WorldWideScience

Sample records for model spectral energy

  1. Modelling and interpreting spectral energy distributions of galaxies with BEAGLE

    CERN Document Server

    Chevallard, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    We present a new-generation tool to model and interpret spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, which incorporates in a consistent way the production of radiation and its transfer through the interstellar and intergalactic media. This flexible tool, named BEAGLE (for BayEsian Analysis of GaLaxy sEds), allows one to build mock galaxy catalogues as well as to interpret in terms of physical parameters any combination of photometric and spectroscopic galaxy observations. The current version of the tool includes the versatile modeling of the emission from stars and photoionized gas, attenuation by dust and the accounting for different instrumental effects. We show a first application of the BEAGLE tool to the interpretation of broadband SEDs of a published sample of ${\\sim}10^4$ galaxies at redshifts $0.1 \\lesssim z\\lesssim8$. We find that the constraints derived on photometric redshifts using this multi-purpose tool are comparable to those obtained using public, dedicated photometric-redshift codes and ...

  2. Modelling and interpreting spectral energy distributions of galaxies with BEAGLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallard, Jacopo; Charlot, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    We present a new-generation tool to model and interpret spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies, which incorporates in a consistent way the production of radiation and its transfer through the interstellar and intergalactic media. This flexible tool, named BEAGLE (for BayEsian Analysis of GaLaxy sEds), allows one to build mock galaxy catalogues as well as to interpret any combination of photometric and spectroscopic galaxy observations in terms of physical parameters. The current version of the tool includes versatile modelling of the emission from stars and photoionized gas, attenuation by dust and accounting for different instrumental effects, such as spectroscopic flux calibration and line spread function. We show a first application of the BEAGLE tool to the interpretation of broad-band SEDs of a published sample of ˜ 10^4 galaxies at redshifts 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 8. We find that the constraints derived on photometric redshifts using this multipurpose tool are comparable to those obtained using public, dedicated photometric-redshift codes and quantify this result in a rigorous statistical way. We also show how the post-processing of BEAGLE output data with the PYTHON extension PYP-BEAGLE allows the characterization of systematic deviations between models and observations, in particular through posterior predictive checks. The modular design of the BEAGLE tool allows easy extensions to incorporate, for example, the absorption by neutral galactic and circumgalactic gas, and the emission from an active galactic nucleus, dust and shock-ionized gas. Information about public releases of the BEAGLE tool will be maintained on http://www.jacopochevallard.org/beagle.

  3. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distributions of Starburst & Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, M A

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a self-consistent model of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of starburst galaxies. Two parameters control the IR SED, the mean pressure in the ISM and the destruction timescale of molecular clouds. Adding a simplified AGN spectrum provides mixing lines on IRAS color : color diagrams. This reproduces the observed colors of both AGNs and starbursts.

  4. Deriving star formation histories from photometry using energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01

    Panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting is a critical tool for determining the physical properties of distant galaxies, such as their stellar mass and star formation rate. One widely used method is the publicly available MAGPHYS code. We build on our previous analysis (Hayward & Smith 2015) by presenting some modifications which enable MAGPHYS to automatically estimate galaxy star formation histories (SFHs), including uncertainties, based on ultra-violet to far-infrared photometry. We use state-of-the art synthetic photometry derived by performing three-dimensional dust radiative transfer on hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disc and merging galaxies to test how well the modified MAGPHYS is able to recover SFHs under idealised conditions, where the true SFH is known. We find that while the SFH of the model with the best fit to the synthetic photometry is a poor representation of the true SFH (showing large variations with the line-of-sight to the galaxy and spurious bursts of star forma...

  5. An integrated model of soil-canopy spectral radiance observations, photosynthesis, fluorescence, temperature and energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Tol

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the model SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes, which is a vertical (1-D integrated radiative transfer and energy balance model. It calculates the radiation and the energy balance of a vegetated land surface at the level of single leaves as well as at canopy level, and the spectrum of the outgoing radiation in the viewing direction, at a high spectral resolution over the range from 0.4 to 50 μm, thus including the visible, near and shortwave infrared, as well as the thermal domain. A special routine is dedicated to the calculation of chlorophyll fluorescence. The calculation of radiative transfer and the energy balance is fully integrated, allowing for feedback between surface temperatures, leaf chlorophyll fluorescence and radiative fluxes. Model simulations were evaluated against observations reported in the literature. The model may serve as a theoretical ground truth to derive relationships between observed spectra and physical processes at the land surface.

  6. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of galaxies: introducing the artificial neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, L; Granato, G L; Almeida, C; Baugh, C M; Frenk, C S; Lacey, C G; Paoletti, L; Petrella, A; Selvestrel, D

    2010-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution of galaxies is a complex function of the star formation history and geometrical arrangement of stars and gas in galaxies. The computation of the radiative transfer of stellar radiation through the dust distribution is time-consuming. This aspect becomes unacceptable in particular when dealing with the predictions by semi-analytical galaxy formation models populating cosmological volumes, to be then compared with multi-wavelength surveys. Mainly for this aim, we have implemented an artificial neural network algorithm into the spectro-photometric and radiative transfer code GRASIL in order to compute the spectral energy distribution of galaxies in a short computing time. This allows to avoid the adoption of empirical templates that may have nothing to do with the mock galaxies output by models. The ANN has been implemented to compute the dust emission spectrum (the bottleneck of the computation), and separately for the star-forming molecular clouds and the diffuse dust (due to t...

  7. Galaxy Modelling; 1, Spectral Energy Distributions from Far-UV to Sub-mm Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Devriendt, J E G; Sadat, R

    1999-01-01

    (abridged) We present STARDUST, a new self-consistent modelling of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies from far-UV to radio wavelengths. In order to derive the SEDs in this broad spectral range, we first couple spectrophotometric and (closed-box) chemical evolutions to account for metallicity effects on the spectra of synthetic stellar populations. We then use a phenomenological fit for the metal-dependent extinction curve and a simple geometric distribution of the dust to compute the optical depth of galaxies and the corresponding obscuration curve. This enables us to calculate the fraction of stellar light reprocessed in the infrared range. In a final step, we define a dust model with various components and we fix the weights of these components in order to reproduce the IRAS correlation of IR colours with total IR luminosities. This allows us to compute far-IR SEDs that phenomenologically mimic observed trends. We are able to predict the spectral evolution of galaxies in a broad wavelength...

  8. Testing one-zone synchrotron-self-Compton models with spectral energy distributions of Mrk 421

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Qianqian; Zhang, Pengfei; Yin, Qian-Qing; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    We test one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models with high-quality multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) data of Mrk 421. We use Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to fit twelve day-scale SEDs of Mrk 421 with one-zone SSC models. Three types of electron energy distribution (EED), a log-parabola (LP) EED, a power-law log-parabola (PLLP) EED and a broken power-law (BPL) EED, are assumed in fits. We find that the one-zone SSC model with the PLLP EED provides successful fits to all the twelve SEDs. However, the one-zone SSC model with the LP and BPL EEDs fail to provide acceptable fits to the highest energy X-ray data or GeV data in several states. We therefore conclude that the one-zone SSC model works well in explaining the SEDs of Mrk 421, and the PLLP EED is preferred over the LP and BPL EEDs for Mrk 421 during the flare in March 2010. We derive magnetic field $B'\\sim0.01$\\ G, Doppler factor $\\delta_{\\rm D}\\sim$30--50, and the curvature parameter of EED $r\\sim1$--$10$ in the model wi...

  9. The Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: Spectral Energy Distributions and Fits Using a Grid of Protostellar Models

    CERN Document Server

    Furlan, E; Ali, B; Stutz, A M; Stanke, T; Tobin, J J; Megeath, S T; Osorio, M; Hartmann, L; Calvet, N; Poteet, C A; Booker, J; Manoj, P; Watson, D M; Allen, L

    2016-01-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS): spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star-formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel, and sub-millimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2-870 $\\mu$m and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ~100 $\\mu$m. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate cons...

  10. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Thomas N; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  11. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of the radio galaxy IC310

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraija, N.; Marinelli, A.; Galván-Gámez, A.; Aguilar-Ruiz, E.

    2017-03-01

    The radio galaxy IC310 located in the Perseus Cluster is one of the brightest objects in the radio and X-ray bands, and one of the closest active galactic nuclei observed in very-high energies. In GeV - TeV γ-rays, IC310 was detected in low and high flux states by the MAGIC telescopes from October 2009 to February 2010. Taking into account that the spectral energy distribution (SED) up to a few GeV seems to exhibit a double-peak feature and that a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model can explain all of the multiwavelength emission except for the non-simultaneous MAGIC emission, we interpret, in this work, the multifrequency data set of the radio galaxy IC310 in the context of homogeneous hadronic and leptonic models. In the leptonic framework, we present a multi-zone SSC model with two electron populations to explain the whole SED whereas for the hadronic model, we propose that a single-zone SSC model describes the SED up to a few GeVs and neutral pion decay products resulting from pγ interactions could describe the TeV - GeV γ-ray spectra. These interactions occur when Fermi-accelerated protons interact with the seed photons around the SSC peaks. We show that, in the leptonic model the minimum Lorentz factor of second electron population is exceedingly high γe ∼ 105 disfavoring this model, and in the hadronic model the required proton luminosity is not extremely high ∼1044 erg/s, provided that charge neutrality between the number of electrons and protons is given. Correlating the TeV γ-ray and neutrino spectra through photo-hadronic interactions, we find that the contribution of the emitting region of IC310 to the observed neutrino and ultra-high-energy cosmic ray fluxes are negligible.

  12. ATLAS Versus NextGen Model Atmospheres: A Combined Analysis of Synthetic Spectral Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.

    2004-08-01

    We carried out a critical appraisal of the two theoretical models, Kurucz' ATLAS9 and PHOENIX/NextGen, for stellar atmosphere synthesis. Our tests relied on the theoretical fit of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for a sample of 334 target stars along the whole spectral-type sequence, from the classical optical catalogs of Gunn & Stryker and Jacoby et al. The best-fitting physical parameters (Teff, logg) of stars allowed an independent calibration of the temperature and bolometric scale versus empirical classification parameters (i.e., spectral type and MK luminosity class); in addition, the comparison of the synthetic templates from the ATLAS and NextGen grids allowed us to probe the capability of the models to match spectrophotometric properties of real stars and assess the impact of the different input physics. We can sketch the following main conclusions of our analysis: (1) Fitting accuracy of both theoretical libraries drastically degrades at low Teff at which both ATLAS and NextGen models still fail to properly account for the contribution of molecular features in the observed SED of K-M stars. (2) Compared with empirical calibrations, both ATLAS and NextGen fits tend, on average, to predict slightly warmer (by 4%-8%) Teff for both giant and dwarf stars of fixed spectral type, but ATLAS provides, in general, a sensibly better fit (a factor of 2 lower σ of flux residuals) than NextGen. (3) There is a striking tendency of NextGen to label target stars with an effective temperature and surface gravity higher than that of ATLAS. The effect is especially evident for MK I-III objects for which about one in four stars is clearly misclassified by NextGen in logg. This is a consequence of some ``degeneracy'' in the solution space, partly induced by the different input physics and geometry constraints in the computation of the integrated emerging flux (ATLAS model atmospheres assume standard plane-parallel layers, while NextGen adopts, for low-gravity stars, a

  13. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of the red giant in RS Ophiuchi: evidence for irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlenko, Ya V; Rushton, M T; Evans, A; Woodward, C E; Helton, L A; O'Brien, T J; Jones, D; Elkin, V

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of optical and infrared spectra of the recurrent nova RS Oph obtained during between 2006 and 2009. The best fit to the optical spectrum for 2006 September 28 gives effective temperature Tef = 3900~K for log g = 2.0, while for log g = 0.0 we find Tef = 4700~K, and a comparison with template stellar spectra provides Tef $\\sim$ 4500 K. The observed spectral energy distribution (SED), and the intensities of the emission lines, vary on short ($\\sim 1$~day) time-scales, due to disc variability. We invoke a simple one-component model for the accretion disc, and a model with a hot boundary layer, with high ($\\sim 3.9 \\times 10^{-6}$ \\Mdot) and low ($\\sim 2 \\times 10^{-8}$ \\Mdot) accretion rates, respectively. Fits to the accretion disc-extracted infrared spectrum (2008 July 15) yield effective temperatures for the red giant of Tef = 3800 +/- 100~K (log g = 2.0) and Tef = 3700 +/- 100~K (log g = 0.0). Furthermore, using a more sophisticated approach, we reproduced the optical and infrared SEDs ...

  14. Star Formation in Collision Debris: Insights from the modeling of their Spectral Energy Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Boquien, M; Galliano, F; Braine, J; Lisenfeld, U; Charmandaris, V; Appleton, P N

    2010-01-01

    During galaxy-galaxy interactions, massive gas clouds can be injected into the intergalactic medium which in turn become gravitationally bound, collapse and form stars, star clusters or even dwarf galaxies. The objects resulting from this process are both "pristine", as they are forming their first generation of stars, and chemically evolved because the metallicity inherited from their parent galaxies is high. Such characteristics make them particularly interesting laboratories to study star formation. After having investigated their star-forming properties, we use photospheric, nebular and dust modeling to analyze here their spectral energy distribution (SED) from the far-ultraviolet to the mid-infrared regime for a sample of 7 star-forming regions. Our analysis confirms that the intergalactic star forming regions in Stephan's Quintet, around Arp 105, and NGC 5291, appear devoid of stellar populations older than 10^9 years. We also find an excess of light in the near-infrared regime (from 2 to 4.5 microns) w...

  15. MODELING THE NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Paulina; Videla, Liza [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Wu, Yanling [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Fisica de Catabria, CSIC-UC, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-20

    We present results from model fitting to the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a homogeneous sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy Sample. Imaging and nuclear flux measurements are presented in an accompanying paper. Here we add Spitzer/IRS observations to further constrain the SEDs after careful subtraction of a starburst component. We use the library of CLUMPY torus models from Nenkova et al. and also test the two-phase models recently produced by Stalevski et al. We find that photometric and spectroscopic observations in the mid-IR ({lambda} {approx}> 5 {mu}m) are crucial to properly constrain the best-fit torus models. About half of our sources show clear near-IR excess of their SEDs above the best-fit models. This problem can be less severe when using the Stalevski et al. models. The nature of this emission is not clear since best-fitted blackbody temperatures are very high ({approx}1700-2500 K) and the Type II classification of our sources would correspond to a small probability to peer directly into the hottest regions of the torus. Crucially, the derived torus parameters are quite robust when using CLUMPY models, independently of whether or not the sources require an additional blackbody component. Our findings suggest that tori are characterized by N{sub 0}{approx}>5, {sigma} {approx}> 40, {tau} {approx}< 25, Angle i {approx}> 40 Degree-Sign , Y {approx}< 50, and A {sup los} {sub v} {approx} 100-300, where N{sub 0} is the number of clouds in the equatorial plane of the torus, {sigma} is the characteristic opening angle of the cloud distribution, {tau} is the opacity of a single cloud, Angle i is the line-of-sight orientation of the torus, Y is the ratio of the inner to the outer radii, and A {sup los} {sub v} is the total opacity along the line of sight. From these, we can determine typical torus sizes and masses of 0.1-5.0 pc and 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, respectively. We find tentative evidence that those nuclei with

  16. The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) and its Contributions to Space Weather Research, the Flare Energy Budget, and Instrument Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at 1 nm spectral resolution and on a 1-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric models. The seminar will begin with a brief overview of the FISM model, and also how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM. Some current studies will then be presented that use FISM estimations of the solar VUV irradiance to quantify the contributions of the increased irradiance from flares to Earth's increased thermospheric and ionospheric densites. Initial results will also be presented from a study looking at the electron density increases in the Martian atmosphere during a solar flare. Results will also be shown quantifying the VUV contributions to the total flare energy budget for both the impulsive and gradual phases of solar flares. Lastly, an example of how FISM can be used to simplify the design of future solar VUV irradiance instruments will be discussed, using the future NOAA GOES-R Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray Sensors (EXIS) space weather instrument.

  17. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  18. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  19. ATLAS vs. NextGen model atmospheres: a combined analysis of synthetic spectral energy distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Rodríguez-Merino, L H

    2004-01-01

    We carried out a critical appraisal of the two theoretical models, Kurucz' ATLAS9 and PHOENIX/NextGen, for stellar atmosphere synthesis. Our tests relied on the theoretical fit of SEDs for a sample of 334 target stars along the whole spectral-type sequence. The best-fitting physical parameters of stars allowed a calibration of the temperature and bolometric scale. The main conclusions of our analysis are: i) the fitting accuracy of both theoretical libraries drastically degrades at low Teff; ii) comparing with empirical calibrations, both ATLAS and NextGen fits tend to predict slightly warmer Teff, but ATLAS provides in general a sensibly better fit; iii) there is a striking tendency of NextGen to label target stars with an effective temperature and surface gravity in excess with respect to ATLAS. This is a consequence of some ``degeneracy'' in the solution space, partly induced by the different input physics and geometry constraints. A different T(\\tau) vertical structure of stellar atmosphere seems also req...

  20. Modelling of the Spectral Energy Distribution of Fornax A: Leptonic and Hadronic Production of High Energy Emission from the Radio Lobes

    CERN Document Server

    McKinley, B; López-Caniego, M; Briggs, F; Hurley-Walker, N; Wayth, R B; Offringa, A R; Crocker, R; Bernardi, G; Procopio, P; Gaensler, B M; Tingay, S J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; McDonald, M; Bell, M; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Jacobs, D; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, D A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2014-01-01

    We present new low-frequency observations of the nearby radio galaxy Fornax A at 154 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array, microwave flux-density measurements obtained from WMAP and Planck data, and gamma-ray flux densities obtained from Fermi data. We also compile a comprehensive list of previously published images and flux-density measurements at radio, microwave and X-ray energies. A detailed analysis of the spectrum of Fornax A between 154 MHz and 1510 MHz reveals that both radio lobes have a similar spatially-averaged spectral index, and that there exists a steep-spectrum bridge of diffuse emission between the lobes. Taking the spectral index of both lobes to be the same, we model the spectral energy distribution of Fornax A across an energy range spanning eighteen orders of magnitude, to investigate the origin of the X-ray and gamma-ray emission. A standard leptonic model for the production of both the X-rays and gamma-rays by inverse-Compton scattering does not fit the multi-wavelength observations. ...

  1. Study on Spectral Overlap Model for Energy Transfer between J-Mult iplets in Rare Earth-Doped Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王殿元; 夏上达; 尹民

    2003-01-01

    Based on the experimental data of KY3F10∶Tm3+ reported by Diaf, Kushida′s spectral overlap model (SOM) of energy transfer between J-multiplets was studied. Firstly, with the help of the Inokuti-Hirayama and Yokota-Tanimoto models, the luminescence decay curve of 3H4 of Tm3+ ion was fitted, and the fitted values of corresponding interaction parameters CDA of energy transfer and CDD of energy migration were obtained. Secondly, by compared with Kushida′s SOM in which the relevant Judd-Ofelt approximative transition rates are known, the average overlap integrals of SDD and SDA were obtained. For SDD, how to treat the contribution of the electronic-dipole (ED) crystal field transition forbidden by C4v site symmetry in the calculation of SDD was discussed. For SDA we suggested that, by including the contribution of the phonon sidebands in the analysis of oscillator strength of transition, Kushida′s SOM of ED-ED resonant energy transfer rate can be extended to non-resonant phonon-assisted D-A energy transfer. The strengths and widths of phonon sidebands in this example were discussed, and the results were reasonably good.

  2. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: IV The Controlling Parameters of the Starburst SED

    CERN Document Server

    Groves, B; Sutherland, R; Kewley, L; Fischera, J; Leitherer, C; Brandl, B; van Breugal, W

    2007-01-01

    We combine the the stellar spectral synthesis code Starburst99, the nebular modelling code MAPPINGSIII, and a 1-D dynamical evolution model of HII regions around massive clusters of young stars to generate improved models of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of starburst galaxies. We introduce a compactness parameter, C, which characterizes the specific intensity of the radiation field at ionization fronts in HII regions, and which controls the shape of the far-IR dust re-emission, often referred to loosely as the dust ``temperature''. We also investigate the effect of metallicity on the overall SED and in particular, on the strength of the PAH features. We provide templates for the mean emission produced by the young compact HII regions, the older (10 - 100 Myr) stars and for the wavelength-dependent attenuation produced by a foreground screen of the dust used in our model. We demonstrate that these components may be combined to produce a excellent fit to the observed SEDs of star formation dominated ga...

  3. Analysis of GRB 080319B and GRB 050904 within the fireshell model: evidence for a broader spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Patricelli, Barbara; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; de Barros, Gustavo; Izzo, Luca; Ruffini, Remo; Vereshchagin, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    (Shortened) GRB080319B, with an isotropic energy E_{iso}=1.32x10^{54}erg, and GRB050904, with E_{iso}=1.04x10^{54}erg, offer the possibility of studying the spectral properties of the prompt radiation of two of the most energetic Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). This allows us to probe the validity of the fireshell model for GRBs beyond 10^{54}erg, well outside the energy range where it has been successfully tested up to now (10^{49}-10^{53}erg). We find that in the low energy region, the prompt emission spectra observed by Swift BAT reveals more power than theoretically predicted. The opportunities offered by these observations to improve the fireshell model are outlined. One of the distinguishing features of the fireshell model is that it relates the observed spectra to the spectrum in the comoving frame of the fireshell. Originally, a fully radiative condition and a comoving thermal spectrum were adopted. An additional power-law in the comoving thermal spectrum is required [...] in the fireshell model for GRBs 080...

  4. Estimating Crop Albedo in the Application of a Physical Model Based on the Law of Energy Conservation and Spectral Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Albedo characterizes the radiometric interface of land surfaces, especially vegetation, and the atmosphere. Albedo is a critical input to many models, such as crop growth models, hydrological models and climate models. For the extensive attention to crop monitoring, a physical albedo model for crops is developed based on the law of energy conservation and spectral invariants, which is derived from a prior forest albedo model. The model inputs have been efficiently and physically parameterized, including the dependency of albedo on the solar zenith/azimuth angle, the fraction of diffuse skylight in the incident radiance, the canopy structure, the leaf reflectance/transmittance and the soil reflectance characteristics. Both the anisotropy of soil reflectance and the clumping effect of crop leaves at the canopy scale are considered, which contribute to the improvement of the model accuracy. The comparison between the model results and Monte Carlo simulation results indicates that the canopy albedo has high accuracy with an RMSE < 0.005. The validation using ground measurements has also demonstrated the reliability of the model and that it can reflect the interaction mechanism between radiation and the canopy-soil system.

  5. An ALMA survey of submillimetre galaxies in the COSMOS field: Physical properties derived from energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, O.; Delvecchio, I.; Smolčić, V.; Aravena, M.; Brisbin, D.; Karim, A.; Magnelli, B.; Novak, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Albrecht, M.; Aussel, H.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P. L.; Casey, C. M.; Hayward, C. C.; Ilbert, O.; Intema, H. T.; Jiang, C.; Le Fèvre, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Muñoz Arancibia, A. M.; Navarrete, F.; Padilla, N. D.; Riechers, D. A.; Salvato, M.; Scott, K. S.; Sheth, K.; Tasca, L. A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) represent an important source population in the origin and cosmic evolution of the most massive galaxies. Hence, it is imperative to place firm constraints on the fundamental physical properties of large samples of SMGs. Aims: We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed-frame wavelength of λobs = 1.1 mm, and followed up at λobs = 1.3 mm with the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA). Methods: We used the MAGPHYS model package to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 124 of the target SMGs, which lie at a median redshift of z = 2.30 (19.4% are spectroscopically confirmed). The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the λobs = 1.3 mm dust emission as a tracer of the molecular gas component. Results: The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, obscured star formation rates, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be log(M⋆/M⊙) = 11.09+0.41-0.53, SFR = 402+661-233 M⊙ yr-1, Tdust = 39.7+9.7-7.4 K, log(Mdust/M⊙) = 9.01+0.20-0.31, and log(Mgas/M⊙ = 11.34+0.20-0.23, respectively. The Mdust/M⋆ ratio was found to decrease as a function of redshift, while the Mgas/Mdust ratio shows the opposite, positive correlation with redshift. The derived median gas-to-dust ratio of 120+73-30 agrees well with the canonical expectation. The gas fraction (Mgas/ (Mgas + M⋆)) was found to range from 0.10 to 0.98 with a median of 0.62+0.27-0.23. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of greater than three (one source lies below the MS). These super-MS objects, or starbursts, are preferentially found at z ≳ 3, which likely reflects the sensitivity limit of our source selection. We estimated that the median gas

  6. Modelling the spectral energy distribution of galaxies. V. The dust and PAH emission SEDs of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Popescu, Cristina C; Dopita, Michael A; Fischera, Joerg; Kylafis, Nikolaos D; Madore, Barry F

    2010-01-01

    We present a self-consistent model of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spiral galaxies from the ultraviolet (UV) to the mid-infrared (MIR)/far-infrared (FIR)/submillimeter (submm) based on a full radiative transfer calculation of the propagation of starlight in galaxy disks. This model predicts not only the total integrated energy absorbed in the UV/optical and re-emitted in the infrared/submm, but also the colours of the dust emission based on an explicit calculation of the strength and colour of the UV/optical radiation fields heating the dust, and incorporating a full calculation of the stochastic heating of small dust grains and PAH molecules. The geometry of the translucent components of the model is empirically constrained using the results from the radiation transfer analysis of Xilouris et al. on spirals in the middle range of the Hubble sequence, while the geometry of the optically thick components is constrained from physical considerations with a posteriori checks of the model prediction...

  7. Constraining the properties of AGN host galaxies with Spectral Energy Distribution modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Ciesla, L; Georgakakis, A; Bernhard, E; Mitchell, P D; Buat, V; Elbaz, D; Floc'h, E Le; Lacey, C G; Magdis, G E; Xilouris, M

    2015-01-01

    [abridged] We use the latest release of CIGALE, a galaxy SED fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in estimating both the SFR and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the galaxy formation SAM GALFORM, we create mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH) and add an AGN of Type 1, Type 2, or intermediate type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We perform an SED fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE assuming three different SFHs: a single- and double-exponentially-decreasing, and a delayed SFH. Constraining thecontribution of an AGN to the LIR (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN<20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of $M_*$ in Type 1 and intermediate type AGNs but has no effect for galaxies hosting Type 2 AGNs. We find that i...

  8. Modeling IR Spectral Energy Distributions: A Pilot Study of Starburst Parameters and Silicate Absorption Curves for Some GOALS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, Michael A; Kewley, Lisa J; Rich, Jeff A; Sanders, Dave; Appleton, Phillip N; Chan, Ben H P; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Evans, Aaron S; Frayer, David T; Howell, Justin H; Inami, Hanae; Mazzarella, Joseph A; Petric, Andreea; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Surace, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study into the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting and the derivation of physical parameters for 19 galaxies observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) survey as observed with the \\emph{Spitzer Space Telescope}. For this we have used the pan-spectral fitting tools developed in a series of papers by Dopita and his co-workers. We show that the standard Lee and Draine `astronomical silicate' model cannot provide a good fit to the silicate absorption features as observed in the heavily dust-extinguished ($A_{\\rm V} \\sim 50$mag.) starbursts. We have derived an empirical fit to the `starburst silicate' absorption in these objects. This absorption curve is consistent with the silicate grains being systematically larger in starburst environments than in the local Galactic interstellar medium. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the SED fitting to each of the fitted parameters, and derive these parameters for those galaxies which do not have an embedded AG...

  9. Photometric Redshifts and Model Spectral Energy Distributions of Galaxies From the SDSS-III BOSS DR10 Data

    CERN Document Server

    Greisel, N; Drory, N; Bender, R; Saglia, R P; Snigula, J

    2015-01-01

    We construct a set of model spectra specifically designed to match the colours of the BOSS CMASS galaxies and to be used with photometric redshift template fitting techniques. As a basis we use a set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of single and composite stellar population models. These models cannot describe well the whole colour range populated by the CMASS galaxies at all redshifts, wherefore we modify them by multiplying the SEDs with $\\lambda^{-\\beta}$ for $\\lambda>\\lambda_i$ for different values of $\\lambda_i$ and $\\beta$. When fitting these SEDs to the colours of the CMASS sample, with a burst and dust components in superposition, we can recreate the location in colour spaces inhabited by the CMASS galaxies. From the best fitting models we select a small subset in a two-dimensional plane, whereto the galaxies were mapped by a self-organizing map. These models are used for the estimation of photometric redshifts with a Bayesian template fitting code. The photometric redshifts with the novel tem...

  10. An accretion-jet model for M87: interpreting the spectral energy distribution and Faraday rotation measure

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Jianchao; Lu, Ru-Sen

    2016-01-01

    M87 is arguably the best supermassive black hole (BH) to explore the jet and/or accretion physics due to its proximity and fruitful high-resolution multi-waveband observations. We model the multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) of M87 core that observed at a scale of 0.4 arcsec ($\\sim 10^5R_{\\rm g}$, $R_{\\rm g}$ is gravitational radius) as recently presented by Prieto et al. Similar to Sgr A*, we find that the millimeter bump as observed by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) can be modeled by the synchrotron emission of the thermal electrons in advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF), while the low-frequency radio emission and X-ray emission may dominantly come from the jet. The millimeter radiation from ADAF dominantly come from the region within $10R_{\\rm g}$, which is roughly consistent with the recent very long baseline interferometry observations at 230\\,GHz. We further calculate the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from both ADAF and jet models, and find that the RM predict...

  11. Modeling the spectral-energy-distribution of 3C 454.3 in a "flat" broad-line-region scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Maichang

    2014-01-01

    The broad-line region (BLR) of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) could have a "flat" geometrical structure to allow GeV gamma-ray photons escape, to produce the observed gamma-ray flares with short timescales. In this paper, we collect the quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the FSRQ 3C 454.3 obtained by the multi-wavelength campaigns spanning from 2007 July to 2011 January, and use a model with the "flat" structure BLR, the accretion disc and the dust torus to explain the SEDs of gamma-ray outbursts. We obtain the following results: (i) The jet is almost in equipartition between magnetic and particle energy densities during the outbursts; (ii) When the emitting region locates inside the cavity of the BLR, the covering factor $f_{\\rm BLR}$ of the BLR is very small; as the emitting region goes into the BLR structure, $f_{\\rm BLR}$ increases. (iii) The aperture angle $\\alpha$ describing the BLR structure is about $45^{\\circ}$; (iv) The central black hole (BH) mass is about $5\\times 10^{...

  12. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .5. Spectral energy distributions, starburst models and star formation history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowan Robinson, M.; Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We have modelled the spectral energy distributions of the 13 Hubble Deep Field (HDF) galaxies reliably detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For two galaxies the emission detected by ISO is consistent with being starlight or the infrared 'cirrus' in the galaxies. For the remaining II...

  13. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .5. Spectral energy distributions, starburst models and star formation history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowan Robinson, M.; Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.;

    1997-01-01

    We have modelled the spectral energy distributions of the 13 Hubble Deep Field (HDF) galaxies reliably detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For two galaxies the emission detected by ISO is consistent with being starlight or the infrared 'cirrus' in the galaxies. For the remaining II...

  14. Energy transfers and spectral eddy viscosity in large-eddy simulations of homogeneous isotropic turbulence: Comparison of dynamic Smagorinsky and multiscale models over a range of discretizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hughes, T.J.R.; Wells, G.N.; Wray, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Energy transfers within large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) grids are studied. The spectral eddy viscosity for conventional dynamic Smagorinsky and variational multiscale LES methods are compared with DNS results. Both models underestimate the DNS results for a very coa

  15. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. I. A global model for the broadband spectral energy distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdipour, M.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kriss, G. A.; Cappi, M.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Arav, N.; Behar, E.; Bianchi, S.; Boissay, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Costantini, E.; Ebrero, J.; Di Gesu, L.; Harrison, F. A.; Kaspi, S.; De Marco, B.; Matt, G.; Paltani, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Ponti, G.; Pozo Nuñez, F.; De Rosa, A.; Ursini, F.; de Vries, C. P.; Walton, D. J.; Whewell, M.

    2015-03-01

    An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured (warm, optically-thick corona as part of the inner accretion disk. We then investigate the effects of the continuum on the ionisation balance and thermal stability of photoionised gas for unobscured and obscured epochs. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548: I. A global model for the broadband spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Mehdipour, M; Kriss, G A; Cappi, M; Petrucci, P -O; Steenbrugge, K C; Arav, N; Behar, E; Bianchi, S; Boissay, R; Branduardi-Raymont, G; Costantini, E; Ebrero, J; Di Gesu, L; Harrison, F A; Kaspi, S; De Marco, B; Matt, G; Paltani, S; Peterson, B M; Ponti, G; Nuñez, F Pozo; De Rosa, A; Ursini, F; de Vries, C P; Walton, D J; Whewell, M

    2015-01-01

    An extensive multi-satellite campaign on NGC 5548 has revealed this archetypal Seyfert-1 galaxy to be in an exceptional state of persistent heavy absorption. Our observations taken in 2013-2014 with XMM-Newton, Swift, NuSTAR, INTEGRAL, Chandra, HST and two ground-based observatories have together enabled us to establish that this unexpected phenomenon is caused by an outflowing stream of weakly ionised gas (called the obscurer), extending from the vicinity of the accretion disk to the broad-line region. In this work we present the details of our campaign and the data obtained by all the observatories. We determine the spectral energy distribution of NGC 5548 from near-infrared to hard X-rays by establishing the contribution of various emission and absorption processes taking place along our line of sight towards the central engine. We thus uncover the intrinsic emission and produce a broadband continuum model for both obscured (average summer 2013 data) and unobscured ($<$ 2011) epochs of NGC 5548. Our res...

  17. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary discs. III. Impact of inner rims on Spectral Energy Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Kamp, Inga

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrostatic density structure of the inner disc rim around HerbigAe stars using the thermo-chemical hydrostatic code ProDiMo. We compare the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and images from our hydrostatic disc models to that from prescribed density structure discs. The 2D continuum radiative transfer in ProDiMo includes isotropic scattering. The dust temperature is set by the condition of radiative equilibrium. In the thermal-decoupled case the gas temperature is governed by the balance between various heating and cooling processes. The gas and dust interact thermally via photoelectrons, radiatively, and via gas accommodation on grain surfaces. As a result, the gas is much hotter than in the thermo-coupled case, where the gas and dust temperatures are equal, reaching a few thousands K in the upper disc layers and making the inner rim higher. A physically motivated density drop at the inner radius ("soft-edge") results in rounded inner rims, which appear ring-like in near-infrared images. The...

  18. Spectral Energy Distributions of SDSS Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H. Z. Li; L. E. Chen

    2014-09-01

    We compiled the radio, optical and X-ray data for SDSS sample, and presented broad band spectral index. The broad band energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and LBLs objects have similar spectral properties. However, HBLs have a separate distinct property. Even so, a unified scheme was also revealed from colour–colour diagram.

  19. Low-Energy Spectral Features in GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Briggs, M S

    1996-01-01

    I discuss low-energy lines in gamma-ray bursts. The process of deconvolving gamma-ray spectral data and the steps needed to demonstrate the existence of a line are explained. Previous observations and the current status of the analysis of the BATSE data are described.

  20. Lick Indices and Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis based on an M31 Star Cluster Sample: Comparisons of Methods and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Zhou; Chen, Bingqiu; Jiang, Linhua; Bian, Fuyan; Li, Zhongmu

    2016-01-01

    Application of fitting techniques to obtain physical parameters---such as ages, metallicities, and $\\alpha$-element to iron ratios---of stellar populations is an important approach to understand the nature of both galaxies and globular clusters (GCs). In fact, fitting methods based on different underlying models may yield different results, and with varying precision. In this paper, we have selected 22 confirmed M31 GCs for which we do not have access to previously known spectroscopic metallicities. Most are located at approximately one degree (in projection) from the galactic center. We performed spectroscopic observations with the 6.5 m MMT telescope, equipped with its Red Channel Spectrograph. Lick/IDS absorption-line indices, radial velocities, ages, and metallicities were derived based on the $\\rm EZ\\_Ages$ stellar population parameter calculator. We also applied full spectral fitting with the ULySS code to constrain the parameters of our sample star clusters. In addition, we performed $\\chi^2_{\\rm min}$...

  1. Modelling the Pan-Spectral Energy Distribution of Starburst Galaxies: I. The role of ISM pressure & the Molecular Cloud Dissipation Timescale

    CERN Document Server

    Dopita, M A; Fischera, J; Sutherland, R; Tuffs, R J; Popescu, C C; Kewley, L J; Reuland, M; Leitherer, C

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the stellar spectral synthesis code STARBURST 99, the nebular modelling code MAPPINGS IIIq, a 1-D dynamical evolution model of \\HII regions around massive clusters of young stars and a simplified model of synchrotron emissivity to produce purely theoretical self-consistent synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for (solar metallicity) starbursts lasting some $10^8$ years. These SEDs extend from the Lyman Limit to beyond 21 cm. We find that two ISM parameters control the form of the SED; the pressure in the diffuse phase of the ISM (or, equivalently, its density), and the molecular cloud dissipation timescale. We present detailed SED fits to Arp 220 and NGC 6240, and we give the predicted colors for starburst galaxies derived from our models for the IRAS and the Spitzer Space Observatory MIPS and IRAC instruments. Our models reproduce the spread in observed colors of starburst galaxies. Finally, we present absolute calibrations to convert observed fluxes into star formation ra...

  2. Spectral unfolding of fast neutron energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Michelle; Jackman, Kevin; Engle, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the energy distribution of a neutron flux is difficult in experiments with constrained geometry where techniques such as time of flight cannot be used to resolve the distribution. The measurement of neutron fluxes in reactors, which often present similar challenges, has been accomplished using radioactivation foils as an indirect probe. Spectral unfolding codes use statistical methods to adjust MCNP predictions of neutron energy distributions using quantified radioactive residuals produced in these foils. We have applied a modification of this established neutron flux characterization technique to experimentally characterize the neutron flux in the critical assemblies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the spallation neutron flux at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results of the unfolding procedure are presented and compared with a priori MCNP predictions, and the implications for measurements using the neutron fluxes at these facilities are discussed.

  3. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Fermi Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Luo, G. Y.; Lin, C.; Yuan, Y. H.; Xiao, H. B.; Zhou, A. Y.; Hua, T. X.; Pei, Z. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, multiwavelength data are compiled for a sample of 1425 Fermi blazars to calculate their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). A parabolic function, {{log}}{(ν {F}ν )={P}1({{log}}ν -{P}2)}2+{P}3, is used for SED fitting. Synchrotron peak frequency ({log}{ν }{{p}}), spectral curvature (P1), peak flux ({ν }{{p}}{F}{ν {{p}}}), and integrated flux (ν {F}ν ) are successfully obtained for 1392 blazars (461 flat-spectrum radio quasars [FSRQs], 620 BL Lacs [BLs], and 311 blazars of uncertain type [BCUs]; 999 sources have known redshifts). Monochromatic luminosity at radio 1.4 GHz, optical R band, X-ray at 1 keV and γ-ray at 1 GeV, peak luminosity, integrated luminosity, and effective spectral indices of radio to optical ({α }{{RO}}) and optical to X-ray ({α }{{OX}}) are calculated. The “Bayesian classification” is employed to log {ν }{{p}} in the rest frame for 999 blazars with available redshift, and the results show that three components are enough to fit the log {ν }{{p}} distribution; there is no ultra-high peaked subclass. Based on the three components, the subclasses of blazars using the acronyms of Abdo et al. are classified, and some mutual correlations are also studied. Conclusions are finally drawn as follows: (1) SEDs are successfully obtained for 1392 blazars. The fitted peak frequencies are compared with common sources from available samples. (2) Blazars are classified as low synchrotron peak sources if log {ν }{{p}}({Hz})≤slant 14.0, intermediate synchrotron peak sources if 14.0\\lt {log} {ν }{{p}}({Hz})≤slant 15.3, and high synchrotron peak sources if {log} {ν }{{p}}({Hz})\\gt 15.3. (3) Gamma-ray emissions are strongly correlated with radio emissions. Gamma-ray luminosity is also correlated with synchrotron peak luminosity and integrated luminosity. (4) There is an anticorrelation between peak frequency and peak luminosity within the whole blazar sample. However, there is a marginally positive correlation for high

  4. Spectral Gap Energy Transfer in Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, S.; Walters, K.; Barros, A. P.; Nogueira, M.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental measurements of atmospheric turbulence energy spectra show E(k) ~ k-3 slopes at synoptic scales (~ 600 km - 2000 km) and k-5/3 slopes at the mesoscales (transfer, energy arrest at macroscales must be introduced. The most commonly used turbulence models developed to mimic the above energy transfer include the energy backscatter model for 2D turbulence in the horizontal plane via Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, dissipative URANS models in the vertical plane, and Ekman friction for the energy arrest. One of the controversial issues surrounding the atmospheric turbulence spectra is the explanation of the generation of the 2D and 3D spectra and transition between them, for energy injection at the synoptic scales. Lilly (1989) proposed that the existence of 2D and 3D spectra can only be explained by the presence of an additional energy injection in the meso-scale region. A second issue is related to the observations of dual peak spectra with small variance in meso-scale, suggesting that the energy transfer occurs across a spectral gap (Van Der Hoven, 1957). Several studies have confirmed the spectral gap for the meso-scale circulations, and have suggested that they are enhanced by smaller scale vertical convection rather than by the synoptic scales. Further, the widely accepted energy arrest mechanism by boundary layer friction is closely related to the spectral gap transfer. This study proposes an energy transfer mechanism for atmospheric turbulence with synoptic scale injection, wherein the generation of 2D and 3D spectra is explained using spectral gap energy transfer. The existence of the spectral gap energy transfer is validated by performing LES for the interaction of large scale circulation with a wall, and studying the evolution of the energy spectra both near to and far from the wall. Simulations are also performed using the Advanced Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF-ARW) for moist zonal flow over Gaussian ridge, and the energy spectra close

  5. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B. M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Benitiez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Marshall, F.; Scargle, J. D.; Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  6. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi Bright Blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Agudo, I.; Ajello, M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Arkharov, A. A.; Axelsson, M.; Bach, U.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broadband spectral properties of the gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical, and other hard X-ray /gamma-ray data, collected within 3 months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars. The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual log v-log v Fv representation, the typical broadband spectral signatures normally attributed to a combination of low-energy synchrotron radiation followed by inverse Compton emission of one or more components. We have used these SED to characterize the peak intensity of both the low- and the high-energy components. The results have been used to derive empirical relationships that estimate the position of the two peaks from the broadband colors (i.e., the radio to optical, alpha(sub ro) , and optical to X-ray, alpha(sub ox), spectral slopes) and from the gamma-ray spectral index. Our data show that the synchrotron peak frequency (v(sup S) (sub peak)) is positioned between 10(exp 12.5) and 10(exp 14) Hz in broad-lined flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and between 10(exp 13) and 10(exp 17) Hz in featureless BL Lacertae objects. We find that the gamma-ray spectral slope is strongly correlated with the synchrotron peak energy and with the X-ray spectral index, as expected at first order in synchrotron-inverse Compton scenarios. However, simple homogeneous, one-zone, synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) models cannot explain most of our SED, especially in the case of FSRQs and low energy peaked (LBL) BL Lacs. More complex models involving external Compton radiation or multiple SSC components are required to reproduce the overall SED and the observed spectral variability. While more than

  7. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting) or non-destructive testing of the internal structure of solids. The focus is on the total energy content of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain, which allows understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder since it isolates the longitudinal P-wave from shear or rotational modes. It is observed from the signal that stronger disorder leads to faster attenuation of the signal. An ordered granular chain exhibits ballistic propagation of energy whereas, a disordered granular chain exhibits more diffusive like propagation, which eventually becomes localized at long time periods. For obtaining mean-field macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been used, however, such an ensemble averaged spectral energy response does not resolve multiple scattering, leading to loss of information, indicating the need for a different framework for micro-macro averaging.

  8. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava Rohit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting or non-destructive testing of the internal structure of solids. The focus is on the total energy content of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain, which allows understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder since it isolates the longitudinal P-wave from shear or rotational modes. It is observed from the signal that stronger disorder leads to faster attenuation of the signal. An ordered granular chain exhibits ballistic propagation of energy whereas, a disordered granular chain exhibits more diffusive like propagation, which eventually becomes localized at long time periods. For obtaining mean-field macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been used, however, such an ensemble averaged spectral energy response does not resolve multiple scattering, leading to loss of information, indicating the need for a different framework for micro-macro averaging.

  9. The spectral energy distribution and mass-loss history of IRC+10420

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudmaijer, RD; Matthews, HE; Blommaert, JADL; Sahu, KC

    1996-01-01

    We present a study of the spectral energy distribution of the peculiar hypergiant IRC + 10420. To this end we have collected published photometry of IRC + 10420 and obtained some new data, in order to construct the spectral energy distribution and fit it with a radiative transfer model. In addition

  10. Spectral stability of unitary network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, Joachim; Bourget, Olivier; Joye, Alain

    2015-08-01

    We review various unitary network models used in quantum computing, spectral analysis or condensed matter physics and establish relationships between them. We show that symmetric one-dimensional quantum walks are universal, as are CMV matrices. We prove spectral stability and propagation properties for general asymptotically uniform models by means of unitary Mourre theory.

  11. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory; 5, Spectral Energy Distributions, Starburst Models and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Rowan-Robinson, M

    1997-01-01

    We have modelled the spectral energy distributions of the 13 HDF galaxies reliably detected by ISO. For 2 galaxies the emission detected by ISO is consistent with being starlight or the infrared 'cirrus' in the galaxies. For the remaining 11 galaxies there is a clear mid-infrared excess, which we interpret as emission from dust associated with a strong starburst. 10 of these galaxies are spirals or interacting pairs, while the remaining one is an elliptical with a prominent nucleus and broad emission lines. We give a new discussion of how the star formation rate can be deduced from the far infrared luminosity and derive star formation rates for these galaxies of 8-1000 $\\phi M_{\\sun}$ per yr, where $\\phi$ takes account of the uncertainty in the initial mass function. The HDF galaxies detected by ISO are clearly forming stars at a prodigious rate compared with nearby normal galaxies. We discuss the implications of our detections for the history of star and heavy element formation in the universe. Although unce...

  12. Spectral Analysis and Atmospheric Models of Microflares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fang; Yu-Hua Tang; Zhi Xu

    2006-01-01

    By use of the high-resolution spectral data obtained with THEMIS on 2002 September 5, the spectra and characteristics of five well-observed microflares have been analyzed. Our results indicate that some of them are located near the longitudinal magnetic polarity inversion lines. All the microflares are accompanied by mass motions. The most obvious characteristic of the Hα microflare spectra is the emission at the center of both Hα and CaII 8542(A) lines. For the first time both thermal and non-thermal semi-empirical atmospheric models for the conspicuous and faint microflares are computed. In computing the non-thermal models, we assume that the electron beam resulting from magnetic reconnection is produced in the chromosphere, because it requires lower energies for the injected particles.It is found there is obvious heating in the low chromosphere. The temperature enhancement is about 1000-2200 K in the thermal models. If the non-thermal effects are included, then the required temperature increase can be reduced by 100-150 K. These imply that the Hα microflares can probably be produced by magnetic reconnection in the solar Iower atmosphere.The radiative and kinetic energies of the Hα microflares are estimated and the total energy is found to be 1027 - 4× 1028 erg.

  13. Metallicity and the spectral energy distribution and spectral types of dwarf O-stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokiem, MR; Martin-Hernandez, NL; Lenorzer, A; de Koter, A; Tielens, AGGA

    2004-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of metallicity on the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) of 0 main sequence (dwarf) stars, focussing on the hydrogen and helium ionizing continua, and on the optical and near-IR lines used for spectral classification. The spectra are based on non-L

  14. A jet-dominated model for a broad-band spectral energy distribution of the nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus in M94

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, Pieter; Markoff, Sera; Uttley, Phil; McHardy, Ian; van der Laan, Tessel; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Connors, Riley

    2017-06-01

    We have compiled a new multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) for the closest obscured low-ionization emission-line region active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 4736, also known as M94. The SED comprises mainly high-resolution (mostly sub-arcsecond, or, at the distance to M94, ≲23 pc from the nucleus) observations from the literature, archival data, as well as previously unpublished sub-millimetre data from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, in conjunction with new electronic MultiElement Radio Interferometric Network (e-MERLIN) L-band (1.5 GHz) observations. Thanks to the e-MERLIN resolution and sensitivity, we resolve for the first time a double structure composed of two radio sources separated by ˜1 arcsec, previously observed only at higher frequency. We explore this data set, which further includes non-simultaneous data from the Very Large Array, the Gemini telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray observatory, in terms of an outflow-dominated model. We compare our results with previous trends found for other AGN using the same model (NGC 4051, M81*, M87 and Sgr A*), as well as hard- and quiescent-state X-ray binaries. We find that the nuclear broad-band spectrum of M94 is consistent with a relativistic outflow of low inclination. The findings in this work add to the growing body of evidence that the physics of weakly accreting black holes scales with mass in a rather straightforward fashion.

  15. Bayesian mixture models for spectral density estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Cadonna, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a novel Bayesian modeling approach to spectral density estimation for multiple time series. Considering first the case of non-stationary timeseries, the log-periodogram of each series is modeled as a mixture of Gaussiandistributions with frequency-dependent weights and mean functions. The implied model for the log-spectral density is a mixture of linear mean functionswith frequency-dependent weights. The mixture weights are built throughsuccessive differences of a logit-normal di...

  16. The Spectral Quark Model and Light Cone Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz-Arriola, E; Broniowsk, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    Chiral quark models offer a practical and simple tool to describe covariantly both low and high energy phenomenology in combination with QCD evolution. This can be done in full harmony with chiral symmetry and electromagnetic gauge invariance. We review the recently proposed spectral quark model where all these constraints are implemented.

  17. SPECTRAL-WEIGHT TRANSFER - BREAKDOWN OF LOW-ENERGY-SCALE SUM-RULES IN CORRELATED SYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEINDERS, MBJ; ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the spectral-weight transfer from the high- to the low-energy scale by means of exact diagonalization of finite clusters for the Mott-Hubbard and charge-transfer model. We find that the spectral-weight transfer is very sensitive to the hybridization strength as well as to the

  18. Fermi energy 5f spectral weight variation in uranium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denlinger, J.D.; Clack, J.; Allen, J.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Uranium materials display a wide range of thermal, electrical and magnetic properties, often exotic. For more than a decade there have been efforts to use photoemission spectroscopy to develop a systematic and unified understanding of the 5f electron states giving rise to this behavior. These efforts have been hampered by a paucity of systems where changes in transport properties are accompanied by substantial spectral changes, so as to allow an attempt to correlate the two kinds of properties within some model. The authors have made resonant photoemission measurements to extract the 5f spectral weight in three systems which show varying degrees of promise of permitting such an attempt, Y{sub 1{minus}x}U{sub x}Pd{sub 3}, U(Pd{sub x}Pt{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 3} and U(Pd{sub x}Cu{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 5}. They have also measured U 4f core level spectra. The 4f spectra can be modeled with some success by the impurity Anderson model (IAM), and the 5f spectra are currently being analyzed in that framework. The IAM characterizes the 5f-electrons of a single site by an f binding energy {epsilon}{sub f}, an f Coulomb interaction and a hybridization V to conduction electrons. Latent in the model are the phenomena of 5f mixed valence and the Kondo effect.

  19. A predictive model for the spectral "bioalbedo" of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. M.; Hodson, A. J.; Taggart, A. J.; Mernild, S. H.; Tranter, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first physical model for the spectral "bioalbedo" of snow, which predicts the spectral reflectance of snowpacks contaminated with variable concentrations of red snow algae with varying diameters and pigment concentrations and then estimates the effect of the algae on snowmelt. The biooptical model estimates the absorption coefficient of individual cells; a radiative transfer scheme calculates the spectral reflectance of snow contaminated with algal cells, which is then convolved with incoming spectral irradiance to provide albedo. Albedo is then used to drive a point-surface energy balance model to calculate snowpack melt rate. The model is used to investigate the sensitivity of snow to algal biomass and pigmentation, including subsurface algal blooms. The model is then used to recreate real spectral albedo data from the High Sierra (CA, USA) and broadband albedo data from Mittivakkat Gletscher (SE Greenland). Finally, spectral "signatures" are identified that could be used to identify biology in snow and ice from remotely sensed spectral reflectance data. Our simulations not only indicate that algal blooms can influence snowpack albedo and melt rate but also highlight that "indirect" feedback related to their presence are a key uncertainty that must be investigated.

  20. Constructing Polynomial Spectral Models for Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Conroy, Charlie; Hogg, David W

    2016-01-01

    Stellar spectra depend on the stellar parameters and on dozens of photospheric elemental abundances. Simultaneous fitting of these $\\mathcal{N}\\sim \\,$10-40 model labels to observed spectra has been deemed unfeasible, because the number of ab initio spectral model grid calculations scales exponentially with $\\mathcal{N}$. We suggest instead the construction of a polynomial spectral model (PSM) of order $\\mathcal{O}$ for the model flux at each wavelength. Building this approximation requires a minimum of only ${\\mathcal{N}+\\mathcal{O}\\choose\\mathcal{O}}$ calculations: e.g. a quadratic spectral model ($\\mathcal{O}=\\,$2), which can then fit $\\mathcal{N}=\\,$20 labels simultaneously, can be constructed from as few as 231 ab initio spectral model calculations; in practice, a somewhat larger number ($\\sim\\,$300-1000) of randomly chosen models lead to a better performing PSM. Such a PSM can be a good approximation to ab initio spectral models only over a limited portion of label space, which will vary case by case. Y...

  1. An Enhanced Global Spectral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-27

    dddtc e prod e = Kinetic energy/unit mass Eq. (5) ekh cpcnst diffusion coefficient for Z, T and W. ep pblvar epsl ipmn epsion ipmn epslr cpcnst eps...param List output ioterm param Terminal output ipdim grddim ipmn ipmn contains the constant parts of the PMNS computation. Refer to routines INIPMN and

  2. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Intitute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10, Bandung, Indonesia 40132 dhani@as.itb.ac.id (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  3. Spectral modeling of nebular-phase supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Jerkstrand, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Massive stars live fast and die young. They shine furiously for a few million years, during which time they synthesize most of the heavy elements in the universe in their cores. They end by blowing themselves up in a powerful explosion known as a supernova. During this process, the core collapses to a neutron star or a black hole, while the outer layers are expelled with velocities of thousands of kilometers per second. The resulting fireworks often outshine the entire host galaxy for many weeks. The explosion energy is eventually radiated away, but powering of the newborn nebula continues by radioactive isotopes synthesized in the explosion. The ejecta are now quite transparent, and we can see the material produced in the deep interiors of the star. To interpret the observations, detailed spectral modeling is needed. This thesis aims to develop and apply state-of-the-art computational tools for interpreting and modeling supernova observations in the nebular phase. This requires calculation of the physical co...

