of each items; high percentage item-performance of an item correlates with high level of necessity of the item in provision of drug information services and vice versa. Results: Out of 78 questionnaires administered, 67 were retrieved given a response rate of 85.90%. The major sources of drug information currently in use were medical journals (79.1%, medical representatives of drug manufacturers and marketers (71.6%. The drug information areas mostly sought for by the respondent were indication (86.6%, use of drug in special group (77.6%. The attitude and behaviour of health professionals towards provision of drug information services in Enugu state were positive. This study identified three barriers and five facilitators as the major factors affecting provision of efficient and effective drug information services in Enugu state. The major

  20. Molecular Modeling in Drug Design for the Development of Organophosphorous Antidotes/Prophylactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    5012 61102A 1102BS11 EB 025 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) Molecular Modeling in Drug Design for the Development of Organophosphorous...t ....................................., ’ i.° AD MOLECULAR MODELING IN DRUG DESIGN FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ORGANOPHOSPHOROUS ANTIDOTES...Reed, W.J. Murray, E.B. Roche and L.N. Donelsmith, Gen. Pharmac., 12, 177-185 (1981). 5. L.B.Kier, "Molecular Orbital Theory in Drug Design ", Academic

  1. Macroscopic modelling of solid-state fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogschagen, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation is different from the more well known process of liquid fermentation because no free flowing water is present. The technique is primarily used in Asia. Well-known products are the foods tempe, soy sauce and saké. In industrial solid-state fermentation, the substrate usually

  2. The interplay between genotype, metabolic state and cofactor treatment governs phenylalanine hydroxylase function and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigl, Michael; Gersting, Søren W; Danecka, Marta K; Messing, Dunja D; Woidy, Mathias; Pinkas, Daniel; Kemter, Kristina F; Blau, Nenad; Muntau, Ania C

    2011-07-01

    The discovery of a pharmacological treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU) raised new questions about function and dysfunction of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), the enzyme deficient in this disease. To investigate the interdependence of the genotype, the metabolic state (phenylalanine substrate) and treatment (BH(4) cofactor) in the context of enzyme function in vitro and in vivo, we (i) used a fluorescence-based method for fast enzyme kinetic analyses at an expanded range of phenylalanine and BH(4) concentrations, (ii) depicted PAH function as activity landscapes, (iii) retraced the analyses in eukaryotic cells, and (iv) translated this into the human system by analyzing the outcome of oral BH(4) loading tests. PAH activity landscapes uncovered the optimal working range of recombinant wild-type PAH and provided new insights into PAH kinetics. They demonstrated how mutations might alter enzyme function in the space of varying substrate and cofactor concentrations. Experiments in eukaryotic cells revealed that the availability of the active PAH enzyme depends on the phenylalanine-to-BH(4) ratio. Finally, evaluation of data from BH(4) loading tests indicated that the patient's genotype influences the impact of the metabolic state on drug response. The results allowed for visualization and a better understanding of PAH function in the physiological and pathological state as well as in the therapeutic context of cofactor treatment. Moreover, our data underscore the need for more personalized procedures to safely identify and treat patients with BH(4)-responsive PAH deficiency.

  3. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rawas, Rana; Saria, Alois

    2016-03-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug's effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or "agonistic" versus the hostile or "antagonistic" social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence.

  4. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  5. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  6. Embedding a State Space Model Into a Markov Decision Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Relund; Jørgensen, Erik; Højsgaard, Søren

    2011-01-01

    estimated from data collected from the animal or herd. State space models (SSMs) are a general tool for modeling repeated measurements over time where the model parameters can evolve dynamically. In this paper we consider methods for embedding an SSM into an MDP with finite state and action space. Different...

  7. Asymptotic-bound-state model for Feshbach resonances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiecke, T.G.; Goosen, M.R.; Walraven, J.T.M.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2010-01-01

    We present an asymptotic-bound-state model which can be used to accurately describe all Feshbach resonance positions and widths in a two-body system. With this model we determine the coupled bound states of a particular two-body system. The model is based on analytic properties of the two-body

  8. Factors associated with history of drug use among female sex workers (FSW in a high HIV prevalence state of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhi Gajendra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intersection between illicit drug use and female commercial sex work has been identified as an important factor responsible for rising HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSW in several northeastern states of India. But, little is know about the factors associated with the use of drugs among FSWs in this region. The objective of the paper was to describe the factors associated with history of drug use among FSWs in Dimapur, an important commercial hub of Nagaland, which is a high HIV prevalence state of India. Methods FSWs were recruited using respondent driven sampling (RDS, and were interviewed to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics and HIV risk behaviours. Biological samples were tested for HIV, syphilis gonorrhea and Chlamydia. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with drug use. Results Among the 426 FSWs in the study, about 25% (n = 107 reported having ever used illicit drugs. Among 107 illicit drug users, 83 (77.6% were non-injecting and 24 (22.4% were injecting drug users. Drug-using FSWs were significantly more likely to test positive for one or more STIs (59% vs. 33.5%, active syphilis (27.1% vs. 11.4% and Chlamydia infection (30% vs. 19.9% compared to their non-drug using peers. Drug-using FSWs were also significantly more likely to be currently married, widowed or separated compared with non-drug-using FSWs. In multiple logistic regression analysis, being an alcohol user, being married, having a larger volume of clients, and having sexual partners who have ever used or shared injecting drugs were found to be independently associated with illicit drug use. Conclusions Drug-using FSWs were more vulnerable to STIs including HIV compared to their non-drug using peers. Several important factors associated with being an FSW who uses drugs were identified in this study and this knowledge can be used to plan more effectively targeted harm reduction strategies

  9. Assessing the state of substitution models describing noncoding RNA evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James E; Whelan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is widely used to investigate the relationships between homologous sequences. RNA molecules have played a key role in these studies because they are present throughout life and tend to evolve slowly. Phylogenetic inference has been shown to be dependent on the substitution model used. A wide range of models have been developed to describe RNA evolution, either with 16 states describing all possible canonical base pairs or with 7 states where the 10 mismatched nucleotides are reduced to a single state. Formal model selection has become a standard practice for choosing an inferential model and works well for comparing models of a specific type, such as comparisons within nucleotide models or within amino acid models. Model selection cannot function across different sized state spaces because the likelihoods are conditioned on different data. Here, we introduce statistical state-space projection methods that allow the direct comparison of likelihoods between nucleotide models and 7-state and 16-state RNA models. To demonstrate the general applicability of our new methods, we extract 287 RNA families from genomic alignments and perform model selection. We find that in 281/287 families, RNA models are selected in preference to nucleotide models, with simple 7-state RNA models selected for more conserved families with shorter stems and more complex 16-state RNA models selected for more divergent families with longer stems. Other factors, such as the function of the RNA molecule or the GC-content, have limited impact on model selection. Our models and model selection methods are freely available in the open-source PHASE 3.0 software.

  10. Text mining for adverse drug events: the promise, challenges, and state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz, Rave; Callahan, Alison; Tamang, Suzanne; Low, Yen; Odgers, David; Finlayson, Sam; Jung, Kenneth; LePendu, Paea; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-10-01

    Text mining is the computational process of extracting meaningful information from large amounts of unstructured text. It is emerging as a tool to leverage underutilized data sources that can improve pharmacovigilance, including the objective of adverse drug event (ADE) detection and assessment. This article provides an overview of recent advances in pharmacovigilance driven by the application of text mining, and discusses several data sources-such as biomedical literature, clinical narratives, product labeling, social media, and Web search logs-that are amenable to text mining for pharmacovigilance. Given the state of the art, it appears text mining can be applied to extract useful ADE-related information from multiple textual sources. Nonetheless, further research is required to address remaining technical challenges associated with the text mining methodologies, and to conclusively determine the relative contribution of each textual source to improving pharmacovigilance.

  11. Drug-resistant Salmonella in the United States: an epidemiologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M L; Tauxe, R V

    1986-11-21

    Salmonellosis poses a health problem of large proportions in the United States. Annually, it accounts for more than 40,000 reported cases, 500 deaths, and financial costs well in excess of $50 million. Antimicrobial resistance is increasing in Salmonella strains, a finding that has important public health implications. Although the chain of transmission of the bacteria is often complex, combined epidemiologic and laboratory studies with the use of new methods in molecular biology make it possible to trace antimicrobial-resistant salmonellae to their primary source--foods of animal origin. These studies suggest that the antimicrobial drugs to which food animals are exposed provide selective pressure that leads to the appearance and persistence of resistant strains.

  12. Computing characterizations of drugs for ion channels and receptors using Markov models

    CERN Document Server

    Tveito, Aslak

    2016-01-01

    Flow of ions through voltage gated channels can be represented theoretically using stochastic differential equations where the gating mechanism is represented by a Markov model. The flow through a channel can be manipulated using various drugs, and the effect of a given drug can be reflected by changing the Markov model. These lecture notes provide an accessible introduction to the mathematical methods needed to deal with these models. They emphasize the use of numerical methods and provide sufficient details for the reader to implement the models and thereby study the effect of various drugs. Examples in the text include stochastic calcium release from internal storage systems in cells, as well as stochastic models of the transmembrane potential. Well known Markov models are studied and a systematic approach to including the effect of mutations is presented. Lastly, the book shows how to derive the optimal properties of a theoretical model of a drug for a given mutation defined in terms of a Markov model.

  13. Numerical implementation of a state variable model for friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzekwa, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boyce, D.E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A general state variable model for friction has been incorporated into a finite element code for viscoplasticity. A contact area evolution model is used in a finite element model of a sheet forming friction test. The results show that a state variable model can be used to capture complex friction behavior in metal forming simulations. It is proposed that simulations can play an important role in the analysis of friction experiments and the development of friction models.

  14. Assessment of the Effectiveness of the New York State Drug Curriculum Guide With Respect to Drug Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Thomas W.

    1973-01-01

    Knowledge achievement comparisons in the areas of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs were made between high school students who received the Curriculum Guide program and comparable students receiving a traditional program. Results evidenced a significantly higher score for the experimental group and indicated that the program appears more effective for…

  15. Modeling software with finite state machines a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Ferdinand; Wagner, Thomas; Wolstenholme, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Modeling Software with Finite State Machines: A Practical Approach explains how to apply finite state machines to software development. It provides a critical analysis of using finite state machines as a foundation for executable specifications to reduce software development effort and improve quality. This book discusses the design of a state machine and of a system of state machines. It also presents a detailed analysis of development issues relating to behavior modeling with design examples and design rules for using finite state machines. This volume describes a coherent and well-tested fr

  16. DrugOn: a fully integrated pharmacophore modeling and structure optimization toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Vlachakis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, pharmacophore modeling has become one of the key components in computer-aided drug design and in modern drug discovery. DrugOn is a fully interactive pipeline designed to exploit the advantages of modern programming and overcome the command line barrier with two friendly environments for the user (either novice or experienced in the field of Computer Aided Drug Design to perform pharmacophore modeling through an efficient combination of the PharmACOphore, Gromacs, Ligbuilder and PDB2PQR suites. Our platform features a novel workflow that guides the user through each logical step of the iterative 3D structural optimization setup and drug design process. For the pharmacophore modeling we are focusing on either the characteristics of the receptor or the full molecular system, including a set of selected ligands. DrugOn can be freely downloaded from our dedicated server system at www.bioacademy.gr/bioinformatics/drugon/.

  17. Quantum-Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers: State Space Model versus Rate Equation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Taleb

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and accurate dynamic model for QD-SOAs is proposed. The proposed model is based on the state space theory, where by eliminating the distance dependence of the rate equation model of the QD-SOA; we derive a state space model for the device. A comparison is made between the rate equation model and the state space model under both steady state and transient regimes. Simulation results demonstrate that the derived state space model not only is much simpler and faster than the rate equation model, but also it is as accurate as the rate equation model.

  18. Evolution analysis of the states of the EZ model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qing-Hua; Ding Yi-Ming; Dong Hong-Guang

    2009-01-01

    Based on suitable choice of states,this paper studies the stability of the equilibrium state of the EZ model by regarding the evolution of the EZ model as a Markov chain and by showing that the Markov chain is ergodic.The Markov analysis is applied to the EZ model with small number of agents,the exact equilibrium state for N=5 and numerical results for N=18 are obtained.

  19. Application of concave microwells to pancreatic tumor spheroids enabling anticancer drug evaluation in a clinically relevant drug resistance model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Eun Yeon

    Full Text Available Intrinsic drug resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC warrants studies using models that are more clinically relevant for identifying novel resistance mechanisms as well as for drug development. Tumor spheroids (TS mimic in vivo tumor conditions associated with multicellular resistance and represent a promising model for efficient drug screening, however, pancreatic cancer cells often fail to form spheroids using conventional methods such as liquid overlay. This study describes the induction of TS of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1, Aspc-1, Capan-2 in concave polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microwell plates and evaluation of their usefulness as an anticancer efficacy test model. All three cell lines showed TS formation with varying degree of necrosis inside TS. Among these, Panc-1 spheroid with spherical morphology, a rather rough surface, and unique adhesion structures were successfully produced with no notable necrosis in concave microwell plates. Panc-1 TS contained growth factors or enzymes such as TGF-β1, CTGF, and MT1-MMP, and extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, and laminin. Panc-1 cells grown as TS showed changes in stem cell populations and in expression levels of miRNAs that may play roles in chemoresistance. Visualization of drug penetration and detection of viability indicators, such as Ki-67 and MitoSOX, were optimized for TS for quantitative analysis. Water-soluble tetrazolium (MTS and acid phosphatase (APH assays were also successfully optimized. Overall, we demonstrated that concave PDMS microwell plates are a novel platform for preparation of TS of weakly aggregating cells and that Panc-1 spheroids may represent a novel three-dimensional model for anti-pancreatic cancer drug screening.

  20. Application of concave microwells to pancreatic tumor spheroids enabling anticancer drug evaluation in a clinically relevant drug resistance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeon, Sang-Eun; No, Da Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Nam, Suk Woo; Oh, Il-Hoan; Lee, Jaehwi; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsic drug resistance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) warrants studies using models that are more clinically relevant for identifying novel resistance mechanisms as well as for drug development. Tumor spheroids (TS) mimic in vivo tumor conditions associated with multicellular resistance and represent a promising model for efficient drug screening, however, pancreatic cancer cells often fail to form spheroids using conventional methods such as liquid overlay. This study describes the induction of TS of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1, Aspc-1, Capan-2) in concave polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell plates and evaluation of their usefulness as an anticancer efficacy test model. All three cell lines showed TS formation with varying degree of necrosis inside TS. Among these, Panc-1 spheroid with spherical morphology, a rather rough surface, and unique adhesion structures were successfully produced with no notable necrosis in concave microwell plates. Panc-1 TS contained growth factors or enzymes such as TGF-β1, CTGF, and MT1-MMP, and extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, and laminin. Panc-1 cells grown as TS showed changes in stem cell populations and in expression levels of miRNAs that may play roles in chemoresistance. Visualization of drug penetration and detection of viability indicators, such as Ki-67 and MitoSOX, were optimized for TS for quantitative analysis. Water-soluble tetrazolium (MTS) and acid phosphatase (APH) assays were also successfully optimized. Overall, we demonstrated that concave PDMS microwell plates are a novel platform for preparation of TS of weakly aggregating cells and that Panc-1 spheroids may represent a novel three-dimensional model for anti-pancreatic cancer drug screening.

  1. Prediction of drug distribution in subcutaneous xenografts of human tumor cell lines and healthy tissues in mouse: application of the tissue composition-based model to antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Gould, Stephen E; Hop, Cornelis Eca; Messick, Kirsten; Oeh, Jason; Liederer, Bianca M

    2015-04-01

    Advanced tissue composition-based models can predict the tissue-plasma partition coefficient (Kp ) values of drugs under in vivo conditions on the basis of in vitro and physiological input data. These models, however, focus on healthy tissues and do not incorporate data from tumors. The objective of this study was to apply a tissue composition-based model to six marketed antineoplastic drugs (docetaxel, DOC; doxorubicin, DOX; gemcitabine, GEM; methotrexate, MTX; topotecan, TOP; and fluorouracil, 5-FU) to predict their Kp values in three human tumor xenografts (HCT-116, H2122, and PC3) as well as in healthy tissues (brain, muscle, lung, and liver) under steady-state in vivo conditions in female NCR nude mice. The mechanisms considered in the tissue/tumor composition-based model are the binding to lipids and to plasma proteins, but the transporter effect was also investigated. The method consisted of analyzing tissue composition, performing the pharmacokinetics studies in mice, and calculating the corresponding in vivo Kp values. Analyses of tumor composition indicated that the tumor xenografts contained no or low amounts of common transporters by contrast to lipids. The predicted Kp values were within twofold and threefold of the measured values in 77% and 93% of cases, respectively. However, predictions for brain for each drug, for liver for MTX, and for each tumor xenograft for GEM were disparate from the observed values, and, therefore, not well served by the model. Overall, this study is the first step toward the mechanism-based prediction of Kp values of small molecules in healthy and tumor tissues in mouse when no transporter and permeation limitation effect is evident. This approach will be useful in selecting compounds based on their abilities to penetrate human cancer xenografts with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, thereby increasing therapeutic index for chemotherapy in oncology study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American

  2. Shell model states around $^{208}Pb$

    CERN Document Server

    Liendo, J A; Gómez, R; Caussyn, D D

    2015-01-01

    The experimental binding energies of single-particle and single-hole neutron states belonging to neutron shells that extend from N = 126 to 184 and 82 to 126 respectively, have been reproduced by solving Schr\\"{o}edinger's equation with a potential containing the traditional Woods-Saxon (WS) plus spin-orbit (SO) potential [1-6], and a superficial term proportional to the derivative of a Woods-Saxon like potential. The agreement between theory and experiment has been achieved by varying the strength of the superficial potential for each state studied, until the theoretical binding energy matches the corresponding measured value. Our results indicate the existence of a explicit relationship between the strength of the superficial potential and the orbital angular momentum quantum number $\\ell$ of the state. This dependence has been used to make reasonable predictions for the excitation energy centroids of states located inside and outside the neutron shells investigated. Comparisons are made with results report...

  3. Hydrodynamic Effects on Drug Dissolution and Deaggregation in the Small Intestine-A Study with Felodipine as a Model Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Lennart; Jonsson, Malin; Weibull, Emelie; Brasseur, James G; Abrahamsson, Bertil

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to understand and predict the influence of hydrodynamic effects in the small intestine on dissolution of primary and aggregated drug particles. Dissolution tests of suspensions with a low-solubility drug, felodipine, were performed in a Couette cell under hydrodynamic test conditions corresponding to the fed small intestine. Dissolution was also performed in the USP II apparatus at two paddle speeds of 25 and 200 rpm and at different surfactant concentrations below critical micelle concentration. The experimental dissolution rates were compared with theoretical calculations. The different levels of shear stress in the in vitro tests did not influence the dissolution of primary or aggregated particles and experimental dissolution rates corresponded very well to calculations. The dissolution rate for the aggregated drug particles increased after addition of surfactant because of deaggregation, but there were still no effect of hydrodynamics. In conclusion, hydrodynamics do not influence dissolution and deaggregation of micronized drug particles in the small intestine of this model drug. Surface tension has a strong effect on the deaggregation and subsequent dissolution. Addition of surfactants at in vivo relevant surface tension levels is thus critical for in vivo predictive in vitro dissolution testing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. Inference in Hidden Markov Models with Explicit State Duration Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, Michael; Wood, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we borrow from the inference techniques developed for unbounded state-cardinality (nonparametric) variants of the HMM and use them to develop a tuning-parameter free, black-box inference procedure for Explicit-state-duration hidden Markov models (EDHMM). EDHMMs are HMMs that have latent states consisting of both discrete state-indicator and discrete state-duration random variables. In contrast to the implicit geometric state duration distribution possessed by the standard HMM, EDHMMs allow the direct parameterisation and estimation of per-state duration distributions. As most duration distributions are defined over the positive integers, truncation or other approximations are usually required to perform EDHMM inference.

  5. The Two Faces of Social Interaction Reward in Animal Models of Drug Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawas, Rana El

    2016-01-01

    Drug dependence is a serious health and social problem. Social factors can modify vulnerability to developing drug dependence, acting as risk factors or protective factors. Whereas stress and peer environment that encourage substance use may increase drug taking, strong attachments between family members and peer environment that do not experience drug use may protect against drug taking and, ultimately, drug dependence. The rewarding effects of drug abuse and social interaction can be evaluated using animal models. In this review we focus on evaluating social interaction reward in the conditioned place preference paradigm. We give an overview of how social interaction, if made available within the drug context, may facilitate, promote and interact with the drug’s effects. However, social interaction, if offered alternatively outside the drug context, may have pronounced protective effects against drug abuse and relapse. We also address the importance of the weight difference parameter between the social partners in determining the positive or “agonistic” versus the hostile or “antagonistic” social interaction. We conclude that understanding social interaction reward and its subsequent effects on drug reward is sorely needed for therapeutic interventions against drug dependence. PMID:26088685

  6. Emergence of the drug-resistant phenotype in tumor subpopulations: a hybrid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, S; Slate, D

    1989-09-20

    A mathematical model is proposed that describes the emergence of drug resistance in a tumor cell population. The model is termed a hybrid in the sense that the population-wide dynamics are described by a stochastic birth-death-migration model with transition probabilities dependent on the deterministic distribution of drug within the average cell. In the model, the probability that a cell dies is proportional to the concentration of drug within the target site in the cell. The micropharmacology describing the distribution of drug within the average cell is described by a standard well-mixed compartment model. Possible mechanisms that can confer drug resistance on a cell are described: decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux, intracellular metabolism or inactivation, or both, of a drug, and a change in the level or sensitivity of a target. The biologic mechanisms underlying resistance and potential strategies for overcoming it are discussed within the context of our model. Results from a numerical simulation are presented as verification of the initial theory.

  7. A comparative legal analysis of social media advertising of drugs in Germany and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechner, Bianca

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies use social media such as Facebook and Twitter more and more to advertise their products. Advertising of medicinal products especially in social media is a critical issue confronting patient protection, competition law and ethical concerns in direct-to-consumer advertising. Advertising in the World Wide Web must take into account national and international regulations, depending on which user from which country will have access to the information posted. Different legal requirements, if any, regulate the advertising of medicinal products. This paper discusses, challenges and compares the requirements and regulations of advertising medicinal products in social media, such as Facebook, in the United States on a federal level and the European Union with Germany as a reference Member State. Social media are very active and fast moving. Therefore, it is challenging and necessary at the same time to set guidelines and regulations for the use of social media in drug advertising. This paper is a first step toward promoting an international, consistent approach when talking about regulating advertising of medicinal products in social media.

  8. A two-dimensional mathematical model of non-linear dual-sorption of percutaneous drug absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George K

    2005-07-01

    the direction parallel to the skin surface must be examined, as well as in the direction into the skin, examined in one-dimensional models. The dual-sorption model is an initial/boundary value problem which consists of (1 one non-linear, two-dimensional, second-order parabolic equation, (2 boundary conditions, (3 one initial condition. Note that, the number of boundary conditions are, six and four, respectively, if the permeation process under consideration is, during the application of the vehicle and during the removal of the vehicle. Adopting the approach of method of lines, the initial/boundary value problem is transformed into an initial-value problem, which consists of (1 a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations, (2 one initial condition. The system of non-linear ordinary differential equations contains time-dependent non-homogeneous terms, if the permeation process under consideration is, during the application of the vehicle. To solve this initial-value problem, an eight-stage sequential algorithm which is second-order accurate, and requires only tri-diagonal solvers, is developed. Results Simulation of the numerical methods described is carried out with various values of the parameter C. The illustrations are given in the form of figures. The concentration profiles are viewed as parabolas along the mesh lines parallel to x-axis or y-axis. The flow rates in different subregions of the skin-region are studied. The shapes of the concentration profiles are examined before and after the steady-state concentration is reached. The concentration reaches steady-state when the flux reaches the steady state. The plots of flux versus time and cumulative amount of drug eliminated into the receptor cell versus time are given. Conclusion Based on the various values of the parameter, C, conclusions are drawn about (1 flow rate of the drug in different regions of the skin, (2 shape of the concentration profiles, (3 the time required to reach the steady-state

  9. Mathematical model for drug molecules encapsulated in lipid nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putthikorn, Sasipim; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-11-01

    Lipid nanotube is considered as a nanocontainer for drug and gene delivery. It is important to understand a basic idea of the encapsulation process. In this paper, we use the Lennard-Jones potential function and the continuous approximation to explain the energy behaviour of three hollow shapes of Doxorubicin (DOX) clusters that are a sphere, a cylinder, and an ellipsoid interacting with the lipid nanotube. On assuming that the surface areas of the three structures are equal, we can find the minimum size of the lipid nanotube that encapsulates DOX inside by determining the suction energy. Moreover, we find that a long cylindrical drug provides the largest suction energy among other structures studied here due to the perfect fit between the cylindrical drug and the cylindrical tube. This investigation is the first step to develop the design of nanocapsule for medical application.

  10. The effect of federal and state off-label marketing investigations on drug prescribing: The case of olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Studdert, David M; Sarpatwari, Ameet; Franklin, Jessica M; Landon, Joan; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, the federal government has frequently investigated and prosecuted pharmaceutical manufacturers for illegal promotion of drugs for indications not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ("off-label" uses). State governments can choose to coordinate with the federal investigation, or pursue their own independent state investigations. One of the largest-ever off-label prosecutions relates to the atypical antipsychotic drug olanzapine (Zyprexa). In a series of settlements between 2008 and 2010, Eli Lilly paid $1.4 billion to the federal government and over $290 million to state governments. We examined the effect of these settlements on off-label prescribing of this medication, taking advantage of geographical differences in states' involvement in the investigations and the timing of the settlements. However, we did not find a reduction in off-label prescribing; rather, there were no prescribing changes among states that joined the federal investigation, those that pursued independent state investigations, and states that pursued no investigations at all. Since the settlements of state investigations of off-label prescribing do not appear to significantly impact prescribing rates, policymakers should consider alternate ways of reducing the prevalence of non-evidence-based off-label use to complement their ongoing investigations.

  11. String Models, Stability and Regge Trajectories for Hadron States

    CERN Document Server

    Sharov, G S

    2013-01-01

    Various string models of mesons and baryons include a string carrying 2 or 3 massive points (quarks or antiquarks). Rotational states (planar uniform rotations) of these systems generate quasilinear Regge trajectories and may be used for describing excited hadron states on these trajectories. For different string models of baryon we are to solve the problem of choice between them and the stability problem for their rotational states. An unexpected result is that for the Y string baryon model these rotations are unstable with respect to small disturbances on the classical level. This instability has specific feature, disturbances grow linearly, whereas for the linear string baryon model they grow exponentially and may increase predictions for baryon's width $\\Gamma$. The classical instability of rotational states and nonstandard Regge slope are the arguments in favor of the stable simplest model of string with massive ends both for baryons and mesons. Rotational states of this model with two types of spin-orbi...

  12. A multistate model to evaluate COPD progression integrating drugs consumption data and hospital databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bartolomeo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The increase in costs related to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic-degenerative diseases requires a better knowledge of the true care pathway of patients. The study objective was to explore, using multi-state modeling, how analyses of drug prescriptions and data obtained from hospital discharge sheets can be used in combination to build a model of patients health care pathway in a non experimental setting. The model was applied to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. Methods Based on the GOLD guidelines, access to hospitalization for COPD and prescription pharmaceuticals were awarded to seven transients states theoretically progressive. The intensity of transition were estimated with the non-parametric method proposed by Aalen and Johansen for multi-state Markov models non-homogeneous in time. Results The COPD patients included in the study are 111190. Patients admitted with a diagnosis of non acute COPD had a growing probability over time of needing prescriptions for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS or the set combination of long-acting beta-agonists (LABA and ICS; they also had a rising probability of an exacerbation. The use of ICS alone or in combination with LABA delays a hospital admission for acute respiratory failure by about 6 months, as compared to short-acting beta-agonists or anticholinergics. Conclusion The probabilities of a transition and their distribution in relation to time, sex, age and clinical status can be a helpful tool for those operating in the health care sector, who are called upon to carry out decisions from the standpoints of both efficacious clinical management and an efficient use of resources.

  13. Neuroimaging markers of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems in drug addiction: relationships to resting-state functional connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Scott J.; London, Edythe D.; Northoff, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by widespread abnormalities in brain function and neurochemistry, including drug-associated effects on concentrations of the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively. In healthy individuals, these neurotransmitters drive the resting state, a default condition of brain function also disrupted in addiction. Here, our primary goal was to review in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography studies that examined markers of glutamate and GABA abnormalities in human drug addiction. Addicted individuals tended to show decreases in these markers compared with healthy controls, but findings also varied by individual characteristics (e.g., abstinence length). Interestingly, select corticolimbic brain regions showing glutamatergic and/or GABAergic abnormalities have been similarly implicated in resting-state functional connectivity deficits in drug addiction. Thus, our secondary goals were to provide a brief review of this resting-state literature, and an initial rationale for the hypothesis that abnormalities in glutamatergic and/or GABAergic neurotransmission may underlie resting-state functional deficits in drug addiction. In doing so, we suggest future research directions and possible treatment implications. PMID:26657968

  14. Neuroimaging markers of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems in drug addiction: Relationships to resting-state functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Scott J; London, Edythe D; Northoff, Georg

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by widespread abnormalities in brain function and neurochemistry, including drug-associated effects on concentrations of the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively. In healthy individuals, these neurotransmitters drive the resting state, a default condition of brain function also disrupted in addiction. Here, our primary goal was to review in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and positron emission tomography studies that examined markers of glutamate and GABA abnormalities in human drug addiction. Addicted individuals tended to show decreases in these markers compared with healthy controls, but findings also varied by individual characteristics (e.g., abstinence length). Interestingly, select corticolimbic brain regions showing glutamatergic and/or GABAergic abnormalities have been similarly implicated in resting-state functional connectivity deficits in drug addiction. Thus, our secondary goals were to provide a brief review of this resting-state literature, and an initial rationale for the hypothesis that abnormalities in glutamatergic and/or GABAergic neurotransmission may underlie resting-state functional deficits in drug addiction. In doing so, we suggest future research directions and possible treatment implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonequilibrium Markov state modeling of the globule-stretch transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We describe a systematic approach to construct coarse-grained Markov state models from molecular dynamics data of systems driven into a nonequilibrium steady state. We apply this method to study the globule-stretch transition of a single tethered model polymer in shear flow. The folding and unfolding rates of the coarse-grained model agree with the original detailed model. We demonstrate that the folding and unfolding proceeds through the same narrow region of configuration space but along different cycles.

  16. Difference and Influence of Inactive and Active States of Cannabinoid Receptor Subtype CB2: From Conformation to Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianping; Feng, Zhiwei; Ma, Shifan; Zhang, Yu; Tong, Qin; Alqarni, Mohammed Hamed; Gou, Xiaojun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-06-27

    antagonist(s) at low concentration. Moreover, the hit from the active CB2 model also behaves as a neutral antagonist at low concentration. Our studies provide new insight leading to a better understanding of the structural and conformational differences between two states of CB2 and illuminate the effects of structure on virtual screening and drug design.

  17. Comparing State SAT Scores Using a Mixture Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungKoung Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Presented at the national conference for AERA (American Educational Research Association) in April 2009. The large variability of SAT taker population across states makes state-by-state comparisons of the SAT scores challenging. Using a mixture modeling approach, therefore, the current study presents a method of identifying subpopulations in terms…

  18. Southern european model welfare state and economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpoutsiou S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current economic crisis has affected the exercise of social policy and has shrunk welfare states in southern Europe. The welfare state, a structure that is a pillar and constant goal of Greek ideology and culture seems to accept strong tremors that threaten the social cohesion of Greek society. This literature review presents the characteristics of the applied social policy and the different models of welfare states, focusing on South model welfare state. Additionally presented benefits of the welfare state such as pension and insurance system and the degree of their contribution to the economic crisis in Greece in recent years.