  4. AGN Spectral Energy Distributions of GLAST Telescope Network Program Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jeff; Lacy, Mark; Daou, Doris; Rapp, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda

    2005-03-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the "GLAST Telescope Network" (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our project will observe one of these objects with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments to determine their Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), which will be compared to a computer model of disk emission in order to determine what component of the SED is due to the disk and what component is due to synchrotron radiation induced by the jets. In addition we will observe our program objects prior to, simultaneously with, and after Spitzer observes them. This gives a direct connection from Spitzer research to student activities in the classroom.

  5. Modeling of spectral characteristics of blue LEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders

    2010-01-01

    are expected to vary with current and junction temperature. Commercial high power blue LEDs were measured with respect to spectral distribution and chromaticity and the result was compared with the model predictions. We have found that the models predict significantly different results with respect...

  6. Constructing Polynomial Spectral Models for Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Hans-Walter; Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Hogg, David W.

    2016-08-01

    Stellar spectra depend on the stellar parameters and on dozens of photospheric elemental abundances. Simultaneous fitting of these { N } ˜ 10-40 model labels to observed spectra has been deemed unfeasible because the number of ab initio spectral model grid calculations scales exponentially with { N }. We suggest instead the construction of a polynomial spectral model (PSM) of order { O } for the model flux at each wavelength. Building this approximation requires a minimum of only ≤ft(≥nfrac{}{}{0em}{}{{ N }+{ O }}{{ O }}\\right) calculations: e.g., a quadratic spectral model ({ O }=2) to fit { N }=20 labels simultaneously can be constructed from as few as 231 ab initio spectral model calculations; in practice, a somewhat larger number (˜300-1000) of randomly chosen models lead to a better performing PSM. Such a PSM can be a good approximation only over a portion of label space, which will vary case-by-case. Yet, taking the APOGEE survey as an example, a single quadratic PSM provides a remarkably good approximation to the exact ab initio spectral models across much of this survey: for random labels within that survey the PSM approximates the flux to within 10-3 and recovers the abundances to within ˜0.02 dex rms of the exact models. This enormous speed-up enables the simultaneous many-label fitting of spectra with computationally expensive ab initio models for stellar spectra, such as non-LTE models. A PSM also enables the simultaneous fitting of observational parameters, such as the spectrum’s continuum or line-spread function.

  7. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  8. An Atlas of Galaxy Spectral Energy Distributions from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael J I; Smith, J -D T; da Cunha, Elisabete; Jarrett, T H; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Armus, Lee; Brandl, Bernhard R; Peek, J E G

    2013-01-01

    We present an atlas of 129 spectral energy distributions for nearby galaxies, with wavelength coverage spanning from the UV to the mid-infrared. Our atlas spans a broad range of galaxy types, including ellipticals, spirals, merging galaxies, blue compact dwarfs and luminous infrared galaxies. We have combined ground-based optical drift-scan spectrophotometry with infrared spectroscopy from Spitzer and Akari, with gaps in spectral coverage being filled using MAGPHYS spectral energy distribution models. The spectroscopy and models were normalized, constrained and verified with matched-aperture photometry measured from Swift, GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, Spitzer and WISE images. The availability of 26 photometric bands allowed us to identify and mitigate systematic errors present in the data. Comparison of our spectral energy distributions with other template libraries and the observed colors of galaxies indicates that we have smaller systematic errors than existing atlases, while spanning a broader range of galaxy types...

  9. [Comparison of two spectral mixture analysis models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-Jun; Lin, Qi-Zhong; Li, Ming-Xiao; Wang, Li-Ming

    2009-10-01

    A spectral mixture analysis experiment was designed to compare the spectral unmixing effects of linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) and constraint linear spectral mixture analysis (CLSMA). In the experiment, red, green, blue and yellow colors were printed on a coarse album as four end members. Thirty nine mixed samples were made according to each end member's different percent in one pixel. Then, field spectrometer was located on the top of the mixed samples' center to measure spectrum one by one. Inversion percent of each end member in the pixel was extracted using LSMA and CLSMA models. Finally, normalized mean squared error was calculated between inversion and real percent to compare the two models' effects on spectral unmixing. Results from experiment showed that the total error of LSMA was 0.30087 and that of CLSMA was 0.37552 when using all bands in the spectrum. Therefore, LSMA was 0.075 less than that of CLSMA when the whole bands of four end members' spectra were used. On the other hand, the total error of LSMA was 0.28095 and that of CLSMA was 0.29805 after band selection. So, LSMA was 0.017 less than that of CLSMA when bands selection was performed. Therefore, whether all or selected bands were used, the accuracy of LSMA was better than that of CLSMA because during the process of spectrum measurement, errors caused by instrument or human were introduced into the model, leading to that the measured data could not mean the strict requirement of CLSMA and therefore reduced its accuracy: Furthermore, the total error of LSMA using selected bands was 0.02 less than that using the whole bands. The total error of CLSMA using selected bands was 0.077 less than that using the whole bands. So, in the same model, spectral unmixing using selected bands to reduce the correlation of end members' spectra was superior to that using the whole bands.

  10. Spectral Energy Distributions of Quasars and AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, B.

    2004-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are multiwavelength emitters. To have any hope of understanding them, or even to determine their energy output, we must observe them in multiple wavebands using many telescopes. I will review what we have learned from broad-band observations of relatively bright, low-redshift AGN over the past ˜ 15 years. AGN can be found at all wavelengths but each provides a different view of the intrinsic population, often with little overlap between samples selected in different wavebands. I look forward to the full view of the intrinsic population which we will obtain over the next few years with surveys using today's new, sensitive observatories. These surveys are already finding enough new and different AGN candidates to pose the question ``What IS an AGN?".

  11. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  12. Adaptable Multivariate Calibration Models for Spectral Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THOMAS,EDWARD V.

    1999-12-20

    Multivariate calibration techniques have been used in a wide variety of spectroscopic situations. In many of these situations spectral variation can be partitioned into meaningful classes. For example, suppose that multiple spectra are obtained from each of a number of different objects wherein the level of the analyte of interest varies within each object over time. In such situations the total spectral variation observed across all measurements has two distinct general sources of variation: intra-object and inter-object. One might want to develop a global multivariate calibration model that predicts the analyte of interest accurately both within and across objects, including new objects not involved in developing the calibration model. However, this goal might be hard to realize if the inter-object spectral variation is complex and difficult to model. If the intra-object spectral variation is consistent across objects, an effective alternative approach might be to develop a generic intra-object model that can be adapted to each object separately. This paper contains recommendations for experimental protocols and data analysis in such situations. The approach is illustrated with an example involving the noninvasive measurement of glucose using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Extensions to calibration maintenance and calibration transfer are discussed.

  13. Spectral geometry: two exactly solvable models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperin, Yu.A. (International Solvay Institutes for Physics and Chemistry, C.P. 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050, Brussels (Belgium) Department of Mathematical and Computational Physics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198904, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation) Institute for Physical Research and Technology, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Pavlov, B.S. (International Solvay Institutes for Physics and Chemistry, C.P. 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050, Brussels (Belgium) Department of Mathematical and Computational Physics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198904, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Rudin, G.E. (Department of Mathematical and Computational Physics, Saint Petersburg State University, 198904, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Vinitsky, S.I. (International Solvay Institutes for Physics and Chemistry, C.P. 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050, Brussels (Belgium) Institute for Physical Research and Technology, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation) Joi

    1994-10-24

    Two exactly solvable models illustrating the links between spectral properties of Hamiltonians, connections on the induced Hilbert bundles and topological characteristics of the basis spaces are considered. The first of them is based on the extension theory for symmetric operators and the second on the one-dimensional Laplace operator with parametrical boundary conditions. ((orig.))

  14. Twisted spectral geometry for the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    In noncommutative geometry, the spectral triple of a manifold does not generate bosonic fields, for fluctuations of the Dirac operator vanish. A Connes-Moscovici twist forces the commutative algebra to be multiplied by matrices. Keeping the space of spinors untouched, twisted-fluctuations then yield perturbations of the spin connection. Applied to the spectral triple of the Standard Model, a similar twist yields the scalar field needed to stabilize the vacuum and to make the computation of the Higgs mass compatible with its experimental value.

  15. Energy Content & Spectral Energy Representation of Wave Propagation in a Granular Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Rohit; Luding, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Studying the energy as well as spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through materials like soil. The study of these properties is aimed at modeling wave propagation for oil, mineral or gas exploration (seismic prospecting) or non-destructive testing for the study of internal structure of solids. Wave propagation through granular materials is often accompanied by energy attenuation which is quantified by Quality factor and this parameter has often been used to characterize material properties, hence, determining the Quality factor (energy attenuation parameter) can also help in determining the properties of the material [3], studied experimentally in [2]. The study of Energy content (Kinetic, Potential and Total Energy) of a pulse propagating through an idealized one-dimensional discrete particle system like a mass disordered granular chain can assist in understanding the energy attenuation due to disorder as a function of propagation distance. The spectral analysis of the energy signal can assist in understanding dispersion as well as attenuation due to scattering in different frequencies (scattering attenuation). The selection of one-dimensional granular chain also helps in studying only the P-wave attributes of the wave and removing the influence of shear or rotational waves. Granular chains with different mass distributions have been studied, by randomly selecting masses from normal, binary and uniform distributions and the standard deviation of the distribution is considered as the disorder parameter, higher standard deviation means higher disorder and lower standard deviation means lower disorder [1]. For obtaining macroscopic/continuum properties, ensemble averaging has been invoked. Instead of analyzing deformation-, velocity- or stress

  16. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  17. A Bayesian Analysis of Spectral ARMA Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel I. Silvestre Bezerra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bezerra et al. (2008 proposed a new method, based on Yule-Walker equations, to estimate the ARMA spectral model. In this paper, a Bayesian approach is developed for this model by using the noninformative prior proposed by Jeffreys (1967. The Bayesian computations, simulation via Markov Monte Carlo (MCMC is carried out and characteristics of marginal posterior distributions such as Bayes estimator and confidence interval for the parameters of the ARMA model are derived. Both methods are also compared with the traditional least squares and maximum likelihood approaches and a numerical illustration with two examples of the ARMA model is presented to evaluate the performance of the procedures.

  18. Visual Method for Spectral Energy Distribution Calculation of Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y. Huang; J. H. Fan

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we propose to use `The Geometer’s Sketchpad’ to the fitting of a spectral energy distribution of blazar based on three effective spectral indices, RO, OX, and RX and the flux density in the radio band. It can make us to see the fitting in detail with both the peak frequency and peak luminosity given immediately. We used our method to those sources whose peak frequency and peak luminosity are given and found that our results are consistent with those given in the work of Sambruna et al. (1996).

  19. The Spectral Energy Distribution of Fermi bright blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Ajello, M; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cavazzuti, E; Cecchi, C; Celik, O; Charles, E; Chaty, S; Chekhtman, A; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Colafrancesco, S; Cominsky, L R; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Silva, E do Couto e; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Frailis, M; Fuhrmann, L; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Healey, S E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Itoh, R; Jackson, M S; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, W N; Kadler, M; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kawai, N; Kerr, M; Knodlseder, J; Kocian, M L; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; McConville, W; McEnery, J E; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We have conducted a detailed investigation of the broad-band spectral properties of the \\gamma-ray selected blazars of the Fermi LAT Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). By combining our accurately estimated Fermi gamma-ray spectra with Swift, radio, infra-red, optical and other hard X-ray/gamma-ray data, collected within three months of the LBAS data taking period, we were able to assemble high-quality and quasi-simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) for 48 LBAS blazars.The SED of these gamma-ray sources is similar to that of blazars discovered at other wavelengths, clearly showing, in the usual Log $\

  20. A first glance into the Spectral Energy Distributions of Single Stellar Populations in the Infrared range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meneses-Goytia, Sofia; Peletier, Reynier F.; Tuffs, RJ; Popescu, CC

    2012-01-01

    The present work shows the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) in the infrared using the IRTF stellar library, obtained using models based on Single Stellar population Models (SSP). We have focused on the K band in order to compare with observables of elliptical galaxies. We also present the compar

  1. Energy modelling software

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry has turned to energy modelling in order to assist them in reducing the amount of energy consumed by buildings. However, while the energy loads of buildings can be accurately modelled, energy models often under...

  2. Bayesian fitting of Taurus brown dwarf spectral energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, N. J.; Harries, Tim J.; Rowe, John; Acreman, David M.

    2012-06-01

    We present derived stellar and disc parameters for a sample of Taurus brown dwarfs both with and without evidence of an associated disc. These parameters have been derived using an online fitting tool (), which includes a statistically robust derivation of uncertainties, an indication of parameter degeneracies and a complete treatment of the input photometric and spectroscopic observations. The observations of the Taurus members with indications of disc presence have been fitted using a grid of theoretical models including detailed treatments of physical processes accepted for higher mass stars, such as dust sublimation, and a simple treatment of the accretion flux. This grid of models has been designed to test the validity of the adopted physical mechanisms, but we have also constructed models using parametrization, for example semi-empirical dust sublimation radii, for users solely interested in parameter derivation and the quality of the fit. The parameters derived for the naked and disc brown dwarf systems are largely consistent with literature observations. However, our inner disc edge locations are consistently closer to the star than previous results and we also derive elevated accretion rates over non-spectral energy distribution based accretion rate derivations. For inner edge locations, we attribute these differences to the detailed modelling we have performed of the disc structure, particularly at the crucial inner edge where departures in geometry from the often adopted vertical wall due to dust sublimation (and therefore accretion flux) can compensate for temperature (and therefore distance) changes to the inner edge of the dust disc. In the case of the elevated derived accretion rates, in some cases, this may be caused by the intrinsic stellar luminosities of the targets exceeding that predicted by the isochrones we have adopted.

  3. Gap timing and the spectral timing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, J W

    1999-04-01

    A hypothesized mechanism underlying gap timing was implemented in the Spectral Timing Model [Grossberg, S., Schmajuk, N., 1989. Neural dynamics of adaptive timing and temporal discrimination during associative learning. Neural Netw. 2, 79-102] , a neural network timing model. The activation of the network nodes was made to decay in the absence of the timed signal, causing the model to shift its peak response time in a fashion similar to that shown in animal subjects. The model was then able to accurately simulate a parametric study of gap timing [Cabeza de Vaca, S., Brown, B., Hemmes, N., 1994. Internal clock and memory processes in aminal timing. J. Exp. Psychol.: Anim. Behav. Process. 20 (2), 184-198]. The addition of a memory decay process appears to produce the correct pattern of results in both Scalar Expectancy Theory models and in the Spectral Timing Model, and the fact that the same process should be effective in two such disparate models argues strongly that process reflects a true aspect of animal cognition.

  4. The Spectral Energy Distribution of the Coldest Known Brown Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Luhman, K L

    2016-01-01

    WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (hereafter WISE 0855-0714) is the coldest known brown dwarf (~250 K) and the fourth closest known system to the Sun (2.2 pc). It has been previously detected only in the J band and two mid-IR bands. To better measure its spectral energy distribution (SED), we have performed deep imaging of WISE 0855-0714 in six optical and near-IR bands with Gemini Observatory, the Very Large Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. Five of the bands show detections, although one detection is marginal (S/N~3). We also have obtained two epochs of images with the Spitzer Space Telescope for use in refining the parallax of the brown dwarf. By combining astrometry from this work and previous studies, we have derived a parallax of 0.449+/-0.008" (2.23+/-0.04 pc). We have compared our photometry for WISE 0855-0714 to data for known Y dwarfs and to the predictions of three suites of models by Saumon et al. (2012) and Morley et al. (2012, 2014) that are defined by the presence or absence of clouds and non-e...

  5. Spectral light management for solar energy conversion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Cameron

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the inherent broadband nature of the solar radiation, combined with the narrow spectral sensitivity range of direct solar to electricity devices, there is a massive opportunity to manipulate the solar spectrum to increase the functionality and efficiency of solar energy conversion devices. Spectral splitting or manipulation facilitates the efficient combination of both high-temperature solar thermal systems, which can absorb over the entire solar spectrum to create heat, and photovoltaic cells, which only convert a range of wavelengths to electricity. It has only recently been possible, with the development of nanofabrication techniques, to integrate micro- and nano-photonic structures as spectrum splitters/manipulators into solar energy conversion devices. In this paper, we summarize the recent developments in beam splitting techniques, and highlight some relevant applications including combined PV-thermal collectors and efficient algae production, and suggest paths for future development in this field.

  6. CMB spectral distortions and energy release in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the spectral deviation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the blackbody spectrum has become a focus of attention as a probe of the thermal history of the Universe. It has been more than 20 years since COBE/FIRAS's measurement, which showed excellent agreement between the CMB spectrum and a perfect blackbody spectrum. Significant developments in the technology since then have allowed us to improve the sensitivity of the absolute spectrum measurement by a factor of {˜ }10^4. Therefore, the physics related to the generation of CMB spectral distortions should now be investigated in greater detail. To probe the physics in the early universe and to open an observational window for new physics, various energy release mechanisms both in and beyond standard cosmology need to be studied. In this paper, we provide a review of the physics of CMB distortions and the energy release that creates CMB distortions in the early universe.

  7. Spectral light management for solar energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Cameron; Mojiri, Ahmad; Rosengarten, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Due to the inherent broadband nature of the solar radiation, combined with the narrow spectral sensitivity range of direct solar to electricity devices, there is a massive opportunity to manipulate the solar spectrum to increase the functionality and efficiency of solar energy conversion devices. Spectral splitting or manipulation facilitates the efficient combination of both high-temperature solar thermal systems, which can absorb over the entire solar spectrum to create heat, and photovoltaic cells, which only convert a range of wavelengths to electricity. It has only recently been possible, with the development of nanofabrication techniques, to integrate micro- and nano-photonic structures as spectrum splitters/manipulators into solar energy conversion devices. In this paper, we summarize the recent developments in beam splitting techniques, and highlight some relevant applications including combined PV-thermal collectors and efficient algae production, and suggest paths for future development in this field.

  8. Vertical spectral representation in primitive equation models of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizzi, A.; Tribbia, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Curry, J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Attempts to represent the vertical structure in primitive equation models of the atmosphere with the spectral method have been unsuccessful to date. Linear stability analysis showed that small time steps were required for computational stability near the upper boundary with a vertical spectral representation and found it necessary to use an artificial constraint to force temperature to zero when pressure was zero to control the upper-level horizontal velocities. This ad hoc correction is undesirable, and an analysis that shows such a correction is unnecessary is presented. By formulating the model in terms of velocity and geopotential and then using the hydrostatic equation to calculate temperature from geopotential, temperature is necessarily zero when pressure is zero. The authors applied this technique to the dry-adiabatic primitive equations on the equatorial {beta} and tropical f planes. Vertical and horizontal normal modes were used as the spectral basis functions. The vertical modes are based on vertical normal modes, and the horizontal modes are normal modes for the primitive equations on a {beta} or f plane. The results show that the upper-level velocities do not necessarily increase, total energy is conserved, and kinetic energy is bounded. The authors found an upper-level temporal oscillation in the horizontal domain integral of the horizontal velocity components that is related to mass and velocity field imbalances in the initial conditions or introduced during the integration. Through nonlinear normal-mode initialization, the authors effectively removed the initial condition imbalance and reduced the amplitude of this oscillation. It is hypothesized that the vertical spectral representation makes the model more sensitive to initial condition imbalances, or it introduces imbalance during the integration through vertical spectral truncation. 20 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Relative calibration of energy thresholds on multi-bin spectral x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölin, M.; Danielsson, M.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate and reliable energy calibration of spectral x-ray detectors used in medical imaging is essential for avoiding ring artifacts in the reconstructed images (computed tomography) and for performing accurate material basis decomposition. A simple and accurate method for relative calibration of the energy thresholds on a multi-bin spectral x-ray detector is presented. The method obtains the linear relations between all energy thresholds in a channel by scanning the thresholds with respect to each other during x-ray illumination. The method does not rely on a model of the detector's response function and does not require any identifiable features in the x-ray spectrum. Applying the same method, the offset between the thresholds can be determined also without external stimuli by utilizing the electronic noise as a source. The simplicity and accuracy of the method makes it suitable for implementation in clinical multi-bin spectral x-ray imaging systems.

  10. New approach to spectral features modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, H. van; Scalia, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of spectral features, speckle effects, is explained, followed by a discussion on many aspects of spectral features generation. The next part gives an overview of means to limit the amplitude of the spectral features. This paper gives a discussion of all means to reduce the spectral featur

  11. MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Leighly, Karen M. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

  12. Spectral properties in supersymmetric matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulton, Lyonell, E-mail: L.Boulton@hw.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar, E-mail: garciamormaria@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Restuccia, Alvaro, E-mail: arestu@usb.ve [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-03-21

    We formulate a general sufficiency criterion for discreteness of the spectrum of both supersymmmetric and non-supersymmetric theories with a fermionic contribution. This criterion allows an analysis of Hamiltonians in complete form rather than just their semiclassical limits. In such a framework we examine spectral properties of various (1+0) matrix models. We consider the BMN model of M-theory compactified on a maximally supersymmetric pp-wave background, different regularizations of the supermembrane with central charges and a non-supersymmetric model comprising a bound state of N D2 with m D0. While the first two examples have a purely discrete spectrum, the latter has a continuous spectrum with a lower end given in terms of the monopole charge.

  13. The Spectral Energy Distribution of the Coldest Known Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L.

    2016-09-01

    WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (hereafter WISE 0855-0714) is the coldest known brown dwarf (˜250 K) and the fourth-closest known system to the Sun (2.2 pc). It has been previously detected only in the J band and two mid-IR bands. To better measure its spectral energy distribution (SED), we have performed deep imaging of WISE 0855-0714 in six optical and near-IR bands with Gemini Observatory, the Very Large Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope. Five of the bands show detections, although one detection is marginal (S/N ˜ 3). We also have obtained two epochs of images with the Spitzer Space Telescope for use in refining the parallax of the brown dwarf. By combining astrometry from this work and previous studies, we have derived a parallax of 0.449 ± 0.008″ (2.23 ± 0.04 pc). We have compared our photometry for WISE 0855-0714 to data for known Y dwarfs and to the predictions of three suites of models by Saumon et al. and Morley et al. that are defined by the presence or absence of clouds and nonequilibrium chemistry. Our estimates of Y - J and J - H for WISE 0855-0714 are redder than colors of other Y dwarfs, confirming a predicted reversal of near-IR colors to redder values at temperatures below 300-400 K. In color-magnitude diagrams, no single suite of models provides a clearly superior match to the sequence formed by WISE 0855-0714 and other Y dwarfs. Instead, the best-fitting model changes from one diagram to the next. Similarly, all of the models have substantial differences from the SED of WISE 0855-0714. As a result, we are currently unable to constrain the presence of clouds or nonequilibrium chemistry in its atmosphere. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini Observatory, and the ESO Telescopes at Paranal Observatory.

  14. Spectral classification of coupling regimes in the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossatto, Daniel Z.; Villas-Bôas, Celso J.; Sanz, Mikel; Solano, Enrique

    2017-07-01

    The quantum Rabi model is in the scientific spotlight due to the recent theoretical and experimental progress. Nevertheless, a full-fledged classification of its coupling regimes remains as a relevant open question. We propose a spectral classification dividing the coupling regimes into three regions based on the validity of perturbative criteria on the quantum Rabi model, which allows us the use of exactly solvable effective Hamiltonians. These coupling regimes are (i) the perturbative ultrastrong coupling regime which comprises the Jaynes-Cummings model, (ii) a region where nonperturbative ultrastrong and nonperturbative deep strong coupling regimes coexist, and (iii) the perturbative deep strong coupling regime. We show that this spectral classification depends not only on the ratio between the coupling strength and the natural frequencies of the unperturbed parts, but also on the energy to which the system can access. These regimes additionally discriminate the completely different behaviors of several static physical properties, namely the total number of excitations, the photon statistics of the field, and the cavity-qubit entanglement. Finally, we explain the dynamical properties which are traditionally associated with the deep strong coupling regime, such as the collapses and revivals of the state population, in the frame of the proposed spectral classification.

  15. Estimation of Wind Turbulence Using Spectral Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The production and loading of wind farms are significantly influenced by the turbulence of the flowing wind field. Estimation of turbulence allows us to optimize the performance of the wind farm. Turbulence estimation is; however, highly challenging due to the chaotic behavior of the wind....... In this paper, a method is presented for estimation of the turbulence. The spectral model of the wind is used in order to provide the estimations. The suggested estimation approach is applied to a case study in which the objective is to estimate wind turbulence at desired points using the measurements of wind...... speed outside the wind field. The results show that the method is able to provide estimations which explain more than 50% of the wind turbulence from the distance of about 300 meters....

  16. Localness of energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence, II. Sharp spectral filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluie, Hussein [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eyink, Gregory L [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scale-locality of subgrid-scale (SGS) energy flux and interband energy transfers defined by the sharp spectral filter. We show by rigorous bounds, physical arguments, and numerical simulations that the spectral SGS flux is dominated by local triadic interactions in an extended turbulent inertial range. Interband energy transfers are also shown to be dominated by local triads if the spectral bands have constant width on a logarithmic scale. We disprove in particular an alternative picture of 'local transfer by nonlocal triads,' with the advecting wavenumber mode at the energy peak. Although such triads have the largest transfer rates of all individual wavenumber triads, we show rigorously that, due to their restricted number, they make an asymptotically negligible contribution to energy flux and log-banded energy transfers at high wavenumbers in the inertial range. We show that it is only the aggregate effect of a geometrically increasing number of local wavenumber triads which can sustain an energy cascade to small scales. Furthermore, nonlocal triads are argued to contribute even less to the space-average energy flux than is implied by our rigorous bounds, because of additional cancellations from scale-decorrelation effects. We can thus recover the -4/3 scaling of nonlocal contributions to spectral energy flux predicted by Kraichnan's abridged Lagrangian-history direct-interaction approximation and test-field model closures. We support our results with numerical data from a 512{sup 3} pseudospectral simulation of isotropic turbulence with phase-shift dealiasing. We also discuss a rigorous counterexample of Eyink [Physica D 78, 222 (1994)], which showed that nonlocal wavenumber triads may dominate in the sharp spectral flux (but not in the SGS energy flux for graded filters). We show that this mathematical counter example fails to satisfy reasonable physical requirements for a turbulent velocity field, which are employed in our

  17. Spectral density method to Anderson-Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebrolu, Narasimha Raju; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Two-parameter spectral density function of a magnetic impurity electron in a non-magnetic metal is calculated within the framework of the Anderson-Holstein model using the spectral density approximation method. The effect of electron-phonon interaction on the spectral function is investigated.

  18. Renormalization of aperiodic model lattices: spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kroon, L

    2003-01-01

    Many of the published results for one-dimensional deterministic aperiodic systems treat rather simplified electron models with either a constant site energy or a constant hopping integral. Here we present some rigorous results for more realistic mixed tight-binding systems with both the site energies and the hopping integrals having an aperiodic spatial variation. It is shown that the mixed Thue-Morse, period-doubling and Rudin-Shapiro lattices can be transformed to on-site models on renormalized lattices maintaining the individual order between the site energies. The character of the energy spectra for these mixed models is therefore the same as for the corresponding on-site models. Furthermore, since the study of electrons on a lattice governed by the Schroedinger tight-binding equation maps onto the study of elastic vibrations on a harmonic chain, we have proved that the vibrational spectra of aperiodic harmonic chains with distributions of masses determined by the Thue-Morse sequence and the period-doubli...

  19. Twisted spectral geometry for the standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The Higgs field is a connection one-form as the other bosonic fields, provided one describes space no more as a manifold M but as a slightly non-commutative generalization of it. This is well encoded within the theory of spectral triples: all the bosonic fields of the standard model - including the Higgs - are obtained on the same footing, as fluctuations of a generalized Dirac operator by a matrix-value algebra of functions on M. In the commutative case, fluctuations of the usual free Dirac operator by the complex-value algebra A of smooth functions on M vanish, and so do not generate any bosonic field. We show that imposing a twist in the sense of Connes-Moscovici forces to double the algebra A, but does not require to modify the space of spinors on which it acts. This opens the way to twisted fluctuations of the free Dirac operator, that yield a perturbation of the spin connection. Applied to the standard model, a similar twist yields in addition the extra scalar field needed to stabilize the electroweak v...

  20. Mean Spectral Energy Distributions and Bolometric Corrections for Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Mehta, Sajjan S; Vogeley, Michael S; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; 10.1088/0067-0049/206/1/4

    2013-01-01

    We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.0641.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope, a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis (PCA) trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extream-UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possib...

  1. Simulated Galaxy Interactions as Probes of Merger Spectral Energy Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Lanz, Lauranne; Zezas, Andreas; Smith, Howard A; Ashby, Matthew L N; Brassington, Nicola; Fazio, Giovanni G; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We present the first systematic comparison of ultraviolet-millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of observed and simulated interacting galaxies. Our sample is drawn from the Spitzer Interacting Galaxy Survey, and probes a range of galaxy interaction parameters. We use 31 galaxies in 14 systems which have been observed with Herschel, Spitzer, GALEX, and 2MASS. We create a suite of GADGET-3 hydrodynamic simulations of isolated and interacting galaxies with stellar masses comparable to those in our sample of interacting galaxies. Photometry for the simulated systems is then calculated with the SUNRISE radiative transfer code for comparison with the observed systems. For most of the observed systems, one or more of the simulated SEDs match reasonably well. The best matches recover the infrared luminosity and the star formation rate of the observed systems, and the more massive systems preferentially match SEDs from simulations of more massive galaxies. The most morphologically distorted systems in our sa...

  2. SEDeblend: A new method for deblending spectral energy distributions in confused imaging

    CERN Document Server

    MacKenzie, Todd; Swinbank, Mark

    2015-01-01

    For high-redshift submillimetre or millimetre sources detected with single dish telescopes, interferometric follow-up has shown that many are multiple submm galaxies blended together. Confusion-limited Herschel observations of such targets are also available, and these sample the peak of their spectral energy distribution in the far-infrared. Many methods for analysing these data have been adopted, but most follow the traditional approach of extracting fluxes before model spectral energy distributions are fit, which has the potential to erase important information on degeneracies among fitting parameters and glosses over the intricacies of confusion noise. Here, we adapt the forward-modelling method that we originally developed to disentangle a high-redshift strongly-lensed galaxy group, in order to tackle this problem in a more statistically rigorous way, by combining source deblending and SED fitting into the same procedure. We call this method "SEDeblend." As an application, we derive constraints on far-in...

  3. Spectral shape variation of interstellar electrons at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high energy electron spectrum analysis has shown that the electron intensity inside the H2 cloud region, or in a spiral arm, should be much lower than that outside it and the observed electron energy spectrum should flatten again at about 1 TeV. In the framework of the leady box model the recently established rigidity dependence of the escape pathlength of cosmic rays would predict a high energy electron spectrum which is flatter than the observed one. This divergence is explained by assuming that the leaky box model can only apply to cosmic ray heavy nuclei, and light nuclei and electrons in cosmic rays may have different behaviors in the interstellar propagation. Therefore, the measured data on high energy electrons should be analyzed based on the proposed nonuniform galactic disk (NUGD) mode.

  4. Enhanced photovoltaic energy conversion using thermally based spectral shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, David M.; Lenert, Andrej; Chan, Walker R.; Bhatia, Bikram; Celanović, Ivan; Soljačić, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-06-01

    Solar thermophotovoltaic devices have the potential to enhance the performance of solar energy harvesting by converting broadband sunlight to narrow-band thermal radiation tuned for a photovoltaic cell. A direct comparison of the operation of a photovoltaic with and without a spectral converter is the most critical indicator of the promise of this technology. Here, we demonstrate enhanced device performance through the suppression of 80% of unconvertible photons by pairing a one-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitter with a tandem plasma-interference optical filter. We measured a solar-to-electrical conversion rate of 6.8%, exceeding the performance of the photovoltaic cell alone. The device operates more efficiently while reducing the heat generation rates in the photovoltaic cell by a factor of two at matching output power densities. We determined the theoretical limits, and discuss the implications of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit. Improving the performance of an unaltered photovoltaic cell provides an important framework for the design of high-efficiency solar energy converters.

  5. Variability of Spectral Energy Distribution of Blazar S5 0716+714

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Rani; Alok C. Gupta; Paul J. Wiita

    2011-03-01

    The emission from blazars is known to be variable at all wavelengths. The flux variability is often accompanied by spectral changes. Spectral energy distribution (SED) changes must be associated with changes in the spectra of emitting electrons and/or the physical parameters of the jet. Meaningful modeling of blazar broadband spectra is required to understand the extreme conditions within the emission region. Not only is the broadband SED crucial, but also information about its variability is needed to understand how the highest states of emission occur and how they differ from the low states. This may help in discriminating between models. Here we present the results of our SED modeling of the blazar S5 0716+714 during various phases of its activity. The SEDs are classified into different bins depending on the optical brightness state of the source.

  6. Energy Criterion for the Spectral Stability of Discrete Breathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2016-08-01

    Discrete breathers are ubiquitous structures in nonlinear anharmonic models ranging from the prototypical example of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model to Klein-Gordon nonlinear lattices, among many others. We propose a general criterion for the emergence of instabilities of discrete breathers analogous to the well-established Vakhitov-Kolokolov criterion for solitary waves. The criterion involves the change of monotonicity of the discrete breather's energy as a function of the breather frequency. Our analysis suggests and numerical results corroborate that breathers with increasing (decreasing) energy-frequency dependence are generically unstable in soft (hard) nonlinear potentials.

  7. Spectral Energy Distributions of T Tauri Stars With Passive Circumstellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, E I

    1997-01-01

    We derive hydrostatic, radiative equilibrium models for passive disks surrounding T Tauri stars. Each disk is encased by an optically thin layer of superheated dust grains. This layer re-emits directly to space about half the stellar energy it absorbs. The other half is emitted inward and regulates the interior temperature of the disk. The heated disk flares. As a consequence, it absorbs more stellar radiation, especially at large radii, than a flat disk would. The portion of the spectral energy distribution contributed by the disk is fairly flat throughout the thermal infrared. At fixed frequency, the contribution from the surface layer exceeds that from the interior by about a factor 3 and is emitted at more than an order of magnitude greater radius. Spectral features from dust grains in the superheated layer appear in emission if the disk is viewed nearly face-on.

  8. Spectral Functions for the Holstein Model

    OpenAIRE

    Robin, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    We perform an unitary transformation for the symmetric phonon mode of the Holstein molecular crystal hamiltonian. We show how to compute the electronic spectral functions by exact numerical diagonalisation of an effective hamiltonian fully taking account of the symmetric phonon mode, usually discarded.

  9. Energy and Spectral Efficiency of Very Large Multiuser MIMO Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ngo, Hien Quoc; Marzetta, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    A multiplicity of autonomous terminals simultaneously transmits data streams to a compact array of antennas. The array uses imperfect channel-state information derived from transmitted pilots to extract the individual data streams. The power radiated by the terminals can be made inversely proportional to the square-root of the number of base station antennas with no reduction in performance. In contrast if perfect channel-state information were available the power could be made inversely proportional to the number of antennas. Lower capacity bounds for maximum-ratio combining (MRC), zero-forcing (ZF) and minimum mean-square error (MMSE) detection are derived. A MRC receiver normally performs worse than ZF and MMSE. However as power levels are reduced, the cross-talk introduced by the inferior maximum-ratio receiver eventually falls below the noise level and this simple receiver becomes a viable option. The tradeoff between the energy efficiency (as measured in bits/J) and spectral efficiency (as measured in b...

  10. Quantum spectral curve for (q,t)-matrix model

    CERN Document Server

    Zenkevich, Yegor

    2015-01-01

    We derive quantum spectral curve equation for (q,t)-matrix model, which turns out to be a certain difference equation. We show that in Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit this equation reproduces the Baxter TQ equation for the quantum XXZ spin chain. This chain is spectral dual to the Seiberg-Witten integrable system associated with the AGT dual gauge theory.

  11. On Sparse, Spectral and Other Parameterizations of Binary Probabilistic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Buchman, David; Schmidt, Mark; Mohamed, Shakir; Poole,David; de Freitas, Nando

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper studies issues relating to the parameterization of probability distributions over binary data sets. Several such parameterizations of models for binary data are known, including the Ising, generalized Ising, canonical and full parameterizations. We also discuss a parameterization that we call the "spectral parameterization", which has received significantly less coverage in existing literature. We provide this parameterization with a spectral interpretation ...

  12. Latitude, Energy, and Time Variations of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral indices Measured by IBEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mihir; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Funsten, Herbert; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zank, Gary; Schwadron, Nathan; Fuselier, Stephen; Allegrini, Frederic; Dayeh, Maher A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the latitude, energy, and time variations of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 5 years of the mission. Our previous results based on the first 3 years of IBEX observations showed that the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur within ±30° of the equator. While these results confirmed the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere, we also showed that, unlike previous reports, the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could not be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, and that they depend on energy and latitude. In this paper we extend the above results to include years 4 and 5 of IBEX observations and investigate if the spectral indices vary as a function of time. Finally, we discuss implications of our results on models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  13. Energy-consumption modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, E.R.

    1980-01-01

    A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

  14. The Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Normal Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dale, D A; Contursi, A; Silbermann, N A; Kolhatkar, S; Dale, Daniel A.; Helou, George; Contursi, Alessandra; Silbermann, Nancy A.; Kolhatkar, Sonali

    2001-01-01

    We present a new phenomenological model for the spectral energy distribution of normal star-forming galaxies between 3 and 1100 microns. A sequence of realistic galaxy spectra are constructed from a family of dust emission curves assuming a power law distribution of dust mass over a wide range of interstellar radiation fields. For each interstellar radiation field heating intensity we combine emission curves for large and very small grains and aromatic feature carriers. The model is constrained by IRAS and ISOCAM broadband photometric and ISOPHOT spectrophotometric observations for our sample of 69 normal galaxies; the model reproduces well the empirical spectra and infrared color trends. These model spectra allow us to determine the infrared energy budget for normal galaxies, and in particular to translate far-infrared fluxes into total (bolometric) infrared fluxes. The 20 to 42 micron range appears to show the most significant growth in relative terms as the activity level increases, suggesting that the 20-...

  15. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb: Experiment and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charache, G.W.; Mu{tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-05-01

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[{equals}{epsilon}{sub 1}(E) + i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3--5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0}(direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}), E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} and (E{sub 0}{prime}), E{sub 0}{prime} + {Delta}{sub 0}{prime} doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function [Phys.Rev.B 56, 4037 (1997)] based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0} + {Delta}{sub 0}and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1} + {Delta}{sub 1} CPS was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/{rvec k} {center_dot} {rvec p} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}.

  16. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, Johann Valentin

    2013-05-15

    Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition than combustion with air. Standard computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are therefore out of their validity range in oxyfuel combustion. This thesis provides a common spectral basis for the validation of new spectral models. A literature review about fundamental gas radiation theory, spectral modeling and experimental methods provides the reader with a basic understanding of the topic. In the first results section, this thesis validates detailed spectral models with high resolution spectral measurements in a gas cell with the aim of recommending one model as the best benchmark model. In the second results section, spectral measurements from a turbulent natural gas flame - as an example for a technical combustion process - are compared to simulated spectra based on measured gas atmospheres. The third results section compares simplified spectral models to the benchmark model recommended in the first results section and gives a ranking of the proposed models based on their accuracy. A concluding section gives recommendations for the selection and further development of simplified spectral radiation models. Gas cell transmissivity spectra in the spectral range of 2.4 - 5.4 {mu}m of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the temperature range from 727 C to 1500 C and at different concentrations were compared in the first results section at a nominal resolution of 32 cm{sup -1} to line-by-line models from different databases, two statistical-narrow-band models and the exponential-wide-band model. The two statistical-narrow-band models EM2C and RADCAL showed good agreement with a maximal band transmissivity deviation of 3 %. The exponential-wide-band model showed a deviation of 6 %. The new line-by-line database HITEMP2010 had the lowest band transmissivity deviation of 2.2% and was therefore recommended as a reference model for the

  17. An analysis of gamma-ray burst spectral break models

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B; Zhang, Bing; Meszaros, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Typical gamma-ray burst spectra are characterized by a spectral break, Ep, which for bright BATSE bursts is found to be narrowly clustered around 300 keV. Recently identified X-ray flashes, which may account for a significant portion of the whole GRB population, seem to extend the Ep distribution to a broader range below 40 keV. On the other hand, within the cosmological fireball model, the issues concerning the dominant energy ingredient of the fireball as well as the location of the GRB emission site are not unambiguously settled, leading to several variants of the fireball model. Here we analyze these models within a unified framework, and critically reexamine the Ep predictions in the various model variants, focusing on their predicted properties. Attention is focused on the ability of the models to match a narrowness of the Ep distribution, and the correlations among Ep and some other measurable observables, as well as the effect of extending these properties to X-ray flash sources. These model propertie...

  18. Calibrating image plate sensitivity in the 700 to 5000 eV spectral energy range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, Michael J.; Lee, Joshua; Romano, Edward; Schneider, Marilyn

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes a method to calibrate image plate sensitivity for use in the low energy spectral range. Image plates, also known as photostimulable luminescence (PSL) detectors, have often proved to be a valuable tool as a detector for plasma physics studies. Their advantages of large dynamic range, high stopping power, and resistance to neutron damage sometimes outweigh the problems of limited resolution and the remote processing required. The neutron damage resistance is required when the X-ray source is producing a high neutron flux. The Static X-ray Imager (SXI) is a key diagnostic on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber at LLNL for use in determining the symmetry of the laser beams. The SXI is essential to proper interpretation of the data from the Dante diagnostic to determine the X-ray radiation temperature. It is comprised of two diagnostics located at the top and the bottom of the target chamber. The usual detector is a large array CCD camera. For shots giving high yields of neutrons, the camera would not only be blinded by the neutrons, it would be damaged. To get around this problem, an image plate (IP) is used as the detector. The NIF application covers the energy range from 700 to 5000 eV. The type of image plates typically used for plasma physics are the Fuji BAS-MS, BAS-SR, and BAS-TR models. All models consist of an X-ray sensitive material made of BaF(Br,I):Eu2+ embedded in a plastic binder. X-rays incident on the phosphor ionize the Eu 2+ producing Eu3+ and free electrons that are trapped in lattice defects (F-centers) produced by the absence of halogen ions in the BaF2 crystal. An image plate readout scanner irradiates the IP with a red laser causing reduction of the Eu3+ and emission of a blue photon. The photon is collected using a photomultiplier and digitized to make an electronic image. Image plates are cleared of all F-centers by putting them under a bright light for about 10 minutes. They are then ready for producing a

  19. Planck early results: Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Aatrokoski, J; Aghanim, N; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Angelakis, E; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Berdyugin, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bhatia, R; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Burrows, D N; Cabella, P; Capalbi, M; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Cavazzuti, E; Cayón, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colafrancesco, S; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Cutini, S; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Dickinson, C; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Dörl, U; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Fuhrmann, L; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; King, O; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Krichbaum, T P; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lavonen, N; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Linden-V\\ornle, M; Lindfors, E; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Max-Moerbeck, W; Mazziotta, M N; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Michelson, P F; Mingaliev, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Monte, C; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Nestoras, I; Netterfield, C B; Nieppola, E; Nilsson, K; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pavlidou, V; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perri, M; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rainó, S; Reach, W T; Readhead, A; Rebolo, R; Reeves, R; Reinecke, M; Reinthal, R; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, J; Riller, T; Riquelme, D; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubi\; Rusholme, B; Saarinen, J; Sandri, M; Savolainen, P; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sievers, A; Sillanpää, A; Smoot, G F; Sotnikova, Y; Starck, J -L; Stevenson, M; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Takalo, L; Tammi, J; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Thompson, D J; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tornikoski, M; Torre, J -P; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Turunen, M; Umana, G; Ungerechts, H; Valenziano, L; Valtaoja, E; Varis, J; Verrecchia, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wandelt, B D; Wu, J; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zensus, J A; Zhou, X; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalog (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, moving in the relativistic jet, shape the radio spectra. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper, physical modelli...

  20. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    A spectral tensor model is presented for turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity components and temperature, assuming uniform vertical gradients in mean temperature and mean wind speed. The model is built upon rapid distortion theory (RDT) following studies by Mann and by Hanazaki and Hunt, using...... the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...... separation. Finally, it is shown that the RDT output can deviate from Monin-Obukhov similarity theory....

  1. The Spectral Energy Distribution and Emission-Line properties of the NLS1 Galaxy Arakelian 564

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, P; Turner, T J; Krämer, S B; Crenshaw, D M; Peterson, B M; Pogge, R W; Brandt, W N; George, I M; Horne, K; Kriss, G A; Netzer, H; Shemmer, O; Wamsteker, W

    2004-01-01

    We present the intrinsic spectral energy distribution (SED) of the NLS1 Arakelian 564, constructed with contemporaneous data obtained during a multi-wavelength, multi-satellite observing campaign in 2000 and 2001. We compare it with that of the NLS1 Ton S180 and with those obtained for BLS1s to infer how the relative accretion rates vary among the Sy1 population. Although the peak of the SED is not well constrained, most of the energy is emitted in the 10-100 eV regime, constituting roughly half of the emitted energy in the optical/X-ray ranges. This is consistent with a primary spectral component peaking in the extreme UV/soft X-ray band, and disk-corona models, hence high accretion rates. Indeed, we estimate that \\dot{m}~1. We examine the emission lines in its spectrum, and we constrain the physical properties of the line-emitting gas through photoionization modeling. The line-emitting gas is characterized by log n~11 and log U~0, and is stratified around log U~0. Our estimate of the radius of the H\\beta-em...

  2. Fitting Spectral Energy Distributions of AGN - A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Gabriela Calistro; Hennawi, Joseph F; Hogg, David W

    2014-01-01

    We present AGNfitter: a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm developed to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) with different physical models of AGN components. This code is well suited to determine in a robust way multiple parameters and their uncertainties, which quantify the physical processes responsible for the panchromatic nature of active galaxies and quasars. We describe the technicalities of the code and test its capabilities in the context of X-ray selected obscured AGN using multiwavelength data from the XMM-COSMOS survey.

  3. Spectral Model of Non-Stationary, Inhomogeneous Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bragg, Andrew D; Clark, Timothy T

    2015-01-01

    We compare results from a spectral model for non-stationary, inhomogeneous turbulence (Besnard et al., Theor. Comp. Fluid. Dyn., vol. 8, pp 1-35, 1996) with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of a shear-free mixing layer (SFML) (Tordella et al., Phys. Rev. E, vol. 77, 016309, 2008). The SFML is used as a test case in which the efficacy of the model closure for the physical-space transport of the fluid velocity field can be tested in a flow with inhomogeneity, without the additional complexity of mean-flow coupling. The model is able to capture certain features of the SFML quite well for intermediate to long-times, including the evolution of the mixing-layer width and turbulent kinetic energy. At short-times, and for more sensitive statistics such as the generation of the velocity field anisotropy, the model is less accurate. We present arguments, supported by the DNS data, that a significant cause of the discrepancies is the local approximation to the intrinsically non-local pressure-transport in physical...

  4. The Doppler Effect and Spectral Energy Distribution of Blazars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The relativistic beaming model is adopted to discuss quantitatively the observational differences between radio-selected BL Lac objects (RBLs) and X-ray-selected BL Lac objects (XBLs), and between BL Lac objects and fiat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). The main results are the following: (1) In the Doppler cor-rected color-color (αin ro-αin ox -αox) diagram, XBLs and FSRQs occupy separated regions,while RBLs bridge the gap between them. These properties suggest that similar in- trinsic physical processes operate in all the objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions. (2) Our results are consistent with the results of Sambruna, Maraschi and Urry (1996) from other methods. We show the αxox introduced by Sambruna to be a good index for describing the energy distribution because it represents the intrinsic energy distribution and includes the Doppler correction. (3) The Doppler effect of relativistic beaming is the main mechanism, and the physical differences (such as magnetic fields, electron energies) are also important complementary fac-tors for understanding the relation between XBLs and RBLs;

  5. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchenko Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, we characterize both short-term (solar rotation and long-term (solar cycle changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2 and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2 and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S models.

  6. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for a fluidized bed model

    CERN Document Server

    Sarra, S A

    2003-01-01

    A Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method and operator splitting are used to solve a hyperbolic system of conservation laws with a source term modeling a fluidized bed. The fluidized bed displays a slugging behavior which corresponds to shocks in the solution. A modified Gegenbauer postprocessing procedure is used to obtain a solution which is free of oscillations caused by the Gibbs-Wilbraham phenomenon in the spectral viscosity solution. Conservation is maintained by working with unphysical negative particle concentrations.

  7. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  8. Spectral energy distributions of the BL Lac PKS 2155-304 from XMM-Newton

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagwan, Jai; Papadakis, I E; Wiita, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    We have used all 20 archival XMM-Newton observations of PKS 2155-304 with simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical data to study its long term flux and spectral variability. We find significant variations, in all bands, on time-scales of years with an rms amplitude of ~ 35-45 per cent, through the optical/UV variations are not correlated with those in the X-ray. We constructed SEDs that span more than three orders of magnitude in frequency and we first fitted them with a log-parabolic model; such models have been applied many times in the past for this, and other, blazars. These fits were poor, so we then examined combined power-law and log-parabolic fits that are improvements. These models indicate that the optical/UV and X-ray flux variations are mainly driven by model normalization variations, but the X-ray band flux is also affected by spectral variations, as parametrized with the model 'curvature' parameter, b. Overall, the energy at which the emitted power is maximum correlates positively with the total flux. ...

  9. Spectral Energy Distribution of Markarian 501: Quiescent State Versus Extreme Outburst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciari, V. A.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huang, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Bastieri, D.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Errando, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinović, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Paneque, D.; Hayashida, M.

    2011-03-01

    The very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) blazar Markarian 501 (Mrk 501) has a well-studied history of extreme spectral variability and is an excellent laboratory for studying the physical processes within the jets of active galactic nuclei. However, there are few detailed multiwavelength studies of Mrk 501 during its quiescent state, due to its low luminosity. A short-term multiwavelength study of Mrk 501 was coordinated in 2009 March, focusing around a multi-day observation with the Suzaku X-ray satellite and including γ-ray data from VERITAS, MAGIC, and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with the goal of providing a well-sampled multiwavelength baseline measurement of Mrk 501 in the quiescent state. The results of these quiescent-state observations are compared to the historically extreme outburst of 1997 April 16, with the goal of examining variability of the spectral energy distribution (SED) between the two states. The derived broadband SED shows the characteristic double-peaked profile. We find that the X-ray peak shifts by over two orders of magnitude in photon energy between the two flux states while the VHE peak varies little. The limited shift in the VHE peak can be explained by the transition to the Klein-Nishina (KN) regime. Synchrotron self-Compton models are matched to the data and the implied KN effects are explored.

  10. Spectral and thermodynamic properties of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Antonio M.; Verbaarschot, Jacobus J. M.

    2016-12-01

    We study spectral and thermodynamic properties of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model, a variant of the k -body embedded random ensembles studied for several decades in the context of nuclear physics and quantum chaos. We show analytically that the fourth- and sixth-order energy cumulants vanish in the limit of a large number of particles N →∞ , which is consistent with a Gaussian spectral density. However, for finite N , the tail of the average spectral density is well approximated by a semicircle law. The specific heat coefficient, determined numerically from the low-temperature behavior of the partition function, is consistent with the value obtained by previous analytical calculations. For energy scales of the order of the mean level spacing we show that level statistics are well described by random matrix theory. Due to the underlying Clifford algebra of the model, the universality class of the spectral correlations depends on N . For larger energy separations we identify an energy scale that grows with N , reminiscent of the Thouless energy in mesoscopic physics, where deviations from random matrix theory are observed. Our results are a further confirmation that the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model is quantum chaotic for all time scales. According to recent claims in the literature, this is an expected feature in field theories with a gravity dual.

  11. Cosmic Ray Spectral Deformation Caused by Energy Determination Errors

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Per J; Carlson, Per; Wannemark, Conny

    2005-01-01

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra, falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the Maximum Detectable Rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  12. Multi-Nucleon Short-Range Correlation Model for Nuclear Spectral Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artiles, Oswaldo; Sargsian, Misak

    2017-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model for nuclear spectral functions at high missing momenta and energies based on the multi-nucleon short-range correlation (SRC) model aimed at probing nuclear structure at short-distances. The model is based on the effective Feynman diagram method which allows us to account for the relativistic effects in the SRC domain. We derive the contribution of two-nucleon SRC with center of mass motion, and three-nucleon SRCs to the nuclear spectral functions. The spectral functions are based on two theoretical approaches in evaluating covariant Feynman diagrams: In the first, referred to as virtual nucleon approximation, we reduce Feynman diagrams to the time ordered non-covariant diagrams by evaluating nucleon spectators on the SRC at their positive energy poles, neglecting the contribution from vacuum diagrams. In the second approach, referred to as light-front approximation, we formulate the boost invariant nuclear spectral function on the light-front reference frame, on which the vacuum diagrams are suppressed. Numerical calculations and parametrization of spectral functions and momentum distributions are presented. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy grant under contract DE- FG02-01ER41172.

  13. Solar Spectral Irradiance under Clear and Cloudy Skies: Measurements and a Semiempirical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nann, Stefan; Riordan, Carol

    1991-04-01

    In a combined effort, the Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research in Germany and the Solar Energy Research Institute in the United States analyzed several thousand measurements of the solar spectral irradiance recorded at four sites. The goal was to develop a semiempirical model that describes the total solar spectral irradiance for clear and cloudy sky conditions based on readily available input data.To investigate how the spectral transmission of clouds deviates from an assumed neutral density filter, the measured spectra are compared with simulated clear-sky spectra. A correlation is established between the cloud thickness and the relatively higher transmission of clouds in the ultraviolet and blue region of the solar spectrum. Using this approach, a semiempirical model is proposed based solely on global and diffuse broadband irradiance measurements, precipitable water-vapor data, and the sun's position. The model, called SEDESI, is applied to calculate spectral irradiance in short time steps (30 or 60 minutes) that are needed for either the design and performance analysis of spectrally selective solar energy conversion systems or to predict daylight availability. The results are also applicable to current climate research areas such as validating radiative transfer codes.

  14. Military target detection using spectrally modeled algorithms and independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Kailash Chandra; Arora, Manoj K.; Singh, Dharmendra; Yadav, Deepti

    2013-02-01

    Most military targets of strategic importance are very small in size. Though some of them may get spatially resolved, most cannot be detected due to lack of adequate spectral resolution. Hyperspectral data, acquired over hundreds of narrow contiguous wavelength bands, are extremely suitable for most military target detection applications. Target detection, however, still remains complicated due to a host of other issues. These include, first, the heavy volume of hyperspectral data, which leads to computational complexities; second, most materials in nature exhibit spectral variability and remain unpredictable; and third, most target detection algorithms are based on spectral modeling and availability of a priori target spectra is an essential requirement, a condition difficult to meet in practice. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a new evolving technique that aims at finding components that are statistically independent or as independent as possible. It does not have any requirement of a priori availability of target spectra and is an attractive alternative. This paper, presents a study of military target detection using four spectral matching algorithms, namely, orthogonal subspace projection (OSP), constrained energy minimisation, spectral angle mapper and spectral correlation mapper, four anomaly detection algorithms, namely, OSP anomaly detector (OSPAD), Reed-Xiaoli anomaly detector (RXD), uniform target detector (UTD), a combination of RXD-UTD. The performances of these spectrally modeled algorithms are then also compared with ICA using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The superior performance of ICA indicates that it may be considered a viable alternative for military target detection.

  15. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper. Th...

  16. Spectral dimension in graph models of causal quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Giasemidis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of scale dependent spectral dimension has attracted special interest in the quantum gravity community over the last eight years. It was first observed in computer simulations of the causal dynamical triangulation (CDT) approach to quantum gravity and refers to the reduction of the spectral dimension from 4 at classical scales to 2 at short distances. Thereafter several authors confirmed a similar result from different approaches to quantum gravity. Despite the contribution from different approaches, no analytical model was proposed to explain the numerical results as the continuum limit of CDT. In this thesis we introduce graph ensembles as toy models of CDT and show that both the continuum limit and a scale dependent spectral dimension can be defined rigorously. First we focus on a simple graph ensemble, the random comb. It does not have any dynamics from the gravity point of view, but serves as an instructive toy model to introduce the characteristic scale of the graph, study the continuum li...

  17. NEW METHOD FOR LOW ORDER SPECTRAL MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to overcome the deficiency in classical method of low order spectral model, a new method for low order spectral model was advanced. Through calculating the multiple correlation coefficients between combinations of different functions and the recorded data under the least square criterion, the truncated functions which can mostly reflect the studied physical phenomenon were objectively distilled from these data. The new method overcomes the deficiency of artificially selecting the truncated functions in the classical low order spectral model. The new method being applied to study the inter-annual variation of summer atmospheric circulation over Northern Hemisphere, the truncated functions were obtained with the atmospheric circulation data of June 1994 and June 1998. The mechanisms for the two-summer atmospheric circulation variations over Northern Hemisphere were obtained with two-layer quasi-geostrophic baroclinic equation.

  18. Electron-energy-loss spectral library and its application to materials science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1983-09-01

    An electron energy loss spectral library can be an invaluable tool in materials research from a fundamental as well as a practical standpoint. Although it will not alleviate all the complications associated with quantification, this type of library can help to elucidate details of spectral profiles previously found intractable. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy. The author also wishes to express his gratitude to the organizing committee for partial financial support provided to attend this meeting.

  19. Spectrally and Energy Efficient OFDM (SEE-OFDM) for Intensity Modulated Optical Wireless Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Emily; Wilson, Sarah Kate; Elgala, Hany; Little, Thomas D. C.

    2015-01-01

    Spectrally and energy efficient orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (SEE-OFDM) is an optical OFDM technique based on combining multiple asymmetrically clipped optical OFDM (ACO-OFDM) signals into one OFDM signal. By summing different components together, SEE-OFDM can achieve the same spectral efficiency as DC-biased optical OFDM (DCO-OFDM) without an energy-inefficient DC-bias. This paper introduces multiple methods for decoding a SEE-OFDM symbol and shows that an iterative decoder wit...

  20. National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C.W. (Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration is developing a new National Energy Modeling System to provide annual forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices on a regional basis in the United States and, to a limited extent, in the rest of the world. The design for the system was based on a requirements analysis, a comparison of requirements with existing modeling capabilities, and a series of widely circulated issue papers defining the choices and tradeoffs for 13 key design decisions. An initial prototpye of the new NEMS was implemented in late 1992, with a more complete, operational version in 1993. NEMS is expected to provide EIA and other users with a greatly enhanced ability to illustrate quickly and effectively the effects of a wide range of energy policy proposals.

  1. Spectral energy distribution of M-subdwarfs: A study of their atmospheric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Bayo, A.; Mousis, O.; Rajpurohit, S.; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. M-type subdwarfs are metal-poor low-mass stars and are probes for the old populations in our Galaxy. Accurate knowledge of their atmospheric parameters and especially their composition is essential for understanding the chemical history of our Galaxy. Aims: The purpose of this work is to perform a detailed study of M-subdwarf spectra covering the full wavelength range from the optical to the near-infrared. It allows us to perform a more detailed analysis of the atmospheric composition in order to determine the stellar parameters, and to constrain the atmospheric models. The study will allow us to further understand physical and chemical processes such as increasing condensation of gas into dust, to point out the missing continuum opacities, and to see how the main band features are reproduced by the models. The spectral resolution and the large wavelength coverage used is a unique combination that can constrain the processes that occur in a cool atmosphere. Methods: We obtained medium-resolution spectra (R = 5000-7000) over the wavelength range 0.3-2.5 μm of ten M-type subdwarfs with X-shooter at VLT. These data constitute a unique atlas of M-subdwarfs from optical to near-infrared. We performed a spectral synthesis analysis using a full grid of synthetic spectra computed from BT-Settl models and obtained consistent stellar parameters such as effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. Results: We show that state-of the-art atmospheric models correctly represent the overall shape of their spectral energy distribution, as well as atomic and molecular line profiles both in the optical and near-infrared. We find that the actual fitted gravities of almost all our sample are consistent with old objects, except for LHS 73 where it is found to be surprisingly low. Based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under programme 092.D-0600(A).

  2. Irregular conformal states and spectral curve: Irregular matrix model approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rim, Chaiho

    2016-01-01

    We present recent developments of irregular conformal conformal states. Irregular vertex operators and their adjoint are used to define the irregular conformal states and their Inner product. Free field formalism can be augmented by screening operators which provide more degrees of freedom. The inner product is conveniently given as partition function of a irregular matrix model. (Deformed) spectral curve is the loop equation of the matrix model at Nekrasov-Shatashivili limit. We present the details of analytic structure of the spectral curve for Virasoso symmetry and its extensions, W-symmetry and super-symmetry.

  3. Spectral modelling of massive binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Palate, Matthieu; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Moreno, Edmundo

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We simulate the spectra of massive binaries at different phases of the orbital cycle, accounting for the gravitational influence of the companion star on the shape and physical properties of the stellar surface. Methods: We used the Roche potential modified to account for radiation pressure to compute the stellar surface of close circular systems and we used the TIDES code for surface computation of eccentric systems. In both cases, we accounted for gravity darkening and mutual heating generated by irradiation to compute the surface temperature. We then interpolated NLTE plane-parallel atmosphere model spectra in a grid to obtain the local spectrum at each surface point. We finally summed all contributions, accounting for the Doppler shift, limb-darkening, and visibility to obtain the total synthetic spectrum. We computed different orbital phases and sets of physical and orbital parameters. Results: Our models predict line strength variations through the orbital cycle, but fail to completely reproduce t...

  4. Iris: Constructing and Analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions with the Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, O.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Busko, I.; Cresitello-Dittmar, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Doe, S.; Evans, J.; Pevunova, O.

    2014-05-01

    We present Iris 2.0, the latest release of the Virtual Astronomical Observatory application for building and analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). With Iris, users may read in and display SEDs inspect and edit any selection of SED data, fit models to SEDs in arbitrary spectral ranges, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be loaded into the application from VOTable and FITS files compliant with the International Virtual Observatoy Alliance interoperable data models, or retrieved directly from NED or the Italian Space Agency Science Data Center; data in non-standard formats may also be converted within the application. Users may seamlessy exchange data between Iris and other Virtual Observatoy tools using the Simple Application Messaging Protocol. Iris 2.0 also provides a tool for redshifting, interpolating, and measuring integratd fluxes, and allows simple aperture corrections for individual points and SED segments. Custom Python functions, template models and template libraries may be imported into Iris for fitting SEDs. Iris may be extended through Java plugins; users can install third-party packages, or develop their own plugin using Iris' Software Development Kit. Iris 2.0 is available for Linux and Mac OS X systems.

  5. Cross spectral energy method for damage assessment of the cable-stayed bridge under operational conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hezhen; Li Huajun

    2008-01-01

    The new cross spectral energy method (CSEM) is proposed for maintaining cable-stayed bridge safety by the measurable output-only vibration response.Damage assessment of real structures is limited by a series of problems such as unknown ambient excitation forces, errors introduced by system identification,incomplete dynamic measurements, etc.Thus the methodology based on cross spectral energy of each substructure member is derived to meet these challenges.The novel damage index does not require any modal or parameter identification technology.It can be calculated directly from vibration test data.In order to evaluate the efficiency of the presented methodology, a three dimensional (3D) actual cable-stayed bridge model with one or more damaged positions under operational conditions was studied.In order to testify the reliability of damage detection method, the response data was polluted by the random noise.It is proved that the proposed method can successfully localize all damage cases even in noisy data.With the help of examples, the CSEM can potentially be applied as a nondestructive evaluation technique (NDT) for on-line health monitoring of cable-stayed bridges with minimum disruption of its operations.

  6. Spectral classification of stars using synthetic model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, E

    2001-01-01

    We devised a straightforward procedure to derive the atmosphere fundamental parameters of stars across the different MK spectral types by comparing mid-resolution spectroscopic observations with theoretical grids of synthetic spectra.The results of a preliminary experiment, by matching the Gunn and Stryker and Jacoby et al. spectrophotometric atlases with the Kurucz models, are briefly discussed. For stars in the A-K spectral range, effective temperature is obtained within a 1-2% relative uncertainty (at 2 sigma confidence level). This value raises to 4-5% for the hottest stars in the samples (O-B spectral types). A poorer fit is obtained throughout for stars cooler than 4000 K mainly due to the limiting input physics in the Kurucz models.

  7. AGNfitter: A Bayesian MCMC approach to fitting spectral energy distributions of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Gabriela Calistro; Hennawi, Joseph F; Hogg, David W

    2016-01-01

    We present AGNfitter, a publicly available open-source algorithm implementing a fully Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the sub-mm to the UV, allowing one to robustly disentangle the physical processes responsible for their emission. AGNfitter makes use of a large library of theoretical, empirical, and semi-empirical models to characterize both the nuclear and host galaxy emission simultaneously. The model consists of four physical emission components: an accretion disk, a torus of AGN heated dust, stellar populations, and cold dust in star forming regions. AGNfitter determines the posterior distributions of numerous parameters that govern the physics of AGN with a fully Bayesian treatment of errors and parameter degeneracies, allowing one to infer integrated luminosities, dust attenuation parameters, stellar masses, and star formation rates. We tested AGNfitter's performace on real data by fitting the SEDs of a sample...

  8. Modelling and validation of spectral reflectance for the colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidovic-Rowe, Dzena; Claridge, Ela

    2005-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of the colon is known to be affected by malignant and pre-malignant changes in the tissue. As part of long-term research on the derivation of diagnostically important parameters characterizing colon histology, we have investigated the effects of the normal histological variability on the remitted spectra. This paper presents a detailed optical model of the normal colon comprising mucosa, submucosa and the smooth muscle layer. Each layer is characterized by five variable histological parameters: the volume fraction of blood, the haemoglobin saturation, the size of the scattering particles, including collagen, the volume fraction of the scattering particles and the layer thickness, and three optical parameters: the anisotropy factor, the refractive index of the medium and the refractive index of the scattering particles. The paper specifies the parameter ranges corresponding to normal colon tissue, including some previously unpublished ones. Diffuse reflectance spectra were modelled using the Monte Carlo method. Validation of the model-generated spectra against measured spectra demonstrated that good correspondence was achieved between the two. The analysis of the effect of the individual histological parameters on the behaviour of the spectra has shown that the spectral variability originates mainly from changes in the mucosa. However, the submucosa and the muscle layer must be included in the model as they have a significant constant effect on the spectral reflectance above 600 nm. The nature of variations in the spectra also suggests that it may be possible to carry out model inversion and to recover parameters characterizing the colon from multi-spectral images. A preliminary study, in which the mucosal blood and collagen parameters were modified to reflect histopathological changes associated with colon cancer, has shown that the spectra predicted by our model resemble measured spectral reflectance of adenocarcinomas. This suggests that

  9. On the Spectral Problems for the Discrete Boltzmann Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aq Kwang-Hua Chu; J. FANG Jing

    2000-01-01

    The discrete Boltzmann models are used to study the spectral problems related to the one-dimensional plane wave propaogation in monatomic gases which are fundamental in the nonequilibrium tatistical thermodynamics. The results show that the 8-velocity model can only describe the propagation of the diffusion mode (entropy wave) in the intermediate Knudsen number regime. The 4- and 6-velocity models, instead, can describe the propagation of sound modes quite well, after comparison with the continuum-mechanical results.

  10. Spectral and thermodynamic properties of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model

    CERN Document Server

    García-García, Antonio M

    2016-01-01

    We study spectral and thermodynamic properties of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model, a variant of the $k$-body embedded random ensembles studied for several decades in the context of nuclear physics and quantum chaos. We show analytically that the fourth and sixth order energy cumulants vanish in the limit of large number of particles $N \\to \\infty$ which is consistent with a Gaussian spectral density. However, for finite $N$, the tail of the average spectral density is well approximated by a semi-circle law. The specific heat coefficient, determined numerically from the low temperature behavior of the partition function, is consistent with the value obtained by previous analytical calculations. For energy scales of the order of the mean level spacing we show level statistics are well described by random matrix theory. Due to the underlying Clifford algebra of the model, the universality class of the spectral correlations depends on $N$. For larger energy separations we identify an energy scale that grows with $N$,...

  11. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  12. Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative Imaging and Research has teamed with the University of Southern Mississippi to develop a novel energy efficient smart light system. Smart lighting adds an...

  13. Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Innovative Imaging and Research and the University of Houston Clear Lake have teamed to develop a widely extensible, affordable, energy efficient, smart lighting...

  14. Cardiac Function Evaluation Analyzing Spectral Components due to the Consumption of Energy Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Bashir Uddin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of energy drinks consumption on cardiac function of human being by analyzing the spectral components of pulse and ECG of several healthy people. Using pulse transducer connected with MP36 (Biopac, USA data acquisition unit, pulse recordings were performed. With electrode lead set connected to the same MP36 data acquisition unit, ECG recordings were also performed. At before and after the consumption of energy drinks available in Bangladesh, pulse and ECG recordings as well as analysis were performed with Biopac software. After having energy drinks, the spectral components such as power of spectral density and amplitude of fast Fourier transform of pulse signal decreased about 47.5 and 37%, respectively. In case of ECG signal, the spectral components such as power of spectral density and amplitude of fast Fourier transform increased about 17 and 7.5% within a short interval about 0-20 min, then effective decrements about 10 and 18.5%, respectively started for long duration. Analyzing spectral parameters, the findings highlight the adverse impacts on cardiac function which may cause cardiac abnormality as well as severe cardiac disease due to the regular consumption of energy drinks.

  15. Global cross-calibration of Landsat spectral mixture models

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Data continuity for the Landsat program relies on accurate cross-calibration among sensors. The Landsat 8 OLI has been shown to exhibit superior performance to the sensors on Landsats 4-7 with respect to radiometric calibration, signal to noise, and geolocation. However, improvements to the positioning of the spectral response functions on the OLI have resulted in known biases for commonly used spectral indices because the new band responses integrate absorption features differently from previous Landsat sensors. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the impact of these changes on linear spectral mixture models that use imagery collected by different Landsat sensors. The 2013 underflight of Landsat 7 and 8 provides an opportunity to cross calibrate the spectral mixing spaces of the ETM+ and OLI sensors using near-simultaneous acquisitions from a wide variety of land cover types worldwide. We use 80,910,343 pairs of OLI and ETM+ spectra to characterize the OLI spectral mixing space and perform a cross-...

  16. Spectral age modelling of the `Sausage' cluster radio relic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroe, Andra; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.

    2014-12-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a post-core passage, binary merging cluster that hosts a large, thin, arc-like radio relic, nicknamed the `Sausage', tracing a relatively strong shock front. We perform spatially resolved spectral fitting to the available radio data for this radio relic, using a variety of spectral ageing models, with the aim of finding a consistent set of parameters for the shock and radio plasma. We determine an injection index of 0.77^{+0.03}_{-0.02} for the relic plasma, significantly steeper than was found before. Standard particle acceleration at the shock front implies a Mach number M=2.90^{+0.10}_{-0.13}, which now matches X-ray measurements. The shock advance speed is vshock ≈ 2500 km s-1, which places the core passage of the two subclusters 0.6-0.8 Gyr ago. We find a systematic spectral age increase from 0 at the northern side of the relic up to ˜60 Myr at ˜145 kpc into the downstream area, assuming a 0.6 nT magnetic field. Under the assumption of freely ageing electrons after acceleration by the `Sausage' shock, the spectral ages are hard to reconcile with the shock speed derived from X-ray and radio observations. Re-acceleration or unusually efficient transport of particle in the downstream area and line-of-sight mixing could help explain the systematically low spectral ages.

  17. VNIR spectral modeling of Mars analogue rocks: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, L.; Roush, T.; Pedrazzi, G.; Sgavetti, M.

    Knowledge regarding the surface composition of Mars and other bodies of the inner solar system is fundamental to understanding of their origin, evolution, and internal structures. Technological improvements of remote sensors and associated implications for planetary studies have encouraged increased laboratory and field spectroscopy research to model the spectral behavior of terrestrial analogues for planetary surfaces. This approach has proven useful during Martian surface and orbital missions, and petrologic studies of Martian SNC meteorites. Thermal emission data were used to suggest two lithologies occurring on Mars surface: basalt with abundant plagioclase and clinopyroxene and andesite, dominated by plagioclase and volcanic glass [1,2]. Weathered basalt has been suggested as an alternative to the andesite interpretation [3,4]. Orbital VNIR spectral imaging data also suggest the crust is dominantly basaltic, chiefly feldspar and pyroxene [5,6]. A few outcrops of ancient crust have higher concentrations of olivine and low-Ca pyroxene, and have been interpreted as cumulates [6]. Based upon these orbital observations future lander/rover missions can be expected to encounter particulate soils, rocks, and rock outcrops. Approaches to qualitative and quantitative analysis of remotely-acquired spectra have been successfully used to infer the presence and abundance of minerals and to discover compositionally associated spectral trends [7-9]. Both empirical [10] and mathematical [e.g. 11-13] methods have been applied, typically with full compositional knowledge, to chiefly particulate samples and as a result cannot be considered as objective techniques for predicting the compositional information, especially for understanding the spectral behavior of rocks. Extending the compositional modeling efforts to include more rocks and developing objective criteria in the modeling are the next required steps. This is the focus of the present investigation. We present results of

  18. Nearby supernova remnants and the cosmic-ray spectral hardening at high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2011-01-01

    Recent measurements of cosmic-ray spectra of several individual nuclear species by the CREAM, TRACER, and ATIC experiments indicate a change in the spectral index of the power laws at TeV energies. Possible explanations among others include non linear diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic-rays, different cosmic-ray propagation properties at higher and lower energies in the Galaxy and the presence of nearby sources. In this paper, we show that if supernova remnants are the main sources of cosmic rays in our Galaxy, the effect of the nearby remnants can be responsible for the observed spectral changes. Using a rigidity dependent escape of cosmic-rays from the supernova remnants, we explain the apparent observed property that the hardening of the helium spectrum occurs at relatively lower energies as compared to the protons and also that the spectral hardening does not persist beyond $\\sim (20-30)$ TeV energies.

  19. Energy calibration of the pixels of spectral X-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Walsh, Michael F; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-03-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have developed a technique for calibrating the energy response of individual pixels using X-ray fluorescence generated by metallic targets directly irradiated with polychromatic X-rays, and additionally γ-rays from (241)Am. This technique was used to measure the energy response of individual pixels in CdTe-Medipix3RX by characterizing noise performance, threshold dispersion, gain variation and spectral resolution. The comparison of these two techniques shows the energy difference of 1 keV at 59.5 keV which is less than the spectral resolution of the detector (full-width at half-maximum of 8 keV at 59.5 keV). Both techniques can be used as quality control tools in a pre-clinical multi-energy CT scanner using spectral X-ray detectors.

  20. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  1. Survey design for Spectral Energy Distribution fitting: a Fisher Matrix approach

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Bickerton, Steven J; Grogin, Norman A; Guo, Yicheng; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2012-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of a galaxy contains information on the galaxy's physical properties, and multi-wavelength observations are needed in order to measure these properties via SED fitting. In planning these surveys, optimization of the resources is essential. The Fisher Matrix formalism can be used to quickly determine the best possible experimental setup to achieve the desired constraints on the SED fitting parameters. However, because it relies on the assumption of a Gaussian likelihood function, it is in general less accurate than other slower techniques that reconstruct the probability distribution function (PDF) from the direct comparison between models and data. We compare the uncertainties on SED fitting parameters predicted by the Fisher Matrix to the ones obtained using the more thorough PDF fitting techniques. We use both simulated spectra and real data, and consider a large variety of target galaxies differing in redshift, mass, age, star formation history, dust content, and wave...

  2. Long-Wavelength, Free-Free Spectral Energy Distributions from Porous Stellar Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Ignace, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The influence of macroclumps for free-free spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of ionized winds is considered. The goal is to emphasize distinctions between microclumping and macroclumping effects. Microclumping can alter SED slopes and flux levels if the volume filling factor of the clumps varies with radius; however, the modifications are independent of the clump geometry. To what extent does macroclumping alter SED slopes and flux levels? In addressing the question, two specific types of macroclump geometries are explored: shell fragments ("pancake"-shaped) and spherical clumps. Analytic and semi-analytic results are derived in the limiting case that clumps never obscure one another. Numerical calculations based on a porosity formalism is used when clumps do overlap. Under the assumptions of a constant expansion, isothermal, and fixed ionization wind, the fragment model leads to results that are essentially identical to the microclumping result. Mass-loss rate determinations are not affected by porosity e...

  3. Spectral Analysis of Biosignals to Evaluate Heart Activity due to the Consumption of Energy Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Bashir Uddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart activity is clearly evaluated in this study by analyzing spectral or frequency components of three Biosignals such as ECG, PPG and blood perfusion signal. This study is done with several healthy human subjects who are totally free from any type of cardiovascular diseases. ECG and PPG recordings were performed with electrode lead set and pulse transducer respectively connected to the same MP36 (Biopac, USA data acquisition unit. LDF measurements were performed with skin surface probe connected to LDF100C module on middle finger tip. This LDF module was connected to MP150 (Biopac, USA data acquisition unit. ECG, PPG and blood perfusion signal recordings were performed before and after having energy drinks available in Bangladesh. After consuming energy drinks, it is observed that the spectral or frequency components for ECG as well as PPG signal decreases with a significant rate from the instant of having ED. That is, the spectral parameters of heart activity decrease due to the consumption of energy drinks. The spectral analysis of LDF signal also results similar type of decrement in their spectral parameters for same type of energy drinks consumption. These results reflect adverse impacts of energy drinks consumption on heart activity.

  4. Spectral Action Models of Gravity on Packed Swiss Cheese Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of (modified) gravity on spacetimes with fractal structure based on packing of spheres, which are (Euclidean) variants of the Packed Swiss Cheese Cosmology models. As the action functional for gravity we consider the spectral action of noncommutative geometry, and we compute its asymptotic expansion on a space obtained as an Apollonian packing of 3-dimensional spheres inside a 4-dimensional ball. Using information from the zeta function of the Dirac operator of the spectral triple, we show that the leading terms in the asymptotic expansion of the spectral action consist of a zeta regularization of the divergent sum of the leading terms of the spectral actions of the individual spheres in the packing, which accounts for the contribution of the points 1 and 3 in the dimension spectrum (as in the case of a 3-sphere). There is also an additional term coming from the residue at the additional point in the dimension spectrum that corresponds to the packing constant. It detects the fractality of t...

  5. A dynamic attenuator improves spectral imaging with energy-discriminating, photon counting detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2015-03-01

    Energy-discriminating, photon counting (EDPC) detectors have high potential in spectral imaging applications but exhibit degraded performance when the incident count rate approaches or exceeds the characteristic count rate of the detector. In order to reduce the requirements on the detector, we explore the strategy of modulating the X-ray flux field using a recently proposed dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator. A previous paper studied this modulation for photon counting detectors but did not explore the impact on spectral applications. In this work, we modeled detection with a bipolar triangular pulse shape (Taguchi et al., 2011) and estimated the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the variance of material selective and equivalent monoenergetic images, assuming deterministic errors at high flux could be corrected. We compared different materials for the dynamic attenuator and found that rare earth elements, such as erbium, outperformed previously proposed materials such as iron in spectral imaging. The redistribution of flux reduces the variance or dose, consistent with previous studies on benefits with conventional detectors. Numerical simulations based on DICOM datasets were used to assess the impact of the dynamic attenuator for detectors with several different characteristic count rates. The dynamic attenuator reduced the peak incident count rate by a factor of 4 in the thorax and 44 in the pelvis, and a 10 Mcps/mm (2) EDPC detector with dynamic attenuator provided generally superior image quality to a 100 Mcps/mm (2) detector with reference bowtie filter for the same dose. The improvement is more pronounced in the material images.

  6. Spectral Duality Between Heisenberg Chain and Gaudin Model

    CERN Document Server

    Mironov, A; Runov, B; Zenkevich, Y; Zotov, A

    2012-01-01

    In our recent paper we described relationships between integrable systems inspired by the AGT conjecture. On the gauge theory side an integrable spin chain naturally emerges while on the conformal field theory side one obtains some special reduced Gaudin model. Two types of integrable systems were shown to be related by the spectral duality. In this paper we extend the spectral duality to the case of higher spin chains. It is proved that the N-site GL(k) Heisenberg chain is dual to the special reduced k+2-points gl(N) Gaudin model. Moreover, we construct an explicit Poisson map between the models at the classical level by performing the Dirac reduction procedure and applying the AHH duality transformation.

  7. BayeSED: A General Approach to Fitting the Spectral Energy Distribution of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Yunkun

    2014-01-01

    We present a newly developed version of BayeSED, a general Bayesian approach to the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies. The new BayeSED code has been systematically tested on a mock sample of galaxies. The comparison between estimated and inputted value of the parameters show that BayeSED can recover the physical parameters of galaxies reasonably well. We then applied BayeSED to interpret the SEDs of a large Ks-selected sample of galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field with stellar population synthesis models. With the new BayeSED code, a Bayesian model comparison of stellar population synthesis models has been done for the first time. We found that the model by Bruzual & Charlot (2003), statistically speaking, has larger Bayesian evidence than the model by Maraston (2005) for the Ks-selected sample. Besides, while setting the stellar metallicity as a free parameter obviously increases the Bayesian evidence of both models, varying the IMF has a notable effect only on the Maraston (2005...

  8. Spectral energy measurements of simulated microemboli of various sizes using a diffraction grating ultrasound probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, William J.; Ballakur, Sowmya G.; Tran, Hoang; Hazard, Sprague W.; Blebea, John

    2003-05-01

    This study characterizes the Doppler signal from simulated microemboli of various sizes in blood mimicking fluid using spectral energy parameters. The goal of this research is to detect microemboli as a non-invasive diagnostic tool, or intra-operatively as a surgical aid. A dual beam diffraction-grating ultrasound probe operating at 10 MHz (Model Echoflow BVM-1, EchoCath, Inc., Princeton, NJ) was used with a flow phantom. Microemboli were polystyrene microspheres in 200 to 1000 micron diameters, in concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 per ml. Average flow velocities were 25, 50, 75, and 100 cm/sec. The distribution of peak values of the power spectrum at 2.5 msec windows was plotted over 15 seconds. The means of the distributions corresponding to the microspheres and background fluid were averaged for the four velocity conditions. Embolic peak spectral power ranged from approximately 12 to 25 dB relative to the background. A detection method based on these measurements is currently being developed.

  9. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, A; Middelberg, E; Seymour, N; Spitler, L R; Emonts, B H C; Franzen, T M O; Hunstead, R; Intema, H T; Marvil, J; Parker, Q A; Sirothia, S K; Hurley-Walker, N; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Callingham, J R; Deshpande, A A; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B -Q; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hindson, L; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Zheng, Q; Chippendale, A P; Harvey-Smith, L; Heywood, I; Indermuehle, B; Popping, A; Sault, R J; Whiting, M T

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z > 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio...

  10. Ultraviolet through Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions from 1000 SDSS Galaxies: Dust Attenuation

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Benjamin D; Seibert, Mark; Treyer, Marie; Martin, D Christopher; Barlow, Tom A; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Small, Todd; Wyder, Ted K; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Rich, R Michael; Szalay, A S; Welsh, Barry Y; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2007-01-01

    The meaningful comparison of models of galaxy evolution to observations is critically dependent on the accurate treatment of dust attenuation. To investigate dust absorption and emission in galaxies we have assembled a sample of ~1000 galaxies with ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) photometry from GALEX, SDSS, and Spitzer and optical spectroscopy from SDSS. The ratio of IR to UV emission (IRX) is used to constrain the dust attenuation in galaxies. We use the 4000A break as a robust and useful, although coarse, indicator of star formation history (SFH). We examine the relationship between IRX and the UV spectral slope (a common attenuation indicator at high-redshift) and find little dependence of the scatter on 4000A break strength. We construct average UV through far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for different ranges of IRX, 4000A break strength, and stellar mass (M_*) to show the variation of the entire SED with these parameters. When binned simultaneously by IRX, 4000A break strength, and M_*...

  11. Multi-Nucleon Short-Range Correlation Model for Nuclear Spectral Functions: I. Theoretical Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Artiles, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical approach for nuclear spectral functions at high missing momenta and removal energy based on the multi-nucleon short-range correlation~(SRC) model. The approach is based on the effective Feynman diagrammatic method which allows to account for the relativistic effects important in the SRC domain. In addition to two-nucleon SRC with center of mass motion we derived also the contribution of three-nucleon SRCs to the nuclear spectral functions. The latter is modeled based on the assumption that 3N SRCs are a product of two sequential short range NN interactions. This approach allowed us to express the 3N SRC part of the nuclear spectral function as a convolution of two NN SRCs. Thus the knowledge of 2N SRCs allows us to model both two- and three-nucleon SRC contribution to the spectral function. The derivations of the spectral functions are based on the two theoretical frameworks in evaluating covariant Feynman diagrams: In the first, referred as virtual nucleon approximation, we reduce Fe...

  12. New Estimation of the Spectral Index of High-Energy Cosmic Rays as Determined by the Compton-Getting Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenomori, M.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Ding, X. H.; Fan, C.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gao, X. Y.; Geng, Q. X.; Guo, H. W.; He, H. H.; He, M.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Q.; Jia, H. Y.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, J. Y.; Lou, Y.-Q.; Lu, H.; Lu, S. L.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Mu, J.; Munakata, K.; Nagai, A.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Onuma, H.; Ouchi, T.; Ozawa, S.; Ren, J. R.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. G.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yan, C. T.; Yang, X. C.; Yasue, S.; Ye, Z. H.; Yu, G. C.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, N. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Tibet ASγ Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The amplitude of the Compton-Getting (CG) anisotropy contains the power-law index of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum. Based on this relation and using the Tibet air shower array data, we measure the cosmic-ray spectral index to be -3.03 ± 0.55stat ± analysis can be utilized to confirm the astrophysical origin of the "knee" against models for nonstandard hadronic interactions in the atmosphere.

  13. Multinucleon short-range correlation model for nuclear spectral functions: Theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artiles, Oswaldo; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a theoretical approach for nuclear spectral functions at high missing momenta and removal energies based on the multinucleon short-range correlation (SRC) model. The approach is based on the effective Feynman diagrammatic method which allows us to account for the relativistic effects important in the SRC domain. In addition to two-nucleon (2N) SRC with center of mass motion we also derive the contribution of three-nucleon SRCs to the nuclear spectral functions. The latter is modeled based on the assumption that 3N SRCs are a product of two sequential short-range nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions. This approach allows us to express the 3N SRC part of the nuclear spectral function as a convolution of two NN SRCs. Thus the knowledge of 2N SRCs allows us to model both two- and three-nucleon SRC contributions to the spectral function. The derivations of the spectral functions are based on two theoretical frameworks for evaluating covariant Feynman diagrams: In the first, referred to as virtual nucleon approximation, we reduce Feynman diagrams to the time ordered noncovariant diagrams by evaluating nucleon spectators in the SRC at their positive energy poles, neglecting explicitly the contribution from vacuum diagrams. In the second approach, referred to as light-front approximation, we formulate the boost invariant nuclear spectral function in the light-front reference frame in which case the vacuum diagrams are generally suppressed and the bound nucleon is described by its light-front variables such as momentum fraction, transverse momentum, and invariant mass.

  14. Discovery of Spectral Variability of Markarian 421 at TeV Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Krennrich, F; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Cui, W; De la Calle-Perez, I; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Holder, J; Horan, D; Jordan, M; Kertzman, M P; Kieda, D B; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Kosack, K; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Moriarty, P; Müller, D; Ong, R A; Pallassini, R; Petry, D; Quinn, J; Reay, N W; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Sembroski, G H; Sidwell, R; Stanton, N; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C

    2002-01-01

    The detection of spectral variability of the gamma-ray blazar Mrk 421 at TeV energies is reported. Observations with the Whipple Observatory 10m gamma-ray telescope taken in 2000/2001 revealed exceptionally strong and long-lasting flaring activity. Flaring levels of 0.4 to 13 times that of the Crab Nebula flux provided sufficient statistics for a detailed study of the energy spectrum between 380 GeV and 8.2 TeV as a function of flux level. These spectra are well described by a power law with an exponential cutoff. There is no evidence for variation in the cutoff energy with flux, and all spectra are consistent with an average value for the cutoff energy of 4.3 TeV. The spectral index varies between 1.89 in a high flux state and 2.72 in a low state. The correlation between spectral index and flux is tight when averaging over the total 2000/2001 data set. Spectral measurements of Mrk~421 from previous years (1995/96 and 1999) by the Whipple collaboration are consistent with this flux-spectral index correlation,...

  15. Bayesian fitting of Taurus brown dwarf spectral energy distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, N J; Rowe, John; Acreman, David M

    2012-01-01

    We present derived stellar and disc parameters for a sample of Taurus brown dwarfs both with and without evidence of an associated disc. These parameters have been derived using an online fitting tool (http://bd-server.astro.ex.ac.uk/), which includes a statistically robust derivation of uncertainties, an indication of pa- rameter degeneracies, and a complete treatment of the input photometric and spectroscopic observations. The observations of the Taurus members with indications of disc presence have been fitted using a grid of theoretical models including detailed treatments of physical processes accepted for higher mass stars, such as dust sublimation, and a simple treatment of the accretion flux. This grid of models has been designed to test the validity of the adopted physical mechanisms, but we have also constructed models using parameterisation, for example semi-empirical dust sublimation radii, for users solely interested in parameter derivation and the quality of the fit. The parameters derived for t...

  16. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in Cycle 24: Observations and Models

    CERN Document Server

    Marchenko, S V; Lean, J L

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265-500 nm during the on-going Cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the GOME-2 and SORCE instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations and predictions of the NRLSSI2 and SATIRE-S models.

  17. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Quasars and AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkes, B J

    2003-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are multiwavelength emitters. To have any hope of understanding them, or even to determine their energy output, we must observe them with many telescopes. I will review what we have learned from broad-band observations of relatively bright, low-redshift AGN over the past 15 years. AGN can be found at all wavelengths but each provides a different view of the intrinsic population, often with little overlap between samples selected in different wavebands. I look forward to the full view of the intrinsic population which we will obtain over the next few years with surveys using today's new, sensitive observatories. These surveys are already finding enough new and different AGN candidates to pose the question "What IS an AGN?".

  18. Spectral Aging Model Applied to Meteosat First Generation Visible Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Decoster

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Meteosat satellites have been operational since the early eighties, creating so far a continuous time period of observations of more than 30 years. In order to use this data for climate data records, a consistent calibration is necessary between the consecutive instruments. Studies have shown that the Meteosat First Generation (MFG satellites (1982–2006 suffer from in-flight degradation which is spectral of nature and is not corrected by the official calibration of EUMETSAT. Continuing on previous published work by the same authors, this paper applies the spectral aging model to a set of clear-sky and cloudy targets, and derives the model parameters for all six MFG satellites (Meteosat-2 to -7. Several problems have been encountered, both due to the instrument and due to geophysical occurrences, and these are discussed and illustrated here in detail. The paper shows how the spectral aging model is an improvement compared to the EUMETSAT calibration method with a stability of 1%–2% for Meteosat-4 to -7, which increases up to 6% for ocean sites using the full MFG time period.

  19. Energy Operation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-27

    Energy Operation Model (EOM) simulates the operation of the electric grid at the zonal scale, including inter-zonal transmission constraints. It generates the production cost, power generation by plant and category, fuel usage, and locational marginal price (LMP) with a flexible way to constrain the power production by environmental constraints, e.g. heat waves, drought conditions). Different from commercial software such as PROMOD IV where generator capacity and heat rate efficiency can only be adjusted on a monthly basis, EOM calculates capacity impacts and plant efficiencies based on hourly ambient conditions (air temperature and humidity) and cooling water availability for thermal plants. What is missing is a hydro power dispatch.

  20. Another algebraic variational principle for the spectral curve of matrix models

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, B

    2014-01-01

    We propose an alternative variational principle whose critical point is the algebraic plane curve associated to a matrix model (the spectral curve, i.e. the large $N$ limit of the resolvent). More generally, we consider a variational principle that is equivalent to the problem of finding a plane curve with given asymptotics and given cycle integrals. This variational principle is not given by extremization of the energy, but by the extremization of an "entropy".

  1. Spectral and energy efficiency analysis of uplink heterogeneous networks with small-cells on edge

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a tractable mathematical framework to analyze the spectral and energy efficiency of an operator initiated deployment of the small-cells (e.g., femtocells) where the small-cell base stations are deliberately positioned around the edge of the macrocell. The considered deployment facilitates the cell-edge mobile users in terms of their coverage, spectral, and energy efficiency and is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) configuration. The reduction in energy consumption is achieved by considering fast power control where the mobile users transmit with adaptive power to compensate the path loss, shadowing and fading. In particular, we develop a moment generating function (MGF) based approach to derive analytical bounds on the area spectral efficiency and exact expressions for the energy efficiency of the mobile users in the considered COE configuration over generalized-K fading channels. Besides the COE configuration, the derived bounds are also shown to be useful in evaluating the performance of random small-cell deployments, e.g., uniformly distributed small-cells. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the improvements in spectral and energy efficiency of the COE configuration with respect to macro-only networks and other unplanned deployment strategies. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel approach to modeling spacecraft spectral reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willison, Alexander; Bédard, Donald

    2016-10-01

    Simulated spectrometric observations of unresolved resident space objects are required for the interpretation of quantities measured by optical telescopes. This allows for their characterization as part of regular space surveillance activity. A peer-reviewed spacecraft reflectance model is necessary to help improve the understanding of characterization measurements. With this objective in mind, a novel approach to model spacecraft spectral reflectance as an overall spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) is presented. A spacecraft's overall sBRDF is determined using its triangular-faceted computer-aided design (CAD) model and the empirical sBRDF of its homogeneous materials. The CAD model is used to determine the proportional contribution of each homogeneous material to the overall reflectance. Each empirical sBRDF is contained in look-up tables developed from measurements made over a range of illumination and reflection geometries using simple interpolation and extrapolation techniques. A demonstration of the spacecraft reflectance model is provided through simulation of an optical ground truth characterization using the Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment-1 Engineering Model nanosatellite as the subject. Validation of the reflectance model is achieved through a qualitative comparison of simulated and measured quantities.

  3. National Energy Outlook Modelling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkers, C.M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    For over 20 years, the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) has been developing the National Energy Outlook Modelling System (NEOMS) for Energy projections and policy evaluations. NEOMS enables 12 energy models of ECN to exchange data and produce consistent and detailed results.

  4. Spectral flow as a map between N = (2 , 0)-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulos, P.; Faraggi, A. E.; Gepner, D.

    2014-07-01

    The space of (2 , 0) models is of particular interest among all heterotic-string models because it includes the models with the minimal SO (10) unification structure, which is well motivated by the Standard Model of particle physics data. The fermionic Z2 ×Z2 heterotic-string models revealed the existence of a new symmetry in the space of string configurations under the exchange of spinors and vectors of the SO (10) GUT group, dubbed spinor-vector duality. In this paper we generalize this idea to arbitrary internal rational conformal field theories (RCFTs). We explain how the spectral flow operator normally acting within a general (2 , 2) theory can be used as a map between (2 , 0) models. We describe the details, give an example and propose more simple currents that can be used in a similar way.

  5. Spectral Energy Distribution of Star-Forming Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    Our analysis allowed us to address the following points: 1) the nature of the featureless ultraviolet continuum in Seyfert 2's, in particular the amount of stellar population that contributes to this waveband; 2) the difference between Seyfert l's and Seyfert 2's in the ratio of ultraviolet (lambda)1400A to soft X-rays continuum, which is larger in Seyfert 2's and apparently contradicts the Unified Model, but may be resolved if we consider the stellar population; 3) search for anisotropic radiation escaping from the nucleus of Seyfert 2's, by comparing the number of ionizing photons, estimated from the ultraviolet continuum photons, to the number of recombination photons, calculated using the H(beta) line flux. In addition, the research from this grant produced template spectra that have been used in a wide variety of applications, including the identification of high redshift galaxies in the Slone survey.

  6. New estimation of the spectral index of high-energy cosmic rays as determined by the Compton-Getting anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y -Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude of the Compton-Getting (CG) anisotropy contains the power-law index of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum. Based on this relation and using the Tibet air-shower array data, we measure the cosmic-ray spectral index to be $-3.03 \\pm 0.55_{stat} \\pm < 0.62_{syst}$ between 6 TeV and 40 TeV, consistent with $-$2.7 from direct energy spectrum measurements. Potentially, this CG anisotropy analysis can be utilized to confirm the astrophysical origin of the ``knee'' against models for non-standard hadronic interactions in the atmosphere.

  7. The Spectral Mixture Models: A Minimum Information Divergence Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Bayesian   Information   Criterion .   Developing a metric that measures the fitness of different models is beyond the scope of our discussion.    2.1...data,  then  the  results  are  questionable  or  perhaps  wrong.    Various  information   criteria  have  been  proposed  such  as  the  Akaike   and...LABORATORY INFORMATION DIRECTORATE THE SPECTRAL MIXTURE MODELS

  8. Grand unification in the spectral Pati-Salam model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [Physics Department, American University of Beirut,Beirut (Lebanon); College de France,3 rue Ulm, F-75005 Paris (France); Connes, Alain [College de France,3 rue Ulm, F-75005 Paris (France); I.H.E.S.,F-91440 Bures-sur-Yvette (France); Department of Mathematics, The Ohio State University,Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Suijlekom, Walter D. van [Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics, Radboud University Nijmegen,Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-11-04

    We analyze the running at one-loop of the gauge couplings in the spectral Pati-Salam model that was derived in the framework of noncommutative geometry. There are a few different scenarios for the scalar particle content which are determined by the precise form of the Dirac operator for the finite noncommutative space. We consider these different scenarios and establish for all of them unification of the Pati-Salam gauge couplings. The boundary conditions are set by the usual RG flow for the Standard Model couplings at an intermediate mass scale at which the Pati-Salam symmetry is broken.

  9. Active galactic nuclei at z ~ 1.5: I. Spectral energy distribution and accretion discs

    CERN Document Server

    Capellupo, Daniel M; Lira, Paulina; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Mejía-Restrepo, Julían

    2014-01-01

    The physics of active super massive black holes (BHs) is governed by their mass (M_BH), spin (a*) and accretion rate ($\\dot{M}$). This work is the first in a series of papers with the aim of testing how these parameters determine the observable attributes of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We have selected a sample in a narrow redshift range, centered on z~1.55, that covers a wide range in M_BH and $\\dot{M}$, and are observing them with X-shooter, covering rest wavelengths ~1200-9800 \\AA. The current work covers 30 such objects and focuses on the origin of the AGN spectral energy distribution (SED). After estimating M_BH and $\\dot{M}$ based on each observed SED, we use thin AD models and a Bayesian analysis to fit the observed SEDs in our sample. We are able to fit 22/30 of the SEDs. Out of the remaining 8 SEDs, 3 can be fit by the thin AD model by correcting the observed SED for reddening within the host galaxy and 4 can be fit by adding a disc wind to the model. In four of these 8 sources, Milky Way-type exti...

  10. A combination of energy method and spectral analysis for study of equations of gas motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renjun DUAN; Seiji UKAI; Tong YANG

    2009-01-01

    There have been extensive studies on the large time behavior of solutions to systems on gas motions, such as the Navier-Stokes equations and the Boltzmann equation. Recently, an approach is introduced by combining the energy method and the spectral analysis to the study of the optimal rates of convergence to the asymptotic profiles. In this paper, we will first illustrate this method by using some simple model and then we will present some recent results on the Navier-Stokes equations and the Boltzmann equation. Precisely, we prove the stability of the non-trivial steady state for the Navier-Stokes equations with potential forces and also obtain the optimal rate of convergence of solutions toward the steady state. The same issue was also studied for the Boltzmann equation in the presence of the general time-space dependent forces. It is expected that this approach can also be applied to other dissipative systems in fluid dynamics and kinetic models such as the model system of radiating gas and the Vlasov-Poisson-Boltzmann system.

  11. High-energy pulse compressor using self-defocusing spectral broadening in anomalously dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Zhou, Binbin

    2014-01-01

    A new high-energy pulse compressor uses self-defocusing spectral broadening in anomalously dispersive quadratic nonlinear crystals, followed by positive group-delay-dispersion compensation. Compression to sub-50 fs is possible from Joule-class 1.03 µm femtosecond amplifiers in large-aperture KDP....

  12. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are co...

  13. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.;

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multifrequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are co...

  14. Planck intermediate results: XLIII. Spectral energy distribution of dust in clusters of galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.;

    2016-01-01

    Although infrared (IR) overall dust emission from clusters of galaxies has been statistically detected using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), it has not been possible to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission over its peak, and thus to break the degene...

  15. Energy System Modeling with REopt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, Travis; Anderson, Kate; Cutler, Dylan; Olis, Dan; Elgqvist, Emma; DiOrio, Nick; Walker, Andy

    2016-07-15

    This poster details how REopt - NREL's software modeling platform for energy systems integration and optimization - can help to model energy systems. Some benefits of modeling with REopt include optimizing behind the meter storage for cost and resiliency, optimizing lab testing, optimizing dispatch of utility scale storage, and quantifying renewable energy impact on outage survivability.

  16. Low-energy constants and condensates from the tau hadronic spectral functions

    CERN Document Server

    Boito, Diogo; Jamin, Matthias; Maltman, Kim; Peris, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    We use results of fits to the OPAL spectral data, obtained from non-strange hadronic \\tau decays, to evaluate the difference between the vector and axial current correlators, \\Pi_{V-A}(Q^2). The behavior of \\Pi_{V-A}(Q^2) near euclidean momentum Q^2=0 is used to determine the effective low-energy constants L_10^eff and C_87^eff related to the renormalized low-energy constants L_10^r and C_87^r in the chiral lagrangian. We also investigate how well two-loop chiral perturbation theory describes \\Pi_{V-A}(Q^2) as a function of Q^2. This is the first determination of L_10^eff and C_87^eff to employ a fully self-consistent model for the violations of quark-hadron duality in both the vector and axial channels. We also discuss the values of the coefficients C_{6,V-A} and C_{8,V-A} governing the dimension six and eight contributions to the operator product expansion representation of \\Pi_{V-A}(Q^2).

  17. Infrared spectral energy distribution decomposition of WISE-selected, hyperluminous hot dust-obscured galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Lulu; Nikutta, Robert; Drouart, Guillaume; Knudsen, Kirsten K

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a Bayesian approach to fit the observed mid-IR-to-submm/mm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 22 WISE-selected and submm-detected, hyperluminous hot dust-obscured galaxies. By adopting the Torus+GB model, we decompose the observed IR SEDs of Hot DOGs into torus and cold dust components. The main results are: 1) Hot DOGs in our submm-detected sample are hyperluminous, with torus emission dominating the IR energy output. However, cold dust emission is non-negligible, averagely contributing ~24% of total IR luminosity. 2) Compared to QSO and starburst SED templates, the median SED of Hot DOGs shows the highest luminosity ratio between mid-IR and submm at rest-frame, while it is very similar to that of QSOs at 10-50um suggesting that the heating sources of Hot DOGs should be buried AGNs. 3) Hot DOGs have both high dust temperatures ~73K and IR luminosity of cold dust. The T-L relation of Hot DOGs suggests that the increase in IR luminosity for Hot DOGs is mostly due to the increase of the dust tem...

  18. Area Spectral Efficiency and Energy Efficiency Tradeoff in Ultradense Heterogeneous Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanhua Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the demand of explosive data traffic, ultradense base station (BS deployment in heterogeneous networks (HetNets as a key technique in 5G has been proposed. However, with the increment of BSs, the total energy consumption will also increase. So, the energy efficiency (EE has become a focal point in ultradense HetNets. In this paper, we take the area spectral efficiency (ASE into consideration and focus on the tradeoff between the ASE and EE in an ultradense HetNet. The distributions of BSs in the two-tier ultradense HetNet are modeled by two independent Poisson point processes (PPPs and the expressions of ASE and EE are derived by using the stochastic geometry tool. The tradeoff between the ASE and EE is formulated as a constrained optimization problem in which the EE is maximized under the ASE constraint, through optimizing the BS densities. It is difficult to solve the optimization problem analytically, because the closed-form expressions of ASE and EE are not easily obtained. Therefore, simulations are conducted to find optimal BS densities.

  19. BayeSED: A General Approach to Fitting the Spectral Energy Distribution of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yunkun; Han, Zhanwen

    2014-11-01

    We present a newly developed version of BayeSED, a general Bayesian approach to the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies. The new BayeSED code has been systematically tested on a mock sample of galaxies. The comparison between the estimated and input values of the parameters shows that BayeSED can recover the physical parameters of galaxies reasonably well. We then applied BayeSED to interpret the SEDs of a large Ks -selected sample of galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field with stellar population synthesis models. Using the new BayeSED code, a Bayesian model comparison of stellar population synthesis models has been performed for the first time. We found that the 2003 model by Bruzual & Charlot, statistically speaking, has greater Bayesian evidence than the 2005 model by Maraston for the Ks -selected sample. In addition, while setting the stellar metallicity as a free parameter obviously increases the Bayesian evidence of both models, varying the initial mass function has a notable effect only on the Maraston model. Meanwhile, the physical parameters estimated with BayeSED are found to be generally consistent with those obtained using the popular grid-based FAST code, while the former parameters exhibit more natural distributions. Based on the estimated physical parameters of the galaxies in the sample, we qualitatively classified the galaxies in the sample into five populations that may represent galaxies at different evolution stages or in different environments. We conclude that BayeSED could be a reliable and powerful tool for investigating the formation and evolution of galaxies from the rich multi-wavelength observations currently available. A binary version of the BayeSED code parallelized with Message Passing Interface is publicly available at https://bitbucket.org/hanyk/bayesed.

  20. [Excitation energy and frequency of transition spectral line of electron in an asymmetry quantum dot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In an asymmetry quantum dot, the properties of the electron, which is strongly coupled with phonon, were investigated. The variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were studied by using a linear combination operator and the unitary transformation methods. Numerical calculations for the variational relations of the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot with the transverse and longituainal effective confinement length of quantum dot and the electron-phonon coupling strength were performed and the results show that the first internal excited state energy, the excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will strongly increase with decreasing the transverse and longitudinal effective confinement length. The first internal excited state energy of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will decrease with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength. The excitation energy and the frequency of transition spectral line between the first internal excited state and the ground state of the electron which is strongly coupled with phonon in an asymmetry quantum dot will increase with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength.

  1. Spectral age modelling of the `Sausage' cluster radio relic

    CERN Document Server

    Stroe, Andra; Hardcastle, Martin J; Röttgering, Huub J A

    2014-01-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 is a post-core passage, binary merging cluster that hosts a large, thin, arc-like radio relic, nicknamed the `Sausage', tracing a relatively strong shock front. We perform spatially-resolved spectral fitting to the available radio data for this radio relic, using a variety of spectral ageing models, with the aim of finding a consistent set of parameters for the shock and radio plasma. We determine an injection index of $0.77^{+0.03}_{-0.02}$ for the relic plasma, significantly steeper than was found before. Standard particle acceleration at the shock front implies a Mach number $M=2.90^{+0.10}_{-0.13}$, which now matches X-ray measurements. The shock advance speed is $v_\\mathrm{shock}\\approx2500$ km s$^{-1}$, which places the core passage of the two subclusters $0.6-0.8$ Gyr ago. We find a systematic spectral age increase from $0$ at the northern side of the relic up to $\\sim60$ Myr at $\\sim145$ kpc into the downstream area, assuming a $0.6$ nT magnetic field. Under the assumption of freely-...

  2. The Simultaneous Low State Spectral Energy Distribution of 1ES 2344+514 from Radio to Very High Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Longo, F; Pittori, C; Vercellone, S; Bastieri, D; Angelakis, E; Fuhrmann, L; Nestoras, I; Krichbaum, T P; Sievers, A; Antonyuk, K A; Baumgartner, W; Berduygin, A; Carini, M; Cook, K; Gehrels, N; Kadler, M; Kovalev, Yu A; Kovalev, Y Y; Krauss, F; Krimm, H A; Lähteenmäki, A; Lister, M L; Max-Moerbeck, W; Pasanen, M; Pushkarev, A B; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J L; Sainio, J; Shakhovskoy, D N; Sokolovsky, K V; Tornikoski, M; Tueller, J; Weidinger, M; Wilms, J

    2012-01-01

    [Abridged] Context. To construct and interpret the spectral energy distribution (SED) of BL Lacertae objects, simultaneous broad-band observations are mandatory. Aims. We intend to study the simultaneous broad-band emission of the high-frequency peaked BL Lac object and known TeV emitter 1ES 2344+514 by means of a pre-organised multi-wavelength campaign independently of the current flux state. By correlating the obtained light curves and describing the corresponding SEDs with state-of-the-art models we intend to derive physical parameters of the emission region. Methods. The observations were conducted during simultaneous visibility windows of MAGIC and AGILE in late 2008. The measurements were complemented by Mets\\"ahovi, RATAN-600, KVA+Tuorla, Swift and VLBA pointings. Additional coverage was provided by the ongoing long-term F-GAMMA and MOJAVE programs, the OVRO 40-m and CrAO telescopes as well as the Fermi satellite. The obtained SEDs are modelled using a one-zone as well as a self-consistent two-zone syn...