  19. Mathematical model to analyze the dissolution behavior of metastable crystals or amorphous drug accompanied with a solid-liquid interface reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Daiki; Iwao, Yasunori; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-02-21

    Metastable crystals and the amorphous state of poorly water-soluble drugs in solid dispersions (SDs), are subject to a solid-liquid interface reaction upon exposure to a solvent. The dissolution behavior during the solid-liquid interface reaction often shows that the concentration of drugs is supersaturated, with a high initial drug concentration compared with the solubility of stable crystals but finally approaching the latter solubility with time. However, a method for measuring the precipitation rate of stable crystals and/or the potential solubility of metastable crystals or amorphous drugs has not been established. In this study, a novel mathematical model that can represent the dissolution behavior of the solid-liquid interface reaction for metastable crystals or amorphous drug was developed and its validity was evaluated. The theory for this model was based on the Noyes-Whitney equation and assumes that the precipitation of stable crystals at the solid-liquid interface occurs through a first-order reaction. Moreover, two models were developed, one assuming that the surface area of the drug remains constant because of the presence of excess drug in the bulk and the other that the surface area changes in time-dependency because of agglomeration of the drug. SDs of Ibuprofen (IB)/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were prepared and their dissolution behaviors under non-sink conditions were fitted by the models to evaluate improvements in solubility. The model assuming time-dependent surface area showed good agreement with experimental values. Furthermore, by applying the model to the dissolution profile, parameters such as the precipitation rate and the potential solubility of the amorphous drug were successfully calculated. In addition, it was shown that the improvement in solubility with supersaturation was able to be evaluated quantitatively using this model. Therefore, this mathematical model would be a useful tool to quantitatively determine the supersaturation

  20. Biopharmaceutical modeling of drug supersaturation during lipid-based formulation digestion considering an absorption sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillhart, Cordula; Imanidis, Georgios; Griffin, Brendan T; Kuentz, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In vitro lipolysis is widely utilized for predicting in vivo performance of oral lipid-based formulations (LBFs). However, evaluation of LBFs in the absence of an absorption sink may have limited in vivo relevance. This study aimed at employing biopharmaceutical modeling to simulate LBF digestion and drug supersaturation in a continuous absorptive environment. Three fenofibrate-loaded LBFs were characterized in vitro (dispersion and lipolysis) and drug precipitation was monitored using in-line Raman spectroscopy. In vitro data were combined with pharmacokinetic data derived from an in vivo study in pigs to simulate intestinal LBF transit. This biopharmaceutical model allowed calculation of lipolysis-triggered drug supersaturation while drug and lipolysis products are absorbed from the intestine. The biopharmaceutical model predicted that, in a continuous absorption environment, fenofibrate supersaturation was considerably lower compared to in vitro lipolysis (non-sink). Hence, the extensive drug precipitation observed in vitro was predicted to be unlikely in vivo. The absorption of lipolysis products increased drug supersaturation, but drug precipitation was unlikely for highly permeable drugs. Biopharmaceutical modeling is a valuable approach for predicting LBFs performance in vivo. In the absence of in vitro tools simulating absorptive conditions, modeling strategies should be further considered.

  1. Kinetic model of drug distribution in the urinary bladder wall following intravesical instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabnar, I; Bogataj, M; Belic, A; Logar, V; Karba, R; Mrhar, A

    2006-09-28

    Intravesical administration of cytotoxic agents is commonly used in urological practice for treatment of superficial bladder cancer. The leading motive is optimisation of drug delivery near the site of action and reduction of systemic toxicity. Bladder pharmacokinetics is complicated by several mechanisms. The objectives of this work were to develop a kinetic model of drug distribution in the bladder wall following intravesical instillation and to study the effect of various parameters on tissue and systemic drug exposure and explore the potential benefits of permeability enhancing effects of chitosan (CH) and polycarbophil (PC) through simulation. Key elements of the model are variable urinary drug concentration due to urine formation and voiding, biphasic diffusion in the bladder tissue and systemic absorption. Model parameters were estimated from bladder-tissue concentration profiles obtained in previous in vitro experiments with pipemidic acid (PPA) as a model drug. The results support further investigations on application of CH and PC in intravesical drug delivery. Both polymers increase permeability of the bladder wall by diffusion enhancement in the urothelium and presumably by improving the contact with the bladder surface. The developed mathematical model could serve for optimisation of intravesical drug delivery and future development of intravesical drug delivery systems.

  2. The paradigm shift to an “open” model in drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Au

    2014-01-01

    The rising cost of healthcare, the rising cost for drug development, the patent cliff for Big pharma, shorter patent protection, decrease reimbursement, and the recession have made it more difficult for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry to develop drugs. Due to the unsustainable amount of time and money in developing a drug that will have a significant return on investment (ROI) it has become hard to sustain a robust pipeline. The industry is transforming its business model to mee...

  3. Concepts and Challenges in Quantitative Pharmacology and Model-Based Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liping; Pfister, Marc; Meibohm, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Model-based drug development (MBDD) has been recognized as a concept to improve the efficiency of drug development. The acceptance of MBDD from regulatory agencies, industry, and academia has been growing, yet today’s drug development practice is still distinctly distant from MBDD. This manuscript is aimed at clarifying the concept of MBDD and proposing practical approaches for implementing MBDD in the pharmaceutical industry. The following concepts are defined and distinguished: PK–PD modeli...

  4. Mechanistic modeling of ophthalmic drug delivery to the anterior chamber by eye drops and contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gause, Samuel; Hsu, Kuan-Hui; Shafor, Chancellor; Dixon, Phillip; Powell, Kristin Conrad; Chauhan, Anuj

    2016-07-01

    Ophthalmic drug for the anterior chamber diseases are delivered into tears by either eye drops or by extended release devices placed in the eyes. The instilled drug exits the eye through various routes including tear drainage into the nose through the canaliculi and transport across various ocular membranes. Understanding the mechanisms relevant to each route can be useful in predicting the dependency of ocular bioavailability on various formulation parameters, such as drug concentration, salinity, viscosity, etc. Mathematical modeling has been developed for each of the routes and validated by comparison with experiments. The individual models can be combined into a system model to predict the fraction of the instilled drug that reaches the target. This review summarizes the individual models for the transport of drugs across the cornea and conjunctiva and the canaliculi tear drainage. It also summarizes the combined tear dynamics model that can predict the ocular bioavailability of drugs instilled as eye drops. The predictions from the individual models and the combined model are in good agreement with experimental data. Both experiments and models predict that the corneal bioavailability for drugs delivered through eye drops is less than 5% due to the small area of the cornea in comparison to the conjunctiva, and the rapid clearance of the instilled solution by tear drainage. A contact lens is a natural choice for delivering drugs to the cornea due to the placement of the contact in the immediate vicinity of the cornea. The drug released by the contact towards the cornea surface is trapped in the post lens tear film for extended duration of at least 30min allowing transport of a large portion into the cornea. The model predictions backed by in vivo animal and clinical data show that the bioavailability increases to about 50% with contact lenses. This realization has encouraged considerable research towards delivering ocular drugs by contact lenses. Commercial

  5. THE MODELING OF DRUG ADDICTION PREVALENCE AND ITS CONSEQUENCES IN RUSSIAN REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Sirotin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The narcotization prevalence in Russia as whole and its regions is described. In order to provide the adequate models the clusters of regions on the level of their economic development are defined. For every group the regression model of drug addiction social distress is constructed. Modeling results allow to find the features of regions and the most significant factors determining the drug addiction prevalence.

  6. Modeling Initiation into Drug Injection among Street Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Elise; Godin, Gaston; Boudreau, Jean-Francois; Cote, Philippe-Benoit; Denis, Veronique; Haley, Nancy; Leclerc, Pascale; Boivin, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the predictors of initiation into drug injection among street youth using social cognitive theory framework. A prospective cohort study based on semi-annual interviews was carried out. Psychosocial determinants referred to avoidance of initiation. Other potential predictors were: sociodemographic characteristics,…

  7. hiv prevention among drug and alcohol users: models of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Few programs have been implemented in Africa to deal specifically ... INTRODUCTION. The abuse of ... Identification Test (AUDIT) (Shaffer et al. 2004). .... actual diagnosis meeting the DSM-IV-TR ..... effective entry point for screening clients ... also manage the HIV care of the drug and .... perspective, it is still an essential.

  8. Dynamic State Space Partitioning for External Memory Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelista, Sami; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    2009-01-01

    We describe a dynamic partitioning scheme usable by model checking techniques that divide the state space into partitions, such as most external memory and distributed model checking algorithms. The goal of the scheme is to reduce the number of transitions that link states belonging to different...

  9. State model for partly undetected non-communicable diseases (NCDs)

    OpenAIRE

    Brinks, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes an age-structured compartment model for irreversible diseases with a pre-clinical state of undiagnosed cases that precedes the diagnosis. The model is able to cope with mortality rates differing between the pre-clinical and the clinical state (differential mortality). Applicability is tested in a hypothetical disease with realistic incidence and mortality rates.

  10. Dependency in State Transitions of Wind Turbines - Inference on model Residuals for State Abstractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herp, Jürgen; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil

    2017-01-01

    the state transitions are based on a hidden variable relevant for the predictor, namely the information of the current state. Given an underlying predictive model based on a Student's t-distribution for the samples and a conditional prior on the state transition, it is shown that state transitions can...... configurations. Comparing to heuristic interpretations of the residuals both models can qualitatively inform about the time when a state transition occurs.......Abstracting turbine states and predicting the transition into failure states ahead of time is important in operation and maintenance of wind turbines. This study presents a method to monitor state transitions of a wind turbine based on the online inference on residuals. In a Bayesian framework...

  11. Mathematical Models for Controlled Drug Release Through pH-Responsive Polymeric Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manga, Ramya D; Jha, Prateek K

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogels consisting of weakly charged acidic/basic groups are ideal candidates for carriers in oral delivery, as they swell in response to pH changes in the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in drug entrapment at low pH conditions of the stomach and drug release at high pH conditions of the intestine. We have developed 1-dimensional mathematical models to study the drug release behavior through pH-responsive hydrogels. Models are developed for 3 different cases that vary in the level of rigor, which together can be applied to predict both in vitro (drug release from carrier) and in vivo (drug concentration in the plasma) behavior of hydrogel-drug formulations. A detailed study of the effect of hydrogel and drug characteristics and physiological conditions is performed to gain a fundamental insight into the drug release behavior, which may be useful in the design of pH-responsive drug carriers. Finally, we describe a successful application of these models to predict both in vitro and in vivo behavior of docetaxel-loaded micelle in a pH-responsive hydrogel, as reported in a recent experimental study. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Population structure and circulating genotypes of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in São Paulo state, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Conceição; Saraiva Giampaglia, Carmen M.; Oliveira, Rosângela S.; Simonsen, Vera; Latrilha, Fábio Oliveira; Moniz, Letícia Lisboa; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine

    2013-01-01

    São Paulo is the most populous Brazilian state and reports the largest number of tuberculosis cases in the country annually (over 18,500). This study included 193 isolates obtained during the 2nd Nationwide Survey on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Resistance that was conducted in São Paulo state and 547 isolates from a laboratory based study of drug resistance that were analyzed by the Mycobacteria Reference Laboratory at the Institute Adolfo Lutz. Both studies were conducted from 2006 to 2008 and sought to determine the genetic diversity and pattern of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates (MTC) circulating in São Paulo. The patterns obtained from the spoligotyping analysis demonstrated that 51/740 (6.9%) of the isolates corresponded to orphan patterns and that 689 (93.1%) of the isolates distributed into 144 shared types, including 119 that matched a preexisting shared type in the SITVIT2 database and 25 that were new isolates. A total of 77/144 patterns corresponded to unique isolates, while the remaining 67 corresponded to clustered patterns (n = 612 isolates clustered into groups of 2–84 isolates each). The evolutionarily ancient PGG1 lineages (Beijing, CAS1-DEL, EAI3-IND, and PINI2) were rarely detected in São Paulo and comprised only 13/740, or 1.76%, of the total isolates; all of the remaining 727/740, or 98.24%, of the MTC isolates from São Paulo state were from the recent PGG2/3 evolutionary isolates belonging to the LAM, T, S, X, and Haarlem lineages, i.e., the Euro-American group. This study provides the first overview of circulating genotypes of M. tuberculosis in São Paulo state and demonstrates that the clustered shared types containing seven or more M. tuberculosis isolates that are spread in São Paulo state included both resistant and susceptible isolates. PMID:23201043

  13. Population structure and circulating genotypes of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in São Paulo state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Conceição; Giampaglia, Carmen M Saraiva; Oliveira, Rosângela S; Simonsen, Vera; Latrilha, Fábio Oliveira; Moniz, Letícia Lisboa; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine

    2013-03-01

    São Paulo is the most populous Brazilian state and reports the largest number of tuberculosis cases in the country annually (over 18,500). This study included 193 isolates obtained during the 2nd Nationwide Survey on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Resistance that was conducted in São Paulo state and 547 isolates from a laboratory based study of drug resistance that were analyzed by the Mycobacteria Reference Laboratory at the Institute Adolfo Lutz. Both studies were conducted from 2006 to 2008 and sought to determine the genetic diversity and pattern of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates (MTC) circulating in São Paulo. The patterns obtained from the spoligotyping analysis demonstrated that 51/740 (6.9%) of the isolates corresponded to orphan patterns and that 689 (93.1%) of the isolates distributed into 144 shared types, including 119 that matched a preexisting shared type in the SITVIT2 database and 25 that were new isolates. A total of 77/144 patterns corresponded to unique isolates, while the remaining 67 corresponded to clustered patterns (n=612 isolates clustered into groups of 2-84 isolates each). The evolutionarily ancient PGG1 lineages (Beijing, CAS1-DEL, EAI3-IND, and PINI2) were rarely detected in São Paulo and comprised only 13/740, or 1.76%, of the total isolates; all of the remaining 727/740, or 98.24%, of the MTC isolates from São Paulo state were from the recent PGG2/3 evolutionary isolates belonging to the LAM, T, S, X, and Haarlem lineages, i.e., the Euro-American group. This study provides the first overview of circulating genotypes of M. tuberculosis in São Paulo state and demonstrates that the clustered shared types containing seven or more M. tuberculosis isolates that are spread in São Paulo state included both resistant and susceptible isolates.

  14. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  15. 75 FR 17418 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Food and Drug...

  16. 75 FR 17423 - Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug Administration, United States Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding Between the Food and Drug... Drug Administration (FDA) is providing notice of a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the FDA, U...

  17. Educational Programs Offered by Colleges of Pharmacy and Drug Information Centers within the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Harold L.; Rosenberg, Jack M.

    1984-01-01

    Surveys mailed to institutions known to be active in disseminating drug information as well as colleges of pharmacy indicated that many of today's pharmacy students may not be receiving sufficient drug information training to respond to the drug information needs of other health professionals and the public. (Author/MLW)

  18. In-silico ADME models: a general assessment of their utility in drug discovery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, M Paul; Hersey, Anne; Hannongbua, Supa

    2011-01-01

    ADME prediction is an extremely challenging area as many of the properties we try to predict are a result of multiple physiological processes. In this review we consider how in-silico predictions of ADME processes can be used to help bias medicinal chemistry into more ideal areas of property space, minimizing the number of compounds needed to be synthesized to obtain the required biochemical/physico-chemical profile. While such models are not sufficiently accurate to act as a replacement for in-vivo or in-vitro methods, in-silico methods nevertheless can help us to understand the underlying physico-chemical dependencies of the different ADME properties, and thus can give us inspiration on how to optimize them. Many global in-silico ADME models (i.e generated on large, diverse datasets) have been reported in the literature. In this paper we selectively review representatives from each distinct class and discuss their relative utility in drug discovery. For each ADME parameter, we limit our discussion to the most recent, most predictive or most insightful examples in the literature to highlight the current state of the art. In each case we briefly summarize the different types of models available for each parameter (i.e simple rules, physico-chemical and 3D based QSAR predictions), their overall accuracy and the underlying SAR. We also discuss the utility of the models as related to lead generation and optimization phases of discovery research.

  19. An axisymmetric steady state vortex ring model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ruo-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Based on the solution of Atanasiu et al. (2004), a theoretical model for axisymmetric vortex flows is derived in the present study by solving the vorticity transport equation for an inviscid, incompressible fluid in cylindrical coordinates. The model can describe a variety of axisymmetric flows with particular boundary conditions at a moderately high Reynolds number. This paper shows one example: a high Reynolds number laminar vortex ring. The model can represent a family of vortex rings by specifying the modulus function using a Rayleigh distribution function. The characteristics of this vortex ring family are illustrated by numerical methods. For verification, the model results compare well with the recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) in terms of the vorticity distribution and streamline patterns, cross-sectional areas of the vortex core and bubble, and radial vorticity distribution through the vortex center. Most importantly, the asymmetry and elliptical outline of the vorticity profile are well capt...

  20. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    -state (untreated, treated, dead) semi-Markov model to analyse the dynamics of drug use. Transitions were from untreated to treated (incidence), the reverse (discontinuation), and from either untreated or treated to dead. Stratified by sex and age categories, prevalence trends of "growth driving" drug categories...... were analysed, exploring trends in incidence- mortality- and discontinuation rates. Trends in prevalence proportions were estimated from logistic regression. Incidence-, discontinuation and mortality rates from Poisson regression. Results: The total cardiovascular treatment intensity increased from 285...