  3. A global low order spectral model designed for climate sensitivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, A. F.; Stevens, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A two level, global, spectral model using pressure as a vertical coordinate is developed. The system of equations describing the model is nonlinear and quasi-geostrophic. A moisture budget is calculated in the lower layer only with moist convective adjustment between the two layers. The mechanical forcing of topography is introduced as a lower boundary vertical velocity. Solar forcing is specified assuming a daily mean zenith angle. On land and sea ice surfaces a steady state thermal energy equation is solved to calculate the surface temperature. Over the oceans the sea surface temperatures are prescribed from the climatological average of January. The model is integrated to simulate the January climate.

  4. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammin, Jochen, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki, E-mail: jcammin1@jhmi.edu, E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu [Division of Medical Imaging Physics, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Xu, Jennifer [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors’ previous work [K. Taguchi et al., “Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects,” Med. Phys. 38(2), 1089–1102 (2011

  5. NUCLEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF TYPE II ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Liza; Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Andrews, Heather [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Alonso-Herrero, Almudena [Instituto de Fisica de Catabria, CSIC-UC, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Alexander, David M.; Ward, Martin [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    We present near- and mid-IR observations of a sample of Seyfert II galaxies drawn from the 12 {mu}m Galaxy sample. The sample was observed in the J, H, K, L, M and N bands. Galaxy surface brightness profiles are modeled using nuclear, bulge, bar (when necessary), and disk components. To check the reliability of our findings, the procedure was tested using Spitzer observations of M 31. Nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are determined for 34 objects, and optical spectra are presented for 38, including analysis of their stellar populations using the STARLIGHT spectral synthesis code. Emission line diagnostic diagrams are used to discriminate between genuine active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and H II nuclei. Combining our observations with those found in the literature, we have a total of 40 SEDs. It is found that about 40% of the SEDs are characterized by an upturn in the near-IR, which we have quantified as a NIR slope {alpha} < 1 for an SED characterized as {lambda}f {sub {lambda}}{proportional_to}{lambda}{sup {alpha}}. The three objects with an H II nucleus and two Seyfert nuclei with strong contamination from a circumnuclear also show an upturn. For genuine AGNs, this component could be explained as emission from the accretion disk, a jet, or from a very hot dust component leaking from the central region through a clumpy obscuring structure. The presence of a very compact nuclear starburst as the origin for this NIR excess emission is not favored by our spectroscopic data for these objects.

  6. Modelling the spectral evolution of classical double radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Manolakou, K

    2002-01-01

    The spectral evolution of powerful double radio galaxies (FR II's) is thought to be determined by the acceleration of electrons at the termination shock of the jet, their transport through the bright head region into the lobes and the production of the radio emission by synchrotron radiation in the lobes. Models presented to date incorporate some of these processes in prescribing the electron distribution which enters the lobes. We have extended these models to include a description of electron acceleration at the relativistic termination shock and a selection of transport models for the head region. These are coupled to the evolution of the electron spectrum in the lobes under the influence of losses due to adiabatic expansion, by inverse Compton scattering on the cosmic background radiation and by synchrotron radiation. The evolutionary tracks predicted by this model are compared to observation using the power/source-size (P-D) diagram. We find that the simplest scenario, in which accelerated particles suff...

  7. Fermi Large Area Telescope Observations of Markarian 421: The Missing Piece of its Spectral Energy Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Escande, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Georganopoulos, M.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kadler, M.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Pearson, T. J.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stevenson, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wehrle, A. E.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Yatsu, Y.; Ylinen, T.; Zensus, J. A.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Berdyugin, A.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bock, R. K.; Boller, A.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bose, D.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; De Cea del Pozo, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, M.; De Sabata, F.; Diago Ortega, A.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsaesser, D.; Ferenc, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giavitto, G.; Godinovi, N.; Hadasch, D.; Herrero, A.; Hildebrand, D.; Höhne-Mönch, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Jogler, T.; Klepser, S.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krause, J.; La Barbera, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, E.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Miyamoto, H.; Moldón, J.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Orito, R.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Partini, S.; Pasanen, M.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, J.; Pochon, J.; Prada, F.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, T.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, K.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shore, S. N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Spiro, S.; Stamerra, A.; Steinke, B.; Storz, J.; Strah, N.; Struebig, J. C.; Suric, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Vankov, H.; Wagner, R. M.; Weitzel, Q.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; MAGIC Collaboration; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Chen, W. P.; Jordan, B.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; McBreen, B.; Larionov, V. M.; Lin, C. S.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Reinthal, R.; Angelakis, E.; Capalbi, M.; Carramiñana, A.; Carrasco, L.; Cassaro, P.; Cesarini, A.; Falcone, A.; Gurwell, M. A.; Hovatta, T.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Krimm, H. A.; Lister, M. L.; Moody, J. W.; Maccaferri, G.; Mori, Y.; Nestoras, I.; Orlati, A.; Pace, C.; Pagani, C.; Pearson, R.; Perri, M.; Piner, B. G.; Ros, E.; Sadun, A. C.; Sakamoto, T.; Tammi, J.; Zook, A.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the γ-ray activity of the high-synchrotron-peaked BL Lacertae object Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) during the first 1.5 years of Fermi operation, from 2008 August 5 to 2010 March 12. We find that the Large Area Telescope (LAT) γ-ray spectrum above 0.3 GeV can be well described by a power-law function with photon index Γ = 1.78 ± 0.02 and average photon flux F(> 0.3 GeV) = (7.23 ± 0.16) × 10-8 ph cm-2 s-1. Over this time period, the Fermi-LAT spectrum above 0.3 GeV was evaluated on seven-day-long time intervals, showing significant variations in the photon flux (up to a factor ~3 from the minimum to the maximum flux) but mild spectral variations. The variability amplitude at X-ray frequencies measured by RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT is substantially larger than that in γ-rays measured by Fermi-LAT, and these two energy ranges are not significantly correlated. We also present the first results from the 4.5 month long multifrequency campaign on Mrk 421, which included the VLBA, Swift, RXTE, MAGIC, the F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, and other collaborations and instruments that provided excellent temporal and energy coverage of the source throughout the entire campaign (2009 January 19 to 2009 June 1). During this campaign, Mrk 421 showed a low activity at all wavebands. The extensive multi-instrument (radio to TeV) data set provides an unprecedented, complete look at the quiescent spectral energy distribution (SED) for this source. The broadband SED was reproduced with a leptonic (one-zone synchrotron self-Compton) and a hadronic model (synchrotron proton blazar). Both frameworks are able to describe the average SED reasonably well, implying comparable jet powers but very different characteristics for the blazar emission site.

  8. Synthetic observations of first hydrostatic cores in collapsing low-mass dense cores. I. Spectral energy distributions and evolutionary sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commerçon, B.; Launhardt, R.; Dullemond, C.; Henning, Th.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The low-mass star formation evolutionary sequence is relatively well-defined both from observations and theoretical considerations. The first hydrostatic core is the first protostellar equilibrium object that is formed during the star formation process. Aims: Using state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement calculations, we aim to provide predictions for the dust continuum emission from first hydrostatic cores. Methods: We investigated the collapse and the fragmentation of magnetized 1 M⊙ prestellar dense cores and the formation and evolution of first hydrostatic cores using the RAMSES code. We used three different magnetization levels for the initial conditions, which cover a wide variety of early evolutionary morphology, e.g., the formation of a disk or a pseudo-disk, outflow launching, and fragmentation. We post-processed the dynamical calculations using the 3D radiative transfer code RADMC-3D. We computed spectral energy distributions and usual evolutionary stage indicators such as bolometric luminosity and temperature. Results: We find that the first hydrostatic core lifetimes depend strongly on the initial magnetization level of the parent dense core. We derive, for the first time, spectral energy distribution evolutionary sequences from high-resolution radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations. We show that under certain conditions, first hydrostatic cores can be identified from dust continuum emission at 24 μm and 70 μm. We also show that single spectral energy distributions cannot help in distinguishing between the formation scenarios of the first hydrostatic core, i.e., between the magnetized and non-magnetized models. Conclusions: Spectral energy distributions are a first useful and direct way to target first hydrostatic core candidates but high-resolution interferometry is definitively needed to determine the evolutionary stage of the observed sources.

  9. The host galaxy of GRB 011121: Morphology and Spectral Energy Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yoldas, A K; Greiner, J; Pierini, D; Pian, E; Rau, A; Yoldas, Aybuke Kupcu; Salvato, Mara; Greiner, Jochen; Pierini, Daniele; Pian, Elena; Rau, Arne

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a detailed study of the host galaxy of GRB 011121 (at z = 0.36) based on high-resolution imaging in 5 broad-band, optical and near-infrared filters with HST and VLT/ISAAC. The surface brightness profile of this galaxy is best fitted by a Sersic law with index ~ 2 - 2.5 and a rather large effective radius (~ 7.5 kpc). Both the morphological analysis and the F450W - F702W colour image suggest that the host galaxy of GRB 011121 is either a disk-system with a rather small bulge, or one hosting a central, dust-enshrouded starburst. Hence, we modeled the integrated spectral energy distribution of this galaxy by combining stellar population and radiative transfer models, assuming properties representative of nearby starburst or normal star-forming, Sbc-like galaxies. A range of plausible fitting solutions indicates that the host galaxy of GRB 011121 has a stellar mass of 3.1 - 6.9 x10^9 Msun, stellar populations with a maximum age ranging from 0.4 to 2 Gyr, and a metallicity ranging from 1 to 2...

  10. SEDEBLEND: a new method for deblending spectral energy distributions in confused imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Todd P.; Scott, Douglas; Swinbank, Mark

    2016-11-01

    For high-redshift submillimetre or millimetre sources detected with single-dish telescopes, interferometric follow-up has shown that many are multiple submillimetre galaxies blended together. Confusion-limited Herschel observations of such targets are also available, and these sample the peak of their spectral energy distribution (SED) in the far-infrared. Many methods for analysing these data have been adopted, but most follow the traditional approach of extracting fluxes before model SEDs are fit, which has the potential to erase important information on degeneracies among fitting parameters and glosses over the intricacies of confusion noise. Here, we adapt the forward-modelling method that we originally developed to disentangle a high-redshift strongly lensed galaxy group, in order to tackle this general problem in a more statistically rigorous way, by combining source deblending and SED fitting into the same procedure. We call this method `SEDeblend'. As an application, we derive constraints on far-infrared luminosities and dust temperatures for sources within the ALMA follow-up of the LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field South Submillimetre Survey. We find an average dust temperature for an 870-μm-selected sample of (33.9 ± 2.4) K for the full survey. When selection effects of the sample are considered, we find no evidence that the average dust temperature evolves with redshift for sources with redshifts greater than about 1.5, when compared to those with redshifts between 0.1 and 1.5.

  11. Peak of spectral energy distribution plays an important role in intra-day variability of blazars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Alok C.; Kalita, Nibedita; Gaur, Haritma; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-10-01

    Blazars can be divided into two sub-classes namely high energy and low energy peaked blazars. In spectral energy distribution, the first synchrotron hump of the former class peaks in UV/X-rays and in IR/optical bands for the latter class. The peak of the spectral energy distribution seems to be responsible for variability properties of these classes of blazars in X-ray and optical bands. Since, in low energy peaked blazars, the X-ray bands lies well below the synchrotron hump, one expects that the highest energy electrons available for the synchrotron emission would have slower effect of variability on X-ray intra-day time-scale. In this paper, by taking the advantage of a sample of 12 low energy peaked blazars with total 50 observations from XMM-Newton since its launch, we confirm that this class is less variable in X-ray bands. We found that out of 50 observational light curves, genuine intra-day variability is present in only two of light curves i.e 4 per cent. Similar results we obtained from our earlier optical intra-day variability studies of high energy peaked blazars where out of 144 light curves, only genuine intra-day variability was detected in 6 light curves i.e ˜4 per cent. Since, X-ray bands lie below the peak of the spectral energy distribution of LSPs where inverse Compton mechanism is dominating rather than synchrotron radiation at the peak of the optical band, leads to slower variability in the X-ray bands. Hence, reducing their intra-day variability in X-ray bands as compared to the variability in optical bands.

  12. Significant reduction in energy for plant-growth lighting in space using targeted LED lighting and spectral manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, L.; Massa, G. D.; Morrow, R. C.; Bourget, C. M.; Wheeler, R. M.; Mitchell, C. A.

    2014-07-01

    Bioregenerative life-support systems involving photoautotrophic organisms will be necessary to sustain long-duration crewed missions at distant space destinations. Since sufficient sunlight will not always be available for plant growth at many space destinations, efficient electric-lighting solutions are greatly needed. The present study demonstrated that targeted plant lighting with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and optimizing spectral parameters for close-canopy overhead LED lighting allowed the model crop leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. 'Waldmann's Green') to be grown using significantly less electrical energy than using traditional electric-lighting sources. Lettuce stands were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber controlling temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 level. Several red:blue ratios were tested for growth rate during the lag phase of lettuce growth. In addition, start of the exponential growth phase was evaluated. Following establishment of a 95% red + 5% blue spectral balance giving the best growth response, the energy efficiency of a targeted lighting system was compared with that of two total coverage (untargeted) LED lighting systems throughout a crop-production cycle, one using the same proportion of red and blue LEDs and the other using white LEDs. At the end of each cropping cycle, whole-plant fresh and dry mass and leaf area were measured and correlated with the amount of electrical energy (kWh) consumed for crop lighting. Lettuce crops grown with targeted red + blue LED lighting used 50% less energy per unit dry biomass accumulated, and the total coverage white LEDs used 32% less energy per unit dry biomass accumulated than did the total coverage red + blue LEDs. An energy-conversion efficiency of less than 1 kWh/g dry biomass is possible using targeted close-canopy LED lighting with spectral optimization. This project was supported by NASA grant NNX09AL99G.

  13. Quantitative analysis of the dual-energy CT virtual spectral curve for focal liver lesions characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi, E-mail: wq20@hotmail.com; Shi, Gaofeng, E-mail: gaofengs62@sina.com; Qi, Xiaohui, E-mail: qixiaohui1984@163.com; Fan, Xueli, E-mail: 407849960@qq.com; Wang, Lijia, E-mail: 893197597@qq.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We establish a feasible method using the virtual spectral curves (VSC) to differentiate focal liver lesions using DECT. • Our study shows the slope of the VSC can be used to differentiate between hemangioma, HCC, metastasis and cyst. • Importantly, the diagnostic specificities associated with using the slope to diagnose both hemangioma and cysts were 100%. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the usefulness of the spectral curve slope of dual-energy CT (DECT) for differentiating between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), hepatic metastasis, hemangioma (HH) and cysts. Methods: In total, 121 patients were imaged in the portal venous phase using dual-energy mode. Of these patients, 23 patients had HH, 28 patients had HCC, 40 patients had metastases and 30 patients had simple cysts. The spectral curves of the hepatic lesions were derived from the 40–190 keV levels of virtual monochromatic spectral imaging. The spectral curve slopes were calculated from 40 to 110 keV. The slopes were compared using the Kruskal–Wallis test. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were used to determine the optimal cut-off value of the slope of the spectral curve to differentiate between the lesions. Results: The spectral curves of the four lesion types had different baseline levels. The HH baseline level was the highest followed by HCC, metastases and cysts. The slopes of the spectral curves of HH, HCC, metastases and cysts were 3.81 ± 1.19, 1.49 ± 0.57, 1.06 ± 0.76 and 0.13 ± 0.17, respectively. These values were significantly different (P < 0.008). Based on ROC analysis, the respective diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 100% for hemangioma (cut-off value ≥ 2.988), 82.1% and 65.9% for HCC (cut-off value 1.167–2.998), 65.9% and 59% for metastasis (cut-off value 0.133–1.167) and 44.4% and 100% for cysts (cut-off value ≤ 0.133). Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the DECT spectral curve in the portal venous phase can be used to

  14. A Spectral Evaluation of Models Performances in Mediterranean Oak Woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, R.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Abramowitz, G.; Carrara, A.; Correia, A.; Kobayashi, H.; Papale, D.; Pearson, D.; Pereira, J.; Piao, S.; Rambal, S.; Sonnentag, O.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem processes are influenced by climatic trends at multiple temporal scales including diel patterns and other mid-term climatic modes, such as interannual and seasonal variability. Because interactions between biophysical components of ecosystem processes are complex, it is important to test how models perform in frequency (e.g. hours, days, weeks, months, years) and time (i.e. day of the year) domains in addition to traditional tests of annual or monthly sums. Here we present a spectral evaluation using wavelet time series analysis of model performance in seven Mediterranean Oak Woodlands that encompass three deciduous and four evergreen sites. We tested the performance of five models (CABLE, ORCHIDEE, BEPS, Biome-BGC, and JULES) on measured variables of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET). In general, model performance fails at intermediate periods (e.g. weeks to months) likely because these models do not represent the water pulse dynamics that influence GPP and ET at these Mediterranean systems. To improve the performance of a model it is critical to identify first where and when the model fails. Only by identifying where a model fails we can improve the model performance and use them as prognostic tools and to generate further hypotheses that can be tested by new experiments and measurements.

  15. Analysis of errors in spectral reconstruction with a Laplace transform pair model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, B.R.; Bushong, S.C. (Baylor Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Coll. of Medicine); Wagner, L.K. (Texas Univ., Houston (USA). Dept. of Radiology); Johnston, D.A.; Almond, P.R. (Anderson (M.D.) Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX (USA))

    1985-05-01

    The sensitivity of a Laplace transform pair model for spectral reconstruction to random errors in attenuation measurements of diagnostic x-ray units has been investigated. No spectral deformation or significant alteration resulted from the simulated attenuation errors. It is concluded that the range of spectral uncertainties to be expected from the application of this model is acceptable for most scientific applications.

  16. Re-acceleration Model for Radio Relics with Spectral Curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Hyesung

    2016-01-01

    Most of the observed features of radio gischt relics such as spectral steepening across the relic width and power-law-like integrated spectrum can be adequately explained by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) model, in which relativistic electrons are (re-)accelerated at shock waves induced in the intracluster medium. However, Kang & Ryu (2015) showed that the steep spectral curvature in the integrated spectrum above $\\sim 2$ GHz detected in the Sausage relic in cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 may not be interpreted by simple radiative cooling of postshock electrons. In order to understand such steepening, we here consider a model in which a spherical shock sweeps through and then exits out of a finite-size cloud with fossil relativistic electrons. The ensuing integrated radio spectrum is expected to steepen much more than predicted for aging postshock electrons, since the re-acceleration stops after the cloud-crossing time. Using DSA simulations that are intended to reproduce radio observations of the Sausage ...

  17. Atomic Data and Spectral Models for FeII

    CERN Document Server

    Bautista, Manuel A; Ballance, Connor; Quinet, Pascal; Ferland, Gary; Mendoza, Claudio; Kallman, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    We present extensive calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact collision strengths for Fe II. The data sets involve 52 levels from the $3d\\,^7$, $3d\\,^64s$, and $3d\\,^54s^2$ configurations. Computations of $A$-values are carried out with a combination of state-of-the-art multiconfiguration approaches, namely the relativistic Hartree--Fock, Thomas--Fermi--Dirac potential, and Dirac--Fock methods; while the $R$-matrix plus intermediate coupling frame transformation, Breit--Pauli $R$-matrix and Dirac $R$-matrix packages are used to obtain collision strengths. We examine the advantages and shortcomings of each of these methods, and estimate rate uncertainties from the resulting data dispersion. We proceed to construct excitation balance spectral models, and compare the predictions from each data set with observed spectra from various astronomical objects. We are thus able to establish benchmarks in the spectral modeling of [Fe II] emission in the IR and optical regions as well as in the UV Fe...

  18. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-09-21

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97-1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20-4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17-0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  19. Modeling Fire Severity in Black Spruce Stands in the Alaskan Boreal Forest Using Spectral and Non-Spectral Geospatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, K.; Kasischke, E. S.; McGuire, A. D.; Turetsky, M. R.; Kane, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    Biomass burning in the Alaskan interior is already a major disturbance and source of carbon emissions, and is likely to increase in response to the warming and drying predicted for the future climate. In addition to quantifying changes to the spatial and temporal patterns of burned areas, observing variations in severity is the key to studying the impact of changes to the fire regime on carbon cycling, energy budgets, and post-fire succession. Remote sensing indices of fire severity have not consistently been well-correlated with in situ observations of important severity characteristics in Alaskan black spruce stands, including depth of burning of the surface organic layer. The incorporation of ancillary data such as in situ observations and GIS layers with spectral data from Landsat TM/ETM+ greatly improved efforts to map the reduction of the organic layer in burned black spruce stands. Using a regression tree approach, the R2 of the organic layer depth reduction models was 0.60 and 0.55 (pb0.01) for relative and absolute depth reduction, respectively. All of the independent variables used by the regression tree to estimate burn depth can be obtained independently of field observations. Implementation of a gradient boosting algorithm improved the R2 to 0.80 and 0.79 (pb0.01) for absolute and relative organic layer depth reduction, respectively. Independent variables used in the regression tree model of burn depth included topographic position, remote sensing indices related to soil and vegetation characteristics, timing of the fire event, and meteorological data. Post-fire organic layer depth characteristics are determined for a large (N200,000 ha) fire to identify areas that are potentially vulnerable to a shift in post-fire succession. This application showed that 12% of this fire event experienced fire severe enough to support a change in post-fire succession. We conclude that non-parametric models and ancillary data are useful in the modeling of the surface

  20. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of their optical and infrared faintness, it is very challenging to study IFRS at these wavelengths. However, IFRS are relatively bright in the radio regime with 1.4 GHz flux densities of a few to a few tens of mJy. Therefore, the radio regime is the most promising wavelength regime in which to constrain their nature. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Methods: We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. Results: We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep (α IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least % of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by the steep SEDs and the compact morphology of IFRS. The detailed multi

  1. Peak of spectral energy distribution play an important role in intra-day variability of Blazars?

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Alok C; Gaur, Haritma; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Blazars can be divided into two sub-classes namely high energy and low energy peaked blazars. In spectral energy distribution, the first synchrotron hump of the former class peaks in UV/X-rays and in IR/optical bands for the latter class. The peak of the spectral energy distribution seems to be responsible for variability properties of these classes of blazars in X-ray and optical bands. Since, in low energy peaked blazars, the X-ray bands lies well below the synchrotron hump, one expects that the highest energy electrons available for the synchrotron emission would have slower effect of variability on X-ray intra-day timescale. In this paper, by taking the advantage of a sample of 12 low energy peaked blazars with total 50 observations from XMM$-$Newton since its launch, we confirm that this class is less variable in X-ray bands. We found that out of 50 observational light curves, genuine intra-day variability is present in only two of light curves i.e 4%. Similar results we obtained from our earlier optical...

  2. Energy Calibration of the Pixels of Spectral X-ray Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-01-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have deve...

  3. A Complete Library of Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions for z=0 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Karin

    CONTEXT: Half of the light emitted by galaxies is starlight absorbed and reprocessed into the infrared by dust. The spectral energy distribution (SED) of this IR emission encodes information on the mass and properties of the dust, the radiation field heating it, and the bolometric luminosity of the region. This makes IR emission a main tool to estimate star formation rates (SFRs) and to trace the distribution of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. The dust itself also plays key roles in the physics of star formation, and thereby galaxy evolution. This critical information on dust and its dependence on environment can only be reliably measured when we have observations with full wavelength coverage of the IR SED that resolve galaxies. With no new IR imaging missions on the horizon, the remarkably thorough census conducted by Herschel, Spitzer, and WISE of the nearby (D formation rate? (2) How are dust and gas related across the galaxy population and how can dust emission best be used to trace gas? and (3) How does the dust grain population vary in response to local environment across galaxies? METHODS: We will use established techniques to uniformly process the archival data, fit models to the spectral energy distributions, match the data in resolution. These have been successfully deployed on similar data by individual teams (including us), but we will apply them to an order of magnitude larger sample. PERCEIVED SIGNIFICANCE: Dust is a main mediator of cloud and star formation, and thus galaxy evolution. Therefore, the properties and evolution of dust in galaxies is directly relevant to key NASA science goals to "Discover how the universe works, explore how it began and evolved, and search for life on planets around other stars." These are also essential tools to understand "How did we get here?" In practical terms, the database that we propose to create would be a major resource for many scientists: a tool to understand the physics of dust and the ISM for

  4. Modeling quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with variable energy flux

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2014-01-01

    In quasi-static MHD, experiments and numerical simulations reveal that the energy spectrum is steeper than Kolmogorov's $k^{-5/3}$ spectrum. To explain this observation, we construct turbulence models based on variable energy flux, which is caused by the Joule dissipation. In the first model, which is applicable to small interaction parameters, the energy spectrum is a power law, but with a spectral exponent steeper than -5/3. In the other limit of large interaction parameters, the second model predicts an exponential energy spectrum and flux. The model predictions are in good agreement with the numerical results.

  5. Canopy spectral invariants for remote sensing and model applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, D.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Dickinson, R.E.; Rautiainen, M.; Stenberg, P.; Disney, M.; Lewis, P.; Cescatti, A.; Tian, Y.; Verhoef, W.; Martonchik, J.V.; Myneni, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of canopy spectral invariants expresses the observation that simple algebraic combinations of leaf and canopy spectral transmittance and reflectance become wavelength independent and determine a small set of canopy structure specific variables. This set includes the canopy interceptance,

  6. AGN Spectral Energy Distributions of GLAST Telescope Network Program Objects II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Jeff; Lacy, Mark; Rapp, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda

    2006-03-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the "GLAST Telescope Network" (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. In the first year of the Spitzer Teacher Observing Program, our project observed one of these objects (4C 29.45) with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments as well as ground based instruments. These observations were used to determine its Spectral Energy Distribution (SED), which was compared to a model of disk emission in order to determine if there was a component of the SED due to synchrotron radiation induced by the jets. In this proposal we will observe another target from the list and expand our efforts to create simultaneous observations through radio telescopes, optical telescopes (large and small), and other instruments as the opportunity arises.

  7. AGN Spectral Energy Distribution of GLAST Telescope Network Program Object 4C 29.45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, J.; Stefaniak, L.; Rapp, S.; Hinckley, B.; Lacy, M.

    2006-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to be launched in 2006 has a proposed observing list that includes AGNs and Polars bright enough to be observed optically by amateurs and students. This observing list is maintained by the GLAST Telescope Network (GTN) and includes a number of objects that have yet to be observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our project observed one of these objects, 4C 29.45, with the Spitzer MIPS and the IRAC instruments and also using ground based telescopes. Observations were made in seven infrared bands with Spitzer. Additional observations made from the ground by students, amateur astronomers, and small college observatories in R,V, and I were nearly simultaneous with the Spitzer observations. We have used this data to construct the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) of 4C 29.45. We compare these data to models of the dust emission from the torus, sychrotron emission from the radio core, and thermal emission from the accretion disk to determine the relative importance of the different emission mechanisms in this object as a function of wavelength.

  8. Spectral Energy Distribution Mapping of Two Elliptical Galaxies on Sub-kpc Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, A.; Temi, P.; Gaspari, M.; Brighenti, F.

    2017-01-01

    We use high-resolution Herschel-PACS data of two nearby elliptical galaxies, IC 1459 and NGC 2768, to characterize their dust and stellar content. IC 1459 and NGC 2768 have an unusually large amount of dust for elliptical galaxies ((1–3) × 105 {M}ȯ ); this dust is also not distributed along the stellar content. Using data from GALEX (ultra-violet) to PACS (far-infrared, FIR), we analyze the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these galaxies with CIGALEMC as a function of the projected position, binning images in 7.″2 pixels. From this analysis, we derive maps of SED parameters, such as the metallicity, the stellar mass, the fraction of young stars, and the dust mass. The larger amount of dust in FIR maps seems related in our model to a larger fraction of young stars which can reach up to 4% in the dustier area. The young stellar population is fitted as a recent (∼0.5 Gyr) short burst of star formation for both galaxies. The metallicities, which are fairly large at the center of both galaxies, decrease with the radial distance with a fairly steep gradient for elliptical galaxies.

  9. Long-wavelength, free-free spectral energy distributions from porous stellar winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignace, R.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of macroclumps for free-free spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of ionized winds is considered. The goal is to emphasize distinctions between microclumping and macroclumping effects. Microclumping can alter SED slopes and flux levels if the volume filling factor of the clumps varies with radius; however, the modifications are independent of the clump geometry. To what extent does macroclumping alter SED slopes and flux levels? In addressing the question, two specific types of macroclump geometries are explored: shell fragments (pancake-shaped) and spherical clumps. Analytic and semi-analytic results are derived in the limiting case that clumps never obscure one another. Numerical calculations based on a porosity formalism is used when clumps do overlap. Under the assumptions of a constant expansion, isothermal, and fixed ionization wind, the fragment model leads to results that are essentially identical to the microclumping result. Mass-loss rate determinations are not affected by porosity effects for shell fragments. By contrast, spherical clumps can lead to a reduction in long-wavelength fluxes, but the reductions are only significant for extreme volume filling factors.

  10. Spectral Energy Distribution Mapping of Two Elliptical Galaxies on sub-kpc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Amblard, Alexandre; Gaspari, Massimo; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We use high-resolution Herschel-PACS data of 2 nearby elliptical galaxies, IC1459 & NGC2768 to characterize their dust and stellar content. IC1459 & NGC2768 have an unusually large amount of dust for elliptical galaxies (1-3 x 10^5 Msun), this dust is also not distributed along the stellar content. Using data from GALEX (ultraviolet) to PACS (far-infrared), we analyze the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these galaxies with CIGALEMC as a function of the projected position, binning images in 7.2" pixels. From this analysis, we derive maps of SED parameters, such as the metallicity, the stellar mass, the fraction of young star and the dust mass. The larger amount of dust in FIR maps seems related in our model to a larger fraction of young stars which can reach up to 4% in the dustier area. The young stellar population is fitted as a recent (~ 0.5 Gyr) short burst of star formation for both galaxies. The metallicities, which are fairly large at the center of both galaxies, decrease with the radial d...

  11. The Spectral Energy Distributions of White Dwarfs in 47 Tucanae: The Distance to the Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Woodley, Kristin A; Kalirai, Jason; Richer, Harvey; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Anderson, Jay; Bergeron, Pier; Dotter, Aaron; Esteves, Lisa; Fahlman, Greg; Hansen, Brad; Heyl, Jeremy; Hurley, Jarrod; Rich, R Michael; Shara, Michael; Stetson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a new distance determination to the Galactic globular cluster 47 Tucanae by fitting the spectral energy distributions of its white dwarfs to pure hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf models. Our photometric dataset is obtained from a 121 orbit Hubble Space Telescope program using the Wide Field Camera 3 UVIS/IR channels, capturing F390W, F606W, F110W, and F160W images. These images cover more than 60 square arcmins and extend over a radial range of 5-13.7 arcmin (6.5-17.9 pc) within the globular cluster. Using a likelihood analysis, we obtain a best fitting unreddened distance modulus of (m - M)o=13.36+/-0.02+/-0.06 corresponding to a distance of 4.70+/-0.04+/-0.13 kpc, where the first error is random and the second is systematic. We also search the white dwarf photometry for infrared excess in the F160W filter, indicative of debris disks or low mass companions, and find no convincing cases within our sample.

  12. Graph spectral characterisation of the XY model on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Expert, Paul; Takaguchi, Taro; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    There is recent evidence that the $XY$ spin model on complex networks can display three different macroscopic states in response to the topology of the network underpinning the interactions of the spins. In this work, we present a novel way to characterise the macroscopic states of the $XY$ spin model based on the spectral decomposition of time series using topological information about the underlying networks. We use three different classes of networks to generate time series of the spins for the three possible macroscopic states. We then use the temporal Graph Signal Transform technique to decompose the time series of the spins on the eigenbasis of the Laplacian. From this decomposition, we produce spatial power spectra, which summarise the activation of structural modes by the non-linear dynamics, and thus coherent patterns of activity of the spins. These signatures of the macroscopic states are independent of the underlying networks and can thus be used as universal signatures for the macroscopic states. ...

  13. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2014-10-07

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  14. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  15. Maximizing the spectral and energy efficiency of ARQ with a fixed outage probability

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjtaieb, Amir

    2015-10-05

    This paper studies the spectral and energy efficiency of automatic repeat request (ARQ) in Nakagami-m block-fading channels. The source encodes each packet into L similar sequences and transmits them to the destination in the L subsequent time slots. The destination combines the L sequences using maximal ratio combining and tries to decode the information. In case of decoding failure, the destination feeds back a negative acknowledgment and then the source sends the same L sequences to the destination. This process continues until successful decoding occurs at the destination with no limit on the number of retransmissions. We consider two optimization problems. In the first problem, we maximize the spectral efficiency of the system with respect to the rate for a fixed power. In the second problem, we maximize the energy efficiency with respect to the transmitted power for a fixed rate. © 2015 IEEE.

  16. Inventory of state energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, A.G.; Gist, R.L.; Underwood, R.G.; Weber, J.C.

    1980-03-31

    These models address a variety of purposes, such as supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy, emergency management of energy, conservation in end uses of energy, and economic factors. Fifty-one models are briefly described as to: purpose; energy system; applications;status; validation; outputs by sector, energy type, economic and physical units, geographic area, and time frame; structure and modeling techniques; submodels; working assumptions; inputs; data sources; related models; costs; references; and contacts. Discussions in the report include: project purposes and methods of research, state energy modeling in general, model types and terminology, and Federal legislation to which state modeling is relevant. Also, a state-by-state listing of modeling efforts is provided and other model inventories are identified. The report includes a brief encylopedia of terms used in energy models. It is assumed that many readers of the report will not be experienced in the technical aspects of modeling. The project was accomplished by telephone conversations and document review by a team from the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute and the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines. A Technical Committee (listed in the report) provided advice during the course of the project.

  17. Optimizing indoor illumination quality and energy efficiency using a spectrally tunable lighting system to augment natural daylight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertog, W; Llenas, A; Carreras, J

    2015-11-30

    This article demonstrates the benefits of complementing a daylight-lit environment with a spectrally tunable illumination system. The spectral components of daylight present in the room are measured by a low-cost miniature spectrophotometer and processed through a number of optimization algorithms, carefully trading color fidelity for energy efficiency. Spectrally-tunable luminaires provide only those wavelengths that ensure that either the final illumination spectrum inside the room is kept constant or carefully follows the dynamic spectral pattern of natural daylight. Analyzing the measured data proves that such a hybrid illumination system brings both unprecendented illumination quality and significant energy savings.

  18. AGNfitter: A Bayesian MCMC Approach to Fitting Spectral Energy Distributions of AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calistro Rivera, Gabriela; Lusso, Elisabeta; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Hogg, David W.

    2016-12-01

    We present AGNfitter, a publicly available open-source algorithm implementing a fully Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the sub-millimeter to the UV, allowing one to robustly disentangle the physical processes responsible for their emission. AGNfitter makes use of a large library of theoretical, empirical, and semi-empirical models to characterize both the nuclear and host galaxy emission simultaneously. The model consists of four physical emission components: an accretion disk, a torus of AGN heated dust, stellar populations, and cold dust in star-forming regions. AGNfitter determines the posterior distributions of numerous parameters that govern the physics of AGNs with a fully Bayesian treatment of errors and parameter degeneracies, allowing one to infer integrated luminosities, dust attenuation parameters, stellar masses, and star-formation rates. We tested AGNfitter’s performance on real data by fitting the SEDs of a sample of 714 X-ray selected AGNs from the XMM-COSMOS survey, spectroscopically classified as Type1 (unobscured) and Type2 (obscured) AGNs by their optical-UV emission lines. We find that two independent model parameters, namely the reddening of the accretion disk and the column density of the dusty torus, are good proxies for AGN obscuration, allowing us to develop a strategy for classifying AGNs as Type1 or Type2, based solely on an SED-fitting analysis. Our classification scheme is in excellent agreement with the spectroscopic classification, giving a completeness fraction of ˜ 86 % and ˜ 70 % , and an efficiency of ˜ 80 % and ˜ 77 % , for Type1 and Type2 AGNs, respectively.

  19. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, Aomawa L; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-01-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. Here we explore this effect using a one dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative-transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy-balance climate model. A three-dimensional general circulation model is also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models we simulate planets covered by ocean, land, and water ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We find that ice-covered conditions occur on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO2 (present atmospheric level on Ea...

  20. Spectral Energy Distribution of Markarian 501: Quiescent State vs. Extreme Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Böttcher, M; Boltuch, D; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Cui, W; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huang, D; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Imran, A; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Konopelko, A; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Perkins, J S; Pichel, A; Pohl, M; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wood, M; Zitzer, B; Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Barrio, J A; Bastieri, D; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Berdyugin, A; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bock, R K; Boller, A; Bonnoli, G; Bordas, P; Tridon, D Borla; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bose, D; Braun, I; Bretz, T; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; del Pozo, E De Cea; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Mendez, C Delgado; Ortega, A Diago; Doert, M; Domínguez, A; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Elsaesser, D; Errando, M; Ferenc, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Giavitto, G; Godinović, N; Hadasch, D; Herrero, A; Hildebrand, D; Höhne-Mönch, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Jogler, T; Klepser, S; Krähenbühl, T; Kranich, D; Krause, J; La Barbera, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Makariev, M; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Miyamoto, H; Moldón, J; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Orito, R; Oya, I; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Partini, S; Pasanen, M; Pauss, F; Pegna, R G; Perez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Pochon, J; Prada, F; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puchades, N; Puljak, I; Reichardt, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saito, K; Saito, T Y; Salvati, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shore, S N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Spiro, S; Stamerra, A; Steinke, B; Storz, J; Strah, N; Struebig, J C; Suric, T; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Torres, D F; Vankov, H; Wagner, R M; Weitzel, Q; Zabalza, V; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Paneque, D; Hayashida, M

    2010-01-01

    The very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) blazar Markarian 501 has a well-studied history of extreme spectral variability and is an excellent laboratory for studying the physical processes within the jets of active galactic nuclei. However, there are few detailed multiwavelength studies of Markarian 501 during its quiescent state, due to its low luminosity. A short-term multiwavelength study of Markarian 501 was coordinated in March 2009, focusing around a multi-day observation with the Suzaku X-ray satellite and including {\\gamma}-ray data from VERITAS, MAGIC, and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope with the goal of providing a well-sampled multiwavelength baseline measurement of Markarian 501 in the quiescent state. The results of these quiescent-state observations are compared to the historically extreme outburst of April 16, 1997, with the goal of examining variability of the spectral energy distribution between the two states. The derived broadband spectral energy distribution shows the characteristic doub...

  1. Sensitivity experiments to mountain representations in spectral models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schlese

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a set of sensitivity experiments to several formulations of orography. Three sets are considered: a "Standard" orography consisting of an envelope orography produced originally for the ECMWF model, a"Navy" orography directly from the US Navy data and a "Scripps" orography based on the data set originally compiled several years ago at Scripps. The last two are mean orographies which do not use the envelope enhancement. A new filtering technique for handling the problem of Gibbs oscillations in spectral models has been used to produce the "Navy" and "Scripps" orographies, resulting in smoother fields than the "Standard" orography. The sensitivity experiments show that orography is still an important factor in controlling the model performance even in this class of models that use a semi-lagrangian formulation for water vapour, that in principle should be less sensitive to Gibbs oscillations than the Eulerian formulation. The largest impact can be seen in the stationary waves (asymmetric part of the geopotential at 500 mb where the differences in total height and spatial pattern generate up to 60 m differences, and in the surface fields where the Gibbs removal procedure is successful in alleviating the appearance of unrealistic oscillations over the ocean. These results indicate that Gibbs oscillations also need to be treated in this class of models. The best overall result is obtained using the "Navy" data set, that achieves a good compromise between amplitude of the stationary waves and smoothness of the surface fields.

  2. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  3. Importance of the green color, absorption gradient, and spectral absorption of chloroplasts for the radiative energy balance of leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Atsushi

    2017-03-14

    Terrestrial green plants absorb photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) but do not absorb photons evenly across the PAR waveband. The spectral absorbance of photosystems and chloroplasts is lowest for green light, which occurs within the highest irradiance waveband of direct solar radiation. We demonstrate a close relationship between this phenomenon and the safe and efficient utilization of direct solar radiation in simple biophysiological models. The effects of spectral absorptance on the photon and irradiance absorption processes are evaluated using the spectra of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The radiation absorption of a leaf arises as a consequence of the absorption of chloroplasts. The photon absorption of chloroplasts is strongly dependent on the distribution of pigment concentrations and their absorbance spectra. While chloroplast movements in response to light are important mechanisms controlling PAR absorption, they are not effective for green light because chloroplasts have the lowest spectral absorptance in the waveband. With the development of palisade tissue, the incident photons per total palisade cell surface area and the absorbed photons per chloroplast decrease. The spectral absorbance of carotenoids is effective in eliminating shortwave PAR (<520 nm), which contains much of the surplus energy that is not used for photosynthesis and is dissipated as heat. The PAR absorptance of a whole leaf shows no substantial difference based on the spectra of direct or diffuse solar radiation. However, most of the near infrared radiation is unabsorbed and heat stress is greatly reduced. The incident solar radiation is too strong to be utilized for photosynthesis under the current CO2 concentration in the terrestrial environment. Therefore, the photon absorption of a whole leaf is efficiently regulated by photosynthetic pigments with low spectral absorptance in the highest irradiance waveband and through a combination of pigment density

  4. Objective information about energy models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, D.R. (Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the Energy Information Administration's program to develop objective information about its modeling systems without hindering model development and applications, and within budget and human resource constraints. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Phase-resolved X-ray spectroscopy and spectral energy distribution of the X-ray soft polar RS Caeli

    CERN Document Server

    Traulsen, I; Schwope, A D; Schwarz, R; Walter, F M; Burwitz, V

    2014-01-01

    RS Cae is the third target in our series of XMM-Newton observations of soft X-ray-dominated polars. Our observational campaign aims to better understand and describe the multiwavelength data, the physical properties of the system components, and the short- and long-term behavior of the component fluxes in RS Cae. We employ stellar atmosphere, stratified accretion-column, and widely used X-ray spectral models. We fit the XMM-Newton spectra, model the multiband light curves, and opt for a mostly consistent description of the spectral energy distribution. Results. Our XMM-Newton data of RS Cae are clearly dominated by soft X-ray emission. The X-ray light curves are shaped by emission from the main accretion region, which is visible over the whole orbital cycle, interrupted only by a stream eclipse. The optical light curves are formed by cyclotron and stream emission. The XMM-Newton X-ray spectra comprise a black-body-like and a plasma component at mean temperatures of 36eV and 7keV. The spectral fits give eviden...

  6. Parallel Semi-Implicit Spectral Element Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, A.; Thomas, S.; Loft, R.

    2001-05-01

    The shallow-water equations (SWE) have long been used to test atmospheric-modeling numerical methods. The SWE contain essential wave-propagation and nonlinear effects of more complete models. We present a semi-implicit (SI) improvement of the Spectral Element Atmospheric Model to solve the SWE (SEAM, Taylor et al. 1997, Fournier et al. 2000, Thomas & Loft 2000). SE methods are h-p finite element methods combining the geometric flexibility of size-h finite elements with the accuracy of degree-p spectral methods. Our work suggests that exceptional parallel-computation performance is achievable by a General-Circulation-Model (GCM) dynamical core, even at modest climate-simulation resolutions (>1o). The code derivation involves weak variational formulation of the SWE, Gauss(-Lobatto) quadrature over the collocation points, and Legendre cardinal interpolators. Appropriate weak variation yields a symmetric positive-definite Helmholtz operator. To meet the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi inf-sup condition and avoid spurious modes, we use a staggered grid. The SI scheme combines leapfrog and Crank-Nicholson schemes for the nonlinear and linear terms respectively. The localization of operations to elements ideally fits the method to cache-based microprocessor computer architectures --derivatives are computed as collections of small (8x8), naturally cache-blocked matrix-vector products. SEAM also has desirable boundary-exchange communication, like finite-difference models. Timings on on the IBM SP and Compaq ES40 supercomputers indicate that the SI code (20-min timestep) requires 1/3 the CPU time of the explicit code (2-min timestep) for T42 resolutions. Both codes scale nearly linearly out to 400 processors. We achieved single-processor performance up to 30% of peak for both codes on the 375-MHz IBM Power-3 processors. Fast computation and linear scaling lead to a useful climate-simulation dycore only if enough model time is computed per unit wall-clock time. An efficient SI

  7. Spectral energy distribution analysis of class I and class II FU Orionis stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gramajo, Luciana V.; Gómez, Mercedes [Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina, Laprida 854, 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Rodón, Javier A., E-mail: luciana@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: mercedes@oac.uncor.edu, E-mail: jrodon@eso.org [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    FU Orionis stars (FUors) are eruptive pre-main sequence objects thought to represent quasi-periodic or recurring stages of enhanced accretion during the low-mass star-forming process. We characterize the sample of known and candidate FUors in a homogeneous and consistent way, deriving stellar and circumstellar parameters for each object. We emphasize the analysis in those parameters that are supposed to vary during the FUor stage. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of 24 of the 26 currently known FUors, using the radiative transfer code of Whitney et al. We compare our models with those obtained by Robitaille et al. for Taurus class II and I sources in quiescence periods by calculating the cumulative distribution of the different parameters. FUors have more massive disks: we find that ∼80% of the disks in FUors are more massive than any Taurus class II and I sources in the sample. Median values for the disk mass accretion rates are ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} versus ∼10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for standard young stellar objects (YSOs) and FUors, respectively. While the distributions of envelope mass accretion rates for class I FUors and standard class I objects are similar, FUors, on average, have higher envelope mass accretion rates than standard class II and class I sources. Most FUors (∼70%) have envelope mass accretion rates above 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. In contrast, 60% of the classical YSO sample has an accretion rate below this value. Our results support the current scenario in which changes experimented by the circumstellar disk explain the observed properties of these stars. However, the increase in the disk mass accretion rate is smaller than theoretically predicted, although in good agreement with previous determinations.

  8. Spectral analysis and markov switching model of Indonesia business cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajar, Muhammad; Darwis, Sutawanir; Darmawan, Gumgum

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the Indonesia business cycle encompassing the determination of smoothing parameter (λ) on Hodrick-Prescott filter. Subsequently, the components of the filter output cycles were analyzed using a spectral method useful to know its characteristics, and Markov switching regime modeling is made to forecast the probability recession and expansion regimes. The data used in the study is real GDP (1983Q1 - 2016Q2). The results of the study are: a) Hodrick-Prescott filter on real GDP of Indonesia to be optimal when the value of the smoothing parameter is 988.474, b) Indonesia business cycle has amplitude varies between±0.0071 to±0.01024, and the duration is between 4 to 22 quarters, c) the business cycle can be modelled by MSIV-AR (2) but regime periodization is generated this model not perfect exactly with real regime periodzation, and d) Based on the model MSIV-AR (2) obtained long-term probabilities in the expansion regime: 0.4858 and in the recession regime: 0.5142.

  9. Spectral element modelling of floating bodies in a Boussinesq framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Ricchiuto, Mario

    The wave energy sector relies heavily on the use of linear hydrodynamic models for the assessment of motions, loads and power production. The linear codes are computationally efficient and produce good results if applied within their application window. However, recent studies using two-phase VOF...

  10. Spectral tensor parameters for wind turbine load modeling from forested and agricultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Segalini, A.

    2015-01-01

    over a forested and an agricultural landscape were used to calculate the model parameters for neutral, slightly stable and slightly unstable atmospheric conditions for a selected wind speed interval. The dissipation rate above the forest was nine times that at the agricultural site. No significant......A velocity spectral tensor model was evaluated from the single-point measurements of wind speed. The model contains three parameters representing the dissipation rate of specific turbulent kinetic energy, a turbulence length scale and the turbulence anisotropy. Sonic anemometer measurements taken...... constant with height at the forest site, whereas the turbulence became more isotropic with height for the agricultural site. Using the three parameters as inputs, we quantified the performance of the model in coherence predictions for vertical separations. The model coherence of all the three velocity...

  11. Spectral composition of light sources and insect phototaxis, with an evaluation of existing spectral response models. Journal of Insect Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunsven, van R.H.A.; Donners, M.; Boekee, K.; Tichelaar, I.; Geffen, van K.G.; Groenendijk, D.; Berendse, F.; Veenendaal, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Artificial illumination attracts insects, but to what extent light attracts insects, depends on the spectral composition of the light. Response models have been developed to predict the attractiveness of artificial light sources. In this study we compared attraction of insects by existing light sour

  12. Spectral density of the correlation matrix of factor models: a random matrix theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, F; Mantegna, R N

    2005-07-01

    We studied the eigenvalue spectral density of the correlation matrix of factor models of multivariate time series. By making use of the random matrix theory, we analytically quantified the effect of statistical uncertainty on the spectral density due to the finiteness of the sample. We considered a broad range of models, ranging from one-factor models to hierarchical multifactor models.

  13. The New Generation Atlas of Quasar Spectral Energy Distributions from Radio to X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Zhaohui; Wills, Beverley J; Wills, Derek; Cales, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A; Green, Richard F; Runnoe, Jessie; Nemmen, Rodrigo S; Gallagher, Sarah; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C; Kelly, Benjamin; Kriss, Gerard A; Li, Jun; Tang, Baitian; Xie, Yanxia

    2011-01-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. (1994) by using high-quality data obtained with several space and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared IRS spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite spectral energy distributions for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar...

  14. Spectral Estimation: An Overdetermined Rational Model Equation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    we obtain the associated power spectral density function Sx(eJw) in which the normalized frequency variable w takes on values in -,n]. This function...coefficients. It therefore follows that these coefficients may be determined from the power spectral density function through the Fourier series coefficient...autocorrelation sequence is equivalent to knowledge of the power spectral density function and vice versa. We belabor this point in order to establish

  15. A modal-spectral model for flanking transmissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblet-Puig, Jordi

    2016-11-01

    A model for the prediction of direct and indirect (flanking) sound transmissions is presented. It can be applied to geometries with extrusion symmetry. The structures are modelled with spectral finite elements. The acoustic domains are described by means of a modal expansion of the pressure field and must be cuboid-shaped. These reasonable simplifications in the geometry allow the use of more efficient numerical methods. Consequently the coupled vibroacoustic problem in structures such as junctions is efficiently solved. The vibration reduction index of T-junctions with acoustic excitation and with point force excitation is compared. The differences due to the excitation type obey quite general trends that could be taken into account by prediction formulas. However, they are smaller than other uncertainties not considered in practice. The model is also used to check if the sound transmissions of a fully vibroacoustic problem involving several flanking paths can be reproduced by superposition of independent paths. There exist some differences caused by the interaction between paths, which are more important at low frequencies.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XLIII. The spectral energy distribution of dust in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Churazov, E; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Désert, F -X; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maggio, G; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, F; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    Although infrared (IR) overall dust emission from clusters of galaxies has been statistically detected using data from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), it has not been possible to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of this emission over its peak, and thus to break the degeneracy between dust temperature and mass. By complementing the IRAS spectral coverage with Planck satellite data from 100 to 857 GHz, we provide new constraints on the IR spectrum of thermal dust emission in clusters of galaxies. We achieve this by using a stacking approach for a sample of several hundred objects from the Planck cluster sample; this procedure averages out fluctuations from the IR sky, allowing us to reach a significant detection of the faint cluster contribution. We also use the large frequency range probed by Planck, together with component-separation techniques, to remove the contamination from both cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (tSZ) signal, which d...

  17. On the high-energy spectral component of TGFs detected by AGILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Galli, Marcello; Ursi, Alessandro; Tavani, Marco; Labanti, Claudio; Fuschino, Fabio; Østgaard, Nikolai; Cummer, Steven; Lyu, Fanchao

    2017-04-01

    We follow up on the latest results presented on TGFs with high-energy counts (>30 MeV) detected by the MCAL instrument onboard the AGILE satellite. The motivation is to provide a reliable assessment of the high-energy spectral component of TGFs, when energy calibration and instrumental effects such as dead time and pile-up are properly accounted for. We consider a dataset of 85 confirmed TGFs with simultaneous WWLLN association detected in the period March - June 2015, providing a sample of events unbiased by any additional selection criteria. Twenty events in this sample include at least one count with reconstructed energy larger than 30 MeV, with few photons with energy apparently above 100 MeV. We show that most of the counts with measured energy exceeding 40 MeV are compatible with pile-up of lower energy photons. However, the topology of the interactions in the detector active volume suggests that a likely scenario for the interpretation of these counts is the simultaneous interaction (within few microseconds) of a small number of photons with energies in the several tens-of-MeV range, rather than a large number of MeV photons.

  18. Energy demand modeling for Uzbekistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobur Khodjaev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to energy demand forecasting in Uzbekistan. Studies show that in spite of the abundant reserves of hydrocarbons, low energy efficiency can have an adverse impact on energy security in Uzbekistan in the future. Oil and gas are the main primary energy source and they ensure energy security of Uzbekistan. Energy demand forecasting is essential in order to develop an effective energy policy. Such forecast can be useful to plan oil and gas production volumes, to identify priorities for the industrial modernization and to create favorable conditions for sustainable economic development in the future. Author proposes model based on translog function for developing medium-and long-term development programs in energy sector and the modernization and technological re-equipment of industry.

  19. Deep multi-spectral ensemble learning for electronic cleansing in dual-energy CT colonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Rie; Näppi, Janne J.; Hironaka, Toru; Kim, Se Hyung; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    We developed a novel electronic cleansing (EC) method for dual-energy CT colonography (DE-CTC) based on an ensemble deep convolution neural network (DCNN) and multi-spectral multi-slice image patches. In the method, an ensemble DCNN is used to classify each voxel of a DE-CTC image volume into five classes: luminal air, soft tissue, tagged fecal materials, and partial-volume boundaries between air and tagging and those between soft tissue and tagging. Each DCNN acts as a voxel classifier, where an input image patch centered at the voxel is generated as input to the DCNNs. An image patch has three channels that are mapped from a region-of-interest containing the image plane of the voxel and the two adjacent image planes. Six different types of spectral input image datasets were derived using two dual-energy CT images, two virtual monochromatic images, and two material images. An ensemble DCNN was constructed by use of a meta-classifier that combines the output of multiple DCNNs, each of which was trained with a different type of multi-spectral image patches. The electronically cleansed CTC images were calculated by removal of regions classified as other than soft tissue, followed by a colon surface reconstruction. For pilot evaluation, 359 volumes of interest (VOIs) representing sources of subtraction artifacts observed in current EC schemes were sampled from 30 clinical CTC cases. Preliminary results showed that the ensemble DCNN can yield high accuracy in labeling of the VOIs, indicating that deep learning of multi-spectral EC with multi-slice imaging could accurately remove residual fecal materials from CTC images without generating major EC artifacts.

  20. A matrix model for the topological string II: The spectral curve and mirror geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, Bertrand; Marchal, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, we presented a matrix model reproducing the topological string partition function on an arbitrary given toric Calabi-Yau manifold. Here, we study the spectral curve of our matrix model and thus derive, upon imposing certain minimality assumptions on the spectral curve, the large volume limit of the BKMP "remodeling the B-model" conjecture, the claim that Gromov-Witten invariants of any toric Calabi-Yau 3-fold coincide with the spectral invariants of its mirror curve.

  1. SPATIAL AND SPECTRAL MODELING OF THE GAMMA-RAY DISTRIBUTION IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foreman, Gary; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert; Fields, Brian; Ricker, Paul [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hughes, Annie, E-mail: gforema2@illinois.edu [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-20

    We perform spatial and spectral analyses of the LMC gamma-ray emission collected over 66 months by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In our spatial analysis, we model the LMC cosmic-ray distribution and gamma-ray production using observed maps of the LMC interstellar medium, star formation history, interstellar radiation field, and synchrotron emission. We use bootstrapping of the data to quantify the robustness of spatial model performance. We model the LMC gamma-ray spectrum using fitting functions derived from the physics of π{sup 0} decay, Bremsstrahlung, and inverse Compton scattering. We find the integrated gamma-ray flux of the LMC from 200 MeV to 20 GeV to be 1.37 ± 0.02 × 10{sup −7} ph cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, of which we attribute about 6% to inverse Compton scattering and 44% to Bremsstrahlung. From our work, we conclude that the spectral index of the LMC cosmic-ray proton population is 2.4 ± 0.2, and we find that cosmic-ray energy loss through gamma-ray production is concentrated within a few 100 pc of acceleration sites. Assuming cosmic-ray energy equipartition with magnetic fields, we estimate LMC cosmic rays encounter an average magnetic field strength ∼3 μG.

  2. Redistribution of carbonyl stretch mode energy in isolated and solvated N-methylacetamide: kinetic energy spectral density analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jonggu; Cho, Minhaeng

    2011-12-07

    The vibrational energy transfer from the excited carbonyl stretch mode in N-deuterated N-methylacetamide (NMA-d), both in isolation and in a heavy water cluster, is studied with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations, employing a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM∕MM) force field at the semiempirical PM3 level. The nonequilibrium ensemble of vibrationally excited NMA-d is prepared by perturbing the positions and velocities of the carbonyl C and O atoms and its NEMD trajectories are obtained with a leap-frog algorithm properly modified for the initial perturbation. In addition to the time-domain analysis of the kinetic and potential energies, a novel method for the spectral analysis of the atomic kinetic energies is developed, in terms of the spectral density of kinetic energy, which provides the time-dependent changes of the frequency-resolved kinetic energies without the complications of normal mode analysis at every MD time step. Due to the QM description of the solute electronic structure, the couplings among the normal modes are captured more realistically than with classical force fields. The energy transfer in the isolated NMA-d is found to proceed first from the carbonyl bond to other modes with time scales of 3 ps or less, and then among the other modes over 3-21 ps. In the solvated NMA-d, most of the excess energy is first transferred to other intramolecular modes within 5 ps, which is subsequently dissipated to solvent with 7-19 ps time scales. The contribution of the direct energy transfer from the carbonyl bond to solvent was only 5% with ~7 ps time scale. Solvent reorganization that leads to destabilization of the electrostatic interactions is found to be crucial in the long time relaxation of the excess energy, while the water intramolecular modes do not contribute significantly. Detailed mode-specific energy transfer pathways are deduced for the isolated and solvated NMA-d and they show that the energy transfer in NMA-d is a

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION ON THE STRUCTURE AND COMPOSITION OF THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE OF EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. H. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China); Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi, E-mail: guojh@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2016-02-20

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of an escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets: HD 189733b, HD 209458b, GJ 436b, and Kepler-11b. We find that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter (λ), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400–900 Å), which pushes the transition of H/H{sup +} to low altitudes. In contrast, the transition of H/H{sup +} moves to higher altitudes when most photons are concentrated in the high-energy spectral region (50–400 Å). For exoplanets with a low λ, the lower temperatures of the atmosphere make many chemical reactions so important that photoionization alone can no longer determine the composition of the escaping atmosphere. For HD 189733b, it is possible to explain the time variability of Lyα between 2010 and 2011 by a change in the EUV SED of the host K-type star, yet invoking only thermal H i in the atmosphere.

  4. The imprint of rapid star formation quenching on the spectral energy distributions of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, L.; Boselli, A.; Elbaz, D.; Boissier, S.; Buat, V.; Charmandaris, V.; Schreiber, C.; Béthermin, M.; Baes, M.; Boquien, M.; De Looze, I.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Pappalardo, C.; Spinoglio, L.; Viaene, S.

    2016-01-01

    In high density environments, the gas content of galaxies is stripped, leading to a rapid quenching of their star formation activity. This dramatic environmental effect, which is not related to typical passive evolution, is generally not taken into account in the star formation histories (SFHs) usually assumed to perform spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of these galaxies, yielding a poor fit of their stellar emission and, consequently, biased estimate of the star formation rate (SFR). In this work, we aim at reproducing this rapid quenching using a truncated delayed SFH that we implemented in the SED fitting code CIGALE. We show that the ratio between the instantaneous SFR and the SFR just before the quenching (rSFR) is well constrained as long as rest-frame UV data are available. This SED modeling is applied to the Herschel Reference Survey (HRS) containing isolated galaxies and sources falling in the dense environment of the Virgo cluster. The latter are Hi-deficient because of ram pressure stripping. We show that the truncated delayed SFH successfully reproduces their SED, while typical SFH assumptions fail. A good correlation is found between rSFR and Hi-def, the parameter that quantifies the gas deficiency of cluster galaxies, meaning that SED fitting results can be used to provide a tentative estimate of the gas deficiency of galaxies for which Hi observations are not available. The HRS galaxies are placed on the SFR-M∗ diagram showing that the Hi-deficient sources lie in the quiescent region, thus confirming previous studies. Using the rSFR parameter, we derive the SFR of these sources before quenching and show that they were previously on the main sequence relation. We show that the rSFR parameter is also recovered well for deeply obscured high redshift sources, as well as in the absence of IR data. SED fitting is thus a powerful tool for identifying galaxies that underwent a rapid star formation quenching.

  5. Spectral optimization and uncertainty quantification in combustion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, David Allan

    Reliable simulations of reacting flow systems require a well-characterized, detailed chemical model as a foundation. Accuracy of such a model can be assured, in principle, by a multi-parameter optimization against a set of experimental data. However, the inherent uncertainties in the rate evaluations and experimental data leave a model still characterized by some finite kinetic rate parameter space. Without a careful analysis of how this uncertainty space propagates into the model's predictions, those predictions can at best be trusted only qualitatively. In this work, the Method of Uncertainty Minimization using Polynomial Chaos Expansions is proposed to quantify these uncertainties. In this method, the uncertainty in the rate parameters of the as-compiled model is quantified. Then, the model is subjected to a rigorous multi-parameter optimization, as well as a consistency-screening process. Lastly, the uncertainty of the optimized model is calculated using an inverse spectral optimization technique, and then propagated into a range of simulation conditions. An as-compiled, detailed H2/CO/C1-C4 kinetic model is combined with a set of ethylene combustion data to serve as an example. The idea that the hydrocarbon oxidation model should be understood and developed in a hierarchical fashion has been a major driving force in kinetics research for decades. How this hierarchical strategy works at a quantitative level, however, has never been addressed. In this work, we use ethylene and propane combustion as examples and explore the question of hierarchical model development quantitatively. The Method of Uncertainty Minimization using Polynomial Chaos Expansions is utilized to quantify the amount of information that a particular combustion experiment, and thereby each data set, contributes to the model. This knowledge is applied to explore the relationships among the combustion chemistry of hydrogen/carbon monoxide, ethylene, and larger alkanes. Frequently, new data will

  6. The Evolving Physical Processes In Interacting Galaxies Traced By Their Spectral Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard

    Mergers and interactions have profound effects on the evolution of galaxies and on the various physical processes associated with star formation and the fueling of active nuclei (AGN). There remains, however, an incomplete understanding of how interactions affect such processes or how important they are in controlling the appearance of today's universe. We propose to study 180 interacting galaxies in 101 systems spanning early to late stage mergers for which newly archived NASA data enable detailed analyses of their ultraviolet-to-far infrared (UV-FIR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Our goal is an improved understanding of how a wide range of key galaxy parameters vary across the interaction sequence. Our derived physical parameters will include the total optical- infrared luminosity, star formation rate, specific star formation rate, stellar mass, dust temperatures and dust masses, compactness, photo-dissociation region (PDR) fractions, and AGN contributions to the FIR SED. Our sample is taken from the Keel-Kennicutt catalog of merging galaxies (based only on apparent galaxy separations and hence free of morphological bias) and the Surace IRAS sample of bright mergers. Our sample contains virtually all bright mergers with UV-FIR data in the archives, including (but not limited to) data from missions GALEX, Swift, Spitzer, WISE, and Herschel. We will re-reduce, recalibrate, and extract the photometry in up to 23 wavelength bands from the UV to the FIR. Our analysis plan emphasizes three new SED modeling tools, one of which we have recently developed. Nearly all of the sources also have Spitzer IRS spectral data (primarily of the circumnuclear regions), and we will use the IRS data to supplement the SED conclusions via our own algorithm which also infers metallicity, interstellar medium (ISM) ambient pressure, and embedded young star fractions. Finally, we will compare each merger to the simulated photometry/ morphology of a suite of simulations based on

  7. Testing spectral models for stellar populations with star clusters: II. Results

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, Rosa M Gonzalez

    2009-01-01

    High spectral resolution evolutionary synthesis models have become a routinely used ingredient in extragalactic work, and as such deserve thorough testing. Star clusters are ideal laboratories for such tests. This paper applies the spectral fitting methodology outlined in Paper I to a sample of clusters, mainly from the Magellanic Clouds and spanning a wide range in age and metallicity, fitting their integrated light spectra with a suite of modern evolutionary synthesis models for single stellar population. The combinations of model plus spectral library employed in this investigation are Galaxev/STELIB, Vazdekis/MILES, SED@/GRANADA, and Galaxev/MILES+GRANADA, which provide a representative sample of models currently available for spectral fitting work. A series of empirical tests are performed with these models, comparing the quality of the spectral fits and the values of age, metallicity and extinction obtained with each of them. A comparison is also made between the properties derived from these spectral f...

  8. A spectral synthesis code for rapid modelling of supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E

    2014-01-01

    We present TARDIS - an open-source code for rapid spectral modelling of supernovae (SNe). Our goal is to develop a tool that is sufficiently fast to allow exploration of the complex parameter spaces of models for SN ejecta. This can be used to analyse the growing number of high-quality SN spectra being obtained by transient surveys. The code uses Monte Carlo methods to obtain a self-consistent description of the plasma state and to compute a synthetic spectrum. It has a modular design to facilitate the implementation of a range of physical approximations that can be compared to asses both accuracy and computational expediency. This will allow users to choose a level of sophistication appropriate for their application. Here, we describe the operation of the code and make comparisons with alternative radiative transfer codes of differing levels of complexity (SYN++, PYTHON, and ARTIS). We then explore the consequence of adopting simple prescriptions for the calculation of atomic excitation, focussing on four sp...

  9. Mid-to-Far Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution of Galaxies in the Spitzer First Look Survey Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qing Wen; Hong Wu; Chen Cao; Xiao-Yang Xia

    2007-01-01

    We made model fitting to the mid-to-far infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for different categories of galaxies in the main extragalactic field of the Spitzer First Look Survey with the aid of spectroscopic information from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.We find that the mid-to-far infrared SEDs of HII galaxies, mixture type galaxies and LINERs can be well fitted by the one-parameter (α) dust model of Dale et al. plus the 13 Gyr dust-free elliptical galaxy model. The statistics of α values indicates that all these galaxies tend to be quiescent, although the HII galaxies are relatively more active than the LINERs. The midinfrared SEDs of absorption galaxies are well fitted simply by the 13 Gyr dust-free elliptical galaxy template, and the near-to-mid infrared SEDs of QSOs can be represented by AGN NGC 5506.

  10. The importance of spectral separation: an assessment of dual-energy spectral separation for quantitative ability and dose efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Bernhard; Grant, Katharine L; Schmidt, Bernhard T; Flohr, Thomas G

    2015-02-01

    One method to acquire dual-energy (DE) computed tomography (CT) data is to perform CT scans at 2 different x-ray tube voltages, typically 80 and 140 kV, either as 2 separate scans, by means of rapid kV switching, or with the use of 2 x-ray sources as in dual-source CT (DSCT) systems. In DSCT, it is possible to improve spectral separation with tin prefiltration (Sn) of the high-kV beam. Recently, x-ray tube voltages beyond the established range of 80 to 140 kV were commercially introduced, which enable additional voltage combinations for DE acquisitions, such as 80/150 Sn or 90/150 Sn kV. Here, we investigate the DE performance of several x-ray tube voltages and prefilter combinations on 2 DSCT scanners and the impact of the spectra on quantitative analysis and dose efficiency. Circular phantoms of different sizes (10-40 cm in diameter) equipped with cylindrical inserts containing water and diluted iodine contrast agent (14.5 mg/cm) were scanned using 2 different DSCT systems (SOMATOM Definition Flash and SOMATOM Force; Siemens AG, Forchheim, Germany). Five x-ray tube voltage combinations (80/140 Sn, 100/140 Sn, 80/150 Sn, 90/150 Sn, and 100/150 Sn kV) were investigated, and the results were compared with the previous standard acquisition technique (80/140 kV). As an example, 80/140 Sn kV means that 1 x-ray tube of the DSCT system was operated at 80 kV, whereas the other was operated at 140 kV with additional tin prefiltration (Sn). Dose values in terms of computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) were kept constant between the different voltage combinations but adjusted with regard to object size according to automatic exposure control recommendations. Reconstructed images were processed using linear blending of the low- and high-kV CT images to combined images, as well as 3-material decomposition techniques to generate virtual noncontrast (VNC) images and iodine images. Contrast and pixel noise were evaluated, as well as DE ratios, which are defined as the CT value

  11. Spectral modelling of a H.E.S.S.-detected pulsar wind nebula

    CERN Document Server

    van Rensburg, C; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes have discovered roughly 30 pulsar wind nebulae at energies above 100 GeV. We present first results from a leptonic emission code that models the spectral energy density of a pulsar wind nebula by solving the Fokker-Planck transport equation and calculating inverse Compton and synchrotron emissivities. Although models such as these have been developed before, most of them model the geometry of a pulsar wind nebula as that of a single sphere. We have created a time-dependent, multi-zone model to investigate changes in the particle spectrum as the particles diffuse through the pulsar wind nebula, as well as predict the radiation spectrum at different positions in the nebula. We calibrate our new model against a more basic previous model and fit the observed spectrum of G0.9+0.1, incorporating data from the High Energy Stereoscopic System as well as radio and X-ray experiments.

  12. Optimised spectral merge of the background model in seismic inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Roy; Zabihi Naeini, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    The inversion of seismic reflection data to absolute impedance generates low-frequency deviations around the true impedance if the frequency content of the background impedance model does not merge seamlessly into the spectrum of the inverted seismic data. We present a systematic method of selecting a background model that minimises the mismatch between the background model and the relative impedance obtained by inverting the seismic data at wells. At each well a set of well-log relative impedances is formed by passing the impedance log through a set of zero-phase high-pass filters. The corresponding background models are constructed by passing the impedance log through the complementary zero-phase low-pass filters and a set of seismic relative impedances is computed by inverting the seismic data using these background models. If the inverted seismic data is to merge perfectly with the background model, it should correspond at the well to the well-log relative impedance. This correspondence is the basis of a procedure for finding the optimum combination of background model and inverted seismic data. It is difficult to predict the low-frequency content of inverted seismic data. These low frequencies are affected by the uncertainties in (1) measuring the low-frequency response of the seismic wavelet and (2) knowing how inversion protects the signal-to-noise ratio at low frequencies. Uncertainty (1) becomes acute for broadband seismic data; the low-frequency phase is especially difficult to estimate. Moreover we show that a mismatch of low-frequency phase is a serious source of inversion artefacts. We also show that relative impedance can estimate the low-frequency phase where a well tie cannot. Consequently we include a low-frequency phase shift, applied to the seismic relative impedances, in the search for the best spectral merge. The background models are specified by a low-cut corner frequency and the phase shifts by a phase intercept at zero frequency. A scan of

  13. Analyses of Cometary Silicate Crystals: DDA Spectral Modeling of Forsterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane

    2012-01-01

    .14x8.14xl in shape with geometrical factors of x:y:z=1:1:10, Fabian et al. 2001; Harker et al. 2007). Alternatively, models for forsterite employ statistical methods like the Distribution of Hollow Spheres (Min et al. 2008; Oliveira et al. 2011) or Gaussian Random Spheres (GRS) or RGF (Gielen et al. 200S). Pancakes, hollow spheres, or GRS shapes similar to wheat sheaf crystal habit (e.g., Volten et al. 2001; Veihelmann et al. 2006), however, do not have the sharp edges, flat faces, and vertices seen in images of cometary crystals in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) or in Stardust samples. Cometary forsterite crystals often have equant or tabular crystal habit (J. Bradley). To simulate cometary crystals, we have computed absorption efficiencies of forsterite using the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) DDSCAT code on NAS supercomputers. We compute thermal models that employ a size distribution of discrete irregularly shaped forsterite crystals (nonspherical shapes with faces and vertices) to explore how crystal shape affects the shape and wavelength positions of the forsterite spectral features and to explore whether cometary crystal shapes support either condensation or annealing scenarios (Lindsay et al. 2012a, b). We find forsterite crystal shapes that best-fit comet Hale-Bopp are tetrahedron, bricks or brick platelets, essentially equant or tabular (Lindsay et al. 2012a,b), commensurate with high temperature condensation experiments (Kobatake et al. 2008). We also have computed porous aggregates with crystal monomers and find that the crystal resonances are amplified. i.e., the crystalline fraction is lower in the aggregate than is derived by fitting a linear mix of spectral features from discrete subcomponents, and the crystal resonances 'appear' to be from larger crystals (Wooden et al. 2012). These results may indicate that the crystalline mass fraction in comets with comae dominated by aggregates may be lower than deduced by popular methods that only emoy

  14. Regions in Energy Market Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short, W.

    2007-02-01

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model--and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  15. Regions in Energy Market Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    This report explores the different options for spatial resolution of an energy market model and the advantages and disadvantages of models with fine spatial resolution. It examines different options for capturing spatial variations, considers the tradeoffs between them, and presents a few examples from one particular model that has been run at different levels of spatial resolution.

  16. The Evolution Of Dusty Galaxies As Seen Through Their Spectral Energy Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajina, Anna

    Most of the build-up of stellar and black hole mass in the Universe occurs ~2-10 billion years after the Big Bang in dusty, gas-rich galaxies. Studying the physical properties of these galaxies is non-trivial as most of the light from stars or accretion onto supermassive black holes (i.e. AGN) is absorbed by dust and re-emitted in the infrared. The exact shape of the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) provides clues as to the relative roles of star-formation and AGN, as well as the geometric distribution of the dust (i.e. is it a compact post-merger source or an extended disk similar to the Milky Way). Understanding how the infrared SEDs evolve with redshift and luminosity (power output) across this key epoch in galaxy formation leads to an understanding of how supermassive black holes and their host galaxies co-evolved, and ultimately how and when the stars we observe in the local Universe were formed. Our key objectives are: Objective 1: Constrain the redshift and luminosity evolution of IR SEDs- We will use an unprecedented sample of 342 galaxies with varying levels of star formation and black hole activity covering the peak epoch of star-formation and black hole build-up. Our sample is ideally suited to the purpose with excellent coverage across the infrared spectrum in particular including mid-IR spectra which are crucial for AGN strength diagnostics. We will also produce an SED template library defined in different bins of redshift and luminosity. Objective 2: Constrain the role of AGN: We will compare several observed diagnostics of the presence and strength of an AGN, including mid-IR spectral diagnostics, SED model-fitting, and X-ray luminosity. We will also use state-of-the-art merger and isolated galaxy simulations, which predict observed SEDs as a function of time and for a wide range of underlying physical conditions (including the strength of the AGN). This comparison is especially important, as our preliminary work indicates, the AGN

  17. Bolometric correction and spectral energy distribution of cool stars in Galactic clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, A.; Patelli, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Pecci, F. Fusi; Oliva, E.

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated the relevant trend of the bolometric correction (BC) at the cool-temperature regime of red giant stars and its possible dependence on stellar metallicity. Our analysis relies on a wide sample of optical-infrared spectroscopic observations, along the 3500 Å ==> 2.5μm wavelength range, for a grid of 92 red giant stars in five (three globular + two open) Galactic clusters, along the full metallicity range covered by the bulk of the stars, -2.2 <= [Fe/H] <= +0.4. Synthetic BVRCIC JHK photometry from the derived spectral energy distributions allowed us to obtain robust temperature (Teff) estimates for each star, within +/-100K or less. According to the appropriate temperature estimate, blackbody extrapolation of the observed spectral energy distribution allowed us to assess the unsampled flux beyond the wavelength limits of our survey. For the bulk of our red giants, this fraction amounted to 15 per cent of the total bolometric luminosity, a figure that raises up to 30 per cent for the coolest targets (Teff <~ 3500K). Overall, we obtain stellar Mbol values with an internal accuracy of a few percentages. Even neglecting any correction for lost luminosity etc., we would be overestimating Mbol by <~0.3mag, in the worst cases. Making use of our new data base, we provide a set of fitting functions for the V and K BC versus Teff and versus (B - V) and (V - K) broad-band colours, valid over the interval 3300 <= Teff <= 5000K, especially suited for red giants. The analysis of the BCV and BCK estimates along the wide range of metallicity spanned by our stellar sample shows no evident drift with [Fe/H]. Things may be different for the B-band correction, where the blanketing effects are more and more severe. A drift of Δ(B - V) versus [Fe/H] is in fact clearly evident from our data, with metal-poor stars displaying a `bluer' (B - V) with respect to the metal-rich sample, for fixed Teff. Our empirical bolometric corrections are in good overall agreement with

  18. Rapid Energy Modeling Workflow Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    sustainable building . Models produced through the REM process can be updated and accessed continually, thus allowing energy managers to continuously explore...time and cost of audits 4. Review the energy analysis findings under the High Performance and Sustainable Building Guiding Principles Compliance

  19. The spectral shift function for planar obstacle scattering at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    McGillivray, I E

    2011-01-01

    Let $H$ signify the free non-negative Laplacian on $\\mathbb{R}^2$ and $H_Y$ the non-negative Dirichlet Laplacian on the complement $Y$ of a nonpolar compact subset $K$ in the plane. We derive the low-energy expansion for the Krein spectral shift function (scattering phase) for the obstacle scattering system $\\{\\,H_Y,\\,H\\,\\}$ including detailed expressions for the first three coefficients. We use this to investigate the large time behaviour of the expected volume of the pinned Wiener sausage associated to $K$.

  20. Positions and Spectral Energy Distributions of 41 Star Clusters in M33

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present accurate positions and multi-color photometry for 41 starclusters detected by Melnick & D'odorico in the nearby spiral galaxy M33 as a partof the BATC Color Survey of the sky in 13 intermediate-band filters from 3800to 10000A. The coordinates of the clusters are found from the HST Guide StarCatalog. By aperture photometry, we obtain the spectral energy distributions ofthe clusters. Using the relations between the BATC intermediate-band system andUBVRI broadband system, we derive their V magnitudes and B - V colors andfind that most of them are blue, which is consistent with previous findings.

  1. The Radio Spectral Energy Distribution and Star-formation Rate Calibration in Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.; Schinnerer, E.; Krause, M.; Dumas, G.; Meidt, S.; Damas-Segovia, A.; Beck, R.; Murphy, E. J.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Groves, B.; Bolatto, A.; Dale, D.; Galametz, M.; Sandstrom, K.; Boquien, M.; Calzetti, D.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Hunt, L. K.; De Looze, I.; Pellegrini, E. W.

    2017-02-01

    We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum (RC) emission from the Key Insight in Nearby Galaxies Emitting in Radio (KINGFISHER) sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4, 4.8, 8.4, and 10.5 GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-RC (1–10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations versus the monochromatic radio luminosities. The 1–10 GHz radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index ({S}ν ∼ {ν }-{α {nt}}) and the thermal fraction ({f}{th}) with mean values of {α }{nt}=0.97 +/- 0.16(0.79 +/- 0.15 for the total spectral index) and {f}{th} = (10 ± 9)% at 1.4 GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ∼3 orders of magnitude in the sample, 4.3× {10}2 {L}ȯ population in galaxies. Comparing the radio and IR SEDs, we find that the FIR-to-MRC ratio could decrease with SFR, due to the amplification of the magnetic fields in star-forming regions. This particularly implies a decrease in the ratio at high redshifts, where mostly luminous/star-forming galaxies are detected.

  2. Metabolic energy correlates of heart rate variability spectral power associated with a 900-calorie challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Richard M; Austin, Rachel E; Hatcher, Mark D; Bond, Vernon; Goring, Kim L

    2011-01-01

    We studied healthy males challenged with a 900 Cal test beverage and correlated EE with the raw (ms(2)) and normalized units (nu) of total power (TP), low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) and VLF spectral power of heart rate variability (HRV). The correlations were evaluated during 20 min of normal breathing (NB, control) and 20 min of paced breathing (PB) at 12 breaths·min(-1) (0.2 Hz). EE was not significantly correlated with any of the HRV variables before the metabolic challenge. After the challenge, EE was positively correlated with LF/HF and with VLF; VLF was also positively correlated with LF/HF during both NB and PB. These findings suggest that EE may be a correlate of LF/HF and of VLF spectral power of HRV in healthy adolescent/young adult males. The association of lower resting energy expenditure with lower amounts of VLF spectral power may occur in individuals with predilections for obese phenotypes.

  3. Metabolic Energy Correlates of Heart Rate Variability Spectral Power Associated with a 900-Calorie Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Millis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied healthy males challenged with a 900 Cal test beverage and correlated EE with the raw (ms2 and normalized units (nu of total power (TP, low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF and VLF spectral power of heart rate variability (HRV. The correlations were evaluated during 20 min of normal breathing (NB, control and 20 min of paced breathing (PB at 12 breaths⋅min−1 (0.2 Hz. EE was not significantly correlated with any of the HRV variables before the metabolic challenge. After the challenge, EE was positively correlated with LF/HF and with VLF; VLF was also positively correlated with LF/HF during both NB and PB. These findings suggest that EE may be a correlate of LF/HF and of VLF spectral power of HRV in healthy adolescent/young adult males. The association of lower resting energy expenditure with lower amounts of VLF spectral power may occur in individuals with predilections for obese phenotypes.

  4. Solar radiation practical modeling for renewable energy applications

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Daryl Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Written by a leading scientist with over 35 years of experience working at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Solar Radiation: Practical Modeling for Renewable Energy Applications brings together the most widely used, easily implemented concepts and models for estimating broadband and spectral solar radiation data. The author addresses various technical and practical questions about the accuracy of solar radiation measurements and modeling. While the focus is on engineering models and results, the book does review the fundamentals of solar radiation modeling and solar radiation m

  5. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-10-16

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m(2) mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems.

  6. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-10-01

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m2 mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems.

  7. The influence of the Extreme Ultraviolet spectral energy distribution on the structure and composition of the upper atmosphere of exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, J H

    2015-01-01

    By varying the profiles of stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral energy distribution (SED), we tested the influences of stellar EUV SEDs on the physical and chemical properties of the escaping atmosphere. We apply our model to study four exoplanets, HD\\,189733b, HD\\,209458b, GJ \\,436b, and Kepler-11b. We found that the total mass loss rates of an exoplanet, which are determined mainly by the integrated fluxes, are moderately affected by the profiles of the EUV SED, but the composition and species distributions in the atmosphere can be dramatically modified by the different profiles of the EUV SED. For exoplanets with a high hydrodynamic escape parameter ($\\lambda$), the amount of atomic hydrogen produced by photoionization at different altitudes can vary by one to two orders of magnitude with the variation of stellar EUV SEDs. The effect of photoionization of H is prominent when the EUV SED is dominated by the low-energy spectral region (400-900${\\AA}$), which pushes the transition of H/H$^{+}$ to low al...

  8. Spectral and Atomic Physics Analysis of Xenon L-Shell Emission From High Energy Laser Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Daniel; Kemp, G. E.; Widmann, K.; Benjamin, R. D.; May, M. J.; Colvin, J. D.; Barrios, M. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Liedahl, D.; Moore, A. S.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of the L-shell (n =2) radiation in mid to high-Z ions is useful for probing plasma conditions in the multi-keV temperature range. Xenon in particular with its L-shell radiation centered around 4.5 keV is copiously produced from plasmas with electron temperatures in the 5-10 keV range. We report on a series of time-resolved L-shell Xe spectra measured with the NIF X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) in high-energy long-pulse (>10 ns) laser produced plasmas at the National Ignition Facility. The resolving power of the NXS is sufficiently high (E/ ∂E >100) in the 4-5 keV spectral band that the emission from different charge states is observed. An analysis of the time resolved L-shell spectrum of Xe is presented along with spectral modeling by detailed radiation transport and atomic physics from the SCRAM code and comparison with predictions from HYDRA a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline atomic-physics from CRETIN. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Hadronic Models for the Extra Spectral Component in the short GRB 090510

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Katsuaki; Mészáros, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A short gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 detected by {\\it Fermi} shows an extra spectral component between 10 MeV and 30 GeV, an addition to a more usual low-energy ($<10$ MeV) Band component. In general, such an extra component could originate from accelerated protons. In particular, inverse Compton emission from secondary electron-positron pairs and proton synchrotron emission are competitive models for reproducing the hard spectrum of the extra component in GRB 090510. Here, using Monte Carlo simulations, we test the hadronic scenarios against the observed properties. To reproduce the extra component around GeV with these models, the proton injection isotropic-equivalent luminosity is required to be larger than $10^{55}$ erg$ / $s. Such large proton luminosities are a challenge for the hadronic models.

  10. 100% DD Energy Model Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-06-30

    The Miami Science Museum energy model has been used during DD to test the building's potential for energy savings as measured by ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G. This standard compares the designed building's yearly energy cost with that of a code-compliant building. The building is currently on track show 20% or better improvement over the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Appendix G baseline; this performance would ensure minimum compliance with both LEED 2.2 and current Florida Energy Code, which both reference a less strict version of ASHRAE 90.1. In addition to being an exercise in energy code compliance, the energy model has been used as a design tool to show the relative performance benefit of individual energy conservation measures (ECMs). These ECMs are areas where the design team has improved upon code-minimum design paths to improve the energy performance of the building. By adding ECMs one a time to a code-compliant baseline building, the current analysis identifies which ECMs are most effective in helping the building meet its energy performance goals.

  11. Global cross-calibration of Landsat spectral mixture models

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, Daniel; Small, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Data continuity for the Landsat program relies on accurate cross-calibration among sensors. The Landsat 8 OLI has been shown to exhibit superior performance to the sensors on Landsats 4-7 with respect to radiometric calibration, signal to noise, and geolocation. However, improvements to the positioning of the spectral response functions on the OLI have resulted in known biases for commonly used spectral indices because the new band responses integrate absorption features differently from prev...

  12. Spectral X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction with a Combination of Energy-Integrating and Photon-Counting Detectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Yang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to develop an algorithm for hybrid spectral computed tomography (CT which combines energy-integrating and photon-counting detectors. While the energy-integrating scan is global, the photon-counting scan can have a local field of view (FOV. The algorithm synthesizes both spectral data and energy-integrating data. Low rank and sparsity prior is used for spectral CT reconstruction. An initial estimation is obtained from the projection data based on physical principles of x-ray interaction with the matter, which provides a more accurate Taylor expansion than previous work and can guarantee the convergence of the algorithm. Numerical simulation with clinical CT images are performed. The proposed algorithm produces very good spectral features outside the FOV when no K-edge material exists. Exterior reconstruction of K-edge material can be partially achieved.

  13. Spectral X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction with a Combination of Energy-Integrating and Photon-Counting Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingsong; Cong, Wenxiang; Xi, Yan; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop an algorithm for hybrid spectral computed tomography (CT) which combines energy-integrating and photon-counting detectors. While the energy-integrating scan is global, the photon-counting scan can have a local field of view (FOV). The algorithm synthesizes both spectral data and energy-integrating data. Low rank and sparsity prior is used for spectral CT reconstruction. An initial estimation is obtained from the projection data based on physical principles of x-ray interaction with the matter, which provides a more accurate Taylor expansion than previous work and can guarantee the convergence of the algorithm. Numerical simulation with clinical CT images are performed. The proposed algorithm produces very good spectral features outside the FOV when no K-edge material exists. Exterior reconstruction of K-edge material can be partially achieved.

  14. Nonlinear spectral and lifetime management in upconversion nanoparticles by controlling energy distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Deng, Renren; Xie, Xiaoji; Huang, Ling; Liu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-28

    Optical tuning of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles has attracted considerable attention over the past decade because this development allows the advance of new frontiers in energy conversion, materials science, and biological imaging. Here we present a rational approach to manipulating the spectral profile and lifetime of lanthanide emission in upconversion nanoparticles by tailoring their nonlinear optical properties. We demonstrate that the incorporation of energy distributors, such as surface defects or an extra amount of dopants, into a rare-earth-based host lattice alters the decay behavior of excited sensitizers, thus markedly improving the emitters' sensitivity to excitation power. This work provides insight into mechanistic understanding of upconversion phenomena in nanoparticles and also enables exciting new opportunities of using these nanomaterials for photonic applications.

  15. High-energy spectral complexity from thermal gradients in black hole atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Skibo, J G

    1995-01-01

    We show that Compton scattering of soft photons with energies near 100 eV in thermally stratified black-hole accretion plasmas with temperatures in the range 100 keV - 1 MeV can give rise to an X-ray spectral hardening near 10 keV. This could produce the hardening observed in the X-ray spectra of black holes, which is generally attributed to reflection or partial covering of the incident continuum source by cold optically thick matter. In addition, we show that the presence of very hot (kT=1 MeV) cores in plasmas leads to spectra exibiting high energy tails similar to those observed from Galactic black-hole candidates.

  16. AN UPSCATTERING SPECTRAL FORMATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Farinelli, Ruben; Frontera, Filippo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Amati, Lorenzo, E-mail: titarchuk@fe.infn.it, E-mail: ltitarch@gmu.edu, E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-06-20

    We propose a model for the spectral formation of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission, where the phenomenological Band function is usually applied to describe this emission. We suggest that the GRB prompt emission is mainly a result of two upscattering processes. The first process is the Comptonization of relatively cold soft photons of the star off electrons of a hot shell of plasma of temperature T{sub e} of the order of 10{sup 9} K (or kT{sub e} {approx} 100 keV) that moves subrelativistically with the bulk velocity V{sub b} substantially less than the speed of light c. In this phase, the Comptonization parameter Y is high and the interaction between a blackbody-like soft seed photon population and hot electrons leads to formation of a saturated Comptonization spectrum modified by the subrelativistic bulk outflow. The second process is an upscattering of the previously Comptonized spectrum by the plasma outflow once it becomes relativistic. This process gives rise to the high-energy power-law (PL) component above the peak in the EF(E) diagram where F(E) is the energy flux. The latter process can be described by a convolution of the Comptonized spectrum with a broken-PL Green function. Possible physical scenarios for this second upscattering process are discussed. In the framework of our model, we give an interpretation of the Amati relation between the intrinsic spectral peak photon energy and radiated energy or luminosity, and we propose a possible explanation of the GRB temporal variability.

  17. Determination of the Spectral Index in the Fission Spectrum Energy Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Amy Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Neutron reaction cross sections play a vital role in tracking the production and destruction of isotopes exposed to neutron fluence. They are central to the process of reconciling the initial and final atom inventories. Measurements of irradiated samples by radiochemical methods in tangent with an algorithm are used to evaluate the fluence a sample is exposed to over the course of the irradiation. This algorithm is the Isotope Production Code (IPC) created and used by the radiochemistry data assessment team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An integral result is calculated by varying the total neutron fluence seen by a sample. A sample, irradiated in a critical assembly, will be exposed to a unique neutron flux defined by the neutron source and distance of the sample from the source. Neutron cross sections utilized are a function of the hardness of the neutron spectrum at the location of irradiation. A spectral index is used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum. Cross sections fit forms applied in IPC are collapsed from a LANL 30-group energy structure. Several decades of research and development have been performed to formalize the current IPC cross section library. Basis of the current fission spectrum neutron reaction cross section library is rooted in critical assembly experiments performed from the 1950’s through the early 1970’s at LANL. The focus of this report is development of the spectral index used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum in the fission spectrum energy regime.

  18. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  19. Characterization of the sub-mesoscale energy cascade in the Alboran Sea thermocline from spectral analysis of multichannel seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallares, Valenti; Moncada, Jhon F.; Biescas, Berta; Klaeschen, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale ocean dynamics is linked to small-scale mixing by means of turbulence, which enables the exchange of kinetic energy across the scales. At equilibrium, the energy flux that is injected at the production range must be balanced by mixing at the dissipation range. While the physics of the different ranges is now well established, an observational gap exists at the 103-101 m scale that prevents to characterize the transition from the anisotropic internal wave motions to isotropic turbulence. This lack of empirical evidence limits our understanding of the mechanisms governing the downward energy cascade, hampering the predictive capability of ocean circulation models. Here we show that this observational gap can be covered using high-resolution multichannel seismic (HR-MCS) data. Spectral analysis of acoustic reflectors imaged in the Alboran Sea (Western Mediterranean) thermocline evidences that this transition is caused by shear instabilities. In particular, we show that the averaged horizontal wavenumber (kx) spectra of the reflector's vertical displacements display three subranges that reproduce theoretical spectral slopes of internal waves [λx>100 m, with λx=kx-1], Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)-type shear instabilities[100 m> λx>33 m], and turbulence[λx<33 m]. The presence of the transitional subrange in the averaged spectrum indicates that the whole chain of events is occurring continuously and simultaneously in the surveyed area. The availability of a system providing observational data at the appropriate scales opens new perspectives to incorporate small-scale mixing in predictive ocean modelling research.

  20. Comparisons Between Model Predictions and Spectral Measurements of Charged and Neutral Particles on the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; hide

    2014-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012. RAD is a particle detector that measures the energy spectrum of charged particles (10 to approx. 200 MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (approx 8 to 200 MeV). The data obtained on the surface of Mars for 300 sols are compared to the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used. For describing the daily column depth of atmosphere, daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) are implemented into transport calculations. Particle flux at RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere depends on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD "E" dosimetry detector by the rest of the instrument. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and suggest that future radiation environments on Mars can be predicted accurately. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios

  1. Validation of spectral gas radiation models under oxyfuel conditions. Part A: Gas cell experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Valentin; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander;

    2011-01-01

    AbstractCombustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition as combustion with air. Standard CFD spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are out of their validity range. The series of three articles provides a common spectral basis for the validat......AbstractCombustion of hydrocarbon fuels with pure oxygen results in a different flue gas composition as combustion with air. Standard CFD spectral gas radiation models for air combustion are out of their validity range. The series of three articles provides a common spectral basis...

  2. Near-Equipartition Jets with Log-Parabola Electron Energy Distribution and the Blazar Spectral-Index Diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles D; Zhang, Li; Finke, Justin D; Lott, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Fermi-LAT analyses show that the gamma-ray photon spectral indices Gamma_gamma of a large sample of blazars correlate with the vFv peak synchrotron frequency v_s according to the relation Gamma_gamma = d - k log v_s. The same function, with different constants d and k, also describes the relationship between Gamma_gamma and peak Compton frequency v_C. This behavior is derived analytically using an equipartition blazar model with a log-parabola description of the electron energy distribution (EED). In the Thomson regime, k = k_EC = 3b/4 for external Compton processes and k = k_SSC = 9b/16 for synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) processes, where b is the log-parabola width parameter of the EED. The BL Lac object Mrk 501 is fit with a synchrotron/SSC model given by the log-parabola EED, and is best fit away from equipartition. Departures from equipartition are limited by jet power and make small corrections to the spectral-index diagrams. Analytic expressions are compared with numerical values derived from self-Compt...

  3. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniatis, I.; Costaridou, L.; Panagiotopoulos, E.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-08-01

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of ``Mild / Moderate'' or ``Severe'' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  4. Grading and quantification of hip osteoarthritis severity by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of radiographic hip joint space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boniatis, I; Costaridou, L; Panayiotakis, G [University of Patras, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, 265 00 Patras (Greece); Panagiotopoulos, E [University of Patras, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, 265 00 Patras (Greece)], E-mail: panayiot@upatras.gr

    2009-08-15

    An image analysis system is proposed for the assessment of hip osteoarthritis (OA) severity. Sixty four hips (18 normal, 46 osteoarthritic), corresponding to 32 patients of unilateral or bilateral hip OA were studied. Employing custom developed software, 64 Region Of Interest (ROI) images of Hip Joint Spaces (HJSs) were delineated on patients' digitized radiographs. The Fourier spectrum of each HJS-ROI was computed and expressed in polar coordinates. Spectral signatures, quantifying the radial and angular distribution of HJS spectral energy were formed. Signature descriptors were generated and utilized in the design of a two-level hierarchical decision tree, used for the grading of the severity of the disease. Accordingly, at Level 1, implemented by a multiple classifier system, the discrimination between normal and osteoarthritic hips was performed. At Level 2, the hips that had been successfully characterized as osteoarthritic at Level 1, were further characterized as of 'Mild / Moderate' or 'Severe' OA, by the Bayes classifier. A signature descriptors based regression model was designed, so as to quantify OA-severity. The system graded OA reliably, given that the accomplished classification accuracies for Level 1 and Level 2 were 98.4% and 100%, respectively. OA-severity values, expressed by HJS-narrowing, correlated highly (r = 0.9, p < 0.001) with values predicted by the model. The system may contribute to OA-patient management.

  5. A novel construction of complex-valued Gaussian processes with arbitrary spectral densities and its application to excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    The recent experimental discoveries about excitation energy transfer (EET) in light harvesting antenna (LHA) attract a lot of interest. As an open non-equilibrium quantum system, the EET demands more rigorous theoretical framework to understand the interaction between system and environment and therein the evolution of reduced density matrix. A phonon is often used to model the fluctuating environment and convolutes the reduced quantum system temporarily. In this paper, we propose a novel way to construct complex-valued Gaussian processes to describe thermal quantum phonon bath exactly by converting the convolution of influence functional into the time correlation of complex Gaussian random field. Based on the construction, we propose a rigorous and efficient computational method, the covariance decomposition and conditional propagation scheme, to simulate the temporarily entangled reduced system. The new method allows us to study the non-Markovian effect without perturbation under the influence of different spectral densities of the linear system-phonon coupling coefficients. Its application in the study of EET in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson model Hamiltonian under four different spectral densities is discussed. Since the scaling of our algorithm is linear due to its Monte Carlo nature, the future application of the method for large LHA systems is attractive. In addition, this method can be used to study the effect of correlated initial condition on the reduced dynamics in the future.

  6. Constraints on dark matter interactions with standard model particles from CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method to constrain elastic scattering between dark matter (DM) and standard model particles in the early Universe. Direct or indirect thermal coupling of non-relativistic DM with photons leads to a heat sink for the latter. This results in spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the amplitude of which can be as large as a few times the DM-to-photon number ratio. We compute CMB spectral distortions due to DM-proton, DM-electron and DM-photon scattering for generic energy-dependent cross sections and DM mass m_DM >~ 1 keV. Using FIRAS measurements we set constraints on the cross sections for m_DM <~ 0.1 MeV. In particular, for energy-independent scattering we obtain sigma[DM-proton] <~ 10^(-24) cm^2 (keV/m_DM)^(1/2), sigma[DM-electron] <~ 10^(-27) cm^2 (keV/m_DM)^(1/2) and sigma[DM-photon] <~ 10^(-39) cm^2 (m_DM/keV). An experiment with the characteristics of PIXIE would extend the regime of sensitivity up to masses m_DM ~ 1 GeV.

  7. NSMAXG: A new magnetic neutron star spectral model in XSPEC

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Wynn C G

    2013-01-01

    The excellent sensitivity of X-ray telescopes, such as Chandra and XMM-Newton, is ideal for the study of cooling neutron stars, which can emit at these energies. In order to exploit the wealth of information contained in the high quality data, a thorough knowledge of the radiative properties of neutron star atmospheres is necessary. A key factor affecting photon emission is magnetic fields, and neutron stars are known to have strong surface magnetic fields. Here I briefly describe our latest work on constructing magnetic (B >= 10^10 G) atmosphere models of neutron stars and the NSMAXG implementation of these models in XSPEC. Our results allow for more robust extractions of neutron star parameters from observations.

  8. Evolution of the stellar-merger red nova V1309 Scorpii: Spectral energy distribution analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylenda, R.; Kamiński, T.

    2016-08-01

    Context. One very important object for understanding the nature of red novae is V1309 Sco. Its pre-outburst observations showed that, before its red-nova eruption in 2008, it was a contact binary quickly evolving to the merger of the components. It thus provided us with a direct evidence that the red novae result from stellar mergers. Aims: We will study the evolution of the post-merger remnant of V1309 Sco over time. Methods: We analyse the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the object and its evolution with time. From various optical and infrared surveys and observing programmes carried out with OGLE, HST, VVV, Gemini South, WISE, Spitzer, and Herschel we constructed observed SED in 2010 and 2012. Some limited data are also available for the red-nova progenitor in 2007. We analyse the data with our model of a dusty envelope surrounding a central star. Results: Dust was present in the pre-outburst state of V1309 Sco. Its high temperature (900-1000 K) suggests that this was a freshly formed dust in a presumable mass-loss from the spiralling-in binary. Shortly after its 2008 eruption, V1309 Sco became almost completely embedded in dust. The parameters (temperature, dimensions) of the dusty envelope in 2010 and 2012 evidence that we then observed matter lost by the object during the 2008 outburst. Its mass is at least 10-3M⊙. The object remains quite luminous, although since its maximum brightness in September 2008, it has faded in luminosity by a factor of ~50 (in 2012). Far infrared data from Herschel reveal presence of a cold (~30 K) dust at a distance of a few thousand AU from the object. Conclusions: Similarly to other red novae, V1309 Sco formed a slowly-expanding, dense, and optically-thick dusty envelope during its 2008 outburst. The main remnant is thus hidden for us. Far infrared data suggests that the object passed an episode of intense mass loss in its recent history. This conclusion could be verified by submillimeter interferometric observations.

  9. One-electron singular spectral features of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Čadež, T.

    2017-01-01

    The momentum, electronic density, spin density, and interaction dependences of the exponents that control the (k , ω)-plane singular features of the σ = ↑ , ↓ one-electron spectral functions of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field are studied. The usual half-filling concepts of one-electron lower Hubbard band and upper Hubbard band are defined in terms of the rotated electrons associated with the model Bethe-ansatz solution for all electronic density and spin density values and the whole finite repulsion range. Such rotated electrons are the link of the non-perturbative relation between the electrons and the pseudofermions. Our results further clarify the microscopic processes through which the pseudofermion dynamical theory accounts for the one-electron matrix elements between the ground state and excited energy eigenstates.

  10. High-energy gamma-rays in the hard spectral state of Cyg X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Chernyakova, Maria; Pooley, Guy G

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained a firm detection of Cyg X-1 during its hard and intermediate spectral states in the energy range of 40 MeV--60 GeV based on observations by Fermi Large Area Telescope, confirming the independent results at $\\geq$60 MeV of Zanin et al. The detection significance is $\\simeq\\! 8\\sigma$ in the 0.1--10 GeV range. In the soft state, we have found upper limits on the emission at energies $\\geq$0.2 MeV, also in agreement with Zanin et al. However, we have found emission with a very soft spectrum in the 40--80 MeV range, not detected previously. This is likely to represent the high-energy cutoff of the high-energy power-law tail observed in the soft state. Similarly, we have detected a $\\gamma$-ray soft excess in the hard state, which appears to be of similar origin. We have also confirmed the presence of an orbital modulation of the detected emission in the hard state, expected if the $\\gamma$-rays are from Compton upscattering of stellar blackbody photons. However, the observed modulation is signifi...

  11. Spectral Models for Early Time SN 2011fe Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Baron, E; Sullivan, M; Hsiao, E; Ellis, R S; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Nugent, P E; Dominguez, I; Krisciunas, K; Phillips, M M; Suntzeff, N; Wang, L; Thomas, R C

    2015-01-01

    We use observed UV through near IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal SNe Ia and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z_solar/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ~0.1 M_sun than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. ...

  12. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  13. Galaxy And Mass Assembly: the evolution of the cosmic spectral energy distribution from z = 1 to z = 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. K.; Driver, S. P.; Davies, L. J. M.; Kafle, P. R.; Robotham, A. S. G.; Vinsen, K.; Wright, A. H.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Bremer, M.; da Cunha, E.; Drinkwater, M.; Holwerda, B.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kelvin, L. S.; Loveday, J.; Phillipps, S.; Wilkins, S.

    2017-09-01

    We present the evolution of the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from z = 1 to 0. Our CSEDs originate from stacking individual spectral energy distribution (SED) fits based on panchromatic photometry from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) and COSMOS data sets in 10 redshift intervals with completeness corrections applied. Below z = 0.45, we have credible SED fits from 100 nm to 1 mm. Due to the relatively low sensitivity of the far-infrared data, our far-infrared CSEDs contain a mix of predicted and measured fluxes above z = 0.45. Our results include appropriate errors to highlight the impact of these corrections. We show that the bolometric energy output of the Universe has declined by a factor of roughly 4 - from 5.1 ± 1.0 at z ∼ 1 to 1.3 ± 0.3 × 1035 h70 W Mpc-3 at the current epoch. We show that this decrease is robust to cosmic sample variance, the SED modelling and other various types of error. Our CSEDs are also consistent with an increase in the mean age of stellar populations. We also show that dust attenuation has decreased over the same period, with the photon escape fraction at 150 nm increasing from 16 ± 3 at z ∼ 1 to 24 ± 5 per cent at the current epoch, equivalent to a decrease in AFUV of 0.4 mag. Our CSEDs account for 68 ± 12 and 61 ± 13 per cent of the cosmic optical and infrared backgrounds, respectively, as defined from integrated galaxy counts and are consistent with previous estimates of the cosmic infrared background with redshift.

  14. The Radio Spectral Energy Distribution and Star Formation Rate Calibration in Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Krause, M; Dumas, G; Meidt, S; Beck, R; Damas-Segovia, A; Murphy, E J; Mulcahy, D D; Groves, B; Bolatto, A; Dale, D; Galametz, M; Sandstrom, K; Boquien, M; Calzetti, D; Kennicutt, R C; Hunt, L K; De Looze, I; Pellegrini, E W

    2016-01-01

    We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum emission from the KINGFISH sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4GHz, 4.8GHz, 8.5GHz, and 10.5GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-radio continuum (1-10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations vs. the monochromatic radio luminosities. The radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Marchov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index (a_nt) and the thermal fraction (fth) with mean values of a_nt~ 0.97 for the 1-10 GHz frequency rang and fth~10% at 1.4GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ~3 orders of magnitude in the sample. The thermal emission is responsible for ~23% of the MRC on average. We also compare the extinction-corrected diagnostics of star formation rate with the thermal and nonthermal radio tracers and derive the fir...

  15. CO Spectral Line Energy Distributions in Orion Sources: Templates for Extragalactic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriolo, Nick; Bergin, Edwin A.; Goicoechea, Javier; Schilke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Relative populations in the excited rotational levels of CO are sensitive to conditions in the interstellar medium. Emission lines originating in these levels can thus be used in constraining parameters such as density, temperature, and radiation field. The Herschel Space Observatory has enabled the observation of CO emission lines arising from the J=4 through J=48 rotational levels, many of which are detected in different sources within the Orion star-forming region. We present observations of CO emission toward Orion KL, Orion H2 Peak 1, Orion South, and the Orion Bar, all of which show distinctive CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) indicating the different excitation mechanisms at work. Using the high spectral resolution HIFI observations, we decompose emission line profiles into multiple components (e.g., shock, outflow, photodissociation region, ambient cloud) in order to characterize the CO SLED associated with each component. In doing so, we generate templates for the various excitation mechanisms that can be applied toward understanding the processes occurring in unresolved star-forming regions where CO observations have been made.

  16. Thermal X-ray emission from a baryonic jet: a self-consistent multicolour spectral model

    CERN Document Server

    Khabibullin, Ildar; Sazonov, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    We present a publicly-available spectral model for thermal X-ray emission from a baryonic jet in an X-ray binary system, inspired by the microquasar SS 433. The jet is assumed to be strongly collimated (half-opening angle $\\Theta\\sim 1\\deg$) and mildly relativistic (bulk velocity $\\beta=V_{b}/c\\sim 0.03-0.3$). Its X-ray spectrum is found by integrating over thin slices of constant temperature, radiating in optically thin coronal regime. The temperature profile along the jet and corresponding differential emission measure distribution are calculated with full account for gas cooling due to expansion and radiative losses. Since the model predicts both the spectral shape and luminosity of the jet's emission, its normalisation is not a free parameter if the source distance is known. We also explore the possibility of using simple X-ray observables (such as flux ratios in different energy bands) to constrain physical parameters of the jet (e.g. gas temperature and density at its base) without broad-band fitting of...

  17. AMARSI: Aerosol modeling and retrieval from multi-spectral imagers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Curier, R.L.; Staroverova, A.; Kokhanovsky, A.; Hoyningen-Huene, W. van; Rozanov, V.V.; Burrows, J.P.; Hesselmans, G.; Gale, L.; Bouvet, M.

    2008-01-01

    The AMARSI project aims at the development and validation of aerosol retrieval algorithms over ocean. One algorithm will be developed for application with data from the Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) on EarthCARE. A second algorithm will be developed using the combined information from AATSR and MERIS,

  18. Holographic dark-energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Sergio; Fabris, Júlio. C.; Herrera, Ramón; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2011-06-01

    Different holographic dark-energy models are studied from a unifying point of view. We compare models for which the Hubble scale, the future event horizon or a quantity proportional to the Ricci scale are taken as the infrared cutoff length. We demonstrate that the mere definition of the holographic dark-energy density generally implies an interaction with the dark-matter component. We discuss the relation between the equation-of-state parameter and the energy density ratio of both components for each of the choices, as well as the possibility of noninteracting and scaling solutions. Parameter estimations for all three cutoff options are performed with the help of a Bayesian statistical analysis, using data from supernovae type Ia and the history of the Hubble parameter. The ΛCDM model is the clear winner of the analysis. According to the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), all holographic models should be considered as ruled out, since the difference ΔBIC to the corresponding ΛCDM value is >10. According to the Akaike information criterion (AIC), however, we find ΔAIC<2 for models with Hubble-scale and Ricci-scale cutoffs, indicating, that they may still be competitive. As we show for the example of the Ricci-scale case, also the use of certain priors, reducing the number of free parameters to that of the ΛCDM model, may result in a competitive holographic model.