  1. The paradigm shift to an “open” model in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Au

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising cost of healthcare, the rising cost for drug development, the patent cliff for Big pharma, shorter patent protection, decrease reimbursement, and the recession have made it more difficult for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry to develop drugs. Due to the unsustainable amount of time and money in developing a drug that will have a significant return on investment (ROI it has become hard to sustain a robust pipeline. The industry is transforming its business model to meet these challenges. In essence a paradigm shift is occurring; the old “closed” model is giving way to a new “open” business model.

  2. Finite State Transducers Approximating Hidden Markov Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kempe, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the conversion of a Hidden Markov Model into a sequential transducer that closely approximates the behavior of the stochastic model. This transformation is especially advantageous for part-of-speech tagging because the resulting transducer can be composed with other transducers that encode correction rules for the most frequent tagging errors. The speed of tagging is also improved. The described methods have been implemented and successfully tested on six languages.

  3. Neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development: an ideal model in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chism, David D; Woods, Michael E; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) has been shown to confer a survival advantage in two randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis. Despite level 1 evidence supporting its benefit, utilization remains dismal with nearly one-half of patients ineligible for cisplatin-based therapy because of renal dysfunction, impaired performance status, and/or coexisting medical problems. This situation highlights the need for the development of novel therapies for the management of MIBC, a disease with a lethal phenotype. The neoadjuvant paradigm in bladder cancer offers many advantages for accelerated drug development. First, there is a greater likelihood of successful therapy at an earlier disease state that may be characterized by less genomic instability compared with the metastatic setting, with an early readout of activity with results determined in months rather than years. Second, pre- and post-treatment tumor tissue collection in patients with MIBC is performed as the standard of care without the need for research-directed biopsies, allowing for the ability to perform important correlative studies and to monitor tumor response to therapy in "real time." Third, pathological complete response (pT0) predicts for improved outcome in patients with MIBC. Fourth, there is a strong biological rationale with rapidly accumulating evidence for actionable targets in bladder cancer. This review focuses on the neoadjuvant paradigm for accelerated drug development using bladder cancer as the ideal model.

  4. Low potency and limited efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in the mouse 6 Hz corneal kindling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, K; Matagne, A; Kaminski, R M

    2014-05-01

    Corneal kindling is a useful alternative to electrically induced amygdala or hippocampal kindling, which requires advanced surgical and EEG techniques that may not be easily available in many laboratories. Therefore the first aim of this study was to evaluate whether repeated 6 Hz corneal stimulation in mice would lead to an increased and persistent seizure response as described for higher frequency (50/60 Hz) corneal kindling. Male NMRI mice stimulated twice daily (except weekends) for 3 s with 6 Hz electrical current at 44 mA displayed robust kindling development, i.e., a progressive increase in seizure severity. The majority of the animals (about 90%) developed a fully kindled state, defined as at least 10 consecutive stage 3-5 seizures within 5 weeks of corneal stimulation. Afterwards, the fully kindled state was maintained for at least 8 weeks with only two days of stimulations per week. Next, the protective efficacy of four mechanistically different antiepileptic drugs (AEDs; clonazepam, valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam) was assessed and compared between 6 Hz and 50 Hz fully kindled mice. All tested AEDs showed a relatively lower potency in the 6 Hz kindling model and a limited efficacy against partial seizures was observed with carbamazepine and levetiracetam. We can conclude that 6 Hz kindling may be more advantageous than the previously described 50/60 Hz corneal kindling models due to its robustness and persistence of the fully kindled state. Furthermore, the observed low potency and limited efficacy of AEDs in 6 Hz fully kindled mice suggest that this model could be a useful tool in the discovery of novel AEDs targeting treatment resistant epilepsy.

  5. Monitoring model drug microencapsulation in PLGA scaffolds using X-ray powder diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Adeyinka Aina; Manish Gupta; Yamina Boukari; Andrew Morris; Nashiru Billa; Stephen Doughty

    2015-01-01

    The microencapsulation of three model drugs; metronidazole, paracetamol and sulphapyridine into Poly (dl-Lactide-Co-Glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds were probed using X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD). Changes in the diffraction patterns of the PLGA scaffolds after encapsulation was suggestive of a chemical interaction between the pure drugs and the scaffolds and not a physical intermixture.

  6. Monitoring model drug microencapsulation in PLGA scaffolds using X-ray powder d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyinka Aina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The microencapsulation of three model drugs; metronidazole, paracetamol and sulphapyridine into Poly (dl-Lactide-Co-Glycolide (PLGA scaffolds were probed using X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD. Changes in the diffraction patterns of the PLGA scaffolds after encapsulation was suggestive of a chemical interaction between the pure drugs and the scaffolds and not a physical intermixture.

  7. Monitoring model drug microencapsulation in PLGA scaffolds using X-ray powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, Adeyinka; Gupta, Manish; Boukari, Yamina; Morris, Andrew; Billa, Nashiru; Doughty, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The microencapsulation of three model drugs; metronidazole, paracetamol and sulphapyridine into Poly (dl-Lactide-Co-Glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds were probed using X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD). Changes in the diffraction patterns of the PLGA scaffolds after encapsulation was suggestive of a chemical interaction between the pure drugs and the scaffolds and not a physical intermixture.

  8. A stochastic multicriteria model for evidence-based decision making in drug benefit-risk analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervonen, Tommi; van Valkenhoef, Gert; Buskens, Erik; Hillege, Hans L.; Postmus, Douwe

    2011-01-01

    Drug benefit-risk (BR) analysis is based on firm clinical evidence regarding various safety and efficacy outcomes. In this paper, we propose a new and more formal approach for constructing a supporting multicriteria model that fully takes into account the evidence on efficacy and adverse drug reacti

  9. Why Do Adolescents Use Drugs? A Common Sense Explanatory Model from the Social Actor's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuno-Gutierrez, Bertha Lidia; Rodriguez-Cerda, Oscar; Alvarez-Nemegyei, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Analysis was made of the common sense explanations of 60 Mexican teenage illicit drug users in rehabilitation to determine their drug use debut. The explanatory model was separated into three blocks, two of which contained common sense aspects: interaction between subject's plane and the collectivity; and relationship between subject's interior…

  10. A Comprehensive Action Model to Combat Drug Abuse in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Robert F.

    1970-01-01

    Emphasized in the model are: creation and adoption of new Board policies and procedures to deal with the drug abuser, crash Emergency Room" program of drug education for grades 4 through 12, inservice education of staff, lowkey parent education, increased employment of paraprofessional supervisory personnel, and community acceptance of and…

  11. [Alcohol and illicit drug use and its influence on the sexual behavior of teenagers from Minas Gerais State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoni, Neilane; Bastos, Francisco I; Mello, Maeve Brito de; Makuch, Maria Yolanda; Sousa, Maria Helena de; Osis, Maria José; Faúndes, Anibal

    2009-06-01

    This article summarizes the findings of a survey including 5,981 students from public schools in Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The analysis assessed the influence of drug use on sexual practices. Among the boys engaged in relationships with casual partners who stated having used illicit drugs, 55.7% reported consistent condom use, as compared to 65.4% among those not reporting such habits. Among boys engaged in relationships with stable partners who reported illicit drug use, consistent condom use was reported by 42.7%, versus 64.1% among those not reporting such habits. In the subgroup of boys engaged in stable relationships who did not report illicit drug use, consistent condom use was less frequent among those that used alcohol/cigarettes, compared to those who did not drink or smoke (60.7% vs. 71.1%). Girls were less likely than boys to use condoms consistently, regardless of the nature of their relationships, without a noticeable influence of drug use. Policies to prevent drug abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, and unplanned pregnancy should be fully integrated.

  12. Psychoactive drug advertising: a comparison of technical information from three countries: Brazil, United States and United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia de Carvalho Mastroianni

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Studies carried out in the 1970s and 1980s showed that there were country-dependent disparities in the information given for the same drug in medical advertisements. National and international regulations have been published to do away with such disparities and to foster the rational use of drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare the information contained in psychoactive drug advertisements published in psychiatric journals in Brazil, the United States and the United Kingdom, before and subsequent to the publication of the United States Export Act, in 1986, the WHO criteria, in 1988, and the Brazilian Sanitary Surveillance Agency Resolution no. 102, in 2000. TYPE OF STUDY AND SETTING: Content analysis, at Centro Brasileiro de Informações sobre Drogas Psicotrópicas (Cebrid. METHODS: We gathered advertisements from Brazilian, American and British psychiatry periodicals published before and after each ruling. We analyzed a total of twenty-four Brazilian advertisements that were for the same psychoactive drugs as advertised in American and/or British publications from the same period. RESULTS: We observed that Brazilian advertisements omitted information on usage restrictions, such as contraindications, adverse reactions, interactions, warnings and precautions, and that such information was present in American and British advertisements. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that disparities in the information given for the same drug still persist. The information depends on the country in which each drug is marketed. The legislation is insufficient for eradicating such disparities.

  13. Chemotherapy induces adaptive drug resistance and metastatic potentials via phenotypic CXCR4-expressing cell state transition in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Hee; Bellat, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OVC) patients who receive chemotherapy often acquire drug resistance within one year. This can lead to tumor reoccurrence and metastasis, the major causes of mortality. We report a transient increase of a small distinctive CXCR4High/CD24Low cancer stem cell population (CXCR4High) in A2780 and SKOV-3 OVC cell lines in response to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel, treatments. The withdrawal of the drug challenges reversed this cell-state transition. CXCR4High exhibits dormancy in drug resistance and mesenchymal-like invasion, migration, colonization, and tumor formation properties. The removal of this cell population from a doxorubicin-resistant A2780 lineage (A2780/ADR) recovered the sensitivity to drug treatments. A cytotoxic peptide (CXCR4-KLA) that can selectively target cell-surface CXCR4 receptor was further synthesized to investigate the therapeutic merits of targeting CXCR4High. This peptide was more potent than the conventional CXCR4 antagonists (AMD3100 and CTCE-9908) in eradicating the cancer stem cells. When used together with cytotoxic agents such as doxorubicin and cisplatin, the combined drug-peptide regimens exhibited a synergistic cell-killing effect on A2780, A2780/ADR, and SKOV-3. Our data suggested that chemotherapy could establish drug-resistant and tumor-initiating properties of OVC via reversible CXCR4 cell state transition. Therapeutic strategies designed to eradicate rather than antagonize CXCR4High might offer a far-reaching potential as supportive chemotherapy. PMID:28196146

  14. A Simple Hubbard Model for the Excited States of Dibenzoterrylene

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeq, Z S

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple Hubbard model to characterize the electronic excited states of the dibenzoterrylene (DBT) molecule; we compute the excited state transition energies and oscillator strengths from the ground state to several singlet excited states. We consider the lowest singlet and triplet states of the molecule, examine their wavefunctions, and compute the density correlation functions that describe these states. We find that the DBT ground state is mostly a closed shell singlet with very slight radical character. We predict a relatively small singlet-triplet splitting of 0.75 eV, which is less than the mid-sized -acenes but larger than literature predictions for this state; this is because the Hubbard interaction makes a very small correction to the singlet and triplet states.

  15. Estimation methods for nonlinear state-space models in ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Berg, Casper Willestofte; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2011-01-01

    The use of nonlinear state-space models for analyzing ecological systems is increasing. A wide range of estimation methods for such models are available to ecologists, however it is not always clear, which is the appropriate method to choose. To this end, three approaches to estimation in the theta...... logistic model for population dynamics were benchmarked by Wang (2007). Similarly, we examine and compare the estimation performance of three alternative methods using simulated data. The first approach is to partition the state-space into a finite number of states and formulate the problem as a hidden...... Markov model (HMM). The second method uses the mixed effects modeling and fast numerical integration framework of the AD Model Builder (ADMB) open-source software. The third alternative is to use the popular Bayesian framework of BUGS. The study showed that state and parameter estimation performance...

  16. Regulatory framework for the availability and use of animal drugs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modric, Sanja

    2013-09-01

    The goal of this article is to help practitioners understand the regulatory framework and basis for the approval of new animal drugs, the terminology and specific meaning of terms related to drug approval, and the marketing and use of veterinary drugs in companion animal practice. Understanding the differences between approved versus unapproved drugs and their use helps practitioners make the appropriate clinical decisions on their patients' treatment. Only when buying approved animal drugs can clinicians be assured of product safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing to the strict standards for quality, purity, and potency, as well as truthful and complete labeling.

  17. A hybrid cellular automaton model of solid tumor growth and bioreductive drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmi, Nabila; Hossain, M A; Phillips, Roger M

    2012-01-01

    Bioreductive drugs are a class of hypoxia selective drugs that are designed to eradicate the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors. Their activity depends upon a number of biological and pharmacological factors and we used a mathematical modeling approach to explore the dynamics of tumor growth, infusion, and penetration of the bioreductive drug Tirapazamine (TPZ). An in-silico model is implemented to calculate the tumor mass considering oxygen and glucose as key microenvironmental parameters. The next stage of the model integrated extra cellular matrix (ECM), cell-cell adhesion, and cell movement parameters as growth constraints. The tumor microenvironments strongly influenced tumor morphology and growth rates. Once the growth model was established, a hybrid model was developed to study drug dynamics inside the hypoxic regions of tumors. The model used 10, 50 and 100 \\mu {\\rm M} as TPZ initial concentrations and determined TPZ pharmacokinetic (PK) (transport) and pharmacodynamics (cytotoxicity) properties inside hypoxic regions of solid tumor. The model results showed that diminished drug transport is a reason for TPZ failure and recommend the optimization of the drug transport properties in the emerging TPZ generations. The modeling approach used in this study is novel and can be a step to explore the behavioral dynamics of TPZ.

  18. A drug cost model for injuries due to road traffic accidents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riewpaiboon A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to develop a drug cost model for injuries due to road traffic accidents for patients receiving treatment at a regional hospital in Thailand. Methods: The study was designed as a retrospective, descriptive analysis. The cases were all from road traffic accidents receiving treatment at a public regional hospital in the fiscal year 2004. Results: Three thousand seven hundred and twenty-three road accident patients were included in the study. The mean drug cost per case was USD18.20 (SD=73.49, median=2.36. The fitted drug cost model had an adjusted R2 of 0.449. The positive significant predictor variables of drug costs were prolonged length of stay, age over 30 years old, male, Universal Health Coverage Scheme, time of accident during 18:00-24:00 o’clock, and motorcycle comparing to bus. To forecast the drug budget for 2006, there were two approaches identified, the mean drug cost and the predicted average drug cost. The predicted average drug cost was calculated based on the forecasted values of statistically significant (p<0.05 predictor variables included in the fitted model; predicted total drug cost was USD44,334. Alternatively, based on the mean cost, predicted total drug cost in 2006 was USD63,408. This was 43% higher than the figure based on the predicted cost approach.Conclusions: The planned budget of drug cost based on the mean cost and predicted average cost were meaningfully different. The application of a predicted average cost model could result in a more accurate budget planning than that of a mean statistic approach.

  19. Assessment of anti-arrhythmic activity of antipsychotic drugs in an animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mow, Tomas; Frederiksen, Kristen; Thomsen, Morten B.

    2015-01-01

    Torsades de Pointes (TdP) is a potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia and a known adverse effect of many drugs secondary to block of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr). In animal models antipsychotic drugs have shown reduced pro-arrhythmic potential compared to drugs...... of methoxamine induced increase in blood pressure. Further investigations are required to clarify the relative importance of α1-adrenergic receptor antagonism in conjunction with the additional effects of antipsychotic drugs on various receptors and ion channels....

  20. Modeling new XYZ states at JPAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilloni, Alessandro [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The observation of the unexpected XYZP resonances has challenged the usual heavy quarkonium framework. One of the most studied exotic states, the X(3872), happens to be copiously produced in high-energy hadron collisions. We discuss how this large prompt production cross-section, together with the comparison with light nuclei production data, disfavors a loosely-bound molecule interpretation, and calls for a new interpretation for the exotic hadron resonances. We also present the research of the Joint Physics Analysis Center in Hadron Spectroscopy.

  1. The runway model of drug self-administration

    OpenAIRE

    Ettenberg, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral scientists have employed operant runways as a means of investigating the motivational impact of incentive stimuli for the better part of the past 100 years. In this task, the speed with which a trained animal traverses a long straight alley for positive incentive stimuli, like food or water, provides a reliable index of the subject’s motivation to seek those stimuli. The runway is therefore a particularly appropriate tool for investigating the drug-seeking behavior of animals worki...

  2. Reconsidering GHB: orphan drug or new model antidepressant?

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, O G; Quednow, B. B.; Seifritz, E.; Wetter, T C

    2012-01-01

    For six decades, the principal mode of action of antidepressant drugs is the inhibition of monoamine re-uptake from the synaptic cleft. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the new generation of dual antidepressants all exert their antidepressant effects by this mechanism. In the early days of the monoaminergic era, other efforts have been made to ameliorate the symptoms of depression by pharmacological means. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) syste...

  3. Pharmacological modeling and biostatistical analysis of a new drug

    OpenAIRE

    Revathi Ananthakrishnan; Philimon Gona

    2010-01-01

    Revathi Ananthakrishnan1, Philimon Gona21Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Boston University, Mathematics and Statistics Department, 111 Cummington St, Boston, MA-02215, USAAbstract: Clinical research and clinical trials of experimental drugs to treat human diseases have gained greater importance in recent years. Phase I–IV clinical trials offer patients the opportunity to gain access to a new, more efficacious and safer medication to alleviate or cure their disease. There are potential side eff...

  4. State of Modeling Symmetry in Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-22

    Modeling radiation drive asymmetry is challenging problem whose agreement with data depends on the hohlraum gas fill density. Modeling to date uses the HYDRA code with crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) calculated separately, and backscattered light removed from the input laser. For high fill hohlraums (~>1 mg/cc), matching symmetry requires ad hoc adjustments to CBET during picket and peak of drive. For near-vacuum hohlraums, there is little CBET or backscatter, and drive is more waist-high than predicted. For intermediate fill densities (~0.6 mg/cc) there appears to be a region of small CBET and backscatter where symmetry is reasonably well modeled. A new technique where backscatter and CBET are done “inline” appears it could bring high fill simulations closer to data.

  5. Coupling dark energy with Standard Model states

    CERN Document Server

    Bento, M C; Bertolami, O

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution one examines the coupling of dark energy to the gauge fields, to neutrinos, and to the Higgs field. In the first case, one shows how a putative evolution of the fundamental couplings of strong and weak interactions via coupling to dark energy through a generalized Bekenstein-type model may cause deviations on the statistical nuclear decay Rutherford-Soddy law. Existing bounds for the weak interaction exclude any significant deviation. For neutrinos, a perturbative approach is developed which allows for considering viable varying mass neutrino models coupled to any quintessence-type field. The generalized Chaplygin model is considered as an example. For the coupling with the Higgs field one obtains an interesting cosmological solution which includes the unification of dark energy and dark matter.

  6. Generic drug exclusivity system in United States%美国的仿制药独占制度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 袁红梅; 连桂玉

    2011-01-01

    [Abstract] Generic drug exclusivity is a unique form of administrative protection for pharmaceutical products in United States. This paper introduced the generic drug exclusivity system in detail, analyzed its legal nature, and objectively evaluated the effectiveness of generic drug exclusivity since its implementation. We propose the necessity and suggestion of establishing the generic drug exclusivity system in China.%仿制药独占制度是美国特有的一种药品行政保护形式.文中详细地介绍了美国的仿制药独占制度,对其法律性质进行了分析,客观评价了仿制药独占制度实施以来发挥的效用,并提出我国建立仿制药独占制度的必要性及建议.

  7. The liberal state and the rogue agency: FDA's regulation of drugs for mood disorders, 1950s-1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Edward

    2008-01-01

    The theory of the liberal state does not generally contemplate the possibility that regulatory agencies will turn into "rogues," regulating against the interests of their clients and, indeed, the public interest. In the years between circa 1955 and 1975 this seems to have happened to one of the prime regulatory agencies of the US federal government: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Intent upon transforming itself from a traditional "cop" agency to a regulatory giant, the FDA campaigned systematically to bring down some safe and effective drugs. This article concentrates on hearings in the area of psychopharmacology regarding several antianxiety drugs, namely meprobamate (Miltown), chlordiazepoxide (Librium) and diazepam (Valium). In addition, from 1967 to 1973 this regulatory vengefulness occurred on a broad scale in the Drug Efficacy Study Implementation (DESI), an administrative exercise that removed from the market almost half of the psychopharmacopoeia. The article explores possible bureaucratic motives for these actions.

  8. A state space representation of VAR models with sparse learning for dynamic gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kaname; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Yamauchi, Mai; Nagasaki, Masao; Yoshida, Ryo; Shimamura, Teppei; Ueno, Kazuko; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Gotoh, Noriko; Miyano, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    We propose a state space representation of vector autoregressive model and its sparse learning based on L1 regularization to achieve efficient estimation of dynamic gene networks based on time course microarray data. The proposed method can overcome drawbacks of the vector autoregressive model and state space model; the assumption of equal time interval and lack of separation ability of observation and systems noises in the former method and the assumption of modularity of network structure in the latter method. However, in a simple implementation the proposed model requires the calculation of large inverse matrices in a large number of times during parameter estimation process based on EM algorithm. This limits the applicability of the proposed method to a relatively small gene set. We thus introduce a new calculation technique for EM algorithm that does not require the calculation of inverse matrices. The proposed method is applied to time course microarray data of lung cells treated by stimulating EGF receptors and dosing an anticancer drug, Gefitinib. By comparing the estimated network with the control network estimated using non-treated lung cells, perturbed genes by the anticancer drug could be found, whose up- and down-stream genes in the estimated networks may be related to side effects of the anticancer drug.

  9. Shell Model States in the Continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, A M; Mazur, I A; Vary, J P

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a method for calculating scattering phase shifts and energies and widths of resonances which utilizes only eigenenergies obtained in variational calculations with oscillator basis and their dependence on oscillator basis spacing $\\hbar\\Omega$. We make use of simple expressions for the $S$-matrix at eigenstates of a finite (truncated) Hamiltonian matrix in the oscillator basis obtained in the HORSE ($J$-matrix) formalism of quantum scattering theory. The validity of the suggested approach is verified in calculations with model Woods--Saxon potentials and applied to calculations of $n\\alpha$ resonances and non-resonant scattering using the no-core shell model.

  10. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, J., E-mail: jochri@fotonik.dtu.dk; Willatzen, M. [Department of Photonics Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Liang, Z. [College of Electronic Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-12-15

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  11. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christensen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  12. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Johan; Liang, Z.; Willatzen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne...... sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simu- lations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples...

  13. Potential Exposure to Anti-Drug Advertising and Drug-Related Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors among United States Youth, 1995-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M.; Emery, Sherry; Szczypka, Glen; Johnston, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Using nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future Study on United States middle and high school students, we related exposure to anti-drug television advertising as measured by Nielsen Media Research ratings points to student self-reported drug-related outcomes from 1995-2006. Multivariate analyses controlling for key socio-demographics and accounting for the complex survey design included 337,918 cases. Results indicated that attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors regarding substance use were significantly related to such advertising exposure over the six months prior to the date youth were surveyed. However, the observed relationships varied by grade level, over time and by advertising tagline and marijuana focus. Findings differed markedly between middle and high school students across the study interval. One factor that may partially explain observed differences may be variation in the degree to which the ads focused on marijuana. Putting a concerted effort into increasing anti-drug advertising will likely increase the exposure to and recall of such ads among youth. However, the likelihood that such advertising will result in youth being less likely to use drugs seems to depend heavily on the type of advertising utilized and how it relates to different ages and characteristics of targeted youth. PMID:20961691

  14. Transformation of Neural State Space Models into LFT Models for Robust Control Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers the extraction of linear state space models and uncertainty models from neural networks trained as state estimators with direct application to robust control. A new method for writing a neural state space model in a linear fractional transformation form in a non...

  15. Modeling the Release Kinetics of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Molecules from Liposomal Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Loew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are frequently used as pharmaceutical nanocarriers to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs such as temoporfin, cyclosporine A, amphotericin B, and paclitaxel to their target site. Optimal drug delivery depends on understanding the release kinetics of the drug molecules from the host liposomes during the journey to the target site and at the target site. Transfer of drugs in model systems consisting of donor liposomes and acceptor liposomes is known from experimental work to typically exhibit a first-order kinetics with a simple exponential behavior. In some cases, a fast component in the initial transfer is present, in other cases the transfer is sigmoidal. We present and analyze a theoretical model for the transfer that accounts for two physical mechanisms, collisions between liposomes and diffusion of the drug molecules through the aqueous phase. Starting with the detailed distribution of drug molecules among the individual liposomes, we specify the conditions that lead to an apparent first-order kinetic behavior. We also discuss possible implications on the transfer kinetics of (1 high drug loading of donor liposomes, (2 attractive interactions between drug molecules within the liposomes, and (3 slow transfer of drugs between the inner and outer leaflets of the liposomes.

  16. Modeling the Release Kinetics of Poorly Water-Soluble Drug Molecules from Liposomal Nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loew, Stephan; Fahr, Alfred; May, Sylvio

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes are frequently used as pharmaceutical nanocarriers to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs such as temoporfin, cyclosporine A, amphotericin B, and paclitaxel to their target site. Optimal drug delivery depends on understanding the release kinetics of the drug molecules from the host liposomes during the journey to the target site and at the target site. Transfer of drugs in model systems consisting of donor liposomes and acceptor liposomes is known from experimental work to typically exhibit a first-order kinetics with a simple exponential behavior. In some cases, a fast component in the initial transfer is present, in other cases the transfer is sigmoidal. We present and analyze a theoretical model for the transfer that accounts for two physical mechanisms, collisions between liposomes and diffusion of the drug molecules through the aqueous phase. Starting with the detailed distribution of drug molecules among the individual liposomes, we specify the conditions that lead to an apparent first-order kinetic behavior. We also discuss possible implications on the transfer kinetics of (1) high drug loading of donor liposomes, (2) attractive interactions between drug molecules within the liposomes, and (3) slow transfer of drugs between the inner and outer leaflets of the liposomes. PMID:21773045

  17. Artificial emotional model based on finite state machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-mei; WU Wei-guo

    2008-01-01

    According to the basic emotional theory, the artificial emotional model based on the finite state machine(FSM) was presented. In finite state machine model of emotion, the emotional space included the basic emotional space and the multiple emotional spaces. The emotion-switching diagram was defined and transition function was developed using Markov chain and linear interpolation algorithm. The simulation model was built using Stateflow toolbox and Simulink toolbox based on the Matlab platform.And the model included three subsystems: the input one, the emotion one and the behavior one. In the emotional subsystem, the responses of different personalities to the external stimuli were described by defining personal space. This model takes states from an emotional space and updates its state depending on its current state and a state of its input (also a state-emotion). The simulation model realizes the process of switching the emotion from the neutral state to other basic emotions. The simulation result is proved to correspond to emotion-switching law of human beings.

  18. Disturbance modeling and state estimation for offset-free predictive control with state-space process models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjewski Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Disturbance modeling and design of state estimators for offset-free Model Predictive Control (MPC with linear state-space process models is considered in the paper for deterministic constant-type external and internal disturbances (modeling errors. The application and importance of constant state disturbance prediction in the state-space MPC controller design is presented. In the case with a measured state, this leads to the control structure without disturbance state observers. In the case with an unmeasured state, a new, simpler MPC controller-observer structure is proposed, with observation of a pure process state only. The structure is not only simpler, but also with less restrictive applicability conditions than the conventional approach with extended process-and-disturbances state estimation. Theoretical analysis of the proposed structure is provided. The design approach is also applied to the case with an augmented state-space model in complete velocity form. The results are illustrated on a 2×2 example process problem.

  19. Mathematical modeling analysis of intratumoral disposition of anticancer agents and drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popilski, Hen; Stepensky, David

    2015-05-01

    Solid tumors are characterized by complex morphology. Numerous factors relating to the composition of the cells and tumor stroma, vascularization and drainage of fluids affect the local microenvironment within a specific location inside the tumor. As a result, the intratumoral drug/drug delivery system (DDS) disposition following systemic or local administration is non-homogeneous and its complexity reflects the differences in the local microenvironment. Mathematical models can be used to analyze the intratumoral drug/DDS disposition and pharmacological effects and to assist in choice of optimal anticancer treatment strategies. The mathematical models that have been applied by different research groups to describe the intratumoral disposition of anticancer drugs/DDSs are summarized in this article. The properties of these models and of their suitability for prediction of the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition and pharmacological effects are reviewed. Currently available mathematical models appear to neglect some of the major factors that govern the drug/DDS intratumoral disposition, and apparently possess limited prediction capabilities. More sophisticated and detailed mathematical models and their extensive validation are needed for reliable prediction of different treatment scenarios and for optimization of drug treatment in the individual cancer patients.

  20. A predictive model for the release of slightly water-soluble drugs from HPMC matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X C; Wang, G P; Wang, Y H; Liang, W Q

    2004-08-01

    A model to predict the fraction of slightly water-soluble drug released as a function of release time (t, h), HPMC concentration (C(H), w/w), drug solubility in distilled water at 37 degrees C (C(s), g/100 mL), and volume of drug molecule (V, nm3) was derived when theophyline, tinidazole, and propylthiouracil were selected as model drugs. The model is log (M(t)/M(infinity)) = 0.8683 logt-0.1930C(s) logt + 0.5406V logt-1.227C(H) + 0.1594C(s) + 0.4423C(H)C(s) - 0.8655 (n = 130, r = 0.9969), where Mt is the amount of drug released at time t, Minfinity is the amount of drug released over a very long time, which corresponds in principle to the initial loading, n is the number of samples, and r is the correlation coefficient. The model was validated using sulfamethoxazole and satisfactory results were obtained. The model can be used to predict the release fraction of variousslightly water-soluble drugs from HPMC matrices having different polymer levels.

  1. How Preclinical Models Evolved to Resemble the Diagnostic Criteria of Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belin-Rauscent, Aude; Fouyssac, Maxime; Bonci, Antonello; Belin, David

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder that affects a subset of the individuals who take drugs. It is characterized by maladaptive drug-seeking habits that are maintained despite adverse consequences and intense drug craving. The pathophysiology and etiology of addiction is only partially understood despite extensive research because of the gap between current preclinical models of addiction and the clinical criteria of the disorder. This review presents a brief overview, based on selected methodologies, of how behavioral models have evolved over the last 50 years to the development of recent preclinical models of addiction that more closely mimic diagnostic criteria of addiction. It is hoped that these new models will increase our understanding of the complex neurobiological mechanisms whereby some individuals switch from controlled drug use to compulsive drug-seeking habits and relapse to these maladaptive habits. Additionally, by paving the way to bridge the gap that exists between biobehavioral research on addiction and the human situation, these models may provide new perspectives for the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for drug addiction. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Utility of population pharmacokinetic modeling in the assessment of therapeutic protein-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Andrew T; Earp, Justin C; Gupta, Manish; Hanley, William; Hu, Chuanpu; Wang, Diane D; Zajic, Stefan; Zhu, Min

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of pharmacokinetic (PK) based drug-drug interactions (DDI) is essential for ensuring patient safety and drug efficacy. With the substantial increase in therapeutic proteins (TP) entering the market and drug development, evaluation of TP-drug interaction (TPDI) has become increasingly important. Unlike for small molecule (e.g., chemical-based) drugs, conducting TPDI studies often presents logistical challenges, while the population PK (PPK) modeling may be a viable approach dealing with the issues. A working group was formed with members from the pharmaceutical industry and the FDA to assess the utility of PPK-based TPDI assessment including study designs, data analysis methods, and implementation strategy. This paper summarizes key issues for consideration as well as a proposed strategy with focuses on (1) PPK approach for exploratory assessment; (2) PPK approach for confirmatory assessment; (3) importance of data quality; (4) implementation strategy; and (5) potential regulatory implications. Advantages and limitations of the approach are also discussed.