  19. Probing Atlas model atmospheres at high spectral resolution. Stellar synthesis and reference template validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Chávez, M.; Rodríguez-Merino, L. H.

    2008-07-01

    Aims: The fast improvement of spectroscopic observations makes mandatory a strong effort on the theoretical side to better reproduce the spectral energy distribution (SED) of stars at high spectral resolution. In this regard, relying on the Kurucz Atlas/Synthe original codes we computed the Bluered library, consisting of 832 synthetic SED of stars, that cover a large parameter space at very high spectral resolution (R = 500 000) along the 3500-7000 Å wavelength range. Methods: Bluered synthetic spectra have been used to assess in finer detail the intrinsic reliability and the performance limits of the Atlas theoretical framework. The continuum-normalized spectra of the Sun, Arcturus, and Vega, plus a selected list of 45 bright stars with high-quality SEDs from the Prugniel & Soubiran Elodie catalog, form our sample designed to probe the global properties of synthetic spectra across the entire range of H-R parameters. Results: Atlas models display a better fitting performance with increasing stellar temperature. High-resolution spectra of Vega, the Sun, and Arcturus have been reproduced at R=100 000, respectively, within a 0.7%, 4.5%, and 8.8% relative scatter in residual flux. In all the three cases, the residual flux distribution shows a significant asymmetry (skewness parameter γ = -2.21, -0.98, -0.67, respectively), which neatly confirms an overall “excess” of theoretical line blanketing. For the Sun, this apparent discrepancy is alleviated, but not recovered, by a systematic decrease (-40%) of the line oscillator strengths, log (gf), especially referring to iron transitions. Definitely, a straight “astrophysical” determination of log (gf) for each individual atomic transition has to be devised to overcome the problem. By neglecting overblanketing effects in theoretical models when fitting high-resolution continuum-normalized spectra of real stars, we lead to a systematically warmer effective temperature (between +80 and +300 K for the solar fit) and a

  20. [Research on the model of spectral unmixing for minerals based on derivative of ratio spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng-Qian; Zhang, Li-Fu; Wu, Tai-Xia; Huang, Chang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The precise analysis of mineral abundance is a key difficulty in hyperspectral remote sensing research. In the present paper, based on linear spectral mixture model, the derivative of ratio spectroscopy (DRS) was introduced for spectral unmixing of visible to short-wave infrared (Vis-SWIR; 0.4 - 2.5 microm) reflectance data. The mixtures of different proportions of plaster and allochite were analyzed to estimate the accuracy of the spectral unmixing model based on DRS. For the best 5 strong linear bands, the Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) of the abundances and the actual abundances were higher than 99.9%, while the root mean square error (RMSE) is less than 2.2%. The result shows that the new spectral unmixing model based on DRS is simple, of rigorous mathematical proof, and highly precise. It has a great potential in high-precision quantitative analysis of spectral mixture with fixed endmembers.

  1. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa; Meadows, V.; Bitz, C. M.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Joshi, M. M.; Robinson, T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. A one dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative-transfer model is used to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy-balance climate model. We simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Our results show that terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. Using a general circulation model we demonstrate that an ocean-covered planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M-dwarf star has a higher global mean surface temperature than a planet orbiting the Sun (a G-dwarf star) at an equivalent stellar flux distance. The effect is even more pronounced when the albedos of snow and ice are lowered, indicating the importance of the spectral dependence of surface ice and snow on climate for these planets. We find that the sensitivity of climate to changes in stellar insolation for M-dwarf planets is weaker than for planets orbiting stars with greater visible and near-UV radiation. While a planet orbiting the Sun becomes ice-covered with an 8% reduction in stellar insolation, a similar planet orbiting an M dwarf requires a 27% reduction to become ice-covered. A 2% reduction in stellar insolation is all that is required for global ice cover on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star. Consequently the habitable zone for surface liquid water on planets with Earth-like greenhouse gas concentrations may be ~12% wider for M-dwarf stars than for G-dwarf stars, and ~3% narrower for F-dwarf stars. Higher obliquities expand the outer habitable zone boundary for surface liquid water. Raising atmospheric CO2 can reduce the ice-albedo effect on M-dwarf planets, but ~3-10 bars are required to entirely mask the climatic effect of ice and snow.

  2. A Comprehensive Statistical Description of Radio-Through-$\\gamma$-Ray Spectral Energy Distributions of All Known Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Peiyuan; Massaro, Francesco; Paggi, Alessandro; Cauteruccio, Joe; Künzel, Soren R

    2016-01-01

    We combined multi-wavelength data for blazars from the Roma-BZCAT catalog and analyzed hundreds of X-ray spectra. We present the fluxes and Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), in 12 frequency bands from radio to $\\gamma$-rays, for a final sample of 2214 blazars. Using a model-independent statistical approach, we looked for systematic trends in the SEDs; the most significant trends involved the radio luminosities and X-ray spectral indices of the blazars. We used a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to determine the basis vectors of the blazar SEDs and, in order to maximize the size of the sample, imputed missing fluxes using the K-nearest neighbors method. Using more than an order of magnitude more data than was available when Fossati et al. (1997, 1998) first reported trends of SED shape with blazar luminosity, we confirmed the anti-correlation between radio luminosity and synchrotron peak frequency, although with greater scatter than was seen in the smaller sample. The same trend can be seen between bolo...

  3. A Proof of Bobkov's Spectral Bound For Convex Domains via Gaussian Fitting and Free Energy Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Milman, Emanuel

    2012-01-01

    We obtain a new proof of Bobkov's lower bound on the first positive eigenvalue of the (negative) Neumann Laplacian (or equivalently, the Cheeger constant) on a bounded convex domain $K$ in Euclidean space. Our proof avoids employing the localization method or any of its geometric extensions. Instead, we deduce the lower bound by invoking a spectral transference principle for log-concave measures, comparing the uniform measure on $K$ with an appropriately scaled Gaussian measure which is conditioned on $K$. The crux of the argument is to establish a good overlap between these two measures (in say the relative-entropy or total-variation distances), which boils down to obtaining sharp lower bounds on the free energy of the conditioned Gaussian measure.

  4. Energy and spectral efficiency analysis for selective ARQ multi-channel systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shafique, Taniya

    2017-07-31

    In this paper, we develop selective retransmission schemes for multiple-channel systems. The proposed schemes are selective automatic repeat request with fixed bandwidth (SARQ-FB), selective chase combining with fixed bandwidth (SCC-FB) and selective automatic repeat request with variable bandwidth (SARQ-VB). The main objective of the proposed schemes is to use the available power and bandwidth budget effectively along with the selective retransmission to deliver the required data successfully within a limited number of transmissions. To investigate the performance of each scheme, we first analyze the average spectral and energy efficiency and derive closed form expressions for each scheme. Then, we compare the EE and SE of each scheme through numerical results.

  5. Optimized Energy Efficiency and Spectral Efficiency Resource Allocation Strategies for Phantom Cellular Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr, M.

    2016-01-06

    Multi-teir hetrogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Meanwhile, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-teir architecture known as Phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE, where we propose an algorithm that computes the SE and EE resource allocation for Phantom cellular networks. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus the number of users, and the ration of Phantom cellresource blocks to the total number or resource blocks. We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to acheive improved SE or EE performance at a non-significant loss in EE or SE performance, respectively. It was found that the system parameters can be tuned so that the EE solution does not yield a significant loss in the SE performance.

  6. Energy technologies and energy efficiency in economic modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses different approaches to incorporating energy technologies and technological development in energy-economic models. Technological development is a very important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological ...... of renewable energy and especially wind power will increase the rate of efficiency improvement. A technologically based model in this case indirectly makes the energy efficiency endogenous in the aggregate energy-economy model.......This paper discusses different approaches to incorporating energy technologies and technological development in energy-economic models. Technological development is a very important issue in long-term energy demand projections and in environmental analyses. Different assumptions on technological...... development are one of the main causes for the very diverging results which have been obtained using bottom-up and top-down models for analysing the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. One of the objectives for studies comparing model results have been to create comparable model assumptions regarding...

  7. An improved numerical method for nonlinear terms of spectral model and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    At present, the spectral model is one of the most widely applied numerical models in the research of numerical prediction and climatic variation. To improve the precision and efficiency of spectral method can greatly contribute to the development of numerical prediction. As the core part of spectral method, the calculating method of nonlinear terms always concentrates on numerical solution of atmospheric dynamical processes in the spectral space. However, there was little study in this field in the late thirty years. According to the principle of nonlinear term calculation with the dimensionality degradation and latitudinal perfect spectral method, we designed a new nonlinear term calculating method and made it compatible well with the common numerical algorithms of the spectral model used internationally. With an own-designed spectral dynamical framework suiting for the numerical application in common uses, theoretical analyses and numerical experiments have also been deeply conducted to compare our new method with the widely-used transform method in an attempt to advance the development of numerical algorithms of spectral model.

  8. Virtual non-contrast CT using dual energy spectral CT: Feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Mok; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of coronary artery calcium scoring based on three virtual noncontrast-enhanced (VNC) images derived from single-source spectral dual-energy CT (DECT) as compared with true noncontrast-enhanced (TNC) images. This prospective study was conducted with the approval of our Institutional Review Board. Ninety-seven patients underwent noncontrast CT followed by contrast-enhanced chest CT using single-source spectral DECT. Iodine eliminated VNC images were reconstructed using two kinds of 2-material decomposition algorithms (material density iodine-water pair [MDW], material density iodine-calcium pair [MDC]) and a material suppressed algorithm (material suppressed iodine [MSI]). Two readers independently quantified calcium on VNC and TNC images. The Spearman correlation coefficient test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analyses. Coronary artery calcium scores from all three VNC images showed excellent correlation with those from the TNC images (Spearman's correlation coefficient [ρ] = 0.94, 0.88, and 0.89 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Measured coronary calcium volumes from VNC images also correlated well with those from TNC images (ρ = 0.92, 0.87, and 0.91 for MDW, MDC, and MSI, respectively; p < 0.001 for all pairs). Among the three VNC images, coronary calcium from MDW correlated best with that from TNC. The coronary artery calcium scores and volumes were significantly lower from the VNC images than from the TNC images (p < 0.001 for all pairs). The use of VNC images from contrast-enhanced CT using dual-energy material decomposition/suppression is feasible for coronary calcium scoring. The absolute value from VNC tends to be smaller than that from TNC.

  9. Camera response prediction for various capture settings using the spectral sensitivity and crosstalk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jueqin; Xu, Haisong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a camera response formation model is proposed to accurately predict the responses of images captured under various exposure settings. Differing from earlier works that estimated the camera relative spectral sensitivity, our model constructs the physical spectral sensitivity curves and device-dependent parameters that convert the absolute spectral radiances of target surfaces to the camera readout responses. With this model, the camera responses to miscellaneous combinations of surfaces and illuminants could be accurately predicted. Thus, creating an "imaging simulator" by using the colorimetric and photometric research based on the cameras would be of great convenience.

  10. Spectral ellipsometry of GaSb and GaInAsSb: Experiment and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charache, G.W.; Mu{tilde n}oz, M.; Wei, K.; Pollak, F.H.; Freeouf, J.L.

    1999-06-30

    The optical constants {epsilon}(E)[={epsilon}{sub 1}(E)+i{epsilon}{sub 2}(E)] of single-crystal GaSb at 300K have been measured using spectral ellipsometry in the range of 0.3-5.3 eV. The {epsilon}(E) spectra displayed distinct structures associated with critical points (CPs) at E{sub 0} (direct gap), spin-orbit split E{sub 0}+{Delta}{sub 0} component, spin-orbit split (E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1}) and (E{sub 0}{prime}, E{sub 0}{prime}+{Delta}{sub 0}{prime}) doublets, as well as E{sub 2}. The experimental data over the entire measured spectral range (after oxide removal) has been fit using the Holden model dielectric function based on the electronic energy-band structure near these CPs plus excitonic and band-to-band Coulomb enhancement effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 0}+{Delta}{sub 0} and the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1} doublet. In addition to evaluating the energies of these various band-to-band CPs, information about the binding energy (R{sub 1}) of the two-dimensional exciton related to the E{sub 1}, E{sub 1}+{Delta}{sub 1} CPs was obtained. The value of R{sub 1} was in good agreement with effective mass/k{sup {rightharpoonup}}{center_dot}p{sup {rightharpoonup}} theory. The ability to evaluate R{sub 1} has important ramifications for recent first-principles band structure calculations which include exciton effects at E{sub 0}, E{sub 1}, and E{sub 2}. The experimental results were compared to other evaluations of the optical constants of GaSb.

  11. Spectral - Lagrangian methods for Collisional Models of Non - Equilibrium Statistical States

    CERN Document Server

    Gamba, Irene M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new spectral Lagrangian based deterministic solver for the non-linear Boltzmann Transport Equation for Variable Hard Potential (VHP) collision kernels with conservative or non-conservative binary interactions.The method is based on symmetries of the Fourier transform of the collision integral, where the complexity in its computing is reduced to a separate integral over the unit sphere $S^2$. In addition, the conservation of moments is enforced by Lagrangian constraints. The resulting scheme is very versatile and adjusts in a very simple manner, to several cases that involve energy dissipation due to local micro-reversibility (inelastic interactions) or elastic model of slowing down process. Our simulations are benchmarked with the available exact self-similar solutions, exact moment equations and analytical estimates for homogeneous Boltzmann equation for both elastic and inelastic VHP interactions. Benchmarking of the simulations involves the selection of a time self-similar rescaling of the num...

  12. CMS-Wave: A Nearshore Spectral Wave Processes Model for Coastal Inlets and Navigation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Battjes and Jansen formula............................................................................................87 Chawla and Kirby formula...incident wave parameters (significant height Hs defined as 4 times the total energy density, spectral peak period Tp, and spectral peak frequency fp ...in the entrance channel (Figure 10). Table 5. Incident wave parameters and current conditions. Run Hs (cm)a Tp (sec)a fp (Hz)b U (cm/sec)c 1

  13. A Stochastic Energy Budget Model Using Physically Based Red Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Weniger, Michael; Hense, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A method to describe unresolved processes in meteorological models by physically based stochastic processes (SP) is proposed by the example of an energy budget model (EBM). Contrary to the common approach using additive white noise, a suitable variable within the model is chosen to be represented by a SP. Spectral analysis of ice core time series shows a red noise character of the underlying fluctuations. Fitting Ornstein Uhlenbeck processes to the observed spectrum defines the parameters for the stochastic dynamic model (SDM). Numerical simulations for different sets of ice core data lead to three sets of strongly differing systems. Pathwise, statistical and spectral analysis of these models show the importance of carefully choosing suitable stochastic terms in order to get a physically meaningful SDM.

  14. Spectral energy distribution simulations of a possible ring structure around the young, red brown dwarf G 196-3 B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhozhay, Olga V.; Zapatero Osorio, María Rosa; Béjar, Víctor J. S.; Boehler, Yann

    2017-01-01

    The origin of the very red optical and infrared colours of intermediate-age (˜10-500 Myr) L-type dwarfs remains unknown. It has been suggested that low-gravity atmospheres containing large amounts of dust may account for the observed reddish nature. We explored an alternative scenario by simulating debris disc around G 196-3 B, which is an L3 young brown dwarf with a mass of ˜15 MJup and an age in the interval 20-300 Myr. The best-fit solution to G 196-3 B's photometric spectral energy distribution from optical wavelengths through 24 μm corresponds to the combination of an unreddened L3 atmosphere (Teff ≈ 1870 K) and a warm (≈1280 K), narrow (≈0.07-0.11 R⊙) debris disc located at very close distances (≈0.12-0.20 R⊙) from the central brown dwarf. This putative, optically thick, dusty belt, whose presence is compatible with the relatively young system age, would have a mass ≥7 × 10-10 M⊕ comprised of submicron/micron characteristic dusty particles with temperatures close to the sublimation threshold of silicates. Considering the derived global properties of the belt and the disc-to-brown dwarf mass ratio, the dusty ring around G 196-3 B may resemble the rings of Neptune and Jupiter, except for its high temperature and thick vertical height (≈6 × 103 km). Our inferred debris disc model is able to reproduce G 196-3 B's spectral energy distribution to a satisfactory level of achievement.

  15. Spectral energy distribution simulations of a possible ring structure around the young, red brown dwarf G 196-3 B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhozhay, Olga V.; Zapatero Osorio, María Rosa; Béjar, Víctor J. S.; Boehler, Yann

    2016-09-01

    The origin of the very red optical and infrared colours of intermediate-age (˜10-500 Myr) L-type dwarfs remains unknown. It has been suggested that low-gravity atmospheres containing large amounts of dust may account for the observed reddish nature. We explored an alternative scenario by simulating protoplanetary and debris discs around G 196-3 B, which is an L3 young brown dwarf with a mass of ˜15 MJup and an age in the interval 20-300 Myr. The best-fit solution to G 196-3 B's photometric spectral energy distribution from optical wavelengths through 24 μm corresponds to the combination of an unreddened L3 atmosphere (Teff ≈ 1870 K) and a warm (≈ 1280 K), narrow (≈ 0.07-0.11 R⊙) debris disc located at very close distances (≈ 0.12-0.20 R⊙) from the central brown dwarf. This putative, optically thick, dusty belt, whose presence is compatible with the relatively young system age, would have a mass ≥7 × 10-10 M⊕ comprised of sub-micron/micron characteristic dusty particles with temperatures close to the sublimation threshold of silicates. Considering the derived global properties of the belt and the disc-to-brown dwarf mass ratio, the dusty ring around G 196-3 B may resemble the rings of Neptune and Jupiter, except for its high temperature and thick vertical height (≈6 × 103 km). Our inferred debris disc model is able to reproduce G 196-3 B's spectral energy distribution to a satisfactory level of achievement.

  16. Star formation relations and CO spectral line energy distributions across the J-ladder and redshift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greve, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Leonidaki, I.; Xilouris, E. M. [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Weiß, A.; Henkel, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Zhang, Z.-Y. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Van der Werf, P.; Meijerink, R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, PO Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Aalto, S. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Observatory, 43994 Onsala (Sweden); Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, A. S. [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Fischer, J. [Naval Research Laboratory, Remote Sensing Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Gao, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcala de Henares, Departamento de Fśica, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Harris, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Naylor, D. A. [Institute for Space Imaging Science, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 (Canada); Smith, H. A. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Spaans, M., E-mail: t.greve@ucl.ac.uk [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present FIR [50-300 μm]–CO luminosity relations (i.e., log L{sub FIR}=αlog L{sub CO}{sup ′}+β) for the full CO rotational ladder from J = 1-0 up to J = 13-12 for a sample of 62 local (z ≤ 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; L {sub IR[8-1000} {sub μm]} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 submillimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations, and sufficiently well-sampled FIR/submillimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs), so that accurate FIR luminosities can be determined. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIR–CO luminosity relations toward the high-IR-luminosity end, while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-J/high-J CO line data (J = 5-4 and higher) that was available prior to Herschel. This new data set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIR–CO luminosity relations (i.e., α ≅ 1) for J = 1-0 up to J = 5-4, with a nearly constant normalization (β ∼ 2). In the simplest physical scenario, this is expected from the (also) linear FIR–(molecular line) relations recently found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However, from J = 6-5 and up to the J = 13-12 transition, we find an increasingly sublinear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (∼100 K) and dense (>10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star-formation-powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova-driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for

  17. Observed spectral energy distribution of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guo; Wang, Hongchi; Nikolov, Nikolay; Seemann, Ulf; Henning, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We aim to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) for the emission from the dayside atmosphere of the hot Jupiter WASP-46b and to investigate its energy budget. We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-46b simultaneously in the g'r'i'z'JHK bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2m telescope. Eclipse depths of the acquired light curves were derived to infer the brightness temperatures at multibands that cover the SED peak. We report the first detection of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b in the K band at 4.2-sigma level and tentative detections in the H (2.5-sigma) and J (2.3-sigma) bands, with flux ratios of 0.253 +0.063/-0.060%, 0.194 +/- 0.078%, and 0.129 +/- 0.055%, respectively. The derived brightness temperatures (2306 +177/-187K, 2462 +245/-302K, and 2453 +198/-258K, respectively) are consistent with an isothermal temperature profile of 2386K, which is significantly higher than the dayside-averaged equilibrium temperature, indicative of very poor heat redistribution eff...

  18. Energy gain and spectral tailoring of ion beams using ultra-high intensity laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Swantusch, Marco; Cerchez, Mirela; Spickermann, Sven; Auorand, Bastian; Wowra, Thomas; Boeker, Juergen; Willi, Oswald

    2015-11-01

    The field of laser driven ion acceleration over the past decade has produced a huge amount of research. Nowadays, several multi-beam facilities with high rep rate system, e.g. ELI, are being developed across the world for different kinds of experiments. The study of interaction dynamics of multiple beams possessing ultra-high intensity and ultra-short pulse duration is of vital importance. Here, we present the first experimental results on ion acceleration using two ultra-high intensity beams. Thanks to the unique capability of Arcturus laser at HHU Düsseldorf, two almost identical, independent beams in laser parameters such as intensity (>1020 W/cm2), pulse duration (30 fs) and contrast (>1010), could be accessed. Both beams are focused onto a 5 μm thin Ti target. While ensuring spatial overlap of the two beams, at relative temporal delay of ~ 50 ps (optimum delay), the proton and carbon ion energies were enhanced by factor of 1.5. Moreover, strong modulation in C4+ions near the high energy cut-off is observed later than the optimum delay for the proton enhancement. This offers controlled tailoring of the spectral content of heavy ions.

  19. Spectral heterogeneity and carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Hacking, Kirsty; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms produce a vast array of spectral forms of antenna pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar energy and also to adapt to growth under the variable environmental conditions of light intensity, temperature, and nutrient availability. This behavior is exemplified by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium that produces different types of LH2 light-harvesting complexes in response to variations in growth conditions. In the present work, three different spectral forms of LH2 from Alc. vinosum, B800-820, B800-840, and B800-850, were isolated, purified, and examined using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The pigment composition of the LH2 complexes was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and all were found to contain five carotenoids: lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin, spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, and rhodovibrin. Spectral reconstructions of the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra based on the pigment composition revealed significantly more spectral heterogeneity in these systems compared to LH2 complexes isolated from other species of purple bacteria. The data also revealed the individual carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiencies which were correlated with the kinetic data from the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic experiments. This series of LH2 complexes allows a systematic exploration of the factors that determine the spectral properties of the bound pigments and control the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer.

  20. Spectral Characterizations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometers using Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, K. Lee; Bitting, Herbert; Lee, Robert B., III; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) techniques are being used to characterize the relative spectral response, or sensitivity, of scanning thermistor bolometers in the infrared (IR) region (2 - >= 100-micrometers). The bolometers are being used in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. The CERES measurements are designed to provide precise, long term monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric radiation energy budget. The CERES instrument houses three bolometric radiometers, a total wavelength (0.3- >= 150-micrometers) sensor, a shortwave (0.3-5-micrometers) sensor, and an atmospheric window (8-12-micrometers) sensor. Accurate spectral characterization is necessary for determining filtered radiances for longwave radiometric calibrations. The CERES bolometers spectral response's are measured in the TRW FTS Vacuum Chamber Facility (FTS - VCF), which uses a FTS as the source and a cavity pyroelectric trap detector as the reference. The CERES bolometers and the cavity detector are contained in a vacuum chamber, while the FTS source is housed in a GN2 purged chamber. Due to the thermal time constant of the CERES bolometers, the FTS must be operated in a step mode. Data are acquired in 6 IR spectral bands covering the entire longwave IR region. In this paper, the TRW spectral calibration facility design and data measurement techniques are described. Two approaches are presented which convert the total channel FTS data into the final CERES spectral characterizations, producing the same calibration coefficients (within 0.1 percent). The resulting spectral response curves are shown, along with error sources in the two procedures. Finally, the impact of each spectral response curve on CERES data validation will be examined through analysis of filtered radiance values from various typical scene types.

  1. Numerical renormalization group calculation of near-gap peaks in spectral functions of the Anderson model with superconducting leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, T.; Weichselbaum, A.; von Delft, J.; Bulla, R.

    2008-07-01

    We use the numerical renormalization group method (NRG) to investigate a single-impurity Anderson model with a coupling of the impurity to a superconducting host. Analysis of the energy flow shows that, contrary to previous belief, NRG iterations can be performed up to a large number of sites, corresponding to energy differences far below the superconducting gap Δ. This allows us to calculate the impurity spectral function A(ω) very accurately for frequencies |ω|~Δ, and to resolve, in a certain parameter regime, sharp peaks in A(ω) close to the gap edge.

  2. Numerical renormalization group calculation of near-gap peaks in spectral functions of the Anderson model with superconducting leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, T; Weichselbaum, A; Delft, J von [Physics Department, Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Bulla, R [Theoretische Physik III, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)], E-mail: Theresa.Hecht@physik.uni-muenchen.de

    2008-07-09

    We use the numerical renormalization group method (NRG) to investigate a single-impurity Anderson model with a coupling of the impurity to a superconducting host. Analysis of the energy flow shows that, contrary to previous belief, NRG iterations can be performed up to a large number of sites, corresponding to energy differences far below the superconducting gap {delta}. This allows us to calculate the impurity spectral function A({omega}) very accurately for frequencies |{omega}|{approx}{delta}, and to resolve, in a certain parameter regime, sharp peaks in A({omega}) close to the gap edge.

  3. Use of Linear Spectral Mixture Model to Estimate Rice Planted Area Based on MODIS Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Wang; Satoshi Uchida

    2008-01-01

    MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Linear spectral mixture models are applied to MOIDS data for the sub-pixel classification of land covers. Shaoxing county of Zhejiang Province in China was chosen to be the study site and early rice was selected as the study crop. The derived proportions of land covers from MODIS pixel using linear spectral mixture models were compared with unsupervised classificat...

  4. MARS Spectral Imaging: From High-Energy Physics to a Biomedical Business

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract MARS spectral scanners provide colour X-Ray images. Current MARS pre-clinical scanners enable researchers and clinicians to measure biochemical and physiological processes in specimens, and animal models of disease. The scanners have developed from a 10 year scientific collaboration between New Zealand and CERN. In parallel a company, MARS Bioimaging Ltd, was founded to commercialise the technology by productising the scanner and selling it to biomedical users around the world. The New Zealand team is now more than 30 people including staff and students from the fields of physics, engineering, computing, maths, radiology, cardiology, biochemistry, oncology, and orthopaedics. Current work with pre-clinical scanners has concluded that the technology will be  useful in heart disease, stroke, arthritis, joint replacements, and cancer. In late 2014, the government announced funding for NZ to build a MARS scanner capable of imaging humans. Bio Professor Anthony Butler is a radiologist wit...

  5. Free energy topological expansion for the 2-matrix model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekhov, Leonid [Steklov Mathematical Institute, ITEP and Poncelet Laboratoire, Moscow (Russian Federation); Eynard, Bertrand [Service de Physique Theorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Orantin, Nicolas [Service de Physique Theorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    We compute the complete topological expansion of the formal hermitian two-matrix model. For this, we refine the previously formulated diagrammatic rules for computing the 1/N expansion of the nonmixed correlation functions and give a new formulation of the spectral curve. We extend these rules obtaining a closed formula for correlation functions in all orders of topological expansion. We then integrate it to obtain the free energy in terms of residues on the associated Riemann surface.

  6. Ekman layers in the Southern Ocean: spectral models and observations, vertical viscosity and boundary layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Elipot

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectral characteristics of the oceanic boundary-layer response to wind stress forcing are assessed by comparing surface drifter observations from the Southern Ocean to a suite of idealized models that parameterize the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using a first-order turbulence closure scheme. The models vary in their representation of vertical viscosity and boundary conditions. Each is used to derive a theoretical transfer function for the spectral linear response of the ocean to wind stress.

    The transfer functions are evaluated using observational data. The ageostrophic component of near-surface velocity is computed by subtracting altimeter-derived geostrophic velocities from observed drifter velocities (nominally drogued to represent motions at 15-m depth. Then the transfer function is computed to link these ageostrophic velocities to observed wind stresses. The traditional Ekman model, with infinite depth and constant vertical viscosity is among the worst of the models considered in this study. The model that most successfully describes the variability in the drifter data has a shallow layer of depth O(30–50 m, in which the viscosity is constant and O(100–1000 m2 s−1, with a no-slip bottom boundary condition. The second best model has a vertical viscosity with a surface value O(200 m2 s−1, which increases linearly with depth at a rate O(0.1–1 cm s−1 and a no-slip boundary condition at the base of the boundary layer of depth O(103m. The best model shows little latitudinal or seasonal variability, and there is no obvious link to wind stress or climatological mixed-layer depth. In contrast, in the second best model, the linear coefficient and the boundary layer depth seem to covary with wind stress. The depth of the boundary layer for this model is found to be unphysically large at some latitudes and seasons, possibly a consequence of the inability of

  7. An element by element spectral element method for elastic wave modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Weijun; WANG Xiuming; ZHANG Hailan

    2006-01-01

    The spectral element method which combines the advantages of spectral method with those of finite element method,provides an efficient tool in simulating elastic wave equation in complex medium. Based on weak form of elastodynamic equations, mathematical formulations for Legendre spectral element method are presented. The wave field on an element is discretized using high-order Lagrange interpolation, and integration over the element is accomplished based upon the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre integration rule. This results in a diagonal mass matrix which leads to a greatly simplified algorithm. In addition, the element by element technique is introduced in our method to reduce the memory sizes and improve the computation efficiency. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the spectral accuracy and the efficiency. Because of combinations of the finite element scheme and spectral algorithms, this method can be used for complex models, including free surface boundaries and strong heterogeneity.

  8. A Fully Bayesian Method for Jointly Fitting Instrumental Calibration and X-Ray Spectral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Connors, Alanna; Drake, Jeremy; Meng, Xiao-Li; Ratzlaff, Pete; Yu, Yaming

    2014-10-01

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is "pragmatic" in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  9. A fully Bayesian method for jointly fitting instrumental calibration and X-ray spectral models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jin; Yu, Yaming [Department of Statistics, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-1250 (United States); Van Dyk, David A. [Statistics Section, Imperial College London, Huxley Building, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Drake, Jeremy; Ratzlaff, Pete [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Connors, Alanna; Meng, Xiao-Li, E-mail: jinx@uci.edu, E-mail: yamingy@ics.uci.edu, E-mail: dvandyk@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: pratzlaff@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: meng@stat.harvard.edu [Department of Statistics, Harvard University, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Owing to a lack of robust principled methods, systematic instrumental uncertainties have generally been ignored in astrophysical data analysis despite wide recognition of the importance of including them. Ignoring calibration uncertainty can cause bias in the estimation of source model parameters and can lead to underestimation of the variance of these estimates. We previously introduced a pragmatic Bayesian method to address this problem. The method is 'pragmatic' in that it introduced an ad hoc technique that simplified computation by neglecting the potential information in the data for narrowing the uncertainty for the calibration product. Following that work, we use a principal component analysis to efficiently represent the uncertainty of the effective area of an X-ray (or γ-ray) telescope. Here, however, we leverage this representation to enable a principled, fully Bayesian method that coherently accounts for the calibration uncertainty in high-energy spectral analysis. In this setting, the method is compared with standard analysis techniques and the pragmatic Bayesian method. The advantage of the fully Bayesian method is that it allows the data to provide information not only for estimation of the source parameters but also for the calibration product—here the effective area, conditional on the adopted spectral model. In this way, it can yield more accurate and efficient estimates of the source parameters along with valid estimates of their uncertainty. Provided that the source spectrum can be accurately described by a parameterized model, this method allows rigorous inference about the effective area by quantifying which possible curves are most consistent with the data.

  10. Data Field Modeling and Spectral-Spatial Feature Fusion for Hyperspectral Data Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Li, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Classification is a significant subject in hyperspectral remote sensing image processing. This study proposes a spectral-spatial feature fusion algorithm for the classification of hyperspectral images (HSI). Unlike existing spectral-spatial classification methods, the influences and interactions of the surroundings on each measured pixel were taken into consideration in this paper. Data field theory was employed as the mathematical realization of the field theory concept in physics, and both the spectral and spatial domains of HSI were considered as data fields. Therefore, the inherent dependency of interacting pixels was modeled. Using data field modeling, spatial and spectral features were transformed into a unified radiation form and further fused into a new feature by using a linear model. In contrast to the current spectral-spatial classification methods, which usually simply stack spectral and spatial features together, the proposed method builds the inner connection between the spectral and spatial features, and explores the hidden information that contributed to classification. Therefore, new information is included for classification. The final classification result was obtained using a random forest (RF) classifier. The proposed method was tested with the University of Pavia and Indian Pines, two well-known standard hyperspectral datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has higher classification accuracies than those obtained by the traditional approaches. PMID:27999259

  11. Data Field Modeling and Spectral-Spatial Feature Fusion for Hyperspectral Data Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da; Li, Jianxun

    2016-12-16

    Classification is a significant subject in hyperspectral remote sensing image processing. This study proposes a spectral-spatial feature fusion algorithm for the classification of hyperspectral images (HSI). Unlike existing spectral-spatial classification methods, the influences and interactions of the surroundings on each measured pixel were taken into consideration in this paper. Data field theory was employed as the mathematical realization of the field theory concept in physics, and both the spectral and spatial domains of HSI were considered as data fields. Therefore, the inherent dependency of interacting pixels was modeled. Using data field modeling, spatial and spectral features were transformed into a unified radiation form and further fused into a new feature by using a linear model. In contrast to the current spectral-spatial classification methods, which usually simply stack spectral and spatial features together, the proposed method builds the inner connection between the spectral and spatial features, and explores the hidden information that contributed to classification. Therefore, new information is included for classification. The final classification result was obtained using a random forest (RF) classifier. The proposed method was tested with the University of Pavia and Indian Pines, two well-known standard hyperspectral datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method has higher classification accuracies than those obtained by the traditional approaches.

  12. Evaluating energy efficiency policies with energy-economy models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mundaca, L.; Neij, L.; Worrell, E.; McNeil, M.

    2010-01-01

    The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems, and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyz

  13. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysias energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining) through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors). The integration to the economic sectors is done exogene...

  14. Evaluating Energy Efficiency Policies with Energy-Economy Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mundaca, Luis; Neij, Lena; Worrell, Ernst; McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-08-01

    The growing complexities of energy systems, environmental problems and technology markets are driving and testing most energy-economy models to their limits. To further advance bottom-up models from a multidisciplinary energy efficiency policy evaluation perspective, we review and critically analyse bottom-up energy-economy models and corresponding evaluation studies on energy efficiency policies to induce technological change. We use the household sector as a case study. Our analysis focuses on decision frameworks for technology choice, type of evaluation being carried out, treatment of market and behavioural failures, evaluated policy instruments, and key determinants used to mimic policy instruments. Although the review confirms criticism related to energy-economy models (e.g. unrealistic representation of decision-making by consumers when choosing technologies), they provide valuable guidance for policy evaluation related to energy efficiency. Different areas to further advance models remain open, particularly related to modelling issues, techno-economic and environmental aspects, behavioural determinants, and policy considerations.

  15. Reaching the Peak of the quasar spectral energy distribution - II. Exploring the accretion disc, dusty torus and host galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, James S; Landt, Hermine; Done, Chris; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    We continue our study of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 11 AGN at 1.5 < z < 2.2, with optical-NIR spectra, X-ray data and mid-IR photometry. In a previous paper we presented the observations and models; in this paper we explore the parameter space of these models. We first quantify uncertainties on the black hole masses (M$_{\\rm BH}$) and degeneracies between SED parameters. The effect of BH spin is tested, and we find that while low to moderate spin values (a$_*$ $\\leq$ 0.9) are compatible with the data in all cases, maximal spin (a$_*$ = 0.998) can only describe the data if the accretion disc is face-on. The outer accretion disc radii are well constrained in 8/11 objects, and are found to be a factor ~5 smaller than the self-gravity radii. We then extend our modelling campaign into the mid-IR regime with WISE photometry, adding components for the host galaxy and dusty torus. Our estimates of the host galaxy luminosities are consistent with the M$_{\\rm BH}$-bulge relationship, and the meas...

  16. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests E Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. E, Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  17. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  18. The quantum-chemical modeling of structure and spectral characteristics for molecular complexes in system «penton-terlon»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Tokar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The structure and spectral properties for molecular complexes, which formed by added monomer form of pentaplast as well as N-phenylbenzamide with some species of intermolecular interaction in system «penton-terlon» have been investigated at ab initio level of theory. It is shown, that the main contribution in total energy of molecules have included by dispersion forces, which realized between Chlorine atom of CH2Cl-group and Hydrogen atoms of benzene rings with amide fragment. The proposed theoretical models are validated in reflection of spectral and energetic characteristics of investigating system. Finally, the results of calculations are in good agreement with that data, which have been obtained for such type modeling previously.

  19. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  20. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  1. Modelling distributed energy resources in energy service networks

    CERN Document Server

    Acha, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Focuses on modelling two key infrastructures (natural gas and electrical) in urban energy systems with embedded technologies (cogeneration and electric vehicles) to optimise the operation of natural gas and electrical infrastructures under the presence of distributed energy resources

  2. Application of the quasi-spectral density function of (15)N nuclei to the selection of a motional model for model-free analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, R; Yamasaki, K; Nagayama, K

    1995-12-01

    Parameters used in model-free analysis were related to simulated spectral density functions in a frequency region experimentally obtained by quasi-spectral density function analysis of (15)N nuclei. Five kinds of motional models used in recent model-free analyses were characterized by a simple classification of the experimental spectral density function. We demonstrate advantages and limitations of each of the motional models. To verify the character of the models, model selection using experimental spectral density functions was examined.

  3. Simultaneous Observations of PKS 2155--304 with H.E.S.S., Fermi, RXTE and ATOM: Spectral Energy Distributions and Variability in a Low State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aharonian, F.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Dublin Inst.; Akhperjanian, A.G.; /Yerevan Phys. Inst.; Anton, G.; /Erlangen - Nuremberg U.; Barres de Almeida, U.; /Durham U.; Bazer-Bachi, A.R.; /Toulouse, CESR; Becherini, Y.; /APC, Paris; Behera, B.; /Heidelberg Observ.; Bernlohr, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Humboldt U., Berlin; Boisson, C.; /LUTH, Meudon; Bochow, A.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Borrel, V.; /Toulouse, CESR; Brion, E.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Brucker, J.; /Erlangen - Nuremberg U.; Brun, P.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Buhler, R.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Bulik, T.; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Busching, I.; /Western Ontario U.; Boutelier, T.; /Grenoble Observ.; Chadwick, P.M.; /Durham U.; Charbonnier, A.; /Paris U., VI-VII; Chaves, R.C.G.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Durham U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Annecy, LAPP /Humboldt U., Berlin /Durham U. /Namibia U. /Western Ontario U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Durham U. /APC, Paris /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Dublin Inst. /Annecy, LAPP /Grenoble Observ. /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr. /Cracow, INP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Heidelberg Observ. /APC, Paris /Montpellier U. /Montpellier U. /Montpellier U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Ecole Polytechnique /Humboldt U., Berlin /Dublin Inst. /Montpellier U. /APC, Paris /SLAC; /more authors..

    2009-05-07

    We report on the first simultaneous observations that cover the optical, X-ray, and high-energy gamma-ray bands of the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304. The gamma-ray bands were observed for 11 days, between 2008 August 25 and 2008 September 6 (MJD 54704-54715), jointly with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the HESS atmospheric Cherenkov array, providing the first simultaneous MeV-TeV spectral energy distribution (SED) with the new generation of {gamma}-ray telescopes. The ATOM telescope and the RXTE and Swift observatories provided optical and X-ray coverage of the low-energy component over the same time period. The object was close to the lowest archival X-ray and very high energy (VHE; >100 GeV) state, whereas the optical flux was much higher. The light curves show relatively little ({approx}30%) variability overall when compared to past flaring episodes, but we find a clear optical/VHE correlation and evidence for a correlation of the X-rays with the high-energy spectral index. Contrary to previous observations in the flaring state, we do not find any correlation between the X-ray and VHE components. Although synchrotron self-Compton models are often invoked to explain the SEDs of BL Lac objects, the most common versions of these models are at odds with the correlated variability we find in the various bands for PKS 2155-304.

  4. Application of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in differential diagnosis of bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Anliang; Liu, Ailian; Liu, Jinghong; Tian, Shifeng; Wang, Heqing; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the clinical value of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in the differential diagnosis between bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We retrospectively analyzed images of 118 patients who received pelvic dual-energy spectral CT imaging. These patients were later confirmed to have bladder cancer in 61 patients and BPH in 57 patients. CT values of the 2 lesion types from 40 to 140 keV were measured from the monochromatic spectral CT image to generate spectral HU curves. The slope of the spectral curve and the lesion effective atomic number were calculated. The measured parameters were analyzed with independent-sample Mann-Whitney U test. There was a statistically significant difference in CT value between the 2 groups from 40 to 90 keV, with the biggest difference at 40 keV (median and interquartile range: 83.3 HU and 22.9 HU vs 60.6 HU and 16.7 HU, Z = 5.932, P benign prostate hyperplasia. PMID:28033269

  5. Modeling energy transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattamatta, Arvind

    Heat transfer in nanostructures differ significantly from that in the bulk materials since the characteristic length scales associated with heat carriers, i.e., the mean free path and the wavelength, are comparable to the characteristic length of the nanostructures. Nanostructure materials hold the promise of novel phenomena, properties, and functions in the areas of thermal management and energy conversion. Example of thermal management in micro/nano electronic devices is the use of efficient nanostructured materials to alleviate 'hot spots' in integrated circuits. Examples in the manipulation of heat flow and energy conversion include nanostructures for thermoelectric energy conversion, thermophotovoltaic power generation, and data storage. One of the major challenges in Metal-Oxide Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices is to study the 'hot spot' generation by accurately modeling the carrier-optical phonon-acoustic phonon interactions. Prediction of hotspot temperature and position in MOSFET devices is necessary for improving thermal design and reliability of micro/nano electronic devices. Thermoelectric properties are among the properties that may drastically change at nanoscale. The efficiency of thermoelectric energy conversion in a material is measured by a non-dimensional figure of merit (ZT) defined as, ZT = sigmaS2T/k where sigma is the electrical conductivity, S is the Seebeck coefficient, T is the temperature, and k is the thermal conductivity. During the last decade, advances have been made in increasing ZT using nanostructures. Three important topics are studied with respect to energy transport in nanostructure materials for micro/nano electronic and thermoelectric applications; (1) the role of nanocomposites in improving the thermal efficiency of thermoelectric devices, (2) the interfacial thermal resistance for the semiconductor/metal contacts in thermoelectric devices and for metallic interconnects in micro/nano electronic devices, (3) the

  6. The nature of massive black hole binary candidates: II. Spectral energy distribution atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Lusso, Elisabeta; Dotti, Massimo; Montuori, Carmen; Hogg, David W; Tsalmantza, Paraskevi; Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, Jason X

    2014-01-01

    Recoiling supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are considered one plausible physical mechanism to explain high velocity shifts between narrow and broad emission lines sometimes observed in quasar spectra. If the sphere of influence of the recoiling SMBH is such that only the accretion disc is bound, the dusty torus would be left behind, hence the SED should then present distinctive features (i.e. a mid-infrared deficit). Here we present results from fitting the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of 32 Type-1 AGN with high velocity shifts between broad and narrow lines. The aim is to find peculiar properties in the multi-wavelength SEDs of such objects by comparing their physical parameters (torus and disc luminosity, intrinsic reddening, and size of the 12$\\mu$m emitter) with those estimated from a control sample of $\\sim1000$ \\emph{typical} quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in the same redshift range. We find that all sources, with the possible exception of J1154+0134, analysed here present a ...

  7. The spectral energy distribution of the central parsec-scaled region of AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, M A; Beckert, T; Tristram, K R W; Neumayer, N; Fernández, J A; Acosta, J; Beckert, Th.

    2007-01-01

    Genuine spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the central few parsec of the nearest and brightest active galaxies in the Southern Hemisphere are presented. They are compiled from very high spatial resolution observations in the radio (VLBA), the infrared (using adaptive optics and interferometry) and the optical (HST). The SEDs are characterized by two main emission bumps peaking in the X-rays and in the infrared respectively, as it is known from optically obscured galactic nuclei. Yet, the SED shape of the IR largely departs from the one derived from large aperture data. It reveals two new features: (1) a very sharp decay at wavelengths shortward of 2 $\\mu$m, plausibly a consequence of the heavy extinction towards the core region and (2) a flattening in the 10-20 $\\mu$m range as well as a downturn toward longer wavelengths. Accordingly, the true bolometric luminosity of these core regions turns out to be about an order of magnitude lower than previously estimated on the basis of IRAS/ISO data. These findin...

  8. Decomposing Dusty Galaxies. I. Multi-Component Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, J A; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Spoon, H W W; Bernard-Salas, J; Houck, J R

    2007-01-01

    We present a new multi-component spectral energy distribution (SED) decomposition method and use it to analyze the ultraviolet to millimeter wavelength SEDs of a sample of dusty infrared-luminous galaxies. SEDs are constructed from spectroscopic and photometric data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, in conjunction with photometry from the literature. Each SED is decomposed into emission from populations of stars, an AGN accretion disk, PAHs, atomic and molecular lines, and distributions of graphite and silicate grains. Decompositions of the SEDs of the template starburst galaxies NGC7714 and NGC2623 and the template AGNs PG0804+761 and Mrk463 provide baseline properties to aid in quantifying the strength of star-formation and accretion in the composite systems NGC6240 and Mrk1014. We find that obscured radiation from stars is capable of powering the total dust emission from NGC6240, although we cannot rule out a contribution from a deeply embedded AGN visible only in X-rays. The decomposition of Mrk1...

  9. Energy Efficiency - Spectral Efficiency Trade-off: A Multiobjective Optimization Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Osama

    2015-04-23

    In this paper, we consider the resource allocation problem for energy efficiency (EE) - spectral efficiency (SE) trade-off. Unlike traditional research that uses the EE as an objective function and imposes constraints either on the SE or achievable rate, we propound a multiobjective optimization approach that can flexibly switch between the EE and SE functions or change the priority level of each function using a trade-off parameter. Our dynamic approach is more tractable than the conventional approaches and more convenient to realistic communication applications and scenarios. We prove that the multiobjective optimization of the EE and SE is equivalent to a simple problem that maximizes the achievable rate/SE and minimizes the total power consumption. Then we apply the generalized framework of the resource allocation for the EE-SE trade-off to optimally allocate the subcarriers’ power for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with imperfect channel estimation. Finally, we use numerical results to discuss the choice of the trade-off parameter and study the effect of the estimation error, transmission power budget and channel-to-noise ratio on the multiobjective optimization.

  10. The UV to FIR spectral energy distribution of star-forming galaxies in the redshift desert

    CERN Document Server

    Oteo, I; Magdis, G; Pérez-García, A M; Cepa, J; Cedrés, B; Sánchez, H Domínguez; Ederoclite, A; Sánchez-Portal, M; Pérez-Martínez, R; Pintos-Castro, I; Polednikova, J

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the rest-frame UV-to-near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), star-forming (SF) BzK (sBzK), and UV-selected galaxies at 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the COSMOS, GOODS-North, and GOODS-South fields. Additionally, we complement the multi-wavelength coverage of the galaxies located in GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields with deep FIR data taken within the framework of the GOODS-Herschel project. According to their best-fitted SED-derived properties we find that, due to their selection criterion involving UV measurements, LBGs tend to be UV-brighter, bluer, have less prominent Balmer break (are younger), and have higher dust-corrected total SFR than sBzK galaxies. In a color versus stellar mass diagram, LBGs at z ~ 2 tend to be mostly located over the blue cloud of galaxies at their redshift, although galaxies with older ages, higher dust attenuation, and redder UV continuum slope deviate to the green valley and red sequence. We find PACS (100um or 160um) individual detection...

  11. CO Spectral Line Energy Distributions in Galactic Sources: Empirical Interpretation of Extragalactic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indriolo, Nick; Bergin, E. A.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Gerin, M.; Gusdorf, A.; Lis, D. C.; Schilke, P.

    2017-02-01

    The relative populations in rotational transitions of CO can be useful for inferring gas conditions and excitation mechanisms at work in the interstellar medium. We present CO emission lines from rotational transitions observed with Herschel/HIFI in the star-forming cores Orion S, Orion KL, Sgr B2(M), and W49N. Integrated line fluxes from these observations are combined with those from Herschel/PACS observations of the same sources to construct CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) from 5 ≤ J u ≤ 48. These CO SLEDs are compared to those reported in other galaxies, with the intention of empirically determining which mechanisms dominate excitation in such systems. We find that CO SLEDs in Galactic star-forming cores cannot be used to reproduce those observed in other galaxies, although the discrepancies arise primarily as a result of beam filling factors. The much larger regions sampled by the Herschel beams at distances of several megaparsecs contain significant amounts of cooler gas, which dominate the extragalactic CO SLEDs, in contrast to observations of Galactic star-forming regions, which are focused specifically on cores containing primarily hot molecular gas. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. What shapes the far-infrared spectral energy distributions of galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Ferguson, Henry C; Somerville, Rachel S

    2015-01-01

    To explore the connection between the global physical properties of galaxies and their far-infrared (FIR) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), we study the variation in the FIR SEDs of a set of hydrodynamically simulated galaxies that are generated by performing dust radiative transfer in post-processing. Our sample includes both isolated and merging systems at various stages of the merging process and covers infrared (IR) luminosities and dust masses that are representative of both low- and high-redshift galaxies. We study the FIR SEDs using principle component analysis (PCA) and find that 97\\% of the variance in the sample can be explained by two principle components (PCs). The first PC characterizes the wavelength of the peak of the FIR SED, and the second encodes the breadth of the SED. We find that the coefficients of both PCs can be predicted well using a double power law in terms of the IR luminosity and dust mass, which suggests that these two physical properties are the primary determinants of galax...

  13. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGN in XMM-COSMOS Survey II - Shape Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Heng; Civano, Francesca; Zamorani, Gianni; Ho, Luis C; Comastri, Andrea; Bongiorno, Angela; Merloni, Andrea; Brusa, Marcella; Trump, Jonathan R; Salvato, Mara; Impey, Chris D; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Celotti, Annalisa; Jahnke, Knud; Vignali, Cristian; Silverman, John D; Urry, C Megan; Schawinski, Kevin; Capak, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The near-infrared to optical-ultraviolet (0.1 -- 10 $\\mu m$) spectral energy distribution (SED) shapes of 407 X-ray-selected radio-quiet type 1 AGN in the wide-field "Cosmic Evolution Survey" (COSMOS) have been studied for signs of evolution. For a sub-sample of 200 radio-quiet quasars with black hole mass estimation and host galaxy correction, we study the mean SEDs as a function of a broad range of redshift, bolometric luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio, and compare them with the Elvis et al. (1994, E94) type 1 AGN mean SED. The mean SEDs in each bin are very similar to each other, showing no evidence of dependence on any of the analyzed parameters. We also checked the SED dispersion as a function of these four parameters, and found no significant dependance. The dispersion of the XMM-COSMOS SEDs is generally larger than E94 SED dispersion in the ultraviolet, which might be largely due to the broader "window function" for COSMOS quasars, and the X-ray based selection technique.

  14. Radio Through X-ray Spectral Energy Distributions of 38 Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Gallagher, S C; Brandt, W N; Egami, E; Hines, D C; Priddey, R S

    2007-01-01

    We have compiled the largest sample of multiwavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars to date, from the radio to the X-ray. We present new Spitzer MIPS (24, 70, and 160 micron) observations of 38 BAL quasars in addition to data from the literature and public archives. In general, the mid-infrared properties of BAL quasars are consistent with those of non-BAL quasars of comparable luminosity. In particular, the optical-to-mid-infrared luminosity ratios of the two populations are indistinguishable. We also measure or place upper limits on the contribution of star formation to the far-infrared power. Of 22 (57%) upper limits, seven quasars have sufficiently sensitive constraints to conclude that star formation likely contributes little (<20%) to their far-infrared power. The 17 BAL quasars (45%) with detected excess far-infrared emission likely host hyperluminous starbursts with L_fir,SF=10^{13-14} L_sun. Mid-infrared through X-ray composite BAL quasar SEDs are pre...

  15. Panchromatic Spectral Energy Distributions of simulated galaxies: results at redshift $z=0$

    CERN Document Server

    Goz, David; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Obreja, Aura; Annunziatella, Marianna; Tescari, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    We present predictions of Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), from the UV to the FIR, of simulated galaxies at $z=0$. These were obtained by post-processing the results of an N-body+hydro simulation of a small cosmological volume, that uses the Multi-Phase Particle Integrator (MUPPI) for star formation and stellar feedback, with the GRASIL-3D radiative transfer code, that includes reprocessing of UV light by dust. Physical properties of galaxies resemble observed ones, though with some tension at small and large stellar masses. Comparing predicted SEDs of simulated galaxies with different samples of local galaxies, we find that these resemble observed ones, when normalised at 3.6 $\\mu$m. A comparison with the Herschel Reference Survey shows that, when binning galaxies in Star Formation Rate (SFR), average SEDs are reproduced to within a factor of $\\sim2$ even in normalization, while binning in stellar mass highlights the same tension that is present in the stellar mass -- SFR plane. We use our sample to inv...

  16. Resource allocation for phantom cellular networks: Energy efficiency vs spectral efficiency

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelhady, Amr M.

    2016-07-26

    Multi-tier heterogeneous networks have become an essential constituent for next generation cellular networks. Mean-while, energy efficiency (EE) has been considered a critical design criterion along with the traditional spectral efficiency (SE) metric. In this context, we study power and spectrum allocation for the recently proposed two-tier network architecture known as phantom cellular networks. The optimization framework includes both EE and SE, where we propose an algorithm that finds the SE and EE resource allocation strategies for phantom cellular networks. Then, we compare the performance of both design strategies versus the number of users, and phantom cells share of the total number of available resource blocks. We aim to investigate the effect of some system parameters to achieve improved SE performance at a non-significant loss in EE performance, or vice versa. It was found that increasing phantom cells share of resource blocks decreases the SE performance loss due to EE optimization when compared with the optimized SE performance. © 2016 IEEE.

  17. Self-consistent Spectral Functions in the $O(N)$ Model from the FRG

    CERN Document Server

    Strodthoff, Nils

    2016-01-01

    We present the first self-consistent direct calculation of a spectral function in the framework of the Functional Renormalization Group. The study is carried out in the relativistic $O(N)$ model, where the full momentum dependence of the propagators in the complex plane as well as momentum-dependent vertices are considered. The analysis is supplemented by a comparative study of the Euclidean momentum dependence and of the complex momentum dependence on the level of spectral functions. This work lays the groundwork for the computation of full spectral functions in more complex systems.