  3. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna Helene Santos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  4. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  5. Shock state: an unrecognized and underestimated presentation of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmoun, Antoine; Dubois, Elsa; Perez, Pierre; Barbaud, Annick; Levy, Bruno

    2013-11-01

    Some patients with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) are probably admitted in intensive care unit (ICU), but data concerning their clinical features at admission are scarce. Therefore, in the present study, we used a clinical network of French intensivists to study the clinical features and evolution of DRESS patients hospitalized in ICU. A national, retrospective, multicenter study collected DRESS cases hospitalized in ICU for DRESS from 2000 to end of 2011. All files were analyzed through the RegiSCAR scoring system as "no," "possible," "probable," or "definite" DRESS. Patients were included only if they had a probable or definite DRESS. Demographic, hemodynamic, biological, and infectious data were recorded. Twenty-one patients were included. Hospital mortality was 10 (47%) of 21, and 16 of 21 patients had on admission a shock state necessitating vasopressor agents. Echocardiographic ejection fraction in shock patients was depressed (47% ± 13%). Mechanical ventilation was required in 13 of 21 cases. Hepatic failure was observed in 11 of 21 cases, acute renal failure in 18 of 20 cases, and lactic acidosis in 12 of 20 patients. Initial bacteriology was negative in all patients. Human herpesvirus reactivations were found in five of 15 cases. In conclusion, shock without bacteriological documentation associated with multiple organ failure is the most common presentation of DRESS at admission in ICU and is associated with a higher mortality than previously described.

  6. 75 FR 31450 - Memorandum of Understanding by and Between the United States Food and Drug Administration and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Memorandum of Understanding by and Between the United States... memorandum of understanding (MOU) between FDA and the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). The...

  7. Nonequilibrium steady states in a model for prebiotic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynveen, A.; Fedorov, I.; Halley, J. W.

    2014-02-01

    Some statistical features of steady states of a Kauffman-like model for prebiotic evolution are reported from computational studies. We postulate that the interesting "lifelike" states will be characterized by a nonequilibrium distribution of species and a time variable species self-correlation function. Selecting only such states from the population of final states produced by the model yields the probability of the appearance of such states as a function of a parameter p of the model. p is defined as the probability that a possible reaction in the the artificial chemistry actually appears in the network of chemical reactions. Small p corresponds to sparse networks utilizing a small fraction of the available reactions. We find that the probability of the appearance of such lifelike states exhibits a maximum as a function of p: at large p, most final states are in chemical equilibrium and hence are excluded by our criterion. At very small p, the sparseness of the network makes the probability of formation of any nontrivial dynamic final state low, yielding a low probability of production of lifelike states in this limit as well. We also report results on the diversity of the lifelike states (as defined here) that are produced. Repeated starts of the model evolution with different random number seeds in a given reaction network lead to final lifelike states which have a greater than random likelihood of resembling one another. Thus a form of "convergence" is observed. On the other hand, in different reaction networks with the same p, lifelike final states are statistically uncorrelated. In summary, the main results are (1) there is an optimal p or "sparseness" for production of lifelike states in our model—neither very dense nor very sparse networks are optimal—and (2) for a given p or sparseness, the resulting lifelike states can be extremely different. We discuss some possible implications for studies of the origin of life.

  8. State-of-Art Review and Report of New Tool for Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-López, Yoan; Caballero, Yaile; Barigye, Stephen J; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Millán-Cabrera, Reisel; Madera, Julio; Torrens, Francisco; Castillo-Garit, Juan A

    2017-08-21

    There are a great number of tools that can be used in QSAR/QSPR studies; they are implemented in several programs that are reviewed in this report. The usefulness of new tools can be proved through comparison, with previously published approaches. In order to perform the comparison the most usual is the use of several benchmark datasets such as DRAGON and Sutherland's datasets. Here, an exploratory study of Atomic Weighted Vectors (AWVs), a new tool useful for drug discovery using different datasets, is presented. In order to evaluate the performance of the new tool, several statistics and QSAR/QSPR experiments are performed. Variability analyses are used to quantify the information content of the AWVs obtained from the tool, by means of an information theory-based algorithm. Principal components analysis is used to analyze the orthogonality of these descriptors, for which the new MDs from AWVs provide different information from those codified by DRAGON descriptors (0-2D). The QSAR models are obtained for every Sutherland's dataset, according to the original division into training/test sets, by means of the multiple linear regression with genetic algorithm (MLR-GA). These models are been validated and compare favorably to several previously published approaches, using the same benchmark datasets. The obtained results show that this tool should be a useful strategy for the QSAR/QSPR studies, despite its simplicity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Monitoring alert and drowsy states by modeling EEG source nonstationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2017-10-01

    Objective. As a human brain performs various cognitive functions within ever-changing environments, states of the brain characterized by recorded brain activities such as electroencephalogram (EEG) are inevitably nonstationary. The challenges of analyzing the nonstationary EEG signals include finding neurocognitive sources that underlie different brain states and using EEG data to quantitatively assess the state changes. Approach. This study hypothesizes that brain activities under different states, e.g. levels of alertness, can be modeled as distinct compositions of statistically independent sources using independent component analysis (ICA). This study presents a framework to quantitatively assess the EEG source nonstationarity and estimate levels of alertness. The framework was tested against EEG data collected from 10 subjects performing a sustained-attention task in a driving simulator. Main results. Empirical results illustrate that EEG signals under alert versus drowsy states, indexed by reaction speeds to driving challenges, can be characterized by distinct ICA models. By quantifying the goodness-of-fit of each ICA model to the EEG data using the model deviation index (MDI), we found that MDIs were significantly correlated with the reaction speeds (r  =  ‑0.390 with alertness models and r  =  0.449 with drowsiness models) and the opposite correlations indicated that the two models accounted for sources in the alert and drowsy states, respectively. Based on the observed source nonstationarity, this study also proposes an online framework using a subject-specific ICA model trained with an initial (alert) state to track the level of alertness. For classification of alert against drowsy states, the proposed online framework achieved an averaged area-under-curve of 0.745 and compared favorably with a classic power-based approach. Significance. This ICA-based framework provides a new way to study changes of brain states and can be applied to

  10. Non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be harmful to normal kidneys: experimental surgery model*

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, E; E. Duman; Bozkurt, D; Sozmen, E; Sen, S; Taskin, H; Timur, O; Kaya, SO; Duman, S

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: The exact effect of analgesics on normal kidneys is not known yet. We aimed to evaluate the impression of non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) used post-operatively on kidneys, in rat (tracheotomy) model.

  11. Nanostructured materials in drug and gene delivery: a review of the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkar, Kailash C; Chavhan, Sandip S; Agatonovik-Kustrin, Snezana; Sawant, Krutika K

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of drug delivery systems have been developed, each with its own advantages and limitations, but the important goals of all of the systems are to enhance bioavailability, reduce drug toxicity, target to a particular organ, and increase the stability of the drug. The development of nanostructured drug carriers have grasped increased attention from scientific and commercial organizations due to their unique ability to deliver drugs and challenging molecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. These carriers present many technological advantages such as high carrier capacity, high chemical and biological stability, feasibility of incorporating both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substances, and their ability to be administered by a variety of routes (including oral, inhalational, and parenteral) to provide controlled/sustained drug release. Moreover, applications of nanoparticulate formulations in enhancing drug solubility, dissolution, bioavailability, safety, and stability have already been proven. In the view of their multifaceted applications, the present review aims to discuss and summarize some of the interesting findings and applications, methods of preparation, and characterization of various nanostructured carriers useful in drug delivery. Included in this discussion are polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, fullerenes, gold and silica nanoparticles, and quantum dots. Because there are likely to be new applications for nanoparticles in drug delivery, they are expected to solve many problems associated with the delivery of drugs and biomolecules through different delivery routes.

  12. Prediction of drug-drug interactions between various antidepressants and ritonavir using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Siccardi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression can impact on the treatment of HIV infection, and effective treatment of depressive conditions can have a beneficial effect improving adherence. However antidepressant treatment requires long-term maintenance, and is prone to pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDI with antiretrovirals. The aim of this study was to predict the magnitude of DDI between ritonavir (RTV and the most commonly prescribed antidepressants using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK model simulating virtual clinical trials. In vitro data describing the physiochemical properties, absorption, metabolism, induction and inhibitory potential of RTV and five antidepressants were obtained from published literature. Interactions between RTV and antidepressants were evaluated using the full PBPK model implemented in the Simcyp Population-based Simulator (Version 11.1, Simcyp Limited, UK and virtual clinical studies were simulated on 50 Caucasian subjects receiving 100mg bid of RTV for 21 days plus sertraline (100mg qd, citalopram (40mg qd, fluoxetine (20mg qd, venlafaxine (25mg qd and then from day 14–21. Simulated pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with observed values available in the literature. The simulated PK parameters of RTV, sertraline, citalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazepine and venlafaxine given alone at standard dosage were similar to reference values obtain from published clinical studies. The effect of simulated RTV co-administration on sertaline, fluoxetine and venlaflaxine was an AUC decrease of 40%, 26% and 6%, respectively and on mirtazepine and citalopram, an AUC increase of 60% and 20% respectively. The magnitude of the simulated DDI between RTV and the antidepressants was overall weak to moderate according to the classification of the FDA. The modest magnitude of these drug-drug interactions could be explained by the fact that antidepressants are substrates of multiple isoforms thus metabolism can still occur through CYPs that are

  13. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Brandon Ogbunugafor

    2016-01-01

    regards to their basic contribution to the study of empirical adaptive landscapes, and in terms of how they inform new models for the evolution of drug resistance.

  14. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Wylie, C Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    basic contribution to the study of empirical adaptive landscapes, and in terms of how they inform new models for the evolution of drug resistance.

  15. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Wylie, C. Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    regards to their basic contribution to the study of empirical adaptive landscapes, and in terms of how they inform new models for the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:26808374

  16. Resting state connectivity correlates with drug and placebo response in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Wilcke, T; Ichesco, E; Hampson, J P; Kairys, A; Peltier, S; Harte, S; Clauw, D J; Harris, R E

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, and memory and mood disturbances. Despite advances in our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, treatment is often challenging. New research indicates that changes in functional connectivity between brain regions, as can be measured by magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) of the resting state, may underlie the pathogenesis of this and other chronic pain states. As such, this parameter may be able to be used to monitor changes in brain function associated with pharmacological treatment, and might also be able to predict treatment response. We performed a resting state fcMRI trial using a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design to investigate mechanisms of action of milnacipran (MLN), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), in fibromyalgia patients. Our aim was to identify functional connectivity patterns at baseline that would differentially predict treatment response to MLN as compared to placebo. Since preclinical studies of MLN suggest that this medication works by augmenting antinociceptive processes, we specifically investigated brain regions known to be involved in pain inhibition. 15 fibromyalgia patients completed the study, consisting of 6 weeks of drug and placebo intake (order counterbalanced) with an interspersed 2 week wash out period. As a main finding we report that reductions in clinical pain scores during MLN were associated with decreased functional connectivity between pro-nociceptive regions and antinociceptive pain regions at baseline, specifically between the rostral part of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the insular cortex (IC), as well as between the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the IC: patients with lower preexisting functional connectivity had the greatest reduction in clinical pain. This pattern was not observed for the placebo period. However a more robust placebo response was associated with lower

  17. Drug Absorption Modeling as a Tool to Define the Strategy in Clinical Formulation Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kuentz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this mini review is to discuss the use of physiologically-based drug absorption modeling to guide the formulation development. Following an introduction to drug absorption modeling, this article focuses on the preclinical formulation development. Case studies are presented, where the emphasis is not only the prediction of absolute exposure values, but also their change with altered input values. Sensitivity analysis of technologically relevant parameters, like the drug’s partic...

  18. Controlled Release of Drugs FromHydrogel Based Matrices Systems: Experiments and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    LAMBERTI, G.; Cascone, S.; Titomanlio, G.; Barba, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels are materials largely used in the formulation of pharmaceuticals since, in principle, they could produce a release system of zero-order kinetics, which is of great therapeutic interest. In this paper, a model was proposed for the description of the main transport phenomena involved in the drug release process from hydrogel matrices (water diffusion, polymer swelling, drug diffusion and polymer dissolution); the model predictions are successfully compared with a large set of exper...

  19. Secure State UML: Modeling and Testing Security Concerns of Software Systems Using UML State Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Batool

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research we present a technique by using which, extended UML models can be converted to standard UML models so that existing MBT techniques can be applied directly on these models. Existing Model Based Testing (MBT Techniques cannot be directly applied to extended UML models due to the difference of modeling notation and new model elements. Verification of these models is also very important. Realizing and testing non functional requirements such as efficiency, portability and security, at model level strengthens the ability of model to turn down risk, cost and probability of system failure in cost effective way. Access control is most widely used technique for implementing security in software systems. Existing approaches for security modeling focus on representation of access control policies such as authentication, role based access control by introducing security oriented model elements through extension in Unified Modelling Language (UML. But doing so hinders the potential and application of MBT techniques to verify these models and test access control policies. In this research we introduce a technique secure State UML to formally design security models with secure UML and then transform it to UML state machine diagrams so that it can be tested, verified by existing MBT techniques. By applying proposed technique on case studies, we found the results that MBT techniques can be applied on resulting state machine diagrams and generated test paths have potential to identify the risks associated with security constraints violation.

  20. Elements of a Model State Education Agency Diffusion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojkowski, Charles

    A study, presented to the National Dissemination Conference, provides a conceptualization of a model diffusion system as it might exist within a state education agency (SEA) and places this diffusion model within the context of the SEA's expanding role as an educational service. Five conclusions were reached regarding a model diffusion system.…

  1. Drug Policy and the Ultima Ratio in A Social and Democratic State, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Hogg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a Member State of the UN and the EU, Spain's drug policy is heavily conditioned by these external superior ‘legal personalities’. Although, the Spanish legislature has enacted amendments to legislation on illicit substances over the last ten years to attenuate excessively punitive law, their interpretation and internal application of conventions on drug legislation has by in large overlooked the ultima ratio principle i.e. minimum intervention (Arana 2012. Spain’s criminal legislation is presented as well as the consequences of the prohibition of illicit substances in this jurisdiction. Finally, alternatives that have emerged in the Basque Autonomous Community to counter the effects of its criminalisation are briefly discussed and promoted as a means of abating external legal constraints that have serious social and legal ramifications. Como miembro de ONU y UE, la política de drogas española está fuertemente condicionada por la legislación emanada de estas entidades jurídicas. A pesar de eso, los legisladores españoles han introducido reformas en la legislación sobre sustancias ilícitas en los últimos diez años para atenuar una legislación excesivamente punitiva, su interpretación y aplicación interna de convenios sobre legislación en materia de drogas en gran parte no toma en cuenta el principio del ultimo ratio (Arana 2012. Se presenta la legislación penal española en materia de sustancias ilícitas y también los efectos que ésta tiene sobre la jurisdicción. Finalmente, las alternativas surgidas en la Comunidad Autónoma Vasca para contrarrestar los efectos de la criminalización, son brevemente discutidas y promovidas como una manera para amainar las limitaciones jurídicas que tienen importantes y serias ramificaciones sociales y legales. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2200886

  2. Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Platforms in Cardiac Disease Modeling and Drug Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, N; Shiti, A; Gepstein, L

    2017-08-01

    The ability to generate patient/disease-specific human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) brings a unique value to the fields of cardiac disease modeling, drug testing, drug discovery, and precision medicine. Further integration of emerging innovative technologies such as developmental-biology inspired differentiation into chamber-specific cardiomyocyte subtypes, genome-editing, tissue-engineering, and novel functional phenotyping methodologies should facilitate even more advanced investigations. Here, we review cornerstone concepts and recent highlights of hPSC-based cardiac disease modeling and drug testing. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  3. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa Mendes, Maïlys; Hirt, Deborah; Urien, Saik; Valade, Elodie; Bouazza, Naïm; Foissac, Frantz; Blanche, Stephane; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Benaboud, Sihem

    2015-11-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy can affect drug disposition. Anticipating these changes will help to maximize drug efficacy and safety in pregnant women. Our objective was to determine if physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) can accurately predict changes in the disposition of renally excreted antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy. Whole body PBPK models were developed for three renally excreted antiretroviral drugs, tenofovir (TFV), emtricitabine (FTC) and lamivudine (3TC). To assess the impact of pregnancy on PK, time-varying pregnancy-related physiological parameters available within the p-PBPK Simcyp software package were used. Renal clearance during pregnancy followed glomerular filtration changes with or without alterations in secretion. PK profiles were simulated and compared with observed data, i.e. area under the curves (AUC), peak plasma concentrations (Cmax ) and oral clearances (CL/F). PBPK models successfully predicted TFV, FTC and 3TC disposition for non-pregnant and pregnant populations. Both renal secretion and filtration changed during pregnancy. Changes in renal clearance secretion were related to changes in renal plasma flow. The maximum clearance increases were approximately 30% (TFV 33%, FTC 31%, 3TC 29%). Pregnancy PBPK models are useful tools to quantify a priori the drug exposure changes during pregnancy for renally excreted drugs. These models can be applied to evaluate alternative dosing regimens to optimize drug therapy during pregnancy. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Extending the “Web of Drug Identity” with Knowledge Extracted from United States Product Labels

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Structured Product Labels (SPLs) contain information about drugs that can be valuable to clinical and translational research, especially if it can be linked to other sources that provide data about drug targets, chemical properties, interactions, and biological pathways. Unfortunately, SPLs currently provide coarsely-structured drug information and lack the detailed annotation that is required to support computational use cases. To help address this issue we created LinkedSPLs, a Linked Data ...

  5. Validation of ecological state space models using the Laplace approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Berg, Casper Willestofte

    2017-01-01

    Many statistical models in ecology follow the state space paradigm. For such models, the important step of model validation rarely receives as much attention as estimation or hypothesis testing, perhaps due to lack of available algorithms and software. Model validation is often based on a naive...... for estimation in general mixed effects models. Implementing one-step predictions in the R package Template Model Builder, we demonstrate that it is possible to perform model validation with little effort, even if the ecological model is multivariate, has non-linear dynamics, and whether observations...... are continuous or discrete. With both simulated data, and a real data set related to geolocation of seals, we demonstrate both the potential and the limitations of the techniques. Our results fill a need for convenient methods for validating a state space model, or alternatively, rejecting it while indicating...

  6. MDMA, Methylone, and MDPV: Drug-Induced Brain Hyperthermia and Its Modulation by Activity State and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn E

    2017-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants are frequently used by humans to intensify the subjective experience of different types of social interactions. Since psychomotor stimulants enhance metabolism and increase body temperatures, their use under conditions of physiological activation and in warm humid environments could result in pathological hyperthermia, a life-threatening symptom of acute drug intoxication. Here, we will describe the brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA, MDPV, and methylone, three structurally related recreational drugs commonly used by young adults during raves and other forms of social gatherings. After a short introduction on brain temperature and basic mechanisms underlying its physiological fluctuations, we will consider how MDMA, MDPV, and methylone affect brain and body temperatures in awake freely moving rats. Here, we will discuss the role of drug-induced heat production in the brain due to metabolic brain activation and diminished heat dissipation due to peripheral vasoconstriction as two primary contributors to the hyperthermic effects of these drugs. Then, we will consider how the hyperthermic effects of these drugs are modulated under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and warm ambient temperature). Since social interaction results in brain and body heat production, coupled with skin vasoconstriction that impairs heat loss to the external environment, these physiological changes interact with drug-induced changes in heat production and loss, resulting in distinct changes in the hyperthermic effects of each tested drug. Finally, we present our recent data, in which we compared the efficacy of different pharmacological strategies for reversing MDMA-induced hyperthermia in both the brain and body. Specifically, we demonstrate increased efficacy of the centrally acting atypical neuroleptic compound clozapine over the peripherally acting vasodilator drug, carvedilol. These data could be important for understanding the potential

  7. Oscillations and multiple steady states in active membrane transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, F M; Bisch, P M

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of some non-linear extensions of the six-state alternating access model for active membrane transport is investigated. We use stoichio-metric network analysis to study the stability of steady states. The bifurcation analysis has been done through standard numerical methods. For the usual six-state model we have proved that there is only one steady state, which is globally asymptotically stable. When we added an autocatalytic step we found self-oscillations. For the competition between a monomer cycle and a dimer cycle, with steps of dimer formation, we have also found self-oscillations. We have also studied models involving the formation of a complex with other molecules. The addition of two steps for formation of a complex of the monomer with another molecule does not alter either the number or the stability of steady states of the basic six-state model. The model which combines the formation of a complex with an autocatalytic step shows both self-oscillations and multiple steady states. The results lead us to conclude that oscillations could be produced by active membrane transport systems if the transport cycle contains a sufficiently large number of steps (six in the present case) and is coupled to at least one autocatalytic reaction,. Oscillations are also predicted when the monomer cycle is coupled to a dimer cycle. In fact, the autocatalytic reaction can be seen as a simplification of the model involving competition between monomer and dimer cycles, which seems to be a more realistic description of biological systems. A self-regulation mechanism of the pumps, related to the multiple stationary states, is expected only for a combined effect of autocatalysis and formation of complexes with other molecules. Within the six-state model this model also leads to oscillation.

  8. FDA-Approved Anti-Obesity Drugs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneschvar, Homayoun L; Aronson, Mark D; Smetana, Gerald W

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a growing health problem in our society and its treatment has been challenging. In recent decades, several anti-obesity drugs have been withdrawn from the market because of reported and documented adverse effects. After years of interruption, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved multiple new anti-obesity drugs. The majority of these medications are taken orally, and only one is administered subcutaneously. In this article, we review the efficacy, adverse effects, and mechanism of action of all 5 FDA-approved drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. From Heuristic to Mathematical Modeling of Drugs Dissolution Profiles: Application of Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendyk, Aleksander; Güres, Sinan; Jachowicz, Renata; Szlęk, Jakub; Polak, Sebastian; Wiśniowska, Barbara; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a mathematical model of the drug dissolution (Q) from the solid lipid extrudates based on the empirical approach. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) and genetic programming (GP) tools were used. Sensitivity analysis of ANNs provided reduction of the original input vector. GP allowed creation of the mathematical equation in two major approaches: (1) direct modeling of Q versus extrudate diameter (d) and the time variable (t) and (2) indirect modeling through Weibull equation. ANNs provided also information about minimum achievable generalization error and the way to enhance the original dataset used for adjustment of the equations' parameters. Two inputs were found important for the drug dissolution: d and t. The extrudates length (L) was found not important. Both GP modeling approaches allowed creation of relatively simple equations with their predictive performance comparable to the ANNs (root mean squared error (RMSE) from 2.19 to 2.33). The direct mode of GP modeling of Q versus d and t resulted in the most robust model. The idea of how to combine ANNs and GP in order to escape ANNs' black-box drawback without losing their superior predictive performance was demonstrated. Open Source software was used to deliver the state-of-the-art models and modeling strategies.

  10. Advances in simultaneous DSC-FTIR microspectroscopy for rapid solid-state chemical stability studies: some dipeptide drugs as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Wang, Shun-Li

    2012-04-01

    The solid-state chemistry of drugs has seen growing importance in the pharmaceutical industry for the development of useful API (active pharmaceutical ingredients) of drugs and stable dosage forms. The stability of drugs in various solid dosage forms is an important issue because solid dosage forms are the most common pharmaceutical formulation in clinical use. In solid-state stability studies of drugs, an ideal accelerated method must not only be selected by different complicated methods, but must also detect the formation of degraded product. In this review article, an analytical technique combining differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier-transform infrared (DSC-FTIR) microspectroscopy simulates the accelerated stability test, and simultaneously detects the decomposed products in real time. The pharmaceutical dipeptides aspartame hemihydrate, lisinopril dihydrate, and enalapril maleate either with or without Eudragit E were used as testing examples. This one-step simultaneous DSC-FTIR technique for real-time detection of diketopiperazine (DKP) directly evidenced the dehydration process and DKP formation as an impurity common in pharmaceutical dipeptides. DKP formation in various dipeptides determined by different analytical methods had been collected and compiled. Although many analytical methods have been applied, the combined DSC-FTIR technique is an easy and fast analytical method which not only can simulate the accelerated drug stability testing but also at the same time enable to explore phase transformation as well as degradation due to thermal-related reactions. This technique offers quick and proper interpretations.

  11. In vivo models of cardiac diseases: application to drug development and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokutan, Hirofumi; Anker, Stefan D; Springer, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is the top cause of human mortality in the Western world. Current drug therapy for cardiac disease has been established via experimental studies using a variety of in vivo animal models. The purpose of this review is to discuss the features (advantages and limitations) of the mainly used in vivo models of cardiac disease and provide the reader with an overview of how they can be utilized in the development and screening of cardiac drugs. A search for articles focusing on and including in vivo models for the main areas of cardiac diseases was performed on PubMed. We also searched the reference lists of identified articles for further original articles. Large and small animal models including genetically modified ones have made accomplishments in the process of cardiac drug development with different clinical relevance. However, there is still a clear need for lessening the gap between human and experimental models by improving in vivo models.

  12. Spectral, thermal, and molecular modeling studies on the encapsulation of selected sulfonamide drugs in β-cyclodextrin nano-cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani-Yaseen, Abdulilah Dawoud; Mo'ala, Abeer

    2014-10-15

    In the present work the inclusion complexation of three sulfonamide (SA) drugs, namely sulfisoxazole (SSX), sulfamethizole (SMZ), and Sulfamethazine (STM) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) has been investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy, DSC, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods. The binding constant (Kb) of SA:β-CD inclusion complexation was determined via applying the modified form of Benesi-Hildebrand equation employing the changes in absorbance at λmax. Obtained results revealed that SA drugs form 1:1 inclusion complex with β-CD with Kb of 650, 1532, 714M(-1) at 25°C for SSX, SMZ, and STM, respectively. The UV-Vis absorption spectra displayed solvatochromic behavior of bathochromic shift with decreasing solvent polarity that in turn is good agreement with their behavior in the presence of β-CD in terms of environment polarity dependency. The inclusion complex formation between β-CD and tested SA drugs in liquid and solid states was confirmed by (1)H NMR and DSC, respectively. Using semi-empirical quantum chemistry methods at PM3 theoretical level, inclusion complexes' structures as well as energetic and thermodynamic parameters of encapsulation were elucidated. Obtained results revealed that the encapsulation is favorably energetic and enthalpic in nature with the inclusion of the aniline moiety through the wide rim side of β-CD nano-cavity. Further, molecular modeling revealed that β-CD encapsulation of SA drugs reduced their (EHOMO-ELUMO) gap.

  13. Potentiation of 5-fluorouracil encapsulated in zeolites as drug delivery systems for in vitro models of colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaça, Natália; Amorim, Ricardo; Machado, Ana F; Parpot, Pier; Pereira, Manuel F R; Sardo, Mariana; Rocha, João; Fonseca, António M; Neves, Isabel C; Baltazar, Fátima

    2013-12-01

    The studies of potentiation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a traditional drug used in the treatment of several cancers, including colorectal (CRC), were carried out with zeolites Faujasite in the sodium form, with different particle sizes (NaY, 700nm and nanoNaY, 150nm) and Linde type L in the potassium form (LTL) with a particle size of 80nm. 5-FU was loaded into zeolites by liquid-phase adsorption. Characterization by spectroscopic techniques (FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C and (27)Al solid-state MAS NMR), chemical analysis, thermal analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), demonstrated the successful loading of 5-FU into the zeolite hosts. In vitro drug release studies (PBS buffer pH 7.4, 37°C) revealed the release of 80-90% of 5-FU in the first 10min. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the release profiles were fitted to zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, Hixson-Crowell, Korsmeyer-Peppas and Weibull kinetic models. The in vitro dissolution from the drug delivery systems (DDS) was explained by the Weibull model. The DDS efficacy was evaluated using two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines, HCT-15 and RKO. Unloaded zeolites presented no toxicity to both cancer cells, while all DDS allowed an important potentiation of the 5-FU effect on the cell viability. Immunofluorescence studies provided evidence for zeolite-cell internalization.

  14. The electronic excited states of green fluorescent protein chromophore models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth Carlton

    We explore the properties of quantum chemical approximations to the excited states of model chromophores of the green fluorescent protein of A. victoria. We calculate several low-lying states by several methods of quantum chemical calculation, including state-averaged complete active space SCF (CASSCF) methods, time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), equation-of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CCSD) and multireference perturbation theory (MRPT). Amongst the low-lying states we identify the optically bright pipi* state of the molecules and examine its properties. We demonstrate that the state is dominated by a single configuration function. We calculate zero-time approximations to the resonance Raman spectrum of GFP chromophore models, and assign published spectra based upon these.

  15. Modeling the fractional magnetic states of magnetostructural transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Torre, Edward [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute for Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The large inverse magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in the off-stoichiometric Heusler alloys occurs at a critical temperature near room temperature. At this temperature, the material is in a mixed-state and can have a variable ratio of two stable magnetic crystallographic-states; a high magnetization state (HM) and a low magnetization state (LM). The field-induced thermal hysteresis in the virgin curve of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} and the virgin first-order reversal curves (VFORC) are presented. A model is introduced to describe the descending branches of these curves based on the different magnetic fields of conversion (from HM to LM). Using limited measurements, the model is used as a tool to determine the fractions of the two crystallographic-states within the mixed-state region.

  16. Structured fusion lasso penalized multi-state models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennhenn-Reulen, Holger; Kneib, Thomas

    2016-11-10

    Multi-state models generalize survival or duration time analysis to the estimation of transition-specific hazard rate functions for multiple transitions. When each of the transition-specific risk functions is parametrized with several distinct covariate effect coefficients, this leads to a model of potentially high dimension. To decrease the parameter space dimensionality and to work out a clear image of the underlying multi-state model structure, one can either aim at setting some coefficients to zero or to make coefficients for the same covariate but two different transitions equal. The first issue can be approached by penalizing the absolute values of the covariate coefficients as in lasso regularization. If, instead, absolute differences between coefficients of the same covariate on different transitions are penalized, this leads to sparse competing risk relations within a multi-state model, that is, equality of covariate effect coefficients. In this paper, a new estimation approach providing sparse multi-state modelling by the aforementioned principles is established, based on the estimation of multi-state models and a simultaneous penalization of the L1 -norm of covariate coefficients and their differences in a structured way. The new multi-state modelling approach is illustrated on peritoneal dialysis study data and implemented in the R package penMSM. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Product State Modelling based on a Meta Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Holm; Sørensen, Christian; Langer, Gilad

    1999-01-01

    ) is a product model that contains continuously updated data regarding the outcome of the production processes. The main contribution of this paper is a definition and a description of a Production Meta Product State Model (Production Meta PSM), using the Unified Modelling Language (UML). The meta model......As products often deviate from their original design and specifications when being produced, adjustments of the product or process are required in order to meet specifications. A prerequisite for this adjustment, is appropriate and effectively collected shop floor data. The Product State Model (PSM...... incorporates a set of characteristics associated to the (1) scope or application domain of the PSM, (2) the artefact or product, and (3) the events transforming the product and trigging product state changes. Moreover, the paper provides guidelines for a specialisation of the meta model with respect...

  18. Development of a production meta Product State Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael Holm; Sørensen, Christian; Langer, Gilad

    1999-01-01

    ) is a product model that contains continuously updated data regarding the outcome of the production processes. The main contribution of this paper is a definition and a description of a Production Meta Product State Model (Production Meta PSM), using the Unified Modelling Language (UML). The meta model......As products often deviate from their original design and specifications when being produced, adjustments of the product or process are required in order to meet specifications. A prerequisite for this adjustment, is appropriate and effectively collected shop floor data. The Product State Model (PSM...... incorporates a set of characteristics associated to the (1) scope or application domain of the PSM, (2) the artefact or product, and (3) the events transforming the product and trigging product state changes. Moreover, the paper provides guidelines for a specialisation of the meta model with respect...

  19. Metropolitan and state economic regions (MASTER) model - overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.C.; Moe, R.J.; Scott, M.J.

    1983-05-01

    The Metropolitan and State Economic Regions (MASTER) model is a unique multi-regional economic model designed to forecast regional economic activity and assess the regional economic impacts caused by national and regional economic changes (e.g., interest rate fluctuations, energy price changes, construction and operation of a nuclear waste storage facility, shutdown of major industrial operations). MASTER can be applied to any or all of the 268 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) and 48 non-SMSA rest-of-state-areas (ROSAs) in the continental US. The model can also be applied to any or all of the continental US counties and states. This report is divided into four sections: capabilities and applications of the MASTER model, development of the model, model simulation, and validation testing.

  20. Characteristics and degradation of chitosan/cellulose acetate microspheres with different model drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-yun ZHOU; Xi-guang CHEN

    2008-01-01

    In this study, chitosan/cellulose acetate micro-spheres (CCAM) were prepared by W/O/W emulsification and solvent evaporation as a drug delivery system. The microspheres were spherical, free-flowing and non-aggre-gated. The CCAM had good flow and suspension ability. The loading efficiency of different model drugs increased with the increasing hydrophobicity of the drug. The load-ing efficiency of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was more than 30% whereas that of ranitidine hydrochloride (RT) or acetaminophen (ACP) was only 10%. The pH values of solution affected the swelling ability of CCAM and the relative humidity had little effect on the characteristics of CCAM when it was not more than 75%. The CCAM system had a good effect on the controlled release of dif-ferent model drugs. However, the release rate became slower with the increase of the hydrophobicity of drugs. The release rate of CCAM loaded with hydrophilic RT was almost 60% during 48 h and the release rate of CCAM loaded with hydrophobic drug of 6-MP was not more than 30%. In the meantime, the CCAM system was degradable in vitro and the degradation rate was faster in lysozyme solution than that in the medium of PBS. So the CCAM system was a degradable promising drug delivery system especially for hydrophobic drugs.