  18. Spectral Running and Non-Gaussianity from Slow-Roll Inflation in Generalised Two--Field Models

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Ki-Young; van de Bruck, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Theories beyond the standard model such as string theory motivate low energy effective field theories with several scalar fields which are not only coupled through a potential but also through their kinetic terms. For such theories we derive the general formulae for the running of the spectral indices for the adiabatic, isocurvature and correlation spectra in the case of two field inflation. We also compute the expected non-Gaussianity in such models for specific forms of the potentials. We find that the coupling has little impact on the level of non-Gaussianity during inflation.

  19. Unsupervised Segmentation of Spectral Images with a Spatialized Gaussian Mixture Model and Model Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen S.X.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe a novel unsupervised spectral image segmentation algorithm. This algorithm extends the classical Gaussian Mixture Model-based unsupervised classification technique by incorporating a spatial flavor into the model: the spectra are modelized by a mixture of K classes, each with a Gaussian distribution, whose mixing proportions depend on the position. Using a piecewise constant structure for those mixing proportions, we are able to construct a penalized maximum likelihood procedure that estimates the optimal partition as well as all the other parameters, including the number of classes. We provide a theoretical guarantee for this estimation, even when the generating model is not within the tested set, and describe an efficient implementation. Finally, we conduct some numerical experiments of unsupervised segmentation from a real dataset.

  20. Hyperspectral unmixing with spectral variability using a perturbed linear mixing model

    CERN Document Server

    Thouvenin, Pierre-Antoine; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Given a mixed hyperspectral data set, linear unmixing aims at estimating the reference spectral signatures composing the data - referred to as endmembers - their abundance fractions and their number. In practice, the identified endmembers can vary spectrally within a given image and can thus be construed as variable instances of reference endmembers. Ignoring this variability induces estimation errors that are propagated into the unmixing procedure. To address this issue, endmember variability estimation consists of estimating the reference spectral signatures from which the estimated endmembers have been derived as well as their variability with respect to these references. This paper introduces a new linear mixing model that explicitly accounts for spatial and spectral endmember variabilities. The parameters of this model can be estimated using an optimization algorithm based on the alternating direction method of multipliers. The performance of the proposed unmixing method is evaluated on synthetic and rea...

  1. ISM Properties in Low-Metallicity Environments III. The Dust Spectral Energy Distributions of II Zw 40, He 2-10 and NGC 1140

    CERN Document Server

    Galliano, F; Jones, A P; Wilson, C D; Bernard, J P

    2005-01-01

    We present new 450 and 850 micron SCUBA data and 1.3 mm MAMBO data of the dwarf galaxies II Zw 40, He 2-10 and NGC 1140. Additional ISOCAM, IRAS as well as ground based data are used to construct the observed mid-infrared to millimeter spectral energy distribution of these galaxies. These spectral energy distributions are modeled in a self-consistent way, as was achieved with NGC 1569 (Galliano et al., 2003), synthesizing both the global stellar radiation field and the dust emission, with further constraints provided by the photoionisation of the gas. Our study shows that low-metallicity galaxies have very different dust properties compared to the Galaxy. Our main results are: (i) a paucity of PAHs which are likely destroyed by the hard penetrating radiation field, (ii) a very small (3-4 nm) average size of grains, consistent with the fragmentation and erosion of dust particles by the numerous shocks, (iii) a significant millimetre excess in the dust spectral energy distribution which can be explained by the ...

  2. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Amarsi, Anish Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the abso- lute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional box-in-a-star model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI777nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  3. Explicit solvent model for spectral shift of acrolein and simulation with molecular dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Quan; LIU Jifeng; FU Kexiang; HAN Keli; LI Xiangyuan

    2006-01-01

    By introducing the concept of spring energy of permanent dipole and taking the conformations of solvent molecules into account, the formulas of electrostatic solvation energy in equilibrium and nonequilibrium are derived from the explicit solvent scheme, with the spatial distribution of the discrete permanent charges and induced dipoles of the solvent molecules involved. The energy change of solute due to the variation of wave function from the case of vacuum to that in solution is estimated by treating the solvent effect as external field in the iteration cycles of the self-consistent field. The expression for spectral shift is deduced and applied to the processes of light absorption and emission in solution. According to the new formulations, the averaged solvent electrostatic potential/molecular dynamics program is modified and adopted to investigate the equilibrium solvation energy of water molecule and spectral shift of acrolein.

  4. Reaching the peak of the quasar spectral energy distribution - II. Exploring the accretion disc, dusty torus and host galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, James S.; Ward, Martin J.; Landt, Hermine; Done, Chris; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan C.

    2017-02-01

    We continue our study of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 11 active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 1.5 maximal spin (a* = 0.998) can only describe the data if the accretion disc is face-on. The outer accretion disc radii are well constrained in 8/11 objects and are found to be a factor ˜5 smaller than the self-gravity radii. We then extend our modelling campaign into the mid-IR regime with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry, adding components for the host galaxy and dusty torus. Our estimates of the host galaxy luminosities are consistent with the MBH-bulge relationship, and the measured torus properties (covering factor and temperature) are in agreement with earlier work, suggesting a predominantly silicate-based grain composition. Finally, we deconvolve the optical-NIR spectra using our SED continuum model. We claim that this is a more physically motivated approach than using empirical descriptions of the continuum such as broken power laws. For our small sample, we verify previously noted correlations between emission linewidths and luminosities commonly used for single-epoch MBH estimates, and observe a statistically significant anticorrelation between [O III] equivalent width and AGN luminosity.

  5. Non-LTE spectral models for the gaseous debris-disk component of Ton 345

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, S; Rauch, T; Werner, K

    2014-01-01

    For a fraction of single white dwarfs with debris disks, an additional gaseous disk was discovered. Both dust and gas are thought to be created by the disruption of planetary bodies. The composition of the extrasolar planetary material can directly be analyzed in the gaseous disk component, and the disk dynamics might be accessible by investigating the temporal behavior of the Ca II infrared emission triplet, hallmark of the gas disk. We obtained new optical spectra for the first helium-dominated white dwarf for which a gas disk was discovered (Ton 345) and modeled the non-LTE spectra of viscous gas disks composed of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, and calcium with chemical abundances typical for solar system asteroids. Iron and its possible line-blanketing effects on the model structure and spectral energy distribution was still neglected. A set of models with different radii, effective temperatures, and surface densities as well as chondritic and bulk-Earth abundances was computed and compared w...

  6. Effects of low-energy excitations on spectral properties at higher binding energy: the metal-insulator transition of VO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Matteo; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Reining, Lucia

    2015-03-20

    The effects of electron interaction on spectral properties can be understood in terms of coupling between excitations. In transition-metal oxides, the spectral function close to the Fermi level and low-energy excitations between d states have attracted particular attention. In this work we focus on photoemission spectra of vanadium dioxide over a wide (10 eV) range of binding energies. We show that there are clear signatures of the metal-insulator transition over the whole range due to a cross coupling of the delocalized s and p states with low-energy excitations between the localized d states. This coupling can be understood by advanced calculations based on many-body perturbation theory in the GW approximation. We also advocate the fact that tuning the photon energy up to the hard-x-ray range can help to distinguish fingerprints of correlation from pure band-structure effects.

  7. Testing spectral models for stellar populations with star clusters: I. Methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, Roberto Cid

    2009-01-01

    High resolution spectral models for simple stellar populations (SSP) developed in the past few years have become a standard ingredient in studies of stellar population of galaxies. As more such models become available, it becomes increasingly important to test them. In this and a companion paper, we test a suite of publicly available evolutionary synthesis models using integrated optical spectra in the blue-near-UV range of 27 well studied star clusters from the work of Leonardi & Rose (2003) spanning a wide range of ages and metallicities. Most (23) of the clusters are from the Magellanic clouds. This paper concentrates on methodological aspects of spectral fitting. The data are fitted with SSP spectral models from Vazdekis and collaborators, based on the MILES library. Best-fit and Bayesian estimates of age, metallicity and extinction are presented, and degeneracies between these parameters are mapped. We find that these models can match the observed spectra very well in most cases, with small formal un...

  8. Spectral energy distribution of M-subdwarfs: A study of their atmospheric properties

    CERN Document Server

    Rajpurohit, A S; Allard, F; Homeier, D; Bayo, A; Mousis, O; Rajpurohit, S; Fernandez-Trincado, J G

    2016-01-01

    Context. M-type subdwarfs are metal-poor low-mass stars and probe for the old populations in our Galaxy. Accurate knowledge of their atmospheric parameters and especially the composition is essential for understanding the chemical history of our Galaxy. Aims. The purpose of this work is to perform a detailed study of M-subdwarf spectra covering the full wavelength range from the optical to the near-infrared. It allows to do a more detailed analysis of the atmospheric composition in order to determine the stellar parameters, and to constrain the atmospheric models. The study will allow us to further understand physical and chemical processes such as increasing condensation of gas into dust, to point out the missing continuum opacities and see how the main band features are reproduced by the models. The spectral resolution and the large wavelength coverage used is a unique combination to constrain the process that occur in cool atmosphere. Methods. We obtained medium-resolution (R = 5000-7000) spectra over the ...

  9. HerMES: The Submillimeter Spectral Energy Distributions of Herschel/SPIRE-Detected Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, B; Clements, D L; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Auld, R; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Burgarella, D; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dwek, E; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Giovannoli, E; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Mortier, A M J; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Fournon, I Perez; Pohlen, M; Rangwala, N; Rawlings, J; Raymond, G; Rigopoulou, D; Rizzo, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Portal, M Sanchez; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valiante, E; Valtchanov, I; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2010-01-01

    We present colours of sources detected with the Herschel/SPIRE instrument in deep extragalactic surveys of the Lockman Hole, Spitzer-FLS, and GOODS-N fields in three photometric bands at 250, 350 and 500 micrometers. We compare these with expectations from the literature and discuss associated uncertainties and biases in the SPIRE data. We identify a 500 micrometer flux limited selection of sources from the HerMES point source catalogue that appears free from neighbouring/blended sources in all three SPIRE bands. We compare the colours with redshift tracks of various contemporary models. Based on these spectral templates we show that regions corresponding to specific population types and redshifts can be identified better in colour-flux space. The redshift tracks as well as the colour-flux plots imply a majority of detected objects with redshifts at 1model SEDs used. We also find that a population of S_250/S_350<0.8 at fluxes above 50 mJy as observed by SPIR...

  10. Planetary model of sunspot emergence: A spectral and autocorrelation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Edmonds, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with intermediate range periodicity in the sunspot area spectrum. An empirical model of sunspot area emergence based on Mercury planet conjunctions was developed and the spectra of the model variation and the sunspot area variation compared. By including solar cycle amplitude modulation and the effect of solar magnetic field reversal the model was able to predict fine detail in the sunspot area spectrum. As Mercury planet conjunctions occur predictably it was possible to compare the time variation of band limited components of sunspot area with the corresponding component variations in the model. When the model component variation was stable corresponding components of sunspot area lagged the model variation by a few tens of days. When a 180 degree phase change occurred in the model variation the corresponding component of sunspot area followed the change over an interval of a few hundred days, first by decreasing to zero and then emerging in phase with the model variation. Where perio...

  11. Energy Blocks — A Physical Model for Teaching Energy Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Most physics educators would agree that energy is a very useful, albeit abstract topic. It is therefore important to use various methods to help the student internalize the concept of energy itself and its related ideas. These methods include using representations such as energy bar graphs, energy pie charts, or energy tracking diagrams. Activities and analogies like Energy Theater and Richard Feynman's blocks, as well as the popular money (or wealth) analogy, can also be very effective. The goal of this paper is to describe a physical model of Feynman's blocks that can be employed by instructors to help students learn the following energy-related concepts: 1. The factors affecting each individual mechanical energy storage mode (this refers to what has been traditionally called a form of energy, and while the Modeling Method of instruction is not the focus of this paper, much of the energy related language used is specific to the Modeling Method). For example, how mass or height affects gravitational energy; 2. Energy conservation; and 3. The graphical relationships between the energy storage mode and a factor affecting it. For example, the graphical relationship between elastic energy and the change in length of a spring.

  12. Models of interacting supernovae and their spectral diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Dessart, Luc; Audit, Edouard; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni

    2016-01-01

    Using radiation-hydrodynamics and radiative-transfer simulations, we explore the origin of the spectral diversity of interacting supernovae (SNe) of type IIn. We revisit SN1994W and investigate the dynamical configurations that can give rise to spectra with narrow lines at all times. We find that a standard ~10Msun 10^51erg SN ejecta ramming into a 0.4Msun dense CSM is inadequate for SN1994W, as it leads to the appearance of broad lines at late times. This structure, however, generates spectra that exhibit the key morphological changes seen in SN1998S. For SN1994W, we consider a completely different configuration, which involves the interaction at a large radius of a low mass inner shell with a high mass outer shell. Such a structure may arise in an 8-12Msun star from a nuclear flash (e.g., of Ne) followed within a few years by core collapse. Our simulations show that the large mass of the outer shell leads to the complete braking of the inner shell material, the formation of a slow dense shell, and the power...

  13. Graph theoretical analysis of the energy landscape of model polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiesi, Marco; Bongini, Lorenzo; Casetti, Lapo; Tattini, Lorenzo

    2009-07-01

    In systems characterized by a rough potential-energy landscape, local energetic minima and saddles define a network of metastable states whose topology strongly influences the dynamics. Changes in temperature, causing the merging and splitting of metastable states, have nontrivial effects on such networks and must be taken into account. We do this by means of a recently proposed renormalization procedure. This method is applied to analyze the topology of the network of metastable states for different polypeptidic sequences in a minimalistic polymer model. A smaller spectral dimension emerges as a hallmark of stability of the global energy minimum and highlights a nonobvious link between dynamic and thermodynamic properties.

  14. Dispersion model for optical thin films applicable in wide spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Ohlídal, Ivan; Giglia, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    In the optics industry thin film systems are used to construct various interference devices such as antireflective coatings, high-reflectance mirrors, beam splitters and filters. The optical characterization of complex optical systems can not be performed by measurements only in the short spectral range in which the interference devices will be employed because the measured data do not contain sufficient information about all relevant parameters of these systems. The characterization of film materials requires the extension of the spectral range of the measurements to the IR region containing phonon absorption and to the UV region containing the electronic excitations. However, this leads to necessity of a dispersion model suitable for the description of the dielectric response in the wide spectral range. Such model must respect the physical conditions following from theory of dispersion, particularly Kramers-Kronig relations and integrability imposed by sum rules. This work presents the construction of a universal dispersion model composed from individual contributions representing both electronic and phonon excitations. The efficiency of presented model is given by the fact that all the contributions are described by analytical expressions. It is shown that the model is suitable for precise modeling of spectral dependencies of optical constants of a broad class of materials used in the optical industry for thin film systems such as MgF2, SiO2, Al2O3, HfO2, Ta2O5 and TiO2 in the spectral range from far IR to vacuum UV.

  15. Spectral solution of urn models for interacting particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pickering, William

    2015-01-01

    Using generating function methods for diagonalizing the transition matrix in 2-Urn models, we provide a complete classification into solvable and unsolvable subclasses, with further division of the solvable models into the Martingale and non-Martingale subcategories, and prove that the stationary distribution is a Gaussian function in the latter. We also give a natural condition related to the symmetry of the random walk in which the non-Martingale Urn models lead to an increase in entropy from Gaussian states. Certain models of social opinion dynamics, treated as Urn models, do not increase in entropy, unlike isolated mechanical systems.

  16. Two sustainable energy system analysis models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Goran Krajacic, Neven Duic; da Graca Carvalho, Maria

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of two energy system analysis models both designed with the purpose of analysing electricity systems with a substantial share of fluctuating renewable energy.......This paper presents a comparative study of two energy system analysis models both designed with the purpose of analysing electricity systems with a substantial share of fluctuating renewable energy....

  17. Complex Evaluation Model of Corporate Energy Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ágnes Kádár Horváth

    2014-01-01

    With the ever increasing energy problems at the doorstep alongside with political, economic, social and environmental challenges, conscious energy management has become of increasing importance in corporate resource management. Rising energy costs, stricter environmental and climate regulations as well as considerable changes in the energy market require companies to rationalise their energy consumption and cut energy costs. This study presents a complex evaluation model of corporate energy m...

  18. Energy: modelization and econometrics. Proceedings of colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fericelli, J.; Lesourd, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The document presents the communications of the ''applied econometric association'' symposium and introduces the description of various French and foreigner models: analysis of the energy demand and production functions with energy input. A detailed evaluation of the Translog function applied to energy is described. Other energy economic aspects are approched: energy prices and costs, energetic balances, energy management in enterprises, impact evaluation of alternative energy policies.

  19. Spectral redistribution of energy and the origin of inverse cascade for gyrokinetics in the sub-Larmor range

    CERN Document Server

    Plunk, G G

    2010-01-01

    It is known that an inverse cascade of energy occurs in two-dimensional neutral fluid turbulence and also, under certain conditions, in magnetized plasma turbulence. The reason for this phenomenon in both cases is due to the existence of two quadratic invariants. The crucial feature of these invariants is that they are {\\em mutually-constraining} in the sense that the spectral redistribution of one is constrained by the other. The gyrokinetic equation, a kinetic equation for magnetized plasma dynamics, has two collisionless quadratic invariants when restricted to two dimensions (in position-space). In this paper, we consider the consequences of this fact for scales smaller than the thermal Larmor radius, where turbulent fluctuations exist, with equal importance, in the position and velocity space dependence of the kinetic distribution function. Using a spectral formalism for position and velocity space, we find that the gyrokinetic invariants are mutually constraining with respect to spectral redistribution o...

  20. Sandmeier model based topographic correction to lunar spectral profiler (SP) data from KAGUYA satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Bo; Wang, Jing-Ran; Guo, Peng-Ju; Wang, Ming-Chang

    2014-09-01

    The Moon may be considered as the frontier base for the deep space exploration. The spectral analysis is one of the key techniques to determine the lunar surface rock and mineral compositions. But the lunar topographic relief is more remarkable than that of the Earth. It is necessary to conduct the topographic correction for lunar spectral data before they are used to retrieve the compositions. In the present paper, a lunar Sandmeier model was proposed by considering the radiance effect from the macro and ambient topographic relief. And the reflectance correction model was also reduced based on the Sandmeier model. The Spectral Profile (SP) data from KAGUYA satellite in the Sinus Iridum quadrangle was taken as an example. And the digital elevation data from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter are used to calculate the slope, aspect, incidence and emergence angles, and terrain-viewing factor for the topographic correction Thus, the lunar surface reflectance from the SP data was corrected by the proposed model after the direct component of irradiance on a horizontal surface was derived. As a result, the high spectral reflectance facing the sun is decreased and low spectral reflectance back to the sun is compensated. The statistical histogram of reflectance-corrected pixel numbers presents Gaussian distribution Therefore, the model is robust to correct lunar topographic effect and estimate lunar surface reflectance.

  1. Consistent adjacency-spectral partitioning for the stochastic block model when the model parameters are unknown

    CERN Document Server

    Fishkind, Donniell E; Tang, Minh; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Priebe, Carey E

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic block model consists of a random partition of n vertices into blocks 1,2,...,K for which, conditioned on the partition, every pair of vertices has probability of adjacency entirely determined by the block membership of the two vertices. (The model parameters are K, the distribution of the random partition, and a communication probability matrix M in [0,1]^(K x K) listing the adjacency probabilities associated with all pairs of blocks.) Suppose a realization of the n x n vertex adjacency matrix is observed, but the underlying partition of the vertices into blocks is not observed; the main inferential task is to correctly partition the vertices into the blocks with only a negligible number of vertices misassigned. For this inferential task, Rohe et al. (2011) prove the consistency of spectral partitioning applied to the normalized Laplacian, and Sussman et al. (2011) extend this to prove consistency of spectral partitioning directly on the adjacency matrix; both procedures assume that K and rankM a...

  2. Spectral coherence model for power fluctuations in a wind farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigueras-Rodriguez, A.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Viedma, A.;

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a model for the coherence between wind speeds located in a horizontal plane corresponding to hub height of wind turbines in a large wind farm. The model has been developed using wind speed and power measurements from the 72 Wind Turbines and two of the meteorological masts from...

  3. A spectral directional reflectance model of row crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, F.J.; Gu, X.F.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, Q.; Yu, T.; Liu, Q.; Huang, H.A.; Qin, W.; Chen, Liangfu; Zhao, H.

    2010-01-01

    A computationally efficient reflectance model for row planted canopies is developed in this paper through separating the contributions of incident direct and diffuse radiation scattered by row canopies. The row model allows calculating the reflectance spectrum in any given direction for the optical

  4. A spectral directional reflectance model of row crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, F.J.; Gu, X.F.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, Q.; Yu, T.; Liu, Q.; Huang, H.A.; Qin, W.; Chen, Liangfu; Zhao, H.

    2010-01-01

    A computationally efficient reflectance model for row planted canopies is developed in this paper through separating the contributions of incident direct and diffuse radiation scattered by row canopies. The row model allows calculating the reflectance spectrum in any given direction for the optical

  5. Determination of the electron-hole pair creation energy for semiconductors from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes

    CERN Document Server

    Scholze, F; Kuschnerus, P; Rabus, H; Richter, M; Ulm, G

    2000-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can be detected by the measurement of the charge carriers produced in a detector. The improved semiconductor technology now allows detectors operating near the physical limits of the detector materials to be designed. The mean energy required for producing an electron-hole pair, W, is a material property of the semiconductor. Here, the determination of W from the spectral responsivity of photodiodes is demonstrated. Using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation, different types of semiconductor photodiodes have been examined in the UV-, VUV-, and soft X-ray spectral range. Their spectral responsivity was determined with relative uncertainties between 0.4% and 1% using a cryogenic electrical-substitution radiometer as primary detector standard. Results are presented for silicon n-on-p junction photodiodes and for GaAsP/Au Schottky diodes at room temperature. The investigations for silicon covered the complete spectral range from 3 to 1500 eV, yielding a constant value W=(3.66+-0.03) eV fo...

  6. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Gemstone Spectral Imaging: A Novel Technique to Determine Human Cardiac Calculus Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Ko, Shih-Chi; Huang, Pei-Jung; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the chemical composition of any calculus in different human organs is essential for choosing the best treatment strategy for patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of determining the chemical composition of a human cardiac calculus using gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) mode on a single-source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in vitro. The cardiac calculus was directly scanned on the Discovery CT750 HD FREEdom Edition using GSI mode, in vitro. A portable fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy was also applied to verify the quantitative accuracy of the DECT measurements. The results of spectral DECT measurements indicate that effective Z values in 3 designated positions located in this calculus were 15.02 to 15.47, which are close to values of 15.74 to 15.86, corresponding to the effective Z values of calcium apatite and hydroxyapatite. The Raman spectral data were also reflected by the predominant Raman peak at 960 cm for hydroxyapatite and the minor peak at 875 cm for calcium apatite. A potential single-source DECT with GSI mode was first used to examine the morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of a giant human cardiac calculus, in vitro. The CT results were consistent with the Raman spectral data, suggesting that spectral CT imaging techniques could be accurately used to diagnose and characterize the compositional materials in the cardiac calculus.

  7. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of simulated galaxies: results at redshift z = 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goz, David; Monaco, Pierluigi; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa; Obreja, Aura; Annunziatella, Marianna; Tescari, Edoardo

    2017-08-01

    We present predictions of spectral energy distributions (SEDs), from the UV to the FIR, of simulated galaxies at z = 0. These were obtained by post-processing the results of an N-body+hydro simulation of a cosmological box of side 25 Mpc, which uses the Multi-Phase Particle Integrator (MUPPI) for star formation and stellar feedback, with the grasil-3d radiative transfer code that includes reprocessing of UV light by dust. Physical properties of our sample of ˜500 galaxies resemble observed ones, though with some tension at small and large stellar masses. Comparing predicted SEDs of simulated galaxies with different samples of local galaxies, we find that these resemble observed ones, when normalized at 3.6 μm. A comparison with the Herschel Reference Survey shows that the average SEDs of galaxies, divided in bins of star formation rate (SFR), are reproduced in shape and absolute normalization to within a factor of ˜2, while average SEDs of galaxies divided in bins of stellar mass show tensions that are an effect of the difference of simulated and observed galaxies in the stellar mass-SFR plane. We use our sample to investigate the correlation of IR luminosity in Spitzer and Herschel bands with several galaxy properties. SFR is the quantity that best correlates with IR light up to 160 μm, while at longer wavelengths better correlations are found with molecular mass and, at 500 μm, with dust mass. However, using the position of the FIR peak as a proxy for cold dust temperature, we assess that heating of cold dust is mostly determined by SFR, with stellar mass giving only a minor contribution. We finally show how our sample of simulated galaxies can be used as a guide to understand the physical properties and selection biases of observed samples.

  8. Global energy modeling - A biophysical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Michael

    2010-09-15

    This paper contrasts the standard economic approach to energy modelling with energy models using a biophysical approach. Neither of these approaches includes changing energy-returns-on-investment (EROI) due to declining resource quality or the capital intensive nature of renewable energy sources. Both of these factors will become increasingly important in the future. An extension to the biophysical approach is outlined which encompasses a dynamic EROI function that explicitly incorporates technological learning. The model is used to explore several scenarios of long-term future energy supply especially concerning the global transition to renewable energy sources in the quest for a sustainable energy system.

  9. Spectral Problems for the Orientation-Free Discrete Kinetic Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱光华; 金燕芳; 方竞

    2002-01-01

    We present computations using orientation-free discrete velocity models for the dispersion relationship of ultrasound propagation in monatomic hard-sphere gases (or a type of gas composed of a system of vortices).Comparisons with previous verified fixed-orientation results for the propagation of the sound mode in rarefied gases show that, if collective excitations are considered, an orientation-free eight-velocity model can capture more physical insights. We also demonstrate the symmetry property of the spectra using the orientation-free eight-velocity model.

  10. Observed spectral energy distribution of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.; van Boekel, R.; Wang, H.; Nikolov, N.; Seemann, U.; Henning, Th.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We aim to construct a spectral energy distribution (SED) for the emission from the dayside atmosphere of the hot Jupiter WASP-46b and to investigate its energy budget. Methods: We observed a secondary eclipse of WASP-46b simultaneously in the g'r'i'z'JHK bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope. Eclipse depths of the acquired light curves were derived to infer the brightness temperatures at multibands that cover the SED peak. Results: We report the first detection of the thermal emission from the dayside of WASP-46b in the K band at 4.2σ level and tentative detections in the H (2.5σ) and J (2.3σ) bands, with flux ratios of 0.253 +0.063-0.060%, 0.194 ± 0.078%, and 0.129 ± 0.055%, respectively. The derived brightness temperatures (2306 +177-187 K, 2462 +245-302 K, and 2453 +198-258 K, respectively) are consistent with an isothermal temperature profile of 2386 K, which is significantly higher than the dayside-averaged equilibrium temperature, indicative of very poor heat redistribution efficiency. We also investigate the tentative detections in the g'r'i' bands and the 3σ upper limit in the z' band, which might indicate the existence of reflective clouds if these tentative detections do not arise from systematics. Based on observations collected with the Gamma Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) on the MPG/ESO 2.2 m telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. Program 088.A-9016 (PI: Chen).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometric time series are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/567/A8

  11. Revisiting the Correlations of Peak Luminosity with Spectral Lag and Peak Energy of the Observed Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Yun-A.; Chang, Heon-Young

    2016-12-01

    An analysis of light curves and spectra of observed gamma-ray bursts in gamma-ray ranges is frequently demanded because the prompt emission contains immediate details regarding the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We have revisited the relationship between the collimation-corrected peak luminosity and the spectral lag, investigating the lag-luminosity relationships in great detail by focusing on spectral lags resulting from all possible combinations of channels. Firstly, we compiled the opening angle data and demonstrated that the distribution of opening angles of 205 long GRBs is represented by a double Gaussian function having maxima at 0.1 and 0.3 radians. We confirmed that the peak luminosity and the spectral lag are anti-correlated, both in the observer frame and in the source frame. We found that, in agreement with our previous conclusion, the correlation coefficient improves significantly in the source frame. It should be noted that spectral lags involving channel 2 (25-50 keV) yield high correlation coefficients, where Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) has four energy channels (channel 1: 15-25 keV, channel 2: 25-50 keV, channel 3: 50-100 keV, channel 4: 100-200 keV). We also found that peak luminosity is positively correlated with peak energy.

  12. Spectral Study of a Broad Energy HPGe Detector for First Measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbrook, Jason; Green, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Intense neutrino flux at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the energy domain below Eν = 50 MeV makes SNS a suitable location for measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering. Coherent scattering is assumed to occupy vital roles in supernovae (SN) events and measurement offers promising insight into SN mechanics and advancements in SN- ν detection. Furthermore, this interaction is well-calculable and therefore, a strong test of the Standard Model. P-Type Point Contact High-purity germanium detectors are excellent candidates for this measurement due to their sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils. One such, a Canberra Broad Energy HPGe detector, was tested for quality degradation from exposure to fast neutrons in the SNS target building, to assess usefulness in a future coherent scattering experiment. Analysis of the lead-shielded spectra was handled using tools developed for the Majorana Demonstrator neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. Broad spectrum energy resolution and 68Ge decay rates were calculated. This poster will present findings that will help determine this detector's eligibility and exposure limitations for measurement in a future coherent neutrino scattering experiment at the SNS.

  13. Spectral modelling of the Alpha Virginis (Spica) binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Palate, M; Rauw, G; Harrington, D; Moreno, E

    2013-01-01

    Context: The technique of matching synthetic spectra computed with theoretical stellar atmosphere models to the observations is widely used in deriving fundamental parameters of massive stars. When applied to binaries, however, these models generally neglect the interaction effects present in these systems Aims: The aim of this paper is to explore the uncertainties in binary stellar parameters that are derived from single-star models Methods: Synthetic spectra that include the tidal perturbations and irradiation effects are computed for the binary system alpha Virginis (Spica) using our recently-developed CoMBiSpeC model. The synthetic spectra are compared to S/N~2000 observations and optimum values of Teff and log(g) are derived. Results: The binary interactions have only a small effect on the strength of the photospheric absorption lines in Spica (<2% for the primary and <4% for the secondary). These differences are comparable to the uncertainties inherent to the process of matching synthetic spectra ...

  14. Integrated ray tracing simulation of spectral bio-signatures from full 3D earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dongok; Seong, Sehyun; Lee, Jae-Min; Hong, Jinsuk; Jeong, Soomin; Jeong, Yukyeong; Kim, Sug-Whan

    2009-08-01

    Accurate identification and understanding of spectral bio-signatures from possible extra terrestrial planets have received an ever increasing attention from both astronomy and space science communities in recent years. In pursuance of this subject, one of the most important scientific breakthroughs would be to obtain the detailed understanding on spectral biosignatures of the Earth, as it serves as a reference datum for accurate interpretation of collapsed (in temporal and spatial domains) information from the spectral measurement using TPF instruments. We report a new Integrated Ray Tracing (IRT) model capable of computing various spectral bio-signatures as they are observed from the Earth surface. The model includes the Sun, the full 3-D Earth, and an optical instrument, all combined into single ray tracing environment in real scale. In particular, the full 3-D Earth surface is constructed from high resolution coastal line data and defined with realistic reflectance and BSDF characteristics depending on wavelength, vegetation types and their distributions. We first examined the model validity by confirming the imaging and radiometric performance of the AmonRa visible channel camera, simulating the Earth observation from the L1 halo orbit. We then computed disk averaged spectra, light curves and NDVI indexes, leading to the construction of the observed disk averaged spectra at the AmonRa instrument detector plane. The model, computational procedure and the simulation results are presented. The future plan for the detailed spectral signature simulation runs for various input conditions including seasonal vegetation changes and variable cloud covers is discussed.

  15. Photosystem Trap Energies and Spectrally-Dependent Energy-Storage Efficiencies in the Chl d-Utilizing Cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris Marina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Mauzerall, David

    2012-01-01

    Acaryochloris marina is the only species known to utilize chlorophyll (Chl) d as a principal photopigment. The peak absorption wavelength of Chl d is redshifted approx. 40 nm in vivo relative to Chl a, enabling this cyanobacterium to perform oxygenic phototrophy in niche environments enhanced in far-red light. We present measurements of the in vivo energy-storage (E-S) efficiency of photosynthesis in A. marina, obtained using pulsed photoacoustics (PA) over a 90-nm range of excitation wavelengths in the red and far-red. Together with modeling results, these measurements provide the first direct observation of the trap energies of PSI and PSII, and also the photosystem-specific contributions to the total E-S efficiency. We find the maximum observed efficiency in A. marina (40+/-1% at 735 nm) is higher than in the Chl a cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis (35+/-1% at 690 nm). The efficiency at peak absorption wavelength is also higher in A. marina (36+/-1% at 710 nm vs. 31+/-1% at 670 nm). In both species, the trap efficiencies are approx. 40% (PSI) and approx. 30% (PSII). The PSI trap in A. marina is found to lie at 740+/-5 nm, in agreement with the value inferred from spectroscopic methods. The best fit of the model to the PA data identifies the PSII trap at 723+/-3 nm, supporting the view that the primary electron-donor is Chl d, probably at the accessory (ChlD1) site. A decrease in efficiency beyond the trap wavelength, consistent with uphill energy transfer, is clearly observed and fit by the model. These results demonstrate that the E-S efficiency in A. marina is not thermodynamically limited, suggesting that oxygenic photosynthesis is viable in even redder light environments.

  16. The peculiar post-AGB supergiant IRAS 04296+3429 optical spectroscopy and its spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Klochkova, V G; Panchuk, V E; Volk, K

    1999-01-01

    The optical spectrum of the infrared source IRAS 04296+3429 (optical counterpart-G0 Ia star, V=14.2) was obtained with the echelle spectrometer PFES at the prime focus of the 6 m telescope. We discover emission bands (0,0) and (0,1) of the Swan system of the C2 molecule in the optical spectrum of IRAS 04296+3429. Comparison with the spectrum of the Hale-Bopp comet leads us to propose that in both cases the same mechanism (resonance fluorescence) is responsible for the emission in the C2 molecular bands. Several strong absorption features whose positions coincide with known diffuse interstellar bands are revealed in the spectrum of IRAS 04296+3429. The infrared spectrum of IRAS 04296+3429 shows the famous 21 um feature, but this object has not been observed by KAO. However, like IRAS 05113+1347, IRAS 05341+0852 and IRAS 22223+4327, our detailed modelling of its spectral energy distribution suggested that this source also should show the 30 um band. In fact, ISO discovered a broad, relatively strong feature aro...

  17. Recovering galaxy stellar population properties from broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting II. The case with unknown redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Pforr, Janine; Tonini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) In a recent work we explored the dependence of galaxy stellar population properties derived from broad-band spectral energy distribution fitting on the fitting parameters, e.g. SFHs, age grid, metallicity, IMF, dust reddening, reddening law, filter setup and wavelength coverage. In this paper we consider also redshift as a free parameter in the fit and study whether one can obtain reasonable estimates of photometric redshifts and stellar population properties at once. We use mock star-forming as well as passive galaxies placed at various redshifts (0.5 to 3) as test particles. Mock star-forming galaxies are extracted from a semi-analytical galaxy formation model. We show that for high-z star-forming galaxies photometric redshifts, stellar masses and reddening can be determined simultaneously when using a broad wavelength coverage and a wide template setup in the fit. Masses are similarly well recovered (median ~ 0.2 dex) as at fixed redshift. For old galaxies with little recent star formation masse...

  18. The radio-loud AGN population at z>~1 in the COSMOS field. I. Selection and Spectral Energy Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Ranieri D; Chiaberge, Marco; Celotti, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    We select a sample of radio galaxies at high redshifts (z>~1) in the COSMOS field, by cross-matching optical/infrared images with the FIRST radio data. The aim of this study is to explore the high-z radio-loud (RL) AGN population at much lower luminosities than the classical samples of distant radio sources and similar to those of the local population of radio galaxies. The wide multiwavelength coverage provided by the COSMOS survey allows us to derive their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). The SED modeling with stellar and dust components (with our code 2SPD) returns several important quantities associated with the AGN and host properties. The final sample consists of 74 RL AGN, which extends the sample previously selected by Chiaberge et al. (2009) and studied by Baldi et al. (2013). The resulting photometric redshifts range from z~0.7 to 3. The sample mostly includes compact radio sources, but also 21 FRIIs; the radio power distribution of the sample at 1.4 GHz covers ~10^(31.5)-10^(34.3) \\erg\\s\\Hz. T...

  19. Models of Energy Saving Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Jørgen Stig

    1999-01-01

    The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devote...... service level and technology are demonstrated as the main determinants of future energy consumption. In the concluding remarks, the main flaws of present energy policy and some visions of the future are discussed.......The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devoted...... to what is termed lifestyle efficiency, including the cultural values and the ability of the economy to provide the services wanted. As explained, integrated resource planning with its optimizing the whole energy chain cannot be combined with sub-optimizing part of it, for instance the supply technology...

  20. Models of Energy Saving Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Jørgen Stig

    1999-01-01

    The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devote...... service level and technology are demonstrated as the main determinants of future energy consumption. In the concluding remarks, the main flaws of present energy policy and some visions of the future are discussed.......The paper first describes the concepts and methods around energy saving, such as energy chain, energy services, end-use technologies, secondary energy, etc. Next are discussed the problems of defining and adding energy services and hence end-use energy efficiency or intensity. A section is devoted...... to what is termed lifestyle efficiency, including the cultural values and the ability of the economy to provide the services wanted. As explained, integrated resource planning with its optimizing the whole energy chain cannot be combined with sub-optimizing part of it, for instance the supply technology...

  1. Polarization spectral synthesis for Type Ia supernova explosion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, M.; Sim, S. A.; Kromer, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present a Monte Carlo radiative transfer technique for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry for multidimensional supernova explosion models. The approach utilizes `virtual-packets' that are generated during the propagation of the Monte Carlo quanta and used to compute synthetic observables for specific observer orientations. Compared to extracting synthetic observables by direct binning of emergent Monte Carlo quanta, this virtual-packet approach leads to a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise. This is not only vital for calculating synthetic spectropolarimetry (since the degree of polarization is typically very small) but also useful for calculations of light curves and spectra. We first validate our approach via application of an idealized test code to simple geometries. We then describe its implementation in the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTIS and present test calculations for simple models for Type Ia supernovae. Specifically, we use the well-known one-dimensional W7 model to verify that our scheme can accurately recover zero polarization from a spherical model, and to demonstrate the reduction in Monte Carlo noise compared to a simple packet-binning approach. To investigate the impact of aspherical ejecta on the polarization spectra, we then use ARTIS to calculate synthetic observables for prolate and oblate ellipsoidal models with Type Ia supernova compositions.

  2. A Search for Spectral Hysteresis and Energy-dependent Time Lags from X-Ray and TeV Gamma-Ray Observations of Mrk 421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Griffin, S.; Håkansson, M. HN.; Hanna, D.; Hervet, O.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; Ong, S. OR. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sadeh, I.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; the VERITAS Collaboration; Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Arcaro, C.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Nöthe, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres-Albà, N.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; the MAGIC Collaboration; Hovatta, T.; de la Calle Perez, I.; Smith, P. S.; Racero, E.; Baloković, M.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are variable emitters across all wavelengths over a wide range of timescales, from months down to minutes. It is therefore essential to observe blazars simultaneously at different wavelengths, especially in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands, where the broadband spectral energy distributions usually peak. In this work, we report on three “target-of-opportunity” observations of Mrk 421, one of the brightest TeV blazars, triggered by a strong flaring event at TeV energies in 2014. These observations feature long, continuous, and simultaneous exposures with XMM-Newton (covering the X-ray and optical/ultraviolet bands) and VERITAS (covering the TeV gamma-ray band), along with contemporaneous observations from other gamma-ray facilities (MAGIC and Fermi-Large Area Telescope) and a number of radio and optical facilities. Although neither rapid flares nor significant X-ray/TeV correlation are detected, these observations reveal subtle changes in the X-ray spectrum of the source over the course of a few days. We search the simultaneous X-ray and TeV data for spectral hysteresis patterns and time delays, which could provide insight into the emission mechanisms and the source properties (e.g., the radius of the emitting region, the strength of the magnetic field, and related timescales). The observed broadband spectra are consistent with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We find that the power spectral density distribution at ≳4 × 10‑4 Hz from the X-ray data can be described by a power-law model with an index value between 1.2 and 1.8, and do not find evidence for a steepening of the power spectral index (often associated with a characteristic length scale) compared to the previously reported values at lower frequencies.

  3. A model-based approach to the spatial and spectral calibration of NIRSpec onboard JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, B.; Giardino, G.; Ferruit, P.; Alves de Oliveira, C.; Birkmann, S. M.; Böker, T.; De Marchi, G.; Gnata, X.; Köhler, J.; Sirianni, M.; Jakobsen, P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The NIRSpec instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) can be operated in multiobject spectroscopy (MOS), long-slit, and integral field unit (IFU) mode with spectral resolutions from 100 to 2700. Its MOS mode uses about a quarter of a million individually addressable minislits for object selection, covering a field of view of ~9 arcmin2. Aims: The pipeline used to extract wavelength-calibrated spectra from NIRSpec detector images relies heavily on a model of NIRSpec optical geometry. We demonstrate how dedicated calibration data from a small subset of NIRSpec modes and apertures can be used to optimize this parametric model to the necessary levels of fidelity. Methods: Following an iterative procedure, the initial fiducial values of the model parameters are manually adjusted and then automatically optimized, so that the model predicted location of the images and spectral lines from the fixed slits, the IFU, and a small subset of the MOS apertures matches their measured location in the main optical planes of the instrument. Results: The NIRSpec parametric model is able to reproduce the spatial and spectral position of the input spectra with high fidelity. The intrinsic accuracy (1-sigma, rms) of the model, as measured from the extracted calibration spectra, is better than 1/10 of a pixel along the spatial direction and better than 1/20 of a resolution element in the spectral direction for all of the grating-based spectral modes. This is fully consistent with the corresponding allocation in the spatial and spectral calibration budgets of NIRSpec.

  4. Global and local aspects of spectral actions

    CERN Document Server

    Iochum, Bruno; Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    The principal object in noncommutatve geometry is the spectral triple consisting of an algebra A, a Hilbert space H, and a Dirac operator D. Field theories are incorporated in this approach by the spectral action principle, that sets the field theory action to Tr f(D^2/\\Lambda^2), where f is a real function such that the trace exists, and \\Lambda is a cutoff scale. In the low-energy (weak-field) limit the spectral action reproduces reasonably well the known physics including the standard model. However, not much is known about the spectral action beyond the low-energy approximation. In this paper, after an extensive introduction to spectral triples and spectral actions, we study various expansions of the spectral actions (exemplified by the heat kernel). We derive the convergence criteria. For a commutative spectral triple, we compute the heat kernel on the torus up the second order in gauge connection and consider limiting cases.

  5. Unstructured Spectral Element Model for Dispersive and Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Bigoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    ). In the present paper we use a single layer of quadratic (in 2D) and prismatic (in 3D) elements. The model has been stabilized through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild modal filter. We present numerical tests of nonlinear waves serving as a proof-of-concept validation...

  6. Polarisation Spectral Synthesis For Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    Despite their relevance across a broad range of astrophysical research topics, Type Ia supernova explosions are still poorly understood and answers to the questions of when, why and how these events are triggered remain unclear. In this respect, polarisation offers a unique opportunity to discriminate between the variety of possible scenarios. The observational evidence that Type Ia supernovae are associated with rather low polarisation signals (smaller than a few per cent) places strong constraints for models and calls for modest asphericities in the progenitor system and/or explosion mechanism.The goal of this thesis is to assess the validity of contemporary Type Ia supernova explosion models by testing whether their predicted polarisation signatures can account for the small signals usually observed. To this end, we have implemented and tested an innovative Monte Carlo scheme in the radiative transfer code artis. Compared to previous Monte Carlo approaches, this technique produces synthetic observables (light curves, flux and polarisation spectra) with a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise and therefore in the required computing time. This improvement is particularly crucial for our study as we aim to extract very weak polarisation signals, comparable to those detected in Type Ia supernovae. We have also demonstrated the applicability of this method to other classes of supernovae via a preliminary study of the first spectropolarimetry observations of superluminous supernovae.Using this scheme, we have calculated synthetic spectropolarimetry for three multi-dimensional explosion models recently proposed as promising candidates to explain Type Ia supernovae. Our findings highlight the power of spectropolarimetry in testing and discriminating between different scenarios. While all the three models predict light curves and flux spectra that are similar to each others and reproduce those observed in Type Ia supernovae comparably well, polarisation does

  7. On the spectral-energy efficiency and rate fairness tradeoff in relay-aided cooperative OFDMA systems

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Zhengyu; Ni, Qiang; Navaie, Keivan; Hou, S.; Wu, S.

    2016-01-01

    In resource constrained wireless systems, achieving higher spectral efficiency (SE) and energy efficiency (EE), and greater rate fairness are conflicting objectives. Here a general framework is presented to analyze the tradeoff among these three performance metrics in cooperative OFDMA systems with decode-and-forward (DF) relaying, where subcarrier pairing and allocation, relay selection, choice of transmission strategy, and power allocation are jointly considered. In our analytical framework...

  8. Enhancing inhibition-induced plasticity in tinnitus--spectral energy contrasts in tailor-made notched music matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alwina; Engell, Alva; Lau, Pia; Wunderlich, Robert; Junghoefer, Markus; Wollbrink, Andreas; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus seems to be caused by reduced inhibition among frequency selective neurons in the auditory cortex. One possibility to reduce tinnitus perception is to induce inhibition onto over-activated neurons representing the tinnitus frequency via tailor-made notched music (TMNM). Since lateral inhibition is modifiable by spectral energy contrasts, the question arises if the effects of inhibition-induced plasticity can be enhanced by introducing increased spectral energy contrasts (ISEC) in TMNM. Eighteen participants suffering from chronic tonal tinnitus, pseudo randomly assigned to either a classical TMNM or an ISEC-TMNM group, listened to notched music for three hours on three consecutive days. The music was filtered for both groups by introducing a notch filter centered at the individual tinnitus frequency. For the ISEC-TMNM group a frequency bandwidth of 3/8 octaves on each side of the notch was amplified, additionally, by about 20 dB. Before and after each music exposure, participants rated their subjectively perceived tinnitus loudness on a visual analog scale. During the magnetoencephalographic recordings, participants were stimulated with either a reference tone of 500 Hz or a test tone with a carrier frequency representing the individual tinnitus pitch. Perceived tinnitus loudness was significantly reduced after TMNM exposure, though TMNM type did not influence the loudness ratings. Tinnitus related neural activity in the N1m time window and in the so called tinnitus network comprising temporal, parietal and frontal regions was reduced after TMNM exposure. The ISEC-TMNM group revealed even enhanced inhibition-induced plasticity in a temporal and a frontal cortical area. Overall, inhibition of tinnitus related neural activity could be strengthened in people affected with tinnitus by increasing spectral energy contrast in TMNM, confirming the concepts of inhibition-induced plasticity via TMNM and spectral energy contrasts.

  9. Construction of Spectral Discoloration Model for Red Lead Pigment by Aging Test and Simulating Degradation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction of spectral discoloration model, based on aging test and simulating degradation experiment, was proposed to detect the aging degree of red lead pigment in ancient murals and to reproduce the spectral data supporting digital restoration of the ancient murals. The degradation process of red lead pigment under the aging test conditions was revealed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and spectrophotometer. The simulating degradation experiment was carried out by proportionally mixing red lead and lead dioxide with referring to the results of aging test. The experimental result indicated that the pure red lead was gradually turned into black lead dioxide, and the amount of tiny particles of the aging sample increased faced with aging process. Both the chroma and lightness of red lead pigment decreased with discoloration, and its hue essentially remains unchanged. In addition, the spectral reflectance curves of the aging samples almost started rising at about 550 nm with the inflection moving slightly from about 570 nm to 550 nm. The spectral reflectance of samples in long- and in short-wavelength regions was fitted well with the logarithmic and linear function. The spectral discoloration model was established, and the real aging red lead pigment in Dunhuang murals was measured and verified the effectiveness of the model.

  10. Blind Hyperspectral Unmixing Using an Extended Linear Mixing Model to Address Spectral Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumetz, Lucas; Veganzones, Miguel-Angel; Henrot, Simon; Phlypo, Ronald; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Jutten, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Spectral unmixing is one of the main research topics in hyperspectral imaging. It can be formulated as a source separation problem, whose goal is to recover the spectral signatures of the materials present in the observed scene (called endmembers) as well as their relative proportions (called fractional abundances), and this for every pixel in the image. A linear mixture model (LMM) is often used for its simplicity and ease of use, but it implicitly assumes that a single spectrum can be completely representative of a material. However, in many scenarios, this assumption does not hold, since many factors, such as illumination conditions and intrinsic variability of the endmembers, induce modifications on the spectral signatures of the materials. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to unmix hyperspectral data using a recently proposed extended LMM. The proposed approach allows a pixelwise spatially coherent local variation of the endmembers, leading to scaled versions of reference endmembers. We also show that the classic nonnegative least squares, as well as other approaches to tackle spectral variability can be interpreted in the framework of this model. The results of the proposed algorithm on two different synthetic datasets, including one simulating the effect of topography on the measured reflectance through physical modelling, and on two real data sets, show that the proposed technique outperforms other methods aimed at addressing spectral variability, and can provide an accurate estimation of endmember variability along the scene because of the scaling factors estimation.

  11. Determination of the optimal energy level in spectral CT imaging for displaying abdominal vessels in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Di, E-mail: hudi0415@163.com [Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Imaging Center, No. 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Yu, Tong, E-mail: hemophilia@126.com [Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Imaging Center, No. 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Duan, Xiaomin, E-mail: potatocat@yeah.net [Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Imaging Center, No. 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Peng, Yun, E-mail: ppengyun@yahoo.com [Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Imaging Center, No. 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Zhai, Renyou, E-mail: zhairenyou@163.com [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Imaging Center, No. 8, Gongti South Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the optimal energy level in contrast-enhanced spectral CT imaging for displaying abdominal vessels in pediatric patients. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was institutional review board approved. 15 children (8 males and 7 females, age range, 6–15 years, mean age 10.1 ± 3.1 years) underwent contrast-enhanced spectral CT imaging for diagnosing solid tumors in abdomen and pelvic areas were included. A single contrast-enhanced scan was performed using a dual energy spectral CT mode with a new split contrast injection scheme (iodixanol at 1–1.5 ml/kg dose. 2/3 first, 1/3 at 7–15 s after the first injection). 101 sets of monochromatic images with photon energies of 40–140 keV with 1 keV interval were reconstructed. Contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) for hepatic portal or vein were generated and compared at every energy level to determine the optimal energy level to maximize CNR. 2 board-certified radiologists interpreted the selected image sets independently for image quality scores. Results: CT values and CNR for the vessels increased as photon energy decreased from 140 to 40 keV: (CT value: 48.29–570.12 HU, CNR: 0.08–14.90) in the abdominal aorta, (58.48–369.73 HU, 0.64–5.87) in the inferior vena cava, and (58.48–369.73 HU, 0.06–6.96) in the portal vein. Monochromatic images at 40–50 keV (average 42.0 ± 4.67 keV) could display vessels above three levels clearly, and with excellent image quality scores of 3.17 ± 0.58 (of 4) (k = 0.50). The CNR values at the optimal energy level were significantly higher than those at 70 keV, an average energy corresponding to the conventional 120 kVp for abdominal CT imaging. Conclusion: Spectral CT imaging provides a set of monochromatic images to optimize image quality and enhance vascular visibility, especially in the hepatic portal and vein systems. The best CNR for displaying abdominal vessels in children was obtained at 42 keV photon energy level.

  12. Subaru spectroscopy and spectral modeling of Cygnus A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, Matthew J.; Perlman, Eric S. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Nikutta, Robert [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Packham, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, 1 UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249 (United States); Elitzur, Moshe [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Av. República 252, Santiago (Chile); Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Levenson, N. A. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Radomski, James T. [SOFIA/USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Aretxaga, Itziar [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Calle Luis Erro 1, Sta. Ma. Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-06-10

    We present high angular resolution (∼0.''5) MIR spectra of the powerful radio galaxy, Cygnus A (Cyg A), obtained with the Subaru telescope. The overall shape of the spectra agree with previous high angular resolution MIR observations, as well as previous Spitzer spectra. Our spectra, both on and off nucleus, show a deep silicate absorption feature. The absorption feature can be modeled with a blackbody obscured by cold dust or a clumpy torus. The deep silicate feature is best fit by a simple model of a screened blackbody, suggesting that foreground absorption plays a significant, if not dominant, role in shaping the spectrum of Cyg A. This foreground absorption prevents a clear view of the central engine and surrounding torus, making it difficult to quantify the extent the torus attributes to the obscuration of the central engine, but does not eliminate the need for a torus in Cyg A.

  13. Illuminating the origins of spectral properties of green fluorescent proteins via proteochemometric and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantasenamat, Chanin; Simeon, Saw; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Songtawee, Napat; Lapins, Maris; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-10-15

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has immense utility in biomedical imaging owing to its autofluorescent nature. In efforts to broaden the spectral diversity of GFP, there have been several reports of engineered mutants via rational design and random mutagenesis. Understanding the origins of spectral properties of GFP could be achieved by means of investigating its structure-activity relationship. The first quantitative structure-property relationship study for modeling the spectral properties, particularly the excitation and emission maximas, of GFP was previously proposed by us some years ago in which quantum chemical descriptors were used for model development. However, such simplified model does not consider possible effects that neighboring amino acids have on the conjugated π-system of GFP chromophore. This study describes the development of a unified proteochemometric model in which the GFP chromophore and amino acids in its vicinity are both considered in the same model. The predictive performance of the model was verified by internal and external validation as well as Y-scrambling. Our strategy provides a general solution for elucidating the contribution that specific ligand and protein descriptors have on the investigated spectral property, which may be useful in engineering novel GFP variants with desired characteristics.

  14. Boundary Layer Parameterization for a Global Spectral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-27

    submitting to a refereed journal. An additional study was conducted to examine how the relative humidity field evolves in the modelled daytime boundary...zo.\\MNz0H=10 15.’- z0.NI0H=100 6.00 9.00 12.00 15.00 18.00 Tine ( DrC ) Figure 4. As Figure 2 for the skin temperature. 136 15000 EzOk1500O

  15. Energy Wave Model of Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍细如

    2015-01-01

    proton emits energy wave, electron could sits any position away from nucleus, but be the most stable just when it sits at the trough of energy wave, and this position accords with Bohr radius and Schr?dinger equation.

  16. S4: A Spatial-Spectral model for Speckle Suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Fergus, Rob; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas; Pueyo, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    High dynamic-range imagers aim to block out or null light from a very bright primary star to make it possible to detect and measure far fainter companions; in real systems a small fraction of the primary light is scattered, diffracted, and unocculted. We introduce S4, a flexible data-driven model for the unocculted (and highly speckled) light in the P1640 spectroscopic coronograph. The model uses Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to capture the spatial structure and wavelength dependence of the speckles but not the signal produced by any companion. Consequently, the residual typically includes the companion signal. The companion can thus be found by filtering this error signal with a fixed companion model. The approach is sensitive to companions that are of order a percent of the brightness of the speckles, or up to $10^{-7}$ times the brightness of the primary star. This outperforms existing methods by a factor of 2-3 and is close to the shot-noise physical limit.

  17. S4: A spatial-spectral model for speckle suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Rob [Department of Computer Science, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent, E-mail: fergus@cs.nyu.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    High dynamic range imagers aim to block or eliminate light from a very bright primary star in order to make it possible to detect and measure far fainter companions; in real systems, a small fraction of the primary light is scattered, diffracted, and unocculted. We introduce S4, a flexible data-driven model for the unocculted (and highly speckled) light in the P1640 spectroscopic coronagraph. The model uses principal components analysis (PCA) to capture the spatial structure and wavelength dependence of the speckles, but not the signal produced by any companion. Consequently, the residual typically includes the companion signal. The companion can thus be found by filtering this error signal with a fixed companion model. The approach is sensitive to companions that are of the order of a percent of the brightness of the speckles, or up to 10{sup –7} times the brightness of the primary star. This outperforms existing methods by a factor of two to three and is close to the shot-noise physical limit.

  18. Modelling energy systems for developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, F.; Benders, R.M.J.; Moll, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing countries' energy use is rapidly increasing, which affects global climate change and global and regional energy settings. Energy models are helpful for exploring the future of developing and industrialised countries. However, energy systems of developing countries differ from those of ind

  19. ENOR - An Energy-Model for Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ek

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The Energy model for Norway, ENOR, is a dynamic, multisectoral economic stimulation model to be used for long term energy analyses. Energy sectors and energy carriers are in principle treated in the same way as other sectors and economic commodities and integrated in the same general framework. The model has a two-level structure - a central coordination module ensures economic consistency, while the behaviour of each production and consumption sector is modelled in separate sector models. The model framework is thus capable of handling both engineering and economic knowledge.

  20. Energy modeling. Volume 2: Inventory and details of state energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, A. G.; Underwood, R. G.; Weber, J. C.; Gist, R. L.; Holman, R. P.; Donald, D. W.

    1981-05-01

    An inventory of energy models developed by or for state governments is presented, and certain models are discussed in depth. These models address a variety of purposes such as: supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy; emergency management of energy; and energy economics. Ten models are described. The purpose, use, and history of the model is discussed, and information is given on the outputs, inputs, and mathematical structure of the model. The models include five models dealing with energy demand, one of which is econometric and four of which are econometric-engineering end-use models.

  1. Visualization-Directed Interactive Model-Fitting to Spectral Data Cubes

    CERN Document Server

    Fluke, Christopher J; Barnes, David G

    2010-01-01

    Spectral datasets obtained at radio frequencies and optical/IR wavelengths are increasing in complexity as new facilities and instruments come online, resulting in an increased need to visualize and quantitatively analyze the velocity structures. As the visible structure in spectral data cubes is not purely spatial, additional insight is required to relate structures in 2D space plus line-of-sight velocity to their true three-dimensional (3D) structures. This can be achieved through the use of models that are converted to velocity-space representations. We have used the S2PLOT programming library to enable intuitive, interactive comparison between 3D models and spectral data, with potential for improved understanding of the spatial configurations. We also report on the use of 3D Cartesian shapelets to support quantitative analysis.

  2. Model Compensation Approach Based on Nonuniform Spectral Compression Features for Noisy Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Geng-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel model compensation (MC method for the features of mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs with signal-to-noise-ratio- (SNR- dependent nonuniform spectral compression (SNSC. Though these new MFCCs derived from a SNSC scheme have been shown to be robust features under matched case, they suffer from serious mismatch when the reference models are trained at different SNRs and in different environments. To solve this drawback, a compressed mismatch function is defined for the static observations with nonuniform spectral compression. The means and variances of the static features with spectral compression are derived according to this mismatch function. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to provide recognition accuracy better than conventional MC methods when using uncompressed features especially at very low SNR under different noises. Moreover, the new compensation method has a computational complexity slightly above that of conventional MC methods.

  3. Differentiating malignant from benign gastric mucosal lesions with quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaoyan; Ni, Cheng; Shen, Yaqi; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Xiao; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the value of quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography (DESCT) for differentiating malignant gastric mucosal lesions from benign gastric mucosal lesions (including gastric inflammation [GI] and normal gastric mucosa [NGM]). This study was approved by the ethics committee, and all patients provided written informed consent. A total of 161 consecutive patients (63 with gastric cancer [GC], 48 with GI, and 50 with NGM) who underwent dual-phase contrast enhanced DESCT scans in the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PVP) were included in this study. Iodine concentration (IC) in lesions was derived from the iodine-based material-decomposition images and normalized to that in the aorta to obtain normalized IC (nIC). The ratios of IC and nIC between the AP and PVP were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for GC and GI was evaluated with reviewing the features including gastric wall thickness, focal, and eccentric on the conventional polychromatic images. All statistical analyses were performed by using statistical software SPSS 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). IC and nIC in GC differed significantly from those in GI and NGM, except for nICAP in comparing GC with GI. Mean nIC values of GC (0.18 ± 0.06 in AP and 0.62 ± 0.16 in PVP) were significantly higher than that of NGM (0.12 ± 0.03 in AP and 0.37 ± 0.08 in PVP) (all P nIC and IC in PVP had high sensitivities of 88.89% and 90.48%, respectively, in differentiating GC from NGM, while the sensitivities were 71.43% and 88.89% during AP. Ratios IC and nIC ratios did not provide adequate diagnostic accuracy with their area under curves less than 0.65. With the conventional features, the diagnostic accuracies for GC and GI were 75.0% and 98.0%, respectively. Quantitative analysis of DESCT imaging parameters for gastric mucosa, such as nIC and IC, is useful for differentiating malignant from benign gastric mucosal lesions. PMID:28079827

  4. Capabilities and accuracy of energy modelling software

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy modelling can be used in a number of different ways to fulfill different needs, including certification within building regulations or green building rating tools. Energy modelling can also be used in order to try and predict what the energy...

  5. A three-dimensional spectral element model for the solution of the hydrostatic primitive equations

    CERN Document Server

    Iskandarani, M; Levin, J C

    2003-01-01

    We present a spectral element model to solve the hydrostatic primitive equations governing large-scale geophysical flows. The highlights of this new model include unstructured grids, dual h-p paths to convergence, and good scalability characteristics on present day parallel computers including Beowulf-class systems. The behavior of the model is assessed on three process-oriented test problems involving wave propagation, gravitational adjustment, and nonlinear flow rectification, respectively. The first of these test problems is a study of the convergence properties of the model when simulating the linear propagation of baroclinic Kelvin waves. The second is an intercomparison of spectral element and finite-difference model solutions to the adjustment of a density front in a straight channel. Finally, the third problem considers the comparison of model results to measurements obtained from a laboratory simulation of flow around a submarine canyon. The aforementioned tests demonstrate the good performance of th...

  6. Clues to Coral Reef Ecosystem Health: Spectral Analysis Coupled with Radiative Transfer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guild, L.; Ganapol, B.; Kramer, P.; Armstrong, R.; Gleason, A.; Torres, J.; Johnson, L.; Garfield, N.

    2003-12-01

    Coral reefs are among the world's most productive and biologically rich ecosystems and are some of the oldest ecosystems on Earth. Coralline structures protect coastlines from storms, maintain high diversity of marine life, and provide nurseries for marine species. Coral reefs play a role in carbon cycling through high rates of organic carbon metabolism and calcification. Coral reefs provide fisheries habitat that are the sole protein source for humans on remote islands. Reefs respond immediately to environmental change and therefore are considered "canaries" of the oceans. However, the world's reefs are in peril: they have shrunk 10-50% from their historical extent due to climate change and anthropogenic activity. An important contribution to coral reef research is improved spectral distinction of reef species' health where anthropogenic activity and climate change impacts are high. Relatively little is known concerning the spectral properties of coral or how coral structures reflect and transmit light. New insights into optical processes of corals under stressed conditions can lead to improved interpretation of airborne and satellite data and forecasting of immediate or long-term impacts of events such as bleaching and disease in coral. We are investigating the spatial and spectral resolution required to detect remotely changes in reef health by coupling spectral analysis of in situ spectra and airborne spectral data with a new radiative transfer model called CorMOD2. Challenges include light attenuation by the water column, atmospheric scattering, and scattering caused by the coral themselves that confound the spectral signal. In CorMOD2, input coral reflectance measurements produce modeled absorption through an inversion at each visible wavelength. The first model development phase of CorMOD2 imposes a scattering baseline that is constant regardless of coral condition, and further specifies that coral is optically thick. Evolution of CorMOD2 is towards a coral

  7. Understanding the Pulsar High Energy Emission: Macroscopic and Kinetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Brambilla, Gabriele; Timokhin, Andrey; Kust Harding, Alice; Kazanas, Demos

    2017-08-01

    Pulsars are extraordinary objects powered by the rotation of magnetic fields of order 10^8, 10^12G anchored onto neutron stars and rotating with periods 10^(-3)-10s. These fields mediate the conversion of their rotational energy into MHD winds and at the same time accelerate particles to energies sufficiently high to produce GeV photons. Fermi, since its launch in 2008, has established several trends among the observed gamma-ray pulsar properties playing a catalytic role in the current modeling of the high energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. We judiciously use the guidance provided by the Fermi data to yield meaningful constraints on the macroscopic parameters of our global dissipative pulsar magnetosphere models. Our FIDO (Force-Free Inside, Dissipative Outside) models indicate that the dissipative regions lie outside the light cylinder near the equatorial current sheet. Our models reproduce the light-curve phenomenology while a detailed comparison of the model spectral properties with those observed by Fermi reveals the dependence of the macroscopic conductivity parameter on the spin-down rate providing a unique insight into the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the high-energy emission in pulsar magnetospheres. Finally, we further exploit these important results by building self-consistent 3D global kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) models which, eventually, provide the dependence of the macroscopic parameter behavior (e.g. conductivity) on the microphysical properties (e.g. particle multiplicities, particle injection rates). Our PIC models provide field structures and particle distributions that are not only consistent with each other but also able to reproduce a broad range of the observed gamma-ray phenomenology (light curves and spectral properties) of both young and millisecond pulsars.

  8. Probing the very-high-energy gamma-ray spectral curvature in the blazar PG 1553+113 with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J.; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J.L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M.V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Will, M; Zanin, R; D'Ammando, F; Lähteenmäki, A; Tornikoski, M; Hovatta, T; Readhead, A C S; Max-Moerbeck, W; Richards, J.L

    2015-01-01

    PG 1553+113 is a very-high-energy (VHE, E>100 GeV) gamma-ray emitter classified as a BL Lac object. Its redshift is constrained by intergalactic absorption lines in the range 0.40.2). The observed curvature is compatible with the extragalactic background light (EBL) imprint predicted by the current generation of EBL models assuming a redshift z~0.4. New constraints on the redshift were derived from the VHE spectrum. These constraints are compatible with previous limits and suggest that the source is most likely located around the optical lower limit, z=0.4. Finally, we find that the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model gives a satisfactory description of the observed multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution during the flare.

  9. Relationship between Cole-Cole model parameters and spectral decomposition parameters derived from SIP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are commonly analysed using phenomenological models. Among these models the Cole-Cole (CC) model is the most popular choice to describe the strength and frequency dependence of distinct polarization peaks in the data. More flexibility regarding the shape of the spectrum is provided by decomposition schemes. Here the spectral response is decomposed into individual responses of a chosen elementary relaxation model, mathematically acting as kernel in the involved integral, based on a broad range of relaxation times. A frequently used kernel function is the Debye model, but also the CC model with some other a priorly specified frequency dispersion (e.g. Warburg model) has been proposed as kernel in the decomposition. The different decomposition approaches in use, also including conductivity and resistivity formulations, pose the question to which degree the integral spectral parameters typically derived from the obtained relaxation time distribution are biased by the approach itself. Based on synthetic SIP data sampled from an ideal CC response, we here investigate how the two most important integral output parameters deviate from the corresponding CC input parameters. We find that the total chargeability may be underestimated by up to 80 per cent and the mean relaxation time may be off by up to three orders of magnitude relative to the original values, depending on the frequency dispersion of the analysed spectrum and the proximity of its peak to the frequency range limits considered in the decomposition. We conclude that a quantitative comparison of SIP parameters across different studies, or the adoption of parameter relationships from other studies, for example when transferring laboratory results to the field, is only possible on the basis of a consistent spectral analysis procedure. This is particularly important when comparing effective CC parameters with spectral parameters derived from decomposition results.

  10. Herschel Observations and Updated Spectral Energy Distributions of Five Sunlike Stars with Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Bryden, Geoff; Harvey, Paul; Green, Joel D.

    2016-12-01

    Observations from the Herschel Space Observatory have more than doubled the number of wide debris disks orbiting Sunlike stars to include over 30 systems with R > 100 AU. Here, we present new Herschel PACS and reanalyzed Spitzer MIPS photometry of five Sunlike stars with wide debris disks, from Kuiper Belt size to R > 150 AU. The disk surrounding HD 105211 is well resolved, with an angular extent of >14″ along the major axis, and the disks of HD 33636, HD 50554, and HD 52265 are extended beyond the PACS point-spread function size (50% of energy enclosed within radius 4.″23). HD 105211 also has a 24 μm infrared excess, which was previously overlooked, because of a poorly constrained photospheric model. Archival Spitzer IRS observations indicate that the disks have small grains of minimum radius a min ˜ 3 μm, although a min is larger than the radiation-pressure blowout size in all systems. If modeled as single-temperature blackbodies, the disk temperatures would all be <60 K. Our radiative transfer models predict actual disk radii approximately twice the radius of a model blackbody disk. We find that the Herschel photometry traces dust near the source population of planetesimals. The disk luminosities are in the range 2 × 10-5 ⩽ L/L ⊙ ⩽ 2 × 10-4, consistent with collisions in icy planetesimal belts stirred by Pluto-size dwarf planets.

  11. Hybrid Energy System Modeling in Modelica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Binder; Christiaan J. J. Paredis; Humberto E. Garcia

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a Hybrid Energy System (HES) configuration is modeled in Modelica. Hybrid Energy Systems (HES) have as their defining characteristic the use of one or more energy inputs, combined with the potential for multiple energy outputs. Compared to traditional energy systems, HES provide additional operational flexibility so that high variability in both energy production and consumption levels can be absorbed more effectively. This is particularly important when including renewable energy sources, whose output levels are inherently variable, determined by nature. The specific HES configuration modeled in this paper include two energy inputs: a nuclear plant, and a series of wind turbines. In addition, the system produces two energy outputs: electricity and synthetic fuel. The models are verified through simulations of the individual components, and the system as a whole. The simulations are performed for a range of component sizes, operating conditions, and control schemes.

  12. Metal artefact reduction in gemstone spectral imaging dual-energy CT with and without metal artefact reduction software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun; Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Medical Convergence Research Institute, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwan Kyu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To assess the usefulness of gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) dual-energy CT (DECT) with/without metal artefact reduction software (MARs). The DECTs were performed using fast kV-switching GSI between 80 and 140 kV. The CT data were retro-reconstructed with/without MARs, by different displayed fields-of-view (DFOV), and with synthesised monochromatic energy in the range 40-140 keV. A phantom study of size and CT numbers was performed in a titanium plate and a stainless steel plate. A clinical study was performed in 26 patients with metallic hardware. All images were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the visualisation of periprosthetic regions and the severity of beam-hardening artefacts by using a five-point scale. The GSI-MARs reconstruction can markedly reduce the metal-related artefacts, and the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition and DFOV. The spectral CT numbers of the prosthesis and periprosthetic regions showed different patterns on stainless steel and titanium plates. Dual-energy CT with GSI-MARs can reduce metal-related artefacts and improve the delineation of the prosthesis and periprosthetic region. We should be cautious when using GSI-MARs because the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition, energy (in keV) and DFOV. The metallic composition and size should be considered in metallic imaging with GSI-MARs reconstruction. circle Metal-related artefacts can be troublesome on musculoskeletal computed tomography (CT). circle Gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) with dual-energy CT (DECT) offers a novel solution circle GSI and metallic artefact reduction software (GSI-MAR) can markedly reduce these artefacts. circle However image quality is influenced by the prosthesis composition and other parameters. circle We should be aware about potential overcorrection when using GSI-MARs. (orig.)

  13. Multiwavelength campaign on the HBL PKS~2155-304 : A new insight on its spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, D A; Zaborov, D; Parson, D; Madejski, G M; NuSTAR, A Furniss On behalf of the; Fermi,

    2015-01-01

    The blazar PKS~2155-304 was the target of a multiwavelength campaign from June to October 2013 which widely improves our knowledge of its spectral energy distribution. This campaign involved the NuSTAR satellite (3-79 keV), the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT, 100~MeV-300~GeV) and the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) array phase II (with an energy threshold of few tens of GeV). While the observations with NuSTAR extend the X-ray spectrum to higher energies than before, H.E.S.S. phase II, together with the use of the LAT PASS 8, enhance the coverage of the $\\gamma$-ray regime with an unprecedented precision. In this work, preliminary results from the multi-wavelength analysis are presented.

  14. Modeling spectral sensitivity at low light levels based on mesopic visual performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meri Viikari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Meri Viikari, Aleksanteri Ekrias, Marjukka Eloholma, Liisa HalonenLighting Laboratory, Helsinki University of Technology, FinlandAbstract: The spectral sensitivity of the eye at low light levels, ie, mesopic conditions, is determined by the rod and cone photoreceptors of the retina operating together in varying degree as adaptation luminance shifts between the scotopic and photopic. Thus mesopic spectral sensitivity is different from photopic, where only cones contribute to vision. There are definite needs for a practical system of mesopic photometry to be used in assessing light at low light levels, especially in road and other outdoor lighting applications. However, neither of the recently proposed systems of mesopic photometry, the MOVE-model or the X-model, is found satisfactory by common consent of the lighting community. The most active debate has considered the upper luminance limit of the mesopic region, which is regarded to be too high for the MOVE-model and too low for the X-model. The present paper proposes a new modified MOVE-model whose upper luminance limit is adjusted to meet the actual road and street lighting luminance values measured in different weather conditions. The paper compares the MOVE-model, X-model, and the proposed modified MOVE-model with three independent visual performance data sets provided by different European universities. Based on the comparison, recommendations are given for future actions towards internationally accepted practice for mesopic photometry.Keywords: spectral sensitivity, mesopic, visual performance, mesopic model, photometry, night-time driving

  15. Energy Systems Modelling Research and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Andersen, Frits; Alberg Østergaard, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This editorial introduces the seventh volume of the International Journal of Sustainable Energy Planning and Management. The volume presents part of the outcome of the project Energy Systems Modelling Research and Analysis (ENSYMORA) funded by the Danish Innovation Fund. The project carried out...... by 11 university and industry partners has improved the basis for decision-making within energy planning and energy scenario making by providing new and improved tools and methods for energy systems analyses....

  16. The next step in coastal numerical models: spectral/hp element methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskilsson, Claes; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we outline the application of spectral/hp element methods for modelling nonlinear and dispersive waves. We present one- and two-dimensional test cases for the shallow water equations and Boussinesqtype equations – including highly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations....

  17. Regional Spectral Model simulations of the summertime regional climate over Taiwan and adjacent areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching-Teng Lee; Ming-Chin Wu; Shyh-Chin Chen

    2005-01-01

    The National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) regional spectral model (RSM) version 97 was used to investigate the regional summertime climate over Taiwan and adjacent areas for June-July-August of 1990 through 2000. The simulated sea-level-pressure and wind fields of RSM1 with 50-km grid space are similar to the reanalysis, but the strength of the...

  18. Experimental weekly to seasonal U.S. forecasts with the Regional Spectral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Roads

    2004-01-01

    As described previously Roads et al. 2001a, hereafter RCF), the Scripps Experimental Climate Prediction Center (ECPC) has been making routine, near-real-time, long-range experimental global and regional dynamical forecasts since 27 September 1997. The global spectral model (GSM) used for these forecasts is that of National Centers for Environmental Prediction’s (NCEP;...

  19. Doping dependence of the spectral function in the t-J model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eder, R; Ohta, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We study the doping dependence of the electronic spectral function in small clusters of the t-J model. We find rigid-band behaviour near the chemical potential and weight transfer from deep below E(F) to above the chemical potential; the latter originates from strong dressing of hobs by spin fluctua

  20. Twisted spectral triple for the Standard Model and spontaneous breaking of the Grand Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Devastato, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    Grand symmetry models in noncommutative geometry have been introduced to explain how to generate minimally (i.e. without adding new fermions) an extra scalar field beyond the standard model, which both stabilizes the electroweak vacuum and makes the computation of the mass of the Higgs compatible with its experimental value. In this paper, we use Connes-Moscovici twisted spectral triples to cure a technical problem of the grand symmetry, that is the appearance together with the extra scalar field of unbounded vectorial terms. The twist makes these terms bounded, and also permits to understand the breaking to the standard model as a dynamical process induced by the spectral action. This is a spontaneous breaking from a pre-geometric Pati-Salam model to the almost-commutative geometry of the standard model, with two Higgs-like fields: scalar and vector.

  1. Different atmospheric parameters influence on spectral UV radiation (measurements and modelling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarova, N.Y. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Meteorological Observatory; Krotkov, N.A. [Maryland Univ., MD (United States). JCESS/Meteorology Dept.; Geogdzhaev, I.V.; Bushnev, S.V.; Kondranin, T.V. [SUMGF/MIPT, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation plays a vital role in the biophysical processes despite its small portion in the total solar flux. UV radiation is subject to large variations at the Earth surface depending greatly on solar elevation, ozone and cloud amount, aerosols and surface albedo. The analysis of atmospheric parameters influence is based on the spectral archive data of three spectral instruments: NSF spectroradiometer (Barrow network) (NSF Polar Programs UV Spectroradiometer Network 1991-1992,1992), spectrophotometer (SUVS-M) of Central Aerological Observatory CAO, spectroradiometer of Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) and model simulations based on delta-Eddington approximation

  2. Energy based prediction models for building acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach robust and simplified yet accurate prediction models, energy based principle are commonly used in many fields of acoustics, especially in building acoustics. This includes simple energy flow models, the framework of statistical energy analysis (SEA) as well as more elaborated...... principles as, e.g., wave intensity analysis (WIA). The European standards for building acoustic predictions, the EN 12354 series, are based on energy flow and SEA principles. In the present paper, different energy based prediction models are discussed and critically reviewed. Special attention is placed...

  3. Evaluation of bio-energy potential using world energy models; Sekai energy model ni yoru bio energy no potential hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, J.; Yamaji, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    Bio-energy potential is evaluated using world energy models. The world energy model is a dynamic model by which the total cost of energy systems between 1995 and 2055 can be minimized on the basis of the optimization type world energy demand and supply model. For the given utilization costs of transportation, recovery and planting, the utilization of bio-energy is promoted even under the cost minimization condition. However, the utilization amount varies in a wide range by changing the utilization costs. Among conversion technologies of bio-energy, it is biomass liquefaction that provides the largest utilization amount. Thermal demand, direct combustion for power generation, and biomass gasification follow to the above. Biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) is to be used up to 2020. It is not to be used after 2030, due to the complete shift to the biomass liquefaction. For a model including the utilization of fast breeder after 2030, the utilization amount of bio-energy is not to change. Competition with food and land utilization is to be investigated. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Evaluation of bio-energy potential using world energy models; Sekai energy model ni yoru bio energy no potential hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujino, J.; Yamaji, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-30

    Bio-energy potential is evaluated using world energy models. The world energy model is a dynamic model by which the total cost of energy systems between 1995 and 2055 can be minimized on the basis of the optimization type world energy demand and supply model. For the given utilization costs of transportation, recovery and planting, the utilization of bio-energy is promoted even under the cost minimization condition. However, the utilization amount varies in a wide range by changing the utilization costs. Among conversion technologies of bio-energy, it is biomass liquefaction that provides the largest utilization amount. Thermal demand, direct combustion for power generation, and biomass gasification follow to the above. Biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) is to be used up to 2020. It is not to be used after 2030, due to the complete shift to the biomass liquefaction. For a model including the utilization of fast breeder after 2030, the utilization amount of bio-energy is not to change. Competition with food and land utilization is to be investigated. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Herschel Observations and Updated Spectral Energy Distributions of Five Sunlike Stars with Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E; Bryden, Geoff; Harvey, Paul M; Green, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    Observations from the Herschel Space Observatory have more than doubled the number of wide debris disks orbiting Sunlike stars to include over 30 systems with R > 100 AU. Here we present new Herschel PACS and re-analyzed Spitzer MIPS photometry of five Sunlike stars with wide debris disks, from Kuiper belt size to R > 150 AU. The disk surrounding HD 105211 is well resolved, with an angular extent of >14" along the major axis, and the disks of HD 33636, HD 50554, and HD 52265 are extended beyond the PACS PSF size (50% of energy enclosed within radius 4.23"). HD 105211 also has a 24-micron infrared excess that was previously overlooked because of a poorly constrained photospheric model. Archival Spitzer IRS observations indicate that the disks have small grains of minimum radius ~3 microns, though the minimum grain gradius is larger than the radiation pressure blowout size in all systems. If modeled as single-temperature blackbodies, the disk temperatures would all be <60 K. Our radiative transfer models pre...

  6. The Sedentary Survey of Extreme High Energy Peaked BL Lacs. II. The Catalog and Spectral Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Giommi, P; Perri, M; Padovani, P

    2004-01-01

    The multi-frequency `Sedentary Survey' is a deep, statistically complete, radio flux limited sample comprising 150 BL Lacertae objects distinguished by their extremely high X-ray to radio flux ratio, ranging from five hundred to over five thousand times that of typical BL Lacs discovered in radio surveys. This paper presents the final, 100% identified, catalog together with the optical, X-ray and broad-band SEDs constructed combining literature multi-frequency data with non-simultaneous optical observations and BeppoSAX X-ray data, when available. The SEDs confirm that the peak of the synchrotron power in these objects is located at very high energies. BeppoSAX wide band X-ray observations show that, in most cases, the X-ray spectra are convex and well described by a logarithmic parabola model peaking (in a E f(E) vs E representation) between 0.02 to several keV. Owing to the high synchrotron energies involved most of the sources in the catalog are likely to be TeV emitters, with the closest and brightest one...

  7. Basis material decomposition in spectral CT using a semi-empirical, polychromatic adaption of the Beer-Lambert model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, S.; Sellerer, T.; Mechlem, K.; Fehringer, A.; Epple, M.; Herzen, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Following the development of energy-sensitive photon-counting detectors using high-Z sensor materials, application of spectral x-ray imaging methods to clinical practice comes into reach. However, these detectors require extensive calibration efforts in order to perform spectral imaging tasks like basis material decomposition. In this paper, we report a novel approach to basis material decomposition that utilizes a semi-empirical estimator for the number of photons registered in distinct energy bins in the presence of beam-hardening effects which can be termed as a polychromatic Beer-Lambert model. A maximum-likelihood estimator is applied to the model in order to obtain estimates of the underlying sample composition. Using a Monte-Carlo simulation of a typical clinical CT acquisition, the performance of the proposed estimator was evaluated. The estimator is shown to be unbiased and efficient according to the Cramér-Rao lower bound. In particular, the estimator is capable of operating with a minimum number of calibration measurements. Good results were obtained after calibration using less than 10 samples of known composition in a two-material attenuation basis. This opens up the possibility for fast re-calibration in the clinical routine which is considered an advantage of the proposed method over other implementations reported in the literature.

  8. Spectral algorithm for non-destructive damage localisation: Application to an ancient masonry arch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciotta, Maria-Giovanna; Ramos, Luís F.; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Vasta, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Structural monitoring and vibration-based damage identification methods are fundamental tools for condition assessment and early-stage damage identification, especially when dealing with the conservation of historical constructions and the maintenance of strategic civil structures. However, although the substantial advances in the field, several issues must still be addressed to broaden the application range of such tools and to assert their reliability. This study deals with the experimental validation of a novel method for non-destructive damage identification purposes. This method is based on the use of spectral output signals and has been recently validated by the authors through a numerical simulation. After a brief insight into the basic principles of the proposed approach, the spectral-based technique is applied to identify the experimental damage induced on a masonry arch through statically increasing loading. Once the direct and cross spectral density functions of the nodal response processes are estimated, the system's output power spectrum matrix is built and decomposed in eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The present study points out how the extracted spectral eigenparameters contribute to the damage analysis allowing to detect the occurrence of damage and to locate the target points where the cracks appear during the experimental tests. The sensitivity of the spectral formulation to the level of noise in the modal data is investigated and discussed. As a final evaluation criterion, the results from the spectrum-driven method are compared with the ones obtained from existing non-model based damage identification methods.

  9. Modeling the seismic response of 2D models of asteroid 433 Eros, based on the spectral-element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Celine; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Lognonné, Philippe; Martin, Roland; Le Goff, Nicolas

    The understanding of the interior structure of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) is a fundamental issue to determine their evolution and origin, and also, to design possible mitigation techniques (Walker and Huebner, 2004). Indeed, if an oncoming Potentially Hazardous Object (PHO) were to threaten the Earth, numerous methods are suggested to prevent it from colliding our planet. Such mitigation techniques may involve nuclear explosives on or below the object surface, impact by a projectile, or concentration of solar energy using giant mirrors (Holsapple, 2004). The energy needed in such mitigation techniques highly depends on the porosity of the hazardous threatening object (asteroid or comet), as suggested by Holsapple, 2004. Thus, for a given source, the seismic response of a coherent homogeneous asteroid should be very different from the seismic response of a fractured or rubble-pile asteroid. To assess this hypothesis, we performed numerical simulations of wave propagation in different interior models of the Near Earth Asteroid 433 Eros. The simulations of wave propagation required a shape model of asteroid Eros, kindly provided by A. Cheng and O. Barnouin-Jha (personal communication). A cross-section along the longest axis has been chosen to define our 2D geometrical model, and we study two models of the interior: a homogeneous one, and a complex one characterized by fault networks below the main crosscut craters, and covered by a regolith layer of thickness ranging from 50 m to 150 m. To perform the numerical simulations we use the spectral-element method, which solves the variational weak form of the seismic wave equation (Komatitsch and Tromp, 1999) on the meshes of the 2D models of asteroid Eros. The homogeneous model is composed of an elastic material characterized by a pressure wave velocity Vp = 3000 m.s-1 , a shear wave velocity Vs = 1700 m.s-1 and a density of 2700 kg.m-3 . The fractured model possesses the same characteristics except for the presence of

  10. A Dynamic Model for Energy Structure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Energy structure is a complicated system concerning economic development, natural resources, technological innovation, ecological balance, social progress and many other elements. It is not easy to explain clearly the developmental mechanism of an energy system and the mutual relations between the energy system and its related environments by the traditional methods. It is necessary to develop a suitable dynamic model, which can reflect the dynamic characteristics and the mutual relations of the energy system and its related environments. In this paper, the historical development of China's energy structure was analyzed. A new quantitative analysis model was developed based on system dynamics principles through analysis of energy resources, and the production and consumption of energy in China and comparison with the world. Finally, this model was used to predict China's future energy structures under different conditions.

  11. Spectroscopic classification of optical transients with the SEDM (Spectral Energy Distribution Machine) on Palomar 60-inch (P60) telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagorodnova, N.; Neill, D.; Walters, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Caltech Time Domain Astronomy group reports the classification of the optical transients SN 2016czr, SN 2016ejc and AT 2016eki. The candidates were discovered by the PMO-Tsinghua Supernova Survey (PTSS: http://119.78.210.3/ptss2/ ), the Gaia ESA survey (Rixon et al,2014, ATel #6593) and the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae ASAS-SN (see Shappee et al. 2014, ApJ, 788, 48 and http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~assassin/index.shtml ). The observations were performed on 2016-07-28 and 2016-07-29 with the Palomar 60-inch (P60) telescope and the Spectral Energy Distribution Machine (SEDM) (http://www.astro.caltech.edu/sedm/, range 350-950nm, spectral resolution R~100) on Palomar 60-inch (P60) telescope.

  12. Testing spectral models for stellar populations with star clusters - I. Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid Fernandes, Roberto; González Delgado, Rosa M.

    2010-04-01

    High-resolution spectral models for simple stellar populations (SSP) developed in the past few years have become a standard ingredient in studies of stellar population of galaxies. As more such models become available, it becomes increasingly important to test them. In this and a companion paper, we test a suite of publicly available evolutionary synthesis models using integrated optical spectra in the blue-near-UV range of 27 well-studied star clusters from the work of Leonardi and Rose spanning a wide range of ages and metallicities. Most (23) of the clusters are from the Magellanic Clouds. This paper concentrates on the methodological aspects of spectral fitting. The data are fitted with SSP spectral models from Vazdekis and collaborators, based on the Medium-resolution INT Library of Empirical Spectra. Best-fitting and Bayesian estimates of age, metallicity and extinction are presented, and degeneracies between these parameters are mapped. We find that these models can match the observed spectra very well in most cases, with small formal uncertainties in t,Z and AV. In some cases, the spectral fits indicate that the models lack a blue old population, probably associated with the horizontal branch. This methodology, which is mostly based on the publicly available code STARLIGHT, is extended to other sets of models in Paper II, where a comparison with properties derived from spatially resolved data (colour-magnitude diagrams) is presented. The global aim of these two papers is to provide guidance to users of evolutionary synthesis models and empirical feedback to model makers.

  13. The dependence of the estimated luminosities of ULX on spectral models

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, A Senorita; Agrawal, V K; Singh, K Y

    2007-01-01

    Data from {\\it Chandra} observations of thirty nearby galaxies were analyzed and 365 X-ray point sources were chosen whose spectra were not contaminated by excessive diffuse emission and not affected by photon pile up. The spectra of these sources were fitted using two spectral models (an absorbed power-law and a disk blackbody) to ascertain the dependence of estimated parameters on the spectral model used. It was found that the cumulative luminosity function depends on the choice of the spectral model, especially for luminosities $> 10^{40}$ ergs/s. In accordance with previous results, a large number ($\\sim 80$) of the sources have luminosities $> 10^{39}$ ergs/s (Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources) with indistinguishable average spectral parameters (inner disk temperature $\\sim 1$ keV and/or photon index $\\Gamma \\sim 2$) with those of the lower luminosities ones. After considering foreground stars and known background AGN,we identify four sources whose minimum luminosity exceed $10^{40}$ ergs/s, and call them Ext...

  14. Directory of Energy Information Administration models 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This directory revises and updates the Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1995, DOE/EIA-0293(95), Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy, July 1995. Four models have been deleted in this directory as they are no longer being used: (1) Market Penetration Model for Ground-Water Heat Pump Systems (MPGWHP); (2) Market Penetration Model for Residential Rooftop PV Systems (MPRESPV-PC); (3) Market Penetration Model for Active and Passive Solar Technologies (MPSOLARPC); and (4) Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS).

  15. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysia’s energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors. The integration to the economic sectors is done exogeneously by specifying the annual sectoral energy demand levels. The model in turn optimizes the energy variables for a specified objective function to meet those demands. Results: By minimizing the inter temporal petroleum product imports for the crude oil system the annual extraction level of Tapis blend is projected at 579600 barrels per day. The aggregate demand for petroleum products is projected to grow at 2.1% year-1 while motor gasoline and diesel constitute 42 and 38% of the petroleum products demands mix respectively over the 5 year planning period. Petroleum products import is expected to grow at 6.0% year-1. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate that the model performs as expected. Thus other types of energy carriers such as natural gas, coal and biomass will be added to the energy system for the overall development of Malaysia energy model.

  16. Spectral Analysis, Synthesis, & Energy Distributions of Nearby E+A Galaxies Using SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Olivia A.; Anderson, Miguel Ricardo; Wally, Muhammad; James, Olivia; Falcone, Julia; Liu, Allen; Wallack, Nicole; Liu, Charles; SDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) Survey (MaNGA Product Launch-4, or MPL-4), of the latest generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV), we identified nine post-starburst (E+A) systems that lie within the Green Valley transition zone. We identify the E+A galaxies by their SDSS single fiber spectrum and u-r color, then confirmed their classification as post-starburst by coding/plotting methods and spectral synthesis codes (FIREFLY and PIPE3D), as well as with their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) from 0.15 µm to 22 µm, using GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE data. We produced maps of gaussian-fitted fluxes, equivalent widths, stellar velocities, metallicities and age. We also produced spectral line ratio diagrams to classify regions of stellar populations of the galaxies. We found that our sample of E+As retain their post-starburst properties across the entire galaxy, not just at their center. We detected matching a trend line in the ultraviolet and optical bands, consistent with the expected SEDs for an E+A galaxy, and also through the J, H and Ks bands, except for one object. We classified one of the nine galaxies as a luminous infrared galaxy, unusual for a post-starburst object. Our group seeks to further study stellar population properties, spectral energy distributions and quenching properties in E+A galaxies, and investigate their role in galaxy evolution as a whole. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement #SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island. This work was also supported by grants to The American Museum of Natural History, and the CUNY College of Staten Island through from National Science Foundation.

  17. Dynamic corner frequency in source spectral model for stochastic synthesis of ground motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodan Sun; Xiaxin Tao; Guoxin Wang; Taojun Liu

    2009-01-01

    The static corner frequency and dynamic corner frequency in stochastic synthesis of ground motion from finite-fault modeling are introduced, and conceptual disadvantages of the two are discussed in this paper. Furthermore, the non-uniform radiation of seismic wave on the fault plane, as well as the trend of the larger rupture area, the lower corner frequency, can be described by the source spectral model developed by the authors. A new dynamic corner frequency can be developed directly from the model. The dependence of ground motion on the size of subfault can be eliminated if this source spectral model is adopted in the synthesis. Finally, the approach presented is validated from the comparison between the synthesized and observed ground motions at six rock stations during the Northridge earthquake in 1994.

  18. A spectral-spatial-dynamic hierarchical Bayesian (SSD-HB) model for estimating soybean yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yoriko; Kujirai, Toshihiro

    2014-10-01

    A method called a "spectral-spatial-dynamic hierarchical-Bayesian (SSD-HB) model," which can deal with many parameters (such as spectral and weather information all together) by reducing the occurrence of multicollinearity, is proposed. Experiments conducted on soybean yields in Brazil fields with a RapidEye satellite image indicate that the proposed SSD-HB model can predict soybean yield with a higher degree of accuracy than other estimation methods commonly used in remote-sensing applications. In the case of the SSD-HB model, the mean absolute error between estimated yield of the target area and actual yield is 0.28 t/ha, compared to 0.34 t/ha when conventional PLS regression was applied, showing the potential effectiveness of the proposed model.

  19. Diffuse ultra-high energy neutrino fluxes and physics beyond the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Atri, E-mail: atri@hri.res.i [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Choubey, Sandhya; Gandhi, Raj [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Watanabe, Atsushi [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2010-06-07

    We study spectral distortions of diffuse ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino flavour fluxes resulting due to physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). Even large spectral differences between flavours at the source are massaged into a common shape at earth by SM oscillations, thus, any significant observed spectral differences are an indicator of new physics present in the oscillation probability during propagation. Lorentz symmetry violation (LV) and neutrino decay are examples, and result in significant distortion of the fluxes and of the well-known bounds on them, which may allow UHE detectors to probe LV parameters, lifetimes and the mass hierarchy over a broad range.

  20. Fast and Parallel Spectral Transform Algorithms for Global Shallow Water Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Ruediger

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation examines spectral transform algorithms for the solution of the shallow water equations on the sphere and studies their implementation and performance on shared memory vector multiprocessors. Beginning with the standard spectral transform algorithm in vorticity divergence form and its implementation in the Fortran based parallel programming language Force, two modifications are researched. First, the transforms and matrices associated with the meridional derivatives of the associated Legendre functions are replaced by corresponding operations with the spherical harmonic coefficients. Second, based on the fast Fourier transform and the fast multipole method, a lower complexity algorithm is derived that uses fast transformations between Legendre and interior Fourier nodes, fast surface spherical truncation and a fast spherical Helmholtz solver. The first modification is fully implemented, and comparative performance data are obtained for varying resolution and number of processes, showing a significant storage saving and slightly reduced execution time on a Cray Y -MP 8/864. The important performance parameters for the spectral transform algorithm and its implementation on vector multiprocessors are determined and validated with the measured performance data. The second modification is described at the algorithmic level, but only the novel fast surface spherical truncation algorithm is implemented. This new multipole algorithm has lower complexity than the standard algorithm, and requires asymptotically only order N ^2log N operations per time step for a grid with order N^2 points. Because the global shallow water equations are similar to the horizontal dynamical component of general circulation models, the results can be applied to spectral transform numerical weather prediction and climate models. In general, the derived algorithms may speed up the solution of time dependent partial differential equations in spherical geometry. A performance model

  1. Localized Spectral Analysis of Fluctuating Power Generation from Solar Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Nijs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in solar irradiance are a serious obstacle for the future large-scale application of photovoltaics. Occurring regularly with the passage of clouds, they can cause unexpected power variations and introduce voltage dips to the power distribution system. This paper proposes the treatment of such fluctuating time series as realizations of a stochastic, locally stationary, wavelet process. Its local spectral density can be estimated from empirical data by means of wavelet periodograms. The wavelet approach allows the analysis of the amplitude of fluctuations per characteristic scale, hence, persistence of the fluctuation. Furthermore, conclusions can be drawn on the frequency of occurrence of fluctuations of different scale. This localized spectral analysis was applied to empirical data of two successive years. The approach is especially useful for network planning and load management of power distribution systems containing a high density of photovoltaic generation units.

  2. Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacFarlane, Joseph J [Prism Computational Sciences

    2009-08-07

    This Final Report summarizes work performed under DOE STTR Phase II Grant No. DE-FG02-05ER86258 during the project period from August 2006 to August 2009. The project, “Development of Spectral and Atomic Models for Diagnosing Energetic Particle Characteristics in Fast Ignition Experiments,” was led by Prism Computational Sciences (Madison, WI), and involved collaboration with subcontractors University of Nevada-Reno and Voss Scientific (Albuquerque, NM). In this project, we have: Developed and implemented a multi-dimensional, multi-frequency radiation transport model in the LSP hybrid fluid-PIC (particle-in-cell) code [1,2]. Updated the LSP code to support the use of accurate equation-of-state (EOS) tables generated by Prism’s PROPACEOS [3] code to compute more accurate temperatures in high energy density physics (HEDP) plasmas. Updated LSP to support the use of Prism’s multi-frequency opacity tables. Generated equation of state and opacity data for LSP simulations for several materials being used in plasma jet experimental studies. Developed and implemented parallel processing techniques for the radiation physics algorithms in LSP. Benchmarked the new radiation transport and radiation physics algorithms in LSP and compared simulation results with analytic solutions and results from numerical radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. Performed simulations using Prism radiation physics codes to address issues related to radiative cooling and ionization dynamics in plasma jet experiments. Performed simulations to study the effects of radiation transport and radiation losses due to electrode contaminants in plasma jet experiments. Updated the LSP code to generate output using NetCDF to provide a better, more flexible interface to SPECT3D [4] in order to post-process LSP output. Updated the SPECT3D code to better support the post-processing of large-scale 2-D and 3-D datasets generated by simulation codes such as LSP. Updated atomic physics modeling to provide for

  3. Evaluation of models of spectral distortions in photon-counting detectors for computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammin, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Weidinger, Thomas; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-04-01

    A semi-analytical model describing spectral distortions in photon-counting detectors (PCDs) for clinical computed tomography was evaluated using simulated data. The distortions were due to count rate-independent spectral response effects and count rate-dependent pulse-pileup effects and the model predicted both the mean count rates and the spectral shape. The model parameters were calculated using calibration data. The model was evaluated by comparing the predicted x-ray spectra to Monte Carlo simulations of a PCD at various count rates. The data-model agreement expressed as weighted coefficient of variation [Formula: see text] was better than [Formula: see text] for dead time losses up to 28% and [Formula: see text] or smaller for dead time losses up to 69%. The accuracy of the model was also tested for the purpose of material decomposition by estimating material thicknesses from simulated projection data. The estimated attenuator thicknesses generally agreed with the true values within one standard deviation of the statistical uncertainty obtained from multiple noise realizations.

  4. Evaluating the validity of spectral calibration models for quantitative analysis following signal preprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da; Grant, Edward

    2012-11-01

    When paired with high-powered chemometric analysis, spectrometric methods offer great promise for the high-throughput analysis of complex systems. Effective classification or quantification often relies on signal preprocessing to reduce spectral interference and optimize the apparent performance of a calibration model. However, less frequently addressed by systematic research is the affect of preprocessing on the statistical accuracy of a calibration result. The present work demonstrates the effectiveness of two criteria for validating the performance of signal preprocessing in multivariate models in the important dimensions of bias and precision. To assess the extent of bias, we explore the applicability of the elliptic joint confidence region (EJCR) test and devise a new means to evaluate precision by a bias-corrected root mean square error of prediction. We show how these criteria can effectively gauge the success of signal pretreatments in suppressing spectral interference while providing a straightforward means to determine the optimal level of model complexity. This methodology offers a graphical diagnostic by which to visualize the consequences of pretreatment on complex multivariate models, enabling optimization with greater confidence. To demonstrate the application of the EJCR criterion in this context, we evaluate the validity of representative calibration models using standard pretreatment strategies on three spectral data sets. The results indicate that the proposed methodology facilitates the reliable optimization of a well-validated calibration model, thus improving the capability of spectrophotometric analysis.

  5. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  6. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  7. Semi-Implicit Algorithm for Elastoplastic Damage Models Involving Energy Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Zhang; Jie Li

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a semi-implicit constitutive integration algorithm for a class of elastoplastic damage models where calculation of damage energy release rates involves integration of free energy. The constitutive equations with energy integration are split into the elastic predictor, plastic corrector, and damage corrector. The plastic corrector is solved with an improved format of the semi-implicit spectral return mapping, which is characterized by constant flow direction and plas...

  8. Directory of Energy Information Administration Models 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This directory revises and updates the 1993 directory and includes 15 models of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Three other new models in use by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have also been included: the Motor Gasoline Market Model (MGMM), Distillate Market Model (DMM), and the Propane Market Model (PPMM). This directory contains descriptions about each model, including title, acronym, purpose, followed by more detailed information on characteristics, uses and requirements. Sources for additional information are identified. Included in this directory are 37 EIA models active as of February 1, 1994.

  9. Power Systems and Energy Storage Modeling for Directed Energy Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    electron laser kW Kilo-watt LCS Littoral Combat Ship LAWS Laser Weapon System MLD Maritime Laser Demonstration MW Mega -watt NiMH Nickel metal...and various littoral combat ships. Also, an accurate, working model of the capacitor energy bank is being developed and the flywheel model is being

  10. World energy projection system: Model documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    The World Energy Project System (WEPS) is an accounting framework that incorporates projects from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product) and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by hydropower, geothermal, coal, and natural gas to produce projections of world energy consumption published annually by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the International Energy Outlook (IEO) (Figure 1). Two independently documented models presented in Figure 1, the Oil Market Simulation (OMS) model and the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES) provide projections of oil and nuclear power consumption published in the IEO. Output from a third independently documented model, and the International Coal Trade Model (ICTM), is not published in the IEO but is used in WEPS as a supply check on projections of world coal consumption produced by WEPS and published in the IEO. A WEPS model of natural gas production documented in this report provides the same type of implicit supply check on the WEPS projections of world natural gas consumption published in the IEO. Two additional models are included in Figure 1, the OPEC Capacity model and the Non-OPEC Oil Production model. These WEPS models provide inputs to the OMS model and are documented in this report.

  11. G-corrected holographic dark energy model

    CERN Document Server

    Malekjani, M

    2013-01-01

    Here we investigate the holographic dark energy model in the framework of FRW cosmology where the Newtonian gravitational constant,$G$, is varying with cosmic time. Using the complementary astronomical data which support the time dependency of $G$, the evolutionary treatment of EoS parameter and energy density of dark energy model are calculated in the presence of time variation of $G$. It has been shown that in this case, the phantom regime can be achieved at the present time. We also calculate the evolution of $G$- corrected deceleration parameter for holographic dark energy model and show that the dependency of $G$ on the comic time can influence on the transition epoch from decelerated expansion to the accelerated phase. Finally we perform the statefinder analysis for $G$- corrected holographic model and show that this model has a shorter distance from the observational point in $s-r$ plane compare with original holographic dark energy model.

  12. Optical Doppler tomography and spectral Doppler imaging of localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Nguyen, Elaine; Liu, Gangjun; Rao, Bin; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    We present a combined optical Doppler tomography/spectral Doppler imaging modality to quantitatively evaluate the dynamic blood circulation and the artery blockage before and after a localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model. Optical Doppler Tomography (ODT) combines the Doppler principle with optical coherence tomography for noninvasive localization and measurement of particle flow velocity in highly scattering media with micrometer scale spatial resolution. Spectral Doppler imaging (SDI) provides complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler imaging. Fast, repeated, ODT scans across an entire vessel were performed to record flow dynamic information with high temporal resolution of cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time for scatters within the imaging volume using spectral Doppler waveforms. Furthermore, vascular conditions can be quantified with various Doppler-angle-independent flow indices. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to evaluate microvascular blood circulation of a localized ischemic stroke mouse model.

  13. Modelling Perception of Structure and Affect in Music: Spectral Centroid and Wishart's Red Bird

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger T. Dean

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pearce (2011 provides a positive and interesting response to our article on time series analysis of the influences of acoustic properties on real-time perception of structure and affect in a section of Trevor Wishart’s Red Bird (Dean & Bailes, 2010. We address the following topics raised in the response and our paper. First, we analyse in depth the possible influence of spectral centroid, a timbral feature of the acoustic stream distinct from the high level general parameter we used initially, spectral flatness. We find that spectral centroid, like spectral flatness, is not a powerful predictor of real-time responses, though it does show some features that encourage its continued consideration. Second, we discuss further the issue of studying both individual responses, and as in our paper, group averaged responses. We show that a multivariate Vector Autoregression model handles the grand average series quite similarly to those of individual members of our participant groups, and we analyse this in greater detail with a wide range of approaches in work which is in press and continuing. Lastly, we discuss the nature and intent of computational modelling of cognition using acoustic and music- or information theoretic data streams as predictors, and how the music- or information theoretic approaches may be applied to electroacoustic music, which is ‘sound-based’ rather than note-centred like Western classical music.

  14. Spectral Inverse Quantum (Spectral-IQ) Method for Modeling Mesoporous Systems: Application on Silica Films by FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Ana-Maria; Putz, Mihai V.

    2012-01-01

    The present work advances the inverse quantum (IQ) structural criterion for ordering and characterizing the porosity of the mesosystems based on the recently advanced ratio of the particle-to-wave nature of quantum objects within the extended Heisenberg uncertainty relationship through employing the quantum fluctuation, both for free and observed quantum scattering information, as computed upon spectral identification of the wave-numbers specific to the maximum of absorption intensity record, and to left-, right- and full-width at the half maximum (FWHM) of the concerned bands of a given compound. It furnishes the hierarchy for classifying the mesoporous systems from more particle-related (porous, tight or ionic bindings) to more wave behavior (free or covalent bindings). This so-called spectral inverse quantum (Spectral-IQ) particle-to-wave assignment was illustrated on spectral measurement of FT-IR (bonding) bands’ assignment for samples synthesized within different basic environment and different thermal treatment on mesoporous materials obtained by sol-gel technique with n-dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and of their combination as cosolvents. The results were analyzed in the light of the so-called residual inverse quantum information, accounting for the free binding potency of analyzed samples at drying temperature, and were checked by cross-validation with thermal decomposition techniques by endo-exo thermo correlations at a higher temperature. PMID:23443102

  15. Spectral Inverse Quantum (Spectral-IQ Method for Modeling Mesoporous Systems: Application on Silica Films by FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work advances the inverse quantum (IQ structural criterion for ordering and characterizing the porosity of the mesosystems based on the recently advanced ratio of the particle-to-wave nature of quantum objects within the extended Heisenberg uncertainty relationship through employing the quantum fluctuation, both for free and observed quantum scattering information, as computed upon spectral identification of the wave-numbers specific to the maximum of absorption intensity record, and to left-, right- and full-width at the half maximum (FWHM of the concerned bands of a given compound. It furnishes the hierarchy for classifying the mesoporous systems from more particle-related (porous, tight or ionic bindings to more wave behavior (free or covalent bindings. This so-called spectral inverse quantum (Spectral-IQ particle-to-wave assignment was illustrated on spectral measurement of FT-IR (bonding bands’ assignment for samples synthesized within different basic environment and different thermal treatment on mesoporous materials obtained by sol-gel technique with n-dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB and of their combination as cosolvents. The results were analyzed in the light of the so-called residual inverse quantum information, accounting for the free binding potency of analyzed samples at drying temperature, and were checked by cross-validation with thermal decomposition techniques by endo-exo thermo correlations at a higher temperature.

  16. Modeling of renewable hybrid energy sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru Cristian Dragos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments and trends in the electric power consumption indicate an increasing use of renewable energy. Renewable energy technologies offer the promise of clean, abundant energy gathered from self-renewing resources such as the sun, wind, earth and plants. Virtually all regions of the world have renewable resources of one type or another. By this point of view studies on renewable energies focuses more and more attention. The present paper intends to present different mathematical models related to different types of renewable energy sources such as: solar energy and wind energy. It is also presented the validation and adaptation of such models to hybrid systems working in geographical and meteorological conditions specific to central part of Transylvania region. The conclusions based on validation of such models are also shown.

  17. Statefinder parameters in two dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris

    2007-01-01

    The statefinder parameters ($r,s$) in two dark energy models are studied. In the first, we discuss in four-dimensional General Relativity a two fluid model, in which dark energy and dark matter are allowed to interact with each other. In the second model, we consider the DGP brane model generalized by taking a possible energy exchange between the brane and the bulk into account. We determine the values of the statefinder parameters that correspond to the unique attractor of the system at hand. Furthermore, we produce plots in which we show $s,r$ as functions of red-shift, and the ($s-r$) plane for each model.

  18. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolli, I; de Wit, T Dudok; Krivova, N A; Tourpali, K; Weber, M; Unruh, Y C; Gray, L; Langematz, U; Pilewskie, P; Rozanov, E; Schmutz, W; Shapiro, A; Solanki, S K; Woods, T N

    2013-01-01

    The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temp...

  19. Application of spectral tuning on the dynamic model of the reactor VVER 1000 support cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musil A.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the optimization of parameters of the dynamic model of the reactor VVER 1000 support cylinder. Within the model of the whole reactor, support cylinder appears to be a significant subsystem for its modal properties having dominant influence on the behaviour of the reactor as a whole. Relative sensitivi