  1. Comparing exponential and exponentiated models of drug demand in cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Lile, Joshua A; Rush, Craig R; Stoops, William W

    2016-12-01

    Drug purchase tasks provide rapid and efficient measurement of drug demand. Zero values (i.e., prices with zero consumption) present a quantitative challenge when using exponential demand models that exponentiated models may resolve. We aimed to replicate and advance the utility of using an exponentiated model by demonstrating construct validity (i.e., association with real-world drug use) and generalizability across drug commodities. Participants (N = 40 cocaine-using adults) completed Cocaine, Alcohol, and Cigarette Purchase Tasks evaluating hypothetical consumption across changes in price. Exponentiated and exponential models were fit to these data using different treatments of zero consumption values, including retaining zeros or replacing them with 0.1, 0.01, or 0.001. Excellent model fits were observed with the exponentiated model. Means and precision fluctuated with different replacement values when using the exponential model but were consistent for the exponentiated model. The exponentiated model provided the strongest correlation between derived demand intensity (Q0) and self-reported free consumption in all instances (Cocaine r = .88; Alcohol r = .97; Cigarette r = .91). Cocaine demand elasticity was positively correlated with alcohol and cigarette elasticity. Exponentiated parameters were associated with real-world drug use (e.g., weekly cocaine use) whereas these correlations were less consistent for exponential parameters. Our findings show that selection of zero replacement values affects demand parameters and their association with drug-use outcomes when using the exponential model but not the exponentiated model. This work supports the adoption of the exponentiated demand model by replicating improved fit and consistency and demonstrating construct validity and generalizability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Quantum-dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers in State Space Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hussein Taleb; Kambiz Abedi; Saeed Golmohammadi

    2013-01-01

    A state space model (SSM) is derived for quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs).Rate equations of QD-SOA are formulated in the form of state update equations,where average occupation probabilities along QD-SOA cavity are considered as state variables of the system.Simulations show that SSM calculates QD-SOA's static and dynamic characteristics with high accuracy.

  3. q-state Potts model on the Apollonian network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Nuno A M; Andrade, Roberto F S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2010-10-01

    The q-state Potts model is studied on the Apollonian network with Monte Carlo simulations and the transfer matrix method. The spontaneous magnetization, correlation length, entropy, and specific heat are analyzed as a function of temperature for different number of states, q. Different scaling functions in temperature and q are proposed. A quantitative agreement is found between results from both methods. No critical behavior is observed in the thermodynamic limit for any number of states.

  4. Incidence of Exposure of Patients in the United States to Multiple Drugs for Which Pharmacogenomic Guidelines Are Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Blagec, Kathrin; Empey, Philip E.; Malone, Daniel C.; Ahmed, Seid Mussa; Ryan, Patrick; Hofer, Sebastian; Boyce, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-emptive pharmacogenomic (PGx) testing of a panel of genes may be easier to implement and more cost-effective than reactive pharmacogenomic testing if a sufficient number of medications are covered by a single test and future medication exposure can be anticipated. We analysed the incidence of exposure of individual patients in the United States to multiple drugs for which pharmacogenomic guidelines are available (PGx drugs) within a selected four-year period (2009–2012) in order to identify and quantify the incidence of pharmacotherapy in a nation-wide patient population that could be impacted by pre-emptive PGx testing based on currently available clinical guidelines. In total, 73 024 095 patient records from private insurance, Medicare Supplemental and Medicaid were included. Patients enrolled in Medicare Supplemental age > = 65 or Medicaid age 40–64 had the highest incidence of PGx drug use, with approximately half of the patients receiving at least one PGx drug during the 4 year period and one fourth to one third of patients receiving two or more PGx drugs. These data suggest that exposure to multiple PGx drugs is common and that it may be beneficial to implement wide-scale pre-emptive genomic testing. Future work should therefore concentrate on investigating the cost-effectiveness of multiplexed pre-emptive testing strategies. PMID:27764192

  5. [In silico, in vitro, in omic experimental models and drug safety evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, Nancy; Goldfain-Blanc, Françoise; Guillouzo, André

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few decades, toxicology has benefited from scientific, technical, and bioinformatic developments relating to patient safety assessment during clinical and drug marketing studies. Based on this knowledge, new in silico, in vitro, and "omic" experimental models are emerging. Although these models cannot currently replace classic safety evaluations performed on laboratory animals, they allow compounds with unacceptable toxicity to be rejected in the early stages of drug development, thereby reducing the number of laboratory animals needed. In addition, because these models are particularly adapted to mechanistic studies, they can help to improve the relevance of the data obtained, thus enabling better prevention and screening of the adverse effects that may occur in humans. Much progress remains to be done, especially in the field of validation. Nevertheless, current efforts by industrial, academic laboratories, and regulatory agencies should, in coming years, significantly improve preclinical drug safety evaluation thanks to the integration of these new methods into the drug research and development process.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy modeling of a drug in molecular solvents and enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Christian J.; Fulfer, Kristen D.; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2017-09-01

    Modeling of drugs in enzymes is of immensurable value to many areas of science. We present a theoretical study on the vibrational spectroscopy of Rilpivirine, a HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, in conventional solvents and in clinically relevant enzymes. The study is based on vibrational spectroscopy modeling of the drug using molecular dynamics simulations, DFT frequency maps, and theory. The modeling of the infrared lineshape shows good agreement with experimental data for the drug in molecular solvents where the local environment motions define the vibrational band lineshape. On the other hand, the theoretical description of the drug in the different enzymes does not match previous experimental findings indicating that the utilized methodology might not apply to heterogeneous environments. Our findings show that the lack of reproducibility might be associated with the development of the frequency map which does not contain all of the possible interactions observed in such systems.

  7. The antifibrotic drug pirfenidone promotes pulmonary cavitation and drug resistance in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahidjo, Bintou A; Maiga, Mariama C; Ihms, Elizabeth A; Maiga, Mamoudou; Ordonez, Alvaro A; Cheung, Laurene S; Beck, Sarah; Andrade, Bruno B; Jain, Sanjay; Bishai, William R

    2016-09-08

    Pirfenidone is a recently approved antifibrotic drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Because tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by granulomatous inflammation in conjunction with parenchymal destruction and replacement fibrosis, we sought to determine whether the addition of pirfenidone as an adjunctive, host-directed therapy provides a beneficial effect during antimicrobial treatment of TB. We hypothesized that pirfenidone's antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties would reduce inflammatory lung damage and increase antimicrobial drug penetration in granulomas to accelerate treatment response. The effectiveness of adjunctive pirfenidone during TB drug therapy was evaluated using a murine model of chronic TB. Mice treated with standard therapy 2HRZ/4HR (H, isoniazid; R, rifampin; and Z, pyrazinamide) were compared with 2 alternative regimens containing pirfenidone (Pf) (2HRZPf/4HRPf and 2HRZPf/4HR). Contrary to our hypothesis, adjunctive pirfenidone use leads to reduced bacterial clearance and increased relapse rates. This treatment failure is closely associated with the emergence of isoniazid monoresistant bacilli, increased cavitation, and significant lung pathology. While antifibrotic agents may eventually be used as part of adjunctive host-directed therapy of TB, this study clearly demonstrates that caution must be exercised. Moreover, as pirfenidone becomes more widely used in clinical practice, increased patient monitoring would be required in endemic TB settings.

  8. The antifibrotic drug pirfenidone promotes pulmonary cavitation and drug resistance in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahidjo, Bintou A.; Maiga, Mariama C.; Ihms, Elizabeth A.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Cheung, Laurene S.; Beck, Sarah; Andrade, Bruno B.; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is a recently approved antifibrotic drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Because tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by granulomatous inflammation in conjunction with parenchymal destruction and replacement fibrosis, we sought to determine whether the addition of pirfenidone as an adjunctive, host-directed therapy provides a beneficial effect during antimicrobial treatment of TB. We hypothesized that pirfenidone’s antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties would reduce inflammatory lung damage and increase antimicrobial drug penetration in granulomas to accelerate treatment response. The effectiveness of adjunctive pirfenidone during TB drug therapy was evaluated using a murine model of chronic TB. Mice treated with standard therapy 2HRZ/4HR (H, isoniazid; R, rifampin; and Z, pyrazinamide) were compared with 2 alternative regimens containing pirfenidone (Pf) (2HRZPf/4HRPf and 2HRZPf/4HR). Contrary to our hypothesis, adjunctive pirfenidone use leads to reduced bacterial clearance and increased relapse rates. This treatment failure is closely associated with the emergence of isoniazid monoresistant bacilli, increased cavitation, and significant lung pathology. While antifibrotic agents may eventually be used as part of adjunctive host-directed therapy of TB, this study clearly demonstrates that caution must be exercised. Moreover, as pirfenidone becomes more widely used in clinical practice, increased patient monitoring would be required in endemic TB settings. PMID:27699232

  9. Near-horizon states of black holes and Calogero models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Basu-Mallick; Pijush K Ghosh; Kumar S Gupta

    2004-03-01

    We find self-adjoint extensions of the rational Calogero model in the presence of the harmonic interaction. The corresponding eigenfunctions may describe the near-horizon quantum states of certain types of black holes.

  10. Critical state soil constitutive model for methane hydrate soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. Uchida; K. Soga; K. Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

      This paper presents a new constitutive model that simulates the mechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soil based on the concept of critical state soil mechanics, referred to as the Methane...

  11. Modeling systems containing alkanolamines with the CPA equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Ane Søgaard; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2008-01-01

    An association model, the cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state (EoS), is applied for the first time to a class of multifunctional compounds (alkanolamines). Three alkanolamines of practical and scientific significance are considered; monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA...... studied using the CPA equation of state (alcohols, amines, and glycols)....

  12. Formulating state space models in R with focus on longitudinal regression models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dethlefsen, Claus; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

      We provide a language for formulating a range of state space models. The described methodology is implemented in the R -package sspir available from cran.r-project.org . A state space model is specified similarly to a generalized linear model in R , by marking the time-varying terms in the form......  We provide a language for formulating a range of state space models. The described methodology is implemented in the R -package sspir available from cran.r-project.org . A state space model is specified similarly to a generalized linear model in R , by marking the time-varying terms...

  13. From bench to bedside: utilization of an in vitro model to predict potential drug-drug interactions in the kidney: the digoxin-mifepristone example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, Cindy; Koren, Gideon; Ito, Shinya

    2003-07-01

    Drug interactions are a common source of drug-induced toxicity. For drugs with narrow therapeutic windows, such as digoxin, an understanding of the potential mechanisms by which drugs might interact is essential to clinical practice. This article describes the utility of a renal tubular cell culture model in the prediction of drug interactions involving P-glycoprotein. Digoxin is a cardiac glycoside that undergoes active secretion in the renal tubules by the MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) drug efflux pump. Mifepristone (RU486) is a recently introduced abortifacient that is largely unstudied in terms of drug-drug interactions. The authors used an in vitro model to study the effects of mifepristone on the renal tubular secretion and cellular uptake of digoxin by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Mifepristone significantly inhibited the renal tubular secretion of digoxin (p = 0.0005), without interfering with its ability to enter the renal tubular cell. Similar results were found with the P-glycoprotein substrate vinblastine. The findings suggest that drug interactions may result if mifepristone is administered with P-glycoprotein substrates, highlighting the usefulness of this model in the study of not only common but also rare combinations of drugs.

  14. A model ternary heparin conjugate by direct covalent bond strategy applied to drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Xin, Dingcheng; Hu, Jiawen; Liu, Kaijian; Pan, Jiangao; Xiang, Jiannan

    2009-01-01

    A model ternary heparin conjugate by direct covalent bond strategy has been developed, in which modified heparin using active mix anhydride as intermediate conjugates with model drug molecule and model specific ligand, respectively. Designed ester bonds between model drug and heparin facilitate hydrolysis kinetics research. The strategy can be extended to design and synthesize a targeted drug delivery system. The key point is to use mixed anhydride groups as activating intermediates to mediate the synthesis of the ternary heparin conjugate. Formation of mixed anhydride is detected by the conductimetry experiment. The ternary heparin conjugate is characterized by (13)C NMR, FT-IR and GPC, respectively. The decreased trend on degree of substitution (DS) is consistent with that of introduced anticancer drug and specific ligand in drug delivery system. Moreover, their anticoagulant activity is evaluated by measuring activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and anti-factor Xa activity. The results show that model ternary heparin conjugate with reduced anticoagulant activity may avoid the risk of severe hemorrhagic complication during the administration and is potential to develop a safe and effective drug delivery system on anticancer research.

  15. The Use of Animal Models for Cancer Chemoprevention Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Animal models currently are used to assess the efficacy of potential chemopreventive agents, including synthetic chemicals, chemical agents obtained from natural products and natural product mixtures. The observations made in these models as well as other data are then used to prioritize agents to determine which are qualified to progress to clinical chemoprevention trials. Organ specific animal models are employed to determine which agents or classes of agents are likely to be the most effec...

  16. A model for luminescence of localized state ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Q.; Xu, S. J.; Xie, M H; Tong, S. Y.

    2004-01-01

    A distribution function for localized carriers, $f(E,T)=\\frac{1}{e^{(E-E_a)/k_BT}+\\tau_{tr}/\\tau_r}$, is proposed by solving a rate equation, in which, electrical carriers' generation, thermal escape, recapture and radiative recombination are taken into account. Based on this distribution function, a model is developed for luminescence from localized state ensemble with a Gaussian-type density of states. The model reproduces quantitatively all the anomalous temperature behaviors of localized ...

  17. The MICOR hadronization model with final state interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Csizmadia, P

    2002-01-01

    Final state interactions on the hadron spectra obtained from the MIcroscopic COalescence Rehadronization (MICOR) model are investigated. MICOR generates baryon and meson resonances in an out- of-equilibrium distribution, directly from quark matter. At the next step, resonances decay into stable hadrons by the JETSET event generator. The final state interactions are simulated using a hadronic cascade, with initial momentum distributions given by MICOR. For the initial space distributions, two simple models are applied and compared. (12 refs).

  18. Analysis of West African Drug Trafficking: The Dynamics of Interdiction and State Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Illegal drug trafficking through West Africa has grown dramatically in the last decade, capturing the attention of U.S., European, and U.N...policymakers. Most countries in West Africa have struggled to adapt to the challenges drug trafficking has presented. A few countries, like Ghana, have made a

  19. Evaluating the Impact of Drug Trafficking Organizations on the Stability of the Mexican State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Since 2007, when President Felipe Calderon declared his government’s war on the drug trafficking organizations operating in his country, the level of...Mexican government is likely to return to a one party system under which drug trafficking and corruption are tolerated but the violence does not

  20. Decline in drug overdose deaths after state policy changes - Florida, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Hal; Paulozzi, Leonard; Porucznik, Christina; Mack, Karin; Herter, Blake

    2014-07-04

    During 2003-2009, the number of deaths caused by drug overdose in Florida increased 61.0%, from 1,804 to 2,905, with especially large increases in deaths caused by the opioid pain reliever oxycodone and the benzodiazepine alprazolam. In response, Florida implemented various laws and enforcement actions as part of a comprehensive effort to reverse the trend. This report describes changes in overdose deaths for prescription and illicit drugs and changes in the prescribing of drugs frequently associated with these deaths in Florida after these policy changes. During 2010-2012, the number of drug overdose deaths decreased 16.7%, from 3,201 to 2,666, and the deaths per 100,000 persons decreased 17.7%, from 17.0 to 14.0. Death rates for prescription drugs overall decreased 23.2%, from 14.5 to 11.1 per 100,000 persons. The decline in the overdose deaths from oxycodone (52.1%) exceeded the decline for other opioid pain relievers, and the decline in deaths for alprazolam (35.6%) exceeded the decline for other benzodiazepines. Similar declines occurred in prescribing rates for these drugs during this period. The temporal association between the legislative and enforcement actions and the substantial declines in prescribing and overdose deaths, especially for drugs favored by pain clinics, suggests that the initiatives in Florida reduced prescription drug overdose fatalities